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Sample records for hydrate reducing enzymes

  1. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...... and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  2. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  3. Chloral hydrate sedation in radiology: retrospective audit of reduced dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, Jennifer [Children' s University Hospital, Radiology Department, Dublin (Ireland); Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Heaslip, Ingrid; Ryan, Stephanie [Children' s University Hospital, Radiology Department, Dublin (Ireland)

    2012-03-15

    Chloral hydrate (CH) is safe and effective for sedation of suitable children. The purpose of this study was to assess whether adequate sedation is achieved with reduced CH doses. We retrospectively recorded outpatient CH sedations over 1 year. We defined standard doses of CH as 50 mg/kg (infants) and 75 mg/kg (children >1 year). A reduced dose was defined as at least 20% lower than the standard dose. In total, 653 children received CH sedation (age, 1 month-3 years 10 months), 42% were given a reduced initial dose. Augmentation dose was required in 10.9% of all children, and in a higher proportion of children >1 year (15.7%) compared to infants (5.7%; P < 0.001). Sedation was successful in 96.7%, and more frequently successful in infants (98.3%) than children >1 year (95.3%; P = 0.03). A reduced initial dose had no negative effect on outcome (P = 0.19) or time to sedation. No significant complications were seen. We advocate sedation with reduced CH doses (40 mg/kg for infants; 60 mg/kg for children >1 year of age) for outpatient imaging procedures when the child is judged to be quiet or sleepy on arrival. (orig.)

  4. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, N.; Michoud, G.; Cario, A.; Ollivier, J.; Franzetti, B.; Jebbar, M.; Oger, P.; Peters, J.

    2016-09-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  5. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez, N.

    2016-09-06

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  6. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Ins/Del Polymorphism and Body Composition: The Intermediary Role of Hydration Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoni, Laura; Napolioni, Valerio; Marchegiani, Francesca; Amadio, Emilio; Gabbianelli, Rosita

    2017-01-01

    The well-known insertion/deletion polymorphism (rs4646994) of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene has been previously associated with obesity, blood flow, muscular strength, and ACE enzyme activity. Despite the relevant role of ACE in homeostasis, few data are currently available on the relationship between rs4646994 and hydration status. Thus, we tested the association between the ACE Ins/Del polymorphism, body composition, and hydration status in a young Italian population. A total of 306 healthy children and adolescents who regularly practice sports were recruited. Anthropometric, bioimpedentiometric parameters, and urine samples were collected, while ACE rs4646994 genotyping was performed on DNA from buccal swabs. General linear models were used for association testing. The ACE Ins/Del polymorphism was associated with body composition. Ins/Ins individuals had higher phase angle (PhA) and body cellular mass index (BCMI) values. A significant influence of the ACE rs4646994 according to hydration status on body composition was also identified. In particular, Ins/Ins individuals displayed higher PhA and BCMI values only if norm-hydrated, while they showed values similar to Del carriers if dehydrated. Our results confirm the relationship between the ACE Ins/Del polymorphism and body composition and suggest a role for hydration status in modulating this relationship. These interesting preliminary results warrant further investigation to disentangle the genetic role of ACE on hydration homeostasis. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Hydration, hydration, hydration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Veronica S; Bates, Graham P

    2010-01-01

    .... Although the importance of adequate hydration in combating heat stress is universally recognized, studies in a range of worker groups have demonstrated a disturbingly poor hydration level in a high...

  8. Hydration-reduced lattice thermal conductivity of olivine in Earth's upper mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yun-Yuan; Hsieh, Wen-Pin; Tan, Eh; Chen, Jiuhua

    2017-04-18

    Earth's water cycle enables the incorporation of water (hydration) in mantle minerals that can influence the physical properties of the mantle. Lattice thermal conductivity of mantle minerals is critical for controlling the temperature profile and dynamics of the mantle and subducting slabs. However, the effect of hydration on lattice thermal conductivity remains poorly understood and has often been assumed to be negligible. Here we have precisely measured the lattice thermal conductivity of hydrous San Carlos olivine (Mg0.9Fe0.1)2SiO4 (Fo90) up to 15 gigapascals using an ultrafast optical pump-probe technique. The thermal conductivity of hydrous Fo90 with ∼7,000 wt ppm water is significantly suppressed at pressures above ∼5 gigapascals, and is approximately 2 times smaller than the nominally anhydrous Fo90 at mantle transition zone pressures, demonstrating the critical influence of hydration on the lattice thermal conductivity of olivine in this region. Modeling the thermal structure of a subducting slab with our results shows that the hydration-reduced thermal conductivity in hydrated oceanic crust further decreases the temperature at the cold, dry center of the subducting slab. Therefore, the olivine-wadsleyite transformation rate in the slab with hydrated oceanic crust is much slower than that with dry oceanic crust after the slab sinks into the transition zone, extending the metastable olivine to a greater depth. The hydration-reduced thermal conductivity could enable hydrous minerals to survive in deeper mantle and enhance water transportation to the transition zone.

  9. Hydrate sodium calcium aluminosilicate does not reduce rumen lipopolysacharide concentrations in cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilachai, R.; Schonewille, J.T.; Thamrongyoswittayakul, C.; Aiumlamai, S.; Wachirapakorn, C.; Everts, H.; Vlaeminck, B.; Doekes, G.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of hydrate sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS) to reduce the concentrations of free lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rumen fluid of cows was investigated. Six, rumen-fistulated crossbred Holstein, non-pregnant, dry cows were randomly assigned to three experimental rations in a study with

  10. Morin hydrate attenuates the acrylamide-induced imbalance in antioxidant enzymes in a murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    SINGH, MAHENDRA PAL; JAKHAR, REKHA; KANG, SUN CHUL

    2015-01-01

    Liver diseases are among the most serious health issues nowadays. Hepatocellular carcinoma, one of the most lethal types of cancer worldwide, can be caused by chemically-induced oxidative stress. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the protective effects of morin hydrate (MH) against acrylamide (AA)-induced hepatotoxicity in male ICR mice. The mice were randomly allocated into 4 groups [the control, the group subcutaneously injected with AA alone (50 mg/kg body weight), the group subcutaneously injected with AA (50 mg/kg body weight) and MH (5 mg/kg body weight) and the group subcutaneously injected with AA (50 mg/kg body weight) and MH (15 mg/kg body weight) for 5 consecutive days]. Histopathological evaluations were performed and the levels of serum hepatic enzymes were analyzed to determine initial liver injury, and the mice in the AA-treated groups were compared with the mice receiving no treatment and with the mice administered MH in combination with AA. Furthermore, oxidative stress, hepatic inflammation and the levels of DNA damage-related markers were evaluated to determine the extent of liver damage induced by AA within a short-term period. The subcutaneous administration of AA induced severe hepatic injury, and combined treatment with AA and MH resulted in a significant improvement in all evaluated parameters. This recovery was most obvious in the group receiving AA and 15 mg/kg body weight dose of MH. The findings of our study demonstrated that MH protected mice from severe hepatic injury induced by AA. Moreover, MH is a natural polyphenolic compound, and thus it has potential for use in the treatment of severe liver diseases, in place of many synthetic drugs. PMID:26252199

  11. Primordial-like enzymes from bacteria with reduced genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferla, Matteo P; Brewster, Jodi L; Hall, Kelsi R; Evans, Gary B; Patrick, Wayne M

    2017-08-01

    The first cells probably possessed rudimentary metabolic networks, built using a handful of multifunctional enzymes. The promiscuous activities of modern enzymes are often assumed to be relics of this primordial era; however, by definition these activities are no longer physiological. There are many fewer examples of enzymes using a single active site to catalyze multiple physiologically-relevant reactions. Previously, we characterized the promiscuous alanine racemase (ALR) activity of Escherichia coli cystathionine β-lyase (CBL). Now we have discovered that several bacteria with reduced genomes lack alr, but contain metC (encoding CBL). We characterized the CBL enzymes from three of these: Pelagibacter ubique, the Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila melanogaster (wMel) and Thermotoga maritima. Each is a multifunctional CBL/ALR. However, we also show that CBL activity is no longer required in these bacteria. Instead, the wMel and T. maritima enzymes are physiologically bi-functional alanine/glutamate racemases. They are not highly active, but they are clearly sufficient. Given the abundance of the microorganisms using them, we suggest that much of the planet's biochemistry is carried out by enzymes that are quite different from the highly-active exemplars usually found in textbooks. Instead, primordial-like enzymes may be an essential part of the adaptive strategy associated with streamlining. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Plasma Adenosine Deaminase Enzyme Reduces with Treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Plasma Adenosine Deaminase Enzyme Reduces with Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Nigerian Patients: Indication for. Diagnosis and Treatment Monitoring. Ige O.a, Edem V.F.b and Arinola O.G.b,*. aDepartment of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria b Department of Chemical Pathology,. University of ...

  13. NAD(PH-hydrate dehydratase- a metabolic repair enzyme and its role in Bacillus subtilis stress adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Petrovova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One of the strategies for survival stress conditions in bacteria is a regulatory adaptive system called general stress response (GSR, which is dependent on the SigB transcription factor in Bacillus sp. The GSR is one of the largest regulon in Bacillus sp., including about 100 genes; however, most of the genes that show changes in expression during various stresses have not yet been characterized or assigned a biochemical function for the encoded proteins. Previously, we characterized the Bacillus subtilis168 osmosensitive mutant, defective in the yxkO gene (encoding a putative ribokinase, which was recently assigned in vitro as an ADP/ATP-dependent NAD(PH-hydrate dehydratase and was demonstrated to belong to the SigB operon. METHODS AND RESULTS: We show the impact of YxkO on the activity of SigB-dependent Pctc promoter and adaptation to osmotic and ethanol stress and potassium limitation respectively. Using a 2DE approach, we compare the proteomes of WT and mutant strains grown under conditions of osmotic and ethanol stress. Both stresses led to changes in the protein level of enzymes that are involved in motility (flagellin, citrate cycle (isocitrate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, glycolysis (phosphoglycerate kinase, and decomposition of Amadori products (fructosamine-6-phosphate deglycase. Glutamine synthetase revealed a different pattern after osmotic stress. The patterns of enzymes for branched amino acid metabolism and cell wall synthesis (L-alanine dehydrogenase, aspartate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, ketol-acid reductoisomerase were altered after ethanol stress. CONCLUSION: We performed the first characterization of a Bacillus subtilis168 knock-out mutant in the yxkO gene that encodes a metabolite repair enzyme. We show that such enzymes could play a significant role in the survival of stressed cells.

  14. NAD(P)H-Hydrate Dehydratase- A Metabolic Repair Enzyme and Its Role in Bacillus subtilis Stress Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvoracek, Lukas; Streitova, Eliska; Licha, Irena

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the strategies for survival stress conditions in bacteria is a regulatory adaptive system called general stress response (GSR), which is dependent on the SigB transcription factor in Bacillus sp. The GSR is one of the largest regulon in Bacillus sp., including about 100 genes; however, most of the genes that show changes in expression during various stresses have not yet been characterized or assigned a biochemical function for the encoded proteins. Previously, we characterized the Bacillus subtilis168 osmosensitive mutant, defective in the yxkO gene (encoding a putative ribokinase), which was recently assigned in vitro as an ADP/ATP-dependent NAD(P)H-hydrate dehydratase and was demonstrated to belong to the SigB operon. Methods and Results We show the impact of YxkO on the activity of SigB-dependent Pctc promoter and adaptation to osmotic and ethanol stress and potassium limitation respectively. Using a 2DE approach, we compare the proteomes of WT and mutant strains grown under conditions of osmotic and ethanol stress. Both stresses led to changes in the protein level of enzymes that are involved in motility (flagellin), citrate cycle (isocitrate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase), glycolysis (phosphoglycerate kinase), and decomposition of Amadori products (fructosamine-6-phosphate deglycase). Glutamine synthetase revealed a different pattern after osmotic stress. The patterns of enzymes for branched amino acid metabolism and cell wall synthesis (L-alanine dehydrogenase, aspartate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, ketol-acid reductoisomerase) were altered after ethanol stress. Conclusion We performed the first characterization of a Bacillus subtilis168 knock-out mutant in the yxkO gene that encodes a metabolite repair enzyme. We show that such enzymes could play a significant role in the survival of stressed cells. PMID:25393291

  15. cis-Terpin Hydrate Metabolism by a Brevibacterium: Patterns of Enzyme Induction, and Accumulation of α-Terpineol in Growth Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Robert H.; Marr, Eleanor K.

    1972-01-01

    A brevibacterium, strain TH-4, previously isolated by aerobic enrichment on the monocyclic monoterpenoid cis-terpin hydrate as a sole carbon and energy source, was found to grow on α-terpineol and on a number of common sugars and organic acids. Oxidation of these terpenoids was shown to occur via an induced enzyme system, as measured manometrically by oxygen uptake and prevention of protein synthesis with chloramphenicol or puromycin. Oxidation of terpin hydrate by cell suspensions appeared to be coincidentally induced by growth on α-terpineol, and oxidation of α-terpineol similarly appeared to be induced by growth on terpin hydrate. Culture fluids in which the TH-4 organism was grown at the expense of cis-terpin hydrate were found to contain (−)-α-terpineol in combined butanol-ether extracts. The isolated compound was shown to be chromatographically and spectrophotometrically identical to an authentic sample of α-terpineol. The stereospecificity of an enzymatic dehydration of terpin hydrate to α-terpineol is considered. PMID:4336108

  16. Tungstate reduces the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes in STZ rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Nocito

    Full Text Available Oral administration of sodium tungstate has shown hyperglycemia-reducing activity in several animal models of diabetes. We present new insights into the mechanism of action of tungstate.We studied protein expression and phosphorylation in the liver of STZ rats, a type I diabetes model, treated with sodium tungstate in the drinking water (2 mg/ml and in primary cultured-hepatocytes, through Western blot and Real Time PCR analysis.Tungstate treatment reduces the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes (PEPCK, G6Pase, and FBPase and also regulates transcription factors accountable for the control of hepatic metabolism (c-jun, c-fos and PGC1α. Moreover, ERK, p90rsk and GSK3, upstream kinases regulating the expression of c-jun and c-fos, are phosphorylated in response to tungstate. Interestingly, PKB/Akt phosphorylation is not altered by the treatment. Several of these observations were reproduced in isolated rat hepatocytes cultured in the absence of insulin, thereby indicating that those effects of tungstate are insulin-independent.Here we show that treatment with tungstate restores the phosphorylation state of various signaling proteins and changes the expression pattern of metabolic enzymes.

  17. Reducing Enzyme Costs Increases the Market Potential of Biofuels (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-08-01

    Cellulosic ethanol prices depend heavily on the cost of the cellulase enzymes used to break down the biomass into fermentable sugars. To reduce these costs, NREL partnered with two leading enzyme companies, Novozymes and Genencor, to engineer new cellulase enzymes that are exceptionally good at breaking down cellulose. Genencor is now part of DuPont Industrial Biosciences.

  18. S100A12 Induced in the Epidermis by Reduced Hydration Activates Dermal Fibroblasts and Causes Dermal Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingling; Zhong, Aimei; Friedrich, Emily E; Jia, Shengxian; Xie, Ping; Galiano, Robert D; Mustoe, Thomas A; Hong, Seok Jong

    2017-03-01

    Disruption of the barrier function of skin increases transepidermal water loss and up-regulates inflammatory pathways in the epidermis. Consequently, sustained expression of proinflammatory cytokines from the epidermis is associated with dermal scarring. We found increased expression of S100A12 in the epidermis of human hypertrophic and keloid scar. Exposing a stratified keratinocyte culture to a reduced-hydration environment increased the expression and secretion of S100A12 by nearly 70%, which in turn activated dermal fibroblasts in vitro. Direct treatment of fibroblasts with conditioned medium collected from stratified keratinocyte culture under reduced-hydration conditions activated fibroblasts, shown by up-regulation of α-smooth muscle actin, pro-collagen 1, and F-actin expression. However, this fibroblast activation was not found when S100A12 was knocked down by RNA interference in keratinocytes. Pharmacological blockade of S100A12 receptors, RAGE, or TLR4 inhibited S100A12-induced fibroblast activation. Local delivery of S100A12 resulted in a marked hypertrophic scar formation in a validated rabbit hypertrophic scar model compared with saline control. Our findings indicate that S100A12 functions as a proinflammatory cytokine and suggest that S100A12 is a potential therapeutic target for dermal scarring. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  20. Optimum potassium chloride concentration to reduce hydration capacity of clay formations; Concentracao otima de cloreto de potassio para reduzir a capacidade de hidratacao das formacoes argilosas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Jose Carlos Vieira [PETROBRAS, Salvador, BA (Brazil). Centro de Recursos Humanos Norte-Nordeste. Setor de Programas de Perfuracao; Oliveira, Manoel Martins de [PETROBRAS, BA (Brazil). Distrito de Perfuracao. Div. de Tecnicas de Perfuracao

    1988-12-31

    An experimental method for ascertaining the optimal concentration of potassium chloride for reducing the hydration and dispersion capacity of clayey formations sensitive to water-based fluids is described. Under this method, filtering time for disperse systems prepared from clayey formation samples is measured. A discussion is offered on theoretical aspects of hydration, expansion, and dispersion of clayey rocks in response to the variations in stress equilibrium states produced by these phenomena when a hole (well) is opened in the rock. The state of the art of this technological branch is also described. (author) 10 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Computational study of hydration at the TD damaged site of DNA in complex with repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, Miroslav [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-02-01

    An analysis of the distribution of water around DNA surface focusing on the role of the distribution of water molecules in the proper recognition of damaged site by repair enzyme T4 Endonuclease V was performed. The native DNA dodecamer, dodecamer with the thymine dimer (TD) and complex of DNA and part of repair enzyme T4 Endonuclease V were examined throughout the 500 ps of molecular dynamics simulation. During simulation the number of water molecules close to the DNA atoms and the residence time were calculated. There is an increase in number of water molecules lying in the close vicinity to TD if compared with those lying close to two native thymines (TT). Densely populated area with water molecules around TD is one of the factors detected by enzyme during scanning process. The residence time was found higher for molecule of the complex and the six water molecules were found occupying the stabile positions between the TD and catalytic center close to atoms P, C3' and N3. These molecules originate water mediated hydrogen bond network that contribute to the stability of complex required for the onset of repair process. (author)

  2. Zeaxanthin-based dietary supplement and topical serum improve hydration and reduce wrinkle count in female subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Steve; Frank, Emily; Gierhart, Dennis; Simpson, Paula; Frumento, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Dietary modification, through supplementation and elimination diets, has become an area of interest to help slow skin aging, reduce symptom severity or prevent reoccurrence of certain dermatologic conditions [Clinical Dermatology vol. 31 (2013) 677-700]. Free radical components (reactive oxygen species or ROS) or lipid peroxide (LPO) is involved in the pathogenesis and progression of accelerated skin aging when prolonged oxidative stress occurs. The use of antioxidant-related therapies such as nutraceuticals is of particular interest in restoring skin homeostasis. Antioxidant carotenoid zeaxanthin is concentrated in the eye and skin tissue and believed to decrease the formation of ROS associated with UV light exposure. With zeaxanthin, phytoceramides, and botanical extracts an oral and topical test product (with zeaxanthin, algae extracts, peptides, hyaluronate) have been developed to improve the appearance and condition of skin when used as directed. Subjects were divided into three groups: two tests (skin formula 1 - oral product alone (ZO-1), skin formula 2- oral product with topical product (ZO-2 + ZT)), and one placebo control. The study consisted of a washout visit, baseline (randomization), week two (2), week four (4), week six (6), week eight (8), and week twelve (12). Key parameters measured were as follows: fine lines, deep lines, total wrinkles, wrinkle severity, radiance/skin color (L, a*, b*), discolorations, and skin pigment homogeneity. Thirty-one subjects completed the twelve-week study; no adverse events were recorded during the study. Statistically significant improvements from baseline mean hydration score were observed in active groups at weeks 2, 6, and 8. A statistically significant difference was observed between mean differences from baseline scores for total wrinkle count at week 4 for the combination active groups compared to placebo. A statistically significant difference from baseline scores for fine lines count was also observed at

  3. Flammability limits of hydrated and anhydrous ethanol at reduced pressures in aeronautical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Christian J R; Carvalho, João A; Andrade, José C; Mendiburu, Andrés Z; Cortez, Ely V; Carvalho, Felipe S; Gonçalves, Beatriz; Quintero, Juan C; Velásquez, Elkin I Gutiérrez; Silva, Marcos H; Santos, José C; Nascimento, Marco A R

    2014-09-15

    There is interest in finding the flammability limits of ethanol at reduced pressures for the future use of this biofuel in aeronautical applications taking into account typical commercial aviation altitude (ethanol and anhydrous ethanol (92.6% and 99.5% p/p, respectively) were determined for a pressure of 101.3 kPa at temperatures between 0 and 200°C. A heating chamber with a spherical 20-l vessel was used. First, LFL and the UFL were determined as functions of temperature and atmospheric pressure to compare results with data published in the scientific literature. Second, after checking the veracity of the data obtained for standard atmospheric pressure, the work proceeded with reduced pressures in the same temperature range. 295 experiments were carried out in total; the first 80 were to calibrate the heating chamber and compare the results with those given in the published scientific literature. 215 experiments were performed both at atmospheric and reduced pressures. The results had a correlation with the values obtained for the LFL, but values for the UFL had some differences. With respect to the water content in ethanol, it was shown that the water vapor contained in the fuel can act as an inert substance, narrowing flammability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Vigorous Periprocedural Hydration With Lactated Ringer's Solution Reduces the Risk of Pancreatitis After Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Kim, Hong Ja; Lee, Byung Uk; Kim, Tae Hyeon; Song, Il Han

    2017-01-01

    Vigorous intravenous fluid resuscitation (IVFR) was reported to reduce post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis in a pilot study. We performed a randomized, double-blind controlled trial to establish whether periprocedural vigorous IVFR reduces the risk of post-ERCP pancreatitis. A total of 510 patients with native papilla at 3 tertiary referral centers in Korea were randomly assigned (1:1) to groups given vigorous IVFR (lactated Ringer's solution in an initial bolus of 10 mL/kg before the procedure, 3 mL/kg/h during the procedure, for 8 hours after the procedure, and a post-procedure bolus of 10 mL/kg) or a standard IVFR (lactated Ringer's solution at 1.5 mL/kg/h during and for 8 hours after the procedure). The primary end point of the study was the development of post-ERCP pancreatitis, and the secondary end point was severity of pancreatitis, hyperamylasemia, and fluid overload. The main indications for ERCP were choledocholithiasis (58%) and malignant biliary stricture (27%). Post-ERCP pancreatitis developed in 11 patients in the vigorous IVFR group (4.3%) and 25 patients in the standard IVFR group (9.8%) (relative risk, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.20-0.86; P = .016). Moderate or severe acute pancreatitis occurred in a significantly smaller proportion of patients in the vigorous IVFR group (0.4%) than in the standard IVFR group (2.0%; P = .040). One patient in the vigorous IVFR group developed peripheral edema. In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial, we found vigorous periprocedural intravenous hydration with lactated Ringer's solution to reduce the incidence and severity of post-ERCP pancreatitis in average-risk and high-risk cases. IVFR is not associated with increased adverse events. ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT02308891. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Hydration lubrication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klein, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The hydration lubrication paradigm, whereby hydration layers are both strongly held by the charges they surround, and so can support large pressures without being squeezed out, and at the same time...

  6. Improving nutrient values of palm kernel cake (PKC by reducing shell contamination and enzymes supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinurat AP

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion of palm kernel cake (PKC in poultry feed is limited due to shell contamination and its low nutritive values, despite the increase of PKC production. Therefore, a series of experiment was conducted in order to improve nutritive values of palm kernel cake (PKC by sieving and enzyme supplementation. First experiment was designed to reduce shell content using shiever with different diameters (1, 2 and 4 mm. Shell content was measured manually to determine the effect of the sieving. The second experiment was carried out by blowing the after sieving at 2 mm shieve PKC, to produced heavy, medium and light fractions. The shell content and nutrient contents of the medium and light fractions were compared to those of unsieved PKC. In the third experiment, the sieved PKC was supplemented with 2 enzymes with different concentrations, i.e., BS4 at 10, 15 and 20 ml/kg PKC and a commercial multi enzymes at 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg PKC. Digestibility of nutrients (dry matter, crude protein and TME were measured by force feeding method with six replications for each sample. Results of the study showed that sieving with 2 mm diameter siever without blowing was effective in reducing about 50% of PKC shell and improved crude protein, ether extract and amino acids, contents and reduced the crude fiber content of the PKC. Supplementation of enzymes improved the digestibility of dry matter, crude protein and the true metabolisable energy (TME of the PKC. Optimum improvement was obtained when PKC was supplemented with 20 ml BS4 enzymes/kg PKC. Similar improvement was obtained by supplementation of commercial multi enzymes at 2 g/kg PKC. Therefore, in order to improve the nutritive values of PKC, it is suggested to sieve the PKC followed by supplementation of enzyme prior to feeding.

  7. Enzyme Supplementation of Broiler Feeds with Reduced Mineral and Energy Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JO Nunes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT An experiment was conducted with the purpose of evaluating enzyme blends on the performance, carcass traits, and bone mineralization of broilers. In total, 928 one-day-old Cobb 500 male chicks of were used. A completely randomized design with four treatments with eight replicates of 29 birds each was adopted. The evaluated treatments were: 1- Positive Control (PC, feed containing the nutritional recommendations of the genetic company's manual; 2- Negative Control (NC, feed with reductions of 75 kcal/kg AME and 0.10 and 0.12 percent points of phosphorus and calcium, respectively; 3 - NC + enzyme blend (amylase + b-glucanase, xylanase, and phytase; 250 g/t of feed and 4 - NC + enzyme complex (phytase, amylase, xylanase, glucanase, pectinase, cellulase, and protease; 200 g/t of feed. Birds fed the diet with reduced nutrient levels (NC presented the worst performance (p0.05 carcass or parts yields. The broilers fed the reduced-nutrient and energy diet presented lower (p<0.05 tibial ash, calcium, and phosphorus contents that the other treatments. The use of enzyme combinations improved the performance of broilers fed diets with reduced nutrient and energy levels.

  8. Hydration testing of athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppliger, Robert A; Bartok, Cynthia

    2002-01-01

    Dehydration not only reduces athletic performance, but also places athletes at risk of health problems and even death. For athletes, monitoring hydration has significant value in maximising performance during training and competition. It also offers medical personnel the opportunity to reduce health risks in situations where athletes engage in intentional weight loss. Simple non-invasive techniques, including weight monitoring and urine tests, can provide useful information. Bioimpedance methods tend to be easy to use and fairly inexpensive, but generally lack the precision and accuracy necessary for hydration monitoring. Blood tests appear to be the most accurate monitoring method, but are impractical because of cost and invasiveness. Although future research is needed to determine which hydration tests are the most accurate, we encourage sports teams to develop and implement hydration monitoring protocols based on the currently available methods. Medical personnel can use this information to maximise their team's athletic performance and minimise heat- and dehydration-related health risks to athletes.

  9. Optimizing Porcine Islet Isolation to Markedly Reduce Enzyme Consumption Without Sacrificing Islet Yield or Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdcraft, Robert W; Green, Michael L; Breite, Andrew G; Circle, Lisa; Meyer, Eric D; Adkins, Hollie; Harbeck, Steven G; Smith, Barry H; Gazda, Lawrence S

    2016-07-01

    Human allogeneic islet transplantation for treatment of type 1 diabetes provides numerous clinical benefits, such as fewer episodes of hypoglycemic unawareness and tighter control of blood glucose levels. Availability of human pancreas for clinical and research use, however, is severely limited. Porcine pancreas offers an abundant source of tissue for optimization of islet isolation methodology and future clinical transplantation, thereby increasing patient access to this potentially lifesaving procedure. Porcine islet isolations were performed using varying amounts of collagenase (7.5, 3.75, or 2.5 Wunsch units per gram tissue) and neutral protease activity (12 000, 6000, or 4000 neutral protease units per gram tissue) and perfusion volumes (1.7 or 0.85 mL/g tissue) to assess their effects on isolation outcomes. Retention of dissociative enzymes within the pancreas during perfusion and digestion was evaluated, along with distribution of the perfusion solution within the tissue. Reducing enzyme usage by as much as 67% and perfusion volume by 50% led to equally successful islet isolation outcomes when compared with the control group (48 ± 7% of tissue digested and 1088 ± 299 islet equivalents per gram of pancreas vs 47 ± 11% and 1080 ± 512, respectively). Using margin-marking dye in the perfusion solution to visualize enzyme distribution demonstrated that increasing perfusion volume did not improve tissue infiltration. Current protocols for porcine islet isolation consume excessive amounts of dissociative enzymes, elevating cost and limiting research and development. These data demonstrate that islet isolation protocols can be optimized to significantly reduce enzyme usage while maintaining yield and function and thus accelerating progress toward clinical application.

  10. Human recombinant arginase enzyme reduces plasma arginine in mouse models of arginase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrage, Lindsay C; Sun, Qin; Elsea, Sarah H; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Frankel, Arthur E; Stone, Everett; Alters, Susan E; Johnson, Dale E; Rowlinson, Scott W; Georgiou, George; Lee, Brendan H

    2015-11-15

    Arginase deficiency is caused by deficiency of arginase 1 (ARG1), a urea cycle enzyme that converts arginine to ornithine. Clinical features of arginase deficiency include elevated plasma arginine levels, spastic diplegia, intellectual disability, seizures and growth deficiency. Unlike other urea cycle disorders, recurrent hyperammonemia is typically less severe in this disorder. Normalization of plasma arginine levels is the consensus treatment goal, because elevations of arginine and its metabolites are suspected to contribute to the neurologic features. Using data from patients enrolled in a natural history study conducted by the Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium, we found that 97% of plasma arginine levels in subjects with arginase deficiency were above the normal range despite conventional treatment. Recently, arginine-degrading enzymes have been used to deplete arginine as a therapeutic strategy in cancer. We tested whether one of these enzymes, a pegylated human recombinant arginase 1 (AEB1102), reduces plasma arginine in murine models of arginase deficiency. In neonatal and adult mice with arginase deficiency, AEB1102 reduced the plasma arginine after single and repeated doses. However, survival did not improve likely, because this pegylated enzyme does not enter hepatocytes and does not improve hyperammonemia that accounts for lethality. Although murine models required dosing every 48 h, studies in cynomolgus monkeys indicate that less frequent dosing may be possible in patients. Given that elevated plasma arginine rather than hyperammonemia is the major treatment challenge, we propose that AEB1102 may have therapeutic potential as an arginine-reducing agent in patients with arginase deficiency. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Dry heat treatment affects wheat bran surface properties and hydration kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Pieter J; Hemdane, Sami; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2016-07-15

    Heat stabilization of wheat bran aims at inactivation of enzymes which may cause rancidity and processability issues. Such treatments may however cause additional unanticipated phenomena which may affect wheat bran technological properties. In this work, the impact of toasting on wheat bran hydration capacity and hydration kinetics was studied. Hydration properties were assessed using the Enslin-Neff and drainage centrifugation water retention capacity methods, thermogravimetric analysis and contact angle goniometry, next to more traditional methods. While equilibrium hydration properties of bran were not affected by the heat treatment, the rate at which the heat treated bran hydrated was, however, very significantly reduced compared to the untreated bran. This phenomenon was found to originate from the formation of a lipid coating during the treatment rendering the bran surface hydrophobic. These insights help to understand and partially account for the modified processability of heat treated bran in food applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Human microsomal carbonyl reducing enzymes in the metabolism of xenobiotics: well-known and promising members of the SDR superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarydová, Lucie; Wsól, Vladimír

    2012-05-01

    The best known, most widely studied enzyme system in phase I biotransformation is cytochrome P450 (CYP), which participates in the metabolism of roughly 9 of 10 drugs in use today. The main biotransformation isoforms of CYP are associated with the membrane of the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER). Other enzymes that are also active in phase I biotransformation are carbonyl reducing enzymes. Much is known about the role of cytosolic forms of carbonyl reducing enzymes in the metabolism of xenobiotics, but their microsomal forms have been mostly poorly studied. The only well-known microsomal carbonyl reducing enzyme taking part in the biotransformation of xenobiotics is 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Physiological roles of microsomal carbonyl reducing enzymes are better known than their participation in the metabolism of xenobiotics. This review is a summary of the fragmentary information known about the roles of the microsomal forms. Besides 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, it has been reported, so far, that retinol dehydrogenase 12 participates only in the detoxification of unsaturated aldehydes formed upon oxidative stress. Another promising group of microsomal biotransformation carbonyl reducing enzymes are some members of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Generally, it is clear that this area is, overall, quite unexplored, but carbonyl reducing enzymes located in the ER have proven very interesting. The study of these enzymes could shed new light on the metabolism of several clinically used drugs or they could become an important target in connection with some diseases.

  13. Experiments on alcocytes containing enzyme nanoparticles for reducing toxic blood concentration of ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, Yu G; Kosenko, E A; Alexandrovich, Yu G; Ataullakhanov, F I

    2012-05-01

    We developed a method of introduction of alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase into mouse and human erythrocytes. The possibility of using erythrocytes loaded with the two enzymes (alcocytes) for reducing ethanol concentration in animal blood was studied. Injection of alcocytes to mice led to accelerated decrease in ethanol concentration as soon as after 5 min and this capacity of alcocytes persisted for at least 2 h. Alcocytes prepared from fresh or preserved human blood did not survive in mice. Thus autologous alcocytes is functionally active and can be used as a protective system in acute alcohol intoxication. The developed method can be regarded as a new medical biotechnology.

  14. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  15. Modelling Gaucher disease progression: long-term enzyme replacement therapy reduces the incidence of splenectomy and bone complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dussen, Laura; Biegstraaten, Marieke; Dijkgraaf, Marcel Gw; Hollak, Carla Em

    2014-01-01

    Long-term complications and associated conditions of type 1 Gaucher Disease (GD) can include splenectomy, bone complications, pulmonary hypertension, Parkinson disease and malignancies. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) reverses cytopenia and reduces organomegaly. To study the effects of ERT on

  16. Lactate Dehydrogenase Catalysis: Roles of Keto, Hydrated, and Enol Pyruvate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meany, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Many carbonyl substrates of oxidoreductase enzymes undergo hydration and enolization so that these substrate systems are partitioned between keto, hydrated (gem-diol), and enol forms in aqueous solution. Some oxidoreductase enzymes are subject to inhibition by high concentrations of substrate. For such enzymes, two questions arise pertaining to…

  17. Patulin reduces glutathione level and enzyme activities in rat liver slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Erika; Diwald, Tabea T; Metzler, Manfred

    2005-04-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to identify glutathione (GSH) adducts of patulin in precision-cut rat liver slices, which were used as a model system to study the metabolism and biological effects of this mycotoxin. Patulin disappeared in the slices but none of the GSH adducts, previously demonstrated in the chemical reaction of patulin with GSH, could be detected by HPLC. After incubation with various concentrations of patulin, a concentration-dependent decline of the GSH level was observed in the slices. For example, only 25% of the GSH of controls was found with 200 microM patulin. The activities of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and of drug metabolizing phase I and phase II enzymes, assayed by the hydroxylation and conjugation of testosterone, were also reduced. On the other hand, incubation with patulin markedly increased lipid peroxidation in the slices. The effects of patulin on enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation may be a consequence of the GSH decline, which cannot be accounted for by a direct reaction of patulin with GSH due to the high concentration of GSH in hepatocytes. The decrease of GSH level and GST activity may be related to the putative mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of patulin.

  18. Involvement of coenzyme A esters and two new enzymes, an enoyl-CoA hydratase and a CoA-transferase, in the hydration of crotonobetaine to L-carnitine by Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elssner, T; Engemann, C; Baumgart, K; Kleber, H P

    2001-09-18

    Two proteins (CaiB and CaiD) were found to catalyze the reversible biotransformation of crotonobetaine to L-carnitine in Escherichia coli in the presence of a cosubstrate (e.g., gamma-butyrobetainyl-CoA or crotonobetainyl-CoA). CaiB (45 kDa) and CaiD (27 kDa) were purified in two steps to electrophoretic homogeneity from overexpression strains. CaiB was identified as crotonobetainyl-CoA:carnitine CoA-transferase by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and enzymatic assays. The enzyme exhibits high cosubstrate specificity to CoA derivatives of trimethylammonium compounds. In particular, the N-terminus of CaiB shows significant identity with other CoA-transferases (e.g., FldA from Clostridium sporogenes, Frc from Oxalobacter formigenes, and BbsE from Thauera aromatica) and CoA-hydrolases (e.g., BaiF from Eubacterium sp.). CaiD was shown to be a crotonobetainyl-CoA hydratase using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and enzymatic assays. Besides crotonobetainyl-CoA CaiD is also able to hydrate crotonyl-CoA with a significantly lower Vmax (factor of 10(3)) but not crotonobetaine. The substrate specificity of CaiD and its homology to the crotonase confirm this enzyme as a new member of the crotonase superfamily. Concluding these results, it was verified that hydration of crotonobetaine to L-carnitine proceeds at the CoA level in two steps: the CaiD catalyzed hydration of crotonobetainyl-CoA to L-carnitinyl-CoA, followed by a CoA transfer from L-carnitinyl-CoA to crotonobetaine, catalyzed by CaiB. When gamma-butyrobetainyl-CoA was used as a cosubstrate (CoA donor), the first reaction is the CoA transfer. The optimal ratios of CaiB and CaiD during this hydration reaction, determined to be 4:1 when crotonobetainyl-CoA was used as cosubstrate and 5:1 when gamma-butyrobetainyl-CoA was used as cosubstrate, are different from that found for in vivo conditions (1:3).

  19. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    . faulting and fluid migration, and 4. trapping of free gas beneath a hydrate seal. Experiments are being conducted to assess the impact of gas hydrate on sediment behavior, particularly with respect to slope failure and other potential geohazards....K. Paull, R. Matsumoto, P.J. Wallace, and W.P. Dillon (Eds.), Proceedings ODP, Scientific Results, v. 164 College Station, TX (Ocean Drilling Program), pp. 179-191. Dallimore, S. R., T. Uchida, and T. S. Collett, 1999, Summary, in S. R. Dallimore, T...

  20. Copper Silicate Hydrate Hollow Spheres Constructed by Nanotubes Encapsulated in Reduced Graphene Oxide as Long-Life Lithium-Ion Battery Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiujuan; Tang, Chunjuan; Wang, Xuanpeng; Zhou, Liang; Wei, Qiulong; Yan, Mengyu; Sheng, Jinzhi; Hu, Ping; Wang, Bolun; Mai, Liqiang

    2015-12-09

    Hierarchical copper silicate hydrate hollow spheres-reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composite is successfully fabricated by a facile hydrothermal method using silica as in situ sacrificing template. The electrochemical performance of the composite as lithium-ion battery anode was studied for the first time. Benefiting from the synergistic effect of the hierarchical hollow structure and conductive RGO matrix, the composite exhibits excellent long-life performance and rate capability. A capacity of 890 mAh/g is achieved after 200 cycles at 200 mA/g and a capacity of 429 mAh/g is retained after 800 cycles at 1000 mA/g. The results indicate that the strategy of combining hierarchical hollow structures with conductive RGO holds the potential in addressing the volume expansion issue of high capacity anode materials.

  1. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate

  2. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  3. Enzyme optimization to reduce the viscosity of pitanga (Eugenia uniflora L. juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Schmitz Ongaratto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary The aim of this work was to separately evaluate the effects of pectinase and cellulase on the viscosity of pitanga juice, and determine the optimum conditions for their use employing response surface methodology. The independent variables were pectinase concentration (0-2.0 mg.g–1 and cellulase concentration (0-1.0 mg.g–1, activity time (10-110 min and incubation temperature (23.2-56.8 °C. The use of pectinase and cellulase reduced the viscosity by about 15% and 25%, respectively. The results showed that enzyme concentration was the most important factor followed by activity time, and for the application of cellulase the incubation temperature had a significant effect too. The regression models showed correlation coefficients (R2 near to 0.90. The pectinase application conditions that led to the lowest viscosity were: concentration of 1.7 mg.g–1, incubation temperature of 37.6 °C and incubation time of 80 minutes, while for cellulase the values were: concentration of 1.0 mg.g-1, temperature range of 25 °C to 35 °C and incubation time of 110 minutes.

  4. Enzymes extracted from apple peels have activity in reducing higher alcohols in Chinese liquors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qi'an; Shi, Junling; Zhu, Jing; Lv, Hongliang; Du, Shuangkui

    2014-10-01

    As the unavoidable byproducts of alcoholic fermentation, higher alcohols are unhealthy compounds widespread in alcoholic drinks. To investigate the activity of apple crude enzymes toward higher alcohols in liquors, five kinds of apple peels, namely, Fuji, Gala, Golden Delicious, Red Star, and Jonagold, were chosen to prepare enzymes, and three kinds of Chinese liquors, namely, Xifeng (containing 45% ethanol), Taibai (containing 50% ethanol), and Erguotou (containing 56% ethanol), were tested. Enzymes were prepared in the forms of liquid solution, powder, and immobilized enzymes using sodium alginate (SA) and chitosan. The treatment was carried out at 37 °C for 1 h. The relative amounts of different alcohols (including ethanol, 1-propanol, isobutanol, 1-butanol, isoamylol, and 1-hexanol) were measured using gas chromatography (GC). Conditions for preparing SA-immobilized Fuji enzymes (SA-IEP) were optimized, and the obtained SA-IEP (containing 0.3 g of enzyme) was continuously used to treat Xifeng liquor eight times, 20 mL per time. Significant degradation rates (DRs) of higher alcohols were observed at different degrees, and it also showed enzyme specificity according to the apple varieties and enzyme preparations. After five repeated treatments, the DRs of the optimized Fuji SA-IEP remained 70% for 1-hexanol and >15% for other higher alcohols.

  5. Enzyme-polyelectrolyte multilayer assemblies on reduced graphene oxide field-effect transistors for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinini, Esteban; Bliem, Christina; Reiner-Rozman, Ciril; Battaglini, Fernando; Azzaroni, Omar; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2017-06-15

    We present the construction of layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies of polyethylenimine and urease onto reduced-graphene-oxide based field-effect transistors (rGO FETs) for the detection of urea. This versatile biosensor platform simultaneously exploits the pH dependency of liquid-gated graphene-based transistors and the change in the local pH produced by the catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The use of an interdigitated microchannel resulted in transistors displaying low noise, high pH sensitivity (20.3µA/pH) and transconductance values up to 800 µS. The modification of rGO FETs with a weak polyelectrolyte improved the pH response because of its transducing properties by electrostatic gating effects. In the presence of urea, the urease-modified rGO FETs showed a shift in the Dirac point due to the change in the local pH close to the graphene surface. Markedly, these devices operated at very low voltages (less than 500mV) and were able to monitor urea in the range of 1-1000µm, with a limit of detection (LOD) down to 1µm, fast response and good long-term stability. The urea-response of the transistors was enhanced by increasing the number of bilayers due to the increment of the enzyme surface coverage onto the channel. Moreover, quantification of the heavy metal Cu2+(with a LOD down to 10nM) was performed in aqueous solution by taking advantage of the urease specific inhibition. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Natural Gas Hydrates

    OpenAIRE

    Ersland, Geir

    2010-01-01

    The experimental set-up with the MRI monitoring apparatus was capable of forming large quantities of methane hydrates in sandstone pores and monitor hydrate growth patterns for various initial conditions. Spontaneous conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate occurred when methane hydrate, in porous media, was exposed to liquid carbon dioxide. The MRI images did not detect any significant increase in signal in the hydrate saturated cores that would indicate the presence of free w...

  7. Can Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors Reduce the Incidence, Severity, and Duration of Radiation Proctitis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alashkham, Abduelmenem, E-mail: alashkham@yahoo.com [Academic Section of Urology, Division of Cancer Research, School of Medicine, University of Dundee, Scotland (United Kingdom); Paterson, Catherine [Academic Section of Urology, Division of Cancer Research, School of Medicine, University of Dundee, Scotland (United Kingdom); Rauchhaus, Petra [Tayside Clinical Trials Unit, School of Medicine, University of Dundee, Scotland (United Kingdom); Nabi, Ghulam [Academic Section of Urology, Division of Cancer Research, School of Medicine, University of Dundee, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether participants taking angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and treated with radical radiation therapy with neoadjuvant/adjuvant hormone therapy have less incidence, severity, and duration of radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: A propensity score analysis of 817 patients who underwent radical radiation therapy with neoadjuvant or adjuvant hormone therapy as primary line management in a cohort study during 2009 to 2013 was conducted. Patients were stratified as follows: group 1, hypertensive patients taking ACEIs (as a study group); group 2, nonhypertensive patients not taking ACEIs; and group 3, hypertensive patients not taking ACEIs (both as control groups). The incidence, severity, and duration of proctitis were the main outcome. χ{sup 2} tests, Mann-Whitney U tests, analysis of variance, risk ratio (RR), confidence interval (CI), Kaplan-Meier plots, and log-rank tests were used. Results: The mean age of the participants was 68.91 years, with a follow-up time of 3.38 years. Based on disease and age-matched comparison, there was a statistically significant difference of proctitis grading between the 3 groups: χ{sup 2} (8, n=308) = 72.52, P<.001. The Mann-Whitney U test indicated that grades of proctitis were significantly lower in hypertensive patients taking ACEIs than in nonhypertensive patients not taking ACEIs and hypertensive patients not taking ACEIs (P<.001). The risk ratio (RR) of proctitis in hypertensive patients taking ACEIs was significantly lower than in hypertensive patients not taking ACEIs (RR 0.40, 95% CI 0.30-0.53, P<.001) and in nonhypertensive patients not taking ACEIs (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.44-0.77, P<.001). Time to event analysis revealed that hypertensive patients taking ACEIs were significantly different from the control groups (P<.0001). Furthermore, hypertensive patients taking ACEIs had significantly faster resolution of proctitis (P<.0001). Conclusion: Patients who were taking ACEIs were

  8. Stability of Enzymes in Granular Enzyme Products for Laundry Detergents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biran, Suzan; Bach, Poul; Simonsen, Ole

    with previously reported H2O2-induced oxidation studies of Savinase® in solutions. Preliminary formulation studies were conducted and application of the designed setup on stability measurements of commercial granulates was illustrated. Addition of salts resulted in a considerable conservation of enzyme activity...... stability was significantly conserved, while at multilayer hydration level, especially when samples were exposed to 100% RH, the activity was reduced by 80% in a one week period. Since no auto-proteolytic activity and covalently-bound aggregate formation were detected, humidity possibly induced formation...... with the enzyme provided better protection than coating the salt as a separate layer. The effect of site-directed mutagenesis on Savinase® stability was illustrated and possible stability enhancing additives for enzyme granulates were proposed. The present study is the first to report the solid-state inactivation...

  9. Angiotensin-converting enzyme activity is reduced in brain microvessels of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, H; Take, K; Wada, A; Izumi, F; Magnoni, M S

    1984-06-01

    Angiotensin -converting enzyme (ACE) activity in brain microvessels of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) controls was measured. Cerebral microvessels, prepared from the cerebral cortices by the albumin flotation and glass bead filtration technique, were free of neuronal and glial elements. ACE activity in brain microvessels of SHR was lower than that of WKY. A Woolf - Augustinsson -Hofstee plot showed that the reduction of the enzyme activity in SHR was due to a 30% decrease in Vmax, without any change in Km for substrate. The decrease of ACE activity in brain microvessels of SHR may indicate an impairment of the central renin-angiotensin system and may be related to cerebral microvascular dysfunctions occurring in hypertension.

  10. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors reduce mortality compared to angiotensin receptor blockers: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Gabriel Lo; Marmentini, Vinicius M; Cosmo, Willian R; Junior, Emilton L

    2017-12-01

    Background There are few reviews comparing the long-term outcomes of the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers in a hypertensive population because both are effective in reducing blood pressure. None of them compared angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers with a placebo group in patients with essential hypertension, because few studies exist with this design. Methods A systematic search of PUBMED, LILACS, SCIELO, ICTRP, Cochrane, EMBASE and ClinicalTrials.gov from 1 January 2000 until 31 December 2015 selected prospective studies that reported an association between the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers in the following cardiovascular outcomes: heart failure/hospitalisation, stroke, acute myocardial infarction, total cardiovascular deaths, total deaths and total outcomes. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were combined by using a fixed-effects model. Results Seventeen studies ( n = 73,761) were included of which 12 studies were randomly assigned to angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy ( n = 24,697) and five to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors ( n = 12,170). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors proved to be significant in reducing total deaths (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.78-0.93) and cardiovascular deaths (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.69-0.87). Angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy did not show a reduction in total deaths (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.96-1.09) or cardiovascular deaths (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.86-1.06). For acute myocardial infarction, stroke and heart failure/hospitalisation, the reductions were significant for both classes. Conclusion Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker use is similar in preventing major cardiovascular outcomes regarding acute myocardial infarction, stroke and heart failure/hospitalisation. However, the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme

  11. Methane Clathrate Hydrate Prospecting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, N.; Romanovsky, V.

    2003-01-01

    A method of prospecting for methane has been devised. The impetus for this method lies in the abundance of CH4 and the growing shortages of other fuels. The method is intended especially to enable identification of subpermafrost locations where significant amounts of methane are trapped in the form of methane gas hydrate (CH4(raised dot)6H2O). It has been estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey that the total CH4 resource in CH4(raised dot) 6H2O exceeds the energy content of all other fossil fuels (oil, coal, and natural gas from non-hydrate sources). Also, CH4(raised dot)6H2O is among the cleanest-burning fuels, and CH4 is the most efficient fuel because the carbon in CH4 is in its most reduced state. The method involves looking for a proxy for methane gas hydrate, by means of the combination of a thermal-analysis submethod and a field submethod that does not involve drilling. The absence of drilling makes this method easier and less expensive, in comparison with prior methods of prospecting for oil and natural gas. The proposed method would include thermoprospecting in combination with one more of the other non-drilling measurement techniques, which could include magneto-telluric sounding and/or a subsurface-electrical-resistivity technique. The method would exploit the fact that the electrical conductivity in the underlying thawed region is greater than that in the overlying permafrost.

  12. Peroxisomal Import Reduces the Proapoptotic Activity of Deubiquitinating Enzyme USP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Reglinski

    Full Text Available The human deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin-specific protease 2 (USP2 regulates multiple cellular pathways, including cell proliferation and apoptosis. As a result of alternative splicing four USP2 isoenzymes are expressed in human cells of which all contain a weak peroxisome targeting signal of type 1 (PTS1 at their C-termini. Here, we systematically analyzed apoptotic effects induced by overexpression and intracellular localization for each isoform. All isoforms exhibit proapoptotic activity and are post-translationally imported into the matrix of peroxisomes in a PEX5-dependent manner. However, a significant fraction of the USP2 pool resides in the cytosol due to a weaker PTS1 and thus low affinity to the PTS receptor PEX5. Blocking of peroxisomal import did not interfere with the proapoptotic activity of USP2, suggesting that the enzyme performs its critical function outside of this compartment. Instead, increase of the efficiency of USP2 import into peroxisomes either by optimization of its peroxisomal targeting signal or by overexpression of the PTS1 receptor did result in a reduction of the apoptotic rate of transfected cells. Our studies suggest that peroxisomal import of USP2 provides additional control over the proapoptotic activity of cytosolic USP2 by spatial separation of the deubiquitinating enzymes from their interaction partners in the cytosol and nucleus.

  13. Verapamil and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in patients with coronary artery disease and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J F; Tingsted, L; Rasmussen, Verner

    1996-01-01

    Verapamil is effective as antianginal medication but contraindicated in patients with congestive heart failure. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors improve survival in patients with congestive heart failure but have limited effect on patients with angina pectoris. No studies have been.......4 to 2.5 +/- 0.6 (p attacks were both significantly reduced after 3 months of treatment. These findings support the hypothesis that the combination of verapamil and trandolapril is useful in patients with attenuated left ventricular function...

  14. DEHP reduces thyroid hormones via interacting with hormone synthesis-related proteins, deiodinases, transthyretin, receptors, and hepatic enzymes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changjiang; Zhao, Letian; Wei, Li; Li, Lianbing

    2015-08-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is used extensively in many personal care and consumer products, resulting in widespread nonoccupational human exposure through multiple routes and media. Limited studies suggest that exposure to DEHP may be associated with altered thyroid function, but detailed mechanisms are unclear. In order to elucidate potential mechanisms by which DEHP disturbs thyroid hormone homeostasis, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage at 0, 250, 500, and 750 mg/kg/day for 30 days and sacrificed within 24 h after the last dose. Gene expressions of thyroid hormone receptors, deiodinases, transthyretin, and hepatic enzymes were measured by RT-PCR; protein levels of transthyretin were also analyzed by Western blot. Results showed that DEHP caused histological changes in the thyroid and follicular epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia were observed. DEHP significantly reduced thyroid hormones (T3, T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) levels, whereas thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was not affected. After exposure to DEHP, biosynthesis of thyroid hormones was suppressed, and sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) levels were significantly reduced. Additionally, levels of deiodinases and transthyretin were also affected. TSH receptor (TSHr) level was downregulated, while TRH receptor (TRHr) level was upregulated. Metabolism of thyroid hormones was accelerated due to elevated gene expression of hepatic enzymes (UDPGTs and CYP2B1) by DEHP. Taken together, observed findings indicate that DEHP could reduce thyroid hormones through influencing biosynthesis, biotransformation, biotransport, receptor levels, and metabolism of thyroid hormones.

  15. Endothelin-converting enzymes degrade α-synuclein and are reduced in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miners, James Scott; Love, Seth

    2017-04-01

    We have examined the roles of the endothelin-converting enzyme-1 and -2 (ECE-1 and ECE-2) in the homeostasis of α-synuclein (α-syn) and pathogenesis of Lewy body disease. The ECEs are named for their ability to convert inactive big endothelin to the vasoactive peptide endothelin-1 (EDN1). We have found that ECE-1 and ECE-2 cleave and degrade α-syn in vitro and siRNA-mediated knockdown of ECE-1 and ECE-2 in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells significantly increased α-syn both intracellularly (within the cell lysate) (p Lewy body disease, we measured ECE-1 and ECE-2 levels by sandwich ELISA in post-mortem samples of cingulate cortex (a region with a predilection for Lewy body pathology) in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and age-matched controls. ECE-1 (p Lewy body pathology as indicated by the level of α-syn phosphorylated at Ser129 (r = -0.54, p < 0.01 for ECE-1 and r = -0.49, p < 0.05 for ECE-2). Our novel findings suggest a role for ECEs in the metabolism of α-syn that could contribute to the development and progression of DLB. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. GABA-shunt enzymes activity in GH3 cells with reduced level of PMCA2 or PMCA3 isoform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Antoni, E-mail: antoni.kowalski@umed.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular Neurochemistry, Medical University of Lodz, 6/8 Mazowiecka Str., 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Zylinska, Ludmila, E-mail: ludmila.zylinska@umed.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular Neurochemistry, Medical University of Lodz, 6/8 Mazowiecka Str., 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Boczek, Tomasz, E-mail: tomasz.boczek@umed.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular Neurochemistry, Medical University of Lodz, 6/8 Mazowiecka Str., 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Rebas, Elzbieta, E-mail: elzbieta.rebas@umed.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular Neurochemistry, Medical University of Lodz, 6/8 Mazowiecka Str., 92-215 Lodz (Poland)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Suppression of PMCA2 or PMCA3 slows down proliferation of GH3 cells. {yields} PMCA2 suppression lowers the activity of GABA-shunt enzymes. {yields} PMCA3 suppression increases the expression of glutamate decarboxylase 65. {yields} PMCA2 and PMCA3 function appears to be linked to regulation of GABA metabolism. -- Abstract: GABA ({gamma}-aminobutyric acid) is important neurotransmitter and regulator of endocrine functions. Its metabolism involves three enzymes: glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65 and GAD67), GABA aminotransferase (GABA-T) and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH). As many cellular processes GABA turnover can depend on calcium homeostasis, which is maintained by plasma membrane calcium ATPases (PMCAs). In excitable cells PMCA2 and PMCA3 isoforms are particularly important. In this study we focused on GABA-metabolizing enzymes expression and activity in rat anterior pituitary GH3 cells with suppressed expression of PMCA2 or PMCA3. We observed that PMCA3-reduced cells have increased GAD65 expression. Suppression of PMCA2 caused a decrease in total GAD and GABA-T activity. These results indicate that PMCA2 and PMCA3 presence may be an important regulatory factor in GABA metabolism. Results suggest that PMCA2 and PMCA3 function is rather related to regulation of GABA synthesis and degradation than supplying cells with metabolites, which can be potentially energetic source.

  17. Hydrated interfacial ions and electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Charged particles such as hydrated ions and transient hydrated electrons, the simplest anionic reducing agents in water, and the special hydronium and hydroxide ions at water interfaces play an important role in many fields of science, such as atmospheric chemistry, radiation chemistry, and biology, as well as biochemistry. This article focuses on these species near hydrophobic interfaces of water, such as the air or vacuum interface of water or water protein/membrane interfaces. Ions at interfaces as well as solvated electrons have been reviewed frequently during the past decade. Although all species have been known for some time with seemingly familiar features, recently the picture in all cases became increasingly diffuse rather than clearer. The current account gives a critical state-of-the art overview of what is known and what remains to be understood and investigated about hydrated interfacial ions and electrons.

  18. Assessment of digestibility improving enzymes potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in broiler production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Anja Marie; Dalgaard, Randi; Thrane, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    was documented through a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) by applying a consequential approach including indirect land use changes (ILUC). The findings showed that Axtra XAP could reduce GHG emissions from broiler production by 5%. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to assess the robustness of the results...

  19. Synergistic kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; Malmos, Christine; von Solms, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Rocking cells were used to investigate the natural gas hydrate formation and decomposition in the presence of kinetic inhibitor, Luvicap. In addition, the influence of poly ethylene oxide (PEO) and NaCl on the performance of Luvicap was investigated using temperature ramping and isothermal...... experiments. Luvicap decreased the hydrate nucleation temperature in ramping and increased the hydrate nucleation time at fixed temperatures. The presence of PEO and NaCl enhanced the nucleation inhibition strength of Luvicap. However the addition of Luvicap promoted the hydrate growth after nucleation. PEO...... does not affect hydrate growth whereas NaCl reduced the hydrate growth both in the presence and absence of Luvicap. In addition complex two-stage hydrate growth was observed in the presence of Luvicap. Moreover, the hydrate formed in the presence of inhibitor took longer time/higher temperature...

  20. Catalase improves saccharification of lignocellulose by reducing lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase-associated enzyme inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brian R; Huang, Hong Zhi; Frickman, Jesper; Halvorsen, Rune; Johansen, Katja S

    2016-03-01

    Efficient enzymatic saccharification of plant cell wall material is key to industrial processing of agricultural and forestry waste such as straw and wood chips into fuels and chemicals. Saccharification assays were performed on steam-pretreated wheat straw under ambient and O2-deprived environments and in the absence and presence of a lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) and catalase. A kinetic model was used to calculate catalytic rate and first-order inactivation rate constants of the cellulases from reaction progress curves. The addition of a LPMO significantly (P catalase significantly reduced (P catalase can be used to protect these mixtures from inactivation.

  1. Increased biomass yield of Lactococcus lactis by reduced overconsumption of amino acids and increased catalytic activities of enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaarel Adamberg

    Full Text Available Steady state cultivation and multidimensional data analysis (metabolic fluxes, absolute proteome, and transcriptome are used to identify parameters that control the increase in biomass yield of Lactococcus lactis from 0.10 to 0.12 C-mol C-mol(-1 with an increase in specific growth rate by 5 times from 0.1 to 0.5 h(-1. Reorganization of amino acid consumption was expressed by the inactivation of the arginine deiminase pathway at a specific growth rate of 0.35 h(-1 followed by reduced over-consumption of pyruvate directed amino acids (asparagine, serine, threonine, alanine and cysteine until almost all consumed amino acids were used only for protein synthesis at maximal specific growth rate. This balanced growth was characterized by a high glycolytic flux carrying up to 87% of the carbon flow and only amino acids that relate to nucleotide synthesis (glutamine, serine and asparagine were consumed in higher amounts than required for cellular protein synthesis. Changes in the proteome were minor (mainly increase in the translation apparatus. Instead, the apparent catalytic activities of enzymes and ribosomes increased by 3.5 times (0.1 vs 0.5 h(-1. The apparent catalytic activities of glycolytic enzymes and ribosomal proteins were seen to follow this regulation pattern while those of enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism increased more than the specific growth rate (over 5.5 times. Nucleotide synthesis formed the most abundant biomonomer synthetic pathway in the cells with an expenditure of 6% from the total ATP required for biosynthesis. Due to the increase in apparent catalytic activity, ribosome translation was more efficient at higher growth rates as evidenced by a decrease of protein to mRNA ratios. All these effects resulted in a 30% decrease of calculated ATP spilling (0.1 vs 0.5 h(-1. Our results show that bioprocesses can be made more efficient (using a balanced metabolism by varying the growth conditions.

  2. An Electrochemical Enzyme Biosensor for 3-Hydroxybutyrate Detection Using Screen-Printed Electrodes Modified by Reduced Graphene Oxide and Thionine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Gonzalo; Pérez-Julián, Elena; Agüí, Lourdes; Cabré, Naomí; Joven, Jorge; Yáñez-Sedeño, Paloma; Pingarrón, José Manuel

    2017-11-11

    A biosensor for 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-HB) involving immobilization of the enzyme 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase onto a screen-printed carbon electrode modified with reduced graphene oxide (GO) and thionine (THI) is reported here. After addition of 3-hydroxybutyrate or the sample in the presence of NAD⁺ cofactor, the generated NADH could be detected amperometrically at 0.0 V vs. Ag pseudo reference electrode. Under the optimized experimental conditions, a calibration plot for 3-HB was constructed showing a wide linear range between 0.010 and 0.400 mM 3-HB which covers the clinically relevant levels for diluted serum samples. In addition, a limit of detection of 1.0 µM, much lower than that reported using other biosensors, was achieved. The analytical usefulness of the developed biosensor was demonstrated via application to spiked serum samples.

  3. Silver nanoparticles reduce brain inflammation and related neurotoxicity through induction of H2S-synthesizing enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Carter, Daniel A.; Leo, Bey Fen; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Chen, Shu; Goode, Angela E.; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Chung, Kian Fan; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Dexter, David T.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.

    2017-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are known to penetrate into the brain and cause neuronal death. However, there is a paucity in studies examining the effect of AgNP on the resident immune cells of the brain, microglia. Given microglia are implicated in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD), it is important to examine how AgNPs affect microglial inflammation to fully assess AgNP neurotoxicity. In addition, understanding AgNP processing by microglia will allow better prediction of their long term bioreactivity. In the present study, the in vitro uptake and intracellular transformation of citrate-capped AgNPs by microglia, as well as their effects on microglial inflammation and related neurotoxicity were examined. Analytical microscopy demonstrated internalization and dissolution of AgNPs within microglia and formation of non-reactive silver sulphide (Ag2S) on the surface of AgNPs. Furthermore, AgNP-treatment up-regulated microglial expression of the hydrogen sulphide (H2S)-synthesizing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). In addition, AgNPs showed significant anti-inflammatory effects, reducing lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated ROS, nitric oxide and TNFα production, which translated into reduced microglial toxicity towards dopaminergic neurons. Hence, the present results indicate that intracellular Ag2S formation, resulting from CSE-mediated H2S production in microglia, sequesters Ag+ ions released from AgNPs, significantly limiting their toxicity, concomitantly reducing microglial inflammation and related neurotoxicity.

  4. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4 isoform 2-knockout mice show reduced enzyme activity, airway hyporeactivity, and lung pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüttemann, Maik; Lee, Icksoo; Gao, Xiufeng; Pecina, Petr; Pecinova, Alena; Liu, Jenney; Aras, Siddhesh; Sommer, Natascha; Sanderson, Thomas H.; Tost, Monica; Neff, Frauke; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Naton, Beatrix; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Favor, Jack; Hans, Wolfgang; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Schrewe, Anja; Sun, Minxuan; Höfler, Heinz; Adamski, Jerzy; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Graw, Jochen; Adler, Thure; Busch, Dirk H.; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Ollert, Markus; Wolf, Eckhard; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Weissmann, Norbert; Doan, Jeffrey W.; Bassett, David J. P.; Grossman, Lawrence I.

    2012-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The purpose of this study was to analyze the function of lung-specific cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4 isoform 2 (COX4i2) in vitro and in COX4i2-knockout mice in vivo. COX was isolated from cow lung and liver as control and functionally analyzed. COX4i2-knockout mice were generated and the effect of the gene knockout was determined, including COX activity, tissue energy levels, noninvasive and invasive lung function, and lung pathology. These studies were complemented by a comprehensive functional screen performed at the German Mouse Clinic (Neuherberg, Germany). We show that isolated cow lung COX containing COX4i2 is about twice as active (88 and 102% increased activity in the presence of allosteric activator ADP and inhibitor ATP, respectively) as liver COX, which lacks COX4i2. In COX4i2-knockout mice, lung COX activity and cellular ATP levels were significantly reduced (−50 and −29%, respectively). Knockout mice showed decreased airway responsiveness (60% reduced Penh and 58% reduced airway resistance upon challenge with 25 and 100 mg methacholine, respectively), and they developed a lung pathology deteriorating with age that included the appearance of Charcot-Leyden crystals. In addition, there was an interesting sex-specific phenotype, in which the knockout females showed reduced lean mass (−12%), reduced total oxygen consumption rate (−8%), improved glucose tolerance, and reduced grip force (−14%) compared to wild-type females. Our data suggest that high activity lung COX is a central determinant of airway function and is required for maximal airway responsiveness and healthy lung function. Since airway constriction requires energy, we propose a model in which reduced tissue ATP levels explain protection from airway hyperresponsiveness, i.e., absence of COX4i2 leads to reduced lung COX activity and ATP levels, which results in impaired airway constriction

  5. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated

  6. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4 isoform 2-knockout mice show reduced enzyme activity, airway hyporeactivity, and lung pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüttemann, Maik; Lee, Icksoo; Gao, Xiufeng; Pecina, Petr; Pecinova, Alena; Liu, Jenney; Aras, Siddhesh; Sommer, Natascha; Sanderson, Thomas H; Tost, Monica; Neff, Frauke; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Naton, Beatrix; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Favor, Jack; Hans, Wolfgang; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Schrewe, Anja; Sun, Minxuan; Höfler, Heinz; Adamski, Jerzy; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Graw, Jochen; Adler, Thure; Busch, Dirk H; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Ollert, Markus; Wolf, Eckhard; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Weissmann, Norbert; Doan, Jeffrey W; Bassett, David J P; Grossman, Lawrence I

    2012-09-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The purpose of this study was to analyze the function of lung-specific cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4 isoform 2 (COX4i2) in vitro and in COX4i2-knockout mice in vivo. COX was isolated from cow lung and liver as control and functionally analyzed. COX4i2-knockout mice were generated and the effect of the gene knockout was determined, including COX activity, tissue energy levels, noninvasive and invasive lung function, and lung pathology. These studies were complemented by a comprehensive functional screen performed at the German Mouse Clinic (Neuherberg, Germany). We show that isolated cow lung COX containing COX4i2 is about twice as active (88 and 102% increased activity in the presence of allosteric activator ADP and inhibitor ATP, respectively) as liver COX, which lacks COX4i2. In COX4i2-knockout mice, lung COX activity and cellular ATP levels were significantly reduced (-50 and -29%, respectively). Knockout mice showed decreased airway responsiveness (60% reduced P(enh) and 58% reduced airway resistance upon challenge with 25 and 100 mg methacholine, respectively), and they developed a lung pathology deteriorating with age that included the appearance of Charcot-Leyden crystals. In addition, there was an interesting sex-specific phenotype, in which the knockout females showed reduced lean mass (-12%), reduced total oxygen consumption rate (-8%), improved glucose tolerance, and reduced grip force (-14%) compared to wild-type females. Our data suggest that high activity lung COX is a central determinant of airway function and is required for maximal airway responsiveness and healthy lung function. Since airway constriction requires energy, we propose a model in which reduced tissue ATP levels explain protection from airway hyperresponsiveness, i.e., absence of COX4i2 leads to reduced lung COX activity and ATP levels, which results in impaired airway constriction and

  7. The temperature hydration kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Oroian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the hydration kinetics of lentil seeds (Lens culinaris in water at different temperatures (25, 32.5, 40, 55, 70 and 80 °C for assessing the adequacy of models for describing the absorption phenomena during soaking. The diffusion coefficient values were calculated using Fick’s model for spherical and hemispherical geometries and the values were in the range of 10−6 m2/s. The experimental data were fitted to Peleg, Sigmoidal, Weibull and Exponential models. The models adequacy was determined using regression coefficients (R2, root mean square error (RMSE and reduced chi-square (χ2. The Peleg model is the suitable one for predicting the experimental data. Temperature had a positive and significant effect on the water absorption capacities and absorption was an endothermic process.

  8. Gas hydrate in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2018-01-17

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring, ice-like substance that forms when water and gas combine under high pressure and at moderate temperatures. Methane is the most common gas present in gas hydrate, although other gases may also be included in hydrate structures, particularly in areas close to conventional oil and gas reservoirs. Gas hydrate is widespread in ocean-bottom sediments at water depths greater than 300–500 meters (m; 984–1,640 feet [ft]) and is also present in areas with permanently frozen ground (permafrost). Several countries are evaluating gas hydrate as a possible energy resource in deepwater or permafrost settings. Gas hydrate is also under investigation to determine how environmental change may affect these deposits.

  9. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  10. Reduced Dental Plaque Formation in Dogs Drinking a Solution Containing Natural Antimicrobial Herbal Enzymes and Organic Matcha Green Tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindinger, Michael I

    2016-01-01

    The results of an exploratory, multicenter clinical study confirmed the hypothesis that a novel, natural, and safe oral care product (OCP) reduced the rate of plaque formation on teeth of dogs consuming the OCP (antimicrobial plant-derived enzymes, organic matcha green tea, cultured dextrose, sodium bicarbonate, and ascorbic acid) compared to controls. Healthy dogs without periodontitis, of varying breeds, sex, and age, were recruited and enrolled, using nonrandomized stratification methods, into a control and treatment groups. Treatment group dogs drank only water into which OCP was suspended, for 28 days. Control group dogs drank their normal household water. On day 0 all teeth were cleaned by a veterinarian and gingivitis was assessed. On days 14, 21, and 28 plaque index, plaque thickness, gingivitis, freshness of breath, and general health were assessed. Over the 28 days of study, dogs on the OCP had significant reduction in plaque index and plaque thickness compared to controls. By day 14 OCP reduced plaque formation by 37%; the 28-day reduction in plaque index and coverage averaged 22% with no measurable gingivitis or calculus. Conclusion. Using the OCP attenuated dental plaque formation when consumed as normal drinking water and in the absence of other modes of oral care.

  11. Reduced Dental Plaque Formation in Dogs Drinking a Solution Containing Natural Antimicrobial Herbal Enzymes and Organic Matcha Green Tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. Lindinger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of an exploratory, multicenter clinical study confirmed the hypothesis that a novel, natural, and safe oral care product (OCP reduced the rate of plaque formation on teeth of dogs consuming the OCP (antimicrobial plant-derived enzymes, organic matcha green tea, cultured dextrose, sodium bicarbonate, and ascorbic acid compared to controls. Healthy dogs without periodontitis, of varying breeds, sex, and age, were recruited and enrolled, using nonrandomized stratification methods, into a control and treatment groups. Treatment group dogs drank only water into which OCP was suspended, for 28 days. Control group dogs drank their normal household water. On day 0 all teeth were cleaned by a veterinarian and gingivitis was assessed. On days 14, 21, and 28 plaque index, plaque thickness, gingivitis, freshness of breath, and general health were assessed. Over the 28 days of study, dogs on the OCP had significant reduction in plaque index and plaque thickness compared to controls. By day 14 OCP reduced plaque formation by 37%; the 28-day reduction in plaque index and coverage averaged 22% with no measurable gingivitis or calculus. Conclusion. Using the OCP attenuated dental plaque formation when consumed as normal drinking water and in the absence of other modes of oral care.

  12. Pralnacasan, an inhibitor of interleukin-1beta converting enzyme, reduces joint damage in two murine models of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolphi, K; Gerwin, N; Verzijl, N; van der Kraan, P; van den Berg, W

    2003-10-01

    To study the effect of pralnacasan, the orally bioavailable pro-drug of a potent, non-peptide inhibitor of interleukin-1beta converting enzyme (ICE), RU 36384/VRT-18858, on joint damage in two mouse models of knee osteoarthritis (OA). In a collagenase-induced OA model, pralnacasan was given orally by gavage to female Balb/c mice at 0, 12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg twice a day. In the second study, pralnacasan was tested in male STR/1N mice, which develop OA spontaneously, by administering food-drug mixtures ad libitum at concentrations of 0, 700 and 4200 ppm (mg/kg food). OA joint damage was assessed by a semi-quantitative histopathological score in both studies. In the STR/1N mouse study, urinary levels of collagen cross-links hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP) and lysylpyridinoline (LP) were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography at baseline, after 3 and 6 weeks of treatment and RU 36384/VRT-18858 plasma concentrations was measured after 6 weeks. In both studies, the mice developed moderate to severe knee joint OA in the medial joint compartments (tibial plateau and femoral condyle), the non-treated control groups showing median histopathological scores from 18 to 21 of a maximal score of 32. Pralnacasan was well tolerated. At the doses of 12.5 and 50 mg/kg in collagenase-induced OA and at the high dose of 4200 ppm in STR/1N mice pralnacasan treatment significantly reduced OA by 13-22%. In the STR/1N mice, urinary levels of HP cross-links and the ratio of HP/LP, which are indicators of joint damage in OA, were significantly reduced in the high dose group by 59 and 84%, respectively. The ICE inhibitor pralnacasan reduced joint damage in two experimental models of OA and has the potential to become a disease-modifying drug for the treatment of OA.

  13. Persistent overexpression of phosphoglycerate mutase, a glycolytic enzyme, modifies energy metabolism and reduces stress resistance of heart in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Okuda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heart failure is associated with changes in cardiac energy metabolism. Glucose metabolism in particular is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of heart failure. We examined the effects of persistent overexpression of phosphoglycerate mutase 2 (Pgam2, a glycolytic enzyme, on cardiac energy metabolism and function. METHODS AND RESULTS: Transgenic mice constitutively overexpressing Pgam2 in a heart-specific manner were generated, and cardiac energy metabolism and function were analyzed. Cardiac function at rest was normal. The uptake of analogs of glucose or fatty acids and the phosphocreatine/βATP ratio at rest were normal. A comprehensive metabolomic analysis revealed an increase in the levels of a few metabolites immediately upstream and downstream of Pgam2 in the glycolytic pathway, whereas the levels of metabolites in the initial few steps of glycolysis and lactate remained unchanged. The levels of metabolites in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle were altered. The capacity for respiration by isolated mitochondria in vitro was decreased, and that for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in vitro was increased. Impaired cardiac function was observed in response to dobutamine. Mice developed systolic dysfunction upon pressure overload. CONCLUSIONS: Constitutive overexpression of Pgam2 modified energy metabolism and reduced stress resistance of heart in mice.

  14. A double-stranded RNA degrading enzyme reduces the efficiency of oral RNA interference in migratory locust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Huifang; Zhang, Jianqin; Li, Daqi; Cooper, Anastasia M W; Silver, Kristopher; Li, Tao; Liu, Xiaojian; Ma, Enbo; Zhu, Kun Yan; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2017-07-01

    Application of RNA interference (RNAi) for insect pest management is limited by variable efficiency of RNAi in different insect species. In Locusta migratoria, RNAi is highly efficient through injection of dsRNA, but oral delivery of dsRNA is much less effective. Efforts to understand this phenomenon have shown that dsRNA is more rapidly degraded in midgut fluid than in hemolymph due to nuclease enzyme activity. In the present study, we identified and characterized two full-length cDNAs of double-stranded RNA degrading enzymes (dsRNase) from midgut of L. migratoria, which were named LmdsRNase2 and LmdsRNase3. Gene expression analysis revealed that LmdsRNase2 and LmdsRNase3 were predominantly expressed in the midgut, relatively lower expression in gastric caeca, and trace expression in other tested tissues. Incubation of dsRNA in midgut fluid from LmdsRNase3-suppressed larvae or control larvae injected with dsGFP resulted in high levels of degradation; however, dsRNA incubated in midgut fluid from LmdsRNase2-suppressed larvae was more stable, indicating LmdsRNase2 is responsible for dsRNA degradation in the midgut. To verify the biological function of LmdsRNase2 in vivo, nymphs were injected with dsGFP, dsLmdsRNase2 or dsLmdsRNase3 and chitinase 10 (LmCht10) or chitin synthase 1 (LmCHS1) dsRNA were orally delivered. Mortality associated with reporter gene knockdown was observed only in locusts injected with dsLmdsRNase2 (48% and 22%, for dsLmCht10 and dsLmCHS1, respectively), implicating LmdsRNase2 in reducing RNAi efficiency. Furthermore, recombinantly expressed LmdsRNase2 fusion proteins degraded dsRNA rapidly, whereas LmdsRNase3 did not. These results suggest that rapid degradation of dsRNA by dsRNase2 in the midgut is an important factor causing low RNAi efficiency when dsRNA is orally delivered in the locust. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Combustion of Methane Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshandell, Melika

    A significant methane storehouse is in the form of methane hydrates on the sea floor and in the arctic permafrost. Methane hydrates are ice-like structures composed of water cages housing a guest methane molecule. This caged methane represents a resource of energy and a potential source of strong greenhouse gas. Most research related to methane hydrates has been focused on their formation and dissociation because they can form solid plugs that complicate transport of oil and gas in pipelines. This dissertation explores the direct burning of these methane hydrates where heat from the combustion process dissociates the hydrate into water and methane, and the released methane fuels the methane/air diffusion flame heat source. In contrast to the pipeline applications, very little research has been done on the combustion and burning characteristics of methane hydrates. This is the first dissertation on this subject. In this study, energy release and combustion characteristics of methane hydrates were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The experimental study involved collaboration with another research group, particularly in the creation of methane hydrate samples. The experiments were difficult because hydrates form at high pressure within a narrow temperature range. The process can be slow and the resulting hydrate can have somewhat variable properties (e.g., extent of clathration, shape, compactness). The experimental study examined broad characteristics of hydrate combustion, including flame appearance, burning time, conditions leading to flame extinguishment, the amount of hydrate water melted versus evaporated, and flame temperature. These properties were observed for samples of different physical size. Hydrate formation is a very slow process with pure water and methane. The addition of small amounts of surfactant increased substantially the hydrate formation rate. The effects of surfactant on burning characteristics were also studied. One finding

  16. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  17. [Frequency of enzymes associated with reduced sensitivity to beta-lactam antibiotics in enterobacteria isolates, Caracas, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcano, Daniel; De Jesús, Andreína; Hernández, Luis; Torres, Luis

    2011-12-01

    To determine the frequency of enzymatic mechanisms associated with reduced sensitivity to broad-spectrum beta-lactam antibiotics in enterobacteria isolates obtained at hospital centers in Caracas, Venezuela. A cross-sectional study was conducted on enterobacteria isolated from patients at eight hospital centers in Caracas, Venezuela, from 15 October 2009 to 15 January 2010. The species were identified using conventional biochemical tests, and their susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs was assessed by antibiogram (Kirby-Bauer method), using the 2010 performance standards published by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Beta-lactam-resistant genes were detected using an enhanced polymerase chain reaction assay. Of 1 235 isolates, 207 (16.8%) exhibited resistance to third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, or both. They presented the following phenotypes: extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL), 93.8%; depressed AmpC, 4.3%; and carbapenemase, 1.9%. Further characterization of the first two phenotypes yielded the following breakdown of types: SHV, 36.7%; CTX-M-1 group, 22.3%; TEM, 21.7%; CTX-M-1 group with impermeability, 5.2%; two-enzyme combinations, 4.5%; CTX-M-2 group, 4.3%; PER, 3.4%; and KPC, 1.9%. The SHV type was predominant in the public hospital strains, whereas the CTX-M-1 group was most common in the strains from the private hospitals. Of the enzymatic mechanisms investigated, the SHV type was the most frequent, followed by the CTX-M-1 group and the TEM type. Also, a high percentage of type KPC was found. The research reported here is one of only a few multicenter studies that have been conducted in Venezuela to evaluate the frequency of this type of antimicrobial resistance mechanism, including phenotypical and molecular characterization. It was shown that the detection methods require proper interpretation of sensitivity profiles and molecular confirmation of the mechanism present.

  18. SnO(2) quantum dots-reduced graphene oxide composite for enzyme-free ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Dipa; Chandra, Sudeshna; Swain, Akshaya K; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2014-06-17

    Most of the urea sensors are biosensors and utilize urease, which limit their use in harsh environments. Recently, because of their exceptional ability to endorse faster electron transfer, carbonaceous material composites and quantum dots are being used for fabrication of a sensitive transducer surface for urea biosensors. We demonstrate an enzyme free ultrasensitive urea sensor fabricated using a SnO2 quantum dots (QDs)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composite. Due to the synergistic effect of the constituents, the SnO2 QDs/RGO (SRGO) composite proved to be an excellent probe for electrochemical sensing. The morphology and structure of the composite was characterized by various techniques, and it was observed that SnO2 QDs are decorated on RGO layers. Electrochemical studies were performed to evaluate the characteristics of the sensor toward detection of urea. Amperometry studies show that the SRGO/GCE electrode is sensitive to urea in the concentration range of 1.6 × 10(-14)-3.9 × 10(-12) M, with a detection limit of as low as 11.7 fM. However, this is an indirect measurement for urea wherein the analytical signal is recorded as a decrease in the amperommetric and/or voltammetric current from the solution redox species ferrocyanide. The porous structure of the SRGO matrix offers a very low transport barrier and thus promotes rapid diffusion of the ionic species from the solution to the electrode, leading to a rapid response time (∼5 s) and ultrahigh sensitivity (1.38 μA/fM). Good analytical performance in the presence of interfering agents, low cost, and easy synthesis methodology suggest that SRGO can be quite promising as an electroactive material for effective urea sensing.

  19. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  20. Methane Production and Carbon Capture by Hydrate Swapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Liang; von Solms, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    gas molecules in the structural lattice. In this work, we quantitatively investigate the swapping behavior from injection of pure carbon dioxide and the (CO2 + N2) binary gas mixture through artificial hydrate-bearing sandstone samples by use of a core-flooding experimental apparatus. A total of 13...... of pure carbon dioxide in swapping methane from its hydrate phase; the methane recovery efficiency in brine water systems is enhanced relative to pure water systems. The replenishment of a fresh (CO2 + N2) gas mixture into the vapor phase can be considered as an efficient extraction method because 46...... in small hydrate cages, as long as the equilibrium formation pressure of (CO2 + N2) binary gas hydrate is below that of methane hydrate, even though adding nitrogen to carbon dioxide reduces the thermodynamic driving force for the formation of a new hydrate. When other conditions are similar, the methane...

  1. Interactions between Cellulolytic Enzymes with Native, Autohydrolysis, and Technical Lignins and the Effect of a Polysorbate Amphiphile in Reducing Nonproductive Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Consuelo; Ferrer, Ana; Salas, Carlos; Jameel, Hasan; Rojas, Orlando J

    2015-12-14

    Understanding enzyme-substrate interactions is critical in designing strategies for bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study we monitored molecular events, in situ and in real time, including the adsorption and desorption of cellulolytic enzymes on lignins and cellulose, by using quartz crystal microgravimetry and surface plasmon resonance. The effect of a nonionic surface active molecule was also elucidated. Three lignin substrates relevant to the sugar platform in biorefinery efforts were considered, namely, hardwood autohydrolysis cellulolytic (HWAH), hardwood native cellulolytic (MPCEL), and nonwood native cellulolytic (WSCEL) lignin. In addition, Kraft lignins derived from softwoods (SWK) and hardwoods (HWK) were used as references. The results indicated a high affinity between the lignins with both, monocomponent and multicomponent enzymes. More importantly, the addition of nonionic surfactants at concentrations above their critical micelle concentration reduced remarkably (by over 90%) the nonproductive interactions between the cellulolytic enzymes and the lignins. This effect was hypothesized to be a consequence of the balance of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions. Moreover, the reduction of surface roughness and increased wettability of lignin surfaces upon surfactant treatment contributed to a lower affinity with the enzymes. Conformational changes of cellulases were observed upon their adsorption on lignin carrying preadsorbed surfactant. Weak electrostatic interactions were determined in aqueous media at pH between 4.8 and 5.5 for the native cellulolytic lignins (MPCEL and WSCEL), whereby a ∼20% reduction in the enzyme affinity was observed. This was mainly explained by electrostatic interactions (osmotic pressure effects) between charged lignins and cellulases. Noteworthy, adsorption of nonionic surfactants onto cellulose, in the form cellulose nanofibrils, did not affect its hydrolytic conversion. Overall, our results

  2. Hydrate pingoes at Nyegga: some characteristic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, M.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrate pingoes were observed on the seafloor during two different remotely operated vehicle (ROV)-dives, conducted by Statoil at complex-pockmark G11, at Nyegga, off Mid-Norway. Confirmation that these structures actually represent hydrate ice-cored sediment mounds (pingoes), was done by other investigators (Ivanov et al., 2006). Because it is expected that hydrate pingoes represent relatively dynamic seafloor topographic structures and that their shape and size most probably will change over relatively short time, it is important to know how to recognise them visually. Hovland and Svensen (2006) highlighted five different characteristic aspects that define hydrate pingoes on the sea floor: 1) They are dome- or disc-shaped features, which may attain any size from ~0.5 m in height and upwards. Inside pockmark G11, they were up to 1 m high. 2) They are circular or oval in plan view and may attain lateral sizes on the seafloor ranging upwards from ~0.5 m. Inside G11 they had lengths of several metres and widths of up to 4 m. 3) They have dense communities of organisms growing on their surfaces. At G11, they were overgrown with small pogonophoran tube-worms. 4) They have patches of white or grey bacterial mats growing on their surface, indicating advection (seepage) of reduced pore-waters. 5) They have small pits and patches of fluidized sediments on their surface, indicating pit corrosion of the sub-surface gas hydrate. Because gas hydrates often form in high-porosity, near-surface sediments, where water is readily available, it is thought that they will build up at locations where gases are actively migrating upwards from depth. However, gas hydrates are not stable in the presence of ambient seawater, as seawater is deficient in guest molecule gases (normally methane). Therefore, they tend to build up below surface above conduits for gas flow from depth. But, the near-surface hydrate ice-lenses will continually be corroded by seawater circulating into the sediments

  3. Skeletal Muscle Fibre-Specific Knockout of p53 Does Not Reduce Mitochondrial Content or Enzyme Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Stocks

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumour protein 53 (p53 has been implicated in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle, with whole-body p53 knockout mice displaying impairments in basal mitochondrial content, respiratory capacity, and enzyme activity. This study aimed to determine the effect of skeletal muscle-specific loss of p53 on mitochondrial content and enzyme activity. Mitochondrial protein content, enzyme activity and mRNA profiles were assessed in skeletal muscle of 8-week-old male muscle fibre-specific p53 knockout mice (p53 mKO and floxed littermate controls (WT under basal conditions. p53 mKO and WT mice displayed similar content of electron transport chain proteins I-V and citrate synthase enzyme activity in skeletal muscle. In addition, the content of proteins regulating mitochondrial morphology (MFN2, mitofillin, OPA1, DRP1, FIS1, fatty acid metabolism (β-HAD, ACADM, ACADL, ACADVL, carbohydrate metabolism (HKII, PDH, energy sensing (AMPKα2, AMPKβ2, and gene transcription (NRF1, PGC-1α, and TFAM were comparable in p53 mKO and WT mice (p > 0.05. Furthermore, p53 mKO mice exhibited normal mRNA profiles of targeted mitochondrial, metabolic and transcriptional proteins (p > 0.05. Thus, it appears that p53 expression in skeletal muscle fibres is not required to develop or maintain mitochondrial protein content or enzyme function in skeletal muscle under basal conditions.

  4. Hydration and nutrition knowledge in adolescent swimmers. Does water intake affect urine hydration markers after swimming?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Altavilla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Little data exists regarding nutritional knowledge and hydration in adolescent swimmers. The aim of this study was to assess the level of nutrition and hydration knowledge and to describe the fluid balance in adolescent swimmers during training. A study was carried out with a cross-sectional descriptive part and a longitudinal part with repeated measurements over five swimming sessions. Eighty-six adolescent swimmers completed a questionnaire to assess their sport nutrition and hydration knowledge. Fluid balance and urine hydration markers were studied during training. Swimmers showed a limited nutrition knowledge (33.26 % ± SD 12.59 and meagre hydration knowledge (28.61 % ± SD 28.59. Females showed lower scores than male swimmers in nutrition and hydration knowledge. Based on urine specific gravity, swimmers started the training close to the euhydrated threshold (1.019 g/mL ± SD 0.008. Although urine specific gravity and urine colour were reduced after the training, there were minimal changes in body mass (-0.12 Kg ± SD 0.31. Sweat loss (2.67 g/min ± SD 3.23 and the net changes in the fluid balance (-0.22 % ± SD 0.59 were low. The poor knowledge in nutrition and hydration encountered in the swimmers can justify the development of a strategy to incorporate nutritional education programmes for this group. Body water deficit from swimming activity seems to be easily replaced with the water intake to maintain hydration. After the training, the urine of swimmers was diluted regardless of their water intake. Dilution of urine did not reflect real hydration state in swimming.

  5. Brief report : enzyme inducers reduce elimination half-life after a single dose of nevirapine in healthy women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L'homme, R.F.A.; Dijkema, T.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Burger, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Single-dose nevirapine (SD-NVP) to prevent mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV is associated with development of NVP resistance, probably because of its long half-life in combination with a low genetic barrier to resistance. The objective of this study was to find enzyme inducers

  6. Pralnacasan, an inhibitor of interleukin-1beta converting enzyme, reduces joint damage in two murine models of osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudolphi, K.; Gerwin, N.; Verzijl, N.; Kraan, P.M. van der; Berg, W.B. van den

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of pralnacasan, the orally bioavailable pro-drug of a potent, non-peptide inhibitor of interleukin-1beta converting enzyme (ICE), RU 36384/VRT-18858, on joint damage in two mouse models of knee osteoarthritis (OA). DESIGN: In a collagenase-induced OA model, pralnacasan

  7. Clathrate Hydrates for Thermal Energy Storage in Buildings: Overview of Proper Hydrate-Forming Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing energy costs are at the origin of the great progress in the field of phase change materials (PCMs. The present work aims at studying the application of clathrate hydrates as PCMs in buildings. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline structures in which guest molecules are enclosed in the crystal lattice of water molecules. Clathrate hydrates can form also at ambient pressure and present a high latent heat, and for this reason, they are good candidates for being used as PCMs. The parameter that makes a PCM suitable to be used in buildings is, first of all, a melting temperature at about 25 °C. The paper provides an overview of groups of clathrate hydrates, whose physical and chemical characteristics could meet the requirements needed for their application in buildings. Simulations with a dynamic building simulation tool are carried out to evaluate the performance of clathrate hydrates in enhancing thermal comfort through the moderation of summer temperature swings and, therefore, in reducing energy consumption. Simulations suggest that clathrate hydrates have a potential in terms of improvement of indoor thermal comfort and a reduction of energy consumption for cooling. Cooling effects of 0.5 °C and reduced overheating hours of up to 1.1% are predicted.

  8. Microbial Community Structure and Diversity in Hydrate Ridge Gas Hydrates (Cascadia Margin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lösekann, T.; Knittel, K.; Boetius, A.; Amann, R.

    2003-04-01

    Here, we present the first quantitative study investigating microorganisms physically associated with Hydrate Ridge gas hydrates. Previous studies have shown that the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in methane enriched surface sediments of Hydrate Ridge is apparently mediated by highly structured microbial consortia (Boetius et al., 2000). These AOM consortia consist of an inner core of methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME2-group) and an outer shell of sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus group). However, recently other microbial associations have been found capable of oxidizing methane anaerobically (e.g. Michaelis et al., 2002; Orphan et al., 2002). Only little is known about microorganisms mediating AOM in direct association with gas hydrates (Lanoil et al., 2001). The microbial community in pure melted gas hydrates sampled at the southern summit of Hydrate Ridge, coast off Oregon (USA), was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Additionally, microbial diversity was studied using 16S rDNA clone libraries for Bacteria and Archaea. First FISH experiments confirm the abundance of AMNE1-group archaea and ANME2-group archaea in pure melted Hydrate Ridge gas hydrates. The abundance of these AOM mediating groups seems to be orders of magnitude lower than in the gas hydrate surrounding sediment. ANME1-cells were detected as filamentous free-living rods. Archaea of the ANME2-group were found in associations. In contrast to the known highly structured Hydrate ridge consortia, these cells are only loosly aggregated. The obtained molecular data will be compared with results of previous studies, which dealt with the microbial diversity in methane enriched surface sediments of Hydrate Ridge. References: Boetius, A., Ravenschlag, K. , Schubert, C., Rickert, D., Widdel, F., Gieseke, A., Amann, R., Jørgensen, B. B., Witte, U. &Pfannkuche, O.: A marine microbial consortium apparently mediating anaerobic oxidation of methane. Nature 407, 623

  9. Methane gas hydrate effect on sediment acoustic and strength properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.; Waite, W.F.; Mason, D.H.; Gilbert, L.Y.; Pecher, I.A.

    2007-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the interaction of methane gas hydrate with host sediment, we studied: (1) the effects of gas hydrate and ice on acoustic velocity in different sediment types, (2) effect of different hydrate formation mechanisms on measured acoustic properties (3) dependence of shear strength on pore space contents, and (4) pore pressure effects during undrained shear.A wide range in acoustic p-wave velocities (Vp) were measured in coarse-grained sediment for different pore space occupants. Vp ranged from less than 1 km/s for gas-charged sediment to 1.77–1.94 km/s for water-saturated sediment, 2.91–4.00 km/s for sediment with varying degrees of hydrate saturation, and 3.88–4.33 km/s for frozen sediment. Vp measured in fine-grained sediment containing gas hydrate was substantially lower (1.97 km/s). Acoustic models based on measured Vp indicate that hydrate which formed in high gas flux environments can cement coarse-grained sediment, whereas hydrate formed from methane dissolved in the pore fluid may not.The presence of gas hydrate and other solid pore-filling material, such as ice, increased the sediment shear strength. The magnitude of that increase is related to the amount of hydrate in the pore space and cementation characteristics between the hydrate and sediment grains. We have found, that for consolidation stresses associated with the upper several hundred meters of sub-bottom depth, pore pressures decreased during shear in coarse-grained sediment containing gas hydrate, whereas pore pressure in fine-grained sediment typically increased during shear. The presence of free gas in pore spaces damped pore pressure response during shear and reduced the strengthening effect of gas hydrate in sands.

  10. Effects of Systemic Hydration on Vocal Acoustics of 18- to 35-Year-Old Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franca, Maria Claudia; Simpson, Kenneth O.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of body hydration and vocal acoustics was investigated in this study. Effects of two levels of hydration on objective measures of vocal acoustics were explored. In an attempt to reduce variability in the degree of systemic hydration and to induce a state of systemic dehydration, participants were instructed to refrain from ingestion…

  11. N-Acetylcysteine plus Saline Hydration versus Saline Hydration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) in patients undergoing coronary angiography pretreated with N-acetylcysteine NAC plus saline hydration or saline hydration alone and to determine the association between various risk factors and RCIN. Methods: Patients were ...

  12. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  13. Repression of both isoforms of disproportionating enzyme leads to higher malto-oligosaccharide content and reduced growth in potato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Henrik Lütken; Lloyd, James Richard; Glaring, Mikkel A.

    2010-01-01

    Two glucanotransferases, disproportionating enzyme 1 (StDPE1) and disproportionating enzyme 2 (StDPE2), were repressed using RNA interference technology in potato, leading to plants repressed in either isoform individually, or both simultaneously. This is the first detailed report of their combined...... repression. Plants lacking StDPE1 accumulated slightly more starch in their leaves than control plants and high levels of maltotriose, while those lacking StDPE2 contained maltose and large amounts of starch. Plants repressed in both isoforms accumulated similar amounts of starch to those lacking StDPE2....... In addition, they contained a range of malto-oligosaccharides from maltose to maltoheptaose. Plants repressed in both isoforms had chlorotic leaves and did not grow as well as either the controls or lines where only one of the isoforms was repressed. Examination of photosynthetic parameters suggested...

  14. Inhibitors of membrane transport reduce lysosomal enzyme secretion from dogfish phagocytes and their killing of sea urchin eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, P; Arvan, P; Falkow, S; Hoffstein, S; Weissmann, G

    1979-04-01

    Blood phagocytes of the dogfish Mustelus canis attack oocytes of the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata, first provoking a surrogate fertilization response and then killing the eggs. To test the hypothesis that secretion of lysosomal contents is critical in this model of phagocyte-mediated cell injury, we studied effects of agents that modify lysosomal enzyme secretion. Inhibitors of membrane transport (>0.1 mM) inhibited postphagocytic secretion of lysosomal beta-glucuronidase from dogfish phagocytes: phloretin > ethacrynate > furosemide > 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid > pyridoxal phosphate > ouabain. The same order of activity was found for inhibition by these agents of killing of Arbacia eggs by phagocytes. Cell activation (fertilization response) and cytotoxicity were quantitated both morphologically and by measurements of enzyme (beta-glucuronidase, catalase) release. The agents neither inhibited fertilization responses of eggs to calcium ionophore A23187 nor impaired their viability. Vital staining demonstrated that ethacrynate prevented phagocytes from degranulating upon contact with zymosan particles. The data not only suggest that agents primarily known for their capacity to inhibit membrane transport systems can inhibit lysosomal enzyme secretion from phagocytes but also support the hypothesis that secretion of lysosomal contents mediates activation and killing of target cells in phagocyte-mediated tissue injury.

  15. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.; Avens, L.R.; Trujillo, E.A.

    1992-03-24

    A process is described for preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride.

  16. Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediment in Offshore Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Holditch; Tad Patzek; Jonny Rutqvist; George Moridis; Richard Plumb

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this multi-year, multi-institutional research project was to develop the knowledge base and quantitative predictive capability for the description of geomechanical performance of hydrate-bearing sediments (hereafter referred to as HBS) in oceanic environments. The focus was on the determination of the envelope of hydrate stability under conditions typical of those related to the construction and operation of offshore platforms. We have developed a robust numerical simulator of hydrate behavior in geologic media by coupling a reservoir model with a commercial geomechanical code. We also investigated the geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS using pore-scale models (conceptual and mathematical) of fluid flow, stress analysis, and damage propagation. The objective of the UC Berkeley work was to develop a grain-scale model of hydrate-bearing sediments. Hydrate dissociation alters the strength of HBS. In particular, transformation of hydrate clusters into gas and liquid water weakens the skeleton and, simultaneously, reduces the effective stress by increasing the pore pressure. The large-scale objective of the study is evaluation of geomechanical stability of offshore oil and gas production infrastructure. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we have developed the numerical model TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate how the formation and disassociation of hydrates in seafloor sediments affects seafloor stability. Several technical papers were published using results from this model. LBNL also developed laboratory equipment and methods to produce realistic laboratory samples of sediments containing gas hydrates so that mechanical properties could be measured in the laboratory. These properties are required to run TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate seafloor stability issues. At Texas A&M University we performed a detailed literature review to determine what gas hydrate formation properties had been measured and reported in the literature. We

  17. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation reduces oxidative stress and increases antioxidant enzyme activity in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bor-Jen; Huang, Yi-Chia; Chen, Shu-Ju; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activity in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). This was an intervention study. Patients who were identified by cardiac catheterization as having at least 50% stenosis of one major coronary artery or receiving percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (n = 51) were randomly assigned to the placebo group (n = 14) or one of the two coenzyme Q10-supplemented groups (60 mg/d, n = 19 [Q10-60 group]; 150 mg/d, n = 18 [Q10-150 group]). Intervention was administered for 12 wk. Patients' blood samples were analyzed every 4 wk for plasma coenzyme Q10 concentrations, malondialdehyde (MDA), and antioxidant enzyme (catalase [CAT], superoxide dismutase [SOD], glutathione peroxidase) activity. Forty-three subjects with CAD completed intervention study. Plasma coenzyme Q10 concentration increased significantly after coenzyme the Q10-150 intervention (P Q10-150 group at week 4 (P = 0.03). The Q10-150 group had significantly lower MDA levels than the placebo group at week 8 (P = 0.03). With respect to antioxidant enzyme activity, subjects in the Q10-150 group had significantly higher CAT (P = 0.03) and SOD (P = 0.03) activity than the placebo group at week 12. The plasma coenzyme Q10 concentration was significantly correlated with MDA levels (r = -0.35, P = 0.02) and CAT (r = 0.43, P = 0.01) and SOD activity (r = 0.39, P = 0.01). The ratio of plasma coenzyme Q10 to total cholesterol was significantly correlated with SOD activity (r = 0.39, P = 0.02). The ratio of plasma coenzyme Q10 to low-density lipoprotein was significantly correlated with CAT (r = 0.35, P = 0.04) and SOD (r = 0.45, P = 0.01) activity. However, there was no relation between coenzyme Q10 concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity. Coenzyme Q10 supplements at a dose of 150 mg can decrease oxidative stress and increase antioxidant enzyme activity in patients with

  18. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  19. Exploitation of marine gas hydrates: Benefits and risks (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallmann, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Vast amounts of natural gas are stored in marine gas hydrates deposited at continental margins. The global inventory of carbon bound as methane in gas hydrates is currently estimated as 1000 × 500 Gt. Large-scale national research projects located mostly in South-East Asia but also in North America and Europe are aiming to exploit these ice-like solids as new unconventional resource of natural gas. Japan, South Korea and other Asian countries are taking the lead because their national waters harbor exploitable gas hydrate deposits which could be developed to reduce the dependency of these nations on costly LGN imports. In 2013, the first successful production test was performed off Japan at water depths of ca. 1000 m demonstrating that natural gas can be released and produced from marine hydrates by lowering the pressure in the sub-seabed hydrate reservoirs. In an alternative approach, CO2 from coal power plans and other industrial sources is used to release natural gas (methane) from hydrates while CO2 is bound and stored in the sub-surface as solid hydrate. These new approaches and technologies are still in an early pre-commercial phase; the costs of field development and gas production exceed the value of natural gas being produced from the slowly dissociating hydrates. However, new technologies are currently under development in the German SUGAR project and elsewhere to reduce costs and enhance gas production rates such that gas hydrates may become commercially exploitable over the coming decade(s). The exploitation of marine gas hydrates may help to reduce CO2 emissions from the fossil fuel sector if the produced natural gas is used to replace coal and/or LNG. Hydrate development could also provide important incentives for carbon capture technologies since CO2 can be used to produce natural gas from hydrates. However, leakage of gas may occur during the production process while slope failure may be induced by the accompanying dissociation/conversion of gas

  20. Antifreeze proteins: Adsorption to ice, silica and gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Huang; Brown, Alan; Wathen, Brent; Ripmeester, John A.; Walker, VIrginia K.

    2005-07-01

    Certain organisms survive under freezing conditions that could otherwise prove fatal by the synthesis of antifreeze proteins (AFPs). AFPs adsorb to the surface of microscopic ice crystals and prevent further ice growth, resulting in a noncolligative freezing point depression. Type I AFP from the winter flounder (wfAFP) is an alfa-helical, alanine-rich serum protein that helps protect against innoculative freezing from ice-laden seas. The AFP of a moth from the boreal forest, Choristoneura fumiferana (Cf), is a beta-helical threonine-rich protein that helps prevent freezing at the overwintering, caterpillar stage. In contrast, the beta-roll AFP from the grass, Lolium perenne (Lp), confers little freezing point depression and the plants readily freeze. Remarkably, AFPs also adsorb to tetrahyrofuran (THF) hydrate, changing the hydrate's octahedral morphology and, as well, inhibiting the growth of THF and gas hydrates. The hyperactive CfAFP, with 30-100 times the activity of wfAFP toward ice, showed far greater nucleation inhibition for THF hydrate than did a commercial hydrate inhibitor, poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). Active AFPs were also judged to be superior to PVP in that they inhibited the memory effect, a phenomenon whereby hydrate reforms at a faster rate soon after melting. An inactive mutant wfAFP, with an amino acid substitution at the ice-binding site, also reduced the growth of THF hydrate but was ineffective at suppressing hydrate reformation. These results suggest that the molecular properties important for ice adsorption and inhibition of hydrate reformation may be similar, and are distinct from those required for hydrate growth inhibition. The different AFPs also show markedly different aggregations on a third hydrophilic substrate, silica. Together these studies suggest that AFP adsorption to ice, hydrates and silica depends on the overall structure, specific residues and protein-protein interactions. (Author)

  1. Production of angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitory (ACE-I) peptides during milk fermentation and their role in reducing hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Amit Kumar; Sanjukta, Samurailatpam; Jeyaram, Kumaraswamy

    2017-09-02

    Fermented milk is a potential source of various biologically active peptides with specific health benefits. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory (ACE-I) peptides are one of the most studied bioactive peptides produced during milk fermentation. The presence of these peptides is reported in various fermented milk products such as, yoghurt, cheese, sour milk, etc., which are also available as commercial products. Many of the ACE-I peptides formed during milk fermentation are resistant to gastrointestinal digestion and inhibit angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in the rennin angiotension system (RAS). There are various factors, which affect the formation ACE-I peptides and their ability to reach the target tissue in active form, which includes type of starters (lactic acid bacteria (LAB), yeast, etc.), substrate composition (casein type, whey protein, etc.), composition of ACE-I peptide, pre and post-fermentation treatments, and its stability during gastrointestinal digestion. The antihypertensive effect of fermented milk products has also been proved by various in vitro and in vivo (animal and human trials) experiments. This paper reviews the literature on fermented milk products as a source of ACE-I peptides and various factors affecting the production and activity of ACE-I peptides.

  2. Abundant off-target edits from site-directed RNA editing can be reduced by nuclear localization of the editing enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecillo-Viejo, Isabel C; Liscovitch-Brauer, Noa; Montiel-Gonzalez, Maria Fernanda; Eisenberg, Eli; Rosenthal, Joshua J C

    2017-11-03

    Site-directed RNA editing (SDRE) is a general strategy for making targeted base changes in RNA molecules. Although the approach is relatively new, several groups, including our own, have been working on its development. The basic strategy has been to couple the catalytic domain of an adenosine (A) to inosine (I) RNA editing enzyme to a guide RNA that is used for targeting. Although highly efficient on-target editing has been reported, off-target events have not been rigorously quantified. In this report we target premature termination codons (PTCs) in messages encoding both a fluorescent reporter protein and the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) protein transiently transfected into human epithelial cells. We demonstrate that while on-target editing is efficient, off-target editing is extensive, both within the targeted message and across the entire transcriptome of the transfected cells. By redirecting the editing enzymes from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, off-target editing is reduced without compromising the on-target editing efficiency. The addition of the E488Q mutation to the editing enzymes, a common strategy for increasing on-target editing efficiency, causes a tremendous increase in off-target editing. These results underscore the need to reduce promiscuity in current approaches to SDRE.

  3. Hot air treatment reduces postharvest decay and delays softening of cherry tomato by regulating gene expression and activities of cell wall-degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yingying; Zhou, Dandan; Wang, Zhenjie; Tu, Sicong; Shao, Xingfeng; Peng, Jing; Pan, Leiqing; Tu, Kang

    2017-09-25

    Fruit softening facilitates pathogen infection and postharvest decay, leading to the reduction of shelf-life. Hot air (HA) treatment at 38 °C for 12 h is effective in reducing postharvest disease and chilling injury of tomato fruit. To explore the effect and mechanism of HA treatment on reducing postharvest decay and softening of cherry tomato, fruit at the mature green stage were treated with HA and then stored at 20 °C for 15 days. Changes in natural decay incidence, firmness, cell wall compositions, activities and gene expression of cell wall-degrading enzymes of cherry tomatoes were assessed. HA treatment reduced natural decay incidence, postponed the firmness decline, inhibited the respiration rate and ethylene production, and retarded pectin solubilization and cellulose degradation of cherry tomatoes. Enzymatic activities and gene expression of pectin methylesterase, polygalacturonase, cellulase and β-galactosidase were inhibited by HA treatment. In addition, the gene expression of LeEXP1 was reduced, while LeEXT was up-regulated after HA treatment. Our findings suggested that HA treatment could inhibit cell wall degradation and postpone softening of cherry tomatoes by regulating gene expression and activities of cell wall-degrading enzymes, resulting in the reduction of postharvest decay. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of hydration products of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J

    2008-05-01

    To characterize the hydration products of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Mineral trioxide aggregate, white Portland cement and bismuth oxide were evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and Rietveld XRD. The cements were tested un-hydrated and after hydration and curing for 30 days at 37 degrees C. Analysis of hydrated cement leachate was performed weekly for five consecutive weeks from mixing using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy after which the cements were viewed under the scanning electron microscope to evaluate the cement microstructure. Quantitative energy dispersive analysis with X-ray was performed and atomic ratios were plotted. Both Portland cement and MTA produced calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) and calcium hydroxide (CH) on hydration. The tricalcium aluminate levels were low for MTA which resulted in reduced production of ettringite and monosulphate. On hydration the bismuth level in the hydrated MTA decreased; bismuth oxide replaced the silica in the C-S-H and was leached out once the C-S-H decomposed with time. Both MTA and Portland cement released a high amount of calcium ions which decreased in amount over the 5-week period. The hydration mechanism of MTA is different to that of Portland cement. In MTA the bismuth oxide is bound to the C-S-H and is leached out from the cement with time as the C-S-H decomposes. MTA produces a high proportion of calcium ions from CH a by-product of hydration and also by decomposition of C-S-H. The release of calcium ions reduces with time.

  5. NMR Studies of Protein Hydration and Protein-Ligand Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yuan

    Water on the surface of a protein is called hydration water. Hydration water is known to play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes including protein folding, enzymatic activation, and drug binding. Although the significance of hydration water has been recognized, the underlying mechanism remains far from being understood. This dissertation employs a unique in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique to study the mechanism of protein hydration and the role of hydration in alcohol-protein interactions. Water isotherms in proteins are measured at different temperatures via the in-situ NMR technique. Water is found to interact differently with hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups on the protein. Water adsorption on hydrophilic groups is hardly affected by the temperature, while water adsorption on hydrophobic groups strongly depends on the temperature around 10 C, below which the adsorption is substantially reduced. This effect is induced by the dramatic decrease in the protein flexibility below 10 C. Furthermore, nanosecond to microsecond protein dynamics and the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of protein hydration are studied as a function of hydration level and temperature. A crossover at 10 C in protein dynamics and thermodynamics is revealed. The effect of water at hydrophilic groups on protein dynamics and thermodynamics shows little temperature dependence, whereas water at hydrophobic groups has stronger effect above 10 C. In addition, I investigate the role of water in alcohol binding to the protein using the in-situ NMR detection. The isotherms of alcohols are first measured on dry proteins, then on proteins with a series of controlled hydration levels. The free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of alcohol binding are also determined. Two distinct types of alcohol binding are identified. On the one hand, alcohols can directly bind to a few specific sites on the protein. This type of binding is independent of temperature and can be

  6. hCG-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress triggers apoptosis and reduces steroidogenic enzyme expression through activating transcription factor 6 in Leydig cells of the testis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-Ji; Kim, Tae-Shin; Park, Choon-Keun; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Lee, In-kyu; Park, Jeen-Woo; Lawson, Mark A; Lee, Dong-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress generally occurs in secretory cell types. It has been reported that Leydig cells, which produce testosterone in response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), express key steroidogenic enzymes for the regulation of testosterone synthesis. In this study, we analyzed whether hCG induces ER stress via three unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways in mouse Leydig tumor (mLTC-1) cells and the testis. Treatment with hCG induced ER stress in mLTC-1 cells via the ATF6, IRE1a/XBP1, and eIF2α/GADD34/ATF4 UPR pathways, and transient expression of 50 kDa protein activating transcription factor 6 (p50ATF6) reduced the expression level of steroidogenic 3β-hydroxy-steroid dehydrogenase Δ5-Δ4-isomerase (3β-HSD) enzyme. In an in vivo model, high-level hCG treatment induced expression of p50ATF6 while that of steroidogenic enzymes, especially 3β-HSD, 17α-hydroxylase/C17–20 lyase (CYP17), and 17β-hydrozysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD), was reduced. Expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes were restored by the ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA). Furthermore, lentivirus-mediated transient expression of p50ATF6 reduced the expression level of 3β-HSD in the testis. Protein expression levels of phospho-JNK, CHOP, and cleaved caspases-12 and -3 as markers of ER stress-mediated apoptosis markedly increased in response to high-level hCG treatment in mLTC-1 cells and the testis. Based on transmission electron microscopy and H&E staining of the testis, it was shown that abnormal ER morphology and destruction of testicular histology induced by high-level hCG treatment were reversed by the addition of TUDCA. These findings suggest that hCG-induced ER stress plays important roles in steroidogenic enzyme expression via modulation of the ATF6 pathway as well as ER stress-mediated apoptosis in Leydig cells. PMID:23256993

  7. Hydration properties and phosphorous speciation in native, gelatinized and enzymatically modified potato starch analyzed by solid-state MAS NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Flemming H; Kasprzak, Mirosław M; Lærke, Helle N; Knudsen, Knud Erik B; Pedersen, Sven; Jørgensen, Anne S; Blennow, Andreas

    2013-09-12

    Hydration of granular, gelatinized and molecularly modified states of potato starch in terms of molecular mobility were analyzed by (13)C and (31)P solid-state MAS NMR. Gelatinization (GEL) tremendously reduced the immobile fraction compared to native (NA) starch granules. This effect was enhanced by enzyme-assisted catalytic branching with branching enzyme (BE) or combined BE and β-amylase (BB) catalyzed exo-hydrolysis. Carbons of the glycosidic α-1,6 linkages required high hydration rates before adopting uniform chemical shifts indicating solid-state disorder and poor water accessibility. Comparative analysis of wheat and waxy maize starches demonstrated that starches were similar upon gelatinization independent of botanical origin and that the torsion angles of the glycosidic linkages were averages of the crystalline A and B type structures. In starch suspension phosphorous in immobile regions was only observed in NA starch. Moreover phosphorous was observed in a minor pH-insensitive form and as major phosphate in hydrated GEL and BE starches. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  9. A mixture containing galactooligosaccharide, produced by the enzymic activity of Bifidobacterium bifidum, reduces Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Laura E J; Best, Angus; Nunez, Alejandro; Salguero, Francisco J; Johnson, Linda; Weyer, Ute; Dugdale, Alexandra H; Cooley, William A; Carter, Ben; Jones, Gareth; Tzortzis, George; Woodward, Martin J; La Ragione, Roberto M

    2009-01-01

    The prebiotic Bimuno is a mixture containing galactooligosaccharide, produced by the galactosyltransferase activity of Bifidobacterium bifidum NCIMB 41171 in the presence of lactose. Previous studies have implicated prebiotics in reducing infections by enteric pathogens, thus it was hypothesized that Bimuno may confer some protection in the murine host from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) infection. In this study, infection caused by S. Typhimurium SL1344nal(r) in the presence or absence of Bimuno was assessed using tissue culture assays, a murine ligated ileal gut loop model and a murine oral challenge model. In tissue culture adherence and invasion assays with HT-29-16E cells, the presence of approximately 2 mM Bimuno significantly reduced the invasion of S. Typhimurium SL1344nal(r) (PBimuno prevented colonization and the associated pathology of S. Typhimurium. In the BALB/c mouse model, the oral delivery of Bimuno prior to challenge with S. Typhimurium resulted in significant reductions in colonization in the five organs sampled, with highly significant reductions being observed in the spleen at 72 and 96 h post-challenge (P=0.0002, Bimuno significantly reduced the colonization and pathology associated with S. Typhimurium infection in a murine model system, possibly by reducing the invasion of the pathogen into host cells.

  10. Lysozyme in water-acetonitrile mixtures: Preferential solvation at the inner edge of excess hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, Vladimir A.; Kuchierskaya, Alexandra A.

    2017-06-01

    Preferential solvation/hydration is an effective way for regulating the mechanism of the protein destabilization/stabilization. Organic solvent/water sorption and residual enzyme activity measurements were performed to monitor the preferential solvation/hydration of hen egg-white lysozyme at high and low water content in acetonitrile at 25 °C. The obtained results show that the protein destabilization/stabilization depends essentially on the initial hydration level of lysozyme and the water content in acetonitrile. There are three composition regimes for the dried lysozyme. At high water content, the lysozyme has a higher affinity for water than for acetonitrile. The residual enzyme activity values are close to 100%. At the intermediate water content, the dehydrated lysozyme has a higher affinity for acetonitrile than for water. A minimum on the residual enzyme activity curve was observed in this concentration range. At the lowest water content, the organic solvent molecules are preferentially excluded from the dried lysozyme, resulting in the preferential hydration. The residual catalytic activity is ˜80%, compared with that observed after incubation in pure water. Two distinct schemes are operative for the hydrated lysozyme. At high and intermediate water content, lysozyme is preferentially hydrated. However, in contrast to the dried protein, at the intermediate water content, the initially hydrated lysozyme has the increased preferential hydration parameters. At low water content, the preferential binding of the acetonitrile molecules to the initially hydrated lysozyme was detected. No residual enzyme activity was observed in the water-poor acetonitrile. Our data clearly show that the initial hydration level of the protein macromolecules is one of the key factors that govern the stability of the protein-water-organic solvent systems.

  11. Inorganic phosphorus fertilizer ameliorates maize growth by reducing metal uptake, improving soil enzyme activity and microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wencheng; Wu, Jiahui; Liu, Xiaowen; Chen, Xianbin; Wu, Yingxin; Yu, Shixiao

    2017-09-01

    Recently, several studies have showed that both organic and inorganic fertilizers are effective in immobilizing heavy metals at low cost, in comparison to other remediation strategies for heavy metal-contaminated farmlands. A pot trial was conducted in this study to examine the effects of inorganic P fertilizer and organic fertilizer, in single application or in combination, on growth of maize, heavy metal availabilities, enzyme activities, and microbial community structure in metal-contaminated soils from an electronic waste recycling region. Results showed that biomass of maize shoot and root from the inorganic P fertilizer treatments were respectively 17.8 and 10.0 folds higher than the un-amended treatments (CK), while the biomass in the organic fertilizer treatments was only comparable to the CK. In addition, there were decreases of 85.0% in Cd, 74.3% in Pb, 66.3% in Cu, and 91.9% in Zn concentrations in the roots of maize grown in inorganic P fertilizer amended soil. Consistently, urease and catalase activities in the inorganic P fertilizer amended soil were 3.3 and 2.0 times higher than the CK, whereas no enhancement was observed in the organic fertilizer amended soil. Moreover, microbial community structure was improved by the application of inorganic P fertilizer, but not by organic fertilizer; the beneficial microbial groups such as Kaistobacter and Koribacter were most frequently detected in the inorganic P fertilizer amended soil. The negligible effect from the organic fertilizer might be ascribed to the decreased pH value in soils. The results suggest that the application of inorganic P fertilizer (or in combination with organic fertilizer) might be a promising strategy for the remediation of heavy metals contaminated soils in electronic waste recycling region. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers reduced dementia risk in patients with diabetes mellitus and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yi-Chun; Huang, Kuang-Wei; Yen, Der-Jen; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-10-01

    The effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) on dementia risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension remain unknown. We investigated the effects of ACEIs and ARBs on dementia risk in patients with type 2 DM and hypertension. We conducted a cohort study by using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We included 2377 patients receiving ACEIs and 1780 patients receiving ARBs in the ACEI and ARB cohorts, respectively. We included a comparable number of patients not receiving ACEIs and ARBs as controls in the non-ACEI and non-ARB cohorts through propensity score matching. The effect of ACEIs and ARBs on dementia risk was estimated through multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression after adjustment for several confounding factors. During the 12-year follow-up period, compared with the non-ACEI cohort, all-cause dementia risk decreased by 26% in the ACEI cohort [hazard ratio (HR)=0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.56-0.96]. The all-cause dementia risk was nearly 40% lower in the ARB cohort than in the non-ARB cohort (HR=0.60, 95% CI=0.37-0.97). These drugs prevented the occurrence of vascular dementia (VD), however, this effect was nonsignificant for Alzheimer's dementia (AD). Treatment duration- and dosage-related protection effects on dementia occurrence were observed. ACEIs and ARBs may effectively prevent all-cause dementia, particularly VD, in patients with type 2 DM and hypertension. Moreover, compared with ACEIs, ARBs appear to be more advantageous in dementia prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of additives on formation of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.S. Zhang; S.S. Fan; D.Q. Liang; K.H. Guo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). Guangzhou Center for Gas Hydrate Research, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion

    2004-11-01

    The formation of natural gas hydrate (NGH) is studied in this work. Kinetics data of hydrate formation with no agitation were collected at various concentrations of the aqueous solutions with different additives such as alkylpolyglucside, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate and potassium oxalate monohydrate. Various kinds of additive increased the formation rates of NGH and its storage capacity and reduced the induction time of NGH formation. Moreover, the storage capacity, the induction time and the hydrate formation rate were influenced by the concentration of the aqueous solution. 24 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Effects of hydration on blood rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, George A; Tangney, Christine C; Rosenson, Robert S

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of oral fluid intake on blood rheology of 17 healthy adults following a 12-14 hour overnight fast from food and drink. An oral fluid load of 500 ml was consumed every 30 minutes for 2 hours. Blood viscosity values at shear rates of 1, 10 and 100 s(-1) were reduced (p<0.05 to p<0.01) at 30 and 120 minutes following hydration; however, these differences were not significant after hematocrit correction. With fluid intake, both uncorrected and corrected viscous component of blood viscoelasticity at oscillatory shear rate of 1 s(-1) and at a constant frequency of 2 Hz were reduced (p<0.05 to p<0.001) at all time points as compared to fasting values. The corrected elastic component of blood viscoelasticity increased 90 minutes after hydration (p<0.05). An overnight fast is accompanied by rheological abnormalities that are altered by fluid intake.

  15. Piroxicam fails to reduce myocellular enzyme leakage and delayed onset muscle soreness induced by isokinetic eccentric exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J-L. Croisier

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the hypothesis that delayed onset muscular soreness (DOMS following intense eccentric muscle contraction could be due to increased production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, ten healthy male subjects were studied. Using a double-blind randomized crossover design, each subject performed two isokinetic tests separated by a period of at least 6 weeks: once with placebo, and once with piroxicam (Feldene®. They were given one capsule containing either placebo or piroxicam (20 mg per day for 6 days with initial doses given starting 3 days prior to isokinetic testing. Exercise consisted of eight stages of five maximal contractions of the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups of both legs separated by 1 min rest phases, on a Kin Trex device at 60°/s angular velocity. The subjective presence and intensity of DOMS were evaluated using a visual analogue scale immediately after, and 24 and 48 h after each test. The mean plasma concentration of PGE2 measured at rest and after exercise was significantly lower in the group treated with piroxicam (p < 0.05. However, statistical analysis (two-way ANOVA test revealed that exercise did not cause any significant change of mean plasma PGE2 over time in either of the two groups. Eccentric work was followed by severe muscle pain in extensor and flexor muscle groups. Maximal soreness was noted 48 h postexercise. Serum creatine kinase activity and the serum concentration of myoglobin increased significantly, and reached peak values 48 h after exercise in both experimental conditions (p < 0.001. By paired t-test, it appeared that there were no significant differences in the serum levels of these two markers of muscle damage between the two groups at any time point. We conclude that: (1 oral administration of piroxicam fails to reduce muscle damage and DOMS caused by strenuous eccentric exercise; and (2 the hypothetical role of increased PGE2 production in eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage, DOMS, and reduced

  16. Enhancing mung bean hydration using the ultrasound technology: description of mechanisms and impact on its germination and main components

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Claudio Miano; Jessica da Costa Pereira; Nanci Castanha; Manoel Divino da Matta Júnior; Pedro Esteves Duarte Augusto

    2016-01-01

    The ultrasound technology was successfully used to improve the mass transfer processes on food. However, the study of this technology on the grain hydration and on its main components properties was still not appropriately described. This work studied the application of the ultrasound technology on the hydration process of mung beans (Vigna radiata). This grain showed sigmoidal hydration behavior with a specific water entrance pathway. The ultrasound reduced ~25% of the hydration process time...

  17. Simulating the effect of hydrate dissociation on wellhead stability during oil and gas development in deepwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingchao; Cheng, Yuanfang; Zhang, Huaiwen; Yan, Chuanliang; Liu, Yuwen

    2018-02-01

    It is well known that methane hydrate has been identified as an alternative resource due to its massive reserves and clean property. However, hydrate dissociation during oil and gas development (OGD) process in deep water can affect the stability of subsea equipment and formation. Currently, there is a serious lack of studies over quantitative assessment on the effects of hydrate dissociation on wellhead stability. In order to solve this problem, ABAQUS finite element software was used to develop a model and to evaluate the behavior of wellhead caused by hydrate dissociation. The factors that affect the wellhead stability include dissociation range, depth of hydrate formation and mechanical properties of dissociated hydrate region. Based on these, series of simulations were carried out to determine the wellhead displacement. The results revealed that, continuous dissociation of hydrate in homogeneous and isotropic formations can causes the non-linear increment in vertical displacement of wellhead. The displacement of wellhead showed good agreement with the settlement of overlying formations under the same conditions. In addition, the shallower and thicker hydrate formation can aggravate the influence of hydrate dissociation on the wellhead stability. Further, it was observed that with the declining elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio, the wellhead displacement increases. Hence, these findings not only confirm the effect of hydrate dissociation on the wellhead stability, but also lend support to the actions, such as cooling the drilling fluid, which can reduce the hydrate dissociation range and further make deepwater operations safer and more efficient.

  18. Identification of enzymes involved in anaerobic benzene degradation by a strictly anaerobic iron-reducing enrichment culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Laban, Nidal; Selesi, Draženka; Rattei, Thomas; Tischler, Patrick; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2010-10-01

    Anaerobic benzene degradation was studied with a highly enriched iron-reducing culture (BF) composed of mainly Peptococcaceae-related Gram-positive microorganisms. The proteomes of benzene-, phenol- and benzoate-grown cells of culture BF were compared by SDS-PAGE. A specific benzene-expressed protein band of 60 kDa, which could not be observed during growth on phenol or benzoate, was subjected to N-terminal sequence analysis. The first 31 amino acids revealed that the protein was encoded by ORF 138 in the shotgun sequenced metagenome of culture BF. ORF 138 showed 43% sequence identity to phenylphosphate carboxylase subunit PpcA of Aromatoleum aromaticum strain EbN1. A LC/ESI-MS/MS-based shotgun proteomic analysis revealed other specifically benzene-expressed proteins with encoding genes located adjacent to ORF 138 on the metagenome. The protein products of ORF 137, ORF 139 and ORF 140 showed sequence identities of 37% to phenylphosphate carboxylase PpcD of A. aromaticum strain EbN1, 56% to benzoate-CoA ligase (BamY) of Geobacter metallireducens and 67% to 3-octaprenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate carboxy-lyase (UbiD/UbiX) of A. aromaticum strain EbN1 respectively. These genes are proposed as constituents of a putative benzene degradation gene cluster (∼ 17 kb) composed of carboxylase-related genes. The identified gene sequences suggest that the initial activation reaction in anaerobic benzene degradation is probably a direct carboxylation of benzene to benzoate catalysed by putative anaerobic benzene carboxylase (Abc). The putative Abc probably consists of several subunits, two of which are encoded by ORFs 137 and 138, and belongs to a family of carboxylases including phenylphosphate carboxylase (Ppc) and 3-octaprenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate carboxy-lyase (UbiD/UbiX). © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Real-time and in situ enzyme inhibition assay for the flux of hydrogen sulfide based on 3D interwoven AuPd-reduced graphene oxide network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongmei; Zhang, Yan; Li, Li; Sun, Guoqiang; Zhang, Lina; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua

    2017-01-15

    A highly sensitive enzyme inhibition analytical platform was established firstly based on paper-supported 3D interwoven AuPd-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) network (NW) for real-time and in situ analysis of H2S released from cancer cells. The novel paper working electrode (PWE) with large electric conductivity, effective surface area and unusual biocompatibility, was fabricated via controllably assembling rGO and AuPd alloy nanoparticles onto the surface of cellulose fibers and into the macropores of paper, which was employed as affinity matrix for horseradish peroxidase (HRP) loading and cells capture. It was the superior performances of AuPd-rGO-NW-PWE that made the loaded HRP exhibit excellent electrocatalytic behavior to H2O2, bring the rapid enhancement of current response. After releasing H2S, the current response would be obviously decreased due to the efficient inhibition effect of H2S on HRP activity. The inhibition degree of HRP was directly proportional to the amount of H2S, and so, the flux of H2S released from cells could be recorded availably. Thus, this proposed enzyme inhibition cyto-sensor could be applied for efficient recording of the release of H2S, which had potential utility to cellular biology and pathophysiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  1. Gas Hydrate Petroleum System Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    In a gas hydrate petroleum system, the individual factors that contribute to the formation of gas hydrate accumulations, such as (1) gas hydrate pressure-temperature stability conditions, (2) gas source, (3) gas migration, and (4) the growth of the gas hydrate in suitable host sediment can identified and quantified. The study of know and inferred gas hydrate accumulations reveal the occurrence of concentrated gas hydrate is mostly controlled by the presence of fractures and/or coarser grained sediments. Field studies have concluded that hydrate grows preferentially in coarse-grained sediments because lower capillary pressures in these sediments permit the migration of gas and nucleation of hydrate. Due to the relatively distal nature of the deep marine geologic settings, the overall abundance of sand within the shallow geologic section is usually low. However, drilling projects in the offshore of Japan, Korea, and in the Gulf of Mexico has revealed the occurrence of significant hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs. The 1999/2000 Japan Nankai Trough drilling confirmed occurrence of hydrate-bearing sand-rich intervals (interpreted as turbidite fan deposits). Gas hydrate was determined to fill the pore spaces in these deposits, reaching saturations up to 80% in some layers. A multi-well drilling program titled "METI Toaki-oki to Kumano-nada" also identified sand-rich reservoirs with pore-filling hydrate. The recovered hydrate-bearing sand layers were described as very-fine- to fine-grained turbidite sand layers measuring from several centimeters up to a meter thick. However, the gross thickness of the hydrate-bearing sand layers were up to 50 m. In 2010, the Republic of Korea conducted the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate (UBGH2) Drilling Expedition. Seismic data clearly showed the development of a thick, potential basin wide, sedimentary sections characterized by mostly debris flows. The downhole LWD logs and core data from Site UBGH2-5 reveal that each debris flows is

  2. Diurnally-Varying Lunar Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Hurley, D.; Retherford, K. D.; Mandt, K.; Greathouse, T. K.; Farrell, W. M.; Vilas, F.

    2016-12-01

    Dayside, non-polar lunar hydration signatures have been observed by a handful of instruments and present insights into the lunar water cycle. In this study, we utilize the unique measurements from the current Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission to study the phenomenon of diurnally-varying dayside lunar hydration. The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) onboard LRO senses a strong far-ultraviolet water absorption edge indicating hydration in small abundances in the permanently shadowed regions as well as on the lunar dayside. We report on diurnal variability in hydration in different terrain types. We investigate the importance of different sources of hydration, including solar wind bombardment and meteoroid bombardment, by observing trends during magnetotail and meteor stream crossings.

  3. Potent arylsulfonamide inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha converting enzyme able to reduce activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule shedding in cancer cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuti, Elisa; Casalini, Francesca; Avramova, Stanislava I; Santamaria, Salvatore; Fabbi, Marina; Ferrini, Silvano; Marinelli, Luciana; La Pietra, Valeria; Limongelli, Vittorio; Novellino, Ettore; Cercignani, Giovanni; Orlandini, Elisabetta; Nencetti, Susanna; Rossello, Armando

    2010-03-25

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) plays a relevant role in tumor biology and progression. Our previous studies showed that ALCAM is expressed at the surface of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells and is released in a soluble form by ADAM-17-mediated shedding. This process is relevant to EOC cell motility and invasiveness, which is reduced by nonspecific inhibitors of ADAM-17. For this reason, ADAM-17 may represent a new useful target in anticancer therapy. Herein, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of new ADAM-17 inhibitors containing an arylsulfonamidic scaffold. Among the new potential inhibitors, two very promising compounds 17 and 18 were discovered, with a nanomolar activity for ADAM-17 isolated enzyme. These compounds proved to be also the most potent in inhibiting soluble ALCAM release in cancer cells, showing a nanomolar activity on A2774 and SKOV3 cell lines.

  4. Partial substitution of NO(3)(-) by NH(4)(+) fertilization increases ammonium assimilating enzyme activities and reduces the deleterious effects of salinity on the growth of barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Surya; Kant, Pragya; Lips, Herman; Barak, Simon

    2007-03-01

    Productivity of cereal crops is restricted in saline soils but may be improved by nitrogen nutrition. In this study, the effect of ionic nitrogen form on growth, mineral content, protein content and ammonium assimilation enzyme activities of barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Alexis L.) irrigated with saline water, was determined. Leaf and tiller number as well as plant fresh and dry weights declined under salinity (120 mM NaCl). In non-saline conditions, growth parameters were increased by application of NH(4)(+)/NO(3)(-) (25:75) compared to NO(3)(-) alone. Under saline conditions, application of NH(4)(+)/NO(3)(-) led to a reduction of the detrimental effects of salt on growth. Differences in growth between the two nitrogen regimes were not due to differences in photosynthesis. The NH(4)(+)/NO(3)(-) regime led to an increase in total N in control and saline treatments, but did not cause a large decrease in plant Na(+) content under salinity. Activities of GS (EC 6.3.1.2), GOGAT (EC 1.4.1.14), PEPC (EC 4.1.1.31) and AAT (EC 2.6.1.1) increased with salinity in roots, whereas there was decreased activity of the alternative ammonium assimilation enzyme GDH (EC 1.4.1.2). The most striking effect of nitrogen regime was observed on GDH whose salinity-induced decrease in activity was reduced from 34% with NO(3)(-) alone to only 14% with the mixed regime. The results suggest that the detrimental effects of salinity can be reduced by partial substitution of NO(3)(-) with NH(4)(+) and that this is due to the lower energy cost of N assimilation with NH(4)(+) as opposed to NO(3)(-) nutrition.

  5. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  6. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  7. Shifting Focus: From Hydration for Performance to Hydration for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Erica T

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, literature on hydration biomarkers has evolved considerably - from (de)hydration assessment towards a more global definition of biomarkers of hydration in daily life. This shift in thinking about hydration markers was largely driven by investigating the differences that existed between otherwise healthy individuals whose habitual, ad-libitum drinking habits differ, and by identifying physiological changes in low-volume drinkers who subsequently increase their water intake. Aside from obvious differences in urinary volume and concentration, a growing body of evidence is emerging that links differences in fluid intake with small, but biologically significant, differences in vasopressin (copeptin), glomerular filtration rate, and markers of metabolic dysfunction or disease. Taken together, these pieces of the puzzle begin to form a picture of how much water intake should be considered adequate for health, and represent a shifting focus from hydration for performance, toward hydration for health outcomes. This narrative review outlines the key areas of research in which the global hydration process - including water intake, urinary hydration markers, and vasopressin - has been associated with health outcomes, focusing on kidney and metabolic endpoints. It will also provide a commentary on how various hydration biomarkers may be used in hydration for health assessment. Finally, if adequate water intake can play a role in maintaining health, how might we tell if we are drinking enough? Urine output is easily measured, and can take into account differences in daily physical activity, climate, dietary solute load, and other factors that influence daily water needs. Today, targets have been proposed for urine osmolality, specific gravity, and color that may be used by researchers, clinicians, and individuals as simple indicators of optimal hydration. However, there remain a large number of incomplete or unanswered research questions regarding the

  8. Pancreatic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NOW HONOR/MEMORIAL GENERAL DONATION MONTHLY PURPLESTRIDE Pancreatic enzymes Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer ... and see a registered dietitian. What are pancreatic enzymes? Pancreatic enzymes help break down fats, proteins and ...

  9. Pectic enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benen, J.A.E.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Visser, J.

    2003-01-01

    The pectic enzymes comprise a diverse group of enzymes. They consist of main-chain depolymerases and esterases active on methyl- and acetylesters of galacturonosyl uronic acid residues. The depolymerizing enzymes comprise hydrolases as wel as lyases

  10. Historical methane hydrate project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Frye, Matt; Goldberg, Dave; Husebo, Jarle; Koh, Carolyn; Malone, Mitch; Shipp, Craig; Torres, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In 1995, U.S. Geological Survey made the first systematic assessment of the volume of natural gas stored in the hydrate accumulations of the United States. That study, along with numerous other studies, has shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world greatly exceeds the volume of known conventional gas resources. However, gas hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of gas hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various gas hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural gas hydrates, and (5) analyzing the effects of methane hydrate on drilling safety.Methane hydrates are naturally occurring crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid water-­‐lattice holds gas molecules in a cage-­‐like structure. The gas and water becomes a solid under specific temperature and pressure conditions within the Earth, called the hydrate stability zone. Other factors that control the presence of methane hydrate in nature include the source of the gas included within the hydrates, the physical and chemical controls on the migration of gas with a sedimentary basin containing methane hydrates, the availability of the water also included in the hydrate structure, and the presence of a suitable host sediment or “reservoir”. The geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrates have become collectively known as the “methane hydrate petroleum system”, which has become the focus of numerous hydrate research programs.Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated

  11. Further chemical studies on controlling gas hydrate formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelland, M.A.; Svartaas, T.M.; Dybvik, L.A. [Rogalandsforskning, Stavanger (Norway)

    1995-03-01

    Gas hydrates are clathrates in which water molecules form a hydrogen bonded network enclosing roughly spherical cavities that are filled with gas molecules. They are a menace to the oil industry in several areas, one example being their potential blocking of production lines and processing equipment. This paper reviews new technology for combating the problem. Natural gas hydrates form in several structures depending on the gas molecules, their size relative to the cavity, and the relative stability of the structures. At high pressures, gas hydrates can be stable well above the melting point of ice. Pipeline blocking can be overcome in many ways: (1) insulate the pipeline, (2) reduce pressure, (3) remove water, (4) use chemicals. These techniques are expensive. Today only thermodynamic inhibitors such as methanol or ethylene glycol are used, but cheaper methods are sought for. Kinetic Inhibitors are chemicals able to (1) delay hydrate nucleation, or (2) delay hydrate crystal growth. Anti-Agglomerators are chemicals able to prevent agglomeration of hydrates. The suitability of the various inhibitor types are discussed. It is concluded from laboratory tests that the best kinetic inhibitors are chemicals (5000 ppm) which prevent hydrate nucleation for several days at ca. 10{sup o}C subcooling, or chemicals that delay visual hydrate growth for 24 hrs at 10 {sup o}C subcooling. The best anti-agglomerators are chemicals preventing agglomeration at 30-40% water cuts at from 3{sup o}C upwards and so far tested in the pressure range 40-95 bar. 5 refs., 18 figs.

  12. Carbohydrates as efficient catalysts for the hydration of α-amino nitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitale, Sampada; Derasp, Joshua S; Hussain, Bashir; Tanveer, Kashif; Beauchemin, André M

    2016-11-01

    Directed hydration of α-amino nitriles was achieved under mild conditions using simple carbohydrates as catalysts exploiting temporary intramolecularity. A broadly applicable procedure using both formaldehyde and NaOH as catalysts efficiently hydrated a variety of primary and secondary susbtrates, and allowed the hydration of enantiopure substrates to proceed without racemization. This work also provides a rare comparison of the catalytic activity of carbohydrates, and shows that the simple aldehydes at the basis of chemical evolution are efficient organocatalysts mimicking the function of hydratase enzymes. Optimal catalytic efficiency was observed with destabilized aldehydes, and with difficult substrates only simple carbohydrates such as formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde proved reliable.

  13. Transgenic and mutation-based suppression of a berberine bridge enzyme-like (BBL) gene family reduces alkaloid content in field-grown tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ramsey S; Lopez, Harry O; Bowen, Steve W; Andres, Karen R; Steede, William T; Dewey, Ralph E

    2015-01-01

    Motivation exists to develop tobacco cultivars with reduced nicotine content for the purpose of facilitating compliance with expected tobacco product regulations that could mandate the lowering of nicotine levels per se, or the reduction of carcinogenic alkaloid-derived tobacco specific nitrosamines (TSNAs). A berberine bridge enzyme-like (BBL) gene family was recently characterized for N. tabacum and found to catalyze one of the final steps in pyridine alkaloid synthesis for this species. Because this gene family acts downstream in the nicotine biosynthetic pathway, it may represent an attractive target for genetic strategies with the objective of reducing alkaloid content in field-grown tobacco. In this research, we produced transgenic doubled haploid lines of tobacco cultivar K326 carrying an RNAi construct designed to reduce expression of the BBL gene family. Field-grown transgenic lines carrying functional RNAi constructs exhibited average cured leaf nicotine levels of 0.684%, in comparison to 2.454% for the untransformed control. Since numerous barriers would need to be overcome to commercialize transgenic tobacco cultivars, we subsequently pursued a mutation breeding approach to identify EMS-induced mutations in the three most highly expressed isoforms of the BBL gene family. Field evaluation of individuals possessing different homozygous combinations of truncation mutations in BBLa, BBLb, and BBLc indicated that a range of alkaloid phenotypes could be produced, with the triple homozygous knockout genotype exhibiting greater than a 13-fold reduction in percent total alkaloids. The novel source of genetic variability described here may be useful in future tobacco breeding for varied alkaloid levels.

  14. Proton affinities of hydrated molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadbeigi, Younes

    2016-09-01

    Proton affinities (PA) of non-hydrated, M, and hydrated forms, M(H2O)1,2,3, of 20 organic molecules including alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones and amines were calculated by the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. For homogeneous families, linear correlations were observed between PAs of the M(H2O)1,2,3 and the PAs of the non-hydrated molecules. Also, the absolute values of the hydration enthalpies of the protonated molecules decreased linearly with the PAs. The correlation functions predicted that for an amine with PA amine with PA > 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is smaller than the PA.

  15. Intra-articular enzyme replacement therapy with rhIDUA is safe, well-tolerated, and reduces articular GAG storage in the canine model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Raymond Y; Aminian, Afshin; McEntee, Michael F; Kan, Shih-Hsin; Simonaro, Calogera M; Lamanna, William C; Lawrence, Roger; Ellinwood, N Matthew; Guerra, Catalina; Le, Steven Q; Dickson, Patricia I; Esko, Jeffrey D

    2014-08-01

    Treatment with intravenous enzyme replacement therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type I does not address joint disease, resulting in persistent orthopedic complications and impaired quality of life. A proof-of-concept study was conducted to determine the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of intra-articular recombinant human iduronidase (IA-rhIDUA) enzyme replacement therapy in the canine MPS I model. Four MPS I dogs underwent monthly rhIDUA injections (0.58 mg/joint) into the right elbow and knee for 6 months. Contralateral elbows and knees concurrently received normal saline. No intravenous rhIDUA therapy was administered. Monthly blood counts, chemistries, anti-rhIDUA antibody titers, and synovial fluid cell counts were measured. Lysosomal storage of synoviocytes and chondrocytes, synovial macrophages and plasma cells were scored at baseline and 1 month following the final injection. All injections were well-tolerated without adverse reactions. One animal required prednisone for spinal cord compression. There were no clinically significant abnormalities in blood counts or chemistries. Circulating anti-rhIDUA antibody titers gradually increased in all dogs except the prednisone-treated dog; plasma cells, which were absent in all baseline synovial specimens, were predominantly found in synovium of rhIDUA-treated joints at study-end. Lysosomal storage in synoviocytes and chondrocytes following 6 months of IA-rhIDUA demonstrated significant reduction compared to tissues at baseline, and saline-treated tissues at study-end. Mean joint synovial GAG levels in IA-rhIDUA joints were 8.62 ± 5.86 μg/mg dry weight and 21.6 ± 10.4 μg/mg dry weight in control joints (60% reduction). Cartilage heparan sulfate was also reduced in the IA-rhIDUA joints (113 ± 39.5 ng/g wet weight) compared to saline-treated joints (142 ± 56.4 ng/g wet weight). Synovial macrophage infiltration, which was present in all joints at baseline, was

  16. Hydration during intense exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, R J; Meyer, N L

    2013-01-01

    Hydration status has profound effects on both physical and mental performance, and sports performance is thus critically affected. Both overhydration and underhydration - if sufficiently severe - will impair performance and pose a risk to health. Athletes may begin exercise in a hypohydrated state as a result of incomplete recovery from water loss induced in order to achieve a specific body mass target or due to incomplete recovery from a previous competition or training session. Dehydration will also develop in endurance exercise where fluid intake does not match water loss. The focus has generally been on training rather than on competition, but sweat loss and fluid replacement in training may have important implications. Hypohydration may impair training quality and may also increase stress levels. It is unclear whether this will have negative effects (reduced training quality, impaired immunity) or whether it will promote a greater adaptive response. Hypohydration and the consequent hyperthermia, however, can enhance the effectiveness of a heat acclimation program, resulting in improved endurance performance in warm and temperate environments. Drinking in training may be important in enhancing tolerance of the gut when athletes plan to drink in competition. The distribution of water between body water compartments may also be important in the initiation and promotion of cellular adaptations to the training stimulus. Copyright © 2013 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Measuring and modelling of the combined thermodynamic promoting effect of tetrahydrofuran and cyclopentane on carbon dioxide hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen; Daraboina, Nagu; Thomsen, Kaj

    2014-01-01

    promoters due to its significant pressure reducing effect in hydrate forming systems such as those related to carbon dioxide capture.The present work shows that hydrate dissociation pressures may be lowered by up to 22% compared to those of the cyclopentane promoted carbon dioxide hydrate system by addition......This work documents both experimental data, and by thermodynamic modelling, the synergistic effect occurring in promoted carbon dioxide hydrate systems at the simultaneous presence of tetrahydrofuran and cyclopentane.Cyclopentane has previously been considered a reference among gas hydrate...

  18. Hydration in soccer: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo; Guerra Isabela; Barros Turíbio Leite de

    2003-01-01

    Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. Th...

  19. Water Dynamics in Protein Hydration Shells: The Molecular Origins of the Dynamical Perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Protein hydration shell dynamics play an important role in biochemical processes including protein folding, enzyme function, and molecular recognition. We present here a comparison of the reorientation dynamics of individual water molecules within the hydration shell of a series of globular proteins: acetylcholinesterase, subtilisin Carlsberg, lysozyme, and ubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical models are used to access site-resolved information on hydration shell dynamics and to elucidate the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation of hydration shell water relative to bulk water. We show that all four proteins have very similar hydration shell dynamics, despite their wide range of sizes and functions, and differing secondary structures. We demonstrate that this arises from the similar local surface topology and surface chemical composition of the four proteins, and that such local factors alone are sufficient to rationalize the hydration shell dynamics. We propose that these conclusions can be generalized to a wide range of globular proteins. We also show that protein conformational fluctuations induce a dynamical heterogeneity within the hydration layer. We finally address the effect of confinement on hydration shell dynamics via a site-resolved analysis and connect our results to experiments via the calculation of two-dimensional infrared spectra. PMID:24479585

  20. Water dynamics in protein hydration shells: the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Aoife C; Laage, Damien

    2014-07-17

    Protein hydration shell dynamics play an important role in biochemical processes including protein folding, enzyme function, and molecular recognition. We present here a comparison of the reorientation dynamics of individual water molecules within the hydration shell of a series of globular proteins: acetylcholinesterase, subtilisin Carlsberg, lysozyme, and ubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical models are used to access site-resolved information on hydration shell dynamics and to elucidate the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation of hydration shell water relative to bulk water. We show that all four proteins have very similar hydration shell dynamics, despite their wide range of sizes and functions, and differing secondary structures. We demonstrate that this arises from the similar local surface topology and surface chemical composition of the four proteins, and that such local factors alone are sufficient to rationalize the hydration shell dynamics. We propose that these conclusions can be generalized to a wide range of globular proteins. We also show that protein conformational fluctuations induce a dynamical heterogeneity within the hydration layer. We finally address the effect of confinement on hydration shell dynamics via a site-resolved analysis and connect our results to experiments via the calculation of two-dimensional infrared spectra.

  1. Kunstige Enzymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bols, Mikael; Bjerre, Jeannette; Marinescu, Lavinia

    2007-01-01

    Enzymer har en enestående evne til at accelerere kemiske processer. Der forskes målrettet i at optimere enzymer baseret på cyclodextrin.......Enzymer har en enestående evne til at accelerere kemiske processer. Der forskes målrettet i at optimere enzymer baseret på cyclodextrin....

  2. Measurements of Water Permeability in Unconsolidated Porous Media with Methane Hydrate Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Sen Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Permeability is one of the key factors that determine the fluids flow capacity and production potential of hydrate deposits. In this study, an experimental setup is developed to investigate the flow properties of the porous media, and the permeabilities to water are measured in the unconsolidated porous media with or without hydrate deposition in the pores. A specialized method of precisely controlling the amount of injected methane gas is employed to form methane hydrate in the core sample, and the hydrate formation process is described by the change characteristics of the gas and hydrate saturations. It is found that the residual gas plays an obstructive role in the water flow and it tends to slightly reduce the water permeability in the porous media, especially under high pressure conditions. After hydrate formation in the core sample, relatively steady flow state can be obtained under suitable water injection rate Q at which hydrate dissociation rate is very slow. The absolute permeability of the porous sample is reduced from 49.2 to 1.2 Darcies when the hydrate saturation increases from 0 to 9.3% in this study, indicating a strong dependence of k on the hydrate saturation.

  3. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  4. Decoration of reduced graphene oxide with rhodium nanoparticles for the design of a sensitive electrochemical enzyme biosensor for 17β-estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povedano, Eloy; Cincotto, Fernando H; Parrado, Concepción; Díez, Paula; Sánchez, Alfredo; Canevari, Thiago C; Machado, Sergio A S; Pingarrón, José M; Villalonga, Reynaldo

    2017-03-15

    A novel nanocomposite material consisting of reduced graphene oxide/Rh nanoparticles was prepared by a one-pot reaction process. The strategy involved the simultaneous reduction of RhCl3 and graphene oxide with NaBH4 and the in situ deposition of the metal nanoparticles on the 2D carbon nanomaterial planar sheets. Glassy carbon electrode coated with this nanocomposite was employed as nanostructured support for the cross-linking of the enzyme laccase with glutaraldehyde to construct a voltammperometric biosensor for 17β-estradiol in the 0.9-11 pM range. The biosensor showed excellent analytical performance with high sensitivity of 25.7AµM-1cm-1, a very low detection limit of 0.54pM and high selectivity. The biosensor was applied to the rapid and successful determination of the hormone in spiked synthetic and real human urine samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A krill oil supplemented diet reduces the activities of the mitochondrial tricarboxylate carrier and of the cytosolic lipogenic enzymes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferramosca, A; Conte, L; Zara, V

    2012-04-01

    The mitochondrial tricarboxylate carrier supplies cytosol with the carbon units necessary for hepatic lipogenesis. The activities of cytosolic acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthetase are therefore strictly connected to the function of mitochondrial tricarboxylate carrier. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are potent modulators of hepatic lipogenesis. In rats fed with a diet enriched with 2.5% krill oil (KO), a novel source of dietary n-3 PUFA, a time-dependent decrease in the activities of the mitochondrial tricarboxylate carrier and of the lipogenic enzymes was found. The KO induced inhibition of hepatic lipogenesis was more pronounced than that found in fish oil (FO)-fed rats, at least at short feeding times. The decrease in the activity of the mitochondrial tricarboxylate carrier caused by KO was due to a reduced expression of the protein. Furthermore, in the KO-fed animals a greater reduction in the levels of hepatic triglycerides and cholesterol was found in comparison to FO-fed rats. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Multiplexed enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor based on ZnO nanorods modified reduced graphene oxide-paper electrode and silver deposition-induced signal amplification strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guoqiang; Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Hongmei; Ma, Chao; Ge, Shenguang; Yan, Mei; Yu, Jinghua; Song, Xianrang

    2015-09-15

    Herein, an origami multiplexed enzyme-free electrochemical (EC) immunodevice is developed for the first time. Typically, ZnO nanorods (ZNRs) modified reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-paper electrode is used as a sensor platform, in which rGO improves the electronic transmission rate and ZNRs provide abundant sites for capture probes binding. Furthermore, by combining the large surface area of rGO and high catalytic activity of bovine serum protein (BSA)-stabilized silver nanoparticles (Ag@BSA) toward H2O2 reduction, rGO/Ag@BSA composites can be used as an excellent signal labels. The current signal is generated from the reduction of H2O2 and further amplified by a subsequent signal labels-promoted deposition of silver. Under optimal conditions, the proposed immunoassays exhibit excellent precision, high sensitivity and a wide linear range of 0.002-120 mIU mL(-1) for human chorionic gonadotropin, 0.001-110 ng mL(-1) for prostate-specific antigen, and 0.001-100 ng mL(-1) for carcinoembryonic antigen. The results for real sample analysis demonstrate that the newly constructed immunosensor arrays provide a simple and cost-effective method for clinical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Proteolytic processing of the streptococcal IgG endopeptidase IdeS modulates the functional properties of the enzyme and results in reduced immunorecognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Helena; Söderberg, Jenny Johansson; Vindebro, Reine; Johansson, Björn P; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    The important human gram positive bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes employs various virulence factors to promote inflammation and to facilitate invasive disease progression. In this study we explored the relation of the secreted streptococcal cysteine proteases IdeS and SpeB, and neutrophil (PMN) proteases. We found that SpeB is resistant to proteolytic attack in an inflammatory environment, emphasizing the importance of SpeB for streptococcal pathogenicity, while PMN enzymes and SpeB itself process the IgG degrading endopeptidase IdeS. Processing occurs as NH2-terminal cleavage of IdeS resulting in reduced immunorecognition of the protease by specific antibodies. While the endopeptidase retains IgG cleaving activity, its ability to suppress the generation of reactive oxygen species is abolished. We suggest that the cleavage of NH2-terminal peptides by SpeB and/or neutrophil proteases is a mechanism evolved to prevent early inactivation of this important streptococcal virulence factor, albeit at the cost of impaired functionality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Traditional Medicinal Herbs and Food Plants Have the Potential to Inhibit Key Carbohydrate Hydrolyzing Enzymes In Vitro and Reduce Postprandial Blood Glucose Peaks In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fawzi Mahomoodally

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that some medicinal herbs and food plants commonly used in the management of diabetes can reduce glucose peaks by inhibiting key carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes. To this effect, extracts of Antidesma madagascariense (AM, Erythroxylum macrocarpum (EM, Pittosporum senacia (PS, and Faujasiopsis flexuosa (FF, Momordica charantia (MC, and Ocimum tenuiflorum (OT were evaluated for α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory effects based on starch-iodine colour changes and PNP-G as substrate, respectively. Only FF and AM extracts/fractions were found to inhibit α-amylase activity significantly (P<0.05 and coparable to the drug acarbose. Amylase bioassay on isolated mouse plasma confirmed the inhibitory potential of AM and FF extracts with the ethyl acetate fraction of FF being more potent (P<0.05 than acarbose. Extracts/fractions of AM and MC were found to inhibit significantly (P<0.05 α-glucosidase activity, with IC50 comparable to the drug 1-deoxynojirimycin. In vivo studies on glycogen-loaded mice showed significant (P<0.05 depressive effect on elevation of postprandial blood glucose following ingestion of AM and MC extracts. Our findings tend to provide a possible explanation for the hypoglycemic action of MC fruits and AM leaf extracts as alternative nutritional therapy in the management of diabetes.

  9. Reduced plasma levels of angiotensin-(1-7 and renin activity in preeclamptic patients are associated with the angiotensin I- converting enzyme deletion/deletion genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P. Velloso

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between preeclampsia and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS is poorly understood. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE is a key RAS component and plays an important role in blood pressure homeostasis by generating angiotensin II (Ang II and inactivating the vasodilator angiotensin-(1-7 (Ang-(1-7. ACE (I/D polymorphism is characterized by the insertion (I or deletion (D of a 287-bp fragment, leading to changes in ACE activity. In the present study, ACE (I/D polymorphism was correlated with plasma Ang-(1-7 levels and several RAS components in both preeclamptic (N = 20 and normotensive pregnant women (N = 20. The percentage of the ACE DD genotype (60% in the preeclamptic group was higher than that for the control group (35%; however, this percentage was not statistically significant (Fisher exact test = 2.86, d.f. = 2, P = 0.260. The highest plasma ACE activity was observed in the ACE DD preeclamptic women (58.1 ± 5.06 vs 27.6 ± 3.25 nmol Hip-His Leu-1 min-1 mL-1 in DD control patients; P = 0.0005. Plasma renin activity was markedly reduced in preeclampsia (0.81 ± 0.2 vs 3.43 ± 0.8 ng Ang I mL plasma-1 h-1 in DD normotensive patients; P = 0.0012. A reduced plasma level of Ang-(1-7 was also observed in preeclamptic women (15.6 ± 1.3 vs 22.7 ± 2.5 pg/mL in the DD control group; P = 0.0146. In contrast, plasma Ang II levels were unchanged in preeclamptic patients. The selective changes in the RAS described in the present study suggest that the ACE DD genotype may be used as a marker for susceptibility to preeclampsia.

  10. Reduced plasma levels of angiotensin-(1-7 and renin activity in preeclamptic patients are associated with the angiotensin I- converting enzyme deletion/deletion genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P. Velloso

    Full Text Available The relationship between preeclampsia and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS is poorly understood. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE is a key RAS component and plays an important role in blood pressure homeostasis by generating angiotensin II (Ang II and inactivating the vasodilator angiotensin-(1-7 (Ang-(1-7. ACE (I/D polymorphism is characterized by the insertion (I or deletion (D of a 287-bp fragment, leading to changes in ACE activity. In the present study, ACE (I/D polymorphism was correlated with plasma Ang-(1-7 levels and several RAS components in both preeclamptic (N = 20 and normotensive pregnant women (N = 20. The percentage of the ACE DD genotype (60% in the preeclamptic group was higher than that for the control group (35%; however, this percentage was not statistically significant (Fisher exact test = 2.86, d.f. = 2, P = 0.260. The highest plasma ACE activity was observed in the ACE DD preeclamptic women (58.1 ± 5.06 vs 27.6 ± 3.25 nmol Hip-His Leu-1 min-1 mL-1 in DD control patients; P = 0.0005. Plasma renin activity was markedly reduced in preeclampsia (0.81 ± 0.2 vs 3.43 ± 0.8 ng Ang I mL plasma-1 h-1 in DD normotensive patients; P = 0.0012. A reduced plasma level of Ang-(1-7 was also observed in preeclamptic women (15.6 ± 1.3 vs 22.7 ± 2.5 pg/mL in the DD control group; P = 0.0146. In contrast, plasma Ang II levels were unchanged in preeclamptic patients. The selective changes in the RAS described in the present study suggest that the ACE DD genotype may be used as a marker for susceptibility to preeclampsia.

  11. Detergents - Zeolites and Enzymes Excel Cleaning Power

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Presently used detergent formulations generally consist of surfactants, builder and cobuilder, bleaching agents, addi- tives for secondary benefits and enzymes. Zeolites are basically hydrated crystalline aluminium silicates which function as ion exchangers and make the water soft by removing calcium, magnesium and ...

  12. α-chymotrypsin in water-acetone and water-dimethyl sulfoxide mixtures: Effect of preferential solvation and hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, Vladimir A; Kuchierskaya, Alexandra A

    2017-10-01

    We investigated water/organic solvent sorption and residual enzyme activity to simultaneously monitor preferential solvation/hydration of protein macromolecules in the entire range of water content at 25°C. We applied this approach to estimate protein destabilization/stabilization due to the preferential interactions of bovine pancreatic α-chymotrypsin with water-acetone (moderate-strength H-bond acceptor) and water-DMSO (strong H-bond acceptor) mixtures. There are three concentration regimes for the dried α-chymotrypsin. α-Chymotrypsin is preferentially hydrated at high water content. The residual enzyme activity values are close to 100%. At intermediate water content, the dehydrated α-chymotrypsin has a higher affinity for acetone/DMSO than for water. Residual enzyme activity is minimal in this concentration range. The acetone/DMSO molecules are preferentially excluded from the protein surface at the lowest water content, resulting in preferential hydration. The residual catalytic activity in the water-poor acetone is ∼80%, compared with that observed after incubation in pure water. This effect is very small for the water-poor DMSO. Two different schemes are operative for the hydrated enzyme. At high and intermediate water content, α-chymotrypsin exhibits preferential hydration. However, at intermediate water content, in contrast to the dried enzyme, the initially hydrated α-chymotrypsin possesses increased preferential hydration parameters. At low water content, no residual enzyme activity was observed. Preferential binding of DMSO/acetone to α-chymotrypsin was detected. Our data clearly demonstrate that the hydrogen bond accepting ability of organic solvents and the protein hydration level constitute key factors in determining the stability of protein-water-organic solvent systems. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Enzyme assays

    OpenAIRE

    Bisswanger, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The essential requirements for enzyme assays are described and frequently occurring errors and pitfalls as well as their avoidance are discussed. The main factors, which must be considered for assaying enzymes, are temperature, pH, ionic strength and the proper concentrations of the essential components like substrates and enzymes. Standardization of these parameters would be desirable, but the diversity of the features of different enzymes prevents unification of assay conditions. Neverthele...

  14. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, J.; Ning, F.; Trinh, T.T.; Kjelstrup, S.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; He, J.; Skallerud, B.H.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation

  15. Prevention of contrast nephropathy by furosemide with matched hydration: the MYTHOS (Induced Diuresis With Matched Hydration Compared to Standard Hydration for Contrast Induced Nephropathy Prevention) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenzi, Giancarlo; Ferrari, Cristina; Marana, Ivana; Assanelli, Emilio; De Metrio, Monica; Teruzzi, Giovanni; Veglia, Fabrizio; Fabbiocchi, Franco; Montorsi, Piero; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of furosemide-forced diuresis and intravenous saline infusion matched with urine output, using a novel dedicated device designed for contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) prevention. CIN is a frequent cause of acute kidney injury associated with increased morbidity and mortality. A total of 170 consecutive patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing coronary procedures were randomized to either furosemide with matched hydration (FMH group, n = 87) or to standard intravenous isotonic saline hydration (control group; n = 83). The FMH group received an initial 250-ml intravenous bolus of normal saline over 30 min followed by an intravenous bolus (0.5 mg/kg) of furosemide. Hydration infusion rate was automatically adjusted to precisely replace the patient's urine output. When a urine output rate >300 ml/h was obtained, patients underwent the coronary procedure. Matched fluid replacement was maintained during the procedure and for 4 h post-treatment. The definition of CIN was a ≥25% or ≥0.5 mg/dl rise in serum creatinine over baseline. In the FMH group, no device- or therapy-related complications were observed. Four (4.6%) patients in the FMH group developed CIN versus 15 (18%) controls (p = 0.005). A lower incidence of cumulative in-hospital clinical complications was also observed in FMH-treated patients than in controls (8% vs. 18%; p = 0.052). In patients with CKD undergoing coronary procedures, furosemide-induced high urine output with matched hydration significantly reduces the risk of CIN and may be associated with improved in-hospital outcome. (Induced Diuresis With Matched Hydration Compared to Standard Hydration for Contrast Induced Nephropathy Prevention [MYTHOS]; NCT00702728). Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hydrate prevention in petroleum production sub sea system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Paula L.F.; Rocha, Humberto A.R. [Universidade Estacio de Sa (UNESA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rodrigues, Antonio P. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    In spite of the merits of the several hydrate prevention techniques used nowadays, such as: chemical product injection for inhibition and use of thick thermal insulate lines; hydrates per times happen and they are responsible for considerable production losses. Depressurization techniques can be used so much for prevention as in the remediation. Some hydrate removal techniques need a rig or vessel, resources not readily available and with high cost, reason that limits such techniques just for remediation and not for prevention. In the present work it is proposed and described an innovative depressurization system, remote and resident, for hydrate prevention and removal, applicable as for individual sub sea wells as for grouped wells by manifold. Based on low cost jet pumps, without movable parts and with a high reliability, this technique allows hydrate prevention or remediation in a fast and remote way, operated from the production unit. The power fluid line and fluid return line can be integrated in the same umbilical or annulus line structure, without significant increase in the construction costs and installation. It is not necessary to wait for expensive resource mobilization, sometimes not available quickly, such as: vessels or rigs. It still reduces the chemical product consumption and permits to depressurized stopped lines. Other additional advantage, depressurization procedure can be used in the well starting, removing fluid until riser emptying. (author)

  17. Dissociation of methane hydrate granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyura, S. Y.; Donskoy, I. G.; Morozov, V. S.

    2017-09-01

    The methane hydrate dissociation at negative temperatures and under external pressure of 1 bar is studied experimentally. It is shown that the dissociation rate of the gas hydrate depends on the granule diameter and heat transfer. The dissociation curve has an extremum. The dissociation rate initially increases due to the temperature increase and reaches the maximum value and then sharply falls due to the curvature of the granules. When describing dissociation kinetics of the spherical granules, it is important to take into account the granule size and their composition.

  18. Experimental Study of Methane Hydrates in Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smirnov Vyacheslav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of gas hydrate formation in porous space of coal has been studied. The experiments conducted have proven the possibility of methane gas hydrate formation in moist coal. It has been demonstrated that the decomposition points of methane gas hydrates in coal are near to the phase equilibrium curve for bulk methane hydrate. Only part of water absorbed by coal can be involved in the methane gas hydrate formation. With the increase in gas pressure increases the amount of gas hydrate formed in natural coal. For formation of hydrates at a positive temperature, the pressure in the system has to be at least 2 MPa. At the same time the speed of formation and decomposition of gas hydrates in coal is big enough.

  19. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  20. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  1. Evaluation of influence of proteoglycans on hydration of articular cartilage with the use of ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-yi YANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To monitor the changes in hydration behaviour of articular cartilage induced by degradation of proteoglycans, and to explore the effect of proteoglycans on hydration behaviour of articular cartilage by using high-frequency ultrasound. Methods Twelve porcine patellae with smooth cartilage surface were prepared and equally divided into two groups: normal group without any enzyme treatment, and trypsin group they were treated with 0.25% trypsin for 8h to digest proteoglycan in the cartilage. The hydration behaviour of the cartilage tissue was scanned by high-frequency ultrasound system with a central frequency of 25MHz. Parameters including cartilage hydration strain and cartilage thickness were measured. The histopathological changes in the articular cartilage were observed under a light microscope. Results It took approximately 20min to reach equilibrium during the hydration process in the normal cartilages, while proteoglycan-degraded cartilage took only about 5min to achieve equilibrium. The equilibrium strain of normal cartilage was 3.5%±0.5%. The degradation of proteoglycans induced a significant decrease in equilibrium strain (1.8%±0.2%, P0.05. Conclusion Proteoglycans play an important role in hydration behaviour of articular cartilage. The degradation of proteoglycans could induce degeneration of cartilage structure and decrease in hydration behaviour after dehydration. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.03.03

  2. Influence of Physical Activity and Ambient Temperature on Hydration: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Mora-Rodriguez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the effects of physical activity (PA and ambient temperature on water turnover and hydration status. Five-hundred seventy three healthy men and women (aged 20–60 years from Spain, Greece and Germany self-reported PA, registered all food and beverage intake, and collected 24-h urine during seven consecutive days. Fasting blood samples were collected at the onset and end of the study. Food moisture was assessed using nutritional software to account for all water intake which was subtracted from daily urine volume to allow calculation of non-renal water loss (i.e., mostly sweating. Hydration status was assessed by urine and blood osmolality. A negative association was seen between ambient temperature and PA (r = −0.277; p < 0.001. Lower PA with high temperatures did not prevent increased non-renal water losses (i.e., sweating and elevated urine and blood osmolality (r = 0.218 to 0.163 all p < 0.001. When summer and winter data were combined PA was negatively associated with urine osmolality (r = −0.153; p = 0.001. Our data suggest that environmental heat acts to reduce voluntary PA but this is not sufficient to prevent moderate dehydration (increased osmolality. On the other hand, increased PA is associated with improved hydration status (i.e., lower urine and blood osmolality.

  3. 77 FR 40032 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to...

  4. 78 FR 37536 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. The Federal... of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of methane... Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate Research and Development Program. Tentative Agenda: The agenda will...

  5. Hydration properties and phosphorous speciation in native, gelatinized and enzymatically modified potato starch analyzed by solid-state MAS NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Kasprzak, Miroslaw Marek; Lærke, Helle Nygaard

    2013-01-01

    by enzyme-assisted catalytic branching with branching enzyme (BE) or combined BE and β-amylase (BB) catalyzed exo-hydrolysis. Carbons of the glycosidic α-1,6 linkages required high hydration rates before adopting uniform chemical shifts indicating solid-state disorder and poor water accessibility...

  6. Enzyme Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; Ferrari, Luna De; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCatDB, SFLD and MACiE are key repositories for data on the chemical mechanisms by which enzymes operate. At the current rate of genome sequencing and manual annotation, human curation will never finish the functional annotation of the ever-expanding list of known enzymes. Hence there is an increasing need for automated annotation, though it is not yet widespread for enzyme data. In contrast, functional ontologies such as the Gene Ontology already profit from automation. Despite our growing understanding of enzyme structure and dynamics, we are only beginning to be able to design novel enzymes. One can now begin to trace the functional evolution of enzymes using phylogenetics. The ability of enzymes to perform secondary functions, albeit relatively inefficiently, gives clues as to how enzyme function evolves. Substrate promiscuity in enzymes is one example of imperfect specificity in protein-ligand interactions. Similarly, most drugs bind to more than one protein target. This may sometimes result in helpful polypharmacology as a drug modulates plural targets, but also often leads to adverse side-effects. Many cheminformatics approaches can be used to model the interactions between druglike molecules and proteins in silico. We can even use quantum chemical techniques like DFT and QM/MM to compute the structural and energetic course of enzyme catalysed chemical reaction mechanisms, including a full description of bond making and breaking. PMID:23116471

  7. Hydration modelling of calcium sulphates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Eligehausen, R.; Gehlen, C.

    2008-01-01

    The CEMHYD3D model has been extended at the University of Twente in last ten years1,2. At present the cement hydration model is extended for the use of gypsum. Although gypsum was present in the model already, the model was not suitable for high contents of gypsum and did not include the transitions

  8. Hydrated-electron population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, MS; Baltuska, A; Wiersma, DA; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Baltuška, Andrius

    2004-01-01

    A detailed frequency-resolved pump-probe study of hydrated electron dynamics, performed with 5-fs pulses, is presented. We show that the experimental data can be successfully described with a model in which the excited state lifetime is similar to50 fs in regular water and similar to70 A in heavy

  9. Molecular Modeling of Enzyme Dynamics Towards Understanding Solvent Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedberg, Nils Hejle Rasmus Ingemar

    This thesis describes the development of a molecular simulation methodology to study properties of enzymes in non-aqueous media at fixed thermodynamic water activities. The methodology is applied in a molecular dynamics study of the industrially important enzyme Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB......) in water and organic solvents. The effects of solvent on structural and dynamical enzyme properties are studied, and special attention is given to how enzyme properties in organic solvents are affected by the hydration level, which is shown to be related to the water activity. In experimental studies...... of enzyme kinetics in non-aqueous media, it has been a fruitful approach to fix the enzyme hydration level by controlling the water activity of the medium. In this work, a protocol is therefore developed for determining the water activity in non-aqueous protein simulations. The method relies on determining...

  10. Hydration mechanisms of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J

    2007-06-01

    To report the hydration mechanism of white mineral trioxide aggregate (White MTA, Dentsply, Tulsa Dental Products, Tulsa, OK, USA). The chemical constitution of white MTA was studied by viewing the powder in polished sections under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The hydration of both white MTA and white Portland cement (PC) was studied by characterizing cement hydrates viewed under the SEM, plotting atomic ratios, performing quantitative energy dispersive analyses with X-ray (EDAX) and by calculation of the amount of anhydrous clinker minerals using the Bogue calculation. Un-hydrated MTA was composed of impure tri-calcium and di-calcium silicate and bismuth oxide. The aluminate phase was scarce. On hydration the white PC produced a dense structure made up of calcium silicate hydrate, calcium hydroxide, monosulphate and ettringite as the main hydration products. The un-reacted cement grain was coated with a layer of hydrated cement. In contrast MTA produced a porous structure on hydration. Levels of ettringite and monosulphate were low. Bismuth oxide was present as un-reacted powder but also incorporated with the calcium silicate hydrate. White MTA was deficient in alumina suggesting that the material was not prepared in a rotary kiln. On hydration this affected the production of ettringite and monosulphate usually formed on hydration of PC. The bismuth affected the hydration mechanism of MTA; it formed part of the structure of C-S-H and also affected the precipitation of calcium hydroxide in the hydrated paste. The microstructure of hydrated MTA would likely be weaker when compared with that of PC.

  11. Thermal properties of methane gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, William F.

    2007-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline solids in which molecules of a “guest” species occupy and stabilize cages formed by water molecules. Similar to ice in appearance (fig. 1), gas hydrates are stable at high pressures and temperatures above freezing (0°C). Methane is the most common naturally occurring hydrate guest species. Methane hydrates, also called simply “gas hydrates,” are extremely concentrated stores of methane and are found in shallow permafrost and continental margin sediments worldwide. Brought to sea-level conditions, methane hydrate breaks down and releases up to 160 times its own volume in methane gas. The methane stored in gas hydrates is of interest and concern to policy makers as a potential alternative energy resource and as a potent greenhouse gas that could be released from sediments to the atmosphere and ocean during global warming. In continental margin settings, methane release from gas hydrates also is a potential geohazard and could cause submarine landslides that endanger offshore infrastructure. Gas hydrate stability is sensitive to temperature changes. To understand methane release from gas hydrate, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a laboratory investigation of pure methane hydrate thermal properties at conditions relevant to accumulations of naturally occurring methane hydrate. Prior to this work, thermal properties for gas hydrates generally were measured on analog systems such as ice and non-methane hydrates or at temperatures below freezing; these conditions limit direct comparisons to methane hydrates in marine and permafrost sediment. Three thermal properties, defined succinctly by Briaud and Chaouch (1997), are estimated from the experiments described here: - Thermal conductivity, λ: if λ is high, heat travels easily through the material. - Thermal diffusivity, κ: if κ is high, it takes little time for the temperature to rise in the material. - Specific heat, cp: if cp is high, it takes a great deal of heat to

  12. Inhibited phase behavior of gas hydrates in graphene oxide: influences of surface and geometric constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daeok; Kim, Dae Woo; Lim, Hyung-Kyu; Jeon, Jiwon; Kim, Hyungjun; Jung, Hee-Tae; Lee, Huen

    2014-11-07

    Porous materials have provided us unprecedented opportunities to develop emerging technologies such as molecular storage systems and separation mechanisms. Pores have also been used as supports to contain gas hydrates for the application in gas treatments. Necessarily, an exact understanding of the properties of gas hydrates in confining pores is important. Here, we investigated the formation of CO2, CH4 and N2 hydrates in non-interlamellar voids in graphene oxide (GO), and their thermodynamic behaviors. For that, low temperature XRD and P-T traces were conducted to analyze the water structure and confirm hydrate formation, respectively, in GO after its exposure to gaseous molecules. Confinement and strong interaction of water with the hydrophilic surface of graphene oxide reduce water activity, which leads to the inhibited phase behavior of gas hydrates.

  13. Enzyme Informatics

    OpenAIRE

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; De Ferrari, Luna; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B O; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCa...

  14. Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy for Structure-II Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeya, Kei; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has a charact......For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has...

  15. Observed gas hydrate morphologies in marine sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Roberts, J.; Druce, M. [Geotek Ltd., Daventry, Northamptonshire (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    The morphology of gas hydrate in marine sediments determines the basic physical properties of the sediment-hydrate matrix and provides information regarding the formation of gas hydrate deposits, and the nature of the disruption that will occur on dissociation. Small-scale morphology is useful in estimating the concentrations of gas hydrate from geophysical data. It is also important for predicting their response to climate change or commercial production. Many remote techniques for gas hydrate detection and quantification depend on hydrate morphology. In this study, morphology of gas hydrate was examined in HYACINTH pressure cores from recent seagoing expeditions. Visual and infrared observations from non-pressurized cores were also used. The expeditions and pressure core analysis were described in detail. This paper described the difference between two types of gas hydrate morphologies, notably pore-filling and grain-displacing. Last, the paper addressed the impact of hydrate morphology. It was concluded that a detailed morphology of gas hydrate is an essential component for a full understanding of the past, present, and future of any gas hydrate environment. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Microbial community structure in methane hydrate-bearing sediments of freshwater Lake Baikal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadnikov, Vitaly V; Mardanov, Andrey V; Beletsky, Alexey V; Shubenkova, Olga V; Pogodaeva, Tatiana V; Zemskaya, Tamara I; Ravin, Nikolai V; Skryabin, Konstantin G

    2012-02-01

    Gas hydrates in marine sediments have been known for many years but recently hydrates were found in the sediments of Lake Baikal, the largest freshwater basin in the world. Marine gas hydrates are associated with complex microbial communities involved in methanogenesis, methane oxidation, sulfate reduction and other biotransformations. However, the contribution of microorganisms to the formation of gas hydrates remains poorly understood. We examined the microbial communities in the hydrate-bearing sediments and water column of Lake Baikal using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Aerobic methanotrophic bacteria dominated the water sample collected at the lake floor in the hydrate-bearing site. The shallow sediments were dominated by Archaea. Methanogens of the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales were abundant, whereas representatives of archaeal lineages known to perform anaerobic oxidation of methane, as well as sulfate-reducing bacteria, were not found. Affiliation of archaea to methanogenic rather than methane-oxidizing lineages was supported by analysis of the sequences of the methyl coenzyme M reductase gene. The deeper sediments located at 85-90 cm depth close to the hydrate were dominated by Bacteria, mostly assigned to Chloroflexi, candidate division JS1 and Caldiserica. Overall, our results are consistent with the biological origin of methane hydrates in Lake Baikal. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Catalysis of gas hydrates by biosurfactants in seawater-saturated sand/clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R. E.; Kothapalli, C.; Lee, M.S. [Mississippi State University, Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, MS (United States); Woolsey, J. R. [University of Mississippi, Centre of Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, MS (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Large gas hydrate mounds have been photographed in the seabed of the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere. According to industry experts, the carbon trapped within gas hydrates is two or three times greater than all known crude oil, natural gas and coal reserves in the world. Gas hydrates, which are ice-like solids formed from the hydrogen bonding of water as water temperature is lowered under pressure to entrap a suitable molecular-size gas in cavities of the developing crystal structure, are found below the ocean floor to depths exhibiting temperature and pressure combinations within the appropriate limits. The experiments described in this study attempt to ascertain whether biosurfactant byproducts of microbial activity in seabeds could catalyze gas hydrate formation. Samples of five possible biosurfactants classifications were used in the experiments. Results showed that biosurfactants enhanced hydrate formation rate between 96 per cent and 288 percent, and reduced hydrate induction time 20 per cent to 71 per cent relative to the control. The critical micellar concentration of rhamnolipid/seawater solution was found to be 13 ppm at hydrate-forming conditions. On the basis of these results it was concluded that minimal microbial activity in sea floor sands could achieve the threshold concentration of biosurfactant that would greatly promote hydrate formation. 28 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  19. Implications of hydration depletion in the in vitro starch digestibility of white bread crumb and crust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Mario M; Román, Laura; Gómez, Manuel

    2018-01-15

    The objective of this study was to provide understanding about the efficacy of decreasing dough hydration to slow down starch digestibility in white bread. Breads were made with 45 (low hydration bread, LHB), 60 (intermediate hydration bread, IHB) and 75% (high hydration bread, HHB) water (flour basis). A hydration depletion down to 45%, which is close to the minimum hydration found in commercially available white bread, did not prevent the starch in the crumb from complete gelatinization. However, LHB and IHB crumbs were more resistant to physical breakdown during in vitro digestion than HHB crumbs, resulting in a 96.81% increase of slowly digestible starch (SDS) from 75 to 45% dough hydration. The degree of gelatinization in crust samples was significantly reduced with a depletion in the dough hydration, ranging from 29.90 to 44.36%, which led to an increase of SDS from 7.41 in HHB to 13.78% in LHB (bread basis). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Submarine Slope Failure Primed and Triggered by Bottom Water Warming in Oceanic Hydrate-Bearing Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyuk Kwon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Many submarine slope failures in hydrate-bearing sedimentary deposits might be directly triggered, or at least primed, by gas hydrate dissociation. It has been reported that during the past 55 years (1955–2010 the 0–2000 m layer of oceans worldwide has been warmed by 0.09 °C because of global warming. This raises the following scientific concern: if warming of the bottom water of deep oceans continues, it would dissociate natural gas hydrates and could eventually trigger massive slope failures. The present study explored the submarine slope instability of oceanic gas hydrate-bearing deposits subjected to bottom water warming. One-dimensional coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (T-H-M finite difference analyses were performed to capture the underlying physical processes initiated by bottom water warming, which includes thermal conduction through sediments, thermal dissociation of gas hydrates, excess pore pressure generation, pressure diffusion, and hydrate dissociation against depressurization. The temperature rise at the seafloor due to bottom water warming is found to create an excess pore pressure that is sufficiently large to reduce the stability of a slope in some cases. Parametric study results suggest that a slope becomes more susceptible to failure with increases in thermal diffusivity and hydrate saturation and decreases in pressure diffusivity, gas saturation, and water depth. Bottom water warming can be further explored to gain a better understanding of the past methane hydrate destabilization events on Earth, assuming that more reliable geological data is available.

  1. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  2. Four Critical Needs to Change the Hydrate Energy Paradigm from Assessment to Production: The 2007 Report to Congress by the U.S. Federal methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahajan,D.; Sloan, D.; Brewer, P.; Dutta, N.; Johnson, A.; Jones, E.; Juenger, K.; Kastner, M.; Masutani, S.; Swenson, R.; Whelan, J.; Wilson, s.; Woolsey, R.

    2009-03-11

    This work summarizes a two-year study by the U.S. Federal Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee recommending the future needs for federally-supported hydrate research. The Report was submitted to the US Congress on August 14, 2007 and includes four recommendations regarding (a) permafrost hydrate production testing, (b) marine hydrate viability assessment (c) climate effect of hydrates, and (d) international cooperation. A secure supply of natural gas is a vital goal of the U.S. national energy policy because natural gas is the cleanest and most widely used of all fossil fuels. The inherent cleanliness of natural gas, with the lowest CO2 emission per unit of heat energy of any fossil fuel, means substituting gas for coal and fuel oil will reduce emissions that can exacerbate the greenhouse effect. Both a fuel and a feedstock, a secure and reasonably priced supply of natural gas is important to industry, electric power generators, large and small commercial enterprises, and homeowners. Because each volume of solid gas hydrate contains as much as 164 standard volumes of methane, hydrates can be viewed as a concentrated form of natural gas equivalent to compressed gas but less concentrated than liquefied natural gas (LNG). Natural hydrate accumulations worldwide are estimated to contain 700,000 TCF of natural gas, of which 200,000 TCF are located within the United States. Compared with the current national annual consumption of 22 TCF, this estimate of in-place gas in enormous. Clearly, if only a fraction of the hydrated methane is recoverable, hydrates could constitute a substantial component of the future energy portfolio of the Nation (Figure 1). However, recovery poses a major technical and commercial challenge. Such numbers have sparked interest in natural gas hydrates as a potential, long-term source of energy, as well as concerns about any potential impact the release of methane from hydrates might have on the environment. Energy-hungry countries such as India and

  3. Well log characterization of natural gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years we have seen significant advancements in the use of downhole well logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From an early start of using wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments to today where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. The most established and well known use of downhole log data in gas hydrate research is the use of electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data (both compressional- and shear-wave data) to make estimates of gas hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. New downhole logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation resistivity log measurements have provided the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly inter-bedded and fracture dominated gas hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing have also allowed for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids (i.e., free-water along with clay and capillary bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms controlling the formation and occurrence of gas hydrate in nature along with data on gas hydrate reservoir properties (i.e., permeabilities) needed to accurately predict gas production rates for various gas hydrate

  4. Improvement of gas hydrate preservation by increasing compression pressure to simple hydrates of methane, ethane, and propane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Masato; Jin, Yusuke; Watanabe, Mizuho; Murayama, Tetsuro; Nagao, Jiro

    2017-09-01

    In this report, we describe the dissociation behavior of gas hydrate grains pressed at 1 and 6 MPa. Certain simple gas hydrates in powder form show anomalous preservation phenomenon under their thermodynamic unstable condition. Investigation of simple hydrates of methane, ethane, and propane reveals that high pressure applied to the gas hydrate particles enhances their preservation effects. Application of high pressure increases the dissociation temperature of methane hydrate and has a restrictive effect against the dissociation of ethane and propane hydrate grains. These improvements of gas hydrate preservation by increasing pressure to the initial gas hydrate particles imply that appropriate pressure applied to gas hydrate particles enhances gas hydrate preservation effects.

  5. Search for memory effects in methane hydrate: structure of water before hydrate formation and after hydrate decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Piers; Soper, Alan K; Thompson, Helen; Westacott, Robin E; Creek, Jefferson L; Hobson, Greg; Koh, Carolyn A

    2005-10-22

    Neutron diffraction with HD isotope substitution has been used to study the formation and decomposition of the methane clathrate hydrate. Using this atomistic technique coupled with simultaneous gas consumption measurements, we have successfully tracked the formation of the sI methane hydrate from a water/gas mixture and then the subsequent decomposition of the hydrate from initiation to completion. These studies demonstrate that the application of neutron diffraction with simultaneous gas consumption measurements provides a powerful method for studying the clathrate hydrate crystal growth and decomposition. We have also used neutron diffraction to examine the water structure before the hydrate growth and after the hydrate decomposition. From the neutron-scattering curves and the empirical potential structure refinement analysis of the data, we find that there is no significant difference between the structure of water before the hydrate formation and the structure of water after the hydrate decomposition. Nor is there any significant change to the methane hydration shell. These results are discussed in the context of widely held views on the existence of memory effects after the hydrate decomposition.

  6. Investigation of hydrate formation and transportability in multiphase flow systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Giovanny A.

    The oil and gas industry is moving towards offshore developments in more challenging environments, where evaluating hydrate plugging risks to avoid operational/safety hazards becomes more difficult (Sloan, 2005). Even though mechanistic models for hydrate plug formation have been developed, components for a full comprehensive model are still missing. Prior to this work, research efforts were focused on flowing hydrate particles with relatively little research on hydrate accumulation, leaving hydrate deposition in multiphase flow an unexplored subject. The focus of this thesis was to better understand hydrate deposition as a form of accumu- lation in pipelines. To incorporate the multiphase flow effect, hydrate formation experiments were carried out at varying water cut (WC) from 15 to 100 vol.%, liquid loading (LL) from 50 to 85 vol.%, mixture velocity (vmix) from 0.75 to 3 m/s, for three fluids systems (100 % WC, water in Conroe crude oil emulsions and King Ranch condensate + water) on the ExxonMobil flowloop (4 in. nominal size and 314 ft. long) at Friendswood, TX. For the 100 % WC flowloop tests, hydrate particle distribution transitions beyond a critical hydrate volume concentration, observed values were between 8.2 to 29.4 vol.%, causing a sudden increase in pressure drop (DP). A revised correlation of the transition as a function of Reynolds number and liquid loading was developed. For Conroe emulsions, DP starts increasing at higher hydrate concentrations than King Ranch condensate, many times at 10 vol.%. Experiments with King Ranch show higher relative DP (10 to 25) than Conroe (2 to 10) performed at the same vmix and LL. Cohesive force measurements between cyclopentane hydrate particles were reduced from a value of 3.32 mN/m to 1.26 mN/m when 6 wt.% Conroe was used and to 0.41 mN/m when 5 wt.% Caratinga crude oil was used; similar values were obtained when extracted asphaltenes were used. King Ranch condensate (11 wt.%) did not significantly change the

  7. Dipolar response of hydrated proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents an analytical theory and numerical simulations of the dipolar response of hydrated proteins. The effective dielectric constant of the solvated protein, representing the average dipole moment induced at the protein by a uniform external field, shows a remarkable variation among the proteins studied by numerical simulations. It changes from 0.5 for ubiquitin to 640 for cytochrome c. The former value implies a negative dipolar susceptibility of ubiquitin, that is a dia-electri...

  8. IMPORTANCE OF HYDRATION IN SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vasić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Importance of hydration is detrmined by importance of functions of water in the human organism: i.e. regulation of body temperature, transport, excretion of waste materials through urine, digestion of food which is facilititated by saliva and gastric juices, maintenance of flexibility of organs and tissues About 60 % body mass of an adult person (males: 61 %, females: 54 % is made up of water. Water content of a newly born baby reaches 77 %, and it is up to 50 % in adults. It is very important for sportsmen to provide adequate hydration during and after the time of bodily activities. A symptom of water shortage is thirst. However, thirst is a late response of an organism and it occurs when dehydration has already taken place. Minimum in take of fluids in humans should range between one-and-half to two liters. It has been known for a long time that there is no success in sport without proper hydration in a sportsman.

  9. Gas hydrates: Technology status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assumed the responsibility for expanding the knowledge base and for developing methods to recover gas from hydrates. These are ice-like mixtures of gas and water where gas molecules are trapped within a framework of water molecules. This research is part of the Unconventional Gas Recovery (UGR) program, a multidisciplinary effort that focuses on developing the technology to produce natural gas from resources that have been classified as unconventional because of their unique geologies and production mechanisms. Current work on gas hydrates emphasizes geological studies; characterization of the resource; and generic research, including modeling of reservoir conditions, production concepts, and predictive strategies for stimulated wells. Complementing this work is research on in situ detection of hydrates and field tests to verify extraction methods. Thus, current research will provide a comprehensive technology base from which estimates of reserve potential can be made, and from which industry can develop recovery strategies. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boswell, R.D.; Shelander, D.; Lee, M.; Latham, T.; Collett, T.; Guerin, G.; Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.; Goldberg, D.

    2009-07-15

    A unique set of high-quality downhole shallow subsurface well log data combined with industry standard 3D seismic data from the Alaminos Canyon area has enabled the first detailed description of a concentrated gas hydrate accumulation within sand in the Gulf of Mexico. The gas hydrate occurs within very fine grained, immature volcaniclastic sands of the Oligocene Frio sand. Analysis of well data acquired from the Alaminos Canyon Block 818 No.1 ('Tigershark') well shows a total gas hydrate occurrence 13 m thick, with inferred gas hydrate saturation as high as 80% of sediment pore space. Average porosity in the reservoir is estimated from log data at approximately 42%. Permeability in the absence of gas hydrates, as revealed from the analysis of core samples retrieved from the well, ranges from 600 to 1500 millidarcies. The 3-D seismic data reveals a strong reflector consistent with significant increase in acoustic velocities that correlates with the top of the gas-hydrate-bearing sand. This reflector extends across an area of approximately 0.8 km{sup 2} and delineates the minimal probable extent of the gas hydrate accumulation. The base of the inferred gas-hydrate zone also correlates well with a very strong seismic reflector that indicates transition into units of significantly reduced acoustic velocity. Seismic inversion analyses indicate uniformly high gas-hydrate saturations throughout the region where the Frio sand exists within the gas hydrate stability zone. Numerical modeling of the potential production of natural gas from the interpreted accumulation indicates serious challenges for depressurization-based production in settings with strong potential pressure support from extensive underlying aquifers.

  11. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  12. Anaerobic oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Boetius, A.; Knittel, K.

    2003-01-01

    At Hydrate Ridge (HR), Cascadia convergent margin, surface sediments contain massive gas hydrates formed from methane that ascends together with fluids along faults from deeper reservoirs. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by a microbial consortium of archaea and sulfate...

  13. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate–saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate–bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  14. The effects of hydration on growth of the house cricket, Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluney, Kevin E; Date, Rishabh C

    2008-01-01

    Maintenance of biochemical gradients, membrane fluidity, and sustained periods of activity are key physiological and behavioral functions of water for animals living in desiccating environments. Water stress may reduce the organism's ability to maintain these functions and as such, may reduce an organism's growth. However, few studies have examined this potential effect. The effects of altered hydration state of the house cricket, Acheta domesticus L. (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) on individual growth were studied under laboratory conditions. Crickets were permitted access to water for three different durations each day, resulting in significant differences in hydration state (32% greater hydration for maximum than minimum duration of water availability). Growth was 59% and 72% greater in dry mass and length, respectively, between the lowest and highest hydration state treatments. These findings may be representative for a variety of animal species and environments and could have important ecological implications.

  15. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO)

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  16. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge F. Gabitto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016 m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

  17. 78 FR 26337 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... Management's Lower 48 Assessment; Results of Consortium for Ocean Leadership Workshop; Update on International Activity; FY 2013 Methane Hydrate Program Activities and Plans; Draft Interagency Roadmap; Methane...

  18. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...

  19. Observations related to tetrahydrofuran and methane hydrates for laboratory studies of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.Y.; Yun, T.S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction among water molecules, guest gas molecules, salts, and mineral particles determines the nucleation and growth behavior of gas hydrates in natural sediments. Hydrate of tetrahydrofuran (THF) has long been used for laboratory studies of gas hydrate-bearing sediments to provide close control on hydrate concentrations and to overcome the long formation history of methane hydrate from aqueous phase methane in sediments. Yet differences in the polarizability of THF (polar molecule) compared to methane (nonpolar molecule) raise questions about the suitability of THF as a proxy for methane in the study of hydrate-bearing sediments. From existing data and simple macroscale experiments, we show that despite its polar nature, THF's large molecular size results in low permittivity, prevents it from dissolving precipitated salts, and hinders the solvation of ions on dry mineral surfaces. In addition, the interfacial tension between water and THF hydrate is similar to that between water and methane hydrate. The processes that researchers choose for forming hydrate in sediments in laboratory settings (e.g., from gas, liquid, or ice) and the pore-scale distribution of the hydrate that is produced by each of these processes likely have a more pronounced effect on the measured macroscale properties of hydrate-bearing sediments than do differences between THF and methane hydrates themselves.

  20. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  1. Non-equilibrium Simulation of CO­2-hydrate Phase Transitions from Mixtures of CO2 and N2 Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qorbani Nashaqi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Storage of CO2 in aquifers is one of several options for reducing the emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere. Generally this option requires sealing integrity through layers of clay or shale. Many reservoirs have regions of temperature and pressure inside hydrate formation conditions. Whether hydrate formation can provide long term extra sealing still remains unverified in view of all co-existing phases that affect hydrate stability. Yet another storage option for CO2 is in the form of hydrate through exchange of in situ CH4 hydrate. Injection of CO2 into hydrate filled sediments is challenging due to the partial filling of pores with hydrate which results in low porosity and low permeability. Formation of new hydrate from injected CO2 will enhance these problems, Mixing N2 gas with the CO2 will increase permeability and will reduce driving forces for formation of new hydrate from pore water and injection gas. Hydrate can generally not reach thermodynamic equilibrium due to Gibbs' phase rule and the combined first and second laws of thermodynamics. These thermodynamic constraints on distribution of masses over co-existing phases are dynamically coupled to local mass- and heat-transport. Reservoir simulations are one possible method for investigation of possible scenarios related to injection of CO2 with N2 into aquifers containing CH4 hydrate. In this work we have developed prevoiusly modified RetrasoCodeBrite (RCB) simulator to handle injection of CO2/N2 gas mixtures. Hydrate formation and dissociation were determined by investigating Gibbs free energy differences between hydrate and hydrate formers. Gibbs free energy differences were calculated from changes in chemical potentials, which were obtained using non-equilibrium thermodynamic approach. Further extension of RCB has been implemented in this work through adding on-the-fly thermodynamic calculations. Correspondingly, hydrate phase transitions are calculated directly inside the code as a result of super

  2. Impact of protein, lipid and carbohydrate on the headspace delivery of volatile compounds from hydrating powders

    OpenAIRE

    Fisk, Ian; Boyer, Maxime; Linforth, Rob S.T.

    2012-01-01

    The release of volatile compounds, such as aroma, from a food material during hydration is of wide relevance to the food industry. To this end, dry powders of varying chemical composition were hydrated in a controlled system to investigate the impact of varying composition (protein, lipid and carbohydrate) on the delivery rate of volatile compounds to the headspace. Additional lipid and carbohydrate reduced the concentration of volatile compounds in the headspace and accelerated their rate of...

  3. Experimental validation of kinetic inhibitor strength on natural gas hydrate nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; Pachitsas, Stylianos; von Solms, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of natural gas hydrate formation in the presence of dissolved salts (NaCl) and crude oil ( a middle east crude with density 851.5 kg/m3 were investigated by using a standard rocking cell (RC-5) apparatus. The hydrate nucleation temperature was reduced in the presence of NaCl and oil...... management in oil and gas facilities. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  4. Low source-sink ratio reduces reserve starch in grapevine woody canes and modulates sugar transport and metabolism at transcriptional and enzyme activity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Angélica; Noronha, Henrique; Dai, Zhanwu; Delrot, Serge; Gerós, Hernâni

    2017-05-19

    Severe leaf removal decreases storage starch and sucrose in grapevine cv. Cabernet Sauvignon fruiting cuttings and modulates the activity of key enzymes and the expression of sugar transporter genes. Leaf removal is an agricultural practice that has been shown to modify vineyard efficiency and grape and wine composition. In this study, we took advantage of the ability to precisely control the number of leaves to fruits in Cabernet Sauvignon fruiting cuttings to study the effect of source-sink ratios (2 (2L), 6 (6L) and 12 (12) leaves per cluster) on starch metabolism and accumulation. Starch concentration was significantly higher in canes from 6L (42.13 ± 1.44 mg g DW-1) and 12L (43.50 ± 2.85 mg g DW-1) than in 2L (22.72 ± 3.10 mg g DW-1) plants. Moreover, carbon limitation promoted a transcriptional adjustment of genes involved in starch metabolism in grapevine woody tissues, including a decrease in the expression of the plastidic glucose-6-phosphate translocator, VvGPT1. Contrarily, the transcript levels of the gene coding the catalytic subunit VvAGPB1 of the VvAGPase complex were higher in canes from 2L plants than in 6L and 12L, which positively correlated with the biochemical activity of this enzyme. Sucrose concentration increased in canes from 2L to 6L and 12L plants, and the amount of total phenolics followed the same trend. Expression studies showed that VvSusy transcripts decreased in canes from 2L to 6L and 12L plants, which correlated with the biochemical activity of insoluble invertase, while the expression of the sugar transporters VvSUC11 and VvSUC12, together with VvSPS1, which codes an enzyme involved in sucrose synthesis, increased. Thus, sucrose seems to control starch accumulation through the adjustment of the cane sink strength.

  5. Enzyme catalysed tandem reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroz-Guinea, Isabel; García-Junceda, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    To transfer to the laboratory, the excellent efficiency shown by enzymes in Nature, biocatalysis, had to mimic several synthetic strategies used by the living organisms. Biosynthetic pathways are examples of tandem catalysis and may be assimilated in the biocatalysis field for the use of isolated multi-enzyme systems in the homogeneous phase. The concurrent action of several enzymes that work sequentially presents extraordinary advantages from the synthetic point of view, since it permits a reversible process to become irreversible, to shift the equilibrium reaction in such a way that enantiopure compounds can be obtained from prochiral or racemic substrates, reduce or eliminate problems due to product inhibition or prevent the shortage of substrates by dilution or degradation in the bulk media, etc. In this review we want to illustrate the developments of recent studies involving in vitro multi-enzyme reactions for the synthesis of different classes of organic compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Flows due to pressure induced dissociation-formation of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo, J. R.; Kwon, S.; Saur, R.; Loekman, S.; Luzi, G.; Rauh, C.; Wierschem, A.; Delgado, A.

    2017-10-01

    During the last decade, Gas Hydrates (GH) have attracted the interest of the scientific community for engineering applications. Carbon dioxide hydrate (CO2H), for instance, may play an important role for capture and sequestration methods in order to reduce global climate change. Despite the extensive literature, the transport phenomena involved during CO2H formation are not yet fully understood. CO2 transfer from gas or liquid phase to the bulk of water is expected to happen not only by molecular diffusion but also driven by natural convective currents induced by CO2 dissolution in water. Using particle tracer methods, we experimentally characterize the flow velocity of the bulk of water during CO2H formation. For that purpose, CO2H is grown inside an optical cell with a volume of 12 mL at various pressures and temperatures. Due to CO2 dissolution, convection currents are noticed prior to hydrate formation. Our experimental results point to a significant correlation between this process and the subsequent hydrate formation. Two well-differentiated hydrate growth patterns were observed depending on the hydrate induction time and the corresponding CO2 concentration distribution inside water. For long induction times, CO2 can be provided from the water phase resulting in rapid growth. Short induction times resulted in slow growth at the interface creating a solid barrier accompanied by a significant drop in the flow velocity. In some cases, the hydrate layer appeared to be unstable and convection could restart.

  7. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  8. IMPORTANCE OF HYDRATION IN SPORTS

    OpenAIRE

    Goran Vasić; Dragoslav Jakonić

    2008-01-01

    Importance of hydration is detrmined by importance of functions of water in the human organism: i.e. regulation of body temperature, transport, excretion of waste materials through urine, digestion of food which is facilititated by saliva and gastric juices, maintenance of flexibility of organs and tissues About 60 % body mass of an adult person (males: 61 %, females: 54 %) is made up of water. Water content of a newly born baby reaches 77 %, and it is up to 50 % in adults. It is very importa...

  9. Hydration recommendations for sport 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montain, Scott J

    2008-01-01

    Fluid replacement remains an important strategy for preserving exercise performance as dehydration in excess of 2% of body weight consistently impairs aerobic exercise performance. Too much of a good thing, however, can have negative health consequences as persistent drinking in excess of sweating rate can induce symptomatic exercise associated hyponatremia. This short review highlights new position stands and/or policy statements regarding fluid replacement for sport, evidence that laboratory findings translate to team sport performance, and current hydration practices of athletes. It is culminated with practical strategies for drinking appropriately during physical activity.

  10. Reduced carbohydrate availability does not modulate training-induced heat shock protein adaptations but does upregulate oxidative enzyme activity in human skeletal muscle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James P. Morton; Louise Croft; Jonathan D. Bartlett; Don P. M. MacLaren; Thomas Reilly; Louise Evans; Anne McArdle; Barry Drust

    2009-01-01

    ... for training-induced heat shock protein (HSP) adaptations of skeletal muscle. A secondary aim was to investigate the influence of reduced carbohydrate availability on oxidative adaptations and exercise performance...

  11. Effects of Nanosilica on Early Age Stages of Cement Hydration

    OpenAIRE

    Forood Torabian Isfahani; Elena Redaelli; Weiwen Li; Yaru Sun

    2017-01-01

    Effects of nanosilica on cement hydration have been broadly investigated in the literature and early age cement hydration, as a whole, has been mainly considered, disregarding the substages of the hydration. The hydration of cement is characterized by different substages and nanosilica effect on the hydration could be a result of diverse, even contradictory, behavior of nanosilica in individual stages of the hydration. In this study, effects of nanosilica on different substages of cement hydr...

  12. The Potential Socio-economic Impacts of Gas Hydrate Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, David; Schaafsma, Marije; Marin-Moreno, Héctor; Minshull, Tim A.

    2017-04-01

    the labour supply may not fit with the labour demand. In regions with an existing strong fossil fuel energy sector, hydrate development would prolong the timeframe for which this sector could significantly contribute to the local and wider economy. In unexploited areas the industry can provide considerable income to an otherwise undeveloped region. Industrialisation tends to increase regional population, pressuring existing public services, such as healthcare and transport infrastructure. Immigrant fossil fuel sector workers are predominantly young, male and single. Their presence may be linked to elevated levels of certain social issues seen as undesirable problems by the community at large, such as drug usage or alcoholism. Hydrate development provides limited benefit to indigenous communities who are still following a traditional cultural lifestyle in the proposed development area, as many opportunities are not compatible with their way of life. Additionally, industry associated infrastructure can reduce the ability of the indigenous population to utilise the land directly, or as an access route elsewhere. The range of possible impacts show that any hydrate development must be carefully managed to maximise its potential, whether this takes the form of using the revenue from hydrate exploitation to try and counter the associated issues, or whether there needs to be specific limits placed on locations where extraction can occur.

  13. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  14. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  15. Dynamics of a photoexcited hydrated electron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, M.S.; Baltuška, A.; Wiersma, D.A.; Kärtner, F.X.

    2004-01-01

    Combining photon-echo and frequency-resolved pump-probe techniques with extremely short laser pulses that consist of only few optical cycles, we investigate the dynamics of the equilibrated hydrated electron. The pure dephasing time of the hydrated electron deduced from the photon-echo measurements

  16. Gas hydrate inhibition of drilling fluid additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolan, L.; Baojiang, S.; Shaoran, R. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates that form during offshore well drilling can have adverse impacts on well operational safety. The hydrates typically form in the risers and the annulus between the casing and the drillstring, and can stop the circulation of drilling fluids. In this study, experiments were conducted to measure the effect of drilling fluid additives on hydrate inhibition. Polyalcohols, well-stability control agents, lubricating agents, and polymeric materials were investigated in a stirred tank reactor at temperatures ranging from -10 degree C to 60 degrees C. Pressure, temperature, and torque were used to detect onset points of hydrate formation and dissociation. The inhibitive effect of the additives on hydrate formation was quantified. Phase boundary shifts were measured in terms of temperature difference or sub-cooling gained when chemicals were added to pure water. Results showed that the multiple hydroxyl groups in polyalcohol chemicals significantly inhibited hydrate formation. Polymeric and polyacrylamide materials had only a small impact on hydrate formation, while sulfonated methyl tannins were found to increase hydrate formation. 6 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  17. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  18. Enzyme immunoassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Dinesen, B; Deckert, M

    1985-01-01

    An enzyme linked immunoadsorbent assay for urinary albumin using commercially available reagents is described. The assay range is 2.5-120 micrograms/l. When samples are analysed in two standard dilutions, the assayable albumin concentration range is 2.5-240 mg/l, covering the clinical range from...

  19. Food Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBroom, Rachel; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2007-01-01

    Many students view biology and chemistry as two unrelated, separate sciences; how these courses are generally taught in high schools may do little to change that impression. The study of enzymes provide a great opportunity for both biology and chemistry teachers to share with students the interdisciplinary nature of science. This article describes…

  20. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the

  1. Fixure-reduce method for the synthesis of Cu2O/MWCNTs nanocomposites and its application as enzyme-free glucose sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Wang, Guangfeng; Zhang, Wei; Wei, Yan; Fang, Bin

    2009-07-15

    Cu(2)O/MWCNT (multi-walled carbon nanotubes) nanocomposites were successfully prepared in large quantities with a new fixure-reduction method under low temperature. The morphology and shape of the Cu(2)O/MWCNTs nanocomposites were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopes (FESEMs), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), respectively. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to evaluate the electrochemical performance of the Cu(2)O/MWCNTs nanocomposites modified electrode towards glucose. Compared to the bare GCE, the Cu(2)O nanoparticles and the MWCNTs modified electrode, the Cu(2)O/MWCNTs modified electrode displays high electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of glucose. With a potential of -0.20 V, the Cu(2)O/MWCNTs modified electrode was used to determine glucose by amperometric, showing significantly lower overvoltage and a linear dependence (R=0.9958) in the concentration up to 10 microM with a sensitivity of 6.53 microA micromol L(-1) and a detection limit of 0.05 micromol L(-1) (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). In summary, the preparation process of the nanocomposites is very simple and the nanocomposites could be used for the development of enzyme-free glucose sensor.

  2. Deficiency of maize starch-branching enzyme i results in altered starch fine structure, decreased digestibility and reduced coleoptile growth during germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yandeau-Nelson Marna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two distinct starch branching enzyme (SBE isoforms predate the divergence of monocots and dicots and have been conserved in plants since then. This strongly suggests that both SBEI and SBEII provide unique selective advantages to plants. However, no phenotype for the SBEI mutation, sbe1a, had been previously observed. To explore this incongruity the objective of the present work was to characterize functional and molecular phenotypes of both sbe1a and wild-type (Wt in the W64A maize inbred line. Results Endosperm starch granules from the sbe1a mutant were more resistant to digestion by pancreatic α-amylase, and the sbe1a mutant starch had an altered branching pattern for amylopectin and amylose. When kernels were germinated, the sbe1a mutant was associated with shorter coleoptile length and higher residual starch content, suggesting that less efficient starch utilization may have impaired growth during germination. Conclusions The present report documents for the first time a molecular phenotype due to the absence of SBEI, and suggests strongly that it is associated with altered physiological function of the starch in vivo. We believe that these results provide a plausible rationale for the conservation of SBEI in plants in both monocots and dicots, as greater seedling vigor would provide an important survival advantage when resources are limited.

  3. Beer consumption reduces cerebral oxidation caused by aluminum toxicity by normalizing gene expression of tumor necrotic factor alpha and several antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Muñoz, M J; Meseguer, I; Sanchez-Reus, M I; Schultz, A; Olivero, R; Benedí, J; Sánchez-Muniz, F J

    2008-03-01

    Aluminum (Al)-induced neurotoxicity is well known and different salts of aluminum have been reported to accelerate oxidative damage to biomolecules. The present study has examined whether silicon consumed in the form of silicic acid or beer could potentially inhibit aluminum toxicity in the brain. Male mice were administered with Al(NO(3))(3) orally at a dose of 450 mg/kg/day in drinking water for 3 month. Experimental mice were given Al(NO(3))(3) along with 50 mg/L of silicic acid or with 0.5 ml/day of beer. Al brain levels in the Al group were four times higher than those of control mice while silicic acid and beer group values were 40% lower than those of the Al group. We have observed that beer prevented accumulation of lipid damage significantly, which resulted from aluminum intake. Decline in the expression of mRNA of endogenous antioxidant enzymes associated with aluminum administration was also inhibited by beer and silicic acid. The tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) RNA expression was normalized in silicic acid and beer groups. Very high and significant correlations were found for the different parameters tested suggesting that moderate consumption of beer, due to its silicon content, effectively protects against the neurotoxic effects of aluminum.

  4. Deficiency of maize starch-branching enzyme i results in altered starch fine structure, decreased digestibility and reduced coleoptile growth during germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Two distinct starch branching enzyme (SBE) isoforms predate the divergence of monocots and dicots and have been conserved in plants since then. This strongly suggests that both SBEI and SBEII provide unique selective advantages to plants. However, no phenotype for the SBEI mutation, sbe1a, had been previously observed. To explore this incongruity the objective of the present work was to characterize functional and molecular phenotypes of both sbe1a and wild-type (Wt) in the W64A maize inbred line. Results Endosperm starch granules from the sbe1a mutant were more resistant to digestion by pancreatic α-amylase, and the sbe1a mutant starch had an altered branching pattern for amylopectin and amylose. When kernels were germinated, the sbe1a mutant was associated with shorter coleoptile length and higher residual starch content, suggesting that less efficient starch utilization may have impaired growth during germination. Conclusions The present report documents for the first time a molecular phenotype due to the absence of SBEI, and suggests strongly that it is associated with altered physiological function of the starch in vivo. We believe that these results provide a plausible rationale for the conservation of SBEI in plants in both monocots and dicots, as greater seedling vigor would provide an important survival advantage when resources are limited. PMID:21599988

  5. Use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy to reduce cardiovascular events in high-risk patients: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommer, William J

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is understood as a continuum; risk factors induce a pathophysiologic cascade that culminates in end-organ failure. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) influences multiple aspects of the pathophysiology via hemodynamic and nonhemodynamic effects. Many long-term clinical trials provide overwhelming evidence of benefits of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) across the cardiovascular continuum, including benefits regarding hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke, renal disease, and heart failure. Trials also indicate additive or synergistic effects of combination therapy in renal disease and heart failure, a possibility supported by the basic biochemistry of the agents. Discussion of these trials is included in part 1 of this 2-part review. Part 2 of the review will discuss the extensive interaction of the RAS with the cellular and molecular pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and the cross-continuum effects of ARBs and ACE inhibitors, which raise the possibility that RAS inhibition can offer protection in high-risk patients who do not have symptoms. The benefits of combined ACE inhibitor/ARB therapy in high-risk patients await confirmation; ongoing clinical research in this area will be discussed.

  6. Hydration shells exchange charge with their protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Lindgård, Per-Anker; Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    Investigation of the interaction between a protein and its hydration shells is an experimental and theoretical challenge. Here, we used ultrasonic pressure waves in aqueous solutions of a protein to explore the conformational states of the protein and its interaction with its hydration shells....... In our experiments, the amplitude of an ultrasonic pressure wave is gradually increased (0–20 atm) while we simultaneously measure the Raman spectra from the hydrated protein (β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme). We detected two types of spectral changes: first, up to 70% increase in the intensity...... the presence of an ultrasonic pressure, a protein and its hydration shells are in thermodynamic and charge equilibrium, i.e. a protein and its hydration shells exchange charges. The ultrasonic wave disrupts these equilibria which are regained within 30–45 min after the ultrasonic pressure is shut off....

  7. Variation of corneal refractive index with hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young L; Walsh, Joseph T Jr.; Goldstick, Thomas K; Glucksberg, Matthew R [Biomedical Engineering Department, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2004-03-07

    We report the effect of changes in the corneal hydration on the refractive index of the cornea. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT), the geometrical thickness and the group refractive index of the bovine cornea were derived simultaneously as the corneal hydration was varied. The corneal hydration was then calculated from the corneal thickness. The group refractive index of the cornea increased non-linearly as the cornea dehydrated. In addition, a simple mathematical model was developed, based on the assumption that changes in corneal hydration occur only in the interfibrilar space with constant water content within the collagen fibrils. Good agreement between the experimental results and the mathematical model supports the assumption. The results also demonstrate that the measurement of refractive index is a quantitative indicator of corneal hydration.

  8. Influence of sodium borate on the early age hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champenois, Jean-Baptiste; Dhoury, Mélanie [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Cau Dit Coumes, Céline, E-mail: celine.cau-dit-coumes@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Mercier, Cyrille [LMCPA, Université de Valenciennes et du Hainaut Cambrésis, 59600 Maubeuge (France); Revel, Bertrand [Centre Commun de Mesure RMN, Université Lille1 Sciences Technologies, Cité Scientifique, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Le Bescop, Patrick [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Damidot, Denis [Ecole des Mines de Douai, LGCgE-GCE, 59508 Douai (France)

    2015-04-15

    Calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cements are potential candidates for the conditioning of radioactive wastes with high sodium borate concentrations. This work thus investigates early age hydration of two CSA cements with different gypsum contents (0 to 20%) as a function of the mixing solution composition (borate and NaOH concentrations). Gypsum plays a key role in controlling the reactivity of cement. When the mixing solution is pure water, increasing the gypsum concentration accelerates cement hydration. However, the reverse is observed when the mixing solution contains sodium borate. Until gypsum exhaustion, the pore solution pH remains constant at ~ 10.8, and a poorly crystallized borate compound (ulexite) precipitates. A correlation is established between this transient precipitation and the hydration delay. Decreasing the gypsum content in the binder, or increasing the sodium content in the mixing solution, are two ways of reducing the stability of ulexite, thus decreasing the hydration delay.

  9. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  10. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-06-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  11. A GENE IN THE CHROMOSOMAL REGION 3P21 WITH GREATLY REDUCED EXPRESSION IN LUNG-CANCER IS SIMILAR TO THE GENE FOR UBIQUITIN-ACTIVATING ENZYME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOK, K; HOFSTRA, R; PILZ, A; van den Berg, Anke; TERPSTRA, P; BUYS, CHCM; CARRITT, B

    1993-01-01

    The chromosomal region 3p21 is thought to be the site of a lung tumor suppressor gene. We recently cloned a gene from this region that has greatly reduced expression in almost all lung tumor cell lines examined, in spite of being widely expressed in a variety of other tumor and nontumor cell types.

  12. Biosurfactant as a Promoter of Methane Hydrate Formation: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Amit; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Kumar, Rajnish; Balomajumder, Chandrajit; Singh, Anil Kumar; Santhakumari, B; Kumar, Pushpendra; Laik, Sukumar

    2016-02-12

    Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) are solid non-stoichiometric compounds often regarded as a next generation energy source. Successful commercialization of NGH is curtailed by lack of efficient and safe technology for generation, dissociation, storage and transportation. The present work studied the influence of environment compatible biosurfactant on gas hydrate formation. Biosurfactant was produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain A11 and was characterized as rhamnolipids. Purified rhamnolipids reduced the surface tension of water from 72 mN/m to 36 mN/m with Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of 70 mg/l. Use of 1000 ppm rhamnolipids solution in C type silica gel bed system increased methane hydrate formation rate by 42.97% and reduced the induction time of hydrate formation by 22.63% as compared to water saturated C type silica gel. Presence of rhamnolipids also shifted methane hydrate formation temperature to higher values relative to the system without biosurfactant. Results from thermodynamic and kinetic studies suggest that rhamnolipids can be applied as environment friendly methane hydrate promoter.

  13. Vibrational Raman spectra of hydrogen clathrate hydrates from density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, K. R.; Venkatnathan, Arun

    2013-03-01

    Hydrogen clathrate hydrates are promising sources of clean energy and are known to exist in a sII hydrate lattice, which consists of H2 molecules in dodecahedron (512) and hexakaidecahedron (51264) water cages. The formation of these hydrates which occur in extreme thermodynamic conditions is known to be considerably reduced by an inclusion of tetrahydrofuran (THF) in cages of these hydrate lattice. In this present work, we employ the density functional theory with a dispersion corrected (B97-D) functional to characterize vibrational Raman modes in the cages of pure and THF doped hydrogen clathrate hydrates. Our calculations show that the symmetric stretch of the H2 molecule in the 51264H2.THF cage is blueshifted compared to the 51264H2 cage. However, all vibrational modes of water molecules are redshifted which suggest reduced interaction between the H2 molecule and water molecules in the 51264H2.THF cage. The symmetric and asymmetric O-H stretch of water molecules in 512H2, 51264H2, and 51264H2.THF cages are redshifted compared with the corresponding guest free cages due to interactions between encapsulated H2 molecules and water molecules of the cages. The low frequency modes contain contributions from contraction and expansion of water cages and vibration of water molecules due to hydrogen bonding and these modes could possibly play an important role in the formation of the hydrate lattice.

  14. Stereochemical mechanism of two sabinene hydrate synthases forming antipodal monoterpenes in thyme (Thymus vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sandra T; Köllner, Tobias G; Asbach, Julia; Degenhardt, Jörg

    2013-01-15

    The essential oil of Thymus vulgaris consists of a complex blend of mono- and sesquiterpenes that provides the plant with its characteristic aromatic odor. Several chemotypes have been described for thyme. In this study, we identified two enzymes of the sabinene hydrate chemotype which are responsible for the biosynthesis of its major monoterpene alcohols, (1S,2R,4S)-(Z)-sabinene hydrate and (1S,2S,4R)-(E)-sabinene hydrate. Both TPS6 and TPS7 are multiproduct enzymes that formed 16 monoterpenes and thus cover almost the whole monoterpene spectrum of the chemotype. Although the product spectra of both enzymes are similar, they form opposing enantiomers of their chiral products. Incubation of the enzymes with the potential reaction intermediates revealed that the stereospecificity of TPS6 and TPS7 is determined by the formation of the first intermediate, linalyl diphosphate. Since TPS6 and TPS7 shared an amino acid sequence identity of 85%, a mutagenesis study was employed to identify the amino acids that determine the stereoselectivity. One amino acid position had a major influence on the stereochemistry of the formed products. Based on comparative models of TPS6 and TPS7 protein structures with the GPP substrate docked in the active site pocket, the influence of this amino acid residue on the reaction mechanism is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Elevated ROS-scavenging enzymes contribute to acclimation to UV-B exposure in transplastomic tobacco plants, reducing the role of plastid peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czégény, Gyula; Le Martret, Bénédicte; Pávkovics, Dóra; Dix, Philip J; Hideg, Éva

    2016-08-20

    Leaf peroxidases play a key role in the successful acclimation of plants to low UV-B doses. The aim of the present study was to examine whether selective enhancement of alternative chloroplast antioxidant pathways achieved by chloroplast transformation affected the need for peroxidase defense. Transplastomic tobacco lines expressing glutathione reductase in combination with either dehydroascorbate reductase or glutathione-S-transferase in their plastids exhibited better tolerance to supplemental UV-B than wild type plants. After 10days UV treatment, both the maximum and effective quantum yields of PSII decreased in the wild type by 10% but were unaffected in either of the transformed lines. Activities of total peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase, in addition to dehydroascorbate reductase and gluthatione-S-transferase, were increased by UV in all lines. Gluthatione reductase activity was unaffected by UV in the transplastomic line engineered to have a higher constitutive level of this enzyme, but increased in the two other genotypes. However, the observed more successful acclimation required less activation of peroxidases in the doubly transformed plants than in the wild type and less increase in non-enzymatic hydroxyl radical neutralization in the dehydroascorbate reductase plus glutathione reductase fortified plants than in either of the other lines. These results highlight the fundamental role of efficient glutathione, and especially ascorbate, recycling in the chloroplast in response to exposure of plants to UV-B. They also identify chloroplast localized peroxidases among the large variety of leaf peroxidases as essential elements of defense, supporting our earlier hypothesis on hydrogen peroxide UV-B photo-cleavage as the primary mechanism behind damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Clathrate Hydrates on Specialised Hardware Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian R. Trott

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Classical equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD simulations have been performed to investigate the computational performance of the Simple Point Charge (SPC and TIP4P water models applied to simulation of methane hydrates, and also of liquid water, on a variety of specialised hardware platforms, in addition to estimation of various equilibrium properties of clathrate hydrates. The FPGA-based accelerator MD-GRAPE 3 was used to accelerate substantially the computation of non-bonded forces, while GPU-based platforms were also used in conjunction with CUDA-enabled versions of the LAMMPS MD software packages to reduce computational time dramatically. The dependence of molecular system size and scaling with number of processors was also investigated. Considering performance relative to power consumption, it is seen that GPU-based computing is quite attractive.

  17. Dipolar response of hydrated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2012-02-28

    The paper presents an analytical theory and numerical simulations of the dipolar response of hydrated proteins in solution. We calculate the effective dielectric constant representing the average dipole moment induced at the protein by a uniform external field. The dielectric constant shows a remarkable variation among the proteins, changing from 0.5 for ubiquitin to 640 for cytochrome c. The former value implies a negative dipolar susceptibility, that is a dia-electric dipolar response and negative dielectrophoresis. It means that ubiquitin, carrying an average dipole of ≃240 D, is expected to repel from the region of a stronger electric field. This outcome is the result of a negative cross-correlation between the protein and water dipoles, compensating for the positive variance of the intrinsic protein dipole in the overall dipolar susceptibility. In contrast to the neutral ubiquitin, charged proteins studied here show para-electric dipolar response and positive dielectrophoresis. The study suggests that the dipolar response of proteins in solution is strongly affected by the coupling of the protein surface charge to the hydration water. The protein-water dipolar cross-correlations are long-ranged, extending ~2 nm from the protein surface into the bulk. A similar correlation length of about 1 nm is seen for the electrostatic potential produced by the hydration water inside the protein. The analysis of numerical simulations suggests that the polarization of the protein-water interface is highly heterogeneous and does not follow the standard dielectric results for cavities carved in dielectrics. The polarization of the water shell gains in importance, relative to the intrinsic protein dipole, at high frequencies, above the protein Debye peak. The induced interfacial dipole can be either parallel or antiparallel to the protein dipole, depending on the distribution of the protein surface charge. As a result, the high-frequency absorption of the protein solution can

  18. Clathrate hydrate tuning for technological purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Profio, Pietro; Germani, Raimondo; Savelli, Gianfranco

    2010-05-01

    Gas hydrates are being increasingly considered as convenient media for gas storage and transportation as the knowledge of their properties increases, in particular as relates to methane and hydrogen. Clathrate hydrates may also represent a feasible sequestration technology for carbon dioxide, due to a well defined P/T range of stability, and several research programs are addressing this possibility. Though the understanding of the molecular structure and supramolecular interactions which are responsible of most properties of hydrates have been elucitated in recent years, the underlying theoretical physico-chemical framework is still poor, especially as relates to the role of "conditioners" (inhibitors and promoters) from the molecular/supramolecular point of view. In the present communication we show some results from our research approach which is mainly focused on the supramolecular properties of clathrate hydrate systems - and their conditioners - as a way to get access to a controlled modulation of the formation, dissociation and stabilization of gas hydrates. In particular, this communication will deal with: (a) a novel, compact apparatus for studying the main parameters of formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in a one-pot experiment, which can be easily and rapidly carried out on board of a drilling ship;[1] (b) the effects of amphiphile molecules (surfactants) as inhibitors or promoters of gas hydrate formation;[2] (c) a novel nanotechnology for a reliable and quick production of hydrogen hydrates, and its application to fuel cells;[3,4] and (d) the development of a clathrate hydrate tecnology for the sequestration and geological storage of man-made CO2, possibly with concomitant recovery of natural gas from NG hydrate fields. Furthermore, the feasibility of catalyzing the reduction of carbon dioxide to energy-rich species by hydrates is being investigated. [1] Di Profio, P., Germani, R., Savelli, G., International Patent Application PCT/IT2006

  19. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  20. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with

  1. Purified galactooligosaccharide, derived from a mixture produced by the enzymic activity of Bifidobacterium bifidum, reduces Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium adhesion and invasion in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Laura E J; Cooley, William A; Jones, Gareth; Nunez, Alejandro; Crudgington, Bentley; Weyer, Ute; Dugdale, Alexandra H; Tzortzis, George; Collins, James W; Woodward, Martin J; La Ragione, Roberto M

    2010-12-01

    The prebiotic Bimuno(®) is a mixture containing galactooligosaccharides (GOSs), produced by the galactosyltransferase activity of Bifidobacterium bifidum NCIMB 41171 using lactose as the substrate. Previous in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrating the efficacy of Bimuno(®) in reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) colonization did not ascertain whether or not the protective effects could be attributed to the prebiotic component GOS. Here we wished to test the hypothesis that GOS, derived from Bimuno(®), may confer the direct anti-invasive and protective effects of Bimuno(®). In this study the efficacy of Bimuno(®), a basal solution of Bimuno(®) without GOS [which contained glucose, galactose, lactose, maltodextrin and gum arabic in the same relative proportions (w/w) as they are found in Bimuno(®)] and purified GOS to reduce S. Typhimurium adhesion and invasion was assessed using a series of in vitro and in vivo models. The novel use of three dimensionally cultured HT-29-16E cells to study prebiotics in vitro demonstrated that the presence of ∼ 5 mg Bimuno(®) ml(-1) or ∼ 2.5 mg GOS ml(-1) significantly reduced the invasion of S. Typhimurium (SL1344nal(r)) (PBimuno(®) or GOS prevented the adherence or invasion of S. Typhimurium to enterocytes, and thus reduced its associated pathology. This protection appeared to correlate with significant reductions in the neutral and acidic mucins detected in goblet cells, possibly as a consequence of stimulating the cells to secrete the mucin into the lumen. In all assays, Bimuno(®) without GOS conferred no such protection, indicating that the basal solution confers no protective effects against S. Typhimurium. Collectively, the studies presented here clearly indicate that the protective effects conferred by Bimuno(®) can be attributed to GOS.

  2. Theoretical modeling insights into elastic wave attenuation mechanisms in marine sediments with pore-filling methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Moreno, H.; Sahoo, S. K.; Best, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    The majority of presently exploitable marine methane hydrate reservoirs are likely to host hydrate in disseminated form in coarse grain sediments. For hydrate concentrations below 25-40%, disseminated or pore-filling hydrate does not increase elastic frame moduli, thus making impotent traditional seismic velocity-based methods. Here, we present a theoretical model to calculate frequency-dependent P and S wave velocity and attenuation of an effective porous medium composed of solid mineral grains, methane hydrate, methane gas, and water. The model considers elastic wave energy losses caused by local viscous flow both (i) between fluid inclusions in hydrate and pores and (ii) between different aspect ratio pores (created when hydrate grows); the inertial motion of the frame with respect to the pore fluid (Biot's type fluid flow); and gas bubble damping. The sole presence of pore-filling hydrate in the sediment reduces the available porosity and intrinsic permeability of the sediment affecting Biot's type attenuation at high frequencies. Our model shows that attenuation maxima due to fluid inclusions in hydrate are possible over the entire frequency range of interest to exploration seismology (1-106 Hz), depending on the aspect ratio of the inclusions, whereas maxima due to different aspect ratio pores occur only at sonic to ultrasound frequencies (104-106 Hz). This frequency response imposes further constraints on possible hydrate saturations able to reproduce broadband elastic measurements of velocity and attenuation. Our results provide a physical basis for detecting the presence and amount of pore-filling hydrate in seafloor sediments using conventional seismic surveys.

  3. Enzyme Nanorings

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Tsui-Fen; So, Christopher; White, Brian R.; Carlson, Jonathan C.T.; Sarikaya, Mehmet; Wagner, Carston

    2008-01-01

    We have demonstrated that nanostructures, and in particular nanorings incorporating a homodimeric enzyme, can be prepared by chemically induced self-assembly of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR)-histidine triad nucleotide binding 1(Hint1) fusion proteins. The dimensions of the nanorings were found by static light scattering and atomic force microscopy studies to be dependent on the length and composition of the peptide linking the fusion proteins, ranging in size from 10 to 70 nm in diameter and...

  4. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  5. Hydration Properties of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS Under Different Hydration Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydration properties of various cementitious materials containing Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag (GGBS, two alkali-activated slag cements (AAS-1 and AAS-2 in which sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide act as alkaline activators respectively, supersulfated cement (SSC and slag Portland cement(PSC, are compared with ordinary Portland cement (OPC to investigate the effect of activating environment on the hydration properties in this study by determining the compressive strength of the pastes, the hydration heat of binders within 96 hours, and the hydration products at age of 28 days. The results show that C-S-H gels are the main hydrated products for all cementitious systems containing GGBS. Ca(OH2 is the hydration products of OPC and PSC paste. However, ettringite and gypsum crystals instead of Ca(OH2 are detected in SSC paste. Additionally, tobermorite, a crystalline C-S-H, and calcite are hydrated products in AAS-1. Tobermorite, cowlesite and calcite are hydrated products of AAS-2 as well. Based on strength results, AAS-1 paste exhibits the highest compressive strength followed by POC, PSC, SSC in order at all testing ages and AAS-2 give the lowest compressive strength except for the early age at 3 days, which is higher than SSC but still lower than PSC. From hydration heat analysis, alkalinity in the reaction solution is a vital factor influencing the initial hydration rate and the initial hydration rate from higher to lower is AAS-2, AAS-1, OPC, PSC and SSC. Although AAS possesses a faster reaction rate in the initial hours, cumulative hydration heat of AAS is comparably lower than that of OPC, but higher than those of PSC and SSC in turn, which indicates that the hydration heat of clinkers is much higher than that of slag.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14934

  6. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors reduce mortality in hypertension: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system inhibitors involving 158 998 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vark, Laura C.; Bertrand, Michel; Akkerhuis, K. Martijn; Brugts, Jasper J.; Fox, Kim; Mourad, Jean-Jacques; Boersma, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Aims Renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors are well established for the reduction in cardiovascular morbidity, but their impact on all-cause mortality in hypertensive patients is uncertain. Our objective was to analyse the effects of RAAS inhibitors as a class of drugs, as well as of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) separately, on all-cause mortality. Methods and results We performed a pooled analysis of 20 cardiovascular morbidity–mortality trials. In each trial at least two-thirds of the patients had to be diagnosed with hypertension, according to the trial-specific definition, and randomized to treatment with an RAAS inhibitor or control treatment. The cohort included 158 998 patients (71 401 RAAS inhibitor; 87 597 control). The incidence of all-cause death was 20.9 and 23.3 per 1000 patient-years in patients randomized to RAAS inhibition and controls, respectively. Overall, RAAS inhibition was associated with a 5% reduction in all-cause mortality (HR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.91–1.00, P= 0.032), and a 7% reduction in cardiovascular mortality (HR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.88–0.99, P= 0.018). The observed treatment effect resulted entirely from the class of ACE inhibitors, which were associated with a significant 10% reduction in all-cause mortality (HR: 0.90, 95% CI: 0.84–0.97, P= 0.004), whereas no mortality reduction could be demonstrated with ARB treatment (HR: 0.99, 95% CI: 0.94–1.04, P= 0.683). This difference in treatment effect between ACE inhibitors and ARBs on all-cause mortality was statistically significant (P-value for heterogeneity 0.036). Conclusion In patients with hypertension, treatment with an ACE inhibitor results in a significant further reduction in all-cause mortality. Because of the high prevalence of hypertension, the widespread use of ACE inhibitors may result in an important gain in lives saved. PMID:22511654

  7. Novel GAA sequence variant c.1211 A>G reduces enzyme activity but not protein expression in infantile and adult onset Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, M I; Kroos, M A; Reuser, A J; Hatcher, E; Akhtar, M; McCready, M E; Tarnopolsky, M A

    2014-03-01

    Pompe disease is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder caused by lysosomal acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency. We report on two affected members of a non-consanguineous Caucasian family, including a classical infantile-onset patient with severe cardiomyopathy (IO) and his paternal grandmother with the adult-onset (AO) form. Two compound heterozygous sequence variants of the GAA gene were identified in each patient by mutation analyses (IO=c.1211A>G and c.1798C>T; AO=c.1211A>G and c.692+5G>T). For this study, the biochemical phenotype resulting from the missense mutation c.1211A>G in exon 8, which converts a highly conserved aspartate to glycine (p.Asp404Gly), was of specific interest because it had not been reported previously. Western blotting revealed a robust expression of all GAA isoforms in quadriceps muscle of both patients (fully CRIM positive), while enzymatic activity was 3.6% (IO) and 6.6% (AO) of normal controls. To further validate these findings, the c.1211A>G sequence variant was introduced in wild type GAA cDNA and over-expressed in HEK293T cells. Site-directed mutagenesis analyses confirmed that the mutation does not affect processing or expression of GAA protein, but rather impairs enzyme function. Similar results were reported for c.1798C>T (p.Arg600Cys), which further supports the biochemical phenotype observed in IO. The third mutation (c.692+5G>T, in intron 3) was predicted to affect normal splicing of the GAA mRNA, and qPCR indeed verified a 4-fold lower mRNA expression in AO. It is concluded that the novel sequence variant c.1211A>G results in full CRIM but significantly lower GAA activity, which in combination with c.1798C>T leads to infantile-onset Pompe disease. We surmise that the difference in disease severity between the two family members in this study is due to a milder effect of the intronic mutation c.692+5G>T (vs. c.1798C>T) on phenotype, partially preserving GAA activity and delaying onset in

  8. Particle Strength of Bayer Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjier, J. L.; Marten, D. F. G.

    Because of the proposed use of fluid bed calciners at the Kaiser Aluminum Baton Rouge Works, studies into the strength of alumina and alumina trihydrate from eight different alumina plants were initiated. It was found in the course of these studies that the particle strength of Bayer hydrate depended on the precipitation process conditions under which it was produced. A series of laboratory precipitation tests was conducted to determine the effect on particle strength of process variables such as seed charge, temperature, caustic concentration and seed recycle. It is concluded from these studies that relative particle strength of alumina trihydrate, as measured by a modified Forsythe-Hertwig Apparatus, can be predicted from a knowledge of the precipitation process conditions.

  9. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand

  10. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  11. Influence of temperature on methane hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Wu, Qingbai; Mu, Cuicui

    2017-08-11

    During gas hydrate formation process, a phase transition of liquid water exists naturally, implying that temperature has an important influence on hydrate formation. In this study, methane hydrate was formed within the same media. The experimental system was kept at 1.45, 6.49, and 12.91 °C respectively, and then different pressurization modes were applied in steps. We proposed a new indicator, namely the slope of the gas flow rates against time (dν g /dt), to represent the intrinsic driving force for hydrate formation. The driving force was calculated as a fixed value at the different stages of formation, including initial nucleation/growth, secondary nucleation/growth, and decay. The amounts of gas consumed at each stage were also calculated. The results show that the driving force during each stage follows an inverse relation with temperature, whereas the amount of consumed gas is proportional to temperature. This opposite trend indicates that the influences of temperature on the specific formation processes and final amounts of gas contained in hydrate should be considered separately. Our results also suggest that the specific ambient temperature under which hydrate is formed should be taken into consideration, when explaining the formation of different configurations and saturations of gas hydrates in natural reservoirs.

  12. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L.; Stern, Laura A.; Weitemeyer, Karen A.; Constable, Steven; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2011-01-01

    As part of our DOE-funded proposal to characterize gas hydrate in the Gulf of Mexico using marine electromagnetic methods, a collaboration between SIO, LLNL, and USGS with the goal of measuring the electrical properties of lab-created methane (CH4) hydrate and sediment mixtures was formed. We examined samples with known characteristics to better relate electrical properties measured in the field to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns. Here we discuss first-ever electrical conductivity (σ) measurements on unmixed CH4 hydrate (Du Frane et al., 2011): 6 x 10-5 S/m at 5 °C, which is ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater. This difference allows electromagnetic (EM) techniques to distinguish highly resistive gas hydrate deposits from conductive water saturated sediments in EM field surveys. More recently, we performed measurements on CH4 hydrate mixed with sediment and we also discuss those initial findings here. Our results on samples free of liquid water are important for predicting conductivity of sediments with pores highly saturated with gas hydrate, and are an essential starting point for comprehensive mixing models.

  13. Relict gas hydrates as possible reason of gas emission from shallow permafrost at the northern part of West Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvilin, Evgeny; Bukhanov, Boris; Tumskoy, Vladimir; Istomin, Vladimir; Tipenko, Gennady

    2017-04-01

    zone) permafrost horizons. The results show that all investigated frozen hydrate-bearing sandy and silty sand samples in the temperature range from -16 °C to -2 °C are characterized by not complete decomposition of pore hydrate at relieving pressure below the equilibrium. It was observed that at typical north Western Siberian permafrost temperature of -6 ° C the safety of pore hydrate in frozen samples can reach 60% at the pressure reducing below the equilibrium. In was found that with increasing temperature and particle size (dispersity) the efficiency of pore hydrate self-preservation is decreased, but even at the temperature of -2 °C there is residual pore methane hydrate content in non-saline sandy samples. All this suggests about high preservation of methane hydrates in frozen sediments at non-equilibrium thermobaric conditions, close to reservoir conditions. Based on the results of mathematical and experimental simulations about the possibility of relic gas hydrates existence on permafrost depth up to 200 m in the northern part of Western Siberia on the less than 200 m due to geological manifestation of the self-preservation effect of gas hydrates. References. 1.Chuvilin EM, Yakushev VS, Perlova EV. Gas and gas hydrates in the permafrost of Bovanenkovo gas field, Yamal Peninsula, West Siberia. // Polarforschung 68: 215-219, 1998. (erschienen 2000). 2.Yakushev V.S., Chuvilin E.M. 2000. Natural gas and hydrate accumulation within permafrost in Russia. Cold Regions Science and Technology. 31: 189-197. These researches are supported by grant RSF №16-17-00051.

  14. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  15. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by Maurer Technology, Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. We plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. We also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. We are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. We hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, our goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  16. Dissociation of Natural and Artificial Methane Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misyura S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Present work deals with natural and artificial methane hydrate dissociation. The heating of the powder produced due to the temperature difference between the external air and the powder. The dissociation rate was determined by gravimetric method. The range of the partial self-preservation for the natural hydrate is significantly longer than for the artificial one and moved to higher temperatures. The destruction of the natural sample is slower than the artificial one. The time-averaged dissociation rate for the artificial sample is equal to 1,25 %/s and for the natural hydrate corresponds to 0,59 %/s.

  17. Tapping methane hydrates for unconventional natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Methane hydrate is an icelike form of concentrated methane and water found in the sediments of permafrost regions and marine continental margins at depths far shallower than conventional oil and gas. Despite their relative accessibility and widespread occurrence, methane hydrates have never been tapped to meet increasing global energy demands. With rising natural gas prices, production from these unconventional gas deposits is becoming economically viable, particularly in permafrost areas already being exploited for conventional oil and gas. This article provides an overview of gas hydrate occurrence, resource assessment, exploration, production technologies, renewability, and future challenges.

  18. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Archer, D.

    2007-01-01

    Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO<...

  19. A positron annihilation study of hydrated DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warman, J. M.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1986-01-01

    Positron annihilation measurements are reported for hydrated DNA as a function of water content and as a function of temperature (20 to -180.degree. C) for samples containing 10 and 50% wt of water. The ortho-positronium mean lifetime and its intensity show distinct variations with the degree...... of hydration and with temperature for the 50% sample. The 10% water sample was relatively insensitive to temperature variation. The results indicate that hydrated DNA containing up to 10% water behaves as a rigid crystalline solid but that the rigidity markedly decreases with a further increase in water...

  20. Mapping the Fluid Pathways and Permeability Barriers of a Large Gas Hydrate Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A.; Zhang, Y. L.; Sun, L. F.; Saleh, R.; Pun, W.; Bellefleur, G.; Milkereit, B.

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of the relationship between the physical properties of gas hydrate saturated sedimentary basins aids in the detection, exploration and monitoring one of the world's upcoming energy resources. A large gas hydrate reservoir is located in the MacKenzie Delta of the Canadian Arctic and geophysical logs from the Mallik test site are available for the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) between depths of approximately 850 m to 1100 m. The geophysical data sets from two neighboring boreholes at the Mallik test site are analyzed. Commonly used porosity logs, as well as nuclear magnetic resonance, compressional and Stoneley wave velocity dispersion logs are used to map zones of elevated and severely reduced porosity and permeability respectively. The lateral continuity of horizontal permeability barriers can be further understood with the aid of surface seismic modeling studies. In this integrated study, the behavior of compressional and Stoneley wave velocity dispersion and surface seismic modeling studies are used to identify the fluid pathways and permeability barriers of the gas hydrate reservoir. The results are compared with known nuclear magnetic resonance-derived permeability values. The aim of investigating this heterogeneous medium is to map the fluid pathways and the associated permeability barriers throughout the gas hydrate stability zone. This provides a framework for an understanding of the long-term dissociation of gas hydrates along vertical and horizontal pathways, and will improve the knowledge pertaining to the production of such a promising energy source.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  2. The interaction of climate change and methane hydrates: Climate-Hydrates Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Kessler, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Gas hydrate, a frozen, naturally-occurring, and highly-concentrated form of methane, sequesters significant carbon in the global system and is stable only over a range of low-temperature and moderate-pressure conditions. Gas hydrate is widespread in the sediments of marine continental margins and permafrost areas, locations where ocean and atmospheric warming may perturb the hydrate stability field and lead to release of the sequestered methane into the overlying sediments and soils. Methane ...

  3. Hydration and nutrition knowledge in adolescent swimmers. Does water intake affect urine hydration markers after swimming?

    OpenAIRE

    Altavilla, Cesare; Prats Moya, Soledad; Caballero, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Little data exists regarding nutritional knowledge and hydration in adolescent swimmers. The aim of this study was to assess the level of nutrition and hydration knowledge and to describe the fluid balance in adolescent swimmers during training. A study was carried out with a cross-sectional descriptive part and a longitudinal part with repeated measurements over five swimming sessions. Eighty-six adolescent swimmers completed a questionnaire to assess their sport nutrition and hydration know...

  4. Hydration education: developing, piloting and evaluating a hydration education package for general practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    McCotter, L; Douglas, P; Laur, C; Gandy, J.; Fitzpatrick, L; Rajput-Ray, M; Ray, S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To (1) assess the hydration knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of doctors; (2) develop an evidence-based training package; and (3) evaluate the impact of the training package. Design Educational intervention with impact evaluation. Setting Cambridgeshire, UK. Participants General practitioners (GPs (primary care physicians)). Interventions Hydration and healthcare training. Main outcome measures Hydration KAP score before and immediately after the training session. Results Kn...

  5. Hydration characteristics of calcium silicate cements with alternative radiopacifiers used as root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Josette

    2010-03-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is composed of calcium silicate cement and bismuth oxide added for radiopacity. The bismuth oxide in MTA has been reported to have a deleterious effect on the physical and chemical properties of the hydrated material. This study aimed to investigate the hydration mechanism of calcium silicate cement loaded with different radiopacifiers for use as a root-end filling material. Calcium silicate cement loaded with barium sulfate, gold, or silver/tin alloy was hydrated, and paste microstructure was assessed after 30 days. In addition, atomic ratio plots of Al/Ca versus Si/Ca and S/Ca and Al/Ca were drawn, and X-ray energy dispersive analysis of the hydration products was performed to assess for inclusion of heavy metals. The leachate produced from the cements after storage of the cements in water for 28 days and the leaching of the radiopacifiers in an alkaline solution was assessed by using inductively coupled plasma. The hydrated calcium silicate cement was composed of calcium silicate hydrate, calcium hydroxide, ettringite, and monosulfate. Unhydrated cement particles were few. No heavy metals were detected in the calcium silicate hydrate except for the bismuth in MTA. Calcium was leached out early in large quantities that reduced with time. The barium and bismuth were leached in increasing amounts. Copper was the most soluble in alkaline solution followed by bismuth and barium in smaller amounts. The bismuth oxide can be replaced by other radiopacifiers that do not affect the hydration mechanism of the resultant material. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Methane hydrate formation in partially water-saturated Ottawa sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    Bulk properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediment strongly depend on whether hydrate forms primarily in the pore fluid, becomes a load-bearing member of the sediment matrix, or cements sediment grains. Our compressional wave speed measurements through partially water-saturated, methane hydrate-bearing Ottawa sands suggest hydrate surrounds and cements sediment grains. The three Ottawa sand packs tested in the Gas Hydrate And Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument (GHASTLI) contain 38(1)% porosity, initially with distilled water saturating 58, 31, and 16% of that pore space, respectively. From the volume of methane gas produced during hydrate dissociation, we calculated the hydrate concentration in the pore space to be 70, 37, and 20% respectively. Based on these hydrate concentrations and our measured compressional wave speeds, we used a rock physics model to differentiate between potential pore-space hydrate distributions. Model results suggest methane hydrate cements unconsolidated sediment when forming in systems containing an abundant gas phase.

  7. A Hydrate Database: Vital to the Technical Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Sloan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates may contain more energy than all the combined other fossil fuels, causing hydrates to be a potentially vital aspect of both energy and climate change. This article is an overview of the motivation, history, and future of hydrate data management using a CODATA vehicle to connect international hydrate databases. The basis is an introduction to the Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML to connect various hydrate databases. The accompanying four articles on laboratory hydrate data by Smith et al., on field hydrate data by L?wner et al., on hydrate modeling by Wang et al., and on construction of a Chinese gas hydrate system by Xiao et al. provide details of GHML in their respective areas.

  8. A fermented barley and soybean formula enhances skin hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sein; Kim, Jong-Eun; Suk, Sujin; Kwon, Oh Wook; Park, Gaeun; Lim, Tae-gyu; Seo, Sang Gwon; Kim, Jong Rhan; Kim, Dae Eung; Lee, Miyeong; Chung, Dae Kyun; Jeon, Jong Eun; Cho, Dong Woon; Hurh, Byung Serk; Kim, Sun Yeou; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-01-01

    Skin hydration is one of the primary aims of beauty and anti-aging treatments. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) and soybean (Glycine max) are major food crops, but can also be used as ingredients for the maintenance of skin health. We developed a natural product-based skin treatment using a barley and soybean formula (BS) incorporating yeast fermentation, and evaluated its skin hydration effects as a dietary supplement in a clinical study. Participants ingested a placebo- (n = 33) or BS- (3 g/day) containing drink (n = 32) for 8 weeks. A significant increase in hydration in the BS group as compared to the placebo group was observed on the faces of subjects after 4 and 8 weeks, and on the forearm after 4 weeks. Decreases in stratum corneum (SC) thickness were also observed on the face and forearm. BS enhanced hyaluronan (HA) and skin barrier function in vitro and reduced Hyal2 expression in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF). BS also recovered ultraviolet (UV) B-induced downregulation of HA in HaCaT cells. These results suggest that BS has promising potential for development as a health functional food to enhance skin health. PMID:26388675

  9. Experimental investigation of gas hydrate formation, plugging and transportability in partially dispersed and water continuous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayamohan, Prithvi

    As oil/gas subsea fields mature, the amount of water produced increases significantly due to the production methods employed to enhance the recovery of oil. This is true especially in the case of oil reservoirs. This increase in the water hold up increases the risk of hydrate plug formation in the pipelines, thereby resulting in higher inhibition cost strategies. A major industry concern is to reduce the severe safety risks associated with hydrate plug formation, and significantly extending subsea tieback distances by providing a cost effective flow assurance management/safety tool for mature fields. Developing fundamental understanding of the key mechanistic steps towards hydrate plug formation for different multiphase flow conditions is a key challenge to the flow assurance community. Such understanding can ultimately provide new insight and hydrate management guidelines to diminish the safety risks due to hydrate formation and accumulation in deepwater flowlines and facilities. The transportability of hydrates in pipelines is a function of the operating parameters, such as temperature, pressure, fluid mixture velocity, liquid loading, and fluid system characteristics. Specifically, the hydrate formation rate and plugging onset characteristics can be significantly different for water continuous, oil continuous, and partially dispersed systems. The latter is defined as a system containing oil/gas/water, where the water is present both as a free phase and partially dispersed in the oil phase (i.e., entrained water in the oil). Since hydrate formation from oil dispersed in water systems and partially dispersed water systems is an area which is poorly understood, this thesis aims to address some key questions in these systems. Selected experiments have been performed at the University of Tulsa flowloop to study the hydrate formation and plugging characteristics for the partially dispersed water/oil/gas systems as well as systems where the oil is completely dispersed

  10. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  11. Towards Commercial Gas Production from Hydrate Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Dawe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade global natural gas consumption has steadily increased since many industrialized countries are substituting natural gas for coal to generate electricity. There is also significant industrialization and economic growth of the heavily populated Asian countries of India and China. The general consensus is that there are vast quantities of natural gas trapped in hydrate deposits in geological systems, and this has resulted in the emerging importance of hydrates as a potential energy resource and an accompanying proliferation of recent studies on the technical and economic feasibility of gas production from hydrates. There are then the associated environmental concerns. This study reviews the state of knowledge with respect to natural gas hydrates and outlines remaining challenges and knowledge gaps.

  12. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoderbek, David [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Farrell, Helen [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Howard, James [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Raterman, Kevin [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Silpngarmlert, Suntichai [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Martin, Kenneth [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Smith, Bruce [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Klein, Perry [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-06-30

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  13. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  14. Worldwide distribution of subaquatic gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Ginsburg, G.D.; Soloviev, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    Sediments containing natural gas hydrates occur worldwide on continental and insular slopes and rises of active and passive margins, on continental shelves of polar regions, and in deep-water (> 300 m) environments of inland lakes and seas. The potential amount of methane in natural gas hydrates is enormous, with current estimates at about 1019 g of methane carbon. Subaquatic gas hydrates have been recovered in 14 different areas of the world, and geophysical and geochemical evidence for them has been found in 33 other areas. The worldwide distribution of natural gas hydrates is updated here; their global importance to the chemical and physical properties of near-surface subaquatic sediments is affirmed. ?? 1993 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Free Communications, Oral Presentations: Hydration Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Susan Yeargin

    2012-01-01

      Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN Context: Hydration status is among several variables measured to determine risk of exertional heat illness during pre-participation exams for preseason practices in summer months...

  16. Nano-granular texture of cement hydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannidou Katerina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical behavior of concrete crucially depends on cement hydrates, the “glue” of cement. The design of high performance and more environmentally friendly cements demands a deeper understanding of the formation of the multiscale structure of cement hydrates, when they precipitate and densify. We investigate the precipitation and setting of nano-grains of cement hydrates using a combination of Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics numerical simulations and study their texture from nano up to the micron scale. We characterize the texture of cement hydrates using the local volume fraction distribution, the pore size distribution, the scattering intensity and the chord length distribution and we compare them with experiments. Our nano-granular model provides cement structure with realistic texture and mechanics and can be further used to investigate degradation mechanisms.

  17. CO2 Hydration Shell Structure and Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowski, Samual R; Mitev, Pavlin D; Hermansson, Kersti; Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2017-07-06

    The hydration-shell of CO2 is characterized using Raman multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) spectroscopy combined with ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) vibrational density of states simulations, to validate our assignment of the experimentally observed high-frequency OH band to a weak hydrogen bond between water and CO2. Our results reveal that while the hydration-shell of CO2 is highly tetrahedral, it is also occasionally disrupted by the presence of entropically stabilized defects associated with the CO2-water hydrogen bond. Moreover, we find that the hydration-shell of CO2 undergoes a temperature-dependent structural transformation to a highly disordered (less tetrahedral) structure, reminiscent of the transformation that takes place at higher temperatures around much larger oily molecules. The biological significance of the CO2 hydration shell structural transformation is suggested by the fact that it takes place near physiological temperatures.

  18. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    CERN Document Server

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  19. Physical properties of sediment containing methane gas hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.; Waite, W.F.; Mason, D.H.; Gilbert, L.Y.

    2005-01-01

    A study conducted by the US Geological Survey (USGS) on the formation, behavior, and properties of mixtures of gas hydrate and sediment is presented. The results show that the properties of host material influence the type and quantity of hydrates formed. The presence of hydrate during mechanical shear tests affects the measured sediment pore pressure. Sediment shear strength may be increased more than 500 percent by intact hydrate, but greatly weakened if the hydrate dissociates.

  20. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  1. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Runyon; Mike Globe; Kent Newsham; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling

  2. Residue specific hydration of primary cell wall potato pectin identified by solid-state 13C single-pulse MAS and CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Chrestensen, Inge Byg; Damager, Iben

    2011-01-01

    Hydration of rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) derived from potato cell wall was analyzed by 13C single-pulse (SP) magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and 13C cross-polarization (CP) MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and supported by 2H SP/MAS NMR experiments. The study shows that the arabinan side chains...... hydrate more readily than the galactan side chains and suggests that the overall hydration properties can be controlled by modifying the ratio of these side chains. Enzymatic modification of native (NA) RG-I provided samples with reduced content of arabinan (sample DA), galactan (sample DG), or both side...... chains (sample DB). Results of these samples suggested that hydration properties were determined by the length and character of the side chains. NA and DA exhibited similar hydration characteristics, whereas DG and DB were difficult to hydrate because of the less hydrophilic properties of the rhamnose...

  3. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  4. Protein pharmacophore selection using hydration-site analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bingjie; Lill, Markus A.

    2012-01-01

    Virtual screening using pharmacophore models is an efficient method to identify potential lead compounds for target proteins. Pharmacophore models based on protein structures are advantageous because a priori knowledge of active ligands is not required and the models are not biased by the chemical space of previously identified actives. However, in order to capture most potential interactions between all potentially binding ligands and the protein, the size of the pharmacophore model, i.e. number of pharmacophore elements, is typically quite large and therefore reduces the efficiency of pharmacophore based screening. We have developed a new method to select important pharmacophore elements using hydration-site information. The basic premise is that ligand functional groups that replace water molecules in the apo protein contribute strongly to the overall binding affinity of the ligand, due to the additional free energy gained from releasing the water molecule into the bulk solvent. We computed the free energy of water released from the binding site for each hydration site using thermodynamic analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Pharmacophores which are co-localized with hydration sites with estimated favorable contributions to the free energy of binding are selected to generate a reduced pharmacophore model. We constructed reduced pharmacophore models for three protein systems and demonstrated good enrichment quality combined with high efficiency. The reduction in pharmacophore model size reduces the required screening time by a factor of 200–500 compared to using all protein pharmacophore elements. We also describe a training process using a small set of known actives to reliably select the optimal set of criteria for pharmacophore selection for each protein system. PMID:22397751

  5. [Progress in Raman spectroscopic measurement of methane hydrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Zhu, Li-hua; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Long-jun

    2009-09-01

    Complex thermodynamics and kinetics problems are involved in the methane hydrate formation and decomposition, and these problems are crucial to understanding the mechanisms of hydrate formation and hydrate decomposition. However, it was difficult to accurately obtain such information due to the difficulty of measurement since methane hydrate is only stable under low temperature and high pressure condition, and until recent years, methane hydrate has been measured in situ using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy, a non-destructive and non-invasive technique, is used to study vibrational modes of molecules. Studies of methane hydrate using Raman spectroscopy have been developed over the last decade. The Raman spectra of CH4 in vapor phase and in hydrate phase are presented in this paper. The progress in the research on methane hydrate formation thermodynamics, formation kinetics, decomposition kinetics and decomposition mechanism based on Raman spectroscopic measurements in the laboratory and deep sea are reviewed. Formation thermodynamic studies, including in situ observation of formation condition of methane hydrate, analysis of structure, and determination of hydrate cage occupancy and hydration numbers by using Raman spectroscopy, are emphasized. In the aspect of formation kinetics, research on variation in hydrate cage amount and methane concentration in water during the growth of hydrate using Raman spectroscopy is also introduced. For the methane hydrate decomposition, the investigation associated with decomposition mechanism, the mutative law of cage occupancy ratio and the formulation of decomposition rate in porous media are described. The important aspects for future hydrate research based on Raman spectroscopy are discussed.

  6. Electrical properties of polycrystalline methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Frane, W. L.; Stern, L.A.; Weitemeyer, K.A.; Constable, S.; Pinkston, J.C.; Roberts, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) remote-sensing techniques are demonstrated to be sensitive to gas hydrate concentration and distribution and complement other resource assessment techniques, particularly seismic methods. To fully utilize EM results requires knowledge of the electrical properties of individual phases and mixing relations, yet little is known about the electrical properties of gas hydrates. We developed a pressure cell to synthesize gas hydrate while simultaneously measuring in situ frequency-dependent electrical conductivity (σ). Synthesis of methane (CH4) hydrate was verified by thermal monitoring and by post run cryogenic scanning electron microscope imaging. Impedance spectra (20 Hz to 2 MHz) were collected before and after synthesis of polycrystalline CH4 hydrate from polycrystalline ice and used to calculate σ. We determined the σ of CH4 hydrate to be 5 × 10−5 S/m at 0°C with activation energy (Ea) of 30.6 kJ/mol (−15 to 15°C). After dissociation back into ice, σ measurements of samples increased by a factor of ~4 and Ea increased by ~50%, similar to the starting ice samples.

  7. Structural characteristics of hydration sites in lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soda, Kunitsugu; Shimbo, Yudai; Seki, Yasutaka; Taiji, Makoto

    2011-06-01

    A new method is presented for determining the hydration site of proteins, where the effect of structural fluctuations in both protein and hydration water is explicitly considered by using molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The whole hydration sites (HS) of lysozyme are composed of 195 single HSs and 38 clustered ones (CHS), and divided into 231 external HSs (EHS) and 2 internal ones (IHS). The largest CHSs, 'Hg' and 'Lβ', are the IHSs having 2.54 and 1.35 mean internal hydration waters respectively. The largest EHS, 'Clft', is located in the cleft region. The real hydration structure of a CHS is an ensemble of multiple structures. The transition between two structures occurs through recombinations of some H-bonds. The number of the experimental X-ray crystal waters is nearly the same as that of the estimated MDS hydration waters for 70% of the HSs, but significantly different for the rest of HSs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of individual hydration strategies for athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Ronald J; Shirreffs, Susan M

    2008-10-01

    Athletes are encouraged to begin exercise well hydrated and to consume sufficient amounts of appropriate fluids during exercise to limit water and salt deficits. Available evidence suggests that many athletes begin exercise already dehydrated to some degree, and although most fail to drink enough to match sweat losses, some drink too much and a few develop hyponatremia. Some simple advice can help athletes assess their hydration status and develop a personalized hydration strategy that takes account of exercise, environment, and individual needs. Preexercise hydration status can be assessed from urine frequency and volume, with additional information from urine color, specific gravity, or osmolality. Change in hydration during exercise can be estimated from the change in body mass that occurs during a bout of exercise. Sweat rate can be estimated if fluid intake and urinary losses are also measured. Sweat salt losses can be determined by collection and analysis of sweat samples, but athletes losing large amounts of salt are likely to be aware of the taste of salt in sweat and the development of salt crusts on skin and clothing where sweat has evaporated. An appropriate drinking strategy will take account of preexercise hydration status and of fluid, electrolyte, and substrate needs before, during, and after a period of exercise. Strategies will vary greatly between individuals and will also be influenced by environmental conditions, competition regulations, and other factors.

  9. Surfactant effects on SF6 hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Young Bok; Lee, Man Sig; Kim, Young Seok; Englezos, Peter; Kim, Myung Hyun; Kim, Yang Do

    2009-03-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) has been widely used in a variety of industrial processes, but it is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. For this reason, it is necessary to separate or collect it from waste gas streams. One separation method is through hydrate crystal formation. In this study, SF(6) hydrate was formed in aqueous surfactant solutions of 0.00, 0.01, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.20 wt% to investigate the effects of surfactants on the hydrate formation rates. Three surfactants, Tween 20 (Tween), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LABS), were tested in a semi-batch stirred vessel at the constant temperature and pressures of 276.2 K and 0.78 MPa, respectively. All surfactants showed kinetic promoter behavior for SF(6) hydrate formation. It was also found that SF(6) hydrate formation proceeded in two stages with the second stage being the most rapid. In situ Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the increased gas consumption rate with the addition of surfactant was possibly due to the increased gas filling rate in the hydrate cavity.

  10. HYDRATION PATTERN IN THE HEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Hue

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To investigate thermal response, hydration behaviour and performance over flatwater kayaking races in tropical conditions (36.8°C and 68 % rh. Five internationally-ranked subjects participated in the 2012 Surfski Ocean Racing World Cup in Guadeloupe to the “Ze Caribbean Race 2012” [i.e., a 35-km downwind race]. Core temperature (T°C and heart rate (HR were measured using portable telemetry units whereas water intake was deduced from backpacks absorption. The kayakers were asked to rate both their comfort sensation and thermal sensation on a scale before and after the race. The performance was related to an increase in T°C, high HR and low water intake (WI; and (2 high values of final T°C were related to high pre T°C and greater increases in T°C being obtained with low pre T°C and (3 WI being related to high pre T°C. The present study demonstrated that the fastest kayakers were those able to paddle at the highest intensities, increasing their T°C and drinking little water without any interference from thermal sensations. Water intake was positively related to pre-race T°C, which reinforces the importance of beginning surfski races with a low T°C. This study demonstrated that well-trained kayakers drinking ad libitum were able to anticipate their intensity/heat storage ratio to prevent heat illness and severe dehydration and maintain high performance.

  11. Enzyme changes associated with mitochondrial malic enzyme deficiency in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohrenweiser, H.W.; Erickson, R.P.

    1979-01-01

    A genetically determined absence of mitochondrial malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.40) in c/sup 3H//c/sup 6H/ mice is accompanied by a four-fold increase in liver glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and a two-fold increase for 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity. Smaller increases in the activity of serine dehydratase and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase are observed while the level of glutamic pyruvate transaminase activity is reduced in the liver of deficient mice. Unexpectedly, the level of activity of total malic enzyme in the livers of mitochrondrial malic enzyme-deficient mice is increased approximately 50% compared to littermate controls. No similar increase in solublle malic enzyme activity is observed in heart of kidney tissue of mutant mice and the levels of total malic enzyme in these tissues are in accord with expected levels of activity in mitochondrial malic enzyme-deficient mice. The divergence in levels of enzyme activity between mutant and wild-type mice begins at 19 to 21 days of age. Immunoinactivation experiments with monospecific antisera to the soluble malic enzyme and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase demonstrate that the activity increases represent increases in the amount of enzyme protein. The alterations are not consistent with a single hormonal response.

  12. Kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrates in offshore drilling, production, and processing. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Natural gas hydrates are crystalline materials formed of natural gas and water at elevated pressures and reduced temperatures. Because natural gas hydrates can plug drill strings, pipelines, and process equipment, there is much effort expended to prevent their formation. The goal of this project was to provide industry with more economical hydrate inhibitors. The specific goals for the past year were to: define a rational approach for inhibitor design, using the most probable molecular mechanism; improve the performance of inhibitors; test inhibitors on Colorado School of Mines apparatuses and the Exxon flow loop; and promote sharing field and flow loop results. This report presents the results of the progress on these four goals.

  13. Combined effect of sodium sulphate and superplasticizer on the hydration of fly ash blended Portland® cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Combined effect of polycarboxylate type superplasticizer and sodium sulphate on the hydration of fly ash blended Portland® cement has been studied by using different techniques. Water consistency, setting times, non-evaporable water contents, water percolation, air contents, compressive strengths and expansion in corrosive atmosphere were determined. Hydration products were examined with the help of DTA and X-ray diffraction techniques. It is found that the superplasticizer reduces the pore size and its adsorption on cement surfaces is decreased in the presence of sodium sulphate. Mechanism of hydration is discussed.

  14. Using magnetic resonance imaging to monitor CH4 hydrate formation and spontaneous conversion of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Bernard A; Stevens, Jim; Howard, James J; Graue, Arne; Kvamme, Bjorn; Aspenes, Erick; Ersland, Geir; Husebø, Jarle; Zornes, David R

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to monitor and quantify methane hydrate formation and exchange in porous media. Conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate, when exposed to liquid carbon dioxide at 8.27 MPa and approximately 4 degrees C, was experimentally demonstrated with MRI data and verified by mass balance calculations of consumed volumes of gases and liquids. No detectable dissociation of the hydrate was measured during the exchange process.

  15. Distinguishing between hydrated, partially hydrated or unhydrated clinker in hardened concrete using microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Rooij, M.R. de; Visser, J.H.M.; Nijland, T.G.

    2010-01-01

    Hydration of clinker particles is since long a topic of interest in both designing and optimizing cement composition and its quantity used in concrete. The interest for carefully observing and also quantifying the type or stage of clinker hydration in hardened cement paste is twofold. Firstly, the

  16. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  17. Thermodynamic properties of methane hydrate in quartz powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronov, Vitaly P; Gorodetskii, Evgeny E; Safonov, Sergey S

    2007-10-04

    Using the experimental method of precision adiabatic calorimetry, the thermodynamic (equilibrium) properties of methane hydrate in quartz sand with a grain size of 90-100 microm have been studied in the temperature range of 260-290 K and at pressures up to 10 MPa. The equilibrium curves for the water-methane hydrate-gas and ice-methane hydrate-gas transitions, hydration number, latent heat of hydrate decomposition along the equilibrium three-phase curves, and the specific heat capacity of the hydrate have been obtained. It has been experimentally shown that the equilibrium three-phase curves of the methane hydrate in porous media are shifted to the lower temperature and high pressure with respect to the equilibrium curves of the bulk hydrate. In these experiments, we have found that the specific heat capacity of the hydrate, within the accuracy of our measurements, coincides with the heat capacity of ice. The latent heat of the hydrate dissociation for the ice-hydrate-gas transition is equal to 143 +/- 10 J/g, whereas, for the transition from hydrate to water and gas, the latent heat is 415 +/- 15 J/g. The hydration number has been evaluated in the different hydrate conditions and has been found to be equal to n = 6.16 +/- 0.06. In addition, the influence of the water saturation of the porous media and its distribution over the porous space on the measured parameters has been experimentally studied.

  18. Hydration of urea and alkylated urea derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatze, Udo

    2018-01-07

    Compressibility data and broadband dielectric spectra of aqueous solutions of urea and some of its alkylated derivatives have been evaluated to yield their numbers Nh of hydration water molecules per molecule of solute. Nh values in a broad range of solute concentrations are discussed and are compared to hydration numbers of other relevant molecules and organic ions. Consistent with previous results, it is found that urea differs from other solutes in its unusually small hydration number, corresponding to just one third of the estimated number of nearest neighbor molecules. This remarkable hydration behavior is explained by the large density φH of hydrogen bonding abilities offered by the urea molecule. In terms of currently discussed models of reorientational motions and allied dynamics in water and related associating liquids, the large density φH causes a relaxation time close to that of undisturbed water with most parts of water encircling the solute. Therefore only a small part of disturbed ("hydration") water is left around each urea molecule. Adding alkyl groups to the basic molecule leads to Nh values which, within the series of n-alkylurea derivatives, progressively increase with the number of methyl groups per solute. With n-butylurea, Nh from dielectric spectra, in conformity with many other organic solutes, slightly exceeds the number of nearest neighbors. Compared to such Nh values, hydration numbers from compressibility data are substantially smaller, disclosing incorrect assumptions in the formula commonly used to interpret the experimental compressibilities. Similar to other series of organic solutes, effects of isomerization have been found with alkylated urea derivatives, indicating that factors other than the predominating density φH of hydrogen bond abilities contribute also to the hydration properties.

  19. Gas Hydrate Characterization in the GoM using Marine EM Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constable, Steven [Univ. Of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-03-31

    while the surface of the gas hydrate grains are not intrinsically conductive, the presence of sand does increase their conductivity. In the field component of this project, we carried out an 18day cruise on the R.V. Roger Revelle in the Gulf of Mexico from 7th-26th October 2008 to collect controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data over four hydrate prospects; blocks AC 818, WR 313, GC 955, and MC 118. During these surveys we deployed 30 ocean bottom electromagnetic (OBEM) recorders a total of 94 times at four survey areas and towed the Scripps Undersea Electromagnetic Source Instrument (SUESI) a total of 103 hours. SUESI transmission was 200 A on a 50 m dipole antenna at heights of 70-100 m above the seafloor. We also towed a neutrally buoyant 3-axis electric field recorder behind the SUESI antenna at a constant offset of 300 m. The use of a towed receiver that is "flown" above the seafloor allowed us to operate in areas where seafloor infrastructure such as wellheads, pipelines, and installed scientific equipment existed. We reduced the data to apparent resistivity psuedosections. The most compelling results come from the hydrate observatory at MC 118, where a localized resistivity anomaly is clearly identified under the southeast crater in an otherwise uniform 1 {Ohm}m background. The data from MC 118 also show that authigenic carbonate does not necessarily express itself as a confounding resistor, as was feared at the start of this project. While the results from the other prospects are much more complicated, the data are well correlated with known geology, and line to line agreement is good. Although these data are not amenable to 1D inversion as was initially hoped, we expect to use a newly developed 2D CSEM inversion code to continue to get useful information from this rich data set.

  20. Electrical conductivity of lab-formed methane hydrate + sand mixtures; technical developments and new results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.; Du Frane, W. L.; Weitemeyer, K. A.; Constable, S.; Roberts, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    frequency associated with the highest phase angle (typically 100 kHz) could be used to effectively isolate the electrical response of the sample from system contributions, enabling determination of σ. Surprisingly, the addition of sand, a nominal insulator, served to increase the overall σ of mixtures with sand fractions up through ~50 vol. % (i.e. those samples with well-connected methane hydrate), while Ea significantly decreased relative to single-phase methane hydrate. The reduced Ea suggests that a separate conduction mechanism operates when sand is present. One possible explanation is that ionic impurities from sand surfaces chemically diffuse into the hydrate grains, increasing their concentration of mobile charge-carrying defects. The fact that the addition of glass beads did not produce the same results supports this hypothesis. Geometrical mixing laws alone may therefore not sufficiently describe complicated mixing relationships between gas hydrate and sediment. Further tests are needed to resolve the competing effects, particularly if results are to be applied to systems that are not dominated by the presence of seawater. Work was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE contracts DE-NT0005668 and DE-AC52-07NA27344, and DOE/USGS Interagency Agreement DE-NT0006147.

  1. Hydration education: developing, piloting and evaluating a hydration education package for general practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCotter, L; Douglas, P; Laur, C; Gandy, J; Fitzpatrick, L; Rajput-Ray, M; Ray, S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To (1) assess the hydration knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of doctors; (2) develop an evidence-based training package; and (3) evaluate the impact of the training package. Design Educational intervention with impact evaluation. Setting Cambridgeshire, UK. Participants General practitioners (GPs (primary care physicians)). Interventions Hydration and healthcare training. Main outcome measures Hydration KAP score before and immediately after the training session. Results Knowledge gaps of doctors identified before the teaching were the definition of dehydration, European Food Safety Authority water intake recommendations, water content of the human body and proportion of water from food and drink. A face-to-face teaching package was developed on findings from the KAP survey and literature search. 54 questionnaires were completed before and immediately after two training sessions with GPs. Following the training, total hydration KAP scores increased significantly (phydration care to allow policymakers to incorporate hydration awareness and care with greater precision in local and national policies. PMID:27927656

  2. The 24-hour skin hydration and barrier function effects of a hyaluronic 1%, glycerin 5%, and Centella asiatica stem cells extract moisturizing fluid: an intra-subject, randomized, assessor-blinded study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milani M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Massimo Milani,1 Adele Sparavigna2 1Difa Cooper, Caronno Pertusella, Varese, 2Dermatologic Institute Dermig Milan, Milan, Italy Introduction: Moisturizing products are commonly used to improve hydration in skin dryness conditions. However, some topical hydrating products could have negative effects on skin barrier function. In addition, hydrating effects of moisturizers are not commonly evaluated up to 24 hours after a single application. Hyaluronic acid (HA and glycerin are very well-known substances able to improve skin hydration. Centella asiatica extract (CAE could exert lenitive, anti-inflammatory and reepithelialization actions. Furthermore, CAE could inhibit hyaluronidase enzyme activity, therefore prolonging the effect of HA. A fluid containing HA 1%, glycerin 5% and stem cells CAE has been recently developed (Jaluronius CS [JCS] fluid. Study aim: To evaluate and compare the 24-hour effects of JCS fluid on skin hydration and on transepidermal water loss (TEWL in healthy subjects in comparison with the control site. Subjects and methods: Twenty healthy women, mean age 40 years, were enrolled in an intra-subject (right vs left, randomized, assessor-blinded, controlled, 1-day trial. The primary end points were the skin hydration and TEWL, evaluated at the volar surface of the forearm and in standardized conditions (temperature- and humidity-controlled room: 23°C and 30% of humidity using a corneometer and a vapometer device at baseline, 1, 8 and 24 hours after JCS fluid application. Measurements were performed by an operator blinded for the treatments. Results: Skin hydration after 24 hours was significantly higher (P=0.001; Mann–Whitney U test in the JCS-treated area in comparison with the control site. JCS induced a significant (P=0.0001 increase in skin hydration at each evaluation time (+59% after 1 hour, +48% after 8 hours and +29% after 24 hours in comparison with both baseline (P=0.0001 and non-treated control site (P=0

  3. Numerical modelling of hydration reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.; John, Timm

    2017-04-01

    Mineral reactions are generally accompanied by volume changes. Observations in rocks and thin section indicate that this often occurred by replacement reactions involving a fluid phase. Frequently, the volume of the original rock or mineral seems to be conserved. If the density of the solid reaction products is higher than the reactants, the associated solid volume decrease generates space for a fluid phase. In other words, porosity is created. The opposite is true for an increase in solid volume during reaction, which leads to a porosity reduction. This slows down and may even stop the reaction if it needs fluid as a reactant. Understanding the progress of reactions and their rates is important because reaction generally changes geophysical and rock mechanical properties which will therefore affect geodynamical processes and seismic properties. We studied the case of hydration of eclogite to blueschist in a subduction zone setting. Eclogitized pillow basalt structures from the Tian-Shan orogeny are transformed to blueschist on the rims of the pillow (van der Straaten et al., 2008). Fluid pathways existed between the pillow structures. The preferred hypothesis of blueschist formation is to supply the fluid for hydration from the pillow margins progressing inward. Using numerical modelling we simulate this coupled reaction-diffusion process. Porosity and fluid pressure evolution are coupled to local thermodynamic equilibrium and density changes. The first rim of blueschist that forms around the eclogite pillow increases volume to such a degree that the system is clogged and the reaction stops. Nevertheless, the field evidence suggests the blueschist formation continued. To prevent the system from clogging, a high incoming pore fluid pressure on the pillow boundaries is needed along with removal of mass from the system to accommodate the volume changes. The only other possibility is to form blueschist from any remaining fluid stored in the core of the pillow

  4. High-Altitude Hydration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazynski, Scott E.; Orndoff, Evelyne; Bue, Grant C.; Schaefbauer, Mark E.; Urban, Kase

    2010-01-01

    Three methods are being developed for keeping water from freezing during high-altitude climbs so that mountaineers can remain hydrated. Three strategies have been developed. At the time of this reporting two needed to be tested in the field and one was conceptual. The first method is Passive Thermal Control Using Aerogels. This involves mounting the fluid reservoir of the climber s canteen to an inner layer of clothing for better heat retention. For the field test, bottles were mounted to the inner fleece layer of clothing, and then aerogel insulation was placed on the outside of the bottle, and circumferentially around the drink straw. When climbers need to drink, they can pull up the insulated straw from underneath the down suit, take a sip, and then put it back into the relative warmth of the suit. For the field test, a data logger assessed the temperatures of the water reservoir, as well as near the tip of the drink straw. The second method is Passive Thermal Control with Copper-Shielded Drink Straw and Aerogels, also mounted to inner layers of clothing for better heat retention. Braided wire emanates from the inside of the fleece jacket layer, and continues up and around the drink straw in order to use body heat to keep the system-critical drink straw warm enough to keep water in the liquid state. For the field test, a data logger will be used to compare this with the above concept. The third, and still conceptual, method is Active Thermal Control with Microcontroller. If the above methods do not work, microcontrollers and tape heaters have been identified that could keep the drink straw warm even under extremely cold conditions. Power requirements are not yet determined because the thermal environment inside the down suit relative to the external environment has not been established. A data logger will be used to track both the external and internal temperatures of the suit on a summit day.

  5. Kinetics of formation and dissociation of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manakov, A. Yu; Penkov, N. V.; Rodionova, T. V.; Nesterov, A. N.; Fesenko, E. E., Jr.

    2017-09-01

    The review covers a wide range of issues related to the nucleation, growth and dissociation of gas hydrates. The attention is focused on publications of the last 10-15 years. Along with the mathematical models used to describe these processes, the results of relevant experimental studies are surveyed. Particular sections are devoted to the gas hydrate self-preservation effect, the water memory effect in the hydrate formation, development of catalysts for hydrate formation and the effect of substances dissolved in the aqueous phase on the formation of hydrates. The main experimental techniques used to study gas hydrates are briefly considered. The bibliography includes 230 references.

  6. Complex admixtures of clathrate hydrates in a water desalination method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Blake A [San Francisco, CA; Bradshaw, Robert W [Livermore, CA; Dedrick, Daniel E [Berkeley, CA; Anderson, David W [Riverbank, CA

    2009-07-14

    Disclosed is a method that achieves water desalination by utilizing and optimizing clathrate hydrate phenomena. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds of gas and water that desalinate water by excluding salt molecules during crystallization. Contacting a hydrate forming gaseous species with water will spontaneously form hydrates at specific temperatures and pressures through the extraction of water molecules from the bulk phase followed by crystallite nucleation. Subsequent dissociation of pure hydrates yields fresh water and, if operated correctly, allows the hydrate-forming gas to be efficiently recycled into the process stream.

  7. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually....... For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems...

  8. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  9. Hydraulic and Mechanical Effects from Gas Hydrate Conversion and Secondary Gas Hydrate Formation during Injection of CO2 into CH4-Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, N.; Deusner, C.; Kossel, E.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Priegnitz, M.; Heeschen, K. U.; Abendroth, S.; Thaler, J.; Haeckel, M.

    2014-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into CH4-hydrate-bearing sediments has the potential to drive natural gas production and simultaneously sequester CO2 by hydrate conversion. The process aims at maintaining the in situ hydrate saturation and structure and causing limited impact on soil hydraulic properties and geomechanical stability. However, to increase hydrate conversion yields and rates it must potentially be assisted by thermal stimulation or depressurization. Further, secondary formation of CO2-rich hydrates from pore water and injected CO2 enhances hydrate conversion and CH4 production yields [1]. Technical stimulation and secondary hydrate formation add significant complexity to the bulk conversion process resulting in spatial and temporal effects on hydraulic and geomechanical properties that cannot be predicted by current reservoir simulation codes. In a combined experimental and numerical approach, it is our objective to elucidate both hydraulic and mechanical effects of CO2 injection and CH4-CO2-hydrate conversion in CH4-hydrate bearing soils. For the experimental approach we used various high-pressure flow-through systems equipped with different online and in situ monitoring tools (e.g. Raman microscopy, MRI and ERT). One particular focus was the design of triaxial cell experimental systems, which enable us to study sample behavior even during large deformations and particle flow. We present results from various flow-through high-pressure experimental studies on different scales, which indicate that hydraulic and geomechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are drastically altered during and after injection of CO2. We discuss the results in light of the competing processes of hydrate dissociation, hydrate conversion and secondary hydrate formation. Our results will also contribute to the understanding of effects of temperature and pressure changes leading to dissociation of gas hydrates in ocean and permafrost systems. [1] Deusner C, Bigalke N, Kossel E

  10. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  11. Dominant Alcohol-Protein Interaction via Hydration-Enabled Enthalpy-Driven Binding Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yuan; Kleinhammes, Alfred; Tang, Pei; Xu, Yan; Wu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Water plays an important role in weak associations of small drug molecules with proteins. Intense focus has been on binding-induced structural changes in the water network surrounding protein binding sites, especially their contributions to binding thermodynamics. However, water is also tightly coupled to protein conformations and dynamics, and so far little is known about the influence of water-protein interactions on ligand binding. Alcohols are a type of low-affinity drugs, and it remains unclear how water affects alcohol-protein interactions. Here, we present alcohol adsorption isotherms under controlled protein hydration using in-situ NMR detection. As functions of hydration level, Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of binding were determined from the temperature dependence of isotherms. Two types of alcohol binding were found. The dominant type is low-affinity nonspecific binding, which is strongly dependent on temperature and the level of hydration. At low hydration levels, this nonspecific binding only occurs above a threshold of alcohol vapor pressure. An increased hydration level reduces this threshold, with it finally disappearing at a hydration level of h~0.2 (g water/g protein), gradually shifting alcohol binding from an entropy-driven to an enthalpy-driven process. Water at charged and polar groups on the protein surface was found to be particularly important in enabling this binding. Although further increase in hydration has smaller effects on the changes of binding enthalpy and entropy, it results in significant negative change in Gibbs free energy due to unmatched enthalpy-entropy compensation. These results show the crucial role of water-protein interplay in alcohol binding. PMID:25856773

  12. Gas Hydrates and Perturbed Permafrost: Can Thermokarst Lakes Leak Hydrate-Derived Methane?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, C.; Walter, K.; Pohlman, J.; Wooller, M.

    2008-12-01

    Thermokarst lakes are common features in the continuous permafrost of Siberia, the Alaskan North Slope, and the Canadian Arctic and have been intensely studied as the loci of rapid and substantial methane flux to the atmosphere. Previous numerical modeling has constrained the conditions under which deep thermokarst lakes can develop organic-rich thaw bulbs (talik) tens of meters thick, and seismic surveys have imaged thaw bulbs more than 75 m thick beneath some thermokarst lakes. Microbial processes active in talik organic material are likely the predominant source for thermokarst methane emissions, although coalbed methane and methane associated with conventional hydrocarbons may contribute in some geologic settings. Here we evaluate the possibility that another source--methane released from dissociating gas hydrate--could contribute to methane emissions from these lakes. Temperatures within and beneath thermokarst lakes are significantly warmer than those in surrounding permafrost, and these relatively warm conditions can persist to depths several times greater than the thickness of the thaw bulb. For a 95-m-thick thaw bulb and a geothermal gradient consistent with the regional top of gas hydrate stability at ~200 m depth, the warmer temperatures beneath a thermokarst lake could lead to destabilization of up to 75 m of gas hydrate. Arguably, the presence of gas hydrate near the top of the stability zone in permafrost regions has not yet been observed. Nonetheless, the potential dissociation of such relatively shallow gas hydrate and the widespread availability in terrestrial settings of high permeability conduits (e.g., faults, sandy strata) that could facilitate the migration of hydrate-derived methane to the surface render this an important topic for future investigation. The susceptibility of permafrost gas hydrate zones to thermal perturbations is in sharp contrast to the situation in conventional marine hydrate provinces. There, gas hydrate first dissociates

  13. Stability evaluation of hydrate-bearing sediments during thermally-driven hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, T.; Cho, G.; Santamarina, J.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrate-bearing sediments may destabilize spontaneously as part of geological processes, unavoidably during petroleum drilling/production operations, or intentionally as part of gas extraction from the hydrate itself. In all cases, high pore fluid pressure generation is anticipated during hydrate dissociation. This study examined how thermal changes destabilize gas hydrate-bearing sediments. First, an analytical formulation was derived for predicting fluid pressure evolution in hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to thermal stimulation without mass transfer. The formulation captures the self-preservation behavior, calculates the hydrate and free gas quantities during dissociation, considering effective stress-controlled sediment compressibility and gas solubility in aqueous phase. Pore fluid pressure generation is proportional to the initial hydrate fraction and the sediment bulk stiffness; is inversely proportional to the initial gas fraction and gas solubility; and is limited by changes in effective stress that cause the failure of the sediment. Second, the analytical formulation for hydrate dissociation was incorporated as a user-defined function into a verified finite difference code (FLAC2D). The underlying physical processes of hydrate-bearing sediments, including hydrate dissociation, self-preservation, pore pressure evolution, gas dissolution, and sediment volume expansion, were coupled with the thermal conduction, pore fluid flow, and mechanical response of sediments. We conducted the simulations for a duration of 20 years, assuming a constant-temperature wellbore transferred heat to the surrounding hydrate-bearing sediments, resulting in dissociation of methane hydrate in the well vicinity. The model predicted dissociation-induced excess pore fluid pressures which resulted in a large volume expansion and plastic deformation of the sediments. Furthermore, when the critical stress was reached, localized shear failure of the sediment around the borehole was

  14. Effects of Nanosilica on Early Age Stages of Cement Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forood Torabian Isfahani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of nanosilica on cement hydration have been broadly investigated in the literature and early age cement hydration, as a whole, has been mainly considered, disregarding the substages of the hydration. The hydration of cement is characterized by different substages and nanosilica effect on the hydration could be a result of diverse, even contradictory, behavior of nanosilica in individual stages of the hydration. In this study, effects of nanosilica on different substages of cement hydration are investigated. Isothermal calorimetry results show that at early ages (initial 72 hours the effects of nanosilica depend on the phenomenon by which the hydration is governed: when the hydration is chemically controlled, that is, during initial reaction, dormant period, and acceleratory period, the hydration rate is accelerated by adding nanosilica; when the hydration is governed by diffusion process, that is, during postacceleratory period, the hydration rate is decelerated by adding nanosilica. The Thermal Gravimetric Analysis on the samples at the hardened state (after 28 days of curing reveals that, after adding nanosilica, the hydration degree slightly increased compared to the plain paste.

  15. Membrane Assisted Enzyme Fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Linfeng

    Purification of proteins is an increasingly important process for the biotechnology industry. Separation of the desired high value protein from other proteins produced by the cell is usually attempted using a combination of different chromatographic techniques. These techniques separate mixtures...... of proteins on the basis of their charge, degree of hydrophobicity, affinity or size. Adequate purity is often not achieved unless several purification steps are combined thereby increasing cost and reducing product yield. Conventional fractionation of proteins using ultrafiltration membranes is limited....... In this thesis, separations using crossflow elecro-membrane filtration (EMF) of amino acids, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and industrial enzymes from Novozymes were performed. The main objective of this study was to investigate the technological feasibility of EMF in the application of industrial enzyme...

  16. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  17. Photosynthetic fuel for heterologous enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Nielsen, Agnieszka Janina Zygadlo

    2017-01-01

    of reducing power. Recent work on the metabolic engineering of photosynthetic organisms has shown that the electron carriers such as ferredoxin and flavodoxin can be used to couple heterologous enzymes to photosynthetic reducing power. Because these proteins have a plethora of interaction partners and rely...... on electrostatically steered complex formation, they form productive electron transfer complexes with non-native enzymes. A handful of examples demonstrate channeling of photosynthetic electrons to drive the activity of heterologous enzymes, and these focus mainly on hydrogenases and cytochrome P450s. However......, competition from native pathways and inefficient electron transfer rates present major obstacles, which limit the productivity of heterologous reactions coupled to photosynthesis. We discuss specific approaches to address these bottlenecks and ensure high productivity of such enzymes in a photosynthetic...

  18. Hydration Status in US Military Officer Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Reva; Cole, Renee

    2016-01-01

    Relocation from a cool to a hot climate is a frequent occurrence in military service. Acclimatization requires time and exposure to heat. Nonacclimatized individuals frequently consume inadequate fluid leading to hypohydration, which can quickly result in dehydration with increased risk of heat illness/injury. This descriptive cross-sectional study assessed the hydration status of 196 officers attending the US Army Medical Department's Officer Basic Course (67%) or Captain's Career Course (33%) in San Antonio, Texas, prior to taking the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT). Consenting Soldiers provided a first morning void urine sample and demographic survey (age, rank, sex, previous geographic location, etc) prior to the APFT. Height, weight, and APFT event scores were collected from a subject-coded, APFT scorecard without personal information data. Binary logistic regression was performed to identify variables that contribute to predicting hypohydration status. The sample population was 54% male, a mean age of 30 years, 5.2 years of military service, and a mean body mass index of 25 kg/m². Nearly one-third met the criteria for hypohydration (≥1.02 urine specific gravity). Soldiers who relocated from a cool environment within 9 days of taking the APFT had 2.1 higher odds of being hypohydrated compared with individuals who had resided in a hot environment for more than 9 days. Women had a 0.5 lower odds of being hypohydrated as compared to males. Significantly more Soldiers were hypohydrated on Monday compared to those tested on Tuesday (33% vs 16%, P=.004). Given these findings, the authors provided 5 recommendations to reduce the number of Soldiers exercising in a hypohydrated state.

  19. Predicting hydration energies for multivalent ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2014-01-01

    We have predicted the free energy of hydration for 40 monovalent and multivalent cations and anions using density functional theory and the implicit solvent model COnductor like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS) at the Becke-Perdew (BP)/Triple zeta valence with polarization functions...... errors. Our results indicate that quantum chemical calculations combined with COSMO-RS solvent treatment is a reliable method for treating multivalent ions in solution, provided one hydration shell of explicit water molecules is included for metal cations. The accuracy is not high enough to allow...... absolute predictions of hydration energies but could be used to investigate trends for several ions, thanks to the low computational cost, in particular for ligand exchange reactions....

  20. Hydration for recreational sport and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenefick, Robert W; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2012-11-01

    This review presents recommendations for fluid needs and hydration assessment for recreational activity. Fluid needs are based on sweat losses, dependent on intensity and duration of the activity, and will vary among individuals. Prolonged aerobic activity is adversely influenced by dehydration, and heat exposure will magnify this effect. Fluid needs predicted for running 5-42 km at recreational paces show that fluid losses are sport drinks, gels, bars) can benefit high-intensity (≤ 1 h) and less-intense, long-duration activity (≥ 1 h). Spot measures of urine color or urine-specific gravity to assess hydration status have limitations. First morning urine concentration and body mass with gross thirst perception can be simple ways to assess hydration status. © 2012 International Life Sciences Institute.

  1. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel in order to mix its respective portion of liquid water with the corresponding portion of the stream. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  2. Propane hydrate nucleation: Experimental investigation and correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    In this work the nucleation kinetics of propane gas hydrate has been investigated experimentally using a stirred batch reactor. The experiments have been performed isothermally recording the pressure as a function of time. Experiments were conducted at different stirring rates, but in the same...... supersaturation region. The experiments showed that the gas dissolution rate rather than the induction time of propane hydrate is influenced by a change in agitation. This was especially valid at high stirring rates when the water surface was severely disturbed.Addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP...... the presence of additives. In most cases reasonable agreement between the data and the model could be obtained. The results revealed that especially the effective surface energy between propane hydrate and water is likely to change when the stirring rate varies from very high to low. The prolongation...

  3. Simulation of Methane Recovery from Gas Hydrates Combined with Storing Carbon Dioxide as Hydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Janicki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the medium term, gas hydrate reservoirs in the subsea sediment are intended as deposits for carbon dioxide (CO2 from fossil fuel consumption. This idea is supported by the thermodynamics of CO2 and methane (CH4 hydrates and the fact that CO2 hydrates are more stable than CH4 hydrates in a certain P-T range. The potential of producing methane by depressurization and/or by injecting CO2 is numerically studied in the frame of the SUGAR project. Simulations are performed with the commercial code STARS from CMG and the newly developed code HyReS (hydrate reservoir simulator especially designed for hydrate processing in the subsea sediment. HyReS is a nonisothermal multiphase Darcy flow model combined with thermodynamics and rate kinetics suitable for gas hydrate calculations. Two scenarios are considered: the depressurization of an area 1,000 m in diameter and a one/two-well scenario with CO2 injection. Realistic rates for injection and production are estimated, and limitations of these processes are discussed.

  4. Engineering Cellulase Enzymes for Bioenergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Meera Elizabeth

    methods. Protein engineering targets to improve cellulases include reducing enzyme inhibition, improving inter-enzyme synergy, and increasing enzyme thermotolerance. Ameliorating enzyme inhibition could improve catalytic activity and thus the speed of conversion from biomass to fermentable sugars. Improved enzyme synergy could reduce the enzyme loading required to achieve equivalent biomass conversion. Finally, thermostable enzymes could enable more biomass to be processed at a time, due to high temperatures decreasing the viscosity of biomass slurries. A high-temperature enzyme saccharification reaction could also decrease the risk of contamination in the resulting concentrated sugar solution. Throughout my PhD, I have explored research projects broadly across all of these topics, with the most success in addressing the issue of enzyme inhibition. Cellulase enzyme Cel7A is the most abundant cellulase employed by natural systems for cellulose hydrolysis. Cellobiohydrolase enzymes like Cel7A break down cellulose into cellobiose (two glucose molecules). Unfortunately, upon cleavage, this product molecule interferes with continued hydrolysis activity of Cel7A; the strong binding of cellobiose in the active site can obstruct the enzyme from processing down the cellulase chain. This phenomenon, known as product inhibition, is a bottleneck to efficient biomass breakdown. Using insights from computational protein modeling studies, I experimentally generated and tested mutant Cel7A enzymes for improved tolerance to cellobiose. Indeed, this strategy yielded Cel7A enzymes exhibiting reduced product inhibition, including some mutants completely impervious to cellobiose. The improvements in tolerance to cellobiose, however, resulted in an overall reduction of enzyme activity for the mutants tested. Nevertheless, my findings substantiated computational reports with experimental evidence and pinpointed an amino acid residue in the Cel7A product binding site that is of interest for

  5. Irrigation port hydration in phacoemulsification surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki H

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hisaharu Suzuki,1 Yoichiro Masuda,2 Yuki Hamajima,1 Hiroshi Takahashi3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School Musashikosugi Hospital, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa, 2Department of Ophthalmology, The Jikei University, Katsushika Medical Center, Tokyo, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan Background: In most cases, hydration is performed by water injection into the stromal tissue with a needle. The technique is simple, however it is sometimes troublesome.Purpose: We describe a simple technique for hydrating the corneal stroma in cataract surgery using an irrigation port.Patients and methods: The technique began by pushing the irrigation port against the corneal stroma for a few seconds during phacoemulsification, which generated edema in the corneal incision that subsequently prevented leakage. This procedure is called the hydration using irrigation port (HYUIP technique. A total of 60 eyes were randomized and placed in two groups, 30 eyes underwent surgeries using the HYUIP technique (HYUIP group and 30 eyes underwent surgeries without the HYUIP technique (control. The three points evaluated during each surgery included 1 the occurrence of anterior chamber collapse during the pulling out of the I/A tip after inserting the intraocular lens, 2 the need for conventional hydration, and 3 watertight completion at the end stage of surgery.Results: The anterior chamber collapse and the need for conventional hydration were significantly smaller in the HYUIP group compared to the control group. Regarding the self-sealing completion, no significant difference was observed between the two groups.Conclusion: The HYUIP technique is an effective method for creating self-sealing wound. In addition, this technique helps to prevent anterior chamber collapse. Keywords: cataract surgery, hydration, irrigation and aspiration, phacoemulsification, wound, self-sealing 

  6. Enhanced Photoreduction of Nitro-aromatic Compounds by Hydrated Electrons Derived from Indole on Natural Montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Haoting; Guo, Yong; Pan, Bo; Gu, Cheng; Li, Hui; Boyd, Stephen A

    2015-07-07

    A new photoreduction pathway for nitro-aromatic compounds (NACs) and the underlying degradation mechanism are described. 1,3-Dinitrobenzene was reduced to 3-nitroaniline by the widely distributed aromatic molecule indole; the reaction is facilitated by montmorillonite clay mineral under both simulated and natural sunlight irradiation. The novel chemical reaction is strongly affected by the type of exchangeable cation present on montmorillonite. The photoreduction reaction is initiated by the adsorption of 1,3-dinitrobenzene and indole in clay interlayers. Under light irradiation, the excited indole molecule generates a hydrated electron and the indole radical cation. The structural negative charge of montmorillonite plausibly stabilizes the radical cation hence preventing charge recombination. This promotes the release of reactive hydrated electrons for further reductive reactions. Similar results were observed for the photoreduction of nitrobenzene. In situ irradiation time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies provided direct evidence for the generation of hydrated electrons and the indole radical cations, which supported the proposed degradation mechanism. In the photoreduction process, the role of clay mineral is to both enhance the generation of hydrated electrons and to provide a constrained reaction environment in the galley regions, which increases the probability of contact between NACs and hydrated electrons.

  7. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  8. Morphology of methane hydrate host sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K.W.; Feng, H.; Tomov, S.; Winters, W.J.; Eaton, M.; Mahajan, D.

    2005-01-01

    The morphological features including porosity and grains of methane hydrate host sediments were investigated using synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) technique. The sediment sample was obtained during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 164 on the Blake Ridge at water depth of 2278.5 m. The CMT experiment was performed at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source facility. The analysis gave ample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity. The method was found to be highly effective for the study of methane hydrate host sediments.

  9. What are gas hydrates?: Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Y.C.; Waite, W.; Boswell, R.; Dallimore, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The English chemistry pioneer Sir Humphry Davy first combined gas and water to produce a solid substance in his lab in 1810. For more than a century after that landmark moment, a small number of scientists catalogued various solid “hydrates” formed by combining water with an assortment of gases and liquids. Sloan and Koh (2007) review this early research, which was aimed at discerning the chemical structures of gas hydrates (Fig. 1.1), as well as the pressures and temperatures at which they are stable. Because no practical applications were found for these synthetic gas hydrates, they remained an academic curiosity.

  10. Arctic Gas hydrate, Environment and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mienert, Jurgen; Andreassen, Karin; Bünz, Stefan; Carroll, JoLynn; Ferre, Benedicte; Knies, Jochen; Panieri, Giuliana; Rasmussen, Tine; Myhre, Cathrine Lund

    2015-04-01

    Arctic methane hydrate exists on land beneath permafrost regions and offshore in shelf and continental margins sediments. Methane or gas hydrate, an ice-like substrate, consists mainly of light hydrocarbons (mostly methane from biogenic sources but also ethane and propane from thermogenic sources) entrapped by a rigid cage of water molecules. The pressure created by the overlying water and sediments offshore stabilizes the CH4 in continental margins at a temperature range well above freezing point; consequently CH4 exists as methane ice beneath the seabed. Though the accurate volume of Arctic methane hydrate and thus the methane stored in hydrates throughout the Quaternary is still unknown it must be enormous if one considers the vast regions of Arctic continental shelves and margins as well as permafrost areas offshore and on land. Today's subseabed methane hydrate reservoirs are the remnants from the last ice age and remain elusive targets for both unconventional energy and as a natural methane emitter influencing ocean environments and ecosystems. It is still contentious at what rate Arctic warming may govern hydrate melting, and whether the methane ascending from the ocean floor through the hydrosphere reaches the atmosphere. As indicated by Greenland ice core records, the atmospheric methane concentration rose rapidly from ca. 500 ppb to ca. 750 ppb over a short time period of just 150 years at the termination of the younger Dryas period ca. 11600 years ago, but the dissociation of large quantities of methane hydrates on the ocean floor have not been documented yet (Brook et al., 2014 and references within). But with the major projected warming and sea ice melting trend (Knies et al., 2014) one may ask, for how long will CH4 stay trapped in methane hydrates if surface and deep-ocean water masses will warm and permafrost continuous to melt (Portnov et al. 2014). How much of the Arctic methane will be consumed by the micro- and macrofauna, how much will

  11. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianyang; Ning, Fulong; Trinh, Thuat T.; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; He, Jianying; Skallerud, Bjørn H.; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation and their grain-boundary structures have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. Here we report direct molecular dynamics simulations of the material instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates under mechanical loading. The results show dislocation-free brittle failure in monocrystalline hydrates and an unexpected crossover from strengthening to weakening in polycrystals. Upon uniaxial depressurisation, strain-induced hydrate dissociation accompanied by grain-boundary decohesion and sliding destabilises the polycrystals. In contrast, upon compression, appreciable solid-state structural transformation dominates the response. These findings provide molecular insight not only into the metastable structures of grain boundaries, but also into unusual ductile flow with hydrate dissociation as observed during macroscopic compression experiments. PMID:26522051

  12. The Effect of Synthetic Hydrated Calcium Aluminate Additive on the Hydration Properties of OPC

    OpenAIRE

    Jolanta Doneliene; Anatolijus Eisinas; Kestutis Baltakys; Agne Bankauskaite

    2016-01-01

    The effect of synthetic CAH (130°C; 8 h; CaO/(SiO2 + Al2O3) = 0.55; Al2O3/(SiO2 + Al2O3) = 0.1, 0.15) with different crystallinity on the hydration kinetics of OPC at early stages of hydration was investigated. Also, the formation mechanism of compounds during OPC hydration was highlighted. It was determined that the synthetic CAH accelerated the initial reaction and shortened the induction period. Also, the second and third exothermic reactions begun earlier, and, during the latter reaction,...

  13. Feasibility of using phase change materials to control the heat of hydration in massive concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Chang; Khil, Bae-Soo; Chae, Young-Seok; Liang, Qi-Bo; Yun, Hyun-Do

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results that can be applied to select a possible phase change material (PCM), such as a latent heat material (LHM), to control the hydration heat in mass concrete structures. Five experimental tests (microconduction, simplified adiabatic temperature rise, heat, and compressive strength tests) were conducted to select the most desirable LHM out of seven types of inorganic PCM used in cement mortar and to determine the most suitable mix design. The results of these experimental tests were used to assess the feasibility of using PCM to reduce hydration heat in mass concrete that was examined. The experimental results show that cement mortar containing barium- [Ba(OH)2 · 8H2O] based PCM has the lowest amount of total hydration heat of the cement pastes. The barium-based PCM provides good latent heat properties that help to prevent volume change and microcracks caused by thermal stress in mass concrete.

  14. Substantial effect of acute hydration on blood pressure in patients with autonomic failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Boesen, F

    1987-01-01

    The effect of acute hydration on arterial blood pressure levels was investigated in ten patients with severe postural hypotension due to autonomic failure. Blood pressure and heart rate were determined in the supine and 60-degree head-up tilted position. Plasma volume and left ventricular ejection...... fraction were measured in the supine position. Measurements were repeated after rapid infusion of 11 of isotonic saline. Acute hydration resulted in increased supine mean blood pressure levels (P less than 0.01) despite normal plasma volumes in all patients. The postural reductions in mean blood pressure...... were reduced from 40 mmHg before to 20 mmHg after saline (median values, P less than 0.01). The results indicate that normal plasma volumes do not ensure optimal circulatory status in patients with autonomic failure. Acute hydration with isotonic saline may be used for immediate corrections of blood...

  15. Feasibility of Using Phase Change Materials to Control the Heat of Hydration in Massive Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Chang Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental results that can be applied to select a possible phase change material (PCM, such as a latent heat material (LHM, to control the hydration heat in mass concrete structures. Five experimental tests (microconduction, simplified adiabatic temperature rise, heat, and compressive strength tests were conducted to select the most desirable LHM out of seven types of inorganic PCM used in cement mortar and to determine the most suitable mix design. The results of these experimental tests were used to assess the feasibility of using PCM to reduce hydration heat in mass concrete that was examined. The experimental results show that cement mortar containing barium- [Ba(OH2·8H2O] based PCM has the lowest amount of total hydration heat of the cement pastes. The barium-based PCM provides good latent heat properties that help to prevent volume change and microcracks caused by thermal stress in mass concrete.

  16. Enzyme actuated bioresponsive hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew Nolan

    Bioresponsive hydrogels are emerging with technological significance in targeted drug delivery, biosensors and regenerative medicine. Conferred with the ability to respond to specific biologically derived stimuli, the design challenge is in effectively linking the conferred biospecificity with an engineered response tailored to the needs of a particular application. Moreover, the fundamental phenomena governing the response must support an appropriate dynamic range and limit of detection. The design of these systems is inherently complicated due to the high interdependency of the governing phenomena that guide the sensing, transduction, and the actuation response of hydrogels. To investigate the dynamics of these materials, model systems may be used which seek to interrogate the system dynamics by uni-variable experimentation and limit confounding phenomena such as: polymer-solute interactions, polymer swelling dynamics and biomolecular reaction-diffusion concerns. To this end, a model system, alpha-chymotrypsin (Cht) (a protease) and a cleavable peptide-chromogen (pro-drug) covalently incorporated into a hydrogel, was investigated to understand the mechanisms of covalent loading and release by enzymatic cleavage in bio-responsive delivery systems. Using EDC and Sulfo-NHS, terminal carboxyl groups of N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide, a cleavable chromogen, were conjugated to primary amines of a hydrated poly(HEMA)-based hydrogel. Hydrogel discs were incubated in buffered Cht causing enzyme-mediated cleavage of the peptide and concomitant release of the chromophore for monitoring. To investigate substrate loading and the effects of hydrogel morphology on the system, the concentration of the amino groups (5, 10, 20, and 30 mol%) and the cross-linked density (1, 5, 7, 9 and 12 mol%) were independently varied. Loading-Release Efficiency of the chromogen was shown to exhibit a positive relation to increasing amino groups (AEMA). The release rates demonstrated a

  17. Influences of Steelmaking Slags on Hydration and Hardening of Concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsanova, A. A.; Dildin, A. N.; Maksimov, S. P.

    2017-11-01

    It is shown that the slag of metallurgical production can be used in the construction industry as an active mineral additive for concrete. This approach allows us to solve environmental problems and reduce costs for the production of binder and concrete simultaneously. Most often slag is used in the form of a filler, an active mineral additive or as a part of a binder for artificial conglomerates. The introduction of slag allows one to notice a part of the cement, to obtain concretes that are more resistant to the impact of aggressive sulfate media. The paper shows the possibility of using recycled steel-smelting slags in the construction industry for the production of cement. An assessment was made of their effect on the hydration of the cement stone and hardening of the concrete together with the plasticizer under normal conditions. In the process of work, we used the slag of the Zlatoust Electrometallurgical Factory. Possible limitations of the content of steel-slag slag in concrete because of the possible presence of harmful impurities are shown. It is necessary to enter slag in conjunction with superplasticizers to reduce the flow of water mixing. Slags can be used as a hardening accelerator for cement concrete as they allow one to increase the degree of cement hydration and concrete strength. It is shown that slags can be used to produce fast-hardening concretes and their comparative characteristics with other active mineral additives are given.

  18. Gas hydrate occurrence and Morpho-structures along Chilean margin

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas Cordero, Ivan De La Cruz

    2009-01-01

    2007/2008 During the last decades, the scientific community spent many efforts to study the gas hydrates in oceanic and permafrost environments. In fact, the gas hydrate occurrence has a global significance because of the potential energy resource represented by the large amount of hydrocarbon trapped in the hydrate phase. Moreover, it may play a role in global climate change, and it is also study because of the hazard that accumulations of gas hydrate may cause to drilling and seabed inst...

  19. Microscopic Origin of Strain Hardening in Methane Hydrate

    OpenAIRE

    Jihui Jia; Yunfeng Liang; Takeshi Tsuji; Sumihiko Murata; Toshifumi Matsuoka

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported for a long time that methane hydrate presents strain hardening, whereas the strength of normal ice weakens with increasing strain after an ultimate strength. However, the microscopic origin of these differences is not known. Here, we investigated the mechanical characteristics of methane hydrate and normal ice by compressive deformation test using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that methane hydrate exhibits strain hardening only if the hydrate is confined to ...

  20. Marine Gas Hydrates - An Untapped Non-conventional Energy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Marine Gas Hydrates - An Untapped Non-conventional Energy Resource · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Gas Hydrate Stability Zone · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Exploration of gas hydrates (seismic) · Characteristics of BSR · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Distribution of Gas Hydrates in KG ...

  1. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted by that enzyme......Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...

  2. Methods of gas hydrate concentration estimation with field examples

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, D.; Dash, R.; Dewangan, P.

    gas hydrate, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, doi:10.1029/2005GL022607. Waite, W., Helgerud, M. B., Nur, A., Pinksto, J. C., Stern, L., and Kirby, S., 2000. Laboratory measurements of compressional and shear wave speeds through methane hydrate: In Gas Hydrates...

  3. Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-06-20

    Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.

  4. HYDRATION IN THE SAND SHRIMP CRANGON SEPTEMSPINOSA: RELATION TO DIET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, J Ross; Jeffries, H Perry

    1976-06-01

    Tissue hydration in the estuarine sand shrimp Crangon septemspinosa is correlated with nutritional conditions. Hydration levels of shrimp who are ingesting food remain normal. In starved shrimp or in individuals who are not ingesting adequate amounts of food, hydration levels are high. Presumably, water replaces metabolized tissues.

  5. Are we being drowned in hydration advice? Thirsty for more?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, James David; Thornton, Simon N; Lee, Jason Kw; Laursen, Paul B

    2014-01-01

    Hydration pertains simplistically to body water volume. Functionally, however, hydration is one aspect of fluid regulation that is far more complex, as it involves the homeostatic regulation of total body fluid volume, composition and distribution. Deliberate or pathological alteration of these regulated factors can be disabling or fatal, whereas they are impacted by exercise and by all environmental stressors (e.g. heat, immersion, gravity) both acutely and chronically. For example, dehydration during exercising and environmental heat stress reduces water volume more than electrolyte content, causing hyperosmotic hypohydration. If exercise continues for many hours with access to food and water, composition returns to normal but extracellular volume increases well above baseline (if exercising upright and at low altitude). Repeating bouts of exercise or heat stress does likewise. Dehydration due to physical activity or environmental heat is a routine fluid-regulatory stress. How to gauge such dehydration and - more importantly-what to do about it, are contested heavily within sports medicine and nutrition. Drinking to limit changes in body mass is commonly advocated (to maintain ≤2% reduction), rather than relying on behavioural cues (mainly thirst) because the latter has been deemed too insensitive. This review, as part of the series on moving in extreme environments, critiques the validity, problems and merits of externally versus autonomously controlled fluid-regulatory behaviours, both acutely and chronically. Our contention is that externally advocated hydration policies (especially based on change in body mass with exercise in healthy individuals) have limited merit and are extrapolated and imposed too widely upon society, at the expense of autonomy. More research is warranted to examine whether ad libitum versus avid drinking is beneficial, detrimental or neither in: acute settings; adapting for obligatory dehydration (e.g. elite endurance competition in

  6. Are we being drowned in hydration advice? Thirsty for more?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Hydration pertains simplistically to body water volume. Functionally, however, hydration is one aspect of fluid regulation that is far more complex, as it involves the homeostatic regulation of total body fluid volume, composition and distribution. Deliberate or pathological alteration of these regulated factors can be disabling or fatal, whereas they are impacted by exercise and by all environmental stressors (e.g. heat, immersion, gravity) both acutely and chronically. For example, dehydration during exercising and environmental heat stress reduces water volume more than electrolyte content, causing hyperosmotic hypohydration. If exercise continues for many hours with access to food and water, composition returns to normal but extracellular volume increases well above baseline (if exercising upright and at low altitude). Repeating bouts of exercise or heat stress does likewise. Dehydration due to physical activity or environmental heat is a routine fluid-regulatory stress. How to gauge such dehydration and — more importantly—what to do about it, are contested heavily within sports medicine and nutrition. Drinking to limit changes in body mass is commonly advocated (to maintain ≤2% reduction), rather than relying on behavioural cues (mainly thirst) because the latter has been deemed too insensitive. This review, as part of the series on moving in extreme environments, critiques the validity, problems and merits of externally versus autonomously controlled fluid-regulatory behaviours, both acutely and chronically. Our contention is that externally advocated hydration policies (especially based on change in body mass with exercise in healthy individuals) have limited merit and are extrapolated and imposed too widely upon society, at the expense of autonomy. More research is warranted to examine whether ad libitum versus avid drinking is beneficial, detrimental or neither in: acute settings; adapting for obligatory dehydration (e.g. elite endurance competition

  7. Compression behaviour of anhydrous and hydrate forms of sodium naproxen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaj, Ledjan; Censi, Roberta; Gashi, Zehadin; Di Martino, Piera

    2010-05-10

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the technological properties and the compression behaviour of the anhydrous and hydrate solid forms of sodium naproxen. Among the hydrates, the following forms were studied: the monohydrate (MSN), obtained by dehydrating a dihydrated form (DSN) in each turn obtained by exposing the anhydrous form at 55% RH; a dihydrated form (CSN) obtained by crystallizing sodium naproxen from water, the tetrahydrated form (TSN) obtained by exposing the anhydrous form at 75% RH. The physico-chemical (crystalline form and water content), the micromeritic (crystal morphology and particle size) and the mechanical properties (Carr's index, apparent particle density, compression behaviour, elastic recovery and strength of compact) were evaluated. We made every effort to reduce differences in crystal habit, particle size and distribution, and amount of absorbed water among the samples, so that the only factors affecting their technological behaviour would be the degree of hydration and the crystalline structure. This study demonstrates a correlation between the compression behaviour and the water molecules present in the crystalline structures. The sites where water molecules are accommodated in the crystalline structure behave like weak points where the crystalline lattice yields under compression. The crystal deformability is proportional to the number of water molecules in these sites; the higher the water content, the higher the deformability, because the densification behaviour changes from a predominantly elastic deformation to a plastic behaviour. The deformability is responsible for a higher densification tendency that favours larger interparticle bonding areas that may explain the better tabletability of TSN and CSN. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Overview of scientific and technical program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, R.B.; Collett, T.S.; Boswell, R.; Anderson, B.J.; Digert, S.A.; Pospisil, G.; Baker, R.; Weeks, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well was drilled within the Alaska North Slope (ANS) Milne Point Unit (MPU) from February 3 to 19, 2007. The well was conducted as part of a Cooperative Research Agreement (CRA) project co-sponsored since 2001 by BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc. (BPXA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to help determine whether ANS gas hydrate can become a technically and commercially viable gas resource. Early in the effort, regional reservoir characterization and reservoir simulation modeling studies indicated that up to 0.34 trillion cubic meters (tcm; 12 trillion cubic feet, tcf) gas may be technically recoverable from 0.92 tcm (33 tcf) gas-in-place within the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation near industry infrastructure within ANS MPU, Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), and Kuparuk River Unit (KRU) areas. To further constrain these estimates and to enable the selection of a test site for further data acquisition, the USGS reprocessed and interpreted MPU 3D seismic data provided by BPXA to delineate 14 prospects containing significant highly-saturated gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs. The "Mount Elbert" site was selected to drill a stratigraphic test well to acquire a full suite of wireline log, core, and formation pressure test data. Drilling results and data interpretation confirmed pre-drill predictions and thus increased confidence in both the prospect interpretation methods and in the wider ANS gas hydrate resource estimates. The interpreted data from the Mount Elbert well provide insight into and reduce uncertainty of key gas hydrate-bearing reservoir properties, enable further refinement and validation of the numerical simulation of the production potential of both MPU and broader ANS gas hydrate resources, and help determine viability of potential field sites for future extended term production testing. Drilling and data acquisition operations demonstrated that gas hydrate

  9. Adsorption of water and carbon dioxide on hematite and consequences for possible hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kivelae, Pilvi-Helina

    2012-04-07

    The interest in carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery is increasing proportional to the decline in naturally driven oil production and also due to the increasing demand for reduced emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Transport of carbon dioxide in offshore pipelines involves high pressure and low temperatures, conditions which may lead to formation of hydrates from residual water dissolved in carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide. The critical question is whether the water at certain temperatures and pressures will drop out as liquid droplets first, and then form hydrates, or alternatively, adsorb on the pipeline surfaces, and subsequently form hydrates heterogeneously. In this work, we used several different basis sets of density functional theory in ab initio calculations to estimate the charge distribution of hematite (the dominating component of rust) crystals. These rust particles were embedded in water and chemical potential for adsorbed water molecules was estimated through thermodynamic integration and compared to similar estimates for water clusters of the same size. While the generated charges were not unique, the use of high order approximations and different basis sets provides a range of likely charge distributions. Values obtained for the chemical potential of water in different surroundings indicated that it would be thermodynamically favorable for water to adsorb on hematite, and that evaluation of potential carbon dioxide hydrate formation conditions and kinetics should be based on this formation mechanism. Depending on the basis set and approximations, the estimated gain for water to adsorb on the hematite surface rather than condense as droplets varied between -1.7 kJ mole(-1) and -3.4 kJ mole(-1). The partial charge distribution on the hematite surface is incompatible with the hydrate structure, and thus hydrates will be unable to attach to the surface. The behavior of water outside the immediate vicinity of hematite (beyond 3

  10. CALCIUM ORTHOPHOSPHATES HYDRATES: FORMATION, STABILITY AND INFLUENCE ON STANDARD PROPERTIES OF PORTLAND CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaziliunas A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of phosphogypsum to produce the binders requires a much higher input than preparation of natural gypsum stone. This makes it uncompetitive material. The investigations presented therein are meant to reduce this input by looking for the ways of rendering impurities harmless. Soluble acid orthophosphates are the main harmful impurity of phosphogypsum. The studies show that dry insoluble calcium orthophosphates hydrates (1.09 % and 2.18 % P2O5 in gypsum have little effect on W/C, setting times and soundness of Portland cement pastes. Insoluble calcium orthophosphates hydrates {CaHPO4∙2H2O, Ca8(HPO42(PO44∙5H2O and Ca9(HPO4(PO45(OH∙4H2O} formed in acidic medium (pH = 4.2 - 5.9 have been destroyed in alkaline medium and reduce standard compressive strength of cement up to 28 %. Calcium orthophosphates hydrates of hydroxyapatite group are stable in alcaline medium, while in dry state they reduce the standard compressive strength of cement until 10 %, but their suspensions prolong setting times of Portland cement as soluble orthophosphates – 2 - 3 times. Alkalis in cement increase pH of paste, but do not change the process of formation of calcium orthophosphates hydrates of hydroxyapatite group: it takes place through an intermediate phase - CaHPO4·2H2O, whose transformation into apatite lasts for 2 - 3 months.

  11. Evaluation of thermostable enzymes for bioethanol processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Pernille Anastasia

    for the ioethanol production, but the expenses can be reduced by using thermostable enzymes, which are known for their increased stability and inhibitor olerance. However, the advantage of using thermostable enzymes has not been studied thoroughly and more knowledge is needed for development of bioethanol processes...... concentration reduced the stability of the enzymes, while addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG) had the opposite effect. In addition, thermostable enzymes retained more activity when tested in a pilot distillation setup, where the enzymes were exposed to increasing temperature and air-liquid interfaces (chapter......, thermostable enzymes were shown to be more efficient than mesophilic enzymes when it came to temperature, inhibitor tolerance and stability against air-liquid forces....

  12. Erythritol reduces small intestinal glucose absorption, increases muscle glucose uptake, improves glucose metabolic enzymes activities and increases expression of Glut-4 and IRS-1 in type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Mopuri, Ramgopal; Nagiah, Savania; Chuturgoon, Anil Amichund; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2017-08-02

    Studies have reported that erythritol, a low or non-glycemic sugar alcohol possesses anti-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic potentials but the underlying mode of actions is not clear. This study investigated the underlying mode of actions behind the anti-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic potentials of erythritol using different experimental models (experiment 1, 2 and 3). Experiment 1 examined the effects of increasing concentrations (2.5-20%) of erythritol on glucose absorption and uptake in isolated rat jejunum and psoas muscle, respectively. Experiments 2 and 3 examined the effects of a single oral dose of erythritol (1 g/kg bw) on intestinal glucose absorption, gastric emptying and postprandial blood glucose increase, glucose tolerance, serum insulin level, muscle/liver hexokinase and liver glucose-6 phosphatase activities, liver and muscle glycogen contents and mRNA and protein expression of muscle Glut-4 and IRS-1 in normal and type 2 diabetic animals. Experiment 1 revealed that erythritol dose dependently enhanced muscle glucose ex vivo. Experiment 2 demonstrated that erythritol feeding delayed gastric emptying and reduced small intestinal glucose absorption as well as postprandial blood glucose rise, especially in diabetic animals. Experiment 3 showed that erythritol feeding improved glucose tolerance, muscle/liver hexokinase and liver glucose-6 phosphatase activities, glycogen storage and also modulated expression of muscle Glut-4 and IRS-1 in diabetic animals. Data suggest that erythritol may exert anti-hyperglycemic effects not only via reducing small intestinal glucose absorption, but also by increasing muscle glucose uptake, improving glucose metabolic enzymes activity and modulating muscle Glut-4 and IRS-1 mRNA and protein expression. Hence, erythritol may be a useful dietary supplement for managing hyperglycemia, particularly for T2D.

  13. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. ACTION: Notice of open... Office of Fossil Energy to the Office of Science 4:45 p.m.-5 p.m. Final Announcements and Adjourn Public...

  14. Pentagonal dodecahedron methane hydrate cage and methanol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    petroleum industry as it plugs the oil flow.12 Restric- tion of hydrate plug ... Interaction energy ( E) for cluster formation has been determined using .... Interaction energies are mentioned in table 2 for all three 1CH4@512 cage, 1CH4@512-methanol clus- ter and 1CH4@512-methanol-Na. + cluster systems. Formation of ...

  15. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Archer, D

    2007-01-01

    .... The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2...

  16. [Terminal phase hydration, pain and delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heick, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hydration of the terminal patient may relieve confusion and complaints of "dry mouth". But it may worsen oedema of the brain, lungs, and extremities, worsen terminal rattling and cause a need for frequent changing of diapers. The decision of whether and how to treat a dying patient with fluids sh...

  17. HYDRATION STRUCTURE AND WATER EXCHANGE DYNAMICS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    was carried out for Fe(II) in water using the 2-body potential and its 3-body correction function to study hydration structure of the Fe(II) ion. Furthermore, the present study investigates the water exchange processes around the Fe(II) ion in the aqueous solution. Emphasis is given on the illumination of the structural changes at ...

  18. Gypsum hydration: a theoretical and experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Qingliang; Brouwers, Jos; de Korte, A.C.J.; Fischer, H.B; Bode, K.A.

    2009-01-01

    Calcium sulphate dihydrate (CaSO4·2H2O or gypsum) is used widely as building material because of its excellent fire resistance, aesthetics, and low price. Hemihydrate occurs in two formations of α- and β-type. Among them β-hemihydrate is mainly used to produce gypsum plasterboard since the hydration

  19. Gold(III)-Catalyzed Hydration of Phenylacetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, J. Michelle; Tzeel, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    A guided inquiry-based experiment exploring the regioselectivity of the hydration of phenylacetylene is described. The experiment uses an acidic gold(III) catalyst in a benign methanol/water solvent system to introduce students to alkyne chemistry and key principles of green chemistry. The experiment can be easily completed in approximately 2 h,…

  20. Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments [Part 2 of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-12-31

    laboratory experiments in a radial cell. We collapse the behavior in the form of a phase diagram fully characterized by two dimensionless groups: a modified capillary number and a ?fracturing number? that reflects the balance between the pressure forces that act to open conduits in the granular pack, and frictional forces that resist it. We use all this small-scale knowledge to propose simple mechanistic models of gas migration and hydrate formation at the geologic bed scale. We propose that methane transport in lake and oceanic sediments is controlled by dynamic conduits, which dilate and release gas as the falling hydrostatic pressure reduces the effective stress below the tensile strength of the sediments. We test our model against a four-month record of hydrostatic load and methane flux in Upper Mystic Lake, Mass., USA, and show that it captures the complex episodicity of methane ebullition. Our quantitative conceptualization opens the door to integrated modeling of methane transport to constrain global methane release from lakes and other methane-rich sediment systems, and to assess its climate feedbacks.

  1. Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments [Part 1 of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-12-31

    laboratory experiments in a radial cell. We collapse the behavior in the form of a phase diagram fully characterized by two dimensionless groups: a modified capillary number and a ?fracturing number? that reflects the balance between the pressure forces that act to open conduits in the granular pack, and frictional forces that resist it. We use all this small-scale knowledge to propose simple mechanistic models of gas migration and hydrate formation at the geologic bed scale. We propose that methane transport in lake and oceanic sediments is controlled by dynamic conduits, which dilate and release gas as the falling hydrostatic pressure reduces the effective stress below the tensile strength of the sediments. We test our model against a four-month record of hydrostatic load and methane flux in Upper Mystic Lake, Mass., USA, and show that it captures the complex episodicity of methane ebullition. Our quantitative conceptualization opens the door to integrated modeling of methane transport to constrain global methane release from lakes and other methane-rich sediment systems, and to assess its climate feedbacks.

  2. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  3. Quorum quenching enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-05-10

    Bacteria use cell-to-cell communication systems based on chemical signal molecules to coordinate their behavior within the population. These quorum sensing systems are potential targets for antivirulence therapies, because many bacterial pathogens control the expression of virulence factors via quorum sensing networks. Since biofilm maturation is also usually influenced by quorum sensing, quenching these systems may contribute to combat biofouling. One possibility to interfere with quorum sensing is signal inactivation by enzymatic degradation or modification. Such quorum quenching enzymes are wide-spread in the bacterial world and have also been found in eukaryotes. Lactonases and acylases that hydrolyze N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signaling molecules have been investigated most intensively, however, different oxidoreductases active toward AHLs or 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolone signals as well as other signal-converting enzymes have been described. Several approaches have been assessed which aim at alleviating virulence, or biofilm formation, by reducing the signal concentration in the bacterial environment. These involve the application or stimulation of signal-degrading bacteria as biocontrol agents in the protection of crop plants against soft-rot disease, the use of signal-degrading bacteria as probiotics in aquaculture, and the immobilization or entrapment of quorum quenching enzymes or bacteria to control biofouling in membrane bioreactors. While most approaches to use quorum quenching as antivirulence strategy are still in the research phase, the growing number of organisms and enzymes known to interfere with quorum sensing opens up new perspectives for the development of innovative antibacterial strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Direct measurement of methane hydrate composition along the hydrate equilibrium boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of methane hydrate, namely nW for CH 4??nWH2O, was directly measured along the hydrate equilibrium boundary under conditions of excess methane gas. Pressure and temperature conditions ranged from 1.9 to 9.7 MPa and 263 to 285 K. Within experimental error, there is no change in hydrate composition with increasing pressure along the equilibrium boundary, but nW may show a slight systematic decrease away from this boundary. A hydrate stoichiometry of n W = 5.81-6.10 H2O describes the entire range of measured values, with an average composition of CH4??5.99(??0.07) H2O along the equilibrium boundary. These results, consistent with previously measured values, are discussed with respect to the widely ranging values obtained by thermodynamic analysis. The relatively constant composition of methane hydrate over the geologically relevant pressure and temperature range investigated suggests that in situ methane hydrate compositions may be estimated with some confidence. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  5. MORPHOLOGY OF METHANE HYDRATE HOST SEDIMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.; TOMOV,S.; WINTER,W.J.; EATON,M.; MAHAJAN,D.

    2004-12-01

    Results from simulated experiments in several laboratories show that host sediments influence hydrate formation in accord with known heterogeneity of host sediments at sites of gas hydrate occurrence (1). For example, in Mackenzie Delta, NWT Canada (Mallik 2L-38 well), coarser-grained units (pore-filling model) are found whereas in the Gulf of Mexico, the found hydrate samples do not appear to be lithologically controlled. We have initiated a systematic study of sediments, initially focusing on samples from various depths at a specific site, to establish a correlation with hydrate occurrence (or variations thereof) to establish differences in their microstructure, porosity, and other associated properties. The synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) set-up at the X-27A tomography beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory was used as a tool to study sediments from Blake Ridge at three sub bottom depths of 0.2, 50, and 667 meters. Results from the tomographic analysis of the deepest sample (667 m) are presented here to illustrate how tomography can be used to obtain new insights into the structures of methane hydrate host sediments. The investigation shows the internal grain/pore space resolution in the microstructure and a 3-D visualization of the connecting pathways obtained following data segmentation into pore space and grains within the sediment sample. The analysis gives the sample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity, as well. An earlier report on the experimental program has been given by Mahajan et al. (2).

  6. [Advances on enzymes and enzyme inhibitors research based on microfluidic devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Feng-Hua; Ye, Jian-Qing; Chen, Zuan-Guang; Cheng, Zhi-Yi

    2010-06-01

    With the continuous development in microfluidic fabrication technology, microfluidic analysis has evolved from a concept to one of research frontiers in last twenty years. The research of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors based on microfluidic devices has also made great progress. Microfluidic technology improved greatly the analytical performance of the research of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors by reducing the consumption of reagents, decreasing the analysis time, and developing automation. This review focuses on the development and classification of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors research based on microfluidic devices.

  7. Solid state interconversion between anhydrous norfloxacin and its hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongcharoen, Wanchai; Byrn, Stephen R; Sutanthavibul, Narueporn

    2008-01-01

    This work is focused on characterizing and evaluating the solid state interconversion of norfloxacin (NF) hydrates. Four stoichiometric NF hydrates, dihydrate, hemipentahydrate, trihydrate, pentahydrate and a disordered NF state, were generated by various methods and characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), thermal analysis and Karl Fisher titrimetry. XRPD patterns of all NF hydrates exhibited crystalline structures. NF hydrate conversion was studied with respect to mild elevated temperature and various degrees of moisture levels. NF hydrates transformed to anhydrous NF Form A after gentle heating at 60 degrees C for 48 h except dihydrate and trihydrate where mixture in XRPD patterns between anhydrous NF Form A and former structures existed. Desiccation of NF hydrates at 0% RH for 7 days resulted in only partial removal of water molecules from the hydrated structures. The hydrated transitional phase and the disordered NF state were obtained from the incomplete dehydration of NF hydrates after thermal treatment and pentahydrate NF after desiccation, respectively. Anhydrous NF Form A and NF hydrates transformed to pentahydrate NF when exposed to high moisture environment except dihydrate. In conclusion, surrounding moisture levels, temperatures and the duration of exposure strongly influenced the interconversion pathways and stoichiometry of anhydrous NF and its hydrates. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Carbon dioxid sequestration in natural gas hydrates: Thermodynamic considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicks, J. M.; Beeskow-Strauch, B.; Luzi, M.; Girod, M.; Erzinger, J.

    2009-12-01

    Due to the increasing energy demands natural gas hydrates become more and more of interest. The huge amount of hydrocarbons - mainly CH4 - stored in natural hydrate reservoirs suggest the use of natural gas hydrates as an energy resource. However, the combustion of this fossil fuel results in an undesired increase of CO2 in the atmosphere. Therefore, a combination of CH4 production on the one hand and the CO2 sequestration on the other hand seems to be ideal. Several investigations regarding the exchange reaction of CH4 with CO2 using pure methane hydrates and pure CO2 or CO2-N2-mixtures have been performed as laboratory studies in the past. Some showed exchange rates up to 85% and concluded that the driving force of this exchange reaction is the higher stability of CO2 hydrates compared to methane hydrates (e.g. Park et al. 2006). However, natural conditions may differ: natural gas hydrates may contain higher hydrocarbons or H2S, which have significant impact in terms of a higher stability of the mixed hydrate phase compared to pure CH4- and CO2-hydrates. Primary results of our investigations on the exchange reaction of a mixed CH4-C3H8-hydrate with CO2 indicates that although the stability of mixed CH4-C3H8-hydrate is significantly shifted to higher temperatures and lower pressures compared to pure CH4-, mixed CH4-CO2- and pure CO2-hydrates, it changes in the presence of CO2 from a structure II hydrate phase to form a structure I CH4-CO2-hydrate which subsequently transforms to CO2-hydrate. This process starts at the interface between gas and hydrate and continues slowly into the bulk phase. These observation lead to the following conclusions: - The driving force of the exchange reaction is less the stability with respect to temperature and pressure conditions of the hydrate phase but rather the chemical equilibrium state in terms of concentration gradients between hydrate and surrounding gas phase - After the initial formation of a CO2-CH4- or CO2 hydrate layer

  9. Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gay Hydrate Production Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. White; B. P. McGrail; S. K. Wurstner

    2009-06-30

    Displacing natural gas and petroleum with carbon dioxide is a proven technology for producing conventional geologic hydrocarbon reservoirs, and producing additional yields from abandoned or partially produced petroleum reservoirs. Extending this concept to natural gas hydrate production offers the potential to enhance gas hydrate recovery with concomitant permanent geologic sequestration. Numerical simulation was used to assess a suite of carbon dioxide injection techniques for producing gas hydrates from a variety of geologic deposit types. Secondary hydrate formation was found to inhibit contact of the injected CO{sub 2} regardless of injectate phase state, thus diminishing the exchange rate due to pore clogging and hydrate zone bypass of the injected fluids. Additional work is needed to develop methods of artificially introducing high-permeability pathways in gas hydrate zones if injection of CO{sub 2} in either gas, liquid, or micro-emulsion form is to be more effective in enhancing gas hydrate production rates.

  10. Preservation phenomena of methane hydrate in pore spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachikubo, Akihiro; Takeya, Satoshi; Chuvilin, Evgeny; Istomin, Vladimir

    2011-10-21

    Dissociation processes of methane hydrate synthesized with glass beads were investigated using powder X-ray diffraction and calorimetry. Methane hydrate formed with coarse glass beads dissociated quickly at 150-200 K; in this temperature range methane hydrate dissociates at atmospheric pressure. In contrast, methane hydrate formed with glass beads less than a few microns in size showed very high stability up to just below the melting point of ice, even though this temperature is well outside the zone of thermodynamic stability of the hydrate. The rate-determining steps for methane hydrate dissociation within pores are also discussed. The experimental results suggest that methane hydrate existing naturally within the pores of fine particles such as mud at low temperatures would be significantly more stable than expected thermodynamically. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  11. Characterization of un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate™ and MTA Angelus™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Sorrentino, F; Damidot, D

    2015-04-01

    BioAggregate™ is a novel material introduced for use as a root-end filling material. It is tricalcium silicate-based, free of aluminium and uses tantalum oxide as radiopacifier. BioAggregate contains additives to enhance the material performance. The purpose of this research was to characterize the un-hydrated and hydrated forms of BioAggregate using a combination of techniques, verify whether the additives if present affect the properties of the set material and compare these properties to those of MTA Angelus™. Un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate and MTA Angelus were assessed. Un-hydrated cement was tested for chemical composition, specific surface area, mineralogy and kinetics of hydration. The set material was investigated for mineralogy, microstructure and bioactivity. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and isothermal calorimetry were employed. The specific surface area was investigated using a gas adsorption method with nitrogen as the probe. BioAggregate was composed of tricalcium silicate, tantalum oxide, calcium phosphate and silicon dioxide and was free of aluminium. On hydration, the tricalcium silicate produced calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The former was deposited around the cement grains, while the latter reacted with the silicon dioxide to form additional calcium silicate hydrate. This resulted in reduction of calcium hydroxide in the aged cement. MTA Angelus reacted in a similar fashion; however, since it contained no additives, the calcium hydroxide was still present in the aged cement. Bioactivity was demonstrated by deposition of hydroxyapatite. BioAggregate exhibited a high specific surface area. Nevertheless, the reactivity determined by isothermal calorimetry appeared to be slow compared to MTA Angelus. The tantalum oxide as opposed to bismuth oxide was inert, and tantalum was not leached in solution. BioAggregate exhibited

  12. Spectroscopic investigation of cement hydrate phases and their chloride binding properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping

    This thesis investigates the chloride binding properties of the hydrate phases present in Portland cement paste and the relationships between chloride binding capacity and the structure of these phases, using primarily NMR spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, XRD, thermal analysis, and chemical analysis. It provides important basic data and new insights into the effects of the structure of the individual hydrate phases on their chloride binding properties, and the atomic level structural states and dynamic behavior of the bound chloride in the cement hydrate crystals and at the solid/solution interface. The chloride binding capacity depends on the structure and surface properties of the individual hydrates. Portlandite and AFm surfaces have high affinity for chloride due to their positive zeta-potentials. For C-S-H samples, the chloride binding capacity increases with increasing C/S ratio due to increased numbers of surface Ca-OH sites and decreased polymerization of silicate chains. Aluminum substitution in C-S-H is unfavorable for chloride binding due to reduced layer charge and increased chain polymerization. For all hydrate phases the mechanism of chloride binding is not simply electrostatic attraction. Formation of metal-chloride clusters in the solution and sorption in the Stem layer may contribute substantially. The bound chlorides near the cement hydrate surfaces are in water solvated environments similar to those in the bulk solution and are in rapid exchange (>2kHz) with free chloride in the bulk solution. The chloride concentration near the surfaces is much higher than in the equilibrium bulk solution, and the reorientational frequency of the water molecules solvating the bound chloride is slower than those in the bulk solution. Chloride has a well-defined structural site in Friedel's salt. In solid solutions between Friedel's salt and hydroxyl-AFm, chloride occurs predominantly in Cl-rich domains except at high OH-contents.

  13. Controls on evolution of gas-hydrate system in the Krishna-Godavari basin, offshore India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badesab, F.; Dewangan, P.; Usapkar, A.; Kocherla, M.; Peketi, A.; Mohite, K.; Sangode, S. J.; Deenadayalan, K.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we integrate environmental magnetic, sedimentological, and geochemical records of sediment core of Hole NGHP-01-10D overlying methane hydrate deposits to decipher the controls on the evolution of fracture-filled gas-hydrate system in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin. Four distinct sedimentary units have been identified, based on the sediment magnetic signatures. An anomalous zone of enhanced magnetic susceptibility (Unit III: 51.9-160.4 mbsf) coinciding with the gas hydrate bearing intervals is due to the presence of magnetite-rich detrital minerals brought-in by the river systems as a result of higher sedimentation events in K-G basin and has no influence over hydrate formation. A strong to moderate correlation between magnetite concentration and chromium reducible sulfur (CRS) content indicates significant influence of sulfidization on the magnetic record and could be further exploited as a proxy to decipher paleo-H2S seepage events. Analysis of high-resolution seismic, bathymetry, and sub-bottom profiler data reveals the existence of a regional fault system in K-G basin. The opening and closing dynamics of the faults facilitated the migration and trapping of required gas concentrations resulting in accumulation of gas hydrates at the studied site. The seismic data provides support to the rock-magnetic interpretations. The observed variations in magnetic and geochemical properties have resulted from the episodic flow of methane and sulfide-enriched fluids through the fracture-filled network formed as a result of shale-tectonism. Our study demonstrated the potential of using an enviro-magnetic approach in combination with other proxies to constrain the evolution of gas-hydrate system in marine environments.

  14. Effects of hydration in rats and mice with polycystic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Katharina; Wang, Xiaofang; Ye, Hong; Irazabal, María V.; Harris, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Vasopressin and V2 receptor signaling promote polycystic kidney disease (PKD) progression, raising the question whether suppression of vasopressin release through enhanced hydration can delay disease advancement. Enhanced hydration by adding 5% glucose to the drinking water has proven protective in a rat model orthologous to autosomal recessive PKD. We wanted to exclude a glucose effect and explore the influence of enhanced hydration in a mouse model orthologous to autosomal dominant PKD. PCK rats were assigned to normal water intake (NWI) or high water intake (HWI) groups achieved by feeding a hydrated agar diet (HWI-agar) or by adding 5% glucose to the drinking water (HWI-glucose), with the latter group used to recapitulate previously published results. Homozygous Pkd1 R3277C (Pkd1RC/RC) mice were assigned to NWI and HWI-agar groups. To evaluate the effectiveness of HWI, kidney weight and histomorphometry were assessed, and urine vasopressin, renal cAMP levels, and phosphodiesterase activities were measured. HWI-agar, like HWI-glucose, reduced urine vasopressin, renal cAMP levels, and PKD severity in PCK rats but not in Pkd1RC/RC mice. Compared with rat kidneys, mouse kidneys had higher phosphodiesterase activity and lower cAMP levels and were less sensitive to the cystogenic effect of 1-deamino-8-d-arginine vasopressin, as previously shown for Pkd1RC/RC mice and confirmed here in Pkd2WS25/− mice. We conclude that the effect of enhanced hydration in rat and mouse models of PKD differs. More powerful suppression of V2 receptor-mediated signaling than achievable by enhanced hydration alone may be necessary to affect the development of PKD in mouse models. PMID:25503729

  15. Developement of mucoadhesive polymer-coated liposomes for hydration of the oral mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh, Rebwar Salar Nori

    2013-01-01

    Dry mucus in the oral cavity is uncomfortable for patients and can lead to other additional illnesses. Reduced or absence of saliva secretion, caused by the diseases, side effects of drugs, aging, or radiotherapy, can result in issues related to xerostomia and dental health. A system that could contribute to increased hydration of the mucus would reduce the discomfort for the patient. In addition, it would prevent the additional issues related to dry mucus. Liposomes and polymer-coated liposo...

  16. In-situ gas hydrate hydrate saturation estimated from various well logs at the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed detailed analysis and interpretation of available 2-D and 3-D seismic data and proposed a viable method for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the gas hydrate stability zone in the Milne Point area of northern Alaska. To validate the predictions of the USGS and to acquire critical reservoir data needed to develop a long-term production testing program, a well was drilled at the Mount Elbert prospect in February, 2007. Numerous well log data and cores were acquired to estimate in-situ gas hydrate saturations and reservoir properties.Gas hydrate saturations were estimated from various well logs such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), P- and S-wave velocity, and electrical resistivity logs along with pore-water salinity. Gas hydrate saturations from the NMR log agree well with those estimated from P- and S-wave velocity data. Because of the low salinity of the connate water and the low formation temperature, the resistivity of connate water is comparable to that of shale. Therefore, the effect of clay should be accounted for to accurately estimate gas hydrate saturations from the resistivity data. Two highly gas hydrate-saturated intervals are identified - an upper ???43 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 54% and a lower ???53 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 50%; both zones reach a maximum of about 75% saturation. ?? 2009.

  17. Probing methane hydrate nucleation through the forward flux sampling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yuanfei; Li, Tianshu

    2014-11-26

    Understanding the nucleation of hydrate is the key to developing effective strategies for controlling methane hydrate formation. Here we present a computational study of methane hydrate nucleation, by combining the forward flux sampling (FFS) method and the coarse-grained water model mW. To facilitate the application of FFS in studying the formation of methane hydrate, we developed an effective order parameter λ on the basis of the topological analysis of the tetrahedral network. The order parameter capitalizes the signature of hydrate structure, i.e., polyhedral cages, and is capable of efficiently distinguishing hydrate from ice and liquid water while allowing the formation of different hydrate phases, i.e., sI, sII, and amorphous. Integration of the order parameter λ with FFS allows explicitly computing hydrate nucleation rates and obtaining an ensemble of nucleation trajectories under conditions where spontaneous hydrate nucleation becomes too slow to occur in direct simulation. The convergence of the obtained hydrate nucleation rate was found to depend crucially on the convergence of the spatial distribution for the spontaneously formed hydrate seeds obtained from the initial sampling of FFS. The validity of the approach is also verified by the agreement between the calculated nucleation rate and that inferred from the direct simulation. Analyzing the obtained large ensemble of hydrate nucleation trajectories, we show hydrate formation at 220 K and 500 bar is initiated by the nucleation events occurring in the vicinity of water-methane interface, and facilitated by a gradual transition from amorphous to crystalline structure. The latter provides the direct support to the proposed two-step nucleation mechanism of methane hydrate.

  18. Do Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors Reduce the Risk of Symptomatic Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer After Definitive Radiation Therapy? Analysis of a Single-Institution Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongmei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, P.R. of China (China); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang, Yan; Xu, Ting; Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Levy, Lawrence B.; O' Reilly, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gold, Kathryn A. [Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies have suggested that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) can mitigate radiation-induced lung injury. We sought here to investigate possible associations between ACEI use and the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) among patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients who received definitive radiation therapy for stages I to III NSCLC between 2004 and 2010 at a single tertiary cancer center. Patients must have received a radiation dose of at least 60 Gy for a single primary lung tumor and have had imaging and dosimetric data available for analysis. RP was quantified according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to assess potential associations between ACEI use and risk of symptomatic RP. Results: Of 413 patients analyzed, 65 were using ACEIs during RT. In univariate analysis, the rate of RP grade ≥2 seemed lower in ACEI users than in nonusers (34% vs 46%), but this apparent difference was not statistically significant (P=.06). In multivariate analysis of all patients, ACEI use was not associated with the risk of symptomatic RP (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.66; P=.07) after adjustment for sex, smoking status, mean lung dose (MLD), and concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy. Subgroup analysis showed that ACEI use did have a protective effect from RP grade ≥2 among patients who received a low (≤20-Gy) MLD (P<.01) or were male (P=.04). Conclusions: A trend toward reduction in symptomatic RP among patients taking ACEIs during RT for NSCLC was not statistically significant on univariate or multivariate analyses, although certain subgroups may benefit from use (ie, male patients and those receiving low MLD). The evidence at this point is insufficient to establish whether the use of ACEIs does or does not reduce the risk of RP.

  19. Geologic implications of gas hydrates in the offshore of India: results of the National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Boswell, Ray; Cochran, J.R.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Lall, Malcolm; Mazumdar, Aninda; Ramana, Mangipudi Venkata; Ramprasad, Tammisetti; Riedel, Michael; Sain, Kalachand; Sathe, Arun Vasant; Vishwanath, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 (NGHP-01) is designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate along the passive continental margin of the Indian Peninsula and in the Andaman convergent margin, with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. The NGHP-01 expedition established the presence of gas hydrates in the Krishna-Godavari and Mahanadi Basins, and the Andaman Sea. The expedition discovered in the Krishna-Godavari Basin one of the thickest gas hydrate accumulations ever documented, in the Andaman Sea one of the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zones in the world, and established the existence of a fully developed gas hydrate petroleum system in all three basins.

  20. A spectroscopic study of the structure and occupancies of clathrate hydrates incorporating hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, R. Gary

    With the ability to store and concentrate gases inside a clean and abundant water framework, clathrate hydrates are considered to be a promising material for many applications related to gas storage, separation, and sequestration. Hydrates of hydrogen are particularly interesting, for in addition to these potential applications, the small molecular size provides an opportunity for use as a model guest in many fundamental studies such as guest diffusion, multiple guest occupancy, and quantum mechanical effects upon confinement. In attempt to study these effects and the viability of H 2 hydrates as an energy storage material, a combined experimental and theoretical approach incorporating Raman spectroscopy, X-ray and neutron diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, ab-initio calculations, and molecular dynamic simulations was performed. One of the most significant challenges in the application of H2 clathrate hydrates is the demanding thermodynamic requirements needed for stability. In recent years, a mechanism known as the `tuning' effect had reportedly solved this issue where thermodynamic requirements could be reduced while simultaneously maintaining high storage capacities. In this work, the viability and validity of this technique is explored and alternative explanations in the form of epitaxial hydrate growth under high driving force conditions are discussed. A second, and equally important challenge facing clathrate hydrates as a future storage material is the overall storage capacity of H2. In previous work, H2 has only been experimentally verified to occupy the small 512 and 43566 3 cages and also in the large 51264 cages of the type II clathrate, often with an energy deficient promoter. In order to achieve more robust energy densities, other hydrate cages must be accessible. Herein a new method for increasing overall hydrate energy densities is presented involving the incorporation of H2 in the large cages of the type I clathrate with CH4 as a co

  1. Physical properties of sediment from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, William J.; Walker, Michael; Hunter, Robert; Collett, Timothy S.; Boswell, Ray M.; Rose, Kelly K.; Waite, William F.; Torres, Marta; Patil, Shirish; Dandekar, Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    This study characterizes cored and logged sedimentary strata from the February 2007 BP Exploration Alaska, Department of Energy, U.S. Geological Survey (BPXA-DOE-USGS) Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The physical-properties program analyzed core samples recovered from the well, and in conjunction with downhole geophysical logs, produced an extensive dataset including grain size, water content, porosity, grain density, bulk density, permeability, X-ray diffraction (XRD) mineralogy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and petrography. This study documents the physical property interrelationships in the well and demonstrates their correlation with the occurrence of gas hydrate. Gas hydrate (GH) occurs in three unconsolidated, coarse silt to fine sand intervals within the Paleocene and Eocene beds of the Sagavanirktok Formation: Unit D-GH (614.4 m-627.9 m); unit C-GH1 (649.8 m-660.8 m); and unit C-GH2 (663.2 m-666.3 m). These intervals are overlain by fine to coarse silt intervals with greater clay content. A deeper interval (unit B) is similar lithologically to the gas-hydrate-bearing strata; however, it is water-saturated and contains no hydrate. In this system it appears that high sediment permeability (k) is critical to the formation of concentrated hydrate deposits. Intervals D-GH and C-GH1 have average "plug" intrinsic permeability to nitrogen values of 1700 mD and 675 mD, respectively. These values are in strong contrast with those of the overlying, gas-hydrate-free sediments, which have k values of 5.7 mD and 49 mD, respectively, and thus would have provided effective seals to trap free gas. The relation between permeability and porosity critically influences the occurrence of GH. For example, an average increase of 4% in porosity increases permeability by an order of magnitude, but the presence of a second fluid (e.g., methane from dissociating gas hydrate) in the reservoir reduces permeability by more than an

  2. Numerical simulation of gas hydrate exploitation from subsea reservoirs in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2017-04-01

    Natural gas (methane) is the most environmental friendly source of fossil energy. When coal is replace by natural gas in power production the emission of carbon dioxide is reduced by 50 %. The vast amount of methane assumed in gas hydrate deposits can help to overcome a shortage of fossil energy resources in the future. To increase their potential for energy applications new technological approaches are being discussed and developed worldwide. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e. g. depressurization and/or carbon dioxide injection) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR - Submarine Gas Hydrate Reservoirs«. In order to simulate the exploitation of hydrate-bearing sediments in the subsea, an in-house simulation model HyReS which is implemented in the general-purpose software COMSOL Multiphysics is used. This tool turned out to be especially suited for the flexible implementation of non-standard correlations concerning heat transfer, fluid flow, hydrate kinetics, and other relevant model data. Partially based on the simulation results, the development of a technical concept and its evaluation are the subject of ongoing investigations, whereby geological and ecological criteria are to be considered. The results illustrate the processes and effects occurring during the gas production from a subsea gas hydrate deposit by depressurization. The simulation results from a case study for a deposit located in the Black Sea reveal that the production of natural gas by simple depressurization is possible but with quite low rates. It can be shown that the hydrate decomposition and thus the gas production strongly depend on the geophysical properties of the reservoir, the mass and heat transport within the reservoir, and

  3. Fundamentals of enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Eleanore; Tracy, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides a general introduction to the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, with a focus on drug-metabolizing enzymes. A prerequisite to understanding enzyme kinetics is having a clear grasp of the meanings of "enzyme" and "catalysis." Catalysts are reagents that can increase the rate of a chemical reaction without being consumed in the reaction. Enzymes are proteins that form a subset of catalysts. These concepts are further explored below.

  4. Industrial enzyme applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Ole; Borchert, Torben Vedel; Fuglsang, Claus Crone

    2002-08-01

    The effective catalytic properties of enzymes have already promoted their introduction into several industrial products and processes. Recent developments in biotechnology, particularly in areas such as protein engineering and directed evolution, have provided important tools for the efficient development of new enzymes. This has resulted in the development of enzymes with improved properties for established technical applications and in the production of new enzymes tailor-made for entirely new areas of application where enzymes have not previously been used.

  5. Methane hydrates and contemporary climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2011-01-01

    As the evidence for warming climate became better established in the latter part of the 20th century (IPCC 2001), some scientists raised the alarm that large quantities of methane (CH4) might be liberated by widespread destabilization of climate-sensitive gas hydrate deposits trapped in marine and permafrost-associated sediments (Bohannon 2008, Krey et al. 2009, Mascarelli 2009). Even if only a fraction of the liberated CH4 were to reach the atmosphere, the potency of CH4 as a greenhouse gas (GHG) and the persistence of its oxidative product (CO2) heightened concerns that gas hydrate dissociation could represent a slow tipping point (Archer et al. 2009) for Earth's contemporary period of climate change.

  6. Experimental techniques for cement hydration studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luttge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cement hydration kinetics is a complex problem of dissolution, nucleation and growth that is still not well understood, particularly in a quantitative way. While cement systems are unique in certain aspects they are also comparable to natural mineral systems. Therefore, geochemistry and particularly the study of mineral dissolution and growth may be able to provide insight and methods that can be utilized in cement hydration research. Here, we review mainly what is not known or what is currently used and applied in a problematic way. Examples are the typical Avrami approach, the application of Transition State Theory (TST to overall reaction kinetics and the problem of reactive surface area. Finally, we suggest an integrated approach that combines vertical scanning interferometry (VSI with other sophisticated analytical techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and theoretical model calculations based on a stochastic treatment.

  7. Acoustic Determination of Methane Hydrate Disssociation Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The compounds are also known to form as a skin on rising methane bubbles, as reported by Rehder et al. [1], Heeschen et al. [2], and Sauter et al. [3...discrepancy. First, during the experi- ment the video monitor used to measure brine column height became clouded with an oily film which was released from...which would result in 12% to 28% error in bulk modulus measurement. The oily substance released from the hydrate samples is an indicator of a second

  8. Serrano charged up for hydrates battle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flatern, R. von

    2001-07-01

    The plugging of pipelines by paraffin and hydrate formations is an obstacle still to be overcome in the transportation of gases in deep cold water. However, a new flow assurance technique is soon to be installed in Shell's Serrano and Oregano fields in the Gulf of Mexico and this is expected to eventually impact on the entire offshore industry: it is this development which is discussed. The system uses electricity to heat the pipelines.

  9. Bioimpedance in medicine: Measuring hydration influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlubik, J.; Hlubik, P.; Lhotska, L.

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the paper is to present results of our ongoing research focused on the influence of body hydration on the body impedance measurements and also on the influence of the frequency used for the measurement. The question is why to measure human body composition and if these values have beneficial results. First goal of the work deals with a question of measuring human body composition. The performed measurements showed certain influence which must be verified by repeated experiments.

  10. Draft genome sequence of Clostridium celerecrescens 152B isolated from sub-seafloor methane hydrate deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkalas, Varsha S; Dabir, Ashwini P; Arora, Preeti; Ranade, Dilip R; Dhakephalkar, Prashant K

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium celerecrescens 152B is an obligate anaerobic, Gram positive rod shaped bacterium isolated from sub-seafloor methane hydrate sediments of Krishna Godavari basin, India. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of C. celerecrescens 152B, which comprises 5,050,495bp in 92 contigs with the G+C content of 43.5%. The whole genome of C. celerecrescens 152B was sequenced for further biotechnological exploitation of its genome features especially regarding the production of secondary metabolites as well as for environmental bioremediation and production of industrially valuable enzymes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The interaction of climate change and methane hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Kessler, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Gas hydrate, a frozen, naturally-occurring, and highly-concentrated form of methane, sequesters significant carbon in the global system and is stable only over a range of low-temperature and moderate-pressure conditions. Gas hydrate is widespread in the sediments of marine continental margins and permafrost areas, locations where ocean and atmospheric warming may perturb the hydrate stability field and lead to release of the sequestered methane into the overlying sediments and soils. Methane and methane-derived carbon that escape from sediments and soils and reach the atmosphere could exacerbate greenhouse warming. The synergy between warming climate and gas hydrate dissociation feeds a popular perception that global warming could drive catastrophic methane releases from the contemporary gas hydrate reservoir. Appropriate evaluation of the two sides of the climate-methane hydrate synergy requires assessing direct and indirect observational data related to gas hydrate dissociation phenomena and numerical models that track the interaction of gas hydrates/methane with the ocean and/or atmosphere. Methane hydrate is likely undergoing dissociation now on global upper continental slopes and on continental shelves that ring the Arctic Ocean. Many factors—the depth of the gas hydrates in sediments, strong sediment and water column sinks, and the inability of bubbles emitted at the seafloor to deliver methane to the sea-air interface in most cases—mitigate the impact of gas hydrate dissociation on atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations though. There is no conclusive proof that hydrate-derived methane is reaching the atmosphere now, but more observational data and improved numerical models will better characterize the climate-hydrate synergy in the future.

  12. The interaction of climate change and methane hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Kessler, John D.

    2017-03-01

    Gas hydrate, a frozen, naturally-occurring, and highly-concentrated form of methane, sequesters significant carbon in the global system and is stable only over a range of low-temperature and moderate-pressure conditions. Gas hydrate is widespread in the sediments of marine continental margins and permafrost areas, locations where ocean and atmospheric warming may perturb the hydrate stability field and lead to release of the sequestered methane into the overlying sediments and soils. Methane and methane-derived carbon that escape from sediments and soils and reach the atmosphere could exacerbate greenhouse warming. The synergy between warming climate and gas hydrate dissociation feeds a popular perception that global warming could drive catastrophic methane releases from the contemporary gas hydrate reservoir. Appropriate evaluation of the two sides of the climate-methane hydrate synergy requires assessing direct and indirect observational data related to gas hydrate dissociation phenomena and numerical models that track the interaction of gas hydrates/methane with the ocean and/or atmosphere. Methane hydrate is likely undergoing dissociation now on global upper continental slopes and on continental shelves that ring the Arctic Ocean. Many factors—the depth of the gas hydrates in sediments, strong sediment and water column sinks, and the inability of bubbles emitted at the seafloor to deliver methane to the sea-air interface in most cases—mitigate the impact of gas hydrate dissociation on atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations though. There is no conclusive proof that hydrate-derived methane is reaching the atmosphere now, but more observational data and improved numerical models will better characterize the climate-hydrate synergy in the future.

  13. Intermolecular Hydrogen Transfer in Isobutane Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Sugahara

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Electron spin resonance (ESR spectra of butyl radicals induced with γ-ray irradiation in the simple isobutane (2-methylpropane hydrate (prepared with deuterated water were investigated. Isothermal annealing results of the γ-ray-irradiated isobutane hydrate reveal that the isobutyl radical in a large cage withdraws a hydrogen atom from the isobutane molecule through shared hexagonal-faces of adjacent large cages. During this “hydrogen picking” process, the isobutyl radical is apparently transformed into a tert-butyl radical, while the sum of isobutyl and tert-butyl radicals remains constant. The apparent transformation from isobutyl to tert-butyl radicals is an irreversible first-order reaction and the activation energy was estimated to be 35 ± 3 kJ/mol, which was in agreement with the activation energy (39 ± 5 kJ/mol of hydrogen picking in the γ-ray-irradiated propane hydrate with deuterated water.

  14. The use of enzymes for beer brewing

    OpenAIRE

    Donkelaar, van, Laura H.G.; Mostert, Joost; Zisopoulos, Filippos K.; Boom, Remko M.; Goot, van der, Atze Jan

    2016-01-01

    The exergetic performance of beer produced by the conventional malting and brewing process is compared with that of beer produced using an enzyme-assisted process. The aim is to estimate if the use of an exogenous enzyme formulation reduces the environmental impact of the overall brewing process. The exergy efficiency of malting was 77%. The main exergy losses stem from the use of natural gas for kilning and from starch loss during germination. The exergy efficiency of the enzyme production p...

  15. The CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry; Le coulis de glace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sari, O.; Hu, J.; Eicher, S.; Brun, F. [Institute of Thermal Engineering, University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland); Sari, O.; Hu, J. [Clean Cooling Solutions, spin off of University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland); Homsy, P. [Nestec Ltd, Vevey (Switzerland); Logel, J.-C. [Axima Refrigeration, Bischheim (France)

    2007-12-15

    A new, very promising refrigerant was developed, which could be used in industrial processes as well as air conditioners: the CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry. Replacing hydrochlorofluorocarbon HCFC refrigerants has a high priority, due to the strong negative environmental impact of these fluids. New refrigerants have to be environment friendly, non-inflammable, cheap and made of natural materials. CO{sub 2} hydrate slurries and/or a mixture of ice slurry and CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry meet these requirements. The University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland in Yverdon, together with industrial partners, investigated the properties of such slurries. The slurries were created using the Coldeco process: the refrigerating fluid is directly injected into the liquid brine. The evaporation of the refrigerating fluid cools the liquid down to its freezing point and homogeneously distributed small crystals appear in the liquid. A test rig was built to measure the physical and chemical properties of the slurries obtained in this way. CO{sub 2} hydrate slurries have a higher energy storage capacitance (500 kJ/kg) than ice slurries (333 kJ/kg). The production of CO{sub 2} hydrate slurries in large quantities in a continuous process was demonstrated. The solid particle concentration was 10%, the pressure amounted to 30 bar and the temperature 2 to 4 {sup o}C. Such slurries can be pumped and circulated in pipe networks. Stainless steel is the appropriate material for such networks. However, the main advantage of the new refrigerant will be, according to the authors, a reduced energy consumption compared to traditional refrigerating cycles: the difference between the temperature required by the user and the refrigerant temperature is reduced, thanks to the use of the latent heat in the new process.

  16. Influence of Physical Activity and Ambient Temperature on Hydration: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Ortega, Juan F.; Fernandez-Elias, Valentin E.; Kapsokefalou, Maria; Malisova, Olga; Athanasatou, Adelais; Husemann, Marlien; Domnik, Kirsten; Braun, Hans

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the effects of physical activity (PA) and ambient temperature on water turnover and hydration status. Five-hundred seventy three healthy men and women (aged 20–60 years) from Spain, Greece and Germany self-reported PA, registered all food and beverage intake, and collected 24-h urine during seven consecutive days. Fasting blood samples were collected at the onset and end of the study. Food moisture was assessed using nutritional software to account for all water intake which was subtracted from daily urine volume to allow calculation of non-renal water loss (i.e., mostly sweating). Hydration status was assessed by urine and blood osmolality. A negative association was seen between ambient temperature and PA (r = −0.277; p hydration status (i.e., lower urine and blood osmolality). PMID:27128938

  17. Effects of hydration on laser soldering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eric K.; Brown, Dennis T.; Kovach, Ian S.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1997-05-01

    Laser welding with albumin-based tissue solder has been investigated as an alternative to surgical suturing. Many surgical procedures require the soldered tissues to be in a hydrated environment. We have studied the effects of hydration on laser soldered rat dermis and baboon articular cartilage in vitro. The solder is composed of human serum albumin, sodium hyaluronate and indocyanine green. We used a micro-pipette to deposit 2 (mu) l of solder on each tissue specimen. An 808 nm cw laser beam with irradiance of 27 W/cm2 was scanned 4 times over the same solder area at a constant speed of 0.84 mm/sec. After photo-coagulation, each tissue specimen was cut into two halves at the center of the solder, perpendicular to the direction of the scanning laser beam. One half was reserved as control while the other half was soaked in phosphate buffered saline for a designated hydration period. The hydration periods were 1 hr, 1, 2, and 7 days. All tissue specimens were fixed in glutaraldahyde, then prepared for scanning electron microcopy analysis. For most of the specimens, there was non-uniform coagulation across the thickness of the solder. Closer to the laser beam, the upper solder region formed a more dense coagulum. While the region closer to solder-tissue interface, the solder aggregated into small globules. This non-uniform coagulation was likely caused by non-uniform energy distribution during photocoagulation. The protein globules and coagulum seem to be responsible for the solder attachment from the specimen surface. However, we have noted that the solder detached from the cartilage substrate as early as after 1 hr of hydration. On the other hand, the solder attached to the dermis much better than to cartilage. This may be explained by the difference in surface roughness of the two tissue types. The dermal layer of the skin is composed of collagen matrix which may provide a better entrapment of the solder than the smooth surface of articular cartilage.

  18. Novel nanotechnology for efficient production of binary clathrate hydrates of hydrogen and other compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Profio, P.; Arca, S.; Germani, R.; Savelli, G. [Perugia Univ., Perugia (Italy). Dept. of Chemistry, Center of Excellence on Innovative Nanostructured Materials

    2008-07-01

    The development of a hydrogen-based economy depends on finding ways to store hydrogen, but current hydrogen storage methods have significant disadvantages. One main challenge in storing sufficient amounts of hydrogen (up to 4 weight per cent) into a clathrate matrix is that of a kinetic origin, in that the mass transfer of hydrogen gas into clathrate structures is significantly limited by the macroscopic scale of the gas-liquid or gas-ice interfaces involved. This paper discussed the possibility of storing hydrogen in clathrate hydrates. It presented a newly developed method for preparing binary hydrogen hydrates that is based on the formation of amphiphile-aided nanoemulsions. Nanotechnology is used to reduce the size of hydrate particles to a few nanometers, thereby minimizing the kinetic hindrance to hydrate formation. This process has potential for increasing the amount of hydrogen stored, as it has provided ca. 1 weight per cent of hydrogen. Two new co-formers were also successfully tested, namely cyclopentane and tetrahydrothiophene. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  19. The Role of Waste Glass Powder During the Hydration Process of Composite Cementitious Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua LIU

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of waste glass powder (GP during the hydration process of composite cementitious materials was investigated by using mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. The compressive strength was also tested. The results indicate that the chemical activity of GP is low. But the pozzolanic reactivity of GP greatly improves with its fineness and the elevated curing temperature, which contributes to improving the mechanical strength. The hydration process of composite cementitious material containing GP is similar to that of pure cement. With the increase of GP content in the composite cement, the occurring time of second exothermic improves, but the value of second exothermic peak and the cumulative hydration heat reduce. The characteristic pore size of pastes containing GP decreases over curing age, which significantly improves their strength. GP does not modify the type of hydration products of composite cementitious material. The microstructure of hardened pastes containing GP is dense due to the generation of C-S-H gel with a low Ca/Si ratio. There is a reaction ring along GP with high fineness, which can enhance the interfacial transition zone to avoid ASR.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.13210

  20. Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone intended for efficient paving materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishina, A.

    2017-10-01

    Due to the growth of load on automotive roads, modern transportation engineering is in need of efficient paving materials. Runways and most advanced highways require Portland cement concretes. This makes important the studies directed to improvement of binders for such concretes. In the present work some peculiarities of the process of Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone with barium hydrosilicate sol were examined. It was found that the admixture of said sol leads to a shift in the induction period to later times without significant change in its duration. The admixture of a modifier with nanoscale barium hydrosilicates increases the degree of hydration of the cement clinker minerals and changes the phase composition of the hydration products; in particular, the content of portlandite and tricalcium silicate decreases, while the amount of ettringite increases. Changes in the hydration processes of Portland cement and early setting of cement stone that are caused by the nanoscale barium hydrosilicates, allow to forecast positive technological effects both at the stage of manufacturing and at the stage of operation. In particular, the formwork age can be reduced, turnover of molds can be increased, formation of secondary ettringite and corrosion of the first type can be eliminated.

  1. Experimental Simulation of the Exploitation of Natural Gas Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Yu Sun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates are cage-like crystalline compounds in which a large amount of methane is trapped within a crystal structure of water, forming solids at low temperature and high pressure. Natural gas hydrates are widely distributed in permafrost regions and offshore. It is estimated that the worldwide amounts of methane bound in gas hydrates are total twice the amount of carbon to be found in all known fossil fuels on earth. A proper understanding of the relevant exploitation technologies is then important for natural gas production applications. In this paper, the recent advances on the experimental simulation of natural gas hydrate exploitation using the major hydrate production technologies are summarized. In addition, the current situation of the industrial exploitation of natural gas hydrate is introduced, which are expected to be useful for establishing more safe and efficient gas production technologies.

  2. Microscopic Origin of Strain Hardening in Methane Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jihui; Liang, Yunfeng; Tsuji, Takeshi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi

    2016-03-24

    It has been reported for a long time that methane hydrate presents strain hardening, whereas the strength of normal ice weakens with increasing strain after an ultimate strength. However, the microscopic origin of these differences is not known. Here, we investigated the mechanical characteristics of methane hydrate and normal ice by compressive deformation test using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that methane hydrate exhibits strain hardening only if the hydrate is confined to a certain finite cross-sectional area that is normal to the compression direction. For normal ice, it does not present strain hardening under the same conditions. We show that hydrate guest methane molecules exhibit no long-distance diffusion when confined to a finite-size area. They appear to serve as non-deformable units that prevent hydrate structure failure, and thus are responsible for the strain-hardening phenomenon.

  3. Raman studies of methane-ethane hydrate metastability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroshi; Strobel, Timothy A; Dec, Steven F; Sloan, E Dendy; Koh, Carolyn A

    2009-03-05

    The interconversion of methane-ethane hydrate from metastable to stable structures was studied using Raman spectroscopy. sI and sII hydrates were synthesized from methane-ethane gas mixtures of 65% or 93% methane in ethane and water, both with and without the kinetic hydrate inhibitor, poly(N-vinylcaprolactam). The observed faster structural conversion rate in the higher methane concentration atmosphere can be explained in terms of the differences in driving force (difference in chemical potential of water in sI and sII hydrates) and kinetics (mass transfer of gas and water rearrangement). The kinetic hydrate inhibitor increased the conversion rate at 65% methane in ethane (sI is thermodynamically stable) but retards the rate at 93% methane in ethane (sII is thermodynamically stable), implying there is a complex interaction between the polymer, water, and hydrate guests at crystal surfaces.

  4. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  5. Focus on the Development of Natural Gas Hydrate in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongfu Tan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrate, also known as combustible ice, and mainly composed of methane, is identified as a potential clean energy for the 21st century. Due to its large reserves, gas hydrate can ease problems caused by energy resource shortage and has gained attention around the world. In this paper, we focus on the exploration and development of gas hydrate as well as discussing its status and future development trend in China and abroad. We then analyze its opportunities and challenges in China from four aspects, resource, technology, economy and policy, with five forces model and Politics Economics Society Technology method. The results show China has abundance gas hydrate resource; however, backward technologies and inadequate investment have seriously hindered the future development of gas hydrate; thus, China should establish relevant cooperation framework and intuitional arrangement to attract more investment as well as breaking through technical difficulties to commercialization gas hydrate as soon as possible.

  6. The Impact of Enzyme Orientation and Electrode Topology on the Catalytic Activity of Adsorbed Redox Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Duncan G. G.; Marritt, Sophie J.; Kemp, Gemma L.; Gordon-Brown, Piers; Butt, Julea N.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that the structural details of electrodes and their interaction with adsorbed enzyme influences the interfacial electron transfer rate. However, for nanostructured electrodes, it is likely that the structure also impacts on substrate flux near the adsorbed enzymes and thus catalytic activity. Furthermore, for enzymes converting macro-molecular substrates it is possible that the enzyme orientation determines the nature of interactions between the adsorbed enzyme and substrate and therefore catalytic rates. In essence the electrode may impede substrate access to the active site of the enzyme. We have tested these possibilities through studies of the catalytic performance of two enzymes adsorbed on topologically distinct electrode materials. Escherichia coli NrfA, a nitrite reductase, was adsorbed on mesoporous, nanocrystalline SnO2 electrodes. CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 reduces menaquinone-7 within 200 nm sized liposomes and this reaction was studied with the enzyme adsorbed on SAM modified ultra-flat gold electrodes. PMID:24634538

  7. Does Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor and β-Blocker Use Reduce the Risk of Primary Liver Cancer? A Case-Control Study Using the U.K. Clinical Practice Research Datalink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, Katrina Wilcox; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; McGlynn, Katherine A; Jick, Susan S

    2016-02-01

    It has been suggested that use of the antihypertensive drugs angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and β-blockers may decrease the risk of primary liver cancer; thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate whether use of ACE inhibitors and/or β-blockers is associated with a lower risk of liver cancer. Nested case-control study. United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink. We identified 490 cases with hypertension and a first-time (incident) diagnosis of primary liver cancer between 1988 and 2011. To account for an induction period, the index date was defined as the date of the first recorded liver cancer diagnosis minus 1 year. Controls were selected from patients with hypertension in the CPRD during the study period with a recorded diagnosis of hypertension who had no diagnosis of liver cancer and were free of any other cancer (except nonmelanoma skin cancer) before the index date; they were matched up to a 4:1 ratio to cases based on index date (same index date as that of their matched case), age (same year of birth), sex, general practice, and number of years of recorded history in the CPRD before the index date (1909 controls). Both cases and controls were required to have at least 2 years of recorded activity in the database before the index date. Exposure was defined as receipt of two or more prescriptions for ACE inhibitors and/or β-blockers before the index date; the reference group was nonuse (0-1 prescription) of ACE or β-blocker prescriptions before the index date. We also examined the effect of duration of use and, separately, the effect of individual drugs within each medication class on risk of liver cancer, and conducted analyses restricted to patients without liver disease or diabetes mellitus. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). No association was found between use of ACE inhibitors and/or β-blockers and the risk of liver cancer compared

  8. Molecular dynamics study on the growth of structure I methane hydrate in aqueous solution of sodium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Yen-Tien; Chen, Li-Jen; Chen, Yan-Ping; Lin, Shiang-Tai

    2012-12-06

    The structure, thermodynamic, and kinetic properties of methane hydrates formed from the aqueous solution of sodium chloride are investigated based on molecular dynamics simulations. A three-phase molecular model consisting of a slab of methane hydrate phase, a slab of liquid water containing sodium chloride, and a gas phase of methane molecules is used. The decrease in the three-phase coexisting temperatures (by 2-3 K) at different pressures (10-100 MPa) for aqueous NaCl solutions (about 2 mol %) confirms the thermodynamic inhibition of NaCl. The growth rate of methane hydrates in NaCl solution is found to be half to one-third of that in pure water. The kinetic inhibition of NaCl is found to be a result of the reduced water repelling at the growing interface due to the strong hydration of ions. Individual ions or NaCl ion pairs can replace water molecules to participate in the formation of the cage structures. The distortion of water cages due to the presence of ions may result in a reduced fraction of occupation of methane in the cage cavities. Our results provide useful insights into the mechanism of growth of methane hydrates in seawater and the desalination.

  9. Building a Gas Hydrate Information System in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yun Xiao; Runqiang Wang; Jianhui Li

    2007-01-01

    Gas hydrates, low molecular weight gas molecules trapped in water-ice "cages," have gained international attention over the last few years for energy, safety, and environmental reasons. In 2000 CODATA (Committee on Data for Science and Technology, International Council for Science) established a task group for Data on Natural Gas Hydrates, which aims to develop a comprehensive information system of all aspects of natural gas hydrates. As important participants of this task group, Chinese scie...

  10. Modeling the fate of methane hydrates under global warming

    OpenAIRE

    Kretschmer, Kerstin; Biastoch, Arne; Rüpke, Lars; Burwicz, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Large amounts of methane hydrate locked up within marine sediments are vulnerable to climate change. Changes in bottom water temperatures may lead to their destabilization and the release of methane into the water column or even the atmosphere. In a multimodel approach, the possible impact of destabilizing methane hydrates onto global climate within the next century is evaluated. The focus is set on changing bottom water temperatures to infer the response of the global methane hydrate invento...

  11. Interactions of water in ionic and nonionic hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleeberg, H. (ed.)

    1987-01-01

    This softbound book contains a large number of typescript papers grouped under five headings: Hydration of Ions; Hydration of Nonionic Substances; Hydration of Biological and Macromolecular Substances; Water and Surfactants; and Methods, Models and Theories. For each of these subject headings, there is a plenary lecture of about 20 pages, as well as short reports of original research. The symposium that generated these was held in Marburg in 1987, to honor the 65th birthday of Werner A. P. Luck.

  12. Heat capacity and heat of dissociation of methane hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueff, R.M.; Sloan, E.D.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1988-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the heat capacity and heat of dissociation of methane hydrates. A technique has been devised which circumvents the two major problems encountered in measuring gas hydrate heat capacity: the need to impose a mechanical pressure during the measurement and the need to have an absolutely pure hydrate sample. The technique was shown to be successful utilizing high-pressure, constant-volume cells in a differential scanning calorimeter.

  13. The use of enzymes for beer brewing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkelaar, van Laura H.G.; Mostert, Joost; Zisopoulos, Filippos K.; Boom, Remko M.; Goot, van der Atze Jan

    2016-01-01

    The exergetic performance of beer produced by the conventional malting and brewing process is compared with that of beer produced using an enzyme-assisted process. The aim is to estimate if the use of an exogenous enzyme formulation reduces the environmental impact of the overall brewing process.

  14. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  15. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology. PMID:26861509

  16. Critical pressure and multiphase flow in Blake Ridge gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemings, P.B.; Liu, Xiuying; Winters, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    We use core porosity, consolidation experiments, pressure core sampler data, and capillary pressure measurements to predict water pressures that are 70% of the lithostatic stress, and gas pressures that equal the lithostatic stress beneath the methane hydrate layer at Ocean Drilling Program Site 997, Blake Ridge, offshore North Carolina. A 29-m-thick interconnected free-gas column is trapped beneath the low-permeability hydrate layer. We propose that lithostatic gas pressure is dilating fractures and gas is migrating through the methane hydrate layer. Overpressured gas and water within methane hydrate reservoirs limit the amount of free gas trapped and may rapidly export methane to the seafloor.

  17. Ethylene Separation via Hydrate Formation in W/O Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Pan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An hybrid absorption-hydration method was adopted to recover C2H4 from C2H4/CH4 binary gas mixtures and the hydrate formation conditions of C2H4/CH4 mixtures was studied experimentally in diesel in water (w/o emulsions. Span 20 at a concentration of 1.0 wt% in the aqueous phase was added to form water in diesel emulsions before hydrate formation and then hydrate in diesel slurry was separated after hydrate formation. The influences of initial gas-liquid volume ratio (53–142, pressure (3.4–5.4 MPa, temperature (274.15–278.15 K, water cuts (10–30 vol%, and the mole fraction of C2H4 in feed gas (13.19–80.44 mol% upon the C2H4 separation efficiency were systematically investigated. The experimental results show that ethylene can be enriched in hydrate slurry phase with high separation factor (S and recovery ratio (R. Most hydrate formation finished in 20 min, after that, the hydrate formation rate became very slow. The conclusion is useful for determining the suitable operation conditions when adopting an absorption-hydration method to separate C2H4/CH4.

  18. Enzyme-Based Listericidal Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Kusum; Grover, Navdeep; Downs, Patrick; Paskaleva, Elena E.; Mehta, Krunal K.; Lee, Lillian; Schadler, Linda S.; Kane, Ravi S.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    2013-01-01

    Cell lytic enzymes represent an alternative to chemical decontamination or use of antibiotics to kill pathogenic bacteria, such as listeria. A number of phage cell lytic enzymes against listeria have been isolated and possess listericidal activity; however, there has been no attempt to incorporate these enzymes onto surfaces. We report three facile routes for the surface incorporation of the listeria bacteriophage endolysin Ply500: covalent attachment onto FDA approved silica nanoparticles (SNPs), incorporation of SNP-Ply500 conjugates into a thin poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) film; and affinity binding to edible crosslinked starch nanoparticles via construction of a maltose binding protein fusion. These Ply500 formulations were effective in killing L. innocua (a reduced pathogenic surrogate) at challenges up to 105 CFU/ml both in non-growth sustaining PBS as well as under growth conditions on lettuce. This strategy represents a new route toward achieving highly selective and efficient pathogen decontamination and prevention in public infrastructure. PMID:23545700

  19. Early feeding to modify digestive enzyme activity in broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagro León T.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effect on digestive enzyme activity in broiler chickens by providing food in the first 48 hrs. after birth. Materials and methods. After incubating 300 fertile eggs from Hubbard breeding and immediately after hatching, the chicks were randomly assigned to treatments: fasting (from hatching to 48 hrs.; Hydrated Balanced Food (HBF from birth to 48 hrs.; commercial hydrating supplement (CHS from birth to 48 hrs. The diets were provided ad libitum. After 48 hrs. a commercial diet was fed. At birth and at 48 and 72 hrs. of age 30 chicks/treatment were sacrificed to determine the enzyme activity of maltase, sucrase, alkaline phosphatase, phytase, a-amylase, trypsin and lipase in samples of duodenal or pancreatic homogenate. Results. The supply of HBF or CHS during the first 48 hrs. of life increased the activity of maltase, sucrase and phytase in the first 3 days of life, with values between 1.2 and up to 4-fold compared to the control (p<0.05. Chickens that fasted for the first 48 hrs. had higher activity of the pancreatic enzymes a-amylase, trypsin, and lipase at 72 hrs. of life (p<0.05. Conclusions. The food supply in the first 48 hrs. after hatching increases the duodenal enzyme activity in the intestinal brush border during the first 3 days of age in broiler chickens.

  20. One-dimensional WO3 and its hydrate: One-step synthesis, structural and spectroscopic characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwu, Kingsley O.; Galeckas, Augustinas; Rauwel, Protima; Kuznetsov, Andrej Y.; Norby, Truls

    2012-01-01

    We report on a one-step hydrothermal growth of one-dimensional (1D) WO3 nanostructures, using urea as 1D growth-directing agent and a precursor free of metals other than tungsten. By decreasing the pH of the starting solution, the size of the nanostructures was reduced significantly, this development being accompanied by the realization of phase pure hexagonal WO3 nanorods (elimination of monoclinic impurity phase) and a red shift in optical absorption edge. Surface analyses indicated the presence of reduced tungsten species in the WO3 nanostructures, which increased two-fold in a hydrated WO3 phase obtained with further decrease in pH. We suggest that oxygen vacancies are responsible for this defect state in WO3, while protons are responsible or contribute significantly to the same in the hydrated phase.

  1. Beverage osmolality as a marker for maintaining appropriate body hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowska1, Anna; Świderski, Franciszek; Rakowska, Rita; Waszkiewicz-Robak, Bożena; Żebrowska-Krasuska, Małgorzata; Dybkowska, Ewa

    Osmolalities can be useful markers for determining whether given beverages are suited for maintaining an adequate hydration of the body. Losing 2% of body water relative to body mass reduces the efficiency of body function when undertaking physical effort by around 20%. Deficiencies in water intakes approaching 5-8% of body mass, double the impairment to the body’s physical and mental functioning, whereas at a level of 10% the body becomes incapable of performing any sort of physical effort. For such reasons the body’s hydration status is vital to its functioning. To asses osmolalities as measured in various types of commercially available mineral waters and non-alcoholic beverages containing different amounts of extracts. Test materials were commercially available mineral waters (of low, medium and high mineral content) along with juices, nectars and drinks that are isotonic, energising and those described as being ‘light’ and sparkling. Osmolality was measured by the 800CL Osmometer instrument from TridentMed whilst the RL-type refractometer was used for determining extract values. Isotonic drinks were found to have the same osmotic pressures as bodily fluids at 275 – 295 mOsm/kg water. The osmotic pressure in mineral waters depended on the extent of mineralisation and ranged from 13 mOsm / kg water (low mineral content) to 119 mOsm/kg water (high mineral content). Low osmolalities were also found in ‘light’ drinks (from 29.3 to 34 mOsm/kg water). Juices, nectars, energising drinks and colas typically have high sugar contents and have high osmolalities ranging 492 – 784 mOsm / kg water. Statistical analysis demonstrated significant associations (p drinks according to similar osmolalities and extract content. Osmolalities measured in beverages are a marker that permits drinks to be classified into groups according to their tonicity and their ability to ensure that the body is properly hydrated; this becoming vital in cases when the body requires

  2. Enzyme inhibition by iminosugars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Óscar; Qing, Feng-Ling; Pedersen, Christian Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Imino- and azasugar glycosidase inhibitors display pH dependant inhibition reflecting that both the inhibitor and the enzyme active site have groups that change protonation state with pH. With the enzyme having two acidic groups and the inhibitor one basic group, enzyme-inhibitor complexes...

  3. Furosemide with saline hydration for prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy in patients undergoing coronary angiography: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Nana; Zhao, Jiegang; Li, Zhuanzhen; Dong, Pingshuan; Wang, Shaoxin; Zhao, Yuwei; Wang, Liping; Wang, Hongyun

    2015-01-23

    The clinical efficacy of furosemide administration in preventing contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) remains uncertain. This meta-analysis was designed to update data on the incidence of CIN with additional furosemide treatment beyond saline hydration in comparison with hydration alone in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A computerized literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases was performed. Trials were eligible if they enrolled patients undergoing coronary angiography and randomly allocated participants to receive furosemide administration in addition to saline hydration or saline hydration alone. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for combinations of studies. Five trials involving 1294 patients (640 for additional furosemide treatment and 654 for hydration alone) were included in the meta-analysis. In the synthesis of data, additional furosemide administration had little impact on the incidence of CIN post-PCI compared with peri-procedural saline hydration alone (OR=0.96; 95% CI 0.33-2.84, p=0.95). Moreover, as for the subsequent need for dialysis, there was no statistical significant difference between the 2 groups (OR=1.01; 95% CI 0.38-2.67, p=0.99). Sensitivity analyses did not show any relevant influence on the overall results. There was no publication bias in the meta-analysis. Furosemide administration did not achieve additional benefit beyond saline hydration in reducing the incidence of CIN in patients undergoing PCI.

  4. Numerical simulation of gas hydrate exploitation from subsea reservoirs in the Black Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2017-01-01

    Natural gas (methane) is the most environmental friendly source of fossil energy. When coal is replace by natural gas in power production the emission of carbon dioxide is reduced by 50 %. The vast amount of methane assumed in gas hydrate deposits can help to overcome a shortage of fossil energy resources in the future. To increase their potential for energy applications new technological approaches are being discussed and developed worldwide. Besides technical challenges that have to be over...

  5. Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Ostrovskii

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper develops the Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-hypothesis, according to which living-matter simplest elements (LMSEs, which are N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, nucleotides, DNA- and RNA-like molecules, amino-acids, and proto-cells repeatedly originated on the basis of thermodynamically controlled, natural, and inevitable processes governed by universal physical and chemical laws from CH4, niters, and phosphates under the Earth's surface or seabed within the crystal cavities of the honeycomb methane-hydrate structure at low temperatures; the chemical processes passed slowly through all successive chemical steps in the direction that is determined by a gradual decrease in the Gibbs free energy of reacting systems. The hypothesis formulation method is based on the thermodynamic directedness of natural movement and consists ofan attempt to mentally backtrack on the progression of nature and thus reveal principal milestones alongits route. The changes in Gibbs free energy are estimated for different steps of the living-matter origination process; special attention is paid to the processes of proto-cell formation. Just the occurrence of the gas-hydrate periodic honeycomb matrix filled with LMSEs almost completely in its final state accounts for size limitation in the DNA functional groups and the nonrandom location of N-bases in the DNA chains. The slowness of the low-temperature chemical transformations and their “thermodynamic front” guide the gross process of living matter origination and its successive steps. It is shown that the hypothesis is thermodynamically justified and testable and that many observed natural phenomena count in its favor.

  6. Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-Hypothesis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskii, Victor; Kadyshevich, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The paper develops the Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-hypothesis), according to which living-matter simplest elements (LMSEs, which are N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, nucleotides), DNA- and RNA-like molecules, amino-acids, and proto-cells repeatedly originated on the basis of thermodynamically controlled, natural, and inevitable processes governed by universal physical and chemical laws from CH4, niters, and phosphates under the Earth's surface or seabed within the crystal cavities of the honeycomb methane-hydrate structure at low temperatures; the chemical processes passed slowly through all successive chemical steps in the direction that is determined by a gradual decrease in the Gibbs free energy of reacting systems. The hypothesis formulation method is based on the thermodynamic directedness of natural movement and consists ofan attempt to mentally backtrack on the progression of nature and thus reveal principal milestones alongits route. The changes in Gibbs free energy are estimated for different steps of the living-matter origination process; special attention is paid to the processes of proto-cell formation. Just the occurrence of the gas-hydrate periodic honeycomb matrix filled with LMSEs almost completely in its final state accounts for size limitation in the DNA functional groups and the nonrandom location of N-bases in the DNA chains. The slowness of the low-temperature chemical transformations and their “thermodynamic front” guide the gross process of living matter origination and its successive steps. It is shown that the hypothesis is thermodynamically justified and testable and that many observed natural phenomena count in its favor. PMID:25382120

  7. Formation of methane nano-bubbles during hydrate decomposition and their effect on hydrate growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherzadeh, S Alireza; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John; Englezos, Peter

    2015-06-07

    Molecular dynamic simulations are performed to study the conditions for methane nano-bubble formation during methane hydrate dissociation in the presence of water and a methane gas reservoir. Hydrate dissociation leads to the quick release of methane into the liquid phase which can cause methane supersaturation. If the diffusion of methane molecules out of the liquid phase is not fast enough, the methane molecules agglomerate and form bubbles. Under the conditions of our simulations, the methane-rich quasi-spherical bubbles grow to become cylindrical with a radius of ∼11 Å. The nano-bubbles remain stable for about 35 ns until they are gradually and homogeneously dispersed in the liquid phase and finally enter the gas phase reservoirs initially set up in the simulation box. We determined that the minimum mole fraction for the dissolved methane in water to form nano-bubbles is 0.044, corresponding to about 30% of hydrate phase composition (0.148). The importance of nano-bubble formation to the mechanism of methane hydrate formation, growth, and dissociation is discussed.

  8. Static formation and dissociation of methane+methylcyclohexane hydrate for gas hydrate production and regasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, S. [Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy and Gas Hydrate, Guangzhou (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (China); Liang, D.; Li, D. [Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy and Gas Hydrate, Guangzhou (China); Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Guangzhou Center for Gas Hydrate Research, Guangzhou (China); Ma, L. [Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy and Gas Hydrate, Guangzhou (China)

    2011-08-15

    The formation and decomposition of methane+methylcyclohexane (MCH) hydrate in a static batch reactor, which was also designed as a high-pressure microwave reactor, were investigated. The addition of 300 ppm sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) provides continuous formation of CH{sub 4}+MCH hydrate under static conditions. Increasing the initial pressure within the narrow range of 2.7 to 4.6 MPa at 274 K enhances the formation rate by even several times. The gas storage capacity can be largely improved with partial coexisting of sI CH{sub 4} hydrate. Unlike a stirred formation, an increase of nonaqueous MCH inhibits the static formation of sH hydrate. The following regasification by 2.45 GHz microwave heating indicates that the dissociation is rate-controlled by the parallel connection of efficient internal heating and conventional external heating. The multiphase convection characterized by osmotic dehydration and driven by intensified regasification is considered as the dominant mechanism affecting the quiescent dissociation. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Natural gas hydrates : development and test of innovative methods for gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicks, J.M.; Spangenberg, E.; Steinhauer, B.; Klump, J.; Giese, R.; Erzinger, J. [German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam (Germany). Helmholtz Centre; Haeckel, M.; Bigalke, N.; Savy, J.P.; Kossel, E.; Deusner, C.; Wallmann, K. [Leibniz Inst. of Marine Sciences (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed a German project conducted to determine the stability of natural gas hydrates during methane production activities. The Submarine Gas Hydrate Reservoirs (SUGAR) project was established to determine depressurization, thermal stimulation, and chemical addition reaction routes for gas hydrates. A heat exchange reactor was used to test for the catalytic oxidation of methane. A large-scale reservoir simulator was used to model hydrates in sediments in natural conditions and to investigate the efficiency of the reactors. Thermocouples were used to collect data related to the expansion of the heat front. The data were then used to upscale the simulations for field conditions. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, confocal Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction techniques were used to investigate the effects of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection on methane production from pure hydrate phases. Results of the study indicated that the exposure of CH{sub 4} hydrates to CO{sub 2} initiates the decomposition of methane hydrates with the subsequent formation of a CO{sub 2} hydrate. The hydrate structure was destroyed and then rebuilt. 28 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures: The σ of CH4 Hydrate + Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stern, Laura A. [U. S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Constable, Steven [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Weitemeyer, Karen A. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); National Oceanography Centre Southampton (United Kingdom), Univ. of Southampton Waterfront Campus, Southampton (United Kingdom); Smith, Megan M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Roberts, Jeffery J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-30

    Knowledge of the electrical properties of multicomponent systems with gas hydrate, sediments, and pore water is needed to help relate electromagnetic (EM) measurements to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns in nature. We built a pressure cell capable of measuring in situ electrical properties of multicomponent systems such that the effects of individual components and mixing relations can be assessed. We first established the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity (σ) of pure, single-phase methane hydrate to be ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater, a substantial contrast that can help differentiate hydrate deposits from significantly more conductive water-saturated sediments in EM field surveys. We report σ measurements of two-component systems in which methane hydrate is mixed with variable amounts of quartz sand or glass beads. Sand by itself has low σ but is found to increase the overall σ of mixtures with well-connected methane hydrate. Alternatively, the overall σ decreases when sand concentrations are high enough to cause gas hydrate to be poorly connected, indicating that hydrate grains provide the primary conduction path. Our measurements suggest that impurities from sand induce chemical interactions and/or doping effects that result in higher electrical conductivity with lower temperature dependence. Finally, these results can be used in the modeling of massive or two-phase gas-hydrate-bearing systems devoid of conductive pore water. Further experiments that include a free water phase are the necessary next steps toward developing complex models relevant to most natural systems.

  11. Pre-Practice Hydration Status and the Effects of Hydration Regimen on Collegiate Division III Male Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Meir Magal; Rebekah J. Cain, Josh C. Long, Kathleen S. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Pre-practice euhydration is key in the prevention of heat related injuries. The pre-practice hydration status of male National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)-Division III athletes and the effects of a direct hydration regimen have yet to be investigated therefore; the aim of the study was 1) to analyze the pre-practice hydration status of current NCAA-DIII male athletes and 2) assess the impact of a directed intervention on pre-practice hydration status. The study was divided into bas...

  12. Characteristics of SF{sub 6} gas hydrate formation mechanisms (kinetics) and surfactants effects on hydrate formation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.; Lee, H.; Kim, Y.D. [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of). School of Materials Science and Engineering; Kim, Y.S.; Lee, J.D. [Korea Inst. of Industrial Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of). Advanced Energy Resource Development Team

    2008-07-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is used as an insulating gas in a variety of industrial applications, and is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG). Gas hydrates are stable crystalline compounds formed by water and natural gas molecules that have relatively large cavities that can be occupied by guest molecules. SF{sub 6} gas is able to form hydrates at relatively mild conditions. This study investigated the hydrate formation mechanisms of SF{sub 6} gas, and presented a potential hydration treatment for the gas. The effects of surface active agents on SF{sub 6} gas hydrate formation were examined experimentally using Tween 20, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LABS). The surfactants showed promoter behaviour for SF{sub 6} gas hydrate formation. Formation rates occurred in 2 stages, with rates rapidly increasing during the second phase. The inflection point occurred approximately 30 minutes after the hydrate nucleation point. Results indicated the existence of a critical concentration of surfactants. It was concluded that SF{sub 6} gas hydrate formation rates were increased by the addition of surfactants. Further studies are needed to investigate 2-stage hydrate formation rates. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Sialic acid-to-urea ratio as a measure of airway surface hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esther, Charles R; Hill, David B; Button, Brian; Shi, Shuai; Jania, Corey; Duncan, Elizabeth A; Doerschuk, Claire M; Chen, Gang; Ranganathan, Sarath; Stick, Stephen M; Boucher, Richard C

    2017-03-01

    Although airway mucus dehydration is key to pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) and other airways diseases, measuring mucus hydration is challenging. We explored a robust method to estimate mucus hydration using sialic acid as a marker for mucin content. Terminal sialic acid residues from mucins were cleaved by acid hydrolysis from airway samples, and concentrations of sialic acid, urea, and other biomarkers were analyzed by mass spectrometry. In mucins purified from human airway epithelial (HAE), sialic acid concentrations after acid hydrolysis correlated with mucin concentrations (r2 = 0.92). Sialic acid-to-urea ratios measured from filters applied to the apical surface of cultured HAE correlated to percent solids and were elevated in samples from CF HAEs relative to controls (2.2 ± 1.1 vs. 0.93 ± 1.8, P urea ratios were elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from β-epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) transgenic mice, known to have reduced mucus hydration, and mice sensitized to house dust mite allergen. In a translational application, elevated sialic acid-to-urea ratios were measured in BALF from young children with CF who had airway infection relative to those who did not (5.5 ± 3.7 vs. 1.9 ± 1.4, P urea ratio performed similarly to percent solids, the gold standard measure of mucus hydration. The method proved robust and has potential to serve as flexible techniques to assess mucin hydration, particularly in samples like BALF in which established methods such as percent solids cannot be utilized. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Exogenic controls on sulfuric acid hydrate production at the surface of Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, J. B.; Cassidy, T.; Paranicas, C.; Shirley, J. H.; Prockter, L. M.; Kamp, L. W.

    2013-03-01

    External agents have heavily weathered the visible surface of Europa. Internal and external drivers competing to produce the surface we see include, but are not limited to: aqueous alteration of materials within the icy shell, initial emplacement of endogenic material by geologic activity, implantation of exogenic ions and neutrals from Jupiter's magnetosphere, alteration of surface chemistry by radiolysis and photolysis, impact gardening of upper surface layers, and redeposition of sputtered volatiles. Separating the influences of these processes is critical to understanding the surface and subsurface compositions at Europa. Recent investigations have applied cryogenic reflectance spectroscopy to Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) observations to derive abundances of surface materials including water ice, hydrated sulfuric acid, and hydrated sulfate salts. Here we compare derived sulfuric acid hydrate (H2SO4·nH2O) abundance with weathering patterns and intensities associated with charged particles from Jupiter's magnetosphere. We present models of electron energy, ion energy, and sulfur ion number flux as well as the total combined electron and ion energy flux at the surface to estimate the influence of these processes on surface concentrations, as a function of location. We found that correlations exist linking both electron energy flux (r∼0.75) and sulfur ion flux (r=0.93) with the observed abundance of sulfuric acid hydrate on Europa. Sulfuric acid hydrate production on Europa appears to be limited in some regions by a reduced availability of sulfur ions, and in others by insufficient levels of electron energy. The energy delivered by sulfur and other ions has a much less significant role. Surface deposits in regions of limited exogenic processing are likely to bear closest resemblance to oceanic composition. These results will assist future efforts to separate the relative influence of endogenic and exogenic sources in establishing the

  15. Discovery of a Novel Microsomal Epoxide Hydrolase-Catalyzed Hydration of a Spiro Oxetane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Qing; Hayes, Martin A; Grönberg, Gunnar; Berggren, Kristina; Castagnoli, Neal; Weidolf, Lars

    2016-08-01

    Oxetane moieties are increasingly being used by the pharmaceutical industry as building blocks in drug candidates because of their pronounced ability to improve physicochemical parameters and metabolic stability of drug candidates. The enzymes that catalyze the biotransformation of the oxetane moiety are, however, not well studied. The in vitro metabolism of a spiro oxetane-containing compound AZD1979 [(3-(4-(2-oxa-6-azaspiro[3.3]heptan-6-ylmethyl)phenoxy)azetidin-1-yl)(5-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)methanone] was studied and one of its metabolites, M1, attracted our interest because its formation was NAD(P)H independent. The focus of this work was to elucidate the structure of M1 and to understand the mechanism(s) of its formation. We established that M1 was formed via hydration and ring opening of the oxetanyl moiety of AZD1979. Incubations of AZD1979 using various human liver subcellular fractions revealed that the hydration reaction leading to M1 occurred mainly in the microsomal fraction. The underlying mechanism as a hydration, rather than an oxidation reaction, was supported by the incorporation of (18)O from H2 (18)O into M1. Enzyme kinetics were performed probing the formation of M1 in human liver microsomes. The formation of M1 was substantially inhibited by progabide, a microsomal epoxide hydrolase inhibitor, but not by trans-4-[4-(1-adamantylcarbamoylamino)cyclohexyloxy]benzoic acid, a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor. On the basis of these results, we propose that microsomal epoxide hydrolase catalyzes the formation of M1. The substrate specificity of microsomal epoxide hydrolase should therefore be expanded to include not only epoxides but also the oxetanyl ring system present in AZD1979. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  16. Calcium bromide hydration for heat storage systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ai Niwa; Noriyuki Kobayashi

    2015-01-01

    A chemical reaction is a common and simple way to produce heat for a heat storage system. The reaction produces heat energy without the use of electricity or fuel. The goal of this study was to develop a heat storage system for use in automobiles, which is able to provide heat rapidly via a hydration reaction. A heat storage system without an evaporator stores high-density heat and has a high heat output rate since the solid–liquid product that is formed is transferred as a heat medium to the...

  17. Report: Fourth International Conference on Gas Hydrates, held at Yokohama, Japan, 19-23 May 2002

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Karisiddaiah, S.M.

    formations, while Dr. L. Stern presented ne insights into the phenomena of anomalous or self- preservation of gas hydrates. JOUR.GEOL.SOC.INDIA, VOL.61, JAN. 2001 Posters on hydrate formation and prevention in pipelines and hydrate based...

  18. Well log characterization of natural gas-hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2012-01-01

    In the last 25 years there have been significant advancements in the use of well-logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrates in nature: whereas wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs were formerly used to identify gas-hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments, more advanced wireline and logging-while-drilling (LWD) tools are now routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas-hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. Resistivity- and acoustic-logging tools are the most widely used for estimating the gas-hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. Recent integrated sediment coring and well-log studies have confirmed that electrical-resistivity and acoustic-velocity data can yield accurate gas-hydrate saturations in sediment grain-supported (isotropic) systems such as sand reservoirs, but more advanced log-analysis models are required to characterize gas hydrate in fractured (anisotropic) reservoir systems. New well-logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation-resistivity log measurements provide the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly interbedded and fracture-dominated gas-hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing (WFT) also allow for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids(i.e., free water along with clay- and capillary-bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms

  19. Investigating the Metastability of Clathrate Hydrates for Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Carolyn Ann [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-11-18

    Important breakthrough discoveries have been achieved from the DOE award on the key processes controlling the synthesis and structure-property relations of clathrate hydrates, which are critical to the development of clathrate hydrates as energy storage materials. Key achievements include: (i) the discovery of key clathrate hydrate building blocks (stable and metastable) leading to clathrate hydrate nucleation and growth; (ii) development of a rapid clathrate hydrate synthesis route via a seeding mechanism; (iii) synthesis-structure relations of H2 + CH4/CO2 binary hydrates to control thermodynamic requirements for energy storage and sequestration applications; (iv) discovery of a new metastable phase present during clathrate hydrate structural transitions. The success of our research to-date is demonstrated by the significant papers we have published in high impact journals, including Science, Angewandte Chemie, J. Am. Chem. Soc. Intellectual Merits of Project Accomplishments: The intellectual merits of the project accomplishments are significant and transformative, in which the fundamental coupled computational and experimental program has provided new and critical understanding on the key processes controlling the nucleation, growth, and thermodynamics of clathrate hydrates containing hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and other guest molecules for energy storage. Key examples of the intellectual merits of the accomplishments include: the first discovery of the nucleation pathways and dominant stable and metastable structures leading to clathrate hydrate formation; the discovery and experimental confirmation of new metastable clathrate hydrate structures; the development of new synthesis methods for controlling clathrate hydrate formation and enclathration of molecular hydrogen. Broader Impacts of Project Accomplishments: The molecular investigations performed in this project on the synthesis (nucleation & growth)-structure-stability relations of clathrate

  20. Medical chilling device designed for hypothermic hydration graft storage system: Design, thermohydrodynamic modeling, and preliminary testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jung Hwan [Hongik University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Hypothermic hydration graft storage is essential to reduce the metabolic demand of cells in vitro. The alleviated metabolic demands reduce the emergence rate of anaerobic metabolism generating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) energy that creates free radicals. The cessive free radicals can damage cells and tissues due to their highly oxidative power with molecules. Current cooling systems such as a conventional air cooling system and an ice pack system are inappropriate for chilling cell tissues in vitro because of inconvenience in use and inconsistent temperature sustainability caused by large size and progressive melting, respectively. Here, we develop a medical chilling device (MCD) for hypothermic hydration graft storage based on thermo-hydrodynamic modeling and thermal electric cooling technology. Our analysis of obtained hydrodynamic thermal behavior of the MCD revealed that the hypothermic condition of 4 .deg. C was continuously maintained, which increased the survival rates of cells in vitro test by reduced free radicals. The validated performance of the MCD promises future development of an optimal hypothermic hydration graft storage system designed for clinical use.

  1. Entrapment of Hydrate-coated Gas Bubbles into Oil and Separation of Gas and Hydrate-film; Seafloor Experiments with ROV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruta, A.; Matsumoto, R.

    2015-12-01

    We trapped gas bubbles emitted from the seafloor into oil-containing collector and observed an unique phenomena. Gas hydrate formation needs water for the crystal lattice; however, gas hydrates in some areas are associated with hydrophobic crude oil or asphalt. In order to understand gas hydrate growth in oil-bearing sediments, an experiment with cooking oil was made at gas hydrate stability condition. We collected venting gas bubbles into a collector with canola oil during ROV survey at a gas hydrate area in the eastern margin of the Sea of Japan. When the gas bubbles were trapped into collector with oil, gas phase appeared above the oil and gas hydrates, between oil and gas phase. At this study area within gas hydrate stability condition, control experiment with oil-free collector suggested that gas bubbles emitted from the seafloor were quickly covered with gas hydrate film. Therefore it is improbable that gas bubbles entered into the oil phase before hydrate skin formation. After the gas phase formation in oil-containing collector, the ROV floated outside of hydrate stability condition for gas hydrate dissociation and re-dived to the venting site. During the re-dive within hydrate stability condition, gas hydrate was not formed. The result suggests that moisture in the oil is not enough for hydrate formation. Therefore gas hydrates that appeared at the oil/gas phase boundary were already formed before bubbles enter into the oil. Hydrate film is the only possible origin. This observation suggests that hydrate film coating gas hydrate was broken at the sea water/oil boundary or inside oil. Further experiments may contribute for revealing kinetics of hydrate film and formation. This work was a part of METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry)'s project entitled "FY2014 Promoting research and development of methane hydrate". We also appreciate support of AIST (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology).

  2. A molecular dynamic study on the dissociation mechanism of SI methane hydrate in inorganic salt aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiafang; Chen, Zhe; Liu, Jinxiang; Sun, Zening; Wang, Xiaopu; Zhang, Jun

    2017-08-01

    Gas hydrate is not only a potential energy resource, but also almost the biggest challenge in oil/gas flow assurance. Inorganic salts such as NaCl, KCl and CaCl2 are widely used as the thermodynamic inhibitor to reduce the risk caused by hydrate formation. However, the inhibition mechanism is still unclear. Therefore, molecular dynamic (MD) simulation was performed to study the dissociation of structure I (SI) methane hydrate in existence of inorganic salt aqueous solution on a micro-scale. The simulation results showed that, the dissociation became stagnant due to the presence of liquid film formed by the decomposed water molecules, and more inorganic ions could shorten the stagnation-time. The diffusion coefficients of ions and water molecules were the largest in KCl system. The structures of ion/H2O and H2O/H2O were the most compact in hydrate/NaCl system. The ionic ability to decompose hydrate cells followed the sequence of: Ca2+>2K+>2Cl->2Na+. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhancing mung bean hydration using the ultrasound technology: description of mechanisms and impact on its germination and main components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miano, Alberto Claudio; Pereira, Jessica da Costa; Castanha, Nanci; Júnior, Manoel Divino da Matta; Augusto, Pedro Esteves Duarte

    2016-01-01

    The ultrasound technology was successfully used to improve the mass transfer processes on food. However, the study of this technology on the grain hydration and on its main components properties was still not appropriately described. This work studied the application of the ultrasound technology on the hydration process of mung beans (Vigna radiata). This grain showed sigmoidal hydration behavior with a specific water entrance pathway. The ultrasound reduced ~25% of the hydration process time. In addition, this technology caused acceleration of the seed germination – and some hypothesis for this enhancement were proposed. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the ultrasound did not change both structure and pasting properties of the bean starch. Finally, the flour rheological properties proved that the ultrasound increased its apparent viscosity, and as the starch was not modified, this alteration was attributed to the proteins. All these results are very desirable for industry since the ultrasound technology improves the hydration process without altering the starch properties, accelerates the germination process (that is important for the malting and sprouting process) and increases the flour apparent viscosity, which is desirable to produce bean-based products that need higher consistency. PMID:27991545

  4. Enhancing mung bean hydration using the ultrasound technology: description of mechanisms and impact on its germination and main components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miano, Alberto Claudio; Pereira, Jessica Da Costa; Castanha, Nanci; Júnior, Manoel Divino Da Matta; Augusto, Pedro Esteves Duarte

    2016-12-01

    The ultrasound technology was successfully used to improve the mass transfer processes on food. However, the study of this technology on the grain hydration and on its main components properties was still not appropriately described. This work studied the application of the ultrasound technology on the hydration process of mung beans (Vigna radiata). This grain showed sigmoidal hydration behavior with a specific water entrance pathway. The ultrasound reduced ~25% of the hydration process time. In addition, this technology caused acceleration of the seed germination - and some hypothesis for this enhancement were proposed. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the ultrasound did not change both structure and pasting properties of the bean starch. Finally, the flour rheological properties proved that the ultrasound increased its apparent viscosity, and as the starch was not modified, this alteration was attributed to the proteins. All these results are very desirable for industry since the ultrasound technology improves the hydration process without altering the starch properties, accelerates the germination process (that is important for the malting and sprouting process) and increases the flour apparent viscosity, which is desirable to produce bean-based products that need higher consistency.

  5. Enhancing mung bean hydration using the ultrasound technology: description of mechanisms and impact on its germination and main components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miano, Alberto Claudio; Pereira, Jessica da Costa; Castanha, Nanci; Júnior, Manoel Divino da Matta; Augusto, Pedro Esteves Duarte

    2016-12-19

    The ultrasound technology was successfully used to improve the mass transfer processes on food. However, the study of this technology on the grain hydration and on its main components properties was still not appropriately described. This work studied the application of the ultrasound technology on the hydration process of mung beans (Vigna radiata). This grain showed sigmoidal hydration behavior with a specific water entrance pathway. The ultrasound reduced ~25% of the hydration process time. In addition, this technology caused acceleration of the seed germination - and some hypothesis for this enhancement were proposed. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the ultrasound did not change both structure and pasting properties of the bean starch. Finally, the flour rheological properties proved that the ultrasound increased its apparent viscosity, and as the starch was not modified, this alteration was attributed to the proteins. All these results are very desirable for industry since the ultrasound technology improves the hydration process without altering the starch properties, accelerates the germination process (that is important for the malting and sprouting process) and increases the flour apparent viscosity, which is desirable to produce bean-based products that need higher consistency.

  6. [NMF and cosmetology of cutaneous hydration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, J-P

    2002-01-01

    In the stratum corneum, the water binds to the intracellular hygroscopic and hydrosoluble substances called "natural moisturizing factors" or NMF. These "natural moisturizing factors" contained in the corneocytes are formed during epidermal differentiation and may represent up to 10 p. cent of the corneocyte mass. They are principally amino acids, carboxylic pyrrolidone acid, lactic acid, urea, glucose and mineral ions. Keratinization plays an important part in the formation of NMF that exhibit strong osmotic potential attracting the water molecules. The binding of water to NMF is the static aspect of cutaneous hydration. The second, dynamic, aspect is related to the selective permeability of the stratum corneum and to its lipid barrier properties, the permeability of which depends on the integrity and nature of the inter-corneocyte lipids and their lamellar organization between the cells. In these conditions, hydration cosmetics rely on two concepts that can be isolated or associated: the supply of hydrophilic substances to the stratum corneum, capable of attracting and retaining water (moisturizer) or capable of restoring the barrier in order to restore normal water loss or of protecting it against aggression (occlusive).

  7. The hydration structure of DNA and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-03-01

    Water-soluble proteins are surrounded by water molecules, and the water molecules mediate the biological processes: i.e. the protein folding, the enzymatic reaction, the molecular recognition via hydrogen bonds, electrostatic interactions and van der Waals interactions. It is essential to know the structural information such as orientation and dynamical behavior of water molecules including hydrogen atoms in order to characterize these interactions. The neutron analysis can determine the positions of the hydrogen atoms at the medium resolution in the protein crystallography (d{sub min}{approx}2.0 A). Recently we have constructed the high-resolution neutron diffractometer (BIX) dedicated for the biological macromolecules. By using this diffractometer, the high resolution (1.5 or 1.6A) neutron structure analyses of sperm whale myoglobin, a wild-type rubredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the rubredoxin mutant have been successfully carried out and their hydration structure including hydrogen atoms have been observed. Hydrogen atoms in the water molecule can be clearly identified in two boomerang-shaped water molecules and the forming of the hydrogen bonds between the two water molecules can be recognized well. It has been concluded that hydration structure observed by the high resolution neutron protein crystallography provides where a water molecule locates, and how it binds to the neighbor atoms, and how it behaves. (M.Suetake)

  8. Calcium bromide hydration for heat storage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Niwa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A chemical reaction is a common and simple way to produce heat for a heat storage system. The reaction produces heat energy without the use of electricity or fuel. The goal of this study was to develop a heat storage system for use in automobiles, which is able to provide heat rapidly via a hydration reaction. A heat storage system without an evaporator stores high-density heat and has a high heat output rate since the solid–liquid product that is formed is transferred as a heat medium to the object that requires heat. The exothermic heat produced from the solid–liquid reaction was measured, and the relationship between the equivalence ratio and the reaction heat was evaluated. The heat output and heat recovered by the heat storage system, which comprised a reaction vessel and a heat exchanger, were measured. We selected solid CaBr2 because it was the best metal halide for a hydration reaction and had a high heat yield from the dissolution reaction. With this system, we were able to achieve a heat recovery rate of 582 kJ/L-H2O. We found no degradation in the chemical composition of CaBr2 after it being recycled 100 times.

  9. Prospects of gas hydrate presence in the Chukchi sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. В. Матвеева

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to forecast the scale and distribution character of gas hydrate stability zone in the Chukchi Sea under simulated natural conditions and basing on these results to estimate resource potential of gas hydrates within this area. Three types of stability zone have been identified. A forecast map of gas hydrate environment and potentially gas hydrate-bearing water areas in the Chukchi Sea has been plotted to a scale of 1:5 000 000. Mapping of gas hydrate stability zone allowed to give a justified forecast based on currently available data on geologic, fluid dynamic, cryogenic, geothermal and pressure-temperature conditions of gas hydrate formation in the Chukchi Sea. It is the first forecast of such kind that focuses on formation conditions for hydrates of various types and compositions in the Arctic seas offshore Russia. Potential amount of gas, stored beneath the Chukchi Sea in the form of hydrates, is estimated based on mapping of their stability zone and falls into the interval of 7·1011-11.8·1013 m3.

  10. Resolving CO2 and methane hydrate formation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golombok, M.; Ineke, E.; Luzardo, J.C.R.; He, Y.Y.; Zitha, P.

    2008-01-01

    We analyse the kinetics of CO2 and methane hydrate formation. The characteristic formation times are associated with different steps of the formation process. Conditions for minimising these rate times are identified while maintaining a regime where CO2 hydrate is formed and methane remains

  11. Severe Oligohydramnios at Mid trimester: Maternal hydration- A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mainstay of management was combined intravenous/oral maternal hydration, bed rest, modification of antihypertensive regimen and close fetal surveillance. The amniotic fluid index returned to normal range and fetal growth has remained satisfactory. The emphasis of the case presentation is the role of maternal hydration ...

  12. Hydration kinetics and textural properties of pigeon peas (Cajanus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soaking at high temperatures increased the hydration rate constant and decreased the soaking time to achieve equilibrium moisture content (EMC)).The activation energy value (Ea) of the hydration process was 12.95kcal/mole. Texturalstudies revealed that the hardness of the grain was a function of the soaking time, ...

  13. Fitness professionals' knowledge and perceptions on hydration and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This descriptive study examined the extent of hydration knowledge and fluid intake pattern in people who work within fitness industry. Fourty fitness professionals were asked to complete a questionnaire about their perspectives on hydration, thirst and fluid intake pattern. Water was the most preferred drink before (75.0%), ...

  14. Evaluation of Nutritional Status and Hydration in Patients on Chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nutrition and hydration of the dialysis patients have major influences on the outcomes of chronic hemodialysis. Purpose: To characterize the states of nutrition and hydration in patients on chronic hemodialysis at Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH) and to evaluate the usefulness of measurements by ...

  15. Unexpected Hydration of a Triple Bond During DNA Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fatthalla, Maha I.; Pedersen, Erik B.

    2016-01-01

    acidic conditions, polarizes the triple bond in the intercalator and this makes hydration of the triple bond possible during the DNA synthesis and an oligonucleotide with 1-(indol-3-yl)-2-(pyren-1-yl)ethanone as the intercalator is formed. Insertion of the unhydrated and hydrated linker systems gave...

  16. Hydration characteristics of switchgrass, big bluestem, and bromegrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomass storage affects its quality and processing, which in turn influences the biomass final utilization applications. Moisture status in biomass is the most influential factor of biomass storage, and hydration kinetics controls the dynamic moisture condition of the biomass. Hydration characteris...

  17. Combustion characteristics of methane hydrate in a laminar boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Y.; Katsuki, R.; Yokomori, T.; Ohmura, R.; Ueda, T. [Keio Univ., Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Takahashi, M.; Iwasaki, T.; Uchida, K. [Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    The combustion characteristics of methane hydrates in a laminar boundary layer were investigated in order to examine the flame propagation speed of methane hydrates. The experiments were performed under atmospheric pressure using methane hydrate crystals previously stored at a liquid-nitrogen temperature. A wind tunnel was used to form an air laminar boundary layer. The crystals were packed in an insulated rectangular cell to ensure that the hydrate layer was level with a horizontal flat plate. The surface of the dissociating hydrate crystals was ignited using a pilot flame at the downstream end of the hydrate crystals. Flame location was measured using a video camera. Results showed that after the flame was extinguished, the methane hydrate crystals were not completely dissociated. The flame was extinguished by an ice layer that had formed over the methane hydrate crystals. Propagation rates were measured in order to explore the relationship between the flame propagation rate and free-stream velocity. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  18. Kinetics and mechanism of ultrasonic-assisted magnesium oxide hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaojia; Nie, Yixing; Jin, Qi; Guo, Lin; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin

    2018-01-01

    The kinetics of ultrasonic-assisted magnesium oxide (MgO) hydration was investigated in the present paper. The degree of hydration at different temperature (298-338K) and reaction time (0.25-3h) was determined by thermal gravity analysis (TGA). And the products of the hydration were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) and Particle Size Distribution analysis (PSD). A coupling model based on characteristic equations for chemical reaction control and inward diffusion control was employed to describe the hydration process. The experimental data indicated that the degree of hydration at 2h under ultrasound reaction condition was 18-25% higher than that of mechanical stirring reaction condition. However, the value was nearly the same at the first hour. Combined with the analysis results of degree of hydration, characterization of products and model fitting, the hydration process was supposed to be a mixed model, which controlled by both chemical reaction and inward diffusion. A reaction mechanism emphasized on the physical effect of ultrasound was proposed, assuming that the hydration product layer was broken and regenerated during the process. The calculated activation energy of 24.2kJmol(-1) corroborated the mechanism proposed in this study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Exploring the solid-form landscape of pharmaceutical hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raijada, Dharaben Kaushikkumar; Bond, Andrew; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann

    2013-01-01

    To understand the transformation pathways amongst anhydrate/hydrate solid forms of sodium naproxen and to highlight the importance of a polymorphic dihydrate within this context.......To understand the transformation pathways amongst anhydrate/hydrate solid forms of sodium naproxen and to highlight the importance of a polymorphic dihydrate within this context....

  20. Three-dimensional computer modeling of slag cement hydration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, Jos; Shui, Z.H.

    2007-01-01

    A newly developed version of a three-dimensional computer model for simulating the hydration and microstructure development of slag cement pastes is presented in this study. It is based on a 3-D computer model for Portland cement hydration (CEMHYD3D) which was originally developed at NIST, taken

  1. Evidence for the use of isoflurane as a replacement for chloral hydrate anesthesia in experimental stroke: an ethical issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maud, Pétrault; Thavarak, Ouk; Cédrick, Lachaud; Michèle, Bastide; Vincent, Bérézowski; Olivier, Pétrault; Régis, Bordet

    2014-01-01

    Since an ethical issue has been raised regarding the use of the well-known anesthetic agent chloral hydrate, owing to its mutagenic and carcinogenic effects in animals, attention of neuroscientists has turned to finding out an alternative agent able to meet not only potency, safety, and analgesic efficacy, but also reduced neuroprotective effect for stroke research. The aim of this study was to compare the potential of chloral hydrate and isoflurane for both modulating the action of the experimental neuroprotectant MK801 and exerting analgesia. After middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats, no difference was observed in 24 h survival rate, success of ischemia, or infarct volume reduction between both anesthetics. However, isoflurane exerted a more pronounced analgesic effect than chloral hydrate as evidenced by formalin test 3 hours after anesthesia onset, thus encouraging the use of isoflurane in experimental stroke models.

  2. The Hydration Structure at Yttria-Stabilized Cubic Zirconia (110)-Water Interface with Sub-Ångström Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Binyang; Kim, Seunghyun; Kim, Taeho; Kim, Jongjin; Hong, Seungbum; Bahn, Chi Bum; Park, Changyong; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-06-01

    The interfacial hydration structure of yttria-stabilized cubic zirconia (110) surface in contact with water was determined with ~0.5 Å resolution by high-resolution X-ray reflectivity measurement. The terminal layer shows a reduced electron density compared to the following substrate lattice layers, which indicates there are additional defects generated by metal depletion as well as intrinsic oxygen vacancies, both of which are apparently filled by water species. Above this top surface layer, two additional adsorbed layers are observed forming a characteristic interfacial hydration structure. The first adsorbed layer shows abnormally high density as pure water and likely includes metal species, whereas the second layer consists of pure water. The observed interfacial hydration structure seems responsible for local equilibration of the defective surface in water and eventually regulating the long-term degradation processes. The multitude of water interactions with the zirconia surface results in the complex but highly ordered interfacial structure constituting the reaction front.

  3. Evidence for the Use of Isoflurane as a Replacement for Chloral Hydrate Anesthesia in Experimental Stroke: An Ethical Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pétrault Maud

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since an ethical issue has been raised regarding the use of the well-known anesthetic agent chloral hydrate, owing to its mutagenic and carcinogenic effects in animals, attention of neuroscientists has turned to finding out an alternative agent able to meet not only potency, safety, and analgesic efficacy, but also reduced neuroprotective effect for stroke research. The aim of this study was to compare the potential of chloral hydrate and isoflurane for both modulating the action of the experimental neuroprotectant MK801 and exerting analgesia. After middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats, no difference was observed in 24 h survival rate, success of ischemia, or infarct volume reduction between both anesthetics. However, isoflurane exerted a more pronounced analgesic effect than chloral hydrate as evidenced by formalin test 3 hours after anesthesia onset, thus encouraging the use of isoflurane in experimental stroke models.

  4. Static demolition by calcium oxide. Part 3. Hydration properties of calcium oxide which is varied on its surface by CO2 gas flow; Seisekkai wo shuseibun to suru seiteki hasaizai. 3. Seisekkai ryushi no hyoso kaishitsu ni yoru suiwa kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, H. [ROX Japan Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Tsugeno, S.; Nagaishi, T. [Kyushu Sangyo University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-10-31

    Fast granular type static demolition agent is dominated by solid-phase surface hydration reaction, and its local hydration velocity is remarkably accelerated on solid surfaces. In some cases, such phenomena cause work defects such as boiling of hydration water and eruption of the agent by pressurized vapor. Study was made on reduction of an initial hydration velocity through surface modification by direct reaction of CO2 with CaO powder. As a result, CaCO3 with thin layer calcite structure was formed on surfaces, modifying surfaces. In dry hydration (equimolar) of modified CaO, the hydration velocity was remarkably reduced, and the utmost exothermic temperature was also lowered. A water diffusion velocity into CaO was affected and reduced probably by formation of surface carbonate layers. Jander` formula was applied as rate-determining formula of diffusion on surface reactive layers to analyze the initial stage of hydration. As the analysis result under the assumption that formation of modified layers is proportional to treatment times, it was estimated that the initial stage of hydration of CaO treated by CO2 is controlled by 1-D diffusion of water into surface CaCO3 layers. 6 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos Nur

    2009-01-08

    We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

  6. Water Dynamics in the Hydration Shells of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The structure and function of biomolecules are strongly influenced by their hydration shells. Structural fluctuations and molecular excitations of hydrating water molecules cover a broad range in space and time, from individual water molecules to larger pools and from femtosecond to microsecond time scales. Recent progress in theory and molecular dynamics simulations as well as in ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy has led to new and detailed insight into fluctuations of water structure, elementary water motions, electric fields at hydrated biointerfaces, and processes of vibrational relaxation and energy dissipation. Here, we review recent advances in both theory and experiment, focusing on hydrated DNA, proteins, and phospholipids, and compare dynamics in the hydration shells to bulk water. PMID:28248491

  7. Temporal constraints on hydrate-controlled methane seepage off Svalbard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, C; Feseker, T; Treude, T; Krastel, S; Liebetrau, V; Niemann, H; Bertics, V J; Dumke, I; Dünnbier, K; Ferré, B; Graves, C; Gross, F; Hissmann, K; Hühnerbach, V; Krause, S; Lieser, K; Schauer, J; Steinle, L

    2014-01-17

    Methane hydrate is an icelike substance that is stable at high pressure and low temperature in continental margin sediments. Since the discovery of a large number of gas flares at the landward termination of the gas hydrate stability zone off Svalbard, there has been concern that warming bottom waters have started to dissociate large amounts of gas hydrate and that the resulting methane release may possibly accelerate global warming. Here, we corroborate that hydrates play a role in the observed seepage of gas, but we present evidence that seepage off Svalbard has been ongoing for at least 3000 years and that seasonal fluctuations of 1° to 2°C in the bottom-water temperature cause periodic gas hydrate formation and dissociation, which focus seepage at the observed sites.

  8. Fundamental challenges to methane recovery from gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servio, P.; Eaton, M.W.; Mahajan, D.; Winters, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental challenges, the location, magnitude, and feasibility of recovery, which must be addressed to recover methane from dispersed hydrate sources, are presented. To induce dissociation of gas hydrate prior to methane recovery, two potential methods are typically considered. Because thermal stimulation requires a large energy input, it is less economically feasible than depressurization. The new data will allow the study of the effect of pressure, temperature, diffusion, porosity, tortuosity, composition of gas and water, and porous media on gas-hydrate production. These data also will allow one to improve existing models related to the stability and dissociation of sea floor hydrates. The reproducible kinetic data from the planned runs together with sediment properties will aid in developing a process to economically recover methane from a potential untapped hydrate source. The availability of plentiful methane will allow economical and large-scale production of methane-derived clean fuels to help avert future energy crises.

  9. Dissociation of methane hydrate in aqueous NaCl solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2014-10-09

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the dissociation of methane hydrate in aqueous NaCl solutions are performed. It is shown that the dissociation of the hydrate is accelerated by the formation of methane bubbles both in NaCl solutions and in pure water. We find two significant effects on the kinetics of the hydrate dissociation by NaCl. One is slowing down in an early stage before bubble formation, and another is swift bubble formation that enhances the dissociation. These effects arise from the low solubility of methane in NaCl solution, which gives rise to a nonuniform spatial distribution of solvated methane in the aqueous phase. We also demonstrate that bubbles form near the hydrate interface in dense NaCl solutions and that the hydrate dissociation proceeds inhomogeneously due to the bubbles.

  10. Methane hydrate formation in confined nanospace can surpass nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casco, Mirian E; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; Ramírez-Cuesta, Anibal J; Rey, Fernando; Jordá, Jose L; Bansode, Atul; Urakawa, Atsushi; Peral, Inma; Martínez-Escandell, Manuel; Kaneko, Katsumi; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco

    2015-03-02

    Natural methane hydrates are believed to be the largest source of hydrocarbons on Earth. These structures are formed in specific locations such as deep-sea sediments and the permafrost based on demanding conditions of high pressure and low temperature. Here we report that, by taking advantage of the confinement effects on nanopore space, synthetic methane hydrates grow under mild conditions (3.5 MPa and 2 °C), with faster kinetics (within minutes) than nature, fully reversibly and with a nominal stoichiometry that mimics nature. The formation of the hydrate structures in nanospace and their similarity to natural hydrates is confirmed using inelastic neutron scattering experiments and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. These findings may be a step towards the application of a smart synthesis of methane hydrates in energy-demanding applications (for example, transportation).

  11. Gas hydrate phase equilibria measurement techniques and phase rule considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, Juan G. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada); Bruusgaard, Hallvard [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Servio, Phillip, E-mail: phillip.servio@mcgill.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: > Inconsistencies found in hydrate literature. > Clarification to the number of variables needed to satisfy and justify equilibrium data. > Application of phase rule to mixed hydrate systems. > Thermodynamically consistent format to present data. - Abstract: A brief review of the Gibbs phase rule for non-reacting systems and its correct application to clathrate hydrates is presented. Clarification is provided for a common mistake found in hydrate phase-equilibria literature, whereby initial compositions are used as intensive variables to satisfy the Gibbs phase rule instead of the equilibrium values. The system of (methane + carbon dioxide + water) under (hydrate + liquid + vapor) equilibrium is used as a case study to illustrate key points and suggestions to improve experimental techniques are proposed.

  12. Hydration of Portoguese cements, measurement and modelling of chemical shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Lino; Geiker, Mette Rica; Figueiras, Joaquim A.

    2008-01-01

    Development of cement hydration was studied by measuring the chemical shrinkage of pastes. Five types of Portuguese Portland cement were used in cement pastes with . Chemical shrinkage was measured by gravimetry and dilatometry. In gravimeters results were recorded automatically during at least...... seven days, dilatometers were manually recorded during at least 56 days. The dispersion model was applied to fit chemical shrinkage results and to estimate the maximum (or ultimate) value for calculation of degree of hydration. Except for a pure Portland cement best fits were obtained by the general...... form of the dispersion model. The development of hydration varied between the investigated cements; based on the measured data the degree of hydration after 24 h hydration at 20 C varied between 40 and 50%. This should be taken into account when comparing properties of concrete made from the different...

  13. Hydration in the Pediatric Athlete - How to Guide Your Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Hydration is arguably among the foremost priorities youth athletes, parents, and coaches habitually consider as vital for sports. Insufficient hydration and a resultant measurable sweat-induced body water deficit can negatively affect performance and, in some athletic scenarios, can be a danger to a young athlete's health and safety, especially during vigorous physical activity in a warm-to-hot environment. Accordingly, it is essential to be well hydrated prior to practice, training, and competition and minimize total body water deficits incurred while being mindful of the greater sweat losses and hydration needs/challenges that accompany physical growth and maturation. Informed clinicians can play a key role as trusted resources in providing the most effective guidelines and making the best overall individual recommendations regarding hydration for youth athletes.

  14. Theoretical description of biomolecular hydration - Application to A-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Soumpasis, D.M. [Max Planck Inst. for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The local density of water molecules around a biomolecule is constructed from calculated two- and three-points correlation functions of polar solvents in water using a Potential-of-Mean-Force (PMF) expansion. As a simple approximation, the hydration of all polar (including charged) groups in a biomolecule is represented by the hydration of water oxygen in bulk water, and the effect of non-polar groups on hydration are neglected, except for excluded volume effects. Pair and triplet correlation functions are calculated by molecular dynamics simulations. We present calculations of the structural hydration for ideal A-DNA molecules with sequences [d(CG){sub 5}]{sub 2} and [d(C{sub 5}G{sub 5})]{sub 2}. We find that this method can accurately reproduce the hydration patterns of A-DNA observed in neutron diffraction experiments on oriented DNA fibers.

  15. Critical state soil constitutive model for methane hydrate soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, S.; Soga, K.; Yamamoto, K.

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a new constitutive model that simulates the mechanical behavior of methane hydrate-bearing soil based on the concept of critical state soil mechanics, referred to as the "Methane Hydrate Critical State (MHCS) model". Methane hydrate-bearing soil is, under certain geological conditions, known to exhibit greater stiffness, strength and dilatancy, which are often observed in dense soils and also in bonded soils such as cemented soil and unsaturated soil. Those soils tend to show greater resistance to compressive deformation but the tendency disappears when the soil is excessively compressed or the bonds are destroyed due to shearing. The proposed model represents these features by introducing five extra model parameters to the conventional critical state model. It is found that, for an accurate prediction of ground settlement, volumetric yielding plays an important role when hydrate soil undergoes a significant change in effective stresses and hydrate saturation, which are expected during depressurization for methane gas recovery.

  16. Heat of Hydration of Low Activity Cementitious Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasol, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-23

    During the curing of secondary waste grout, the hydraulic materials in the dry mix react exothermally with the water in the secondary low-activity waste (LAW). The heat released, called the heat of hydration, can be measured using a TAM Air Isothermal Calorimeter. By holding temperature constant in the instrument, the heat of hydration during the curing process can be determined. This will provide information that can be used in the design of a waste solidification facility. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the heat of hydration and other physical properties are being collected on grout prepared using three simulants of liquid secondary waste generated at the Hanford Site. From this study it was found that both the simulant and dry mix each had an effect on the heat of hydration. It was also concluded that the higher the cement content in the dry materials mix, the greater the heat of hydration during the curing of grout.

  17. Inhibition of Methane Hydrate Formation by Ice-Structuring Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Ramløv, Hans; Thomsen, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    In the oil and gas industry there is ample motivation for moving toward greener kinetic inhibitors of gas hydrates as many of those used today suffer from poor biodegradability. In this work, we have investigated experimentally whether ice-structuring proteins (ISPs) found in fish and insect......, assumed biodegradable, are capable of inhibiting the growth of methane hydrate (a structure I hydrate). The ISPs investigated were type III HPLC12 (originally identified in ocean pout) and ISP type III found in meal worm (Tenebrio molitor). These were compared to polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) a well......-known kinetic hydrate inhibitor. The results revealed that adding ISP in sufficient amounts caused the appearance of an initial nonlinear growth period. At a certain point during the growth process the growth pattern changed to linear which is identical to the growth observed for methane hydrate in the absence...

  18. Nasogastric Hydration in Infants with Bronchiolitis Less Than 2 Months of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Ed; Bata, Sonny; Rengasamy, Sharmila; Krieser, David; Cheek, John; Jachno, Kim; Babl, Franz E

    2016-11-01

    To determine whether nasogastric hydration can be used in infants less than 2 months of age with bronchiolitis, and characterize the adverse events profile of these infants compared with infants given intravenous (IV) fluid hydration. A descriptive retrospective cohort study of children with bronchiolitis under 2 months of age admitted for hydration at 3 centers over 3 bronchiolitis seasons was done. We determined type of hydration (nasogastric vs IV fluid hydration) and adverse events, intensive care unit admission, and respiratory support. Of 491 infants under 2 months of age admitted with bronchiolitis, 211 (43%) received nonoral hydration: 146 (69%) via nasogastric hydration and 65 (31%) via IV fluid hydration. Adverse events occurred in 27.4% (nasogastric hydration) and 23.1% (IV fluid hydration), difference of 4.3%; 95%CI (-8.2 to 16.9), P = .51. The majority of adverse events were desaturations (21.9% nasogastric hydration vs 21.5% IV fluid hydration, difference 0.4%; [-11.7 to 12.4], P = .95). There were no pulmonary aspirations in either group. Apneas and bradycardias were similar in each group. IV fluid hydration use was positively associated with intensive care unit admission (38.5% IV fluid hydration vs 19.9% nasogastric hydration; difference 18.6%, [5.1-32.1], P = .004); and use of ventilation support (27.7% IV fluid hydration vs 15.1% nasogastric hydration; difference 12.6 [0.3-23], P = .03). Fewer infants changed from nasogastric hydration to IV fluid hydration than from IV fluid hydration to nasogastric hydration (12.3% vs 47.7%; difference -35.4% [-49 to -22], P infants admitted with bronchiolitis. Nasogastric hydration and IV fluid hydration had similar rates of complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of Wheat Bran Hydration Properties As Affected by Toasting and Degree of Milling on Optimal Dough Development in Bread Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Pieter J; Bogaerts, Silke; Hemdane, Sami; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2016-05-11

    The impact of the hydration capacity and hydration rate of wheat bran on optimal bread dough development and loaf volume was investigated using coarse bran, both native as well as after toasting, milling, presoaking, and combinations of the latter. It was found that toasting reduces bran's hydration rate, which, during mixing, results in a temporary excess of water in which dough development takes place inefficiently and hence requires additional time. This mechanism was further substantiated by the observation that delayed dough development can be counteracted by the presoaking of bran. Milling of bran increases its hydration rate and results in faster optimal dough development. Presoaking of nonmilled bran, however, did not result in faster dough development. Smaller bran particles do lead to faster dough development, probably due to increased proper contacts between flour particles. Optimal loaf volumes did not change upon milling and toasting.

  20. Effect of Hydration and Confinement on Micro-Structure of Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadde, Harish Kumar

    Calcium-silicate-hydrate(C-S-H) gel is a primary nano-crystalline phase present in hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) responsible for its strength and creep behavior. Our reliance on cement for infrastructure is global, and there is a need to improve infrastructure life-times. A way forward is to engineer the cement with more durability and long-term strength. The main purpose of this research is to quantify the micro-structure of C-S-H to see if cement can be engineered at various length scales to improve long-term behavior by spatial arrangement. We investigate the micro-structure evolution of C-S-H in cement as a function of hydration time and confinement. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) were used to quantify the material and spatial properties of C-S-H as a function of hydration time. The data obtained from these experiments was used to identify C-S-H phases in cement sample. Pair Distribution Function (PDF) analysis of HD C-S-H phase with different hydration times was done at Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, beamline 11-ID-B. Only nonlinear trends in the atomic ordering of C-S-H gel as a function of hydration time were observed. Solid state 29Si Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was used to quantify the effect of confinement on two types of C-S-H: white cement C-S-H and synthetic C-S-H. NMR spectra revealed that there is no significant difference in the structure of C-S-H due to confinement when compared with unconfined C-S-H. It is also found that there is significant difference in the Si environments of these two types of C-S-H. Though it does seem possible to engineer the cement on atomic scales, all these studies reveal that engineering cement on such a scale requires a more statistically accurate understanding of intricate structure of C-S-H than is currently available.

  1. Short hydration regimen with magnesium supplementation prevents cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in lung cancer: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Teppei; Uozu, Sakurako; Isogai, Sumito; Hayashi, Masamichi; Goto, Yasuhiro; Nakanishi, Toru; Imaizumi, Kazuyoshi

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate renal function in lung cancer patients who were administered cisplatin with continuous higher-volume hydration (CH) or a short hydration (SH) regimen. We retrospectively evaluated patients with lung cancer who were treated with chemotherapy regimens including >50 mg/m2 of cisplatin between August 2007 and March 2015. Between August 2007 and December 2012, patients received a continuous higher-volume hydration regimen without magnesium (Mg) supplementation (CH group), and after May 2013, patients received a short hydration regimen with Mg supplementation (SH group). To evaluate the factors influencing serum creatinine (SCr) increase during the first course of cisplatin chemotherapy, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted. A total of 122 patients were evaluated, 62 patients in the CH group and 60 patients in the SH group. Grade 1 (National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events; version 4.0) or higher SCr increases were more frequently observed in the CH group than in the SH group after the first cycle (P = 0.01, Fisher's exact test) and for all cycles (P = 0.03). Multivariate analysis revealed that short hydration (odds ratio (OR), 0.30; 95% confidence internal (CI) (0.11-0.75), P = 0.01) and estimated creatinine clearance (eCcr) of ≥70 mL/min (OR, 0.25; 95% CI (0.088-0.69), P = 0.008) were associated with a significantly reduced risk for cisplatin-induced grade 1 or higher SCr increase. Our study suggested that a short hydration method with Mg supplementation and eCcr of ≥70 mL/min reduced the risk of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

  2. Possibility of submarine landslide triggering due to dissociation of hydrates - an approach through ring shear tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Dok, Atitkagna

    2015-04-01

    In Japan, the MH21 Research Consortium is developing the advanced technology of mining submarine methane hydrates by reducing pressure of hydrates to induce dissociation and gasification of hydrates. However, assessment and prediction technology of dissociation is still under development through intensive study. On the other hands, authors have pointed out the possibility of large-scale submarine landslides by the sliding surface liquefaction of the hydrate bearing- layers. Author has tested dry-ice and silica-sands mixture specimen as a methane hydrate substitutes in a series of partially-drained high speed / stress-controlled ring shear tests. Their results strongly suggest the possibility of sliding surface liquefaction under strong seismic condition, while the possibility of extensive dissociation especially under mining by reducing pressure is not clear. Author modified the ring shear apparatus DPRI-7 of Kyoto University so that it can cool down the specimen and measure the specimen temperature during shearing. Silica sands #7 submerged in TBAB (Tetra-butyl-ammonium bromide) solution was used for the specimen. This TBAB solution was frozen at around room temperature of 8 - 12 degrees Celsius under 1 atmospheric pressure. A series of constant speed shearing test was conducted to examine the rate-effect. Frictional characteristics was achieved under 0.1 - 10 cm/s of shear speed which was changed in stepping-up and down. The results show rather the temperature effect was obvious than the speed. At the first shearing of the specimen immediately after frozen, extreme high peak stress was obtained. Then the residual shear strength showed medium peak at temperature of about 4 degrees, then gradually decreased up to about 10 degrees. The medium peak of shear strength may come from the generation of angular grains due to crushing the specimen during initial shearing. The decreasing thereafter may have resulted from further crushing, rounding of the hydrates and

  3. Ultrasonic sound speed of hydrating calcium sulphate hemihydrate; part 2, the correlation of sound velocity to hydration degree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Brouwers, Jos; Fischer, H.B; Matthes, C.; Beuthan, C.

    2011-01-01

    In this article the sound velocity through a mix is correlated to the hydration degree of the mix. Models are presented predicting the sound velocity through fresh slurries and hardened products. These two states correspond to the starting and finishing point of the hydration process. The present

  4. Enzymes and muscle diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Plebani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle disorders may result in release of muscle enzymes into the circulation and give increased serum enzyme activity. A variety of enzymes routinely determined in the clinical laboratory may be elevated, but creatine kinase is the enzyme present in the highest concentration in muscle, and in every variety of muscle disease is the serum enzyme which shows the greatest incidence and degree of elevation. Aspartate aminotransferase is the enzyme associated most significantly with inflammation. A diagnostic algorithm based on the combined measurement of creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase and aldolase has been found to discriminate muscular distrophies from polymyositis and other myopathies. This combination of laboratory tests has diagnostic application and thus allows the clinician to better select patients who need to have a skeletal muscle biopsy as a diagnostic procedure.

  5. Study of Cd Te recrystallization by hydrated-CdCl{sub 2} thermal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez V, C.; Albor A, M. L.; Galarza G, U.; Aguilar H, J. R. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Fisica, San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Gonzalez T, M. A. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Computo, Nueva Industrial Vallejo, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Flores M, J. M. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Quimica e Industrias Extractivas, Departamento de Ingenieria en Metalurgia y Materiales, Nueva Industrial Vallejo, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Jimenez O, D. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, SEPI, Nueva Industrial Vallejo, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2017-11-01

    Cd Te thin films solar cells are currently produced using a layer sequence of glass/FTO/CdS/Cd Te/metal contact (Cu/Ag), these films are deposited by two different techniques, chemical bath deposition (CBD) and close space vapour transport (CSVT). In order to reach reasonable conversion efficiencies, the device has to be thermally treated in a hydrated-CdCl{sub 2} atmosphere. This study was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence, Sem-EDS, four probe method and Sims profiling of Cd Te. These analyses confirm the presence of hydrated CdCl{sub 2} and Cd Te phases on Cd Te surface and shown a good recrystallization morphology helping to the carriers mobility along the structure. Using the thermal treatment was possible to reduce the resistivity of Cd Te thin film; it is a result to the Cl migration along the Cd Te solar cell structure, reducing the defects between CdS and Cd Te thin films. A strong Cd Te thin film recrystallization was observed by the implementation of a hydrated-CdCl{sub 2} treatment doing to this a good candidate to Cd Te solar cells process. (Author)

  6. Linking basin-scale and pore-scale gas hydrate distribution patterns in diffusion-dominated marine hydrate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann E.; Hillman, Jess I. T.; Malinverno, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study is to computationally determine the potential distribution patterns of diffusion-driven methane hydrate accumulations in coarse-grained marine sediments. Diffusion of dissolved methane in marine gas hydrate systems has been proposed as a potential transport mechanism through which large concentrations of hydrate can preferentially accumulate in coarse-grained sediments over geologic time. Using one-dimensional compositional reservoir simulations, we examine hydrate distribution patterns at the scale of individual sand layers (1-20 m thick) that are deposited between microbially active fine-grained material buried through the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). We then extrapolate to two-dimensional and basin-scale three-dimensional simulations, where we model dipping sands and multilayered systems. We find that properties of a sand layer including pore size distribution, layer thickness, dip, and proximity to other layers in multilayered systems all exert control on diffusive methane fluxes toward and within a sand, which in turn impact the distribution of hydrate throughout a sand unit. In all of these simulations, we incorporate data on physical properties and sand layer geometries from the Terrebonne Basin gas hydrate system in the Gulf of Mexico. We demonstrate that diffusion can generate high hydrate saturations (upward of 90%) at the edges of thin sands at shallow depths within the GHSZ, but that it is ineffective at producing high hydrate saturations throughout thick (greater than 10 m) sands buried deep within the GHSZ. Furthermore, we find that hydrate in fine-grained material can preserve high hydrate saturations in nearby thin sands with burial.Plain Language SummaryThis study combines one-, two-, and three-dimensional simulations to explore one potential process by which methane dissolved in water beneath the seafloor can be converted into solid methane hydrate. This work specifically examines one end-member methane transport

  7. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  8. Superior thermoelectric response in the 3R phases of hydrated NaxRhO2

    KAUST Repository

    Saeed, Y.

    2014-03-17

    Density functional theory is used to investigate the thermoelectric properties of the 3R phases of NaxRhO2 for different Na vacancy configurations and concentrations. As compared to the analogous 2H phases, the modified stacking of the atomic layers in the 3R phases reduces the interlayer coupling. As a consequence, the 3R phases are found to be superior in the technologically relevant temperature range. The Rh d3z2-r2 orbitals still govern the valence band maxima and therefore determine the transport properties. A high figure of merit of 0.35 is achieved in hydrated Na0.83RhO2 at 580 K by water intercalation, which is 34% higher than in the non-hydrated phase.

  9. Profiling the orphan enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Next Generation Sequencing generates an incredible amount of sequence and great potential for new enzyme discovery. Despite this huge amount of data and the profusion of bioinformatic methods for function prediction, a large part of known enzyme activities is still lacking an associated protein sequence. These particular activities are called “orphan enzymes”. The present review proposes an update of previous surveys on orphan enzymes by mining the current content of public databases. While the percentage of orphan enzyme activities has decreased from 38% to 22% in ten years, there are still more than 1,000 orphans among the 5,000 entries of the Enzyme Commission (EC) classification. Taking into account all the reactions present in metabolic databases, this proportion dramatically increases to reach nearly 50% of orphans and many of them are not associated to a known pathway. We extended our survey to “local orphan enzymes” that are activities which have no representative sequence in a given clade, but have at least one in organisms belonging to other clades. We observe an important bias in Archaea and find that in general more than 30% of the EC activities have incomplete sequence information in at least one superkingdom. To estimate if candidate proteins for local orphans could be retrieved by homology search, we applied a simple strategy based on the PRIAM software and noticed that candidates may be proposed for an important fraction of local orphan enzymes. Finally, by studying relation between protein domains and catalyzed activities, it appears that newly discovered enzymes are mostly associated with already known enzyme domains. Thus, the exploration of the promiscuity and the multifunctional aspect of known enzyme families may solve part of the orphan enzyme issue. We conclude this review with a presentation of recent initiatives in finding proteins for orphan enzymes and in extending the enzyme world by the discovery of new

  10. Enzymes in animal nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Scientific Committee on Animal Nutrition

    2011-01-01

    This report brings overview of endogenous as well as exogenous enzymes and their role and importance in animal nutrition. Enzymes for animal nutrition have been systematically developed since 1980´s. Phytase, xylanase and β-glucanase are used in poultry-rising, pig breeding, aquaculture and begin to push to the ruminant nutrition. Phytase increase availability of P, Ca, Zn, digestibility of proteins and fats. Its positive effect on the environment is well described – enzymes decrease the cont...

  11. Enzyme catalysed tandem reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Oroz-Guinea, Isabel; García-Junceda, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    To transfer to the laboratory, the excellent efficiency shown by enzymes in Nature, biocatalysis, had to mimic several synthetic strategies used by the living organisms. Biosynthetic pathways are examples of tandem catalysis and may be assimilated in the biocatalysis field for the use of isolated multi-enzyme systems in the homogeneous phase. The concurrent action of several enzymes that work sequentially presents extraordinary advantages from the synthetic point of view, since it permits a r...

  12. Peptide-modified surfaces for enzyme immobilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinglin Fu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemistry and particularly enzymology at surfaces is a topic of rapidly growing interest, both in terms of its role in biological systems and its application in biocatalysis. Existing protein immobilization approaches, including noncovalent or covalent attachments to solid supports, have difficulties in controlling protein orientation, reducing nonspecific absorption and preventing protein denaturation. New strategies for enzyme immobilization are needed that allow the precise control over orientation and position and thereby provide optimized activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A method is presented for utilizing peptide ligands to immobilize enzymes on surfaces with improved enzyme activity and stability. The appropriate peptide ligands have been rapidly selected from high-density arrays and when desirable, the peptide sequences were further optimized by single-point variant screening to enhance both the affinity and activity of the bound enzyme. For proof of concept, the peptides that bound to β-galactosidase and optimized its activity were covalently attached to surfaces for the purpose of capturing target enzymes. Compared to conventional methods, enzymes immobilized on peptide-modified surfaces exhibited higher specific activity and stability, as well as controlled protein orientation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A simple method for immobilizing enzymes through specific interactions with peptides anchored on surfaces has been developed. This approach will be applicable to the immobilization of a wide variety of enzymes on surfaces with optimized orientation, location and performance, and provides a potential mechanism for the patterned self-assembly of multiple enzymes on surfaces.

  13. Food and feed enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraatz, Marco Alexander; Rühl, Martin; Zorn, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Humans have benefited from the unique catalytic properties of enzymes, in particular for food production, for thousands of years. Prominent examples include the production of fermented alcoholic beverages, such as beer and wine, as well as bakery and dairy products. The chapter reviews the historic background of the development of modern enzyme technology and provides an overview of the industrial food and feed enzymes currently available on the world market. The chapter highlights enzyme applications for the improvement of resource efficiency, the biopreservation of food, and the treatment of food intolerances. Further topics address the improvement of food safety and food quality.

  14. Water Intake and Hydration Indices in Healthy European Adults: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malisova, Olga; Athanasatou, Adelais; Pepa, Alex; Husemann, Marlien; Domnik, Kirsten; Braun, Hans; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Ortega, Juan F.; Fernandez-Elias, Valentin E.; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Hydration status is linked with health, wellness, and performance. We evaluated hydration status, water intake, and urine output for seven consecutive days in healthy adults. Volunteers living in Spain, Germany, or Greece (n = 573, 39 ± 12 years (51.1% males), 25.0 ± 4.6 kg/m2 BMI) participated in an eight-day study protocol. Total water intake was estimated from seven-day food and drink diaries. Hydration status was measured in urine samples collected over 24 h for seven days and in blood samples collected in fasting state on the mornings of days 1 and 8. Total daily water intake was 2.75 ± 1.01 L, water from beverages 2.10 ± 0.91 L, water from foods 0.66 ± 0.29 L. Urine parameters were: 24 h volume 1.65 ± 0.70 L, 24 h osmolality 631 ± 221 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο, 24 h specific gravity 1.017 ± 0.005, 24 h excretion of sodium 166.9 ± 54.7 mEq, 24 h excretion of potassium 72.4 ± 24.6 mEq, color chart 4.2 ± 1.4. Predictors for urine osmolality were age, country, gender, and BMI. Blood indices were: haemoglobin concentration 14.7 ± 1.7 g/dL, hematocrit 43% ± 4% and serum osmolality 294 ± 9 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο. Daily water intake was higher in summer (2.8 ± 1.02 L) than in winter (2.6 ± 0.98 L) (p = 0.019). Water intake was associated negatively with urine specific gravity, urine color, and urine sodium and potassium concentrations (p hydration level. PMID:27058557