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Sample records for hydrate eutectic aggregates

  1. Solidification and microstructures of binary ice-I/hydrate eutectic aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C.; Cooper, R.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Rieck, K.D.; Stern, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    The microstructures of two-phase binary aggregates of ice-I + salt-hydrate, prepared by eutectic solidification, have been characterized by cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (CSEM). The specific binary systems studied were H2O-Na2SO4, H2O-MgSO4, H2O-NaCl, and H2O-H2SO4; these were selected based on their potential application to the study of tectonics on the Jovian moon Europa. Homogeneous liquid solutions of eutectic compositions were undercooled modestly (??T - 1-5 ??C); similarly cooled crystalline seeds of the same composition were added to circumvent the thermodynamic barrier to nucleation and to control eutectic growth under (approximately) isothermal conditions. CSEM revealed classic eutectic solidification microstructures with the hydrate phase forming continuous lamellae, discontinuous lamellae, or forming the matrix around rods of ice-I, depending on the volume fractions of the phases and their entropy of dissolving and forming a homogeneous aqueous solution. We quantify aspects of the solidification behavior and microstructures for each system and, with these data articulate anticipated effects of the microstructure on the mechanical responses of the materials.

  2. Microstructure and Physical Properties of Sulfate Hydrate/Ice Eutectic Aggregates in the Binary System Sodium-Sulfate/Water at Planetary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C. M.; Kirby, S.; Durham, W.; Stern, L.

    2004-12-01

    Reflectance spectra data from Mars Odyssey, Galileo and potentially from Cassini suggest the presence of hydrated salts on numerous satellites in environments such as evaporate beds or combined with water ice. Improved mission data on these occurrences indicate that grain structures and properties of such materials merit a closer look using laboratory methods. Here we report the synthesis of a two-phase aggregate of sodium sulfate hydrate and water ice made by eutectic solidification from solution, characterization of its microstructure using cryogenic SEM, and comparison of its physical properties to those of its end-member components. Samples are crystallized from solution using a precision cryobath and seeded growth. The reaction is a "simple" one meaning that there is no solid solution formation in either of the two solid phases. The eutectic composition we studied for the sodium sulfate hydrate is 4wt% Na2SO4, which corresponds to about .06 volume fraction of Na2SO4ṡ10H2O, mirabilite, and .94 ice I. The eutectic microstructure observed with this volume fraction, which is termed "broken lamellar", consists of fairly uniform blade-like mirabilite grains arranged in roughly parallel columns within a water ice matrix. The blades and matrix material form a lamella that alternates with lamellae of pure ice. Energy dispersive spectroscopy of these eutectic mixtures confirms the presence of the two crystalline phases. Also, we find that lamellar spacing decreases with increasing growth rate. Constant-strain-rate tests in compression are carried out in the cryogenic gas deformation apparatus at LLNL in a pressure-temperature range appropriate to the icy satellites. We report the rheology of the two-phase aggregate and compare it to the strength properties of pure water ice and pure mirabilite. With the aid of numerous studies on similar structures in the literature on metals, we analyze the deformation mechanics from the perspective of defect and crack propagation

  3. Development of salt hydrate eutectics as latent heat storage for air conditioning and cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efimova, Anastasia [Brandenburgische Technische Universität (BTU) Cottbus – Senftenberg, Chair of Inorganic Chemistry, Großenhainer Str. 57, 01968 Senftenberg (Germany); Pinnau, Sebastian; Mischke, Matthias; Breitkopf, Cornelia [Technische Universität Dresden, Chair of Technical Thermodynamics, Helmholtzstr. 14, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Ruck, Michael [Technische Universität Dresden, Chair of Inorganic Chemistry, Bergstr. 66, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Schmidt, Peer, E-mail: peer.schmidt@hs-lausitz.de [Brandenburgische Technische Universität (BTU) Cottbus – Senftenberg, Chair of Inorganic Chemistry, Großenhainer Str. 57, 01968 Senftenberg (Germany)

    2014-01-10

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Inorganic salt hydrates. • Latent heat thermal energy storage. • Thermal behavior of melting and crystallization. • Cycling stability. • Nucleation. - Abstract: Sustainable air conditioning systems require heat reservoirs that operate between 4 and 20 °C. A systematic search for binary and ternary eutectics of inorganic salts and salt hydrates with melting temperatures in this temperature regime and with high enthalpies of fusion has been performed by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Promising results were obtained for the pseudo-ternary system Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O, Mn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O, and KNO{sub 3} with the melting temperature range 18–21 °C and the enthalpy of fusion of about 110 kJ kg{sup −1}. Suitable nucleating and thickening agents have been found and tested to prevent the mixture from supercooling and phase separation.

  4. Compositional characteristics and hydration behavior of mineral trioxide aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsi Wang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA was one of most popular biomaterials for endodontic treatment in the past decade. Its superb biocompatibility, sealing ability and surface for tissue adhesion all make MTA a potential candidate for many dental applications, such as apexification, perforation repair, repair of root resorption, and as a root-end filling material. There are many review articles regarding the physical, chemical and biological properties of MTA. However, there are few reviews discussing the relationship between the composition and hydration behavior of MTA. The aim of this article was to provide a systematic review regarding the compositional characteristics and hydration behavior of MTA.

  5. Study on Expansion Cracking of Hydration in Concrete Aggregates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In accordance with a fresh accident by severe expansion cracks of structural elements,based on systematic detection and analyses such as X-ray diffraction,differential thermal analysis,scanning electron microscory,chemical analysis,petrographic analysis, electronic probe analysis,and atomic absorption spectroscopy analysis, it is pointed out that the dominant reasons lie in the hydration reaction of magnesia in concrete aggregates, resulting in a volume expansion in structure members.A wholly new corresponding strengthening method is applied to the cracked elements and turned out to be effective.

  6. Arguments for a Comprehensive Laboratory Research Subprogram on Hydrocarbon Gas Hydrates and Hydrate-Sediment Aggregates in the 2005-2010 DOE Methane Hydrate R & D Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, S. H.

    2005-12-01

    Field observations of natural hydrocarbon clathrate hydrates, including responses to drilling perturbations of hydrates, well logging and analysis of drill core, and field geophysics are, combined with theoretical modeling, justifiably key activities of the authorized 2005-2010 DOE Methane Hydrate Program. It is argued in this presentation that sustained fundamental laboratory research amplifies, extends and verifies results obtained from field and modeling investigations and does so in a cost-effective way. Recent developments of hydrocarbon clathrate hydrate and sediment aggregate synthesis methods, applications of in-situ optical cell, Raman, NMR, x-ray tomography and neutron diffraction techniques, and cryogenic x-ray and SEM methods re-enforce the importance of such lab investigations. Moreover, there are large data gaps for hydrocarbon-hydrate and hydrate-sediment-aggregate properties. We give three examples: 1) All natural hydrocarbon hydrates in sediment core have been altered to varying degrees by their transit, storage, depressurization, and subsequent lab investigations, as are well-log observations during drilling operations. Interpretation of drill core properties and structure and well logs are also typically not unique. Emulations of the pressure-temperature-deformation-time histories of synthetic samples offer a productive way of gaining insight into how natural samples and logging measurements may be compositionally and texturally altered during sampling and handling. 2) Rock physics models indicate that the effects of hydrates on sediment properties depend on the manner in which hydrates articulate with the sediment matrix (their conformation). Most of these models have not been verified by direct testing using hydrocarbon hydrates with conformation checked by optical cell observations or cryogenic SEM. Such tests are needed and technically feasible. 3) Modeling the effects of exchanges of heat, multiphase fluid fluxes, and deformation involve

  7. Evidence of self-aggregation of cationic surfactants in a choline chloride+glycerol deep eutectic solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Mahi; Singh, Ranjan K; Pandey, Siddharth

    2015-08-24

    Based on fluorescence probe, electrical conductivity, surface tension, small-angle X-ray/dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy experiments, we present the first clear lines of evidence for self-aggregation of cationic surfactants of the n-alkyltrimethylammonium family within an archetypical deep eutectic solvent comprised of a 1:2 molar mixture of choline chloride and glycerol. Estimated thermodynamic parameters suggest this self-aggregation process to be less entropically driven than that in water. These novel water-free self-assemblies might serve as dynamic soft templates to direct the growth of size- or shape-tailored nanoparticles within water-restricted media. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Chemo-physical modeling of cement mortar hydration: Role of aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jena, E-mail: jeong@profs.estp.fr [Université Paris-Est, Institut de Recherche en Constructibilité, ESTP, 28 Avenue Président Wilson, 94234 Cachan (France); Ramézani, Hamidréza, E-mail: hamidreza.ramezani@univ-orleans.fr [CRMD, CNRS FRE 3520-Research Center on Divided Materials, École Polytechnique de l’Université d’Orléans, 8 rue Léonrad de Vinci, 45072 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Leklou, Nordine, E-mail: nordine.leklou@univ-nantes.fr [LUNAM Université, Université de Nantes-IUT Saint-Nazaire, GeM, CNRS UMR 6183, Research Institute in Civil Engineering and Mechanics, 58 rue Michel Ange BP 420 44606 Saint Nazaire Cedex (France); Mounanga, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.mounanga@univ-nantes.fr [LUNAM Université, Université de Nantes-IUT Saint-Nazaire, GeM, CNRS UMR 6183, Research Institute in Civil Engineering and Mechanics, 58 rue Michel Ange BP 420 44606 Saint Nazaire Cedex (France)

    2013-07-20

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: After mixing of the cement with water, most of the anhydride products sustain the hydration process and this leads to the hydrate products, e.g. CSH, Ca(OH){sub 2}, Afm and Aft. The mentioned hydration process is a highly complex phenomenon involving the chemically based thermo-activation inside the cement mortars during the early age hydration process. The chemo-thermal hydration reactions drasticaly increase at the early age of hydration after the mixing action and then it becomes less important and turns to be nearly asymptotic. The progress of the hydration phenomenon drives the material properties change during the very early age of cement hydration. Regarding the mortar and concrete, such hydration process would not be homogeneous through the cement matrix due to the aggregates presence. These inclusions will affect the temperature distribution as well as degree of hydration. In the current contribution, the chemical and thermal hydration have been firstly investigated by means of SEM observations using replica method and secondly by the 3D-FEM numerical experiments including two different case studies using glass beads as aggregates. The numerical experiments match fairly good the experimental measurements obtained using a pseudo-adiabatic testing setup for the case studies herein. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images observation demonstrates the gap spaces around the glass beads next to the external surfaces. These gaps can be essentially seen for the multi-glass beads case study. The role of the temperature and degree of hydration gradients are clearly obtained using the numerical samples. Some fresh routes and outlooks have been afterwards discussed.

  9. Hydration and diffusion processes shape microbial community organization and function in model soil aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2015-12-01

    The constantly changing soil hydration status affects gas and nutrient diffusion through soil pores and thus the functioning of soil microbial communities. The conditions within soil aggregates are of particular interest due to limitations to oxygen diffusion into their core, and the presence of organic carbon often acting as binding agent. We developed a model for microbial life in simulated soil aggregates comprising of 3-D angular pore network model (APNM) that mimics soil hydraulic and transport properties. Within these APNM, we introduced individual motile (flagellated) microbial cells with different physiological traits that grow, disperse, and respond to local nutrients and oxygen concentrations. The model quantifies the dynamics and spatial extent of anoxic regions that vary with hydration conditions, and their role in shaping microbial community size and activity and the spatial (self) segregation of anaerobes and aerobes. Internal carbon source and opposing diffusion directions of oxygen and carbon within an aggregate were essential to emergence of stable coexistence of aerobic and anaerobic communities (anaerobes become extinct when carbon sources are external). The model illustrates a range of hydration conditions that promote or suppress denitrification or decomposition of organic matter and thus affect soil GHG emissions. Model predictions of CO2 and N2O production rates were in good agreement with limited experimental data. These limited tests support the dynamic modeling approach whereby microbial community size, composition, and spatial arrangement emerge from internal interactions within soil aggregates. The upscaling of the results to a population of aggregates of different sizes embedded in a soil profile is underway.

  10. Influence of aggregate and supplementary cementitious materials on the properties of hydrated lime (CL90s mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pavía

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrated lime is a historic material currently used in conservation. It hardens slowly by carbonation slowing construction however, supplementary cementitious materials accelerate hardening enhancing strength. Hydrated-lime mortars with rice husk ash–RHA-; ground granulated blastfurnace slag–GGBS- and increasing amounts of two aggregates were studied. Increasing aggregate lowered strength as interfacial zones proliferate; it lowered hygric properties and raised water demand. Aggregate content/composition didn’t affect the high water retention. For the higher aggregate contents (90 days, limestone mortars are c.20% stronger than silica mortars while the (1:1 silica sand mortars are 56% stronger in flexion. Additions increased strength with little impact on hygric properties. GGBS increased strength c.six times. RHA increased strength with little impact on hygric properties due to its great specific surface and high water-demand increasing porosity. GGBS and RHA properties ruling hydrate production and the kinetics of the pozzolanic reaction are considered partially responsible for the mortar property variation.

  11. Distinct role of hydration water in protein misfolding and aggregation revealed by fluctuating thermodynamics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2015-04-21

    Protein aggregation in aqueous cellular environments is linked to diverse human diseases. Protein aggregation proceeds through a multistep process initiated by conformational transitions, called protein misfolding, of monomer species toward aggregation-prone structures. Various forms of aggregate species are generated through the association of misfolded monomers including soluble oligomers and amyloid fibrils. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms and driving forces involved in the misfolding and subsequent association has been a central issue for understanding and preventing protein aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and type II diabetes. In this Account, we provide a thermodynamic perspective of the misfolding and aggregation of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease through the application of fluctuating thermodynamics. This approach "dissects" the conventional thermodynamic characterization of the end states into the one of the fluctuating processes connecting them, and enables one to analyze variations in the thermodynamic functions that occur during the course of protein conformational changes. The central quantity in this approach is the solvent-averaged effective energy, f = Eu + Gsolv, comprising the protein potential energy (Eu) and the solvation free energy (Gsolv), whose time variation reflects the protein dynamics on the free energy landscape. Protein configurational entropy is quantified by the magnitude of fluctuations in f. We find that misfolding of the Aβ monomer when released from a membrane environment to an aqueous phase is driven by favorable changes in protein potential energy and configurational entropy, but it is also accompanied by an unfavorable increase in solvation free energy. The subsequent dimerization of the misfolded Aβ monomers occurs in two steps. The first step, where two widely separated monomers come into contact distance, is driven by water-mediated attraction, that is, by a

  12. Hydration of cations: a key to understanding of specific cation effects on aggregation behaviors of PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, Jacob C; Wu, Tsung-yu; Zhang, Yanjie

    2013-09-05

    This work reports results from the interactions of a series of monovalent and divalent cations with a triblock copolymer, poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO). Phase transition temperatures of the polymer in the presence of chloride salts with six monovalent and eight divalent cations were measured using an automated melting point apparatus. The polymer undergoes a two-step phase transition, consisting of micellization of the polymer followed by aggregation of the micelles, in the presence of all the salts studied herein. The results suggest that hydration of cations plays a key role in determining the interactions between the cations and the polymer. The modulation of the phase transition temperature of the polymer by cations can be explained as a balance between three interactions: direct binding of cations to the oxygen in the polymer chains, cations sharing one water molecule with the polymer in their hydration layer, and cations interacting with the polymer via two water molecules. Monovalent cations Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+) do not bind to the polymer, while Li(+) and NH4(+) and all the divalent cations investigated including Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Cd(2+) bind to the polymer. The effects of the cations correlate well with their hydration thermodynamic properties. Mechanisms for cation-polymer interactions are discussed.

  13. Coatings for directional eutectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rairden, J. R.; Jackson, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Coatings developed to provide oxidation protection for the directionally-solidified eutectic alloy NiTaC-B (4.4 weight percent Cr) were evaluated. Of seven Co-, Fe- and Ni-base coatings that were initially investigated, best resistance to cyclic oxidation was demonstrated by duplex coatings fabricated by depositing a layer of NiCrAl(Y) by vacuum evaporation from an electron beam source followed by deposition of an Al overlayer using the pack cementation process. It was found that addition of carbon to the coating alloy substantially eliminated the problem of fiber denudation in TaC-type eutectic alloys. Burner rig cycled NiTaC-B samples coated with Ni-20Cr-5Al-0.1C-0.1Y+Al and rupture-tested at 1100 deg C performed as well as or better than uncoated, vacuum cycled and air-tested NiTaC-13; however, a slight degradation with respect to uncoated material was noted in air-stress rupture tests at 870 deg C for both cycled and uncycled samples.

  14. Directional Solidification of Eutectic Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayir, Ali

    2001-01-01

    Two major problems associated with structural ceramics are lack of damage tolerance and insufficient strength and creep resistance at very high temperatures of interest for aerospace application. This work demonstrated that the directionally solidified eutectics can have unique poly-phase microstructures and mechanical properties superior to either constituent alone. The constraining effect of unique eutectic microstructures result in higher resistance to slow crack growth and creep. Prospect of achieving superior properties through controlled solidification are presented and this technology can also be beneficial to produce new class of materials.

  15. Absorption Spectra of Astaxanthin Aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Olsina, Jan; Minofar, Babak; Polivka, Tomas; Mancal, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids in hydrated polar solvents form aggregates characterized by dramatic changes in their absorption spectra with respect to monomers. Here we analyze absorption spectra of aggregates of the carotenoid astaxanthin in hydrated dimethylsulfoxide. Depending on water content, two types of aggregates were produced: H-aggregates with absorption maximum around 390 nm, and J-aggregates with red-shifted absorption band peaking at wavelengths >550 nm. The large shifts with respect to absorption maximum of monomeric astaxanthin (470-495 nm depending on solvent) are caused by excitonic interaction between aggregated molecules. We applied molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate structure of astaxanthin dimer in water, and the resulting structure was used as a basis for calculations of absorption spectra. Absorption spectra of astaxanthin aggregates in hydrated dimethylsulfoxide were calculated using molecular exciton model with the resonance interaction energy between astaxanthin monomers constrained by semi-e...

  16. Semiconductor eutectics for energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, A. S.

    1983-04-01

    Directionally-oriented two-phase semiconducting eutectics are potential device-materials. A comprehensive search of the literature gives a list of semiconducting eutectic systems. Among these, the SnSe-SnSe2 was chosen for studies in detail. The SnSe-SnSe2 eutectic grown by the Bridgman technique has a multi-P/N-junction lamellar microstructure. Since its plasma frequency has not been detected within the infrared reflectance spectrum up to 40 micrometers of wavelength, it is, therefore, concluded that the SnSe-SnSe2 eutectic is a non-degenerate semiconductor. SnSe single crystals grown from the vapor phase have a hole concentration of 9.72 x 10(17) cm(+3) and a mobility of 154 cm(2)/sec-v at room temperature. This mobility is proportional to T/sup -1/3/ for T 1300 K and T/sup -2.25/ for T 1300 K. The index of reflection for SnSe single crystal has been determined froma wavelength of micrometers to a wavelength of 40 micrometers and was found to be 3.120 at 3 microns and 3.095 at 15 microns. A current-voltage characteristic expressed as I = I0 exp (qv/2.08 KT) was measured on a SnSe diode, which exhibits a negative resistance after the breakdown.

  17. An AFM Study of the Effects of Silanization Temperature, Hydration, and Annealing on the Nucleation and Aggregation of Condensed OTS Domains on Mica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, David W; Hlady, Vladimir

    1996-03-25

    Partial monolayers of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) were formed on mica under different reaction conditions in which the silanization temperature, time, and amount of water adsorbed on the mica substrates were varied. OTS surface coverage increased with silanization time for all samples; however, the amount and distribution of adsorbed OTS varied greatly under these different reaction conditions. AFM analysis showed that OTS formed two phases on mica silanized at 25°C: condensed "island-like" domains and expanded "liquid-like" domains. Partially dehydrated mica silanized at 9°C, however, displayed only condensed domains which were of smaller size compared to those on the 25°C samples. The lateral diffusion and aggregation of small condensed OTS domains to form larger aggregates was evident on all surfaces except the 25°C partially dehydrated mica. A uniform distribution of many small condensed domains surrounded by expanded OTS phases was seen instead. Extended annealing resulted in surface diffusion and aggregation of these domains and nucleation of new condensed domains from the surrounding expanded OTS phases. These observations are consistent with a deposition, diffusion, and aggregation model (DDA) which allows for activated diffusion; however, rigorous modeling is not presented here.

  18. Evaporation Behavior and Characterization of Eutectic Solvent and Ibuprofen Eutectic Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Tuntarawongsa, Sarun; Charoensuksai, Purin

    2016-10-01

    Liquid eutectic system of menthol and camphor has been reported as solvent and co-solvent for some drug delivery systems. However, surprisingly, the phase diagram of menthol-camphor eutectic has not been reported previously. The evaporation behavior, physicochemical, and thermal properties of this liquid eutectic and ibuprofen eutectic solution were characterized in this study. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis indicated that a eutectic point of this system was near to 1:1 menthol/camphor and its eutectic temperature was -1°C. The solubility of ibuprofen in this eutectic was 282.11 ± 6.67 mg mL(-1) and increased the drug aqueous solubility fourfold. The shift of wave number from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated the hydrogen bonding of each compound in eutectic mixture. The weight loss from thermogravimetric analysis of menthol and camphor related to the evaporation and sublimation, respectively. Menthol demonstrated a lower apparent sublimation rate than camphor, and the evaporation rate of eutectic solvent was lower than the sublimation rate of camphor but higher than the evaporation of menthol. The evaporation rate of the ibuprofen eutectic solution was lower than that of the eutectic solvent because ibuprofen did not sublimate. This eutectic solvent prolonged the ibuprofen release with diffusion control. Thus, the beneficial information for thermal behavior and related properties of eutectic solvent comprising menthol-camphor and ibuprofen eutectic solution was attained successfully. The rather low evaporation of eutectic mixture will be beneficial for investigation and tracking the mechanism of transformation from nanoemulsion into nanosuspension in the further study using eutectic as oil phase.

  19. Scaling-Up Eutectic Freeze Crystallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genceli, F.E.

    2008-01-01

    A novel crystallization technology, Eutectic Freeze Crystallization (EFC) has been investigated and further developed in this thesis work. EFC operates around the eutectic temperature and composition of aqueous solutions and can be used for recovery of (valuable) dissolved salts (and/or or acids) an

  20. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    and the role it plays in the global climate and the future of fuels. Russia, Japan, Nigeria, Peru, Chile, Pakistan, Indonesia, Korea, etc are various countries who are perusing the gas hydrates studies as a future resource for fuel. Indian Initiative..., 1993, Free gas at the base of the gas hydrate zone in the vicinity of the Chile Triple junction: Geology, v. 21, pp. 905-908. Borowski, W.S., C.K. Paull, and U. William, III, 1999, Global and local variations of interstitial sulfate gradients...

  1. Development of deep eutectic solvents applied in extraction and separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxia; Row, Kyung Ho

    2016-09-01

    Deep eutectic solvents, as an alternative to ionic liquids, have greener credentials than ionic liquids, and have attracted considerable attention in related chemical research. Deep eutectic solvents have attracted increasing attention in chemistry for the extraction and separation of various target compounds from natural products. This review highlights the preparation of deep eutectic solvents, unique properties of deep eutectic solvents, and synthesis of deep-eutectic-solvent-based materials. On the other hand, application in the extraction and separation of deep eutectic solvents is also included in this report. In this paper, the available data and references in this field are reviewed to summarize the applications and developments of deep eutectic solvents. Based on the development of deep eutectic solvents, an exploitation of new deep eutectic solvents and deep eutectic solvents-based materials is expected to diversify into extraction and separation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. 轻骨料的返水作用对粉煤灰二次水化的影响%EFFECT OF WATER RELEASE OF LIGHTWEIGHT AGGREGATE ON SECONDARY HYDRATION OF FLY ASH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔丽娟; 葛勇; 张宝生; 张巍

    2009-01-01

    研究了轻骨科掺量不同的混凝土当掺与不掺粉煤灰时不同龄期的抗氯离子扩散性能以及骨料附近水化产物中Ca(OH)2含量和水泥石孔结构的变化情况.结果表明:随着混凝土中轻骨料掺量的增加,掺加了粉煤灰的浆体28~90 d期间水化产物中Ca(OH)2含量的减少幅度大于未掺粉煤灰试样的,且水泥石孔隙率有所降低,孔径细化,掺入粉煤灰后轻骨科掺量越多的试样孔径细化越显著,可见轻骨料后期返出的水分起到了自养护作用,保证了粉煤灰的水化.在混凝土中掺入适量的轻骨料,其返水特性与粉煤灰二次水化反应的协同作用使得混凝土后期抗渗性能显著提高,优于普通骨料混凝土.%Concretes containing different fractions of lightweight aggregate (LWA) and fly ash (FA) were prepared. The Ca(OH)2 content and pore structure of the paste around aggregate as well as the chloride permeability of concrete were investigated. The results show that, with the increase of the LWA content, an increase of the curing age from 28 d to 90d has made the decrease of the Ca(OH)2 content of the paste mixed with FA increases gradually as compared to that of the pasted mixed without FA, and the hardened cement paste appears a structure with a lower porosity and freer pores. The pore size of specimen made at a higher LWA content becomes smaller due to the addition of the FA. It is indicated that the water release effect of the LWA can play a role for the internal curing and ensure the hydration of the FA at later age. The impermeability of concrete prepared with the LWA and FA also gains more improve-ment as compared to normal weight concrete in long term.

  3. Characterization of un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate™ and MTA Angelus™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Sorrentino, F; Damidot, D

    2015-04-01

    BioAggregate™ is a novel material introduced for use as a root-end filling material. It is tricalcium silicate-based, free of aluminium and uses tantalum oxide as radiopacifier. BioAggregate contains additives to enhance the material performance. The purpose of this research was to characterize the un-hydrated and hydrated forms of BioAggregate using a combination of techniques, verify whether the additives if present affect the properties of the set material and compare these properties to those of MTA Angelus™. Un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate and MTA Angelus were assessed. Un-hydrated cement was tested for chemical composition, specific surface area, mineralogy and kinetics of hydration. The set material was investigated for mineralogy, microstructure and bioactivity. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and isothermal calorimetry were employed. The specific surface area was investigated using a gas adsorption method with nitrogen as the probe. BioAggregate was composed of tricalcium silicate, tantalum oxide, calcium phosphate and silicon dioxide and was free of aluminium. On hydration, the tricalcium silicate produced calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The former was deposited around the cement grains, while the latter reacted with the silicon dioxide to form additional calcium silicate hydrate. This resulted in reduction of calcium hydroxide in the aged cement. MTA Angelus reacted in a similar fashion; however, since it contained no additives, the calcium hydroxide was still present in the aged cement. Bioactivity was demonstrated by deposition of hydroxyapatite. BioAggregate exhibited a high specific surface area. Nevertheless, the reactivity determined by isothermal calorimetry appeared to be slow compared to MTA Angelus. The tantalum oxide as opposed to bismuth oxide was inert, and tantalum was not leached in solution. BioAggregate exhibited

  4. Effect of interface kinetics on the eutectic growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jinfu; ZHOU Yaohe

    2005-01-01

    The atom-attachment kinetics at the solid-liquid interface was incorporated into the eutectic growth theory. The dependence of kinetic undercooling on the structure of the eutectic phases was investigated. Due to the introduction of the kinetic effect, the coupled eutectic growth can proceed in a wider undercooling range, but the growth velocity decreases while the minimum eutectic lamellar spacing remains unchanged. The proportion of kinetic undercooling to the total undercooling is dependent not only on the growth velocity, but also on the phase diagram. Calculation indicated that the proportion decreases as the crystallization temperature range of single eutectic phase at the eutectic composition enlarges.

  5. A visualization of the eutectic solidification process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Olejnik

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The study presents a visualization of the sequence of formation of eutectic grains during solidification in volume and directional solidification of model organic materials from the system of salol (faceted phase - camphor (non-faceted phase and carbon tetrabromide (non-faceted phase - hexachloroethane (non-faceted phase. It has been proved that the faceted phase may act as a substrate for nucleation of the non-faceted phase, while the non-faceted phase in a eutectic grain is of polycrystalline character. The directional solidification of non-faceted/non-faceted eutectic enabled disclosing various structural defects, while solidification in volume explained in what way the, so called, halo effect is formed.

  6. Eutectic phase in water-ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Ziock, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    medium, which is known to disfavor such reactions. Thus, it was proposed early on that these polymerizations had to be supported by particular environments, such as mineral surfaces and eutectic phases in water-ice, which would have led to the concentration of the monomers out of the bulk aqueous medium...... and their condensation. This review presents the work conducted to understand how the eutectic phases in water-ice might have promoted RNA polymerization, thereby presumably contributing to the emergence of the ancient information and catalytic system envisioned by the RNA World hypothesis....

  7. Pb-free Sn-Ag-Cu ternary eutectic solder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, I.E.; Yost, F.G.; Smith, J.F.; Miller, C.M.; Terpstra, R.L.

    1996-06-18

    A Pb-free solder includes a ternary eutectic composition consisting essentially of about 93.6 weight % Sn-about 4.7 weight % Ag-about 1.7 weight % Cu having a eutectic melting temperature of about 217 C and variants of the ternary composition wherein the relative concentrations of Sn, Ag, and Cu deviate from the ternary eutectic composition to provide a controlled melting temperature range (liquid-solid ``mushy`` zone) relative to the eutectic melting temperature (e.g. up to 15 C above the eutectic melting temperature). 5 figs.

  8. Morphology of solidification front in eutectic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Trepczyńska - Łent

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the analysis of morphology of solidification front in eutectic made. It was present influence of composition, solidification velocity, concentration micro-field and capillarity effects on the morphology of the solid/liquid interface. It was introduced phase-field model.

  9. Clathrate hydrates in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Keith C; Brewer, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Scientific knowledge of natural clathrate hydrates has grown enormously over the past decade, with spectacular new findings of large exposures of complex hydrates on the sea floor, the development of new tools for examining the solid phase in situ, significant progress in modeling natural hydrate systems, and the discovery of exotic hydrates associated with sea floor venting of liquid CO2. Major unresolved questions remain about the role of hydrates in response to climate change today, and correlations between the hydrate reservoir of Earth and the stable isotopic evidence of massive hydrate dissociation in the geologic past. The examination of hydrates as a possible energy resource is proceeding apace for the subpermafrost accumulations in the Arctic, but serious questions remain about the viability of marine hydrates as an economic resource. New and energetic explorations by nations such as India and China are quickly uncovering large hydrate findings on their continental shelves.

  10. Penetrating behavior of eutectic liquid during Al/Cu contact reactive brazing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The behavior of eutectic liquid penetrating into the Al base during Al/Cu contact reactive brazing process was studied. Analysis results show that the eutectic liquid prefers to expand along the grain boundary in the depth direction. Meanwhile, dissolution of solid Al and Cu into the eutectic liquid promotes the eutectic reaction and the continuously formed eutectic liquid leads to the reactive penetrating.

  11. Study on Potassium Fluoaluminate Eutectic Flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张韻慧; 尹淑梅; 肖莉; 李宁; 张则甡

    2004-01-01

    In this study, Nocolok eutectic flux,used widely in the process of the brazing of aluminum and its alloy, was prepared by the reaction between Al(OH)3/KOH resolution and HF. A series of KF-AlF3 eutectic productions at various reaction temperatures were prepared. The melting points of the products were measured by differential thermal analysis (DTA), and the composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results suggest that the temperature control is important to produce an ideal flux consisting of K2AlF5, H2O and KAlF4, with a low melting point of 560 ℃,which is suitable for the brazing of aluminum and its alloy as the aluminum fluxes.

  12. Crystallography of Alumina-YAG-Eutectic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali; Dickerson, Robert M.; Matson, Lawrence E.

    2000-01-01

    Multiple descriptions of the alumina-YAG eutectic crystallography appear in the ceramic literature. The orientation between two phases in a eutectic system has direct impact on residual stress, morphology, microstructural stability, and high temperature mechanical properties. A study to demonstrate that the different crystallographic relationships can be correlated with different growth constraints was undertaken. Fibers produced by Laser-Heated Float Zone (LHFZ) and Edge-defined Film-fed Growth (EFG) were examined. A map of the orientation relationship between Al2O3 and Y3Al5O12 and their relationship to the fiber growth axis as a function of pull rate are presented. Regions in which a single orientation predominates are identified.

  13. Raman mapping in the elucidation of solid salt eutectic and near eutectic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Kerridge, D. H.

    2002-01-01

    not consist of a pure chemical component, although having one component in a high concentration. Probably the behaviour represents separation on solidification due to the limiting solid solubility. The 'conglomerate' structures are very different from what has been found for metallic or ceramic eutectics...... finer grained. The high area of 'interphasial' contact between the solid solutions is considered to be responsible for the unexpectedly high electrical conductivity previously found and to give rise to part of the melting enthalpy differences between those of solidified salt eutectics and those...

  14. Microstructural Evolution of Rapidly Solidified Co-Mo and Ni-Mo Eutectic Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiujun HAN; Wenjing YAO; Bingbo WEI

    2003-01-01

    Droplets of Co-37.6 wt pct Mo and Ni-47.7 wt pct Mo eutectic alloys were rapidly solidified during containerless processing in a 3 m drop tube. A kind of anomalous eutectic appears in these two eutectic alloys when undercooling is beyond 56 and 61 K, respectively. The two eutectic phases in anomalous eutectic were observed to grow in dendrite manner. The formation of anomalous eutectic is ascribed to the cooperative dendrite growth of the two independently nucleated eutectic phases. Current dendrite and eutectic growth theories are applied to describe the observed processes.

  15. Deep eutectic solvents as efficient solvent system for the extraction of κ-carrageenan from Kappaphycus alvarezii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arun Kumar; Sharma, Mukesh; Mondal, Dibyendu; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2016-01-20

    Three different deep eutectic solvents (DESs) prepared by the complexation of choline chloride with urea, ethylene glycol and glycerol along with their hydrated counterparts were used for the selective extraction of κ-carrageenan from Kappaphycus alvarezii. Upon comparison of the quality of the polysaccharide with the one obtained using water as extraction media as well as the one extracted using widely practiced conventional method, it was found that, the physicochemical as well as rheological properties of κ-carrageenan obtained using DESs as solvents was at par to the one obtained using conventional method and was superior in quality when compared to κ-carrageenan obtained using water as solvent. Considering the tedious nature of the extraction method employed in conventional extraction process, the DESs can be considered as suitable alternative solvents for the facile extraction of the polysaccharide directly from the seaweed. However, among the hydrated and non-hydrated DESs, the hydrated ones were found to be more effective in comparison to their non-hydrated counterparts.

  16. Precision of the eutectic points determination by the isopleths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutsyk, V I; Sumkina, O G; Savinov, V V; Zelenaya, A E, E-mail: vluts@pres.bscnet.ru [Physical Problems Department, Buryat Scientific Center of RAS (Siberian Branch), 8 Sakhyanova st., Ulan-Ude, 670047 (Russian Federation)

    2011-10-29

    An imitation of quaternary eutectic point searching techniques by means of two-dimensional sections set construction (tie-lines method) was made, using the model of T-x-y-z diagram of eutectic type without solid-phases solubility as an example. The errors, appearing in sections graphics of experimentally studied systems, are analyzed.

  17. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-03-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8–133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared.

  18. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  19. 温度对大掺量粉煤灰水泥水化C-S-H聚合度的影响%Effect of Temperature on Aggregate States of Hydration Products C-S-H Gel of Cement with High Content of Fly Ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于文金; 罗永传; 弓子成; 丁庆军

    2011-01-01

    Effect of curing temperature and temperature variation on silicon-oxy tetrahedron aggregate states of hydra-tion products C-S-H gel of cement with high content of fly ash materials by high-resolution solid "Si NMR,XRD and FT-IR testing techniques. The results show that silicon-oxy tetrahedron aggregate states C-S-H gel and contents of alumi-num-oxy tetrahedron increased and then stabilized with the increase of curing temperature. Curing at normal temperature was good for increasing silicon-oxy tetrahedron aggregate states of CSH gels and contents of aluminum-oxy tetrahedron at the periods from 7 d to 28 d.%采用固体29Si核磁共振、FTIR、XRD测试方法研究了养护温度、温度变化对大掺量粉煤灰水泥基材料水化C-S-H凝胶硅氧四面体聚合程度的影响规律.结果表明:粉煤灰掺量为50%时,C-S-H凝胶硅氧四面体的聚合程度和C-S-H凝胶中铝氧四面体的比例随着养护温度的升高而呈现先增加后稳定的趋势.在7d至28 d龄期阶段,常温养护更加有利于C-S-H凝胶硅氧四面体聚合程度的增加,也更有利于Al原子取代Si原子.

  20. Rapid solidification of undercooled Al-Cu-Si eutectic alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Ying; WEI BingBo

    2009-01-01

    Under the conventional solidification condition,a liquid aluminium alloy can be hardly undercooled because of oxidation.In this work,rapid solidification of an undercooled liquid Al,80.4Cu,13.6Si,6 ternary eutectic alloy was realized by the glass fluxing method combined with recycled superheating.The re-lationship between superheating and undercooling was investigated at a certain cooling rate of the alloy melt.The maximum undercooling is 147 K (0.18 TE).The undercooled ternary eutectic is composed of α(Al) solid solution,(Si) semiconductor and β(CuAl,2) intermetallic compound.In the (Al+Si+θ) ternary eutectic,(Si) faceted phase grows independently,while (Al) and θ non-faceted phases grow coopera-tively in the lamellar mode.When undercooling is small,only (Al) solid solution forms as the leading phase.Once undercooling exceeds 73 K,(Si) phase nucleates firstly and grows as the primary phase.The alloy microstructure consists of primary (Al) dendrite,(Al+9) pseudobinary eutectic and (Al+Si+θ) ternary eutectic at small undercooling,while at large undercooling primary (Si) block,(Al+θ) pseudo-binary eutectic and (Al+Si+θ) ternary eutectic coexist.As undercooling increases,the volume fraction of primary (Al) dendrite decreases and that of primary (Si) block increases.

  1. Functionalization of graphene using deep eutectic solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayyan, Maan; Abo-Hamad, Ali; AlSaadi, Mohammed AbdulHakim; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-08-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have received attention in various applications because of their distinctive properties. In this work, DESs were used as functionalizing agents for graphene due to their potential to introduce new functional groups and cause other surface modifications. Eighteen different types of ammonium- and phosphonium-salt-based DESs were prepared and characterized by FTIR. The graphene was characterized by FTIR, STA, Raman spectroscopy, XRD, SEM, and TEM. Additional experiments were performed to study the dispersion behavior of the functionalized graphene in different solvents. The DESs exhibited both reduction and functionalization effects on DES-treated graphene. Dispersion stability was investigated and then characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and zeta potential. DES-modified graphene can be used in many applications, such as drug delivery, wastewater treatment, catalysts, composite materials, nanofluids, and biosensors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the use of DESs for graphene functionalization.

  2. Non-Covalent Derivatives: Cocrystals and Eutectics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Stoler

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-covalent derivatives (NCDs are formed by incorporating one (or more coformer molecule(s into the matrix of a parent molecule via non-covalent forces. These forces can include ionic forces, Van der Waals forces, hydrogen bonding, lipophilic-lipophilic interactions and pi-pi interactions. NCDs, in both cocrystal and eutectic forms, possess properties that are unique to their supramolecular matrix. These properties include critical product performance factors such as solubility, stability and bioavailability. NCDs have been used to tailor materials for a variety of applications and have the potential to be used in an even broader range of materials and processes. NCDs can be prepared using little or no solvent and none of the reagents typical to synthetic modifications. Thus, NCDs represent a powerfully versatile, environmentally-friendly and cost-effective opportunity.

  3. Hydration Assessment of Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Although there is no scientific consensus for 1 ) howbest to assess the hydration status of athletes, 2)what criteria to use as acceptable outcome measurements, or 3) the best time to apply practical assessment methods, there are methods that can be used toprovide athletes with useful feedback about their hydration status

  4. Deep eutectic solvents as novel extraction media for protein partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qun; Wang, Yuzhi; Huang, Yanhua; Ding, Xueqin; Chen, Jing; Xu, Kaijia

    2014-05-21

    Four kinds of green deep eutectic solvent (DES) were synthesized, including choline chloride (ChCl)-urea, tetramethylammonium chloride (TMACl)-urea, tetrapropylammonium bromide (TPMBr)-urea and ChCl-methylurea. An aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) based ChCl-urea DES was studied for the first time for the extraction of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Single factor experiments proved that the extraction efficiency of BSA was influenced by the mass of the DES, concentration of K2HPO4 solution, separation time and extraction temperature. The optimum conditions were determined through an orthogonal experiment with the four factors described above. The results showed that under the optimum conditions, the average extraction efficiency could reach up to 99.94%, 99.72%, 100.05% and 100.05% (each measured three times). The relative standard deviations (RSD) of extraction efficiencies in precision, repeatability and stability experiments were 0.5533% (n = 5), 0.8306% (n = 5) and 0.9829% (n = 5), respectively. UV-vis and FT-IR spectra confirmed that there were no chemical interactions between BSA and the DES in the extraction process, and the CD spectra proved that the conformation of BSA did not change after extraction. The conductivity, DLS and TEM were combined to investigate the microstructure of the top phase and the possible mechanism for the extraction. The results showed that hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bonding interactions and the salting-out effect played important roles in the transfer process, and the aggregation and surrounding phenomenon were the main driving forces for the separation. All of these results proved that ionic liquid (IL)-based ATPSs could potentially be substituted with DES-based ATPSs to offer new possibilities in the extraction of proteins.

  5. Improvement of Bearing Capacity in Recycled Aggregates Suitable for Use as Unbound Road Sub-Base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Garach

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates are specified as types of aggregates with lower densities, higher water absorption capacities, and lower mechanical strength than natural aggregates. In this paper, the mechanical behaviour and microstructural properties of natural aggregates, recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates were compared. Different specimens of unbound recycled mixtures demonstrated increased resistance properties. The formation of new cement hydrated particles was observed, and pozzolanic reactions were discovered by electronon microscopy in these novel materials. The properties of recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates suggest that these recycled materials can be used in unbound road layers to improve their mechanical behaviour in the long term.

  6. Compression effect and the structure of liquid eutectic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Prokhorenko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Experimentally investigated the temperature dependence of the density and thermoelectric power of the eutectic melt. Based on the results and structural modeling, to explain the effect of compression in the melt and the principles of complex alloying.

  7. The structure of solid salt eutectics - Why lamellar or conglomerate?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerridge, David H; Horsewell, Andy; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    Using KCl/ZnSO4 eutectic it has been shown that cooling the melt into a room temperature enclosure forms a lamellar structure, whereas cooling into a heated enclosure (225 °C) forms a conglomerate structure, while an enclosure temperature of 125 °C gave a partially conglomerate structure with som...... melting point eutectics, whereas eutectics of lower melting point form conglomerate structure.......Using KCl/ZnSO4 eutectic it has been shown that cooling the melt into a room temperature enclosure forms a lamellar structure, whereas cooling into a heated enclosure (225 °C) forms a conglomerate structure, while an enclosure temperature of 125 °C gave a partially conglomerate structure with some...

  8. Deep eutectic-solvothermal synthesis of nanostructured ceria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oliver S Hammond; Karen J Edler; Daniel T Bowron; Laura Torrente-murciano

    2017-01-01

    .... Here we report the synthesis of nanostructured ceria using the green Deep Eutectic Solvent reline, which allows morphology and porosity control in one of the less energy-intensive routes reported to date...

  9. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  10. Characterization of CoQ 10-lauric acid eutectic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarate, Bapurao; Bansal, Arvind K., E-mail: akbansal@niper.ac.in

    2015-04-10

    Highlights: • Two polymorphic forms of CoQ 10. • CoQ 10 forms eutectic mixture with LA. • Experimental and predicted values of eutectic points are 70% CoQ 10 at 37.93 °C and 87.7% CoQ 10 at 38.98 °C, respectively. • Attraction exists between CoQ 10 and LA molecules. - Abstract: Solid state characterization of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ 10) was carried out using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), variable temperature X-ray diffractometry (VT-XRD) and hot/cold stage microscopy (H/CSM). It revealed that CoQ 10 exists in two polymorphic forms. The recrystallized samples of CoQ 10 melted at different temperatures either due to the wide crystal size variation or change in crystallinity. Further, the binary mixture of CoQ 10 and lauric acid (LA) formed eutectic mixture in the ratio 70:30 melting at 37.93 °C, which was close to the predicted eutectic composition of 87.7:12.3 melting at 38.98 °C. The values of actual liquidus temperatures for CoQ 10 are higher than the predicted liquidus temperatures. The experimental heat of fusion at eutectic point was less than the calculated heat of fusion. Activity coefficient of CoQ 10 in the binary mixture was less than unity, which indicates the attraction between the components of eutectic mixture.

  11. Lamellar coupled growth in the neopentylglycol-(D)camphor eutectic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witusiewicz, V. T.; Sturz, L.; Hecht, U.; Rex, S.

    2014-01-01

    Lamellar eutectic growth was investigated in the transparent organic alloy neopentylglycol-(D)camphor of eutectic composition (NPG-45.3 wt% DC) using bulk (3D) and thin (2D) samples. Two types of eutectic grains were observed in the polycrystalline samples, either with lamellae well aligned to the direction of solidification or inclined at an angle of 21.5±1.5°. The well aligned grains were used for determining lamellar spacing as function of growth velocity V and temperature gradient G. Based on these data the Jackson-Hunt constant was evaluated to be KJH=1.60±0.15 μm3 s-1. For low growth velocity experiments the contact angles for (DC) and (NPG) lamellae at eutectic triple junctions were also evaluated, being θ(DC)=50.9±4.1° and θ(NPG)=41.8±4.7°, respectively. Using these values, as well as phase diagram data and the Gibbs-Thomson coefficients, the chemical coefficient of diffusion of (D)camphor in the eutectic liquid at eutectic temperature 53 °C was estimated to be DL=97±15 μm2 s-1.

  12. Competitive growth of different phases in eutectic alloys under directional solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Shuangming; MA; Bole; LI; Xiaoli; LIU; Lin; FU; Hengzhi

    2005-01-01

    By comparisons of interface growth temperatures of different phases in eutectic systems, competitive growth between the primary phase, halo structure and coupled eutectic has been discussed. The compositions for the formation of coupled eutectic have been discussed at the coexisting with the primary phase in eutectic under directional solidification. Solidification conditions, such as growth rate and composition required for the formation of the primary phase, halo structure and coupled eutectic have been proposed. Numerical calculation results show that no halo structure formed in directionally solidified Sn-Pb eutectic, but in Al-Si eutectic, competitive growth structures of the primaryβ-Si phase,α-Al halo structure and coupled eutectic (α+β) may exist at the hypereutectic composition between 12.6% and 25% Si. The calculated results of Al-Si eutectic fit in with the reported experiment results.

  13. Rheological properties of hydrate suspensions in asphaltenic crude oils; Proprietes rheologiques de suspensions d'hydrate dans des bruts asphalteniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques de Toledo Camargo, R.

    2001-03-01

    The development of offshore oil exploitation under increasing water depths has forced oil companies to increase their understanding of gas hydrate formation and transportation in multiphase flow lines in which a liquid hydrocarbon phase is present. This work deals with the flow behaviour of hydrate suspensions in which a liquid hydrocarbon is the continuous phase. Three different liquid hydrocarbons are used: an asphaltenic crude oil, a condensate completely free of asphaltenes and a mixture between the asphaltenic oil and heptane. The rheological characterisation of hydrate suspensions is the main tool employed. Two original experimental devices are used: a PVT cell adapted to operate as a Couette type rheometer and a semi-industrial flow loop. Hydrate suspensions using the asphaltenic oil showed shear-thinning behaviour and thixotropy. This behaviour is typically found in flocculated systems, in which the particles attract each other forming flocs of aggregated particles at low shear rates. The suspensions using the condensate showed Newtonian behaviour. Their relative viscosities were high, which suggests that an aggregation process between hydrate particles takes. place during hydrate formation. Finally, hydrate suspensions using the mixture asphaltenic oil-heptane showed shear-thinning behaviour, thixotropy and high relative viscosity. From these results it can be inferred that, after the achievement of the hydrate formation process, the attractive forces between hydrate particles are weak. making unlikely pipeline obstruction by an aggregation process. Nevertheless, during the hydrate formation, these attractive forces can be sufficiently high. It seems that the hydrate surface wettability is an important parameter in this phenomena. (author)

  14. Traveling waves, two-phase fingers, and eutectic colonies in thin-sample directional solidification of a ternary eutectic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu; Faivre

    2000-04-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the morphological transition of lamellar eutectic growth fronts called "formation of eutectic colonies" by the method of thin-sample directional solidification of a transparent model alloy, CBr4-C2Cl6. This morphological transition is due to the presence in the melt of traces of chemical components other than those of the base binary alloy (impurities). In this study, we use naphthalene as an impurity. The formation of eutectic colonies has generally been viewed as an impurity-driven Mullins-Sekerka instability of the envelope of the lamellar front. This traditional view neglects the strong interaction existing between the Mullins-Sekerka process and the dynamics of the lamellar pattern. This investigation brings to light several original features of the formation of eutectic colonies, in particular, the emission of long-wavelength traveling waves, and the appearance of dendritelike structures called two-phase fingers, which are connected with this interaction. We study the part played by these phenomena in the transition to eutectic colonies as a function of the impurity concentration. Recent theoretical results on the linear stability of ternary lamellar eutectic fronts [Plapp and Karma, Phys. Rev. E 60, 6865 (1999)] shed light on some aspects of the observed phenomena.

  15. Modelling Eutectic Growth in Unmodified and Modified Near-Eutectic Al-Si Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiedje, Niels Skat; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Taylor, John A.

    2013-01-01

    growth parameters from the literature that depend on the type of modification (unmodified, Na-modified or Sr-modified) are used to describe differences in growth of the alloys. Modelling results are compared with solidification experiments where an Al-12.5wt%Si alloy was cast in unmodified, Na modified...... and Sr modified forms. The model confirms experimental observations of how modification and alloy composition influence nucleation, growth and finally the size of eutectic cells in the alloys. Modelling results are used to explain how cooling conditions in the casting act together with the nuclei density...

  16. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  17. Wet hydrate dissolution plant

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Mirjana S.; Kovačević Branimir T.; Pezo Lato L.

    2003-01-01

    The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant with capacity of 50,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE), Italy, in 1997, for increasing detergent zeolite production from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate ...

  18. Wetting of nonconserved residue-backbones: A feature indicative of aggregation associated regions of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Mohan R; Pal, Arumay; Hu, Zhongqiao; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Chee Keong, Kwoh; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S

    2016-02-01

    Aggregation is an irreversible form of protein complexation and often toxic to cells. The process entails partial or major unfolding that is largely driven by hydration. We model the role of hydration in aggregation using "Dehydrons." "Dehydrons" are unsatisfied backbone hydrogen bonds in proteins that seek shielding from water molecules by associating with ligands or proteins. We find that the residues at aggregation interfaces have hydrated backbones, and in contrast to other forms of protein-protein interactions, are under less evolutionary pressure to be conserved. Combining evolutionary conservation of residues and extent of backbone hydration allows us to distinguish regions on proteins associated with aggregation (non-conserved dehydron-residues) from other interaction interfaces (conserved dehydron-residues). This novel feature can complement the existing strategies used to investigate protein aggregation/complexation.

  19. A green deep eutectic solvent-based aqueous two-phase system for protein extracting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Kaijia; Wang, Yuzhi, E-mail: wyzss@hnu.edu.cn; Huang, Yanhua; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • A strategy for the protein purification with a deep eutectic solvent(DES)-based aqueous two-phase system. • Choline chloride-glycerin DES was selected as the extraction solvent. • Bovine serum albumin and trypsin were used as the analytes. • Aggregation phenomenon was detected in the mechanism research. - Abstract: As a new type of green solvent, deep eutectic solvent (DES) has been applied for the extraction of proteins with an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) in this work. Four kinds of choline chloride (ChCl)-based DESs were synthesized to extract bovine serum albumin (BSA), and ChCl-glycerol was selected as the suitable extraction solvent. Single factor experiments have been done to investigate the effects of the extraction process, including the amount of DES, the concentration of salt, the mass of protein, the shaking time, the temperature and PH value. Experimental results show 98.16% of the BSA could be extracted into the DES-rich phase in a single-step extraction under the optimized conditions. A high extraction efficiency of 94.36% was achieved, while the conditions were applied to the extraction of trypsin (Try). Precision, repeatability and stability experiments were studied and the relative standard deviations (RSD) of the extraction efficiency were 0.4246% (n = 3), 1.6057% (n = 3) and 1.6132% (n = 3), respectively. Conformation of BSA was not changed during the extraction process according to the investigation of UV–vis spectra, FT-IR spectra and CD spectra of BSA. The conductivity, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to explore the mechanism of the extraction. It turned out that the formation of DES–protein aggregates play a significant role in the separation process. All the results suggest that ChCl-based DES-ATPS are supposed to have the potential to provide new possibilities in the separation of proteins.

  20. Excited-state dynamics of astaxanthin aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuciman, Marcel; Durchan, Milan; Šlouf, Václav; Keşan, Gürkan; Polívka, Tomáš

    2013-05-01

    Astaxanthin forms three types of aggregates in hydrated dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). In DMSO/water ratio of 1:1, a red-shifted J-aggregate with maximum at 570 nm is generated, while a ratio of 1:9 produces blue-shifted H-aggregates with peaks at 386 nm (H1) and 460 nm (H2). Monomeric astaxanthin in DMSO has an S1 lifetime of 5.3 ps, but a long-lived (33 ps) S∗ signal was also identified. Aggregation changes the S1 lifetimes to 17 ps (H1), 30 ps (H2), and 14 ps (J). Triplet state of astaxanthin, most likely generated via singlet homofission, was observed in H1 and H2 aggregates.

  1. Micro/macro solidification modeling of columnar eutectic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Ward Michael

    2000-11-01

    A general multidimensional model of alloy solidification is presented in which a velocity-dependent freezing temperature is coupled with the macroscale energy equation. The velocity dependence of the freezing temperature ( Tf˜v ) results from the microscale species diffusion for microstructures with coupled eutectic growth. At solidification rates ( ˜ 1--10 mm/s) that are representative of gravity permanent mold and die casting processes, consideration of the nonequilibrium conditions at the interface affects the prediction of the macroscale thermal field. Near-eutectic alloys freeze with a macroscopically discrete solid-liquid interface at a temperature below the equilibrium eutectic temperature. The model is illustrated with unidirectional solidification of a near-eutectic alloy in a finite domain and solved numerically with a fixed-grid Galerkin finite element method. The numerical algorithm includes inexpensive steps to compute the interface speed explicitly. By nondimensionalizing the governing equations the effect of coupled eutectic growth on heat transport is clearly identified so that the model's sensitivity to important parameters can be investigated. Additionally, the average eutectic spacing can be determined with the temperature field, rather than post-determination from a standard, uncoupled solution of the energy equation. The eutectic coupling results indicate that the predicted solid-liquid interface location lags behind the uncoupled solution; therefore, decreasing the amount of solid formed, increasing the total solidification time, and increasing the average eutectic spacing. A procedure is also illustrated for computing mechanical properties using experimental correlations and the computed interface velocity history. The effect of the eutectic undercooling is then studied in a square domain and a realistic three-dimensional production casting geometry. In order to address the multidimensional cases, a phase-field formulation is developed

  2. Application of deep eutectic solvents in the extraction and separation of target compounds from various samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Baokun; Zhang, Heng; Row, Kyung Ho

    2015-03-01

    Deep eutectic solvents, as a new type of eco-friendly solvent, have attracted increasing attention in chemistry for the extraction and separation of target compounds from various samples. To summarize the application of deep eutectic solvents, this review highlights some of the unique properties of deep eutectic solvents and deep-eutectic-solvent-based materials, as well as their applications in extraction and separation. In this paper, the available data and references in this field are reviewed to summarize the application developments of deep eutectic solvents. Based on the development of deep eutectic solvents, the exploitation of new deep eutectic solvents and deep-eutectic-solvent-based materials are expected to diversify into extraction and separation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Localized removal of the Au-Si eutectic bonding layer for the selective release of microstructures

    OpenAIRE

    Gradin, Henrik; Braun, Stefan; Stemme, Göran; van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents and investigates a novel technique for the footprint and thickness-independent selective release of Au–Si eutectically bonded microstructures through the localized removal of their eutectic bond interface. The technique is based on the electrochemical removal of the gold in the eutectic layer and the selectivity is provided by patterning the eutectic layer and by proper electrical connection or isolation of the areas to be etched or removed, respectively. The gold removal ...

  4. Modified Mechanism of Eutectic Silicon in Al2O3/Al-Si Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Al2O3/Al-Si alloy composite was manufactured by squeeze casting. The morphology of the eutectic silicon in the composite was observed by scanning electronic microscope (SEM), and the modified mechanism of eutectic silicon in the composite was approached. The alumina fiber in the composite can trigger twin during the growth of Al-Si eutectic and lead to the modification of eutectic silicon near the fiber.

  5. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  6. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Pusztai, Tamás [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Mohri, Tetsuo [Center for Computational Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Gránásy, László, E-mail: granasy.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-21

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendrites → dendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations.

  7. Transformation of eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension fabricating with solvent evaporation and ultrasonication technique

    OpenAIRE

    Phaechamud T; Tuntarawongsa S

    2016-01-01

    Thawatchai Phaechamud,1 Sarun Tuntarawongsa2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, 2Pharmaceutical Intelligence Unit Prachote Plengwittaya, Faculty of Pharmacy, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand Abstract: Eutectic solvent can solubilize high amount of some therapeutic compounds. Volatile eutectic solvent is interesting to be used as solvent in the preparation of nanosuspension with emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The mechanism of transformation from the eutectic emul...

  8. Refinement of Eutectic Silicon Phase of Aluminum A356 Alloy Using High-Intensity Ultrasonic Vibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian, Xiaogang [ORNL; Han, Qingyou [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    The eutectic silicon in A356 alloy can be refined and modified using either chemical, quench, or superheating modification. We observed, for the first time, that the eutectic silicon can also be significantly refined using high-intensity ultrasonic vibration. Rosette-like eutectic silicon is formed during solidification of specimen treated with high-intensity ultrasonic vibration.

  9. Eutectic Salt Catalyzed Environmentally Benign and Highly Efficient Biginelli Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmadin Azizi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple deep eutectic solvent based on tin (II chloride was used as a dual catalyst and environmentally benign reaction medium for an efficient synthesis of 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H-one derivatives, from aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes, 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds, and urea in good-to-excellent yields and short reaction time. This simple ammonium deep eutectic solvent, easily synthesized from choline chloride and tin chloride, is relatively inexpensive and recyclable, making it applicable for industrial applications.

  10. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  11. Construction aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  12. [Hydration in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maristany, Cleofé Pérez-Portabella; Segurola Gurruchaga, Hegoi

    2011-01-01

    Water is an essential foundation for life, having both a regulatory and structural function. The former results from active and passive participation in all metabolic reactions, and its role in conserving and maintaining body temperature. Structurally speaking it is the major contributer to tissue mass, accounting for 60% of the basis of blood plasma, intracellular and intersticial fluid. Water is also part of the primary structures of life such as genetic material or proteins. Therefore, it is necessary that the nurse makes an early assessment of patients water needs to detect if there are signs of electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration can be a very serious problem, especially in children and the elderly. Dehydrations treatment with oral rehydration solution decreases the risk of developing hydration disorders, but even so, it is recommended to follow preventive measures to reduce the incidence and severity of dehydration. The key to having a proper hydration is prevention. Artificial nutrition encompasses the need for precise calculation of water needs in enteral nutrition as parenteral, so the nurse should be part of this process and use the tools for calculating the patient's requirements. All this helps to ensure an optimal nutritional status in patients at risk. Ethical dilemmas are becoming increasingly common in clinical practice. On the subject of artificial nutrition and hydration, there isn't yet any unanimous agreement regarding hydration as a basic care. It is necessary to take decisions in consensus with the health team, always thinking of the best interests of the patient.

  13. Polymerisation of activated RNA in eutectic ice phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dörr, Mark; Maurer, Sarah Elisabeth; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    (“cooperative sequences”) or degrading (“parasitic sequences”) the RNA population. These eutectic phases in water-ice are plausible prebiotic micro-environments that should help to overcome the dilution problem in origin of life scenarios. They might have supported the production of libraries...

  14. Microstructural evolution of eutectic Au-Sn solder joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Geon

    2002-05-31

    Current trends toward miniaturization and the use of lead(Pb)-free solder in electronic packaging present new problems in the reliability of solder joints. This study was performed in order to understand the microstructure and microstructural evolution of small volumes of nominally eutectic Au-Sn solder joints (80Au-20Sn by weight), which gives insight into properties and reliability.

  15. Microstructural evolution of eutectic Au-Sn solder joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Geon [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-05-01

    Current trends toward miniaturization and the use of lead(Pb)-free solder in electronic packaging present new problems in the reliability of solder joints. This study was performed in order to understand the microstructure and microstructural evolution of small volumes of nominally eutectic Au-Sn solder joints (80Au-20Sn by weight), which gives insight into properties and reliability.

  16. Effect of titanium on the near eutectic grey iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    The effect of Titanium on the microstructure of grey iron was investigated experimentally in this work. Tensile test bars of grey cast iron of near eutectic alloys containing 0.01, 0.1, 0.26 and 0.35% Ti, respectively were made in green sand moulds. Chemical analysis, metallographic investigation...

  17. SHAPE CHARACTERIZATION OF CONCRETE AGGREGATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Hu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available As a composite material, the performance of concrete materials can be expected to depend on the properties of the interfaces between its two major components, aggregate and cement paste. The microstructure at the interfacial transition zone (ITZ is assumed to be different from the bulk material. In general, properties of conventional concrete have been found favoured by optimum packing density of the aggregate. Particle size is a common denominator in such studies. Size segregation in the ITZ among the binder particles in the fresh state, observed in simulation studies by concurrent algorithm-based SPACE system, additionally governs density as well as physical bonding capacity inside these shell-like zones around aggregate particles. These characteristics have been demonstrated qualitatively pertaining also after maturation of the concrete. Such properties of the ITZs have direct impact on composite properties. Despite experimental approaches revealed effects of aggregate grain shape on different features of material structure (among which density, and as a consequence on mechanical properties, it is still an underrated factor in laboratory studies, probably due to the general feeling that a suitable methodology for shape characterization is not available. A scientific argument hindering progress is the interconnected nature of size and shape. Presently, a practical problem preventing shape effects to be emphasized is the limitation of most computer simulation systems in concrete technology to spherical particles. New developments at Delft University of Technology will make it possible in the near future to generate jammed states, or other high-density fresh particle mixtures of non-spherical particles, which thereupon can be subjected to hydration algorithms. This paper will sketch the outlines of a methodological approach for shape assessment of loose (non-embedded aggregate grains, and demonstrate its use for two types of aggregate, allowing

  18. Supported Silver Nanoparticle and Near-Interface Solution Dynamics in a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammons, Joshua A.; Ustarroz, Jon; Muselle, Thibault; Torriero, Angel A. J.; Terryn, Herman; Suthar, Kamlesh; Ilavsky, Jan

    2016-01-28

    Type III deep eutectic solvents (DES) have attracted significant interest as both environmentally friendly and functional solvents that are, in some ways, advantageous to traditional aqueous systems. While these solvents continue to produce remarkable thin films and nanoparticle assemblies, their interactions with metallic surfaces are complex and difficult to manipulate. In this study, the near-surface region (2–600 nm) of a carbon surface is investigated immediately following silver nanoparticle nucleation and growth. This is accomplished, in situ, using a novel grazing transmission small-angle X-ray scattering approach with simultaneous voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. With this physical and electrochemical approach, the time evolution of three distinct surface interaction phenomena is observed: aggregation and coalescence of Ag nanoparticles, multilayer perturbations induced by nonaggregated Ag nanoparticles, and a stepwise transport of dissolved Ag species from the carbon surface. The multilayer perturbations contain charge-separated regions of positively charged choline-ethylene and negatively charged Ag and Cl species. Both aggregation-coalescence and the stepwise decrease in Ag precursor near the surface are observed to be very slow (~2 h) processes, as both ion and particle transport are significantly impeded in a DES as compared to aqueous electrolytes. Finally, altogether, this study shows how the unique chemistry of the DES changes near the surface and in the presence of nanoparticles that adsorb the constituent species.

  19. Modeling of aluminum-silicon irregular eutectic growth by cellular automaton model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the extensive application of Al-Si alloys in the automotive and aerospace industries as structural components, an understanding of their microstructural formation, such as dendrite and (Al+Si eutectic, is of great importance to control the desirable microstructure, so as to modify the performance of castings. Since previous major themes of microstructural simulation are dendrite and regular eutectic growth, few efforts have been paid to simulate the irregular eutectic growth. Therefore, a multiphase cellular automaton (CA model is developed and applied to simulate the time-dependent Al-Si irregular eutectic growth. Prior to model establishment, related experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of cooling rate and Sr modification on the growth of eutectic Si. This CA model incorporates several aspects, including growth algorithms and nucleation criterion, to achieve the competitive and cooperative growth mechanism for nonfaceted-faceted Al-Si irregular eutectic. The growth kinetics considers thermal undercooling, constitutional undercooling, and curvature undercooling, as well as the anisotropic characteristic of eutectic Si growth. The capturing rule takes into account the effects of modification on the silicon growth behaviors. The simulated results indicate that for unmodified alloy, the higher eutectic undercooling results in the higher eutectic growth velocity, and a more refined eutectic microstructure as well as narrower eutectic lamellar spacing. For modified alloy, the eutectic silicon tends to be obvious fibrous morphology and the morphology of eutectic Si is determined by both chemical modifier and cooling rate. The predicted microstructure of Al-7Si alloy under different solidification conditions shows that this proposed model can successfully reproduce both dendrite and eutectic microstructures.

  20. Modeling of aluminum-silicon irregular eutectic growth by cellular automaton model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Chen; Qing-yan Xu; Bai-cheng Liu

    2016-01-01

    Due to the extensive application of Al-Si aloys in the automotive and aerospace industries as structural components, an understanding of their microstructural formation, such as dendrite and (Al+Si) eutectic, is of great importance to control the desirable microstructure, so as to modify the performance of castings. Since previous major themes of microstructural simulation are dendrite and regular eutectic growth, few efforts have been paid to simulate the irregular eutectic growth. Therefore, a multiphase celular automaton (CA) model is developed and applied to simulate the time-dependent Al-Si irregular eutectic growth. Prior to model establishment, related experiments were carried out to investigate the inlfuence of cooling rate and Sr modiifcation on the growth of eutectic Si. This CA model incorporates several aspects, including growth algorithms and nucleation criterion, to achieve the competitive and cooperative growth mechanism for nonfaceted-faceted Al-Si irregular eutectic. The growth kinetics considers thermal undercooling, constitutional undercooling, and curvature undercooling, as wel as the anisotropic characteristic of eutectic Si growth. The capturing rule takes into account the effects of modiifcation on the silicon growth behaviors. The simulated results indicate that for unmodiifed aloy, the higher eutectic undercooling results in the higher eutectic growth velocity, and a more reifned eutectic microstructure as wel as narrower eutectic lamelar spacing. For modiifed aloy, the eutectic silicon tends to be obvious ifbrous morphology and the morphology of eutectic Si is determined by both chemical modiifer and cooling rate. The predicted microstructure of Al-7Si aloy under different solidiifcation conditions shows that this proposed model can successfuly reproduce both dendrite and eutectic microstructures.

  1. Adhesion force interactions between cyclopentane hydrate and physically and chemically modified surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2014-12-07

    Interfacial interactions between liquid-solid and solid-solid phases/surfaces are of fundamental importance to the formation of hydrate deposits in oil and gas pipelines. This work establishes the effect of five categories of physical and chemical modification to steel on clathrate hydrate adhesive force: oleamide, graphite, citric acid ester, nonanedithiol, and Rain-X anti-wetting agent. Hydrate adhesive forces were measured using a micromechanical force apparatus, under both dry and water-wet surface conditions. The results show that the graphite coating reduced hydrate-steel adhesion force by 79%, due to an increase in the water wetting angle from 42 ± 8° to 154 ± 7°. Two chemical surface coatings (nonanedithiol and the citric acid ester) induced rapid hydrate growth in the hydrate particles; nonanedithiol increased hydrate adhesive force by 49% from the baseline, while the citric acid ester coating reduced hydrate adhesion force by 98%. This result suggests that crystal growth may enable a strong adhesive pathway between hydrate and other crystalline structures, however this effect may be negated in cases where water-hydrocarbon interfacial tension is minimised. When a liquid water droplet was placed on the modified steel surfaces, the graphite and citric acid ester became less effective at reducing adhesive force. In pipelines containing a free water phase wetting the steel surface, chemical or physical surface modifications alone may be insufficient to eliminate hydrate deposition risk. In further tests, the citric acid ester reduced hydrate cohesive forces by 50%, suggesting mild activity as a hybrid anti-agglomerant suppressing both hydrate deposition and particle agglomeration. These results demonstrate a new capability to develop polyfunctional surfactants, which simultaneously limit the capability for hydrate particles to aggregate and deposit on the pipeline wall.

  2. Modeling Hydrates and the Gas Hydrate Markup Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Wang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates, as an important potential fuels, flow assurance hazards, and possible factors initiating the submarine geo-hazard and global climate change, have attracted the interest of scientists all over the world. After two centuries of hydrate research, a great amount of scientific data on gas hydrates has been accumulated. Therefore the means to manage, share, and exchange these data have become an urgent task. At present, metadata (Markup Language is recognized as one of the most efficient ways to facilitate data management, storage, integration, exchange, discovery and retrieval. Therefore the CODATA Gas Hydrate Data Task Group proposed and specified Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML as an extensible conceptual metadata model to characterize the features of data on gas hydrate. This article introduces the details of modeling portion of GHML.

  3. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  4. A study on gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byoung Jae; Jung, Tae Jin; Sunwoo, Don [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Sufficient documents were reviewed to understand solid components of water and gaseous hydrocarbon known as gas hydrates, which represent an important potential energy resource of the future. The review provides us with valuable information on crystal structures, kinetics, origin and distribution of gas hydrates. In addition, the review increased our knowledge of exploration and development methods of gas hydrates. Large amounts of methane, the principal component of natural gas, in the form of solid gas hydrate are found mainly offshore in outer continental margin sediment and, to a lesser extent, in polar regions commonly associated with permafrost. Natural gas hydrates are stable in some environments where the hydrostatic pressure exerted by overlying water column is sufficient for hydrate formation and stability. The required high pressures generally restrict gas hydrate to sediments beneath water of approximately 400 m. Higher sediment temperatures at greater subbottom depths destabilize gas hydrates. Based on the pressure- temperature condition, the outer continental margin of East Sea where water depth is deep enough to form gas hydrate is considered to have high potential of gas hydrate accumulations. (author). 56 refs., tabs., figs.

  5. Rapid eutectic growth in undercooled Al-Ge alloy under free fall condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘向荣; 曹崇德; 魏炳波

    2003-01-01

    Eutectic growth in Al-51.6%wt Ge alloy has been investigated during free fall in a drop tube. With decreasing undercooling △T, the microstructural evolution has shown a transition from lamellar eutectic to anomalous eutectic.A maximum cooling rate of 4.2×104K/s and undercooling of up to 240K (0.35TE) are obtained in the experiment.The eutectic coupled zone is calculated on the basis of current eutectic and dendritic growth theories, which covers a composition range from 48%-59% Ge and leans towards the Ge-rich side. The two critical undercoolings for the eutectic transition are △T1*=101K and △T2*=178K. When △T ≤△T1*, the microstructure for Al-51.6% Ge eutectic shows lamellar eutectic. If △T ≥△T2*, the microstructure shows anomalous eutectic. In the intermediate range of △T1* <△T <△T2*, the microstructure is the mixture of the above two types of eutectics.

  6. Drilling Gas Hydrates on hydrate Ridge, Oregon continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A. M.; Bohrmann, G.; Leg 204 Science Party

    2002-12-01

    During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which gas hydrate is forming. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: 1) that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally

  7. Relationships between different hydration properties of commercial and laboratory soybean isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Añón, M C; Sorgentini, D A; Wagner, J R

    2001-10-01

    Functional properties related to water protein interactions of soy protein isolates depend on the structural and aggregation characteristics of their major components (storage globulins 7S and 11S) that could be modified by the preparation procedure, thermal and/or chemical treatments, and drying methods. Commercial and laboratory isolates with different functionalities resulting from their structural modifications were compared. Isolates with high solubility or excessive thermally induced insolubilization or compact calcium-induced aggregates caused low water-imbibing capacity (WIC) values. The highest WIC results from the balance between intermediate solubility and the formation of aggregates with good hydration properties. The apparent viscosity of dispersions of commercial (spray dried) and laboratory (lyophilized) isolates depends on the WIC, the morphology and size of the particles, and the interaction of the hydrated particles. The hydration properties and viscosity of protein isolate suspensions were strongly determined by the amount and properties of the insoluble fraction.

  8. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  9. Hydration Repulsion between Carbohydrate Surfaces Mediated by Temperature and Specific Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsieh; Cox, Jason R.; Ow, Hooisweng; Shi, Rena; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-06-01

    Stabilizing colloids or nanoparticles in solution involves a fine balance between surface charges, steric repulsion of coating molecules, and hydration forces against van der Waals attractions. At high temperature and electrolyte concentrations, the colloidal stability of suspensions usually decreases rapidly. Here, we report a new experimental and simulation discovery that the polysaccharide (dextran) coated nanoparticles show ion-specific colloidal stability at high temperature, where we observed enhanced colloidal stability of nanoparticles in CaCl2 solution but rapid nanoparticle-nanoparticle aggregation in MgCl2 solution. The microscopic mechanism was unveiled in atomistic simulations. The presence of surface bound Ca2+ ions increases the carbohydrate hydration and induces strongly polarized repulsive water structures beyond at least three hydration shells which is farther-reaching than previously assumed. We believe leveraging the binding of strongly hydrated ions to macromolecular surfaces represents a new paradigm in achieving absolute hydration and colloidal stability for a variety of materials, particularly under extreme conditions.

  10. Superhydrophobic optically transparent silica films formed with a eutectic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiu Yonghao [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332-0100 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); Xiao Fei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 China (China); Hess, Dennis W. [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332-0100 (United States)], E-mail: dennis.hess@chbe.gatech.edu; Wong, C.P. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States)], E-mail: cp.wong@mse.gatech.edu

    2009-01-01

    A eutectic liquid (choline chloride and urea) that served as a templating agent in sol-gel processing was used to prepare thin silica films on glass microscope slides. Subsequent extraction of the eutectic liquid yielded a film with a rough surface. After treating the film surface with a fluoroalkyl silane, the surface became superhydrophobic with a contact angle {approx} 170 deg. and a contact angle hysteresis < 10 deg. The optical transmittance of the film coated on the glass slide was comparable to that of the microscope glass slide. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface structures; a tipless probe allowed measurement of the force of interaction with superhydrophobic surfaces. The interaction force between the AFM probe and the superhydrophobic surface was reduced greatly compared to that between the probe and the flat surface treated with fluoroalkyl silane.

  11. Effect of Sb Addition on the Solidification of Deeply Undercooled Ag-28.1 wt. % Cu Eutectic Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Zhao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ag-28.1 wt. % Cu eutectic alloy solidifies in the form of eutectic dendrite at undercooling above 76 K. The remelting and ripening of the original lamellar eutectics result in the formation of the anomalous eutectics in the final microstructure. The addition of the third element Sb (0.5 and 1 wt. % does not change the growth mode, but enlarges the volume fraction of anomalous eutectics because of the increasing recalescence rate. The additional constitutional supercooling owing to the Sb enrichment ahead of the eutectic interface promotes the branching of the interface and as a result fine lamellar eutectic arms form around the anomalous eutectics in the Sb-added Ag-28.1 wt. % Cu eutectic alloy.

  12. Eutectic-Free Superalloy Made By Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Deborah Dianne

    1995-01-01

    By suitable control of thermal conditions in directional-solidification process, supperalloy structural and machine components (e.g., turbine blades) cast with microstructures enhancing resistance to fatigue. Specific version of process and thermal conditions chosen to reduce micro-segregation during solidification and to minimize or eliminate script carbide and eutectic-phase inclusions, which are brittle inclusions found to decrease resistance to fatigue.

  13. Shape rheocasting of unmodified Al-Si binary eutectic

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Curle, UA

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available contribution to fundamental questions about the subject [25]. Experiments with Sr-modified Al-Si binary eutectic are planned. Acknowledgements We would like to acknowledge: DST (Department of Science and Technology) for funding under the AMI (Advanced... Metals Initiative) Program; Dr. Sagren Govender for support as the Advanced Casting Technologies research group leader; Marius Grobler and Sigqibo Camagu with assistance. References [1] Li YD, Apelian D, Xing B, Ma Y, Hao Y. Trans Nonferrous Met Soc...

  14. Inelastic neutron scattering study of reline: shedding light on the hydrogen bonding network of deep eutectic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, C F; Coutinho, J A P; Nolasco, M M; Parker, S F; Ribeiro-Claro, P J A; Rudić, S; Soares, B I G; Vaz, P D

    2017-07-21

    The solids choline chloride and urea, mixed in a 1 : 2 molar proportion, form the iconic deep eutectic solvent "Reline". A combination of computational and vibrational spectroscopy tools, including inelastic neutron scattering (INS), have been used to probe intermolecular interactions in the eutectic mixture. Reline's experimental spectra were estimated using discrete and periodic ab initio calculations of a molecular aggregate with two choline chloride and four urea units. This is the minimum size required to achieve satisfactory agreement with experiment, as smaller clusters cannot represent all of reline's significant intermolecular interactions. The INS spectrum of reline, compared with that of pure choline chloride, reveals a displacement of chloride anions away from their preferred positions on top of choline's methyl groups, whose torsional movement becomes less hindered in the mixture. Urea, which adopts a planar (sp(2)) shape in the crystal, becomes non-planar (sp(3)) in reline, a feature herein discussed for the first time. In reline, urea molecules form a wide range of hydrogen bonds, from soft contacts to stronger associations, the latter being responsible for the deviation from ideality. The chloride's interactions with choline are largely conserved at the hydroxyl end while becoming weaker at the cationic headgroup. The interplay of soft and strong interactions confers flexibility to the newly formed hydrogen-bond network and allows the ensemble to remain liquid at room temperature.

  15. Development of green betaine-based deep eutectic solvent aqueous two-phase system for the extraction of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Wang, Yuzhi; Xu, Kaijia; Huang, Yanhua; Wen, Qian; Ding, Xueqin

    2016-05-15

    Six kinds of new type of green betaine-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been synthesized. Deep eutectic solvent aqueous two-phase systems (DES-ATPS) were established and successfully applied in the extraction of protein. Betaine-urea (Be-U) was selected as the suitable extractant. Single factor experiments were carried out to determine the optimum conditions of the extraction process, such as the salt concentration, the mass of DES, the separation time, the amount of protein, the temperature and the pH value. The extraction efficiency could achieve to 99.82% under the optimum conditions. Mixed sample and practical sample analysis were discussed. The back extraction experiment was implemented and the back extraction efficiency could reach to 32.66%. The precision experiment, repeatability experiment and stability experiment were investigated. UV-vis, FT-IR and circular dichroism (CD) spectra confirmed that the conformation of protein was not changed during the process of extraction. The mechanisms of extraction were researched by dynamic light scattering (DLS), the measurement of the conductivity and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). DES-protein aggregates and embraces phenomenon play considerable roles in the separation process. All of these results indicated that betaine-based DES-ATPS may provide a potential substitute new method for the separation of proteins.

  16. Microstructure and Eutectic Transformation of Squeeze Casting Alumina/Zinc Alloy Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Alumina fiber-reinforced zinc alloy composites were manufactured by squeeze casting, and the eutectic transformation in thezinc alloy composites was studied. The results indicate that there is a fine and close interface between the fiber and the matrix,and the alloy elements can improve the combination between the fibers and the matrix in the composites. The fibers can serveas the sites of heterogeneous nucleation of the eutectic in the zinc alloy during the solidification of the composites, and thesilicon on the interface between the fibers and the matrix plays a leading role during the coupled growth of the eutectic so thatthe eutectic transformation of the composites consists of Al-Si eutectic transformation and Zn-Al eutectic transformation.

  17. Modelling of Transport Phenomena at Cement Matrix—Aggregate Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Breugel, Klaas; Koenders, Eddie; Ye, Guang

    2004-01-01

    The performance of a heterogeneous material like concrete is largely determined by the many interfaces in this material. This contribution focuses on the potential of numerical simulation models to investigate the character of the matrix-aggregate interfacial zone and to simulate hydration-induce...

  18. Theoretical and computational studies of hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration: Towards a molecular description of the hydration of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, Shekhar

    The unique balance of forces underlying biological processes-such as protein folding, aggregation, molecular recognition, and the formation of biological membranes-owes its origin in large part to the surrounding aqueous medium. A quantitative description of fundamental noncovalent interactions, in particular hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions at molecular- scale separations, requires an accurate description of water structure. Thus, the primary goals of our research are to understand the role of water in mediating interactions between molecules and to incorporate this understanding into molecular theories for calculating water-mediated interactions. We have developed a molecular model of hydrophobic interactions that uses methods of information theory to relate hydrophobic effects to the density fluctuations in liquid water. This model provides a quantitative description of small-molecule hydration thermodynamics, as well as insights into the entropies of unfolding globular proteins. For larger molecular solutes, we relate the inhomogeneous water structure in their vicinity to their hydration thermodynamics. We find that the water structure in the vicinity of nonpolar solutes is only locally sensitive to the molecular details of the solute. Water structures predicted using this observation are used to study the association of two neopentane molecules and the conformational equilibria of n-pentane molecule. We have also studied the hydration of a model molecular ionic solute, a tetramethylammonium ion, over a wide range of charge states of the solute. We find that, although the charge dependence of the ion hydration free energy is quadratic, negative ions are more favorably hydrated compared to positive ions. Moreover, this asymmetry of hydration can be reconciled by considering the differences in water organization surrounding positive and negative ions. We have also developed methods for predicting water structure surrounding molecular ions and relating

  19. Bonding of sapphire to sapphire by eutectic mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deluca, J. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An element comprising sapphire, ruby or blue sapphire can be bonded to another element of such material with a eutectic mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide. The bonding mixture may be applied in the form of a distilled water slurry or by electron beam vapor deposition. In one embodiment the eutectic is formed in situ by applying a layer of zirconium oxide and then heating the assembly to a temperature above the eutectic temperature and below the melting point of the material from which the elements are formed. The formation of a sapphire rubidium maser cell utilizing eutectic bonding is shown.

  20. High Magnetic Field-Induced Formation of Banded Microstructures in Lamellar Eutectic Alloys During Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi; Fautrelle, Yves; Gagnoud, Annie; Ren, Zhongming; Moreau, Rene

    2016-08-01

    The influences of high magnetic field (up to 12 T) on the morphology of Pb-Sn and Al-Al2Cu lamellar eutectics during directional solidification were investigated. The experimental results indicate that, along with a decrease in eutectic spacing, the banded structure forms at lower growth speeds under high magnetic field and the band spacing decreases as the magnetic field increases. Moreover, the application of a magnetic field enriches the Cu solute in the liquid ahead of the liquid/solid interface during directional solidification of an Al-Al2Cu eutectic alloy. The effects of high magnetic field on the eutectic points of non-ferromagnetic alloys and the stress acting on the eutectic lamellae during directional solidification have been studied. Both thermodynamic evaluation and DTA measurements reveal that the high magnetic field has a negligible effect on the eutectic points of non-ferromagnetic alloys. However, the high magnetic field caused an increase of the nucleation temperature and undercooling. The numerical results indicate that a considerable stress is produced on the eutectic lamellae during directional solidification under high magnetic field. The formation of a banded structure in a lamellar eutectic during directional solidification under high magnetic field may be attributed to both the buildup of the solute in the liquid ahead of the liquid/solid interface and the stress acting on the eutectic lamellae.

  1. Micro-to-nano-scale deformation mechanisms of a bimodal ultrafine eutectic composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seoung Wan; Kim, Jeong Tae; Hong, Sung Hwan; Park, Hae Jin; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Nae Sung; Seo, Yongho; Suh, Jin Yoo; Eckert, Jürgen; Kim, Do Hyang; Park, Jin Man; Kim, Ki Buem

    2014-09-30

    The outstading mechanical properties of bimodal ultrafine eutectic composites (BUECs) containing length scale hierarchy in eutectic structure were demonstrated by using AFM observation of surface topography with quantitative height measurements and were interpreted in light of the details of the deformation mechanisms by three different interface modes. It is possible to develop a novel strain accommodated eutectic structure for triggering three different interface-controlled deformation modes; (I) rotational boundary mode, (II) accumulated interface mode and (III) individual interface mode. A strain accommodated microstructure characterized by the surface topology gives a hint to design a novel ultrafine eutectic alloys with excellent mechanical properties.

  2. Hydration and physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bob

    2007-10-01

    There is a rich scientific literature regarding hydration status and physical function that began in the late 1800s, although the relationship was likely apparent centuries before that. A decrease in body water from normal levels (often referred to as dehydration or hypohydration) provokes changes in cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, metabolic, and central nervous function that become increasingly greater as dehydration worsens. Similarly, performance impairment often reported with modest dehydration (e.g., -2% body mass) is also exacerbated by greater fluid loss. Dehydration during physical activity in the heat provokes greater performance decrements than similar activity in cooler conditions, a difference thought to be due, at least in part, to greater cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain associated with heat exposure. There is little doubt that performance during prolonged, continuous exercise in the heat is impaired by levels of dehydration >or= -2% body mass, and there is some evidence that lower levels of dehydration can also impair performance even during relatively short-duration, intermittent exercise. Although additional research is needed to more fully understand low-level dehydration's effects on physical performance, one can generalize that when performance is at stake, it is better to be well-hydrated than dehydrated. This generalization holds true in the occupational, military, and sports settings.

  3. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  4. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.mallamace@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Mallamace, Domenico [Dipartimento SASTAS, Università di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Sebastiano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Cirino [CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Stanley, H. Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  5. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  6. Investigation on Gas Storage in Methane Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigao Sun; Rongsheng Ma; Shuanshi Fan; Kaihua Guo; Ruzhu Wang

    2004-01-01

    The effect of additives (anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), nonionic surfactant alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG), and liquid hydrocarbon cyclopentane (CP)) on hydrate induction time and formation rate, and storage capacity was studied in this work. Micelle surfactant solutions were found to reduce hydrate induction time, increase methane hydrate formation rate and improve methane storage capacity in hydrates. In the presence of surfactant, hydrate could form quickly in a quiescent system and the energy costs of hydrate formation were reduced. The critical micelle concentrations of SDS and APG water solutions were found to be 300× 10-6 and 500× 10-6 for methane hydrate formation system respectively. The effect of anionic surfactant (SDS) on methane storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to a nonionic surfactant (APG). CP also reduced hydrate induction time and improved hydrate formation rate, but could not improve methane storage in hydrates.

  7. Anionically Stabilized Cellulose Nanofibrils through Succinylation Pretreatment in Urea-Lithium Chloride Deep Eutectic Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkälä, Tuula; Sirviö, Juho Antti; Lorite, Gabriela S; Liimatainen, Henrikki

    2016-11-09

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are green chemicals that have the potential to replace traditional solvents in chemical reactions. In this study, urea-LiCl DES was used successfully as a reaction medium in the anionic functionalization of wood cellulose with succinic anhydride. The effects of reaction temperature and time on the carboxyl content and yield were evaluated. The analyses of the degree of polymerization and crystallinity revealed that the DES was a nondegrading and nondissolving reaction medium. Three samples with the highest carboxyl contents were further nanofibrillated with a microfluidizer to diameters of 2-7 nm, as observed by atomic force microscopy. Samples treated at 70-80 °C for 2 h gave the best outcome and resulted in highly viscose and transparent gels. The sample treated at 90 °C contained larger nanoparticles and larger aggregates owing to the occurrence of possible side reactions but resulted in better thermal stability. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The chemical composition of mineral trioxide aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilleri Josette

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA is composed of Portland cement, with 4:1 addition of bismuth oxide added so that the material can be detected on a radiograph. The cement is made up of calcium, silicon and aluminium. The main constituent phases are tricalcium and dicalcium silicate and tricalcium aluminate. There are two commercial forms of MTA, namely the grey and the white. The difference between the grey and the white materials is the presence of iron in the grey material, which makes up the phase tetracalcium alumino-ferrite. This phase is absent in white MTA. Hydration of MTA occurs in two stages. The initial reaction between tricalcium aluminate and water in the presence of calcium sulphate results in the production of ettringite. Tricalcium and dicalcium silicate react with water to produce calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide, which is leached out of the cement with time.

  9. The effects of urea, guanidinium chloride and sorbitol on porphyrin aggregation: Molecular dynamics simulation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maryam Ghadamgahi; Davood Ajloo

    2013-05-01

    This paper compares the inhibition effect of porphyrin aggregation in the presence of urea, guanidinium chloride (Gdn) and sorbitol by molecular dynamics simulation. It demonstrates that porphyrin aggregation increases in sorbitol, but decreases towards addition of urea and Gdn. It shows that urea, Gdn and sorbitol can have a large effect — positive or negative, depending on the concentration — on the aggregation of the porphyrin. The effect of urea, Gdn and sorbitol on porphyrin aggregation has been inferred from the effect of these solutes on the hydration layer of porphyrin. It appears that the Gdn is more suitable than urea for decreasing the hydration layer of porphyrin while several osmolites like sorbitol are known to increase hydration layer and thus might stabilize the porphyrin aggregation. Results of radial distribution function (RDF), distributed atoms or molecules around target species, indicated that the increase and exclusion of solvent around porphyrin by osmolytes and Gdn would affect significantly on porphyrin aggregation. There was a sizeable difference in potency between the Gdn and urea, with the urea being less potent to decrease hydration layer and porphyrin aggregation.

  10. Divorced Eutectic Solidification of Mg-Al Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monas, Alexander; Shchyglo, Oleg; Kim, Se-Jong; Yim, Chang Dong; Höche, Daniel; Steinbach, Ingo

    2015-08-01

    We present simulations of the nucleation and equiaxed dendritic growth of the primary hexagonal close-packed -Mg phase followed by the nucleation of the -phase in interdendritic regions. A zoomed-in region of a melt channel under eutectic conditions is investigated and compared with experiments. The presented simulations allow prediction of the final properties of an alloy based on process parameters. The obtained results give insight into the solidification processes governing the microstructure formation of Mg-Al alloys, allowing their targeted design for different applications.

  11. Polymerisation of activated RNA in eutectic ice phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dörr, Mark; Maurer, Sarah Elisabeth; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    , metal catalyzed condensation reactions (s. micrograph, right). With a new, non-radioactive ex-perimental essay we are selectively monitoring the 5'-3' and 5'-2' elongation of 5'-fluorescence labeled RNA oligomers. At - 18.5 °C the polymerization reaction and its selectivity is expected to be much higher...... (“cooperative sequences”) or degrading (“parasitic sequences”) the RNA population. These eutectic phases in water-ice are plausible prebiotic micro-environments that should help to overcome the dilution problem in origin of life scenarios. They might have supported the production of libraries...

  12. Field Emission Cold Cathode Devices Based on Eutectic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    suggested that the most promising candidates are the carbides and borides of tantalum, hafnium and niobium together with zirconium carbide. The choice of...in ternary La-B-X systems, some evidence is available6 5 ’ 6 6( , to suggest that LaB6 and aluminium form a eutectic equilibrium, thereby creating a...the composition of the fibres and matrix. Fibres Matrix Nickel, wt.% 27.9 70.1 Molybdenum, wt.% 65.7 20.8 Tantalim, wt.% 2.0 2.8 Aluminium , wt.% 4.5

  13. Deep eutectic solvents in countercurrent and centrifugal partition chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrer, Simon; Bezold, Franziska; García, Eva Marra; Minceva, Mirjana

    2016-02-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were evaluated as solvents in centrifugal partition chromatography, a liquid-liquid chromatography separation technology. To this end, the partition coefficients of ten natural compounds of different hydrophobicity were determined in non-aqueous biphasic systems containing DES. The influence of the composition of DESs and the presence of water in the biphasic system on the partition coefficient were also examined. In addition, several process relevant physical properties of the biphasic system, such as the density and viscosity of the phases, were measured. A mixture of three to four hydrophobic compounds was successfully separated in a centrifugal partition extractor using a heptane/ethanol/DES biphasic system.

  14. Pattern Formation and Growth Kinetics in Eutectic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Jing [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Growth patterns during liquid/solid phase transformation are governed by simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer mechanisms, creation of new interfaces, jump of the crystallization units from liquid to solid and their rearrangement in the solid matrix. To examine how the above processes influence the scale of microstructure, two eutectic systems are chosen for the study: a polymeric system polyethylene glycol-p-dibromobenzene (PEG-DBBZ) and a simple molecular system succinonitrile (SCN)-camphor. The scaling law for SCN-camphor system is found to follow the classical Jackson-Hunt model of circular rod eutectic, where the diffusion in the liquid and the interface energy are the main physics governing the two-phase pattern. In contrast, a significantly different scaling law is observed for the polymer system. The interface kinetics of PEG phase and its solute concentration dependence thus have been critically investigated for the first time by directional solidification technique. A model is then proposed that shows that the two-phase pattern in polymers is governed by the interface diffusion and the interface kinetics. In SCN-camphor system, a new branch of eutectic, elliptical shape rodl, is found in thin samples where only one layer of camphor rods is present. It is found that the orientation of the ellipse can change from the major axis in the direction of the thickness to the direction of the width as the velocity and/or the sample thickness is decreased. A theoretical model is developed that predicts the spacing and orientation of the elliptical rods in a thin sample. The single phase growth patterns of SCN-camphor system were also examined with emphasis on the three-dimensional single cell and cell/dendrite transition. For the 3D single cell in a capillary tube, the entire cell shape ahead of the eutectic front can be described by the Saffmann-Taylor finger only at extremely low growth rate. A 3D directional solidification model is developed to

  15. Effect of phosphor addition on eutectic solidification and microstructure of an Al-13%Si alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Hengcheng

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As the refiner or modifier, the master alloys containing high concentration phosphor are widely used in preparing eutectic or hypereutectic Al-Si alloys. To study the effect of phosphor addition on the eutectic solidification and microstructure of the Al-13%Si alloy, an investigation has been undertaken by means of thermal analysis and micro/macro-structure observation. Results indicate that addition of phosphor in near eutectic Al-Si alloy promotes the nucleation of eutectic but has little refinement impact on primary Si particles as expected. Conversely, both primary Si particles and eutectic Si flakes become slightly coarser in P-rich alloys. The coarsening of eutectic Si flakes ties closely to the increased eutectic growth temperature with phosphor addition. The eutectic solidification of the alloy proceeds from the near mold zone towards the center, and it is also found that a few independent nucleation regions emerge in liquid at the solidification front due to the addition of phosphor.

  16. Natural deep eutectic solvents and their application in natural product research and development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dai, yuntao

    2013-01-01

    Natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents (DES) were proposed by our group to extend the range of ILs and DES, particularly to develop cheap, nontoxic, and low viscosity green solvents, and to apply them in health-related fields. They are liquid supramolec

  17. Evaluation of the solid/liquid interface undercooling during Sn-Se Eutectic growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zanotello

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The Sn-Se eutectic solidification allows one to obtain a lamellar structure, formed by SnSe and SnSe2 compounds, which are p and n semiconducting types, respectively. The SnSe-SnSe2 eutectic composite is a promising material to be used in photovoltaic device manufacturing. In a lamellar eutectic microstructure, the main parameter, which governs many of its characteristics, is the lamellar spacing. Such a parameter is primarily a result of the undercooling at the solid/liquid interface, which depends on the growth rate and the eutectic system properties. In this work, the Sn-Se alloy corresponding to eutectic composition was studied by using DSC thermal analysis and directional solidification at several growth rates in a vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger unit. The objective of the experiments was to investigate the influence of the growth rate on the growth undercooling, as well as on the eutectic microstructure. The microstructure analysis showed that a very regular and aligned structure formed by the SnSe and SnSe2 solid phases can be produced. By using the classic eutectic growth theory developed by Jackson and Hunt, the experimental results obtained led to the evaluation of a relationship among growth rates, eutectic growth temperature and lamellar spacing.

  18. Ternary eutectic growth of Ag-Cu-Sb alloy within ultrasonic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Wei; HONG ZhenYu; WEI BingBo

    2007-01-01

    The liquid to solid transformation of ternary Ag42.4Cu21.6Sb36 eutectic alloy was accomplished in an ultrasonic field with a frequency of 35 kHz, and the growth mechanism of this ternary eutectic was examined. Theoretical calculations predict that the sound intensity in the liquid phase at the solidification interface increases gradually as the interface moves up from the sample bottom to its top. The growth mode of (ε + θ + Sb) ternary eutectic exhibits a transition of "divorced eutectic- mixture of anomalous and regular structures-regular eutectic" along the sample axis due to the inhomogeneity of sound field distribution. In the top zone with the highest sound intensity, the cavitation effect promotes the three eutectic phases to nucleate independently, while the acoustic streaming efficiently suppresses the coupled growth of eutectic phases. In the meantime, the ultrasonic field accelerates the solute transportation at the solid-liquid interface, which reduces the solute solubility of eutectic phases.

  19. Eutectic Solidification in Al-13.0%Si Alloys with Combined Addition of Strontium and Boron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hengcheng Liao; Ke Ding; Juanjuan Bi; Min Zhang; Huipin Wang; Lei Zhao

    2009-01-01

    The influence of addition of boron (B) on eutectic solidification in a near-eutectic AI-13.0%Si alloy modified with strontium (Sr) was investigated using thermal analysis and macro/microstructure observation. Addition of B in the Sr-modified alloy leads to a considerable increase in nucleation temperature (Tn, the minimum temperature prior to recalescence (TM) and growth temperature (TG). In the Sr-modified alloy, nucleation of eutectic might originate at the heterogeneous sites on the mold wall or in the melt near the wall, and eutectic solidification proceeds gradually towards the center, controlled by undercooling of melt. However, with addition of B in the Sr-modified alloy, undercooling required for eutectic nucleation became small, and hence eutectic solidification might occur almost simultaneously within whole casting, controlled by amount of heterogeneous sites. With excessive addition of B in the Sr-modified alloy, nucleation of eutectic grains was explosive within the whole casting and the power of Sr on eutectic solidification was completely poisoned.

  20. Hydration and rotational diffusion of levoglucosan in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corezzi, S.; Sassi, P.; Paolantoni, M.; Comez, L.; Morresi, A.; Fioretto, D.

    2014-05-01

    Extended frequency range depolarized light scattering measurements of water-levoglucosan solutions are reported at different concentrations and temperatures to assess the effect of the presence and distribution of hydroxyl groups on the dynamics of hydration water. The anhydro bridge, reducing from five to three the number of hydroxyl groups with respect to glucose, considerably affects the hydration properties of levoglucosan with respect to those of mono and disaccharides. In particular, we find that the average retardation of water dynamics is ≈3-4, that is lower than ≈5-6 previously found in glucose, fructose, trehalose, and sucrose. Conversely, the average number of retarded water molecules around levoglucosan is 24, almost double that found in water-glucose mixtures. These results suggest that the ability of sugar molecules to form H-bonds through hydroxyl groups with surrounding water, while producing a more effective retardation, it drastically reduces the spatial extent of the perturbation on the H-bond network. In addition, the analysis of the concentration dependence of the hydration number reveals the aptitude of levoglucosan to produce large aggregates in solution. The analysis of shear viscosity and rotational diffusion time suggests a very short lifetime for these aggregates, typically faster than ≈20 ps.

  1. Hydrates fighting tools; Des outils de lutte contre les hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2003-04-01

    Shell Exploration and Production company (SEPCo) is the operator of the 'Popeye' deep offshore field in the Gulf of Mexico. Thanks to the introduction of a low dosing hydrates inhibitor (LDHI) elaborated by Shell Global Solutions, the company has added a 7.5 Gpc extra volume of gas to its recoverable reserves. This new technology avoids the plugging of pipes by hydrates formation. (J.S.)

  2. Evaluation of Hydrated Lime Filler in Asphalt Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abbas Hasan Al-Jumaily

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral filler is one of important materials and affecting on properties and quality of asphalt mixtures .There are different types of mineral filler depended on cost and quality , the matter encourages us to achieve this study to evaluate hydrated lime filler effects on properties of asphalt mixes related with strength and durability. Conventional asphaltic concrete mixtures with Portland cement and soft sandstone fillers and mixtures modified with hydrated lime were evaluated for their fundamental engineering properties as defined by Marshall properties , index of retained strength , indirect tensile strength , permanent deformation characteristics , and fatigue resistance .A typical dense graded mixture employed in construction of surface course pavement in Iraq in accordance with SCRB specifications was used .The materials used in this study included mineral aggregate materials (coarse and fine sizes were originally obtained from Najaf Sea quarries and two grades of asphalt cements produced from Daurah refinery which are D47 and D66 . The physical properties , stiffness modulus and chemical composition are evaluated for the recovered asphalt cement from prepared asphalt mixes containing various filler types .The paper results indicated that the addition of hydrated lime as mineral filler improved the permanent deformation characteristics and fatigue life and the use of hydrated lime will decrease the moisture susceptibility of the asphalt mixtures.

  3. Calculations of the phase interface constitution during the non-equilibrium growth of binary eutectics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvoj, Z. (Inst. of Physics, Academy of Science, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1993-01-01

    It is well-known that eutectics do not necessarily grow at the eutectic temperature, or with the eutectic composition. Thus, the eutectic point can be shifted due to nonequilibrium conditions in the system. This fact was observed in many experiments. We try to explain this behaviour on the basis of the study of phase transformation kinetics. We construct the kinetic phase diagrams within the framework of the nucleation theory as well as of the theory of growth on the phase interface. Our models are based on the molecular model of the difference in chemical potential of components for the liquid and solid phases. The proposed model describes the position of the eutectic point very well. (orig.).

  4. Investigation of Fixed Points Exceeding 2500 °C Using Metal Carbide-Carbon Eutectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasajima, N.; Yamada, Y.; Sakuma, F.

    2003-09-01

    The melting and freezing plateaus of four metal carbide-carbon (MC-C) eutectics, B4C-C, δ(Mo carbide)-C, TiC-C and ZrC-C eutectics were investigated by radiation thermometry for the first time. The observed melting temperatures were 2386 °C, 2583 °C, 2761 °C and 2883 °C, respectively. The plateau shapes of δ(Mo carbide)-C, TiC-C and ZrC-C eutectics are relatively flat compared to the quite rounded plateau shape of the B4C-C eutectic. The results indicate that MC-C eutectics can establish a new series of high-temperature fixed points above 2500 °C.

  5. MICROSTRUCTURE OF BINARY Mg-Al EUTECTIC ALLOY WIRES PRODUCED BY THE OHNO CONTINUOUS CASTING PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.M.Zhang; T.Lū; C.J.Xu; X.F.Guo

    2008-01-01

    Directionally solidified binary Mg-Al eutectic alloy wires of approximately 5 mm in diameter were produced by the Ohno continuous casting (OCC) process and the mi-crostructure was examined.It was found that the wires possess obvious unidirectional growth characteristic along its axial direction.The microstructure consists of parallel columnar grains that resulted from the competitive growth of equiaxed grains solidified on the head of dummy bar.Each columnar grain comprises regular eutectic α-Mg and β-Mg17 Al12 phases,which grew along the axial direction of the wires.The morphology of the eutectic is mainly lameUar,meanwhile rod eutectic exists.The formation of rod eutectic was attributed to the "bridging effect" caused by incidental elements in the alloy.

  6. Obsidian Hydration: A New Paleothermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Riciputi, Lee R [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [ORNL; Elam, J. Michael [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2006-01-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  7. Obsidian hydration: A new paleothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Riciputi, Lee R.; Cole, David R.; Fayek, Mostafa; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-07-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  8. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  9. Anthracene + Pyrene Solid Mixtures: Eutectic and Azeotropic Character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, James W; Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M

    2010-09-01

    To better characterize the thermodynamic behavior of a binary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixture, thermochemical and vapor pressure experiments were used to examine the phase behavior of the anthracene (1) + pyrene (2) system. A solid-liquid phase diagram was mapped for the mixture. A eutectic point occurs at 404 K at x(1) = 0.22. A model based on eutectic formation can be used to predict the enthalpy of fusion associated with the mixture. For mixtures that contain x(1) < 0.90, the enthalpy of fusion is near that of pure pyrene. This and X-ray diffraction results indicate that mixtures of anthracene and pyrene have pyrene-like crystal structures and energetics until the composition nears that of pure anthracene. Solid-vapor equilibrium studies show that mixtures of anthracene and pyrene form solid azeotropes at x(1) of 0.03 and 0.14. Additionally, mixtures at x(1) = 0.99 sublime at the vapor pressure of pure anthracene, suggesting that anthracene behavior is not significantly influenced by x(2) = 0.01 in the crystal structure.

  10. Eutectic solidification as explained by the thermodynamics of irreversible processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wołczyński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The grain size diameter is the main parameter characterizing a given metallic alloy. In the case of Al-Si or Fe-C eutectic alloy theaverage inter-lamellar spacing is a good parameter which seems to be adequate to describe this irregular structure. To define the averageinter-lamellar spacing the regular areas within generally irregular structure has been distinguished.It has been postulated that the formation of regular structure could be related to the minimum entropy production criterion. From theother side the maximum destabilization of the non-faceted phase interface could be referred to marginal stability.The criterion of minimum entropy production allows to formulate the growth law for regular lamellar structure solidifying understationary state. It defines the regular eutectic spacing versus growth rate. The marginal stability concept allows to define the maximum wavelength which can be developed at the solid / liquid interface of non-faceted (Al phase. It defines the maximum spacing within irregular structure taking into account the wavelength of instability (marginal stability created at the non-faceted phase interface.An average inter-lamellar spacing results from the relationship formulated on the basis of both spacings. It should beemphasized that both conditions (criteria are deduced from the thermodynamics of irreversible processes.The simplified scheme of irregular structure incorporates, additionally the intermediate lamella of faceted phase that is also taken into account in the definition of average inter-lamellar spacing,

  11. Deep eutectic-solvothermal synthesis of nanostructured ceria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Oliver S.; Edler, Karen J.; Bowron, Daniel T.; Torrente-Murciano, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Ceria is a technologically important material with applications in catalysis, emissions control and solid-oxide fuel cells. Nanostructured ceria becomes profoundly more active due to its enhanced surface area to volume ratio, reactive surface oxygen vacancy concentration and superior oxygen storage capacity. Here we report the synthesis of nanostructured ceria using the green Deep Eutectic Solvent reline, which allows morphology and porosity control in one of the less energy-intensive routes reported to date. Using wide Q-range liquid-phase neutron diffraction, we elucidate the mechanism of reaction at a molecular scale at considerably milder conditions than the conventional hydrothermal synthetic routes. The reline solvent plays the role of a latent supramolecular catalyst where the increase in reaction rate from solvent-driven pre-organization of the reactants is most significant. This fundamental understanding of deep eutectic-solvothermal methodology will enable future developments in low-temperature synthesis of nanostructured ceria, facilitating its large-scale manufacturing using green, economic, non-toxic solvents.

  12. Storing natural gas as frozen hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, J.S.; Khokhar, A.A. (Univ. of Trondheim (Norway)); Parlaktuna, M. (Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey))

    1994-02-01

    The formation of natural gas hydrates is a well-known problem in the petroleum and natural gas industries. Hydrates are solid materials that form when liquid water and natural gas are brought in contact under pressure. Hydrate formation need not be a problem. On the contrary, it can be an advantage. The volume of hydrates is much less than that of natural gas. At standard conditions, hydrates occupy 150 to 170 times less volume than the corresponding gas. Typically, natural gas hydrates contain 15% gas and 85% water by mass. It follows that hydrates can be used for large-scale storage of natural gas. Benesh proposed using hydrates to improve the load factor of natural gas supply systems. The author suggested that hydrates could be produced by bringing liquid water into contact with natural gas at the appropriate temperature and high pressure. The hydrate then would be stored at a temperature and pressure where it was stable. When gas was needed for the supply system, the hydrate would be melted at low pressure. The stability of a natural gas hydrate during storage at atmospheric pressure and below-freezing temperatures was studied in the laboratory. The gas hydrate was produced in a stirred vessel at 2- to 6-MPa pressure and temperatures from 0 to 20 C. The hydrate was refrigerated and stored in deep freezers at [minus]5, [minus]10, and [minus]18 C for up to 10 days. The natural gas hydrate remained stable when kept frozen at atmospheric pressure.

  13. Subassembly aggregates of papaya mosaic virus protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, J W; Hallett, F R; Bancroft, J B

    1983-08-01

    An examination of the number of subunits in small aggregates of papaya mosaic virus (PMV) coat protein is presented based on a model system which gives results consistent with the experimental observation that the 14 S subassembly species is a double disc, composed of two rows of nine subunits each. The estimated hydration of the disc, about 0.85 g 1H20/9 protein, is unusually large and indicates a cavitated structure for the disc. Comparison with other rod-shaped viruses suggests that the flexuous nature of PMV is a consequence of sparse axial inter-subunit contacts at high radius.

  14. Hofmeister effects: interplay of hydration, nonelectrostatic potentials, and ion size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Drew F; Boström, Mathias; Lo Nostro, Pierandrea; Ninham, Barry W

    2011-07-21

    The classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory of colloids, and corresponding theories of electrolytes, are unable to explain ion specific forces between colloidal particles quantitatively. The same is true generally, for surfactant aggregates, lipids, proteins, for zeta and membrane potentials and in adsorption phenomena. Even with fitting parameters the theory is not predictive. The classical theories of interactions begin with continuum solvent electrostatic (double layer) forces. Extensions to include surface hydration are taken care of with concepts like inner and outer Helmholtz planes, and "dressed" ion sizes. The opposing quantum mechanical attractive forces (variously termed van der Waals, Hamaker, Lifshitz, dispersion, nonelectrostatic forces) are treated separately from electrostatic forces. The ansatz that separates electrostatic and quantum forces can be shown to be thermodynamically inconsistent. Hofmeister or specific ion effects usually show up above ≈10(-2) molar salt. Parameters to accommodate these in terms of hydration and ion size had to be invoked, specific to each case. Ionic dispersion forces, between ions and solvent, for ion-ion and ion-surface interactions are not explicit in classical theories that use "effective" potentials. It can be shown that the missing ionic quantum fluctuation forces have a large role to play in specific ion effects, and in hydration. In a consistent predictive theory they have to be included at the same level as the nonlinear electrostatic forces that form the skeletal framework of standard theory. This poses a challenge. The challenges go further than academic theory and have implications for the interpretation and meaning of concepts like pH, buffers and membrane potentials, and for their experimental interpretation. In this article we overview recent quantitative developments in our evolving understanding of the theoretical origins of specific ion, or Hofmeister effects. These are demonstrated

  15. Airway Hydration and COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  16. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  17. Effect of strontium and solidification rate on eutectic grain structure in an AI-13 wt% Si alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liao Hengcheng; Bi Juanjuan; Zhang Min; Ding Ke; Jiang Yunfeng; Cai Mingdong

    2009-01-01

    The influence of strontium addition and solidification rate on eutectic grain structure in a near-eutectic AI-Si alloy was investigated. The characteristic temperature of eutectic nucleation (TN),minimum temperature prior to recalescence (TM),and the growth temperature (TG) during cooling were determined by quantitative thermal analysis. All characteristic temperatures were found to decrease continuously with increasing Sr content and solidification rate. Microstructural analysis also revealed that the eutectic grain size decreases with increasing Sr content and solidification rate. Such eutectic grain refinement is attributed to the increased actual under-cooling ahead of the liquid/solid interface during solidification.

  18. Tetrahydrofuran hydrate decomposition characteristics in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongchen; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Shenglong; Zhao, Jiafei; Yang, Mingjun

    2016-12-01

    Many tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate properties are similar to those of gas hydrates. In the present work THF hydrate dissociation in four types of porous media is studied. THF solution was cooled to 275.15 K with formation of the hydrate under ambient pressure, and then it dissociated under ambient conditions. THF hydrate dissociation experiments in each porous medium were conducted three times. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to obtain images. Decomposition time, THF hydrate saturation and MRI mean intensity (MI) were measured and analyzed. The experimental results showed that the hydrate decomposition time in BZ-4 and BZ-3 was similar and longer than that in BZ-02. In each dissociation process, the hydrate decomposition time of the second and third cycles was shorter than that of the first cycle in BZ-4, BZ-3, and BZ-02. The relationship between THF hydrate saturation and time is almost linear.

  19. Kinetic model for astaxanthin aggregation in water-methanol mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannetti, Rita; Alibabaei, Leila; Pucciarelli, Filippo

    2009-07-01

    The aggregation of astaxanthin in hydrated methanol was kinetically studied in the temperature range from 10 °C to 50 °C, at different astaxanthin concentrations and solvent composition. A kinetic model for the formation and transformation of astaxanthin aggregated has been proposed. Spectrophotometric studies showed that monomeric astaxanthin decayed to H-aggregates that after-wards formed J-aggregates when water content was 50% and the temperature lower than 20 °C; at higher temperatures, very stable J-aggregates were formed directly. Monomer formed very stable H-aggregates when the water content was greater than 60%; in these conditions H-aggregates decayed into J-aggregates only when the temperature was at least 50 °C. Through these findings it was possible to establish that the aggregation reactions took place through a two steps consecutive reaction with first order kinetic constants and that the values of these depended on the solvent composition and temperature.

  20. Directionally solidified Al2O3/GAP eutectic ceramics by micro-pulling-down method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xue; Su, Haijun; Guo, Fengwei; Tan, Xi; Cao, Lamei

    2016-11-01

    We reported a novel route to prepare directionally solidified (DS) Al2O3/GAP eutectic ceramics by micro-pulling-down (μ-PD) method. The eutectic crystallizations, microstructure characters and evolutions, and their mechanical properties were investigated in detail. The results showed that the Al2O3/GAP eutectic composites can be successfully fabricated through μ-PD method, possessed smooth surface, full density and large crystal size (the maximal size: φ90 mm × 20 mm). At the process of Diameter, the as-solidified Al2O3/GAP eutectic presented a combination of "Chinese script" and elongated colony microstructure with complex regular structure. Inside the colonies, the rod-type or lamellar-type eutectic microstructures with ultra-fine GAP surrounded by the Al2O3 matrix were observed. At an appropriate solidificational rate, the binary eutectic exhibited a typical DS irregular eutectic structure of "chinese script" consisting of interpenetrating network of α-Al2O3 and GAP phases without any other phases. Therefore, the interphase spacing was refined to 1-2 µm and the irregular microstructure led to an outstanding vickers hardness of 17.04 GPa and fracture toughness of 6.3 MPa × m1/2 at room temperature.

  1. Glass transition in binary eutectic systems: best glass-forming composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Min; Li, Zijing; Chen, Zeming; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Riping; Tian, Yongjun

    2010-09-23

    The glass transition and glass-forming ability in a binary eutectic system of methyl o-toluate (MOT) versus methyl p-toluate (MPT) are studied across the whole composition range. The phase diagram is constructed to explore the best glass-forming composition as the characteristic temperatures of the glass transition, crystallization, eutectic, and liquidus are determined. The best vitrification region is found to locate between the eutectic and the midpoint compositions of the eutectic line, indicating a remarkable deviation from the eutectic composition. The compilation of various simple binary eutectic systems covering inorganic, metallic, ionic, and molecular glass-forming liquids reproduces the rule. Kinetics and thermodynamics in binary systems are investigated to associate with the rule. The composition dependence of the structural relaxation time and the kinetic fragility are presented with dielectric measurements. It is found that whereas mixing of binary miscible liquids kinetically favors glass formation, thermodynamic contribution to the deviation of the best glass-forming composition from eutectics is implied.

  2. Ternary eutectic growth of Ag-Cu-Sb alloy within ultrasonic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The liquid to solid transformation of ternary Ag42.4Cu21.6Sb36 eutectic alloy was ac- complished in an ultrasonic field with a frequency of 35 kHz, and the growth mechanism of this ternary eutectic was examined. Theoretical calculations predict that the sound intensity in the liquid phase at the solidification interface increases gradually as the interface moves up from the sample bottom to its top. The growth mode of (ε + θ + Sb) ternary eutectic exhibits a transition of "divorced eutectic— mixture of anomalous and regular structures—regular eutectic" along the sample axis due to the inhomogeneity of sound field distribution. In the top zone with the highest sound intensity, the cavitation effect promotes the three eutectic phases to nucleate independently, while the acoustic streaming efficiently suppresses the coupled growth of eutectic phases. In the meantime, the ultrasonic field accelerates the solute transportation at the solid-liquid interface, which reduces the solute solubility of eutectic phases.

  3. Reflectance spectra of hydrated chlorine salts: The effect of temperature with implications for Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Jennifer; Dalton, J. Brad; Chevrier, Vincent F.; Jamieson, Corey S.; Barrows, R. Scott

    2014-11-01

    Hydrated chlorine salts are expected to exist on a variety of planetary bodies, including inner planets such as Mars and outer planet satellites such as Europa. However, detection by remote sensing has been limited due to a lack of comparison data in spectral libraries. In addition, at low temperatures spectral features of many H2O-bearing species deviate from their room temperature behavior. Thus, we acquired spectra of NaCl, NaClO4·nH2O, MgCl2·nH2O, Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O, and Mg(ClO3)2·6H2O from 0.35 to 2.5 µm at both 298 and 80 K to observe the effects of temperature on diagnostic spectral features. In the near-infrared, the strongest spectral features often arise from water molecules. Increasing hydration states increases the depth and width of water bands. Interestingly, at low temperature these bands become narrower with sharper, better defined minima, allowing individual bands to be more easily resolved. We also measured frozen eutectic solutions of NaCl, MgCl2, and KCl. We show that while care must be taken to acquire laboratory spectra of all hydrated phases at the relevant conditions (e.g., temperature and pressure) for the planetary body being studied, chlorine salts do possess distinct spectral features that should allow for their detection by remote sensing.

  4. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.;

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...... and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  5. Progress of Gas Hydrate Studies in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊栓狮; 汪集旸

    2006-01-01

    A brief overview is given on the gas hydrate-related research activities carried out by Chinese researchers in the past 15 years. The content involves: (1) Historical review. Introducing the gas hydrate research history in China; (2) Gas hydrate research groups in China. There are nearly 20 groups engaged in gas hydrate research now; (3) Present studies.Including fundamental studies, status of the exploration of natural gas hydrate resources in the South China Sea region, and development of hydrate-based new techniques; (4) Future development.

  6. Hydration of fly ash cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etsuo Sakai; Shigeyoshi Miyahara; Shigenari Ohsawa; Seung-Heun Lee; Masaki Daimon [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Graduate School of Science and Engineering

    2005-06-01

    It is necessary to establish the material design system for the utilization of large amounts of fly ash as blended cement instead of disposing of it as a waste. Cement blended with fly ash is also required as a countermeasure to reduce the amount of CO{sub 2} generation. In this study, the influences of the glass content and the basicity of glass phase on the hydration of fly ash cement were clarified and hydration over a long curing time was characterized. Two kinds of fly ash with different glass content, one with 38.2% and another with 76.6%, were used. The hydration ratio of fly ash was increased by increasing the glass content in fly ash in the specimens cured for 270 days. When the glass content of fly ash is low, the basicity of glass phase tends to decrease. Reactivity of fly ash is controlled by the basicity of the glass phase in fly ash during a period from 28 to 270 days. However, at an age of 360 days, the reaction ratios of fly ash show almost identical values with different glass contents. Fly ash also affected the hydration of cement clinker minerals in fly ash cement. While the hydration of alite was accelerated, that of belite was retarded at a late stage.

  7. Effect of strontium on primary dendrite and eutectic temperature of A357 aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhongwei

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Solidification process of A357 alloy with Sr addition was investigated in this paper. In particular, the effects of strontium and cooling rate on α-Al dendrite and Al-Si eutectic characteristic temperature were characterized by differential thermal analysis (DTA. Sr addition not only modifies the Al-Si eutectic, but also affects the morphology and structure of primary α-Al dendrite. Sr decreases the growth temperature of α-Al dendrite and Al-Si eutectic, and it also affects the dendrite growth mechanism. It has been found that such effect becomes more significant with higher cooling rate.

  8. Spasmodic growth during the rapid solidification of undercooled Ag-Cu eutectic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clopet, C. R.; Cochrane, R. F.; Mullis, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    A melt fluxing technique has been used to undercool Ag-Cu eutectic alloy by 10-70 K and the subsequent recalescence has been studied using high speed imaging. Spasmodic growth of the solidification front was observed, in which the growth front would make a series of quasi-periodic jumps separated by extended periods during which time growth appeared to arrest. Evidence of this previously unreported mode of growth is presented. The high speed images and microstructural evidence support the theory that anomalous eutectics form by the growth and subsequent remelting of eutectic dendrites.

  9. A Transition from Eutectic Growth to Dendritic Growth Induced by High Undercooling Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕勇军; 魏炳波

    2003-01-01

    Cu-8 wt.%Al eutectic alloy was undercooled by up to 187K (0.14 TE) using a drop tube technique. The crystal growth and phase selection mechanisms were investigated during containerless rapid solidification. It is found that the microstructural morphology is characterized by lamellar eutectic growth at small undercoolings. However,if the liquid alloy is undercooled by more than 25K, eutectic growth will be suppressed completely and the dendritic growth of (Gu) solid solution dominates its solidification process. When the undercooling exceeds 153 K, a microstructural transition from coarse dendrite to equiaxed dendrite takes place.

  10. Transmission laser bonding of low melting eutectic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, C.; Cromwell, K.; Hermsdorf, J.; Akin, M.; Wurz, M. C.; Kaierle, S.; Maier, H. J.; Overmeyer, L.

    2016-03-01

    Transparent polymers with low glass transition temperatures are flexible materials and can serve as an optical waveguide or as substrates for the layer structure in applications such as humidity or temperature sensors. The background of this publication is the development of a laser-based process to bond silicon chips, which serve as emitter or detector in an optical system, on a substrate, without exposing the substrate to thermo-mechanical stress. Using transmission laser bonding of low-melting eutectic alloys, the necessary energy can be coupled into the fusion zone precisely to reduce the process time. In this paper, Si-chips with 52In48Sn and 66In34Bi layers are investigated to bond on rigid substrates. Experimental results are presented, which illustrate the mechanical stability of these compounds.

  11. Self Assembled Structures by Directional Solidification of Eutectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Interest in ordered porous structures has grown because of there unique properties such as photonic bandgaps, high backing packing density and high surface to volume ratio. Inspired by nature, biometric strategies using self assembled organic molecules dominate the development of hierarchical inorganic structures. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) also exhibit self assembly characteristics to form hierarchical metallic and inorganic structures. Crystallization of diphasic materials by DSE can produce two dimensional ordered structures consisting of rods or lamella. By selective removal of phases, DSE is capable to fabricate ordered pore arrays or ordered pin arrays. Criteria and limitations to fabricate hierarchical structures will be presented. Porous structures in silicon base alloys and ceramic systems will be reported.

  12. Lead-bismuth eutectic recrystallization studies for the Megapie target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucchini, A. [ENEA, FIS/MET, Centro Ricerche ' E.Clementel' , via Don Fiammelli 2, 40128 Bologna (Italy); Agostini, P. [ENEA, FIS/ING, Centro Ricerche Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano, Bologna (Italy); Baicchi, E. [ENEA, FIS/ING, Centro Ricerche Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano (Bologna) (Italy)]. E-mail: elio.baicchi@brasimone.enea.it

    2005-02-01

    The expansion behaviour after freezing of the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) with 44.5% lead and 55.5% bismuth is described according to the reported theory. The issue of the vessel structural integrity after LBE recrystallization was dealt with by experimental and numerical studies performed in the frame of the Megapie (Megawatt Pilot Experiment) project. We have identified the important elements which, in the case of LBE solidification inside the Megapie target, play a role in the reduction of the possible vessel over-stressing; among them, the LBE yield strength has been tested under significant experimental conditions. The resulting suggestions can also be related to the design and to the freezing procedures for other LBE technology facilities.

  13. Alkaline extraction of polonium from liquid lead bismuth eutectic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinitz, S.; Neuhausen, J.; Schumann, D.

    2011-07-01

    The production of highly radiotoxic polonium isotopes poses serious safety concerns for the development of future nuclear systems cooled by lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). In this paper it is shown that polonium can be extracted efficiently from LBE using a mixture of alkaline metal hydroxides (NaOH + KOH) in a temperature range between 180 and 350 °C. The extraction ratio was analyzed for different temperatures, gas blankets and phase ratios. A strong dependence of the extraction performance on the redox properties of the cover gas was found. While hydrogen facilitates the removal of polonium, oxygen has a negative influence on the extraction. These findings open new possibilities to back up the safety of future LBE based nuclear facilities.

  14. Comparison of stromal hydration techniques for clear corneal cataract incisions: conventional hydration versus anterior stromal pocket hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifflin, Mark D; Kinard, Krista; Neuffer, Marcus C

    2012-06-01

    Anterior stromal pocket hydration was compared with conventional hydration for preventing wound leak after 2.8 mm uniplanar clear corneal incisions (CCIs) in patients having routine cataract surgery. Conventional hydration involves hydration of the lateral walls of the main incision with visible whitening of the stroma. The anterior stromal pocket hydration technique involves creation of an additional supraincisional stromal pocket overlying the main incision, which is then hydrated instead of the main incision. Sixty-six eyes of 48 patients were included in the data analysis with 33 assigned to each study group. The anterior stromal pocket hydration technique was significantly better than conventional hydration in preventing wound leak due to direct pressure on the posterior lip of the incision. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah; Dr. Yong Xu; Dr. Atul Sheth; Dr. Pradeep Agrawal

    2001-12-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) estimates that by the year 2010, 40% or more of U.S. gas supply will be provided by supplements including substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. These supplements must be cost competitive with other energy sources. The first generation technologies for coal gasification e.g. the Lurgi Pressure Gasification Process and the relatively newer technologies e.g. the KBW (Westinghouse) Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, U-Gas Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, British Gas Corporation/Lurgi Slagging Gasifier, Texaco Moving-Bed Gasifier, and Dow and Shell Gasification Processes, have several disadvantages. These disadvantages include high severities of gasification conditions, low methane production, high oxygen consumption, inability to handle caking coals, and unattractive economics. Another problem encountered in catalytic coal gasification is deactivation of hydroxide forms of alkali and alkaline earth metal catalysts by oxides of carbon (CO{sub x}). To seek solutions to these problems, a team consisting of Clark Atlanta University (CAU, a Historically Black College and University, HBCU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) proposed to identify suitable low melting eutectic salt mixtures for improved coal gasification. The research objectives of this project were to: Identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; Assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; Evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; Determine catalyst dispersion at high carbon conversion levels; Evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; Evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and Conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process.

  16. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  17. Distinguishing aggregate formation and aggregate clearance using cell based assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Eenjes, E.; J.M. Dragich; H. Kampinga (Harm); A. Yamamoto, A.

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe accumulation of ubiquitinated proteinaceous inclusions represents a complex process, reflecting the disequilibrium between aggregate formation and aggregate clearance. Although decreasing aggregate formation or augmenting aggregate clearance will ultimately lead to diminished aggrega

  18. Hydration of highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Thomas S; Weiss, Alexander K H; Randolf, Bernhard R; Rode, Bernd M

    2011-08-01

    Based on a series of ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) simulations, the broad spectrum of structural and dynamical properties of hydrates of trivalent and tetravalent ions is presented, ranging from extreme inertness to immediate hydrolysis. Main group and transition metal ions representative for different parts of the periodic system are treated, as are 2 threefold negatively charged anions. The results show that simple predictions of the properties of the hydrates appear impossible and that an accurate quantum mechanical simulation in cooperation with sophisticated experimental investigations seems the only way to obtain conclusive results.

  19. Great Market Potential of Hydrazine Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Yuying

    2007-01-01

    @@ Stable consumption growth worldwide Hydrazine hydrate is an organic chemical raw material with extensive applications. The world's capacity to produce hydrazine hydrate has reached more than 200 thousand t/atoday (based on 100% hydrazine content).

  20. Measurement of water transport from saturated pumice aggregates to hardening cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Bentz, Dale; Lange, David A.;

    2006-01-01

    In internal water curing of High Performance Concrete, it is fundamental to know how and when the water contained in the internal curing agent is released into the hydrating cement paste. In this study, X-ray absorption measurements showed that considerable transport of water from saturated pumice...... stone to hydrating cement paste with water/cement ratio 0.3 took place in the first days after casting and covered a distance of at least 4 mm. As a consequence, the total amount of water released by the lightweight aggregates, rather than the spatial distribution of the aggregates, is in this case...

  1. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  2. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  3. Interlamellar spacing and average interface undercooling of irregular eutectic in steady-state growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Guang-hui; LIN Xin; HUANG Wei-dong

    2008-01-01

    The average lamellar spacing and interface undercooling in steady-state irregular eutectic growth were estimated based on the Jackson and Hunt's analysis by relaxing the isothermal interface assumption. At low growth rates, the average lamellar spacing and average interface undercooling are dependent only on the characteristic thermo-physical properties of a binary eutectic system. For a general Al-Si eutectic, it is found that the eutectic characteristic length based on the present non-isothermal analysis is consistent with that obtained from isothermal analysis; however, the average interface undercooling is remarkably different between them, and such discrepancy in average interface undercooling increases with increasing of growth rate. The measured interface undercooling obtained from literature is reasonably interpreted by present non-isothermal analysis.

  4. Meloxicam transdermal delivery: effect of eutectic point on the rate and extent of skin permeation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soliman Mohammadi-Samani

    2014-02-01

    Conclusion: This study set out to determine that thymol plays as a skin permeation enhancer and increases the meloxicam skin absorption and this enhancement is significant at the eutectic point of drug-enhancer mixture.

  5. Microstructure Characteristics of Ni-Nb Near Eutectic Alloy during EBFZM Directional Solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Microstructure Characteristic of Ni-Nb near eutectic alloy is systematically investigated during directional solidification with electron beam floating zone melting (EBFZM). The effect of the zone melting rate on the microstructure has also been studied.

  6. Directional growth of Al-Mg2Si eutectic alloy in the SZ2 unmanned spaceship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN; Mingxiang(潘明祥); LI; Shunpu(李顺朴); ZHAO; Deqian(赵德乾); WANG; Weihua(汪卫华); WEN; Ping(闻平); YU; Yude(俞育德); NIE; Yuxin(聂玉昕); ZHAO; Shengxue(赵生旭); ZHUANG; Yanxin(庄艳歆); CHEN; Xichen(陈熙琛)

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the investigation results on directional growth of Al-Mg2Si eutectic alloy in the SZ2 unmanned spaceship. The analysis shows that microgravity has influence on the directional growth of Al-Mg2Si eutectic alloy. The eutectic colony in space-grown sample is larger than that in ground-grown sample, and the directional effect is not so good as that of terrestrial sample. But there is no obvious difference in the lamellar thickness between these samples, and lamellar interspacing in space sample is smaller than that grown on the ground. A simple discussion is done on the gravity effect on the directional growth of Al-Mg2Si eutectic alloy.

  7. Effect of Low Diffusion Coefficient on Eutectic Instability of Al-25 wt%Sm Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Nan

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion coefficient decides the solute diffusion length and is a critical parameter in the selection of microstructure scales and in governing microstructure transitions. Al-25 wt% Sm alloy is selected to reveal the impact of low diffusion coefficient on the eutectic instability, and the results are compared with those of Al-Cu alloys.Laser remelting experiments are performed and the transition growth velocity from eutectic to α-Al dendrite is examined. Compared with Al-Cu alloys, the eutectic instability takes place at a velocity more than one order of magnitude smaller. The theoretical calculation by the Trivedi-Magnin- Kurz (TMK) model also predicts that the eutectic will become instable at smaller growth velocity for Al-Sm alloy than Al-Cu alloy, which is ascribed to the low diffusion coefficient.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-30

    properties of key hydrated cement constituent calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) at the molecular, nanometer scale level. Due to complexity, still unknown...public release; distribution is unlimited. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate- Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure The views... Cement Molecular Structure Report Title Multi-scale modeling of complex material systems requires starting from fundamental building blocks to

  9. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, He; Li, Qiang; Ren, Yang; Fan, Longlong; Chen, Jun; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2016-08-01

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  10. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, He [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Li, Qiang [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Ren, Yang [Argonne National Laboratory, X-Ray Science Division, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Fan, Longlong [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Chen, Jun [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Deng, Jinxia [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Xing, Xianran [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China

    2016-06-06

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  11. Investigation of Wafer Level Au-Si Eutectic Bonding of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) with Silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Bushra, Sobia

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research work was to investigate the low temperature gold silicon eutectic bonding of SMA with silicon wafers. The research work was carried out to optimize a bond process with better yield and higher bond strength. The gold layer thickness, processing temperature, diffusion barrier, adhesive layer, and the removal of silicon oxide are the important parameters in determining a reliable and uniform bond. Based on the previous work on Au-Si eutectic bonding, 7 different Si...

  12. Polyethylene Glycol Drilling Fluid for Drilling in Marine Gas Hydrates-Bearing Sediments: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Kuang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Shale inhibition, low-temperature performance, the ability to prevent calcium and magnesium-ion pollution, and hydrate inhibition of polyethylene glycol drilling fluid were each tested with conventional drilling-fluid test equipment and an experimental gas-hydrate integrated simulation system developed by our laboratory. The results of these tests show that drilling fluid with a formulation of artificial seawater, 3% bentonite, 0.3% Na2CO3, 10% polyethylene glycol, 20% NaCl, 4% SMP-2, 1% LV-PAC, 0.5% NaOH and 1% PVP K-90 performs well in shale swelling and gas hydrate inhibition. It also shows satisfactory rheological properties and lubrication at temperature ranges from −8 °C to 15 °C. The PVP K-90, a kinetic hydrate inhibitor, can effectively inhibit gas hydrate aggregations at a dose of 1 wt%. This finding demonstrates that a drilling fluid with a high addition of NaCl and a low addition of PVP K-90 is suitable for drilling in natural marine gas-hydrate-bearing sediments.

  13. Deep eutectic solvents for the purification of chloromycetin and thiamphenicol from milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guizhen; Zhu, Tao; Row, Kyung Ho

    2017-02-01

    Deep eutectic solvents were used in both dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and solid-phase extraction for the purification of chloromycetin and thiamphenicol from milk. In the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction procedure, deep eutectic solvents mixed with chloroform at different ratios (0:1-5:1, v/v) were used as the extraction agent to optimize the procedure, and the ratio of 2:1 v/v was found to be the best extraction agent with 87.23 and 83.17% recoveries of chloromycetin and thiamphenicol, respectively. Furthermore, deep eutectic solvents were also used to modify molecular imprinted polymers in solid-phase extraction procedure, and the polymers were used to purify chloromycetin and thiamphenicol from milk. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to characterize the polymers. The solid-phase extraction recoveries with deep eutectic solvents with molecularly imprinted polymers (chloromycetin and thiamphenicol, two templates), molecularly imprinted polymers (without deep eutectic solvents), and nonimprinted polymers (without a template) for chloromycetin were 91.23, 82.64, and 57.3%, respectively, and recoveries for thiamphenicol were 87.02, 79.03, and 52.27%, respectively. The recoveries of chloromycetin and thiamphenicol from milk in the solid-phase extraction procedure were higher than using deep eutectic solvents mixed with chloroform as the extraction agent in the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction procedure. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Eutectic Bonding Utilizing Radio Frequency Induction Heating for Fabricating Vertical Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunmi; Kim, Areum; Cui, Yinhua; Chae, Su Jin; Nam, Minwoo; Kwon, Soon Hyeong; Cha, Yong Won; Pyo, Sung Gyu

    2015-11-01

    Vertical light-emitting diodes (VLEDs) have attracted considerable attention owing to their improved thermal, electrical, and optical performance compared to conventional LEDs. To fabricate VLEDs, a bonding technique is required following laser lift-off. Eutectic bonding techniques are preferred owing to their low-heat mechanism and production safety. However, the conventional resistance heating method for eutectic bonding process, the extremely longer process time becomes a problem such as cost rise, wapage. In this study, the thermal efficiency was measured according to the diameter of the coil in order to optimize the eutectic bonding of the RF induction heating method in order to solve this problem. We confirmed that successful eutectic bonding is possible with less than 30 min processing using Sn-Glass. In addition, Au (20 wt%)/Sn (80 wt%) alloy, a mainly used the eutectic bonding interlayer material for VLEDs, can also be used as an interlayer to provide void-free eutectic bonding in less than 30 min.

  15. Phase transformation and deformation behavior of NiTi-Nb eutectic joined NiTi wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liqiang; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Lai-Chang; Chen, Liangyu; Lu, Weijie; Zhang, Di

    2016-04-06

    NiTi wires were brazed together via eutectic reaction between NiTi and Nb powder deposited at the wire contact region. Phase transformation and deformation behavior of the NiTi-Nb eutectic microstructure were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cyclic loading-unloading tests. Results show that R phase and B19' martensite transformation are induced by plastic deformation. R phase transformation, which significantly contributes to superelasticity, preferentially occurs at the interfaces between NiTi and eutectic region. Round-shaped Nb-rich phase with rod-like and lamellar-type eutectics are observed in eutectic regions. These phases appear to affect the deformation behavior of the brazed NiTi-Nb region via five distinct stages in stress-strain curves: (I) R phase reorientation, (II) R phase transformation from parent phase, (III) elastic deformation of reoriented martensite accompanied by the plastic deformation of Nb-rich phase and lamellar NiTi-Nb eutectic, (IV) B19' martensitic transformation, and (V) plastic deformation of the specimen.

  16. A STEEL MATRIX WEAR RESISTANT COMPOSITE REINFORCED BY IN-SITU GRANULAR EUTECTICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.M. Xu; T.X. Li; J.G. Li

    2001-01-01

    A new steel matrix wear resistant composite reinforced by in situ granular eutectics can be obtained by modifying with a Si-Ce-Ti compound in the steel melt. The result indicates that the in situ granular eutectic is a pseudo-eutectic of austenite and (Fe, Mn)3C, which is formed between austenite dendrites during solidification due to the segregation of C and Mn impelled by modifying elements. The quantity of in situ granular eutectic reaches up to 8% 12%, and its grain size is in the range from 10μm to 20μm. The austenite steel matrix wear resistant composite reinforced by in situ granular eutectic (abbreviated AGE composite) and austenite-bainite steel matrix wear resistant composite reinforced by in situ granular eutectic (abbreviated ABGE composite) are obtained in the as-cast state and by air hardening, respectively. The wear resistance of the AGE and ABGE composites can be more greatly increased than that of their matrix steels under low and medium impact working condition.

  17. Formation mechanism of primary phases and eutectic structures within undercooled Pb-Sb-Sn ternary alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The solidification characteristics of three types of Pb-Sb-Sn ternary alloys with different primary phases were studied under substantial undercooling conditions. The experimental results show that primary (Pb) and SbSn phases grow in the dendritic mode, whereas primary (Sb) phase exhibits faceted growth in the form of polygonal blocks and long strips. (Pb) solid solution phase displays strong affinity with SbSn intermetallic compound so that they produce various morphologies of pseudobinary eutectics, but it can only grow in the divorced eutectic mode together with (Sb) phase. Although (Sb) solid solution phase and SbSn intermetallic com- pound may grow cooperatively within ternary eutectic microstructures, they sel- dom form pseudobinary eutectics independently. The (Pb)+(Sb)+SbSn ternary eutectic structure usually shows lamellar morphology, but appears as anomalous eutectic when its volume fraction becomes small. EDS analyses reveal that all of the three primary (Pb), (Sb) and SbSn phases exhibit conspicuous solute trapping effect during rapid solidification, which results in the remarkable extension of sol- ute solubility.

  18. Formation mechanism of primary phases and eutectic structures within undercooled Pb-Sb-Sn ternary alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG WeiLi; DAI FuPing; WEI BingBo

    2007-01-01

    The solidification characteristics of three types of Pb-Sb-Sn ternary alloys with different primary phases were studied under substantial undercooling conditions. The experimental results show that primary (Pb) and SbSn phases grow in the dendritic mode, whereas primary (Sb) phase exhibits faceted growth in the form of polygonal blocks and long strips. (Pb) solid solution phase displays strong affinity with SbSn intermetallic compound so that they produce various morphologies of pseudobinary eutectics, but it can only grow in the divorced eutectic mode together with (Sb) phase. Although (Sb) solid solution phase and SbSn intermetallic compound may grow cooperatively within ternary eutectic microstructures, they seldom form pseudobinary eutectics independently. The (Pb)+(Sb)+SbSn ternary eutectic structure usually shows lamellar morphology, but appears as anomalous eutectic when its volume fraction becomes small. EDS analyses reveal that all of the three primary (Pb), (Sb) and SbSn phases exhibit conspicuous solute trapping effect during rapid solidification, which results in the remarkable extension of solute solubility.

  19. Terahertz sensing of corneal hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul S; Tewari, Priyamvada; Bourges, Jean Louis; Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Bennett, David B; Taylor, Zachary D; Lee, H; Brown, Elliott R; Grundfest, Warren S; Culjat, Martin O

    2010-01-01

    An indicator of ocular health is the hydrodyanmics of the cornea. Many corneal disorders deteriorate sight as they upset the normal hydrodynamics of the cornea. The mechanisms include the loss of endothelial pump function of corneal dystophies, swelling and immune response of corneal graft rejection, and inflammation and edema, which accompany trauma, burn, and irritation events. Due to high sensitivity to changes of water content in materials, a reflective terahertz (300 GHz and 3 THz) imaging system could be an ideal tool to measure the hydration level of the cornea. This paper presents the application of THz technology to visualize the hydration content across ex vivo porcine corneas. The corneas, with a thickness variation from 470 - 940 µm, were successfully imaged using a reflective pulsed THz imaging system, with a maximum SNR of 50 dB. To our knowledge, no prior studies have reported on the use of THz in measuring hydration in corneal tissues or other ocular tissues. These preliminary findings indicate that THz can be used to accurately sense hydration levels in the cornea using a pulsed, reflective THz imaging system.

  20. Physical properties of gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliner, J.T.R.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring, solid crystalline compounds (clathrates) that encapsulate gas molecules inside the lattices of hydrogen bonded water molecules within a specific temperature-pressure stability zone. Estimates of the total quantity of available methane gas in natural occurring hydrates are based on twice the energy content of known conventional fossil fuels reservoirs. Accurate and reliable in-situ quantification techniques are essential in determining the economic viability of this potential energy yield, which is dependent upon several factors such as sensitivity of the temperature-pressure stability zone, sediment type, porosity, permeability, concentration/abundance of free gas, spatial distribution in pore spaces, specific cage occupancy, and the influence of inhibitors. Various techniques like acoustic P and S waves, time domain reflectometry, and electrical resistance have been used to analyze the quantity and spatial distribution of the gas hydrate samples. These techniques were reviewed and the results obtained in the course of gas hydrate research were presented. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Hydration kinetics of transgenic soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Francielle Fracasso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic and experimental analyses of the hydration process of transgenic soybeans (BRS 225 RR are provided. The importance of the hydration process consists of the grain texture modifications which favor grinding and extraction of soybeans. The soaking isotherms were obtained for four different temperatures. Results showed that temperature affected transgenic soybeans´ hydration rate and time. Moisture content d.b. of the soybeans increased from 0.12 ± 0.01 kg kg-1 to 1.45 ± 0.19 kg kg-1 during 270 min. of process. Two models were used to fit the kinetic curves: an empirical model developed by Peleg (1988 and a phenomenological one, proposed by Omoto et al. (2009. The two models adequately represented the hydration kinetics. Peleg model was applied to the experimental data and the corresponding parameters were obtained and correlated to temperature. The model by Omoto et al. (2009 showed a better statistical fitting. Although Ks was affected by temperature (Ks = 0.38079 exp (-2289.3 T-1, the equilibrium concentration remained practically unchanged.

  2. Physical activity, hydration and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Marcos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of mankind, man has sought ways to promote and preserve health as well as to prevent disease. Hydration, physical activity and exercise are key factors for enhancing human health. However, either a little dose of them or an excess can be harmful for health maintenance at any age. Water is an essential nutrient for human body and a major key to survival has been to prevent dehydration. However, there is still a general controversy regarding the necessary amount to drink water or other beverages to properly get an adequate level of hydration. In addition, up to now the tools used to measure hydration are controversial. To this end, there are several important groups of variables to take into account such as water balance, hydration biomarkers and total body water. A combination of methods will be the most preferred tool to find out any risk or situation of dehydration at any age range. On the other hand, physical activity and exercise are being demonstrated to promote health, avoiding or reducing health problems, vascular and inflammatory diseases and helping weight management. Therefore, physical activity is also being used as a pill within a therapy to promote health and reduce risk diseases, but as in the case of drugs, dose, intensity, frequency, duration and precautions have to be evaluated and taken into account in order to get the maximum effectiveness and success of a treatment. On the other hand, sedentariness is the opposite concept to physical activity that has been recently recognized as an important factor of lifestyle involved in the obesogenic environment and consequently in the risk of the non-communicable diseases. In view of the literature consulted and taking into account the expertise of the authors, in this review a Decalogue of global recommendations is included to achieve an adequate hydration and physical activity status to avoid overweight/obesity consequences.

  3. Structural and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from alite hydration in the presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, Oscar, E-mail: oamendoz@unal.edu.co [Grupo del Cemento y Materiales de Construcción (CEMATCO). Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Medellín (Colombia); Giraldo, Carolina [Cementos Argos S.A., Medellín (Colombia); Camargo, Sergio S. [Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro/COPPE, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tobón, Jorge I. [Grupo del Cemento y Materiales de Construcción (CEMATCO). Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Medellín (Colombia)

    2015-08-15

    This research evaluates the effect of sodium and potassium hydroxide on the structure and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from the hydration of pure alite. Monoclinic (MIII) alite was synthesized and hydrated, using water-to-alite ratios of 0.5 and 0.6 and additions of 10% NaOH and KOH by weight of alite. Based on results of X-ray diffraction, isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nanoindentation, two different effects of the alkaline hydroxides on the hydration reaction of alite, both at early and later ages, can be identified: (i) a differentiated hydration process, attributed to an enhancement in calcium hydroxide (CH) precipitation and a stimulation of the C-S-H nuclei; and (ii) an increase in the elastic modulus of the C-S-H aggregations, attributed to an electrostatic attraction between positive charges from the alkaline cations and negative charges from the C-S-H structure.

  4. Preparation of eutectic substrate mixtures for enzymatic conversion of ATC to L-cysteine at high concentration levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Sung Hun; Park, Hae Woong; Choe, Deokyeong; Shin, Chul Soo

    2014-06-01

    High concentration eutectic substrate solutions for the enzymatic production of L-cysteine were prepared. Eutectic melting of binary mixtures consisting of D,L-2-amino-Δ(2)-thiazoline-4-carboxylic acid (ATC) as a substrate and malonic acid occurred at 39 °C with an ATC mole fraction of 0.5. Formation of eutectic mixtures was confirmed using SEM, SEM-EDS, and XPS surface analyses. Sorbitol, MnSO4, and NaOH were used as supplements for the enzymatic reactions. Strategies for sequential addition of five compounds, including a binary ATC mixture and supplements, during preparation of eutectic substrate solutions were established. Eutectic substrate solutions were stable for 24 h. After 6 h of enzymatic reactions, a 550 mM L-cysteine yield was obtained from a 670 mM eutectic ATC solution.

  5. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  7. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goa...... volumes and the needs for high pressure. The process could be interesting for concentration of heat sensitive, high value products......Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...

  8. Effects of Minute Addition of Ni on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Sn-Zn Eutectic Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, P.; Tiwary, C. S.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2016-10-01

    The current work explores the effects of a small addition of Ni on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Sn-Zn eutectic solder alloy (Sn-14.9 at.%Zn). In two sets of experiments, Ni is either added to the eutectic alloy or Zn in the eutectic alloy is replaced by an increasing amount of Ni. The study indicates that small additions of Ni in eutectic Sn-Zn solder (˜0.017 at.%) refines the eutectic microstructure together with the appearance of the small amount of primary Zn plates. Increasing the Ni content to 0.142 at.% and beyond, then an intermetallic phase ϒ-Ni5Zn21 with dendritic morphology appears in the microstructure along with dendrites of primary Sn. The scale of eutectic microstructure shows a decreasing trend till 0.902 at.%Ni with eutectic spacing of 1.98 ± 0.32 μm for this alloy. Further addition of Ni coarsens the microstructure. The replacement of Zn with Ni in the eutectic composition follows a similar trend with a lesser refinement of the microstructure. In both the scenarios, the addition of a small amount of Ni increases the eutectic temperatures till a critical concentration is reached beyond which one can observe a decrease in the eutectic point. The trend is similar for the solid solubility of Zn in Sn while the trend is opposite for the measured eutectic composition, which decreases at the initial stages of Ni addition. Through a detailed measurement of mechanical properties, the study establishes significant improvement of the strength of Sn-Zn solder with small additions of Ni in the alloy with a maximum hardness of 26 ± 1 HV and 0.2% proof stress of 72 ± 3 MPa at room temperature for the eutectic alloy with 0.902 at.%Ni.

  9. Well log characterization of natural gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years we have seen significant advancements in the use of downhole well logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From an early start of using wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments to today where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. The most established and well known use of downhole log data in gas hydrate research is the use of electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data (both compressional- and shear-wave data) to make estimates of gas hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. New downhole logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation resistivity log measurements have provided the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly inter-bedded and fracture dominated gas hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing have also allowed for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids (i.e., free-water along with clay and capillary bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms controlling the formation and occurrence of gas hydrate in nature along with data on gas hydrate reservoir properties (i.e., permeabilities) needed to accurately predict gas production rates for various gas hydrate

  10. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn

    2009-11-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  11. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, D.D.; Martin, A.I.; Yun, T.S.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. The effect of hydrate saturation on water retention curves in hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Zheng, Xianglei; Jang, Jaewon

    2016-05-01

    The experimental measurement of water retention curve in hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behavior of hydrate dissociation and gas production. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is selected as hydrate former. The pore habit of THF hydrates is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel. It is confirmed that THF hydrates are not wetting phase on the quartz surface of the micromodel and occupy either an entire pore or part of pore space resulting in change in pore size distribution. And the measurement of water retention curves in THF hydrate-bearing sediments with hydrate saturation ranging from Sh = 0 to Sh = 0.7 is conducted for excess water condition. The experimental results show that the gas entry pressure and the capillary pressure increase with increasing hydrate saturation. Based on the experimental results, fitting parameters for van Genuchten equation are suggested for different hydrate saturation conditions.

  13. Comparisons of Co-C and Pd-C Eutectic-Point Cells for Thermocouple Calibration Between NMIA and NMIJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, H.; Jahan, F.; Yamazawa, K.

    2017-02-01

    Comparisons between NMIA and NMIJ on the melting temperatures of the Co-C eutectic point and the Pd-C eutectic point were performed using an NMIJ high-temperature furnace. The eutectic-point cells were constructed by NMIA and NMIJ following two different specifications. NMIA designed two miniature crucibles, one for Co-C and one for Pd-C eutectic-point cells. NMIJ designed larger eutectic-point cells, one for Co-C and one for Pd-C eutectic-point cells. Prior to performing the comparisons, the effect of conductive heat flow through the thermocouple stem was evaluated during the melting. The comparisons of the Co-C eutectic-point cells and of the Pd-C eutectic-point cells were performed using types R, B and Pt/Pd thermocouples. Despite the different cell designs and different material sources, the melting temperatures of the Co-C and Pd-C eutectic-point cells under investigation agreed within 0.1°C.

  14. Highly Efficient Enzymatic Preparation of Daidzein in Deep Eutectic Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Bin Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Daidzein, which is scarce in nature, has gained significant attention due to its superior biological activity and bioavailability compared with daidzin. So far, it has been widely used in the medicine and health care products industries. The enzymatic approach for the preparation of daidzein has prevailed, benefitted by its high efficiency and eco-friendly nature. Our present research aimed at providing a preparation method of daidzein by enzymatic hydrolysis of daidzin in a new “green” reaction medium-deep eutectic solvents (DESs. Herein, the DESs were screened via evaluating enzyme activity, enzyme stability and the substrate solubility, and the DES (ChCl/EG 2:1, 30 vol % was believed to be the most appropriate co-solvent to improve the bioconversion efficiency. Based on the yield of daidzein, response surface methodology (RSM was employed to model and optimize the reaction parameters. Under these optimum process conditions, the maximum yield of 97.53% was achieved and the purity of daidzein crude product reached more than 70%, which is more efficient than conversions in DESs-free buffer. Importantly, it has been shown that DESs medium could be reused for six batches of the process with a final conversion of above 50%. The results indicated that this procedure could be considered a mild, environmentally friendly, highly efficient approach to the economical production of daidzein, with a simple operation process and without any harmful reagents being involved.

  15. Use of eutectic mixture of local anesthetics in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, S

    1999-01-01

    The Eutectic Mixture of Local Anesthetics (EMLA) is a topical application, which has proved to be a useful medication for providing pain relief among children. It is an emulsion containing a 1:1 mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine. The high concentration of the uncharged anesthetic base in the microdroplets of the emulsion ensure effective skin penetration. In the pediatric population EMLA has been shown to be efficacious when it is used prior to venipuncture, cannulation, lumbar puncture, laser treatment of port wine stains, curettage of molluscum contagiosum or vaccination. For several of these indications, the efficacy has been documented by double blind controlled trials, that have used objective and quasi-objective scales for assessing pain relief. The dose of EMLA is between 0.5 to 1 gram, and the cream should be applied half to one hour prior to the procedure. Local side effects are very mild, and the only systemic side effect of importance is the risk of methemoglobinemia in young infants. The literature has conflicting reports about the safety of EMLA in neonates.

  16. Purification of biodiesel by choline chloride based deep eutectic solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niawanti, Helda; Zullaikah, Siti; Rachimoellah, M.

    2017-05-01

    Purification is a crucial step in biodiesel production to meet the biodiesel standard. This study purified biodiesel using choline chloride based deep eutectic solvent (DES). DES was used to reduce unreacted oil and unsaponifiable matter in rice bran oil based biodiesel. The objective of this work was to study the effect of extraction time using DES on the content and yield of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME). Rice bran used in this work contains 16.49 % of oil with initial free fatty acids (FFA) of 44.75 %. Acid catalyzed methanolysis was employed to convert rice bran oil (RBO) into biodiesel under following operation conditions: T = 60 °C, t = 8 h, molar ratio of oil to methanol = 1/10, H2SO4 = 1% w/w of oil. Rice bran oil based biodiesel obtained contain 89.05 % of FAME with very low FFA content (0.05 %). DES was made from a mixture of choline chloride and ethylene glycol with molar ratio of 1/2. Molar ratio of crude biodiesel to DES were 1/2 and 1/4. Extraction time was varied from 15 minutes to 240 minutes at 30 °C. The highest FAME content was obtained after purification for 240 min. at molar ratio crude biodiesel to DES 1/4 was 96.60 %. This work shows that DES has potential to purify biodiesel from non-edible raw material, such as RBO.

  17. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hiléia K S; Uknalis, Joseph; Liu, Shih-Chuan; Gonçalves, Maria P; Liu, LinShu

    2015-09-01

    Very recently our group has produced novel agar-based fibers by an electrospinning technique using water as solvent and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as co-blending polymer. Here, we tested the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl)trimethylammonium chloride/urea prepared at 1:2 molar ratio, as an alternative solvent medium for agar electrospinning. The electrospun materials were collected with an ethanol bath adapted to a previous electrospinning set-up. One weight percent agar-in-DES showed improved viscoelasticity and hence, spinnability, when compared to 1 wt% agar-in-water and pure agar nanofibers were successfully electrospun if working above the temperature of sol-gel transition (∼80 °C). By changing the solvent medium we decreased the PVA concentration (5 wt% starting solution) and successfully produced composite fibers with high agar contents (50/50 agar/PVA). Best composite fibers were formed with the 50/50 and 30/70 agar/PVA solutions. These fibers were mechanically resistant, showed tailorable surface roughness and diverse size distributions, with most of the diameters falling in the sub-micron range. Both nano and micro forms of agar fibers (used separately or combined) may have potential for the design of new and highly functional agar-based materials.

  18. Characteristics of Eutectic α(Cr,Fe)-(Cr,Fe)23C6 in the Eutectic Fe-Cr-C Hardfacing Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hsuan-Han; Hsieh, Chih-Chun; Lin, Chi-Ming; Wu, Weite

    2016-10-01

    A specific eutectic (Cr,Fe)-(Cr,Fe)23C6 structure had been previously reported in the research studies of Fe-Cr-C hardfacing alloys. In this study, a close observation and discussion of the eutectic (Cr,Fe)-(Cr,Fe)23C6 were conducted. The eutectic solidification occurred when the chromium content of the alloy exceeded 35 wt pct. The eutectic structure showed a triaxial radial fishbone structure which was the so called "complex regular structure." Lamellar costa plates showed local asymmetry at two sides of a spine. Individual costae were able to combine as one, and spines showed extra branches. Costae that were nearly parallel to the heat flow direction were longer than those that were vertical to the heat flow direction. The triaxial spines preferred to intersect at 120 deg, while the costae preferred to intersect the spine at 90 deg and 35.26 deg due to the lattice relationships. The solidified metal near the fusion boundary showed an irregular structure instead of a complex regular structure. The reason for the irregular morphology was the high growth rate near the fusion boundary.

  19. Hydration, Ionic Valence and Cross-Linking Propensities of Cations Determine the Stability of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Agrinaldo; Pontes, Frederico J.; Lins, Roberto D.; Soares, Thereza A.

    2013-10-29

    The supra-molecular structure of LPS aggregates governs outer membrane permeability and activation of the host immune response during Gram-negative bacterial infections. Molecular dynamics simulations unveil at atomic resolution 10 the subtle balance between cation hydration and cross-link ability in modulating phase transitions of LPS membranes.

  20. Transformation of eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension fabricating with solvent evaporation and ultrasonication technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phaechamud T

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Thawatchai Phaechamud,1 Sarun Tuntarawongsa2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, 2Pharmaceutical Intelligence Unit Prachote Plengwittaya, Faculty of Pharmacy, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand Abstract: Eutectic solvent can solubilize high amount of some therapeutic compounds. Volatile eutectic solvent is interesting to be used as solvent in the preparation of nanosuspension with emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The mechanism of transformation from the eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension was investigated in this study. The 30% w/w ibuprofen eutectic solution was used as the internal phase, and the external phase is composed of Tween 80 as emulsifier. Ibuprofen nanosuspension was prepared by eutectic emulsion solvent evaporating method followed with ultrasonication. During evaporation process, the ibuprofen concentration in emulsion droplets was increased leading to a drug supersaturation but did not immediately recrystallize because of low glass transition temperature (Tg of ibuprofen. The contact angle of the internal phase on ibuprofen was apparently lower than that of the external phase at all times of evaporation, indicating that the ibuprofen crystals were preferentially wetted by the internal phase than the external phase. From calculated dewetting value ibuprofen crystallization occurred in the droplet. Crystallization of the drug was initiated with external mechanical force, and the particle size of the drug was larger due to Ostwald ripening. Cavitation force from ultrasonication minimized the ibuprofen crystals to the nanoscale. Particle size and zeta potential of formulated ibuprofen nanosuspension were 330.87±51.49 nm and -31.1±1.6 mV, respectively, and exhibited a fast dissolution. Therefore, the combination of eutectic emulsion solvent evaporation method with ultrasonication was favorable for fabricating an ibuprofen nanosuspension, and the transformation mechanism was attained successfully. Keywords

  1. Investigation of Au/Si Eutectic Wafer Bonding for MEMS Accelerometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongling Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Au/Si eutectic bonding is considered to BE a promising technology for creating 3D structures and hermetic packaging in micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS devices. However, it suffers from the problems of a non-uniform bonding interface and complex processes for the interconnection of metal wires. This paper presents a novel Au/Si eutectic wafer bonding structure and an implementation method for MEMS accelerometer packaging. The related processing parameters influencing the Au/Si eutectic bonding quality were widely investigated. It was found that a high temperature of 400 °C with a low heating/cooling rate of 5 °C/min is crucial for successful Au/Si eutectic bonding. High contact force is beneficial for bonding uniformity, but the bonding strength and bonding yield decrease when the contact force increases from 3000 to 5000 N due to the metal squeezing out of the interface. The application of TiW as an adhesion layer on a glass substrate, compared with a commonly used Cr or Ti layer, significantly improves the bonding quality. The bonding strength is higher than 50 MPa, and the bonding yield is above 90% for the presented Au/Si eutectic bonding. Furthermore, the wafer-level vacuum packaging of the MEMS accelerometer was achieved based on Au/Si eutectic bonding and anodic bonding with one process. Testing results show a nonlinearity of 0.91% and a sensitivity of 1.06 V/g for the MEMS accelerometer. This Au/Si eutectic bonding process can be applied to the development of reliable, low-temperature, low-cost fabrication and hermetic packaging for MEMS devices.

  2. Eutectic and solid-state wafer bonding of silicon with gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abouie, Maryam; Liu, Qi [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2V4 (Canada); Ivey, Douglas G., E-mail: doug.ivey@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2V4 (Canada)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eutectic and solid-state Au-Si bonding are compared for both a-Si and c-Si samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exchange of a-Si and Au layer was observed in both types of bonded samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of c-Si for bonding resulted in formation of craters at the Au/c-Si interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid-state Au-Si bonding produces better bonds in terms of microstructure. - Abstract: The simple Au-Si eutectic, which melts at 363 Degree-Sign C, can be used to bond Si wafers. However, faceted craters can form at the Au/Si interface as a result of anisotropic and non-uniform reaction between Au and crystalline silicon (c-Si). These craters may adversely affect active devices on the wafers. Two possible solutions to this problem were investigated in this study. One solution was to use an amorphous silicon layer (a-Si) that was deposited on the c-Si substrate to bond with the Au. The other solution was to use solid-state bonding instead of eutectic bonding, and the wafers were bonded at a temperature (350 Degree-Sign C) below the Au-Si eutectic temperature. The results showed that the a-Si layer prevented the formation of craters and solid-state bonding not only required a lower bonding temperature than eutectic bonding, but also prevented spill out of the solder resulting in strong bonds with high shear strength in comparison with eutectic bonding. Using amorphous silicon, the maximum shear strength for the solid-state Au-Si bond reached 15.2 MPa, whereas for the eutectic Au-Si bond it was 13.2 MPa.

  3. Microbial community dynamics in soil aggregates shape biogeochemical gas fluxes from soil profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    Microbial communities inhabiting soil aggregates dynamically adjust their activity and composition in response to variations in hydration and other external conditions. These rapid dynamics shape signatures of biogeochemical activity and gas fluxes emitted from soil profiles. Mechanistic models of microbial processes in unsaturated aggregate pore networks revealed dynamic interplay between oxic and anoxic microsites that are jointly shaped by hydration and by aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities. The spatial extent of anoxic niches (hotspots) flicker in time (hot moments) and support significant anaerobic microbial activity even in aerated soil profiles. We employed an individual-based model for microbial community life in soil aggregate assemblies represented by 3-D angular pore networks with profiles of water, carbon, and oxygen that vary with soil depth as boundary conditions. The study integrates microbial activity within aggregates of different sizes and soil depth to obtain biogeochemical fluxes over the soil profile. The results quantify impacts of dynamic shifts in microbial community composition on CO2 and N2O production rates in soil profiles in good agreement with experimental data. Aggregate size distribution and the shape of resource profiles in a soil determine how hydration dynamics shape denitrification and carbon utilization rates. Results from the mechanistic model for microbial activity in aggregates of different sizes were used to derive parameters for analytical representation of soil biogeochemical processes across large scales of interest for hydrological and climate models.

  4. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  5. Platelet activation and aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Sander; Larsen, O H; Christiansen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a new laboratory model of whole blood platelet aggregation stimulated by endogenously generated thrombin, and explores this aspect in haemophilia A in which impaired thrombin generation is a major hallmark. The method was established to measure platelet aggregation initiated...

  6. Synthesis of hydrated lutetium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Liu [South China Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Guangdong (China); Rong-jun Ma [Changsha Research Institute of Minig and Metallurgy, Hunan (China)

    1997-09-01

    Crystalline lutetium carbonate was synthesized for the corresponding chloride using ammonium bicarbonate as precipitant. The chemical analyses suggest that the synthesized lutetium carbonate is a hydrated basic carbonate or oxycarbonate. The X-ray powder diffraction data are presented. The IR data for the compound show the presence of two different carbonate groups. There is no stable intermediate carbonate in the process of thermal decomposition of the lutetium carbonate. (au) 15 refs.

  7. Aggregates from mineral wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baic Ireneusz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem concerning the growing demand for natural aggregates and the need to limit costs, including transportation from remote deposits, cause the increase in growth of interest in aggregates from mineral wastes as well as in technologies of their production and recovery. The paper presents the issue related to the group of aggregates other than natural. A common name is proposed for such material: “alternative aggregates”. The name seems to be fully justified due to adequacy of this term because of this raw materials origin and role, in comparison to the meaning of natural aggregates based on gravel and sand as well as crushed stones. The paper presents characteristics of the market and basic application of aggregates produced from mineral wastes, generated in the mining, power and metallurgical industries as well as material from demolished objects.

  8. Crystallite size distributions of marine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapp, S.A.; Bohrmann, G.; Abegg, F. [Bremen Univ., Bremen (Germany). Research Center of Ocean Margins; Hemes, S.; Klein, H.; Kuhs, W.F. [Gottingen Univ., Gottingen (Germany). Dept. of Crystallography

    2008-07-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to determine the crystallite size distributions of natural gas hydrate samples retrieved from the Gulf of Mexico, the Black Sea, and a hydrate ridge located near offshore Oregon. Synchrotron radiation technology was used to provide the high photon fluxes and high penetration depths needed to accurately analyze the bulk sediment samples. A new beam collimation diffraction technique was used to measure gas hydrate crystallite sizes. The analyses showed that gas hydrate crystals were globular in shape. Mean crystallite sizes ranged from 200 to 400 {mu}m for hydrate samples taken from the sea floor. Larger grain sizes in the hydrate ridge samples suggested differences in hydrate formation ages or processes. A comparison with laboratory-produced methane hydrate samples showed half a lognormal curve with a mean value of 40{mu}m. Results of the study showed that a cautious approach must be adopted when transposing crystallite-size sensitive physical data from laboratory-made gas hydrates to natural settings. It was concluded that crystallite size information may also be used to resolve the formation ages of gas hydrates when formation processes and conditions are constrained. 48 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  9. IMPORTANCE OF HYDRATION IN SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vasić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Importance of hydration is detrmined by importance of functions of water in the human organism: i.e. regulation of body temperature, transport, excretion of waste materials through urine, digestion of food which is facilititated by saliva and gastric juices, maintenance of flexibility of organs and tissues About 60 % body mass of an adult person (males: 61 %, females: 54 % is made up of water. Water content of a newly born baby reaches 77 %, and it is up to 50 % in adults. It is very important for sportsmen to provide adequate hydration during and after the time of bodily activities. A symptom of water shortage is thirst. However, thirst is a late response of an organism and it occurs when dehydration has already taken place. Minimum in take of fluids in humans should range between one-and-half to two liters. It has been known for a long time that there is no success in sport without proper hydration in a sportsman.

  10. Marine Synechococcus Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuer, S.; Deng, W.; Cruz, B. N.; Monks, L.

    2016-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are considered to play an important role in the oceanic biological carbon pump, especially in oligotrophic regions. But as single cells are too small to sink, their carbon export has to be mediated by aggregate formation and possible consumption by zooplankton producing sinking fecal pellets. Here we report results on the aggregation of the ubiquitous marine pico-cyanobacterium Synechococcus as a model organism. We first investigated the mechanism behind such aggregation by studying the potential role of transparent exopolymeric particles (TEP) and the effects of nutrient (nitrogen or phosphorus) limitation on the TEP production and aggregate formation of these pico-cyanobacteria. We further studied the aggregation and subsequent settling in roller tanks and investigated the effects of the clays kaolinite and bentonite in a series of concentrations. Our results show that despite of the lowered growth rates, Synechococcus in nutrient limited cultures had larger cell-normalized TEP production, formed a greater volume of aggregates, and resulted in higher settling velocities compared to results from replete cultures. In addition, we found that despite their small size and lack of natural ballasting minerals, Synechococcus cells could still form aggregates and sink at measureable velocities in seawater. Clay minerals increased the number and reduced the size of aggregates, and their ballasting effects increased the sinking velocity and carbon export potential of aggregates. In comparison with the Synechococcus, we will also present results of the aggregation of the pico-cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus in roller tanks. These results contribute to our understanding in the physiology of marine Synechococcus as well as their role in the ecology and biogeochemistry in oligotrophic oceans.

  11. Natural deep eutectic solvents as new potential media for green technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Yuntao [Natural Products Laboratory, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Spronsen, Jaap van; Witkamp, Geert-Jan [Laboratory for Process Equipment, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Verpoorte, Robert [Natural Products Laboratory, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Choi, Young Hae, E-mail: y.choi@chem.leidenuniv.nl [Natural Products Laboratory, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-03-05

    Highlights: ► Natural products were used as a source for deep eutectic solvents and ionic liquids. ► We define own chemical and physical properties of natural deep eutectic solvents. ► Interaction between natural deep eutectic solvents and solutes was confirmed by NMR. ► The developed natural deep eutectic solvents were applied as green media. - Abstract: Developing new green solvents is one of the key subjects in Green Chemistry. Ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents, thus, have been paid great attention to replace current harsh organic solvents and have been applied to many chemical processing such as extraction and synthesis. However, current ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents have still limitations to be applied to a real chemical industry due to toxicity against human and environment and high cost of ILs and solid state of most deep eutectic solvents at room temperature. Recently we discovered that many plant abundant primary metabolites changed their state from solid to liquid when they were mixed in proper ratio. This finding made us hypothesize that natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) play a role as alternative media to water in living organisms and tested a wide range of natural products, which resulted in discovery of over 100 NADES from nature. In order to prove deep eutectic feature the interaction between the molecules was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All the tested NADES show clear hydrogen bonding between components. As next step physical properties of NADES such as water activity, density, viscosity, polarity and thermal properties were measured as well as the effect of water on the physical properties. In the last stage the novel NADES were applied to the solubilization of wide range of biomolecules such as non-water soluble bioactive natural products, gluten, starch, and DNA. In most cases the solubility of the biomolecules evaluated in this study was greatly higher than water. Based on the

  12. Construction and Characterization of Mini-ruthenium-Carbon Eutectic Cells for Industrial Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diril, A.; Bourson, F.; Parga, C.; Sadli, M.

    2015-12-01

    High-temperature eutectic fixed points have proved to be convenient tools for temperature scale dissemination and thermometer calibrations/checks at temperatures above 1100°C. In order to investigate the feasibility of metal-carbon eutectic cells in industrial applications as a means for assessing the traceability of non-contact thermometers, a batch of cells was constructed at LNE-Cnam, NPL, and TUBITAK UME. Compared to the usual dimensions of high-temperature fixed point cells (45 mm in length × 24 mm in diameter), a new cell design was created to fit with industrial applications. TUBITAK UME constructed and characterized five ruthenium-carbon (Ru-C) eutectic cells of dimensions 24 mm in length × 24 mm in diameter. One of these cells has been selected and characterized at CEA premises. Ru-C eutectic cells have been evaluated in terms of short-term repeatability, reproducibility, furnace effect, sharp temperature ramps, and the effect of cell location. Measurements at TÜBİTAK UME have been performed with a transfer standard pyrometer calibrated at the copper point and a BB3500pg high-temperature blackbody furnace was used for construction and measurement. For the measurements at CEA, a Land Standard—HIMERT S1 radiation thermometer and a VITI induction furnace were used. In this article results of the measurements at TÜBİTAK UME and CEA will be presented. The possible use of these mini-eutectic cells as industrial temperature standards will be discussed.

  13. Microstructural evolution of ternary Ag33Cu42Ge25 eutectic alloy inside ultrasonic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic field with a frequency of 20 kHz is introduced into the solidification process of ternary Ag33Cu42Ge25 eutectic alloy from the sample bottom to its top. The ultrasound stimulates the nucleation of alloy melt and prevents its bulk undercooling. At low ultrasound power of 250 W, the primary ε2 phase in the whole alloy sample grows into non-faceted equiaxed grains, which differs to its faceted morphology of long strip under static condition. The pseudobinary (Ag+ε2 eutectic transits from dendrite shape grain composed of rod type eutectic to equiaxed chrysanthemus shape formed by lamellar structure. By contrast, the ultrasound produces no obvious variation in the morphology of ternary (Ag+Ge+ε2 eutectic except a coarsening effect. When ultrasound power rises to 500 W, divorced ternary (Ag+Ge+ε2 eutectic forms at the sample bottom. However, in the upper part, the ultrasonic energy weakens, and it only brings about prominent refining effect to primary ε2 phase. The microstructural evolution mechanism is investigated on the cavitation, acoustic streaming and acoustic attenuation.

  14. Microstructural evolution of ternary Ag33Cu42Ge25 eutectic alloy inside ultrasonic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhai; Xiaoyu Lu; Bingbo Wei

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic field with a frequency of 20 kHz is introduced into the solidification process of ternary Ag33Cu42Ge25 eutectic alloy from the sample bottom to its top. The ultrasound stimulates the nucleation of alloy melt and prevents its bulk undercooling. At low ultrasound power of 250 W, the primary ε2 phase in the whole alloy sample grows into non-faceted equiaxed grains, which differs to its faceted morphology of long strip under static condition. The pseudobinary (Ag+ε2) eutectic transits from dendrite shape grain composed of rod type eutectic to equiaxed chrysanthemus shape formed by lamellar structure. By contrast, the ultrasound produces no obvious variation in the morphology of ternary (Ag+Ge+ε2) eutectic except a coarsening effect. When ultrasound power rises to 500 W, divorced ternary (Ag+Ge+ε2) eutectic forms at the sample bottom. However, in the upper part, the ultrasonic energy weakens, and it only brings about prominent refining effect to primaryε2 phase. The microstructural evolution mechanism is investigated on the cavitation, acoustic streaming and acoustic attenuation.

  15. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  16. Cement-aggregate compatibility and structure property relationships including modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, H.M.; Xi, Y.

    1993-07-15

    The role of aggregate, and its interface with cement paste, is discussed with a view toward establishing models that relate structure to properties. Both short (nm) and long (mm) range structure must be considered. The short range structure of the interface depends not only on the physical distribution of the various phases, but also on moisture content and reactivity of aggregate. Changes that occur on drying, i.e. shrinkage, may alter the structure which, in turn, feeds back to alter further drying and shrinkage. The interaction is dynamic, even without further hydration of cement paste, and the dynamic characteristic must be considered in order to fully understand and model its contribution to properties. Microstructure and properties are two subjects which have been pursued somewhat separately. This review discusses both disciplines with a view toward finding common research goals in the future. Finally, comment is made on possible chemical reactions which may occur between aggregate and cement paste.

  17. Protein aggregate myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregate myopathies (PAM are an emerging group of muscle diseases characterized by structural abnormalities. Protein aggregate myopathies are marked by the aggregation of intrinsic proteins within muscle fibers and fall into four major groups or conditions: (1 desmin-related myopathies (DRM that include desminopathies, a-B crystallinopathies, selenoproteinopathies caused by mutations in the, a-B crystallin and selenoprotein N1 genes, (2 hereditary inclusion body myopathies, several of which have been linked to different chromosomal gene loci, but with as yet unidentified protein product, (3 actinopathies marked by mutations in the sarcomeric ACTA1 gene, and (4 myosinopathy marked by a mutation in the MYH-7 gene. While PAM forms 1 and 2 are probably based on impaired extralysosomal protein degradation, resulting in the accumulation of numerous and diverse proteins (in familial types in addition to respective mutant proteins, PAM forms 3 and 4 may represent anabolic or developmental defects because of preservation of sarcomeres outside of the actin and myosin aggregates and dearth or absence of other proteins in these actin or myosin aggregates, respectively. The pathogenetic principles governing protein aggregation within muscle fibers and subsequent structural sarcomeres are still largely unknown in both the putative catabolic and anabolic forms of PAM. Presence of inclusions and their protein composition in other congenital myopathies such as reducing bodies, cylindrical spirals, tubular aggregates and others await clarification. The hitherto described PAMs were first identified by immunohistochemistry of proteins and subsequently by molecular analysis of their genes.

  18. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  19. SEISMIC STUDIES OF MARINE GAS HYDRATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Haibin

    2003-01-01

    We give a brief introduction of developments of seismic methods in the studies of marine gas hydrates. Then we give an example of seismic data processing for BSRs in western Nankai accretionary prism, a typical gas hydrate distribution region. Seismic data processing is proved to be important to obtain better images of BSRs distribution. Studies of velocity structure of hydrated sediments are useful for better understanding the distribution of gas hydrates. Using full waveform inversion, we successfully derived high-resolution velocity model of a double BSR in eastern Nankai Trough area. Recent survey and research show that gas hydrates occur in the marine sediments of the South China Sea and East China Sea.But we would like to say seismic researches on gas hydrate in China are very preliminary.

  20. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  1. Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy for Structure-II Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeya, Kei; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has a charact...

  2. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  3. Aggregated Computational Toxicology Online Resource

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Aggregated Computational Toxicology Online Resource (AcTOR) is EPA's online aggregator of all the public sources of chemical toxicity data. ACToR aggregates data...

  4. Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy shows a sparingly hydrated interface and low counterion mobility in triflate micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Filipe S; Chaimovich, Hernan; Cuccovia, Iolanda M; Buchner, Richard

    2013-08-13

    The properties of ionic micelles are affected by the nature of the counterion. Specific ion effects can be dramatic, inducing even shape and phase changes in micellar solutions, transitions apparently related to micellar hydration and counterion binding at the micellar interface. Thus, determining the hydration and dynamics of ions in micellar systems capable of undergoing such transitions is a crucial step in understanding shape and phase changes. For cationic micelles, such transitions are common with large organic anions as counterions. Interestingly, however, phase separation also occurs for dodecyltrimethylammonium triflate (DTATf) micelles in the presence of sodium triflate (NaTf). Specific ion effects for micellar solutions of dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DTAC), bromide (DTAB), methanesulfonate (DTAMs), and triflate (DTATf) were studied with dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS), a technique capable of monitoring hydration and counterion dynamics of micellar aggregates. In comparison to DTAB, DTAC, and DTAMs, DTATf micelles were found to be considerably less hydrated and showed reduced counterion mobility at the micellar interface. The obtained DTATf and DTAMs data support the reported central role of the anion's -CF3 moiety with respect to the properties of DTATf micelles. The reduced hydration observed for DTATf micelles was rationalized in terms of the higher packing of this surfactant compared to that of other DTA-based systems. The decreased mobility of Tf(-) anions condensed at the DTATf interface strongly suggests the insertion of Tf(-) in the micellar interface, which is apparently driven by the strong hydrophobicity of -CF3.

  5. Prediction of Refrigerant Gas Hydrates Formation Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deqing Liang; Ruzhu Wang; Kaihua Guo; Shuanshi Fan

    2001-01-01

    A fugacity model was developed for prediction of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates formation conditions based on the molecule congregation and solution theories. In this model, g as hydrates were regarded as non-ideal solid solution composed of water groups and guest molecules, and the expressions of fugacity of guest molecules in hydrate phase was proposed accordingly. It has been shown that the developed model can indicate successfully the effect of guest-guest molecule interaction. The results showed that the model can describe better the characteristics of phase equilibrium of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates and predictions are in good agreement with experimental data.

  6. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO)

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  7. Estimating the Eutectic Composition of Simple Binary Alloy System Using Linear Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Olawale Hakeem AMUDA

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple linear equation was developed and applied to a hypothetical binary equilibrium diagram to evaluate the eutectic composition of the binary alloy system. Solution of the equations revealed that the eutectic composition of the case study Pb – Sn, Bi – Cd and Al – Si alloys are 39.89% Pb, 60.11% Sn, 58.01% Bi, 41.99% Cd and 90.94% Al, 9.06% Si respectively. These values are very close to experimental values. The percent deviation of analytical values from experimental values ranged between 2.87 and 5% for the three binary systems considered, except for Si – Al alloy in which the percent deviation for the silicon element was 22%.It is concluded that equation of straight line could be used to predict the eutectic composition of simple binary alloys within tolerable experimental deviation range of 2.5%.

  8. Evolution of eutectic structures in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys during heat treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xi-gang; JIANG Da-ming; MENG Qing-chang; ZHANG Bao-you; WANG Tao

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the eutectic structures in the alloys with different copper contents during heat treatment was studied by scanning electron microscopy(SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy(EDS), and differential scanning calorimetry(DSC). The as cast microstructures involve α(Al), eutectic(α(Al) + Mg(Al, Cu, Zn)2) and Al7Cu2Fe. The Al2CuMg particles form during heat treatment. The volume of coarse phases decreases quickly in the initial 12 h during heat treatment. The volume of coarse phases change a little at 400 and 420 ℃. Copper content has a great influence on the evolution of the eutectic. The coarse phases dissolve slowly in alloy with higher copper content.

  9. Effect of erbium on properties and microstructure of Al-Si eutectic alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING

    2010-01-01

    Eutectic Al-12.6 wt.%Si alloys with various contents of the rare earth dement Er were prepared by the conventional casting technique.The effect of Er on the microstructure and properties of the eutectic Al-Si alloys was investigated using optical microscopy,scanning electron microscopy as well as the friction and wear tests.It was found that the addition of Er obviously improved the anti-wear properties,and reduced the friction coefficient of the alloys.The appropriate addition of Er would change the size and shape of the eutectic silicon,and thereby refine the microstructure of the Al-Si alloys.The refinement mechanism was also discussed.

  10. Ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents in natural products research: mixtures of solids as extraction solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yuntao; van Spronsen, Jaap; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2013-11-22

    Mixtures of solid chemicals may become liquid under certain conditions. These liquids are characterized by the formation of strong ionic (ionic liquids) or hydrogen bonds (deep eutectic solvents). Due to their extremely low vapor pressure, they are now widely used in polymer chemistry and synthetic organic chemistry, yet little attention has been paid to their use as extraction solvents of natural products. This review summarizes the preparation of ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents with natural product components and recent progress in their applications to the extraction and analysis of natural products as well as the recovery of extracted compounds from their extracts. Additionally, various factors affecting extraction features of ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents, as well as potential useful technologies including microwave and ultrasound to increase the extraction efficiency, are discussed.

  11. One-pot multi-component synthesis of 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives in biocompatible deep eutectic solvents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suhas Pednekar; Rahul Bhalerao; Nitin Ghadge

    2013-05-01

    An efficient protocol for the synthesis of differently substituted 1, 4-dihydropyridines in deep eutectic solvents under solvent-free conditions is reported here. Excellent yields of the resultant products have been obtained. Recyclability studies have also been performed for deep eutectic solvents with very little loss in activity up to five recycles.

  12. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  13. Structural characterization of astaxanthin aggregates as revealed by analysis and simulation of optical spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Liping; Hu, Taoping; Xu, Zhigang

    2017-10-01

    Carotenoids can self-assemble in hydrated polar solvents to form J- or H-type aggregates, inducing dramatic changes in photophysical properties. Here, we measured absorption and emission spectra of astaxanthin in ethanol-water solution using ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectrometers. Two types of aggregates were distinguished in mixed solution at different water contents by absorption spectra. After addition of water, all probed samples immediately formed H-aggregates with maximum blue shift of 31 nm. In addition, J-aggregate was formed in 1:3 ethanol-water solution measured after an hour. Based on Frenkel exciton model, we calculated linear absorption and emission spectra of these aggregates to describe aggregate structures in solution. For astaxanthin, experimental results agreed well with the fitted spectra of H-aggregate models, which consisted of tightly packed stacks of individual molecules, including hexamers, trimers, and dimers. Transition moment of single astaxanthin in ethanol was obtained by Gaussian 09 program package to estimate the distance between molecules in aggregates. Intermolecular distance of astaxanthin aggregates ranges from 0.45 nm to 0.9 nm. Fluorescence analysis showed that between subbands, strong exciton coupling induced rapid relaxation of H-aggregates. This coupling generated larger Stokes shift than monomers and J-aggregates.

  14. Recycled aggregates concrete: aggregate and mix properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Fonteboa, B.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This study of structural concrete made with recycled concrete aggregate focuses on two issues: 1. The characterization of such aggregate on the Spanish market. This involved conducting standard tests to determine density, water absorption, grading, shape, flakiness and hardness. The results obtained show that, despite the considerable differences with respect to density and water absorption between these and natural aggregates, on the whole recycled aggregate is apt for use in concrete production. 2. Testing to determine the values of basic concrete properties: mix design parameters were established for structural concrete in non-aggressive environments. These parameters were used to produce conventional concrete, and then adjusted to manufacture recycled concrete aggregate (RCA concrete, in which 50% of the coarse aggregate was replaced by the recycled material. Tests were conducted to determine the physical (density of the fresh and hardened material, water absorption and mechanical (compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and modulus of elasticity properties. The results showed that, from the standpoint of its physical and mechanical properties, concrete in which RCA accounted for 50% of the coarse aggregate compared favourably to conventional concrete.

    Se aborda el estudio de hormigones estructurales fabricados con áridos reciclados procedentes de hormigón, incidiéndose en dos aspectos: 1. Caracterización de tales áridos, procedentes del mercado español. Para ello se llevan a cabo ensayos de densidad, absorción, granulometría, coeficiente de forma, índice de lajas y dureza. Los resultados obtenidos han puesto de manifiesto que, a pesar de que existen diferencias notables (sobre todo en cuanto a densidad y absorción con los áridos naturales, las características de los áridos hacen posible la fabricación de hormigones. 2. Ensayos sobre propiedades básicas de los hormigones: se establecen parámetros de dosificaci

  15. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  16. Propagation of Tau aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedert, Michel; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2017-05-30

    Since 2009, evidence has accumulated to suggest that Tau aggregates form first in a small number of brain cells, from where they propagate to other regions, resulting in neurodegeneration and disease. Propagation of Tau aggregates is often called prion-like, which refers to the capacity of an assembled protein to induce the same abnormal conformation in a protein of the same kind, initiating a self-amplifying cascade. In addition, prion-like encompasses the release of protein aggregates from brain cells and their uptake by neighbouring cells. In mice, the intracerebral injection of Tau inclusions induced the ordered assembly of monomeric Tau, followed by its spreading to distant brain regions. Short fibrils constituted the major species of seed-competent Tau. The existence of several human Tauopathies with distinct fibril morphologies has led to the suggestion that different molecular conformers (or strains) of aggregated Tau exist.

  17. Aggregation and Averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Irving H.

    The arithmetic processes of aggregation and averaging are basic to quantitative investigations of employment, unemployment, and related concepts. In explaining these concepts, this report stresses need for accuracy and consistency in measurements, and describes tools for analyzing alternative measures. (BH)

  18. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, W.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 {angstrom} Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 {angstrom}, 500 {angstrom}, and 300 {angstrom} per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 {angstrom}/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 {angstrom}/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study.

  19. Transformation of eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension fabricating with solvent evaporation and ultrasonication technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Tuntarawongsa, Sarun

    2016-01-01

    Eutectic solvent can solubilize high amount of some therapeutic compounds. Volatile eutectic solvent is interesting to be used as solvent in the preparation of nanosuspension with emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The mechanism of transformation from the eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension was investigated in this study. The 30% w/w ibuprofen eutectic solution was used as the internal phase, and the external phase is composed of Tween 80 as emulsifier. Ibuprofen nanosuspension was prepared by eutectic emulsion solvent evaporating method followed with ultrasonication. During evaporation process, the ibuprofen concentration in emulsion droplets was increased leading to a drug supersaturation but did not immediately recrystallize because of low glass transition temperature (T g) of ibuprofen. The contact angle of the internal phase on ibuprofen was apparently lower than that of the external phase at all times of evaporation, indicating that the ibuprofen crystals were preferentially wetted by the internal phase than the external phase. From calculated dewetting value ibuprofen crystallization occurred in the droplet. Crystallization of the drug was initiated with external mechanical force, and the particle size of the drug was larger due to Ostwald ripening. Cavitation force from ultrasonication minimized the ibuprofen crystals to the nanoscale. Particle size and zeta potential of formulated ibuprofen nanosuspension were 330.87±51.49 nm and -31.1±1.6 mV, respectively, and exhibited a fast dissolution. Therefore, the combination of eutectic emulsion solvent evaporation method with ultrasonication was favorable for fabricating an ibuprofen nanosuspension, and the transformation mechanism was attained successfully.

  20. Cell aggregation and sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R H

    1995-01-01

    The aggregation of cells into clumps or flocs has been exploited for decades in such applications as biological wastewater treatment, beer brewing, antibiotic fermentation, and enhanced sedimentation to aid in cell recovery or retention. More recent research has included the use of cell aggregation and sedimentation to selectively separate subpopulations of cells. Potential biotechnological applications include overcoming contamination, maintaining plasmid-bearing cells in continuous fermentors, and selectively removing nonviable hybridoma cells from perfusion cultures.

  1. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  2. In-situ Micro-structural Studies of Gas Hydrate Formation in Sedimentary Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhs, Werner F.; Chaouachi, Marwen; Falenty, Andrzej; Sell, Kathleen; Schwarz, Jens-Oliver; Wolf, Martin; Enzmann, Frieder; Kersten, Michael; Haberthür, David

    2015-04-01

    The formation process of gas hydrates in sedimentary matrices is of crucial importance for the physical and transport properties of the resulting aggregates. This process has never been observed in-situ with sub-micron resolution. Here, we report on synchrotron-based micro-tomographic studies by which the nucleation and growth processes of gas hydrate were observed in different sedimentary matrices (natural quartz, glass beds with different surface properties, with and without admixtures of kaolinite and montmorillonite) at varying water saturation. The nucleation sites can be easily identified and the growth pattern is clearly established. In under-saturated sediments the nucleation starts at the water-gas interface and proceeds from there to form predominantly isometric single crystals of 10-20μm size. Using a newly developed synchrotron-based method we have determined the crystallite size distributions (CSD) of the gas hydrate in the sedimentary matrix confirming in a quantitative and statistically relevant manner the impressions from the tomographic reconstructions. It is noteworthy that the CSDs from synthetic hydrates are distinctly smaller than those of natural gas hydrates [1], which suggest that coarsening processes take place in the sedimentary matrix after the initial hydrate formation. Understanding the processes of formation and coarsening may eventually permit the determination of the age of gas hydrates in sedimentary matrices [2], which are largely unknown at present. Furthermore, the full micro-structural picture and its evolution will enable quantitative digital rock physics modeling to reveal poroelastic properties and in this way to support the exploration and exploitation of gas hydrate resources in the future. [1] Klapp S.A., Hemes S., Klein H., Bohrmann G., McDonald I., Kuhs W.F. Grain size measurements of natural gas hydrates. Marine Geology 2010; 274(1-4):85-94. [2] Klapp S.A., Klein H, Kuhs W.F. First determination of gas hydrate

  3. Hydration behaviour of polyhydroxylated fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Zavala, J G [Departamento de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario de Los Lagos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Enrique Diaz de Leon S/N, 47460 Jalisco (Mexico); Barajas-Barraza, R E [Departamento de Matematicas y Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Occidente, Periferico Sur, Manuel Gomez MorIn No 8585, 45604 Jalisco (Mexico); Padilla-Osuna, I; Guirado-Lopez, R A, E-mail: jgrz@culagos.udg.mx, E-mail: ebarajas@iteso.mx, E-mail: ismael@ifisica.uaslp.mx, E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Fisica ' Manuel Sandoval Vallarta' , Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2011-10-28

    We have performed semi-empirical as well as density functional theory calculations in order to analyse the hydration properties of both bare C{sub 60} and highly hydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes. In all of our calculations, a total of 42 and 98 water molecules are always surrounding our here-considered carbon nanostructures. We found different wetting properties as a function of the chemical composition and structure of the OH-molecular over-layer covering the fullerene surface. In the case of bare C{sub 60}, water adsorption reveals that the H{sub 2}O species are not uniformly arranged around the carbon network but rather forms water droplets of different sizes, clearly revealing the hydrophobic nature of the C{sub 60} structure. In contrast, in the polyhydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes, the degree of wetting is strongly influenced by the precise location of the hydroxyl groups. We found that different adsorbed configurations for the OH-molecular coating can lead to the formation of partially hydrated or completely covered C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} compounds, a result that could be used to synthesize fullerene materials with different degrees of wettability. By comparing the relative stability of our hydroxylated structures in both bare and hydrated conditions we obtain that the energy ordering of the C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomers can change in the presence of water. The radial distribution function of our hydrated fullerenes reveals that water near these kinds of surfaces is densely packed. In fact, by counting the number of H{sub 2}O molecules which are adsorbed, by means of hydrogen bonds, to the surface of our more stable C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomer, we found that it varies in the range of 5-10, in good agreement with experiments. Finally, by comparing the calculated optical absorption spectra of various C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} structures in the presence and absence of water molecules, we note that only slight variations in the position and

  4. Protein dynamics: hydration and cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Heremans

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-pressure behavior of proteins seems to be unique among the biological macromolecules. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic data show the typical elliptical stability diagram. This may be extended by assuming that the unfolded state gives rise to volume and enthalpy-driven liquid-liquid transitions. A molecular interpretation follows from the temperature and the pressure dependence of the hydration and cavities. We suggest that positron annihilation spectroscopy can provide additional quantitative evidence for the contributions of cavities to the dynamics of proteins. Only mature amyloid fibrils that form from unfolded proteins are very resistant to pressure treatment.

  5. Template Directed Oligomer Ligation in Eutectic Phases in Water-Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dörr, Mark; Löffler, Philipp M. G.; Wieczorek, Rafal

    2011-01-01

    Eutectic phases of water-ice are protective micro-environments for the non-enzymatic, metal ion mediated polymerization of imidazole-activated ribonucleotides (Monnard 2008). Polymers of up to 30-mer lengths can herein be achieved. Even longer polymers can be obtained by adding activated monomers...... in the middle of the construct). References Monnard P, Szostak JW (2008). Metal-ion catalyzed polymerization in the eutectic phase in water-ice: A possible approach to template-directed RNA polymerization. J.Inorg.Biochem., 102(5-6):1104-1111. Scott WG, Finch JT, Klug A (1995). The crystal structure of an AII...

  6. Numerical modelling of microstructure forming process for Al-Al3Fe eutectic alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李荣德; 周振平

    2003-01-01

    A self-adjusting model was presented on the basis of the effect of temperature gradient on eutectic growth and a curved solid/liquid interface. Finite differential method was adopted to solve the model. The average lamellar spacing of the Al-Al3Fe eutectic alloy and the content fields ahead of the solidifying interface under different growth rates were calculated. Directional solidification experiments were carried out in order to prove the modification of the modeling. The experimental results are in relatively good agreement with the calculations.

  7. Directional solidification of metal-gas eutectic and fabrication of regular porous metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Directional solidification of metal-gas eutectic (Gasar) is a novel process for making regular porous metals.This process is based on a solid-gas eutectic reaction involving a gaseous medium and a metal or a ceramic phase, and allows an easy control of the porosity, such as its pore size, pore orientation and morphology in a wide range by properly adjusting its melting and solidification conditions. The latest progress and our research work in this field are reviewed in this paper.

  8. Directional solidification of metal-gas eutectic and fabrication of regular porous metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan LIU

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Directional solidification of metal-gas eutectic (Gasar is a novel process for making regular porous metals.This process is based on a solid-gas eutectic reaction involving a gaseous medium and a metal or a ceramic phase, and allows an easy control of the porosity, such as its pore size, pore orientation and morphology in a wide range by properly adjusting its melting and solidification conditions. The latest progress and our research work in this field are reviewed inthis paper.

  9. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  10. How polar are choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ashish; Rai, Rewa; Pal, Mahi; Pandey, Siddharth

    2014-01-28

    Developing and characterizing green solvents with low toxicity and cost is one of the most important issues in chemistry. Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs), in this regard, have shown tremendous promise. Compared to popular organic solvents, DESs possess negligible VOCs and are non-flammable. Compared to ionic liquids, which share many characteristics but are ionic compounds and not ionic mixtures, DESs are cheaper to make, much less toxic and mostly biodegradable. An estimate of the polarity associated with DESs is essential if they are to be used as green alternatives to common organic solvents in industries and academia. As no one physical parameter can satisfactorily represent solute-solvent interactions within a medium, polarity of DESs is assessed through solvatochromic optical spectroscopic responses of several UV-vis absorbance and molecular fluorescence probes. Information on the local microenvironment (i.e., the cybotactic region) that surrounds several solvatochromic probes [betaine dye, pyrene, pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS), p-toluidinyl-6-naphthalene sulfonate (TNS), 6-propionyl-2-(dimethylaminonaphthalene) (PRODAN), coumarin-153, and Nile Red] for four common and popular DESs formed from choline chloride combined with 1,2-ethanediol, glycerol, urea, and malonic acid, respectively, in 1 : 2 molar ratios termed ethaline, glyceline, reline, and maline is obtained and used to assess the effective polarity afforded by each of these DESs. The four DESs as indicated by these probe responses are found to be fairly dipolar in nature. Absorbance probe betaine dye and fluorescence probes ANS, TNS, PRODAN, coumarin-153, and Nile Red, whose solvatochromic responses are based on photoinduced charge-transfer, imply ethaline and glyceline, DESs formed using alcohol-based H-bond donors, to be relatively more dipolar in nature as compared to reline and maline. The pyrene polarity scale, which is based on polarity-induced changes in

  11. [Based on Curing Age of Calcined Coal Gangue Fine Aggregate Mortar of X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zuo-chao; Xia, Jun-wu; Duan, Xiao-mu; Cao, Ji-chang

    2016-03-01

    By using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and environmental scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis method, we stud- ied the activity of coal gangue fine aggregate under different calcination temperature. In view of the activity of the highest-700 degrees C high temperature calcined coal gangue fine aggregate mortar of hydration products, microstructure and strength were discussed in this paper, and the change laws of mortar strength with curing age (3, 7, 14, 28, 60 and 90 d) growth were analyzed. Test results showed that coal gangue fine aggregate with the increase of calcination temperature, the active gradually increases. When the calcination temperature reaches 700 degrees C, the activity of coal gangue fine aggregate is the highest. When calcining temperature continues to rise, activity falls. After 700 degrees C high temperature calcined coal gangue fine aggregate has obvious ash activity, the active components of SiO2 and Al2 O3 can be with cement hydration products in a certain degree of secondary hydration reaction. Through on the top of the activity of different curing age 700 degrees C high temperature calcined coal gangue fine aggregate mortar, XRD and SEM analysis showed that with the increase of curing age, secondary hydration reaction will be more fully, and the amount of hydration products also gradually increases. Compared with the early ages of the cement mortar, the products are more stable hydration products filling in mortar microscopic pore, which can further improve the microstructure of mortar, strengthen the interface performance of the mortar. The mortar internal structure is more uniform, calcined coal gangue fine aggregate and cement mortar are more of a strong continuous whole, which increase the later strength of hardened cement mortar, 700 degrees C high temperature calcined coal gangue fine aggregate pozzolanic effect is obvious.

  12. Dynamics of a photoexcited hydrated electron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, M.S.; Baltuška, A.; Wiersma, D.A.; Kärtner, F.X.

    2004-01-01

    Combining photon-echo and frequency-resolved pump-probe techniques with extremely short laser pulses that consist of only few optical cycles, we investigate the dynamics of the equilibrated hydrated electron. The pure dephasing time of the hydrated electron deduced from the photon-echo measurements

  13. Gas hydrate inhibition of drilling fluid additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolan, L.; Baojiang, S.; Shaoran, R. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates that form during offshore well drilling can have adverse impacts on well operational safety. The hydrates typically form in the risers and the annulus between the casing and the drillstring, and can stop the circulation of drilling fluids. In this study, experiments were conducted to measure the effect of drilling fluid additives on hydrate inhibition. Polyalcohols, well-stability control agents, lubricating agents, and polymeric materials were investigated in a stirred tank reactor at temperatures ranging from -10 degree C to 60 degrees C. Pressure, temperature, and torque were used to detect onset points of hydrate formation and dissociation. The inhibitive effect of the additives on hydrate formation was quantified. Phase boundary shifts were measured in terms of temperature difference or sub-cooling gained when chemicals were added to pure water. Results showed that the multiple hydroxyl groups in polyalcohol chemicals significantly inhibited hydrate formation. Polymeric and polyacrylamide materials had only a small impact on hydrate formation, while sulfonated methyl tannins were found to increase hydrate formation. 6 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  14. Hydration shells exchange charge with their protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Lindgård, Per-Anker; Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert;

    2010-01-01

    Investigation of the interaction between a protein and its hydration shells is an experimental and theoretical challenge. Here, we used ultrasonic pressure waves in aqueous solutions of a protein to explore the conformational states of the protein and its interaction with its hydration shells. In...

  15. A new geotechnical gas hydrates research laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates encapsulate natural gas molecules in a very compact form, as ice-like compounds composed of water molecules. Permafrost environments and offshore areas contain vast quantities of gas hydrates within soil and rock. This paper describes the role played by gas hydrates in submarine slope instability, their potential as a sustainable energy source, and their effects on global climate change. A new state-of-the-art laboratory located at the University of Calgary, which was developed to study the geomechanical behaviour of gas hydrate-sediment mixtures, was also presented. A specialized high pressure low temperature triaxial apparatus capable of performing a suite of tests on gas hydrate-sediment mixtures is housed in this laboratory. Extensive renovations were required in order to enable the use of methane gas to simulate natural hydrate formation conditions. The laboratory is specifically designed to examine the properties and behaviour of reconstituted gas hydrate-sediment mixtures and natural gas hydrate core samples. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  17. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  18. Eutectic reaction analysis between TRU-50%Zr alloy fuel and HT-9 cladding, and temperature prediction of eutectic reaction under steady-state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Bong Sang; Park, Won Seok

    2001-02-01

    Blanket fuel assembly for HYPER contains a bundle of pins arrayed in triangular pitch, which has hexagonal bundle structure. The reference blanket fuel pin consists of the fuel slug of TRU-50wt%Zr alloy and the cladding material of ferritic martensite steel, HT-9. Chemical interaction between fuel slug and cladding is one of the major concerns in metallic fuel rod design. The contact of metallic fuel slug and stainless steel cladding in a fuel rod forms a complex multi-component diffusion couple at elevated temperatures. The potential problem of inter-diffusion of fuel and cladding components is essentially two-fold weakening of cladding mechanical strength due to the formation of diffusion zones in the cladding, and the formation of comparatively low melting point phases in the fuel/cladding interface to develop eutectic reaction. The main components of fuel slug are composed of zirconium alloying element in plutonium matrix, including neptunium, americium and uranium additionally. Therefore basic eutectic reaction change of Pu-Fe binary system can be assessed, while it is estimated how much other elements zirconium, uranium, americium and neptunium influence on plutonium phase stability. Afterwards it is needed that eutectic reaction is verified through experimental necessarily.

  19. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the

  20. Optical dynamics of molecular aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Steven

    2006-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the spectroscopy and dynamics of molecular aggregates in amorphous matrices. Aggregates of three different molecules were studied. The molecules are depicted in Fig. (1.1). Supersaturated solutions of these molecules show aggregate formation. Aggregation is a process si

  1. Compound Natural Gas Hydrate: A Natural System for Separation of Hydrate-Forming Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, M. D.; Osegovic, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Natural processes that separate materials from a mixture may exert a major influence on the development of the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and other planetary bodies. Natural distillation and gravity separation, amongst others, are well known means of differentiating materials through liquid-gas partitioning. One of the least known attributes of clathrate (gas) hydrates is their potential effect on the evolution of planetary system oceans and atmospheres. Gas hydrates separate gases from mixtures of gases by concentrating preferred hydrate-forming materials (HFM) guests within the water-molecule cage structure of crystalline hydrate. Different HFMs have very different fields of stability. When multiple hydrate formers are present, a preference series based on their selective uptake exists. Compound hydrate, which is formed from two or more species of HFM, extract preferred HFM from a mixture in very different proportions to their relative percentages of the original mixture. These compound hydrates can have different formation and dissociation conditions depending on the evolution of the environment. That is, the phase boundary of the compound hydrate that is required for dissociation lies along a lower pressure - higher temperature course. Compound hydrates respond to variations in temperature, pressure, and HFM composition. On Earth, the primary naturally occurring hydrate of interest to global climate modeling is methane hydrate. Oceanic hydrate on Earth is the largest store of carbon in the biosphere that is immediately reactive to environmental change, and is capable of releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere over a short geological time span. Hydrate formation is essentially metastable and is very sensitive to environmental change and to gas flux. Where natural variations in temperature and pressure varies so that hydrate will form and dissociate in some cyclical manner, such as in oceans where sea level is capable of rising and

  2. Observing Convective Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.; Wing, Allison A.; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Turner, David D.; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-06-01

    Convective self-aggregation, the spontaneous organization of initially scattered convection into isolated convective clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing, was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  3. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  4. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated

  5. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-07-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  6. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-06-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  7. Lauric and palmitic acids eutectic mixture as latent heat storage material for low temperature heating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncbilek, K.; Sari, A. [Gaziosmanpasa Univ., Tokat (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry; Tarhan, S.; Erguenes, G. [Gaziosmanpasa Univ., Tokat (Turkey). Dept. of Agricultural Machinery; Kaygusuz, K. [Karadeniz Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

    2005-04-01

    Palmitic acid (PA, 59.8 {sup o}C) and lauric acid (LA, 42.6 {sup o}C) are phase change materials (PCM) having quite high melting temperatures which can limit their use in low temperature solar applications such as solar space heating and greenhouse heating. However, their melting temperatures can be tailored to appropriate value by preparing a eutectic mixture of the lauric and the palmitic acids. In the present study, the thermal analysis based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique shows that the mixture of 69.0 wt% LA and 31 wt% PA forms a eutectic mixture having melting temperature of 35.2 {sup o}C and the latent heat of fusion of 166.3 J g{sup -1}. This study also considers the experimental determination of the thermal characteristics of the eutectic mixture during the heat charging and discharging processes. Radial and axial temperature distribution, heat transfer coefficient between the heat transfer fluid (HTF) pipe and the PCM, heat recovery rate and heat charging and discharging fractions were experimentally established employing a vertical concentric pipe-in-pipe energy storage system. The changes of these characteristics were evaluated with respect to the effect of inlet HTF temperature and mass flow rate. The DSC thermal analysis and the experimental results indicate that the LA-PA eutectic mixture can be a potential material for low temperature thermal energy storage applications in terms of its thermo-physical and thermal characteristics. (author)

  8. Lauric and myristic acids eutectic mixture as phase change material for low-temperature heating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keles, Sadat; Kaygusuz, Kamil [Karadeniz Technical Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, Trabzon (Turkey); Sari, Ahmet [Gaziosmanpasa Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, Tokat (Turkey)

    2005-07-01

    Lauric acid (m.p.: 42.6 deg C) and myristic acid (m.p.: 52.2 deg C) are phase change materials (PCM) having quite high melting points which can limit their use in low-temperature solar applications such as solar space heating and greenhouse heating. However, their melting temperatures can be tailored to appropriate value by preparing a eutectic mixture of lauric acid (LA) and myristic acid (MA). In the present study, the thermal analysis based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique shows that the mixture of 66.0 wt% LA forms a eutectic mixture having melting temperature of 34.2 deg C and the latent heat of fusion of 166.8 J g{sup -1} . This study also considers the experimental establishment of thermal characteristics of the eutectic PCM in a vertical concentric pipe-in-pipe heat storage system. Thermal performance of the PCM was evaluated with respect to the effect of inlet temperature and mass flow rate of the heat transfer fluid on those characteristics during the heat charging and discharging processes. The DSC thermal analysis and the experimental results indicate that the LA-MA eutectic PCM can be potential material for low-temperature solar energy storage applications in terms of its thermo-physical and thermal characteristics. (Author)

  9. Lauric and palmitic acids eutectic mixture as latent heat storage material for low temperature heating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadir Tuncbilek; Ahmet Sari [Gaziosmanpasa University, Tokat (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry; Sefa Tarhan; Gazanfer Ergunes [Gaziosmanpasa University, Tokat (Turkey). Dept. of Agricultural Machinery; Kamil Kaygusuz [Karadeniz University, Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

    2005-04-01

    Palmitic acid (PA, 59.8{sup o}C) and lauric acid (LA, 42.6{sup o}C) are phase change materials (PCM) having quite high melting temperatures which can limit their use in low temperature solar applications such as solar space heating and greenhouse heating. However, their melting temperatures can be tailored to appropriate value by preparing a eutectic mixture of the lauric and the palmitic acids. In the present study, the thermal analysis based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique shows that the mixture of 69.0 wt% LA and 31 wt% PA forms a eutectic mixture having melting temperature of 35.2 {sup o}C and the latent heat of fusion of 166.3 J g{sup -1}. This study also considers the experimental determination of the thermal characteristics of the eutectic mixture during the heat charging and discharging processes. Radial and axial temperature distribution, heat transfer coefficient between the heat transfer fluid (HTF) pipe and the PCM, heat recovery rate and heat charging and discharging fractions were experimentally established employing a vertical concentric pipe-in-pipe energy storage system. The changes of these characteristics were evaluated with respect to the effect of inlet HTF temperature and mass flow rate. The DSC thermal analysis and the experimental results indicate that the LA-PA eutectic mixture can be a potential material for low temperature thermal energy storage applications in terms of its thermo-physical and thermal characteristics. (author)

  10. Morphological Change and Its Mechanism of Eutectic Silicon for Strontium-Modified Alloy A357

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jian-ting; DU Xing-hao

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure evolution for alloy A357 modified by original Al-10Sr alloy was systematically investigated. The results show that the eutectic silicon phase becomes finer and more homogeneous with the increase of strontium concentration and modifying temperature. The mechanism of microstructure evolution was also investigated by TEM observation.

  11. High current electric arcs above the In-Ga-Sn eutectic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klementyeva, I. B.; Pinchuk, M. E.

    2016-11-01

    The results of investigations of high-current dc and ac arc discharges of atmospheric pressure emerging above the free surface of liquid metal (In-Ga-Sn eutectic alloy) are presented in the paper. The mechanism of the arc formation due to pinch-effect is discussed here.

  12. Consolidation of B4C-TaB2 eutectic composites by spark plasma sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro Demirskyi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The in situ synthesis/consolidation of B4C-TaB2 eutectic composites by spark plasma sintering (SPS is reported. The microstructure–property relations were determined for composites with the B4C-TaB2 eutectic composition as functions of TaB2 content, and TaB2-TaB2 interlamellar spacing. A clear maximum in fracture toughness was identified (∼4.5 MPa m1/2 for eutectic composites with interlamellar spacing between 0.9 and 1.1 μm. The composites with the hypereutectic composition of 40 mol.% TaB2 obtained by SPS exhibited lower Vickers hardness (25–26 GPa but higher indentation fracture toughness (up to 4.9 MPa m1/2 than eutectic composites with 30–35 mol.% of TaB2.

  13. Al based ultra-fine eutectic with high room temperature plasticity and elevated temperature strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwary, C.S., E-mail: cst311@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India); Kashyap, S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India); Kim, D.H. [Center for Non-Crystalline Materials, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chattopadhyay, K. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India)

    2015-07-15

    Developments of aluminum alloys that can retain strength at and above 250 °C present a significant challenge. In this paper we report an ultrafine scale Al–Fe–Ni eutectic alloy with less than 3.5 at% transition metals that exhibits room temperature ultimate tensile strength of ~400 MPa with a tensile ductility of 6–8%. The yield stress under compression at 300 °C was found to be 150 MPa. We attribute it to the refinement of the microstructure that is achieved by suction casting in copper mold. The characterization using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) reveals an unique composite structure that contains the Al–Al{sub 3}Ni rod eutectic with spacing of ~90 nm enveloped by a lamellar eutectic of Al–Al{sub 9}FeNi (~140 nm). Observation of subsurface deformation under Vickers indentation using bonded interface technique reveals the presence of extensive shear banding during deformation that is responsible for the origin of ductility. The dislocation configuration in Al–Al{sub 3}Ni eutectic colony indicates accommodation of plasticity in α-Al with dislocation accumulation at the α-Al/Al{sub 3}Ni interface boundaries. In contrast the dislocation activities in the intermetallic lamellae are limited and contain set of planner dislocations across the plates. We present a detailed analysis of the fracture surface to rationalize the origin of the high strength and ductility in this class of potentially promising cast alloy.

  14. Optical, Electrochemical and Thermal Studies of Conjugated Polymers Synthesized by Eutectic Melt Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathula, Chinna; Buruga, Kezia; Kang, Youngjong; Khazi, Imtiyaz Ahmed M

    2017-02-15

    This paper reports on the synthesis of a novel donor-acceptor conjugated polymers, P1 and P2 by solvent free eutectic melt polymerization reaction. Triisopropylsilylethynyl(TIPS) substituted benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene(BDT) is used as donor, thienithiophene(TT) and thienopyrroledione(TPD) are utilized as acceptors for demonstrating eutectic polymerization. The most important fact in the solvent-free reaction between solid reactants actually proceeds through bulk liquid phases. Such liquid phases are possible due to the formation of eutectics between the reactants and product(s) and any evolution of heat. Naphthalene is explored in this reaction for forming eutectics with the reactants, resulting in desired polymers. Thermal stability, optical and electrochemical properties of these polymers were determined. Optical band gaps of the polymers were found to be 1.58 and 1.65 eV. Electrochemical studies by cyclic voltametry experiment revealed HOMO and LUMO energy levels to be -5.22, -5.60 eV, and -3.76, -4.16 eV, respectively. The polymers were thermally stable up to 285-400 °C. Thermal, optical and electrochemical studies indicated these materials to be promising candidates in organic electronic applications.

  15. Directional solidification processing of eutectic alloys in the Ni Al V system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic, S.; Coelho, A. A.; Caram, R.

    2000-04-01

    Intermetallic matrix composites (IMCs) offer attractive properties, such as high toughness of the metal coupled with low density, high modulus and high strength of the intermetallics. Among a large number of the intermetallics, a particular interest has been shown in the NiAl intermetallic compound, since it exhibits several advantages over the currently used nickel-based superalloys. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in directional solidification of the eutectic alloys as a concept of reinforcing intermetallics with in situ refractory metals. The present study is related to the study of the eutectic alloys in the ternary NiAl-V system. The eutectic composition and temperature were accurately determined. It was concluded that the solidification behaviour of the Ni-Al-V eutectic is strongly dependent on the growth conditions, namely growth rate and orientation, and that it can be easily modified. Also, it was observed that the orientation of the grain, i.e., the direction of growth is the determining factor in the lamellar/rod transition as well as in the morphology of the degenerated structure.

  16. Establishment of the Co-C Eutectic Fixed-Point Cell for Thermocouple Calibrations at NIMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongrai, O.; Elliott, C. J.

    2017-08-01

    In 2015, NIMT first established a Co-C eutectic temperature reference (fixed-point) cell measurement capability for thermocouple calibration to support the requirements of Thailand's heavy industries and secondary laboratories. The Co-C eutectic fixed-point cell is a facility transferred from NPL, where the design was developed through European and UK national measurement system projects. In this paper, we describe the establishment of a Co-C eutectic fixed-point cell for thermocouple calibration at NIMT. This paper demonstrates achievement of the required furnace uniformity, the Co-C plateau realization and the comparison data between NIMT and NPL Co-C cells by using the same standard Pt/Pd thermocouple, demonstrating traceability. The NIMT measurement capability for noble metal type thermocouples at the new Co-C eutectic fixed point (1324.06°C) is estimated to be within ± 0.60 K (k=2). This meets the needs of Thailand's high-temperature thermocouple users—for which previously there has been no traceable calibration facility.

  17. Unconstrained solidification and characterisation of near-eutectic Al-Cu-Ag alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebzeeva, S.; Nagels, E.; Froyen, L. [Katholieke Univ. Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering

    2008-11-15

    This study focuses on the microstructure formation in two Al-Cu-Ag alloys with near-eutectic composition on either side of the {alpha}(Al)/{theta}-Al{sub 2}Cu groove. The alloys solidified equiaxially with two different cooling rates for each composition of alloy. The primary phases formed are {alpha}(Al) or {theta}-Al{sub 2}Cu, but univariant and invariant eutectic reactions are common. In hypoeutectic samples macrosegregation of the {alpha}(Al) phase occurred. The univariant {alpha}(Al)/{theta}-Al{sub 2}Cu eutectic in these samples is formed by coupled two-phase structures. The univariant eutectic in the samples, which exhibit primary {theta}-Al{sub 2}Cu, grew partially competitively due to the {alpha}(Al) single phase instability. It is suggested that the difference in solubility of the segregating element Ag in {alpha}(Al) and {theta}-Al{sub 2}Cu phases and processing parameters such as cooling rates determine the resulting microstructure. (orig.)

  18. Efficient continuous synthesis of high purity deep eutectic solvents by twin screw extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, D E; Wright, L A; James, S L; Abbott, A P

    2016-03-18

    Mechanochemical synthesis has been applied to the rapid synthesis of Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs), including Reline 200 (choline chloride : urea, 1 : 2), in a continuous flow methodology by Twin Screw Extrusion (TSE). This gave products in higher purity and with Space Time Yields (STYs), four orders of magnitude greater than for batch methods.

  19. Free energy change of off-eutectic binary alloys on solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsaka, K.; Trinh, E. H.; Lin, J.-C.; Perepezko, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    A formula for the free energy difference between the undercooled liquid phase and the stable solid phase is derived for off-eutectic binary alloys in which the equilibrium solid/liquid transition takes place over a certain temperature range. The free energy change is then evaluated numerically for a Bi-25 at. pct Cd alloy modeled as a sub-subregular solution.

  20. The Collins Model and the Eutectic-Type and the Peritectic-Type Phase Diagrams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Chuan-Mei; CHEN Li-Rong

    2003-01-01

    From the Gibbs free energy and the equations of two-phase equilibrium curves of the two-dimensionalbinary system which has the Lennard-Jones potential, using the Collins model, the eutectic-type phase diagram and theperitectic-type phase diagram of the binary system are obtained, whose results are quite similar to the behavior of thethree-dimensional (3D) substances.

  1. Experimental Study of Natural Gas Storage in Hydrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙志高; 王如竹; 郭开华; 樊栓狮

    2004-01-01

    Hydrate formation rate plays an important role in the making of hydrates for natural gas storage. The effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG) and cyclopentane (CP) on natural gas hydrate formation rate, induction time and storage capacity was studied. Micellar surfactant solutions were found to increase hydrate formation rate in a quiescent system and improve hydrate formation rate and natural gas storage capacity. The process of hydrate formation includes two stages with surfactant presence. Hydrate forms quickly in the first stage, and then the formation rate is slowed down. Surfactants (SDS or APG) reduce the induction time of hydrate formation. The effect of an anionic surfactant (SDS) on gas storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to a nonionic surfactant (APG). CP also reduces the induction time of hydrate formation, but can not improve the natural gas storage capacity in hydrates.

  2. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with

  3. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  4. Fractals of Silica Aggregates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhinhongLi; DongWu; Yuhansun; JunWang; YiLiu; BaozhongDong; Zhinhong

    2001-01-01

    Silica aggregates were prepared by base-catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of alkoxides in alcohol.Polyethylene glycol(PEG) was used as organic modifier.The sols were characterized using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) with synchrotron radiation as X-ray source.The structure evolution during the sol-gel process was determined and described in terms of the fractal geometry.As-produced silica aggregates were found to be mass fractals.The fractl dimensions spanned the regime 2.1-2.6 corresponding to more branched and compact structures.Both RLCA and Eden models dominated the kinetic growth under base-catalyzed condition.

  5. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  6. Temperature dependence of the liquid eutectic lead-lithium alloy density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alchagirov; Boris; B.; Mozgovoi; Alexandr; G.; Taova; Tamara; M.

    2005-01-01

    Lead-lithium alloys are of great interest for practice as the advanced materials to be used in new technique, nuclear energetics, and so forth. Terefore, study on the physico-chemical properties of the latter is of major significance. An analysis of the available literature shows that there are a few works, devoted to study of Pb-Li alloys densities. However, temperature dependence of the density ρ(T), and its temperature coefficientK=dρ/dT for eutectic alloy were obtained by either extrapolation of the density data up to the eutectic alloy's composition, or calculation method. There is a certain discrepancy amounting to as high as 4%, while the allowable error in the density measurements is less than 0.5%. The discrepancy between the results for the temperature coefficients of density amounts to 80%.In this work we present the experimental data on the temperature dependence of Ph0.83 Li0.17 eutectic alloy's density in the temperature range 520K to 643 K. The alloys were prepared using Pb and Li with 99. 999% and 99.8% contents of the basic elements, respectively. We use the improved device, which permits to get the results with error less than 0. 15%. The results of 115 measurements of density in 520K to 643K temperature range were processed by the least-square method. Density polytherm of Pb0.83 Li0. 17 eutectic alloy is described by linear equation ρ(T) =9507.89-0. 79813(T-508) , kg/m3 ,where T is the absolute temperature by K. Mearsurement error was 0. 12% at 95% reliability.Discrepancy in the temperature coefficient data was 1.08%.Thus, the temperature dependence of the Pb-Li eutectic alloy density was studied by the precise two-capillary method. The obtained results may be recommended as the most reliable reference data.

  7. Sustainable Poly(Ionic Liquids) for CO2 Capture Based on Deep Eutectic Monomers

    KAUST Repository

    Isik, Mehmet

    2016-10-05

    The design of high performance solid sorbent materials for CO2 capture is a technology which has been employed to mitigate global warming. However, the covalent incorporation of functionalities into polymeric supports usually involves multistep energy-intensive chemical processes. This fact makes the net CO2 balance of the materials negative even though they possess good properties as CO2 sorbents. Here we show a new family of polymers which are based on amines, amidoximes, and natural carboxylic acids and can be obtained using sustainable low energy processes. Thus, deep eutectic monomers based on natural carboxylic acids, amidoximes, and amines have been prepared by just mixing with cholinium type methacrylic ammonium monomer. The formation of deep eutectic monomers was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry measurements. In all cases, the monomers displayed glass transition temperatures well below room temperature. Computational studies revealed that the formation of eutectic complexes lengthens the distance between the cation and the anion causing charge delocalization. The liquid nature of the resulting deep eutectic monomers (DEMs) made it possible to conduct a fast photopolymerization process to obtain the corresponding poly(ionic liquids). Materials were characterized by means of nuclear magnetic resonance, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray diffraction to evaluate the properties of the polymers. The polymers were then used as solid sorbents for CO2 capture. It has been shown that the polymers prepared with citric acid displayed better performance both experimentally and computationally. The current endeavor showed that sustainable poly(ionic liquids) based on deep eutectic monomers can be easily prepared to produce low-energy-cost alternatives to the materials currently being researched for CO2 capture. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  8. Natural deep eutectic solvents as new potential media for green technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yuntao; van Spronsen, Jaap; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2013-03-05

    Developing new green solvents is one of the key subjects in Green Chemistry. Ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents, thus, have been paid great attention to replace current harsh organic solvents and have been applied to many chemical processing such as extraction and synthesis. However, current ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents have still limitations to be applied to a real chemical industry due to toxicity against human and environment and high cost of ILs and solid state of most deep eutectic solvents at room temperature. Recently we discovered that many plant abundant primary metabolites changed their state from solid to liquid when they were mixed in proper ratio. This finding made us hypothesize that natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) play a role as alternative media to water in living organisms and tested a wide range of natural products, which resulted in discovery of over 100 NADES from nature. In order to prove deep eutectic feature the interaction between the molecules was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All the tested NADES show clear hydrogen bonding between components. As next step physical properties of NADES such as water activity, density, viscosity, polarity and thermal properties were measured as well as the effect of water on the physical properties. In the last stage the novel NADES were applied to the solubilization of wide range of biomolecules such as non-water soluble bioactive natural products, gluten, starch, and DNA. In most cases the solubility of the biomolecules evaluated in this study was greatly higher than water. Based on the results the novel NADES may be expected as potential green solvents at room temperature in diverse fields of chemistry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Microstructure Characteristics of the Eutectics of Die Cast AM60B Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mengwu Wu; Shoumei Xiong

    2011-01-01

    Under the cold-chamber high pressure die casting (HPDC) process, samples were produced with AM60B magnesium alloy to investigate the microstructure characteristics of the eutectics, especially focusing on the constitution, morphology and distribution of the eutectics over cross section of the castings. Attentions were also paid to study the effect of heat treatment on the eutectics in the die castings. Based on experimental analysis using optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), it was determined that fully divorced eutectics consisting of a-Mg and β-Mg17Al12 appeared at the grain boundary of the primary α-Mg in the as-cast microstructure. Islands and networks of β-Mg17Al12 phase were observed in the central region of the castings, while the β-Mg17Al12 phase revealed a more dispersed and granular morphology on the surface layer. The two phases ratio β/α in the central region of the castings was approximately 10%, which was higher than that on the surface layer. Besides, the defect bands contained a higher percentage of the eutectics than the adjacent regions. After aging treatment (T6), only a-Mg phase was detected by XRD in the AM60B magnesium alloy, though a small amount of precipitated β-Mg17Al12 phase was observed at the grain boundary. In contrast to the microstructure of die cast AZ91D magnesium alloy under the same T6 heat treatment, no discontinuous precipitation of the β-Mg17Al12 phase was observed in AM60B magnesium alloy die castings.

  10. Deep eutectic solvents: sustainable media for nanoscale and functional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A

    2014-08-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) represent an alternative class of ionic fluids closely resembling room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), although, strictly speaking, they are distinguished by the fact that they also contain an organic molecular component (typically, a hydrogen bond donor like a urea, amide, acid, or polyol), frequently as the predominant constituent. Practically speaking, DESs are attractive alternatives to RTILs, sharing most of their remarkable qualities (e.g., tolerance to humidity, negligible vapor pressure, thermostability, wide electrochemical potential windows, tunability) while overcoming several limitations associated with their RTIL cousins. Particularly, DESs are typically, less expensive, more synthetically accessible (typically, from bulk commodity chemicals using solvent/waste-free processes), nontoxic, and biodegradable. In this Account, we provide an overview of DESs as designer solvents to create well-defined nanomaterials including shape-controlled nanoparticles, electrodeposited films, metal-organic frameworks, colloidal assemblies, hierarchically porous carbons, and DNA/RNA architectures. These breakthroughs illustrate how DESs can fulfill multiple roles in directing chemistry at the nanoscale: acting as supramolecular template, metal/carbon source, sacrificial agent (e.g., ammonia release from urea), and/or redox agent, all in the absence of formal stabilizing ligand (here, solvent and stabilizer are one and the same). The ability to tailor the physicochemical properties of DESs is central to controlling their interfacial behavior. The preorganized "supramolecular" nature of DESs provides a soft template to guide the formation of bimodal porous carbon networks or the evolution of electrodeposits. A number of essential parameters (viscosity, polarity, surface tension, hydrogen bonding), plus coordination with solutes/surfaces, all play significant roles in modulating species reactivity and mass transport properties governing the

  11. Hydration Properties of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS Under Different Hydration Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydration properties of various cementitious materials containing Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag (GGBS, two alkali-activated slag cements (AAS-1 and AAS-2 in which sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide act as alkaline activators respectively, supersulfated cement (SSC and slag Portland cement(PSC, are compared with ordinary Portland cement (OPC to investigate the effect of activating environment on the hydration properties in this study by determining the compressive strength of the pastes, the hydration heat of binders within 96 hours, and the hydration products at age of 28 days. The results show that C-S-H gels are the main hydrated products for all cementitious systems containing GGBS. Ca(OH2 is the hydration products of OPC and PSC paste. However, ettringite and gypsum crystals instead of Ca(OH2 are detected in SSC paste. Additionally, tobermorite, a crystalline C-S-H, and calcite are hydrated products in AAS-1. Tobermorite, cowlesite and calcite are hydrated products of AAS-2 as well. Based on strength results, AAS-1 paste exhibits the highest compressive strength followed by POC, PSC, SSC in order at all testing ages and AAS-2 give the lowest compressive strength except for the early age at 3 days, which is higher than SSC but still lower than PSC. From hydration heat analysis, alkalinity in the reaction solution is a vital factor influencing the initial hydration rate and the initial hydration rate from higher to lower is AAS-2, AAS-1, OPC, PSC and SSC. Although AAS possesses a faster reaction rate in the initial hours, cumulative hydration heat of AAS is comparably lower than that of OPC, but higher than those of PSC and SSC in turn, which indicates that the hydration heat of clinkers is much higher than that of slag.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14934

  12. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand

  13. Prospecting for marine gas hydrate resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Shipp, Craig; Reichel, Thomas; Shelander, Dianna; Saeki, Tetsuo; Frye, Matthew; Shedd, William; Collett, Timothy S.; McConnell, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    As gas hydrate energy assessment matures worldwide, emphasis has evolved away from confirmation of the mere presence of gas hydrate to the more complex issue of prospecting for those specific accumulations that are viable resource targets. Gas hydrate exploration now integrates the unique pressure and temperature preconditions for gas hydrate occurrence with those concepts and practices that are the basis for conventional oil and gas exploration. We have aimed to assimilate the lessons learned to date in global gas hydrate exploration to outline a generalized prospecting approach as follows: (1) use existing well and geophysical data to delineate the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), (2) identify and evaluate potential direct indications of hydrate occurrence through evaluation of interval of elevated acoustic velocity and/or seismic events of prospective amplitude and polarity, (3) mitigate geologic risk via regional seismic and stratigraphic facies analysis as well as seismic mapping of amplitude distribution along prospective horizons, and (4) mitigate further prospect risk through assessment of the evidence of gas presence and migration into the GHSZ. Although a wide range of occurrence types might ultimately become viable energy supply options, this approach, which has been tested in only a small number of locations worldwide, has directed prospect evaluation toward those sand-hosted, high-saturation occurrences that were presently considered to have the greatest future commercial potential.

  14. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  15. Gas hydrate dissociation structures in submarine slopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidley, I.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Studies have suggested that gas hydrates may play a role in submarine slope failures. However, the mechanics surrounding such failures are poorly understood. This paper discussed experimental tests conducted on a small-scale physical model of submarine soils with hydrate inclusions. The laboratory tests investigated the effects of slope angle and depth of burial of the hydrate on gas escape structures and slope stability. Laponite was used to model the soils due to its ability to swell and produce a clear, colorless thixotropic gel when dispersed in water. An R-11 refrigerant was used to form hydrate layers and nodules. The aim of the experiment was to investigate the path of the fluid escape structures and the development of a subsequent slip plane caused by the dissociation of the R-11 hydrates. Slope angles of 5, 10, and 15 degrees were examined. Slopes were examined using high-resolution, high-speed imaging techniques. Hydrate placement and slope inclinations were varied in order to obtain stability data. Results of the study showed that slope angle influenced the direction of travel of the escaping gas, and that the depth of burial affected sensitivity to slope angle. Theoretical models developed from the experimental data have accurately mapped deformations and stress states during testing. Further research is being conducted to investigate the influence of the size, shape, and placement of the hydrates. 30 refs., 15 figs.

  16. Hydration Properties of Soybean Protein Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Remondetto

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydration properties of soybean isolates with different processing conditions (heat treatments, pH and protein concentrations were studied. Degree of denaturation,, solubility in water, in 0.2mol/L NaCl, and in media of different sodium dodecyl sulfate concentrations, viscosity and water imbibing capacity of the different samples were determinated and correlated. Treatments at temperatures higher than 80ºC denatured 11S and 7S proteins, leading to exposure of hydrophobic groups, which produced insoluble aggregates either in water or in high ionic strength media. These isolates possessed high water imbibing capacities and gave rise to viscous dispersions. Significant correlations were obtained between hydration properties and the "m" coefficient as calculated by a power law equation relating viscosity with the protein concentration of the dispersion. This "m" coefficient also correlated with the denaturation enthalpy of the protein isolates. On the basis of these results, it might be suggested that the "m" coefficient - dependent of the hydrodynamic behaviour of the particles - was a good estimator of the degree of protein denaturation.Estudaram-se as propriedades de hidratação de isolados de soja com diferentes condições de procesamento (tratamentos térmicos, pH e concentração de proteínas. Para diferentes amostras determinaram-se e correlacionaram-se o gráu de desnaturalização, a solubilidade em água, em 0,2mol/L NaCl e em diferentes concentrações de dodecil sulfato de sódio, viscosidade e capacidade de absorção de água. Os tratamentos a temperaturas superiores aos 80ºC desnaturaram as fracções 11S e 7S, provocando a exposição de grupos hidrofóbicos os que produziram agregados insolúveis, em água como em solução com alta força iónica. Estes isolados posuiam alta capacidade de absorção de água e dispersões com alta viscosidade. Achou-se uma correlação significativa entre as propriedades de hidratação e o

  17. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by Maurer Technology, Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. We plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. We also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. We are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. We hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, our goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  18. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  19. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  20. Hexosome and hexagonal phases mediated by hydration and polymeric stabilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amar-Yuli, Idit; Wachtel, Ellen; Shoshan, Einav Ben; Danino, Dganit; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2007-03-27

    In this research, we studied the factors that control formation of GMO/tricaprylin/water hexosomes and affect their inner structure. As a stabilizer of the soft particles dispersed in the aqueous phase, we used the hydrophilic nonionic triblock polymer Pluronic 127. We demonstrate how properties of the hexosomes, such as size, structure, and stability, can be tuned by their internal composition, polymer concentration, and processing conditions. The morphology and inner structure of the hexosomes were characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering, cryo-transmission electron microscope, and dynamic light scattering. The physical stability (to creaming, aggregation, and coalescence) of the hexosomes was further examined by the LUMiFuge technique. Two competing processes are presumed to take place during the formation of hexosomes: penetration of water from the continuous phase during dispersion, resulting in enhanced hydration of the head groups, and incorporation of the polymer chains into the hexosome structure while providing a stabilizing surface coating for the dispersed particles. Hydration is an essential stage in lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC) formation. The polymer, on the other hand, dehydrates the lipid heads, thereby introducing disorder into the LLC and reducing the domain size. Yet, a critical minimum polymer concentration is necessary in order to form stable nanosized hexosomes. These competing effects require the attention of those preparing hexosomes. The competition between these two processes can be controlled. At relatively high polymer concentrations (1-1.6 wt % of the total formulation of the soft particles), the hydration process seems to occur more rapidly than polymer adsorption. As a result, smaller and more stable soft particles with high symmetry were formed. On the other hand, when the polymer concentration is fixed at lower levels (<1.0 wt %), the homogenization process encourages only partial polymer adsorption during the dispersion

  1. Geoinformation Generalization by Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Jogun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Geoinformation generalization can be divided into model generalization and cartographic generalization. Model generalization is the supervised reduction of data in a model, while cartographic generalization is the reduction of the complexity of map content adapted to the map scale, and/or use by various generalization operators (procedures. The topic of this paper is the aggregation of geoinformation. Generally, aggregation is the joining of nearby, congenial objects, when the distance between them is smaller than the minimum sizes. Most researchers in geoinformation generalization have focused on line features. However, the appearance of web-maps with point features and choropleth maps has led to the development of concepts and algorithms for the generalization of point and polygonal features. This paper considers some previous theoretical premises and actual examples of aggregation for point, line and polygonal features. The algorithms for aggregation implemented in commercial and free GIS software were tested. In the conclusion, unresolved challenges that occur in dynamic cartographic visualizations and cases of unusual geometrical features are highlighted.

  2. Erosion of dust aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to gain a deeper insight into how much different aggregate types are affected by erosion. Especially, it is important to study the influence of the velocity of the impacting projectiles. We also want to provide models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks with simple recipes to account for erosion effects. Methods: To study the erosion of dust aggregates we employed a molecular dynamics approach that features a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. For the first time, the model has been extended by introducing a new visco-elastic damping force which requires a proper calibration. Afterwards, different sample generation methods were used to cover a wide range of aggregate types. Results: The visco-elastic damping force introduced in this work turns out to be crucial to reproduce results obtained from laboratory experiments. After proper calibration, we find that erosion occurs for impact velocities of 5 m/s and above. Though fractal aggregates as ...

  3. Diffusion in aggregated soil.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rappoldt, C.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of an aggregated soil is characterized by the distribution of the distance from an arbitrary point in the soil to the nearest macropore or crack. From this distribution an equivalent model system is derived to which a diffusion model can be more easily applied. The model system consist

  4. Final Report for the September 2001 Workshop on Physical Property Measurements for the Gas Hydrate R&D Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, N D; Durham, W B; Kirby, S; Brewer, P

    2001-10-01

    A 2-day workshop ''Physical and Chemical Property Measurements for the Gas Hydrate R&D Community'' was held on 17-18 September 2001. Putting together this workshop was a joint effort by LLNL, MBARI and the USGS, Menlo Park. Twenty-two people from a wide variety of institutions and backgrounds participated. An additional eighteen people were forced to cancel at the last minute due to the events of 11 September 2001. The premise of the workshop was that progress in nearly every aspect of gas hydrate research depends fundamentally on the availability of high-quality property data and the development of laboratory insights into the physics and chemistry that govern gas hydrates in nature. One objective of the workshop was to develop a dialogue between laboratory scientists who make property measurements of gas hydrates and scientists who use these data for quantitative modeling. A second objective was to help facilitate research among experimentalists and the acquisition of reliable gas hydrate properties. The latter focused mainly, but not exclusively, on researchers from institutions in the San Francisco Bay Area to energize a community that has a geographic advantage in collaborative relationships. The workshop was successful at meeting both of these objectives, although the unique perspectives of the invitees who weren't able to attend were missed. After reviewing the current state of gas hydrate R&D with respect to property measurements, there was general agreement that it is time to move forward with new approaches (e.g., seafloor experiments, lab experiments with hydrate-sediment aggregates) and new applications of techniques (e.g., improved seismics, in situ x-ray and neutron diffraction and tomography, and NMR scanning). The workshop consensus is summarized at the end of this document in a table of fundamental questions pertaining to natural gas hydrates and possible experimental lab and seafloor approaches to answering them.

  5. Proton percolation on hydrated lysozyme powders

    OpenAIRE

    Careri, G; Giansanti, A; Rupley, John A.

    1986-01-01

    The framework of percolation theory is used to analyze the hydration dependence of the capacitance measured for protein samples of pH 3-10, at frequencies from 10 kHz to 4 MHz. For all samples there is a critical value of the hydration at which the capacitance sharply increases with increase in hydration level. The threshold hc = 0.15 g of water per g of protein is independent of pH below pH 9 and shows no solvent deuterium isotope effect. The fractional coverage of the surface at hc is in cl...

  6. Glass powder blended cement hydration modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Huda

    The use of waste materials in construction is among the most attractive options to consume these materials without affecting the environment. Glass is among these types of potential waste materials. In this research, waste glass in powder form, i.e. glass powder (GP) is examined for potential use in enhancing the characteristics of concrete on the basis that it is a pozzolanic material. The experimental and the theoretical components of the work are carried out primarily to prove that glass powder belongs to the "family" of the pozzolanic materials. The chemical and physical properties of the hydrated activated glass powder and the hydrated glass powder cement on the microstructure level have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The work presented in this thesis consists of two main phases. The first phase contains experimental investigations of the reaction of glass powder with calcium hydroxide (CH) and water. In addition, it includes experiments that are aimed at determining the consumption of water and CH with time. The reactivity, degree of hydration, and nature of the pore solution of the glass powder-blended cement pastes and the effect of adding different ratios of glass powder on cement hydration is also investigated. The experiments proved that glass powder has a pozzolanic effect on cement hydration; hence it enhances the chemical and physical properties of cement paste. Based on the experimental test results, it is recommended to use a glass powder-to-cement ratio (GP/C) of 10% as an optimum ratio to achieve the best hydration and best properties of the paste. Two different chemical formulas for the produced GP C-S-H gel due to the pure GP and GP-CH pozzolanic reaction hydration are proposed. For the pure GP hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a calcium-to-silica ratio (C/S) of 0.164, water-to-silica ratio (H/S) of 1.3 and sodium/silica ratio (N/S) of 0.18. However, for the GP-CH hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a C/S ratio of 1

  7. Effect of Some Admixtures on the Hydration of Silica Fume and Hydrated Lime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effects of sodium salt of naphthalene formaldehyde sulfonic acid and stearic acid on the hydration of silica fume and Ca(0H)2 have been investigated. The hydration was carried out at 60℃ and W/S ratio of 4 for various time intervals namely, 1, 3, 7 and 28 days and in the presence of 0.2% and 5% superplasticizer and stearic acid. The results of the hydration kinetics show that both admixtures accelerate the hydration reaction of silica fume and calcium hydroxide during the first 7 days. Whereas, after 28 days hydration there is no significant effect. Generally, most of free calcium hydroxide seems to be consumed after 28 days. In addition, the phase composition as well as the microstructure of the formed hydrates was examined by using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) respectively.

  8. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: Constraints from ODP Leg 204

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A.M.; Long, P.E.; Torres, M.E.; Bohrmann, G.; Rack, F.R.; Collett, T.S.; Goldberg, D.S.; Milkov, A.V.; Riedel, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Bangs, N.L.; Barr, S.R.; Borowski, W.S.; Claypool, G.E.; Delwiche, M.E.; Dickens, G.R.; Gracia, E.; Guerin, G.; Holland, M.; Johnson, J.E.; Lee, Y.-J.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, X.; Teichert, B.; Tomaru, H.; Vanneste, M.; Watanabe, M. E.; Weinberger, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, we sampled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) from the seafloor to its base in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space or 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs. Elsewhere, the average gas hydrate content of the sediments in the gas hydrate stability zone is generally <2% of the pore space, although this estimate may increase by a factor of 2 when patchy zones of locally higher gas hydrate content are included in the calculation. These patchy zones are structurally and stratigraphically controlled, contain up to 20% hydrate in the pore space when averaged over zones ???10 m thick, and may occur in up to ???20% of the region imaged by 3D seismic data. This heterogeneous gas hydrate distribution is an important constraint on models of gas hydrate formation in marine sediments and the response of the sediments to tectonic and environmental change. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  10. Kinetic analysis of the multistep aggregation mechanism of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoud, Lucrèce; Arosio, Paolo; Sozo, Margaux; Yates, Andrew; Norrant, Edith; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2014-09-11

    We investigate by kinetic analysis the aggregation mechanism of two monoclonal antibodies belonging to the IgG1 and IgG2 subclass under thermal stress. For each IgG, we apply a combination of size exclusion chromatography and light scattering techniques to resolve the time evolution of the monomer, dimer, and trimer concentrations, as well as the average molecular weight and the average hydrodynamic radius of the aggregate distribution. By combining the detailed experimental characterization with a theoretical kinetic model based on population balance equations, we extract relevant information on the contribution of the individual elementary steps on the global aggregation process. The analysis shows that the two molecules follow different aggregation pathways under the same operating conditions. In particular, while the monomer depletion of the IgG1 is found to be rate-limited by monomeric conformational changes, bimolecular collision is identified as the rate-limiting step in the IgG2 aggregation process. The measurement of the microscopic rate constants by kinetic analysis allows the quantification of the protein-protein interaction potentials expressed in terms of the Fuchs stability ratio (W). It is found that the antibody solutions exhibit large W values, which are several orders of magnitude larger than the values computed in the frame of the DLVO theory. This indicates that, besides net electrostatic repulsion, additional effects delay the aggregation kinetics of the antibody solutions with respect to diffusion-limited conditions. These effects likely include the limited efficiency of the collision events due to the presence of a limited number of specific aggregation-prone patches on the heterogeneous protein surface, and the contribution of additional repulsive non-DLVO forces to the protein-protein interaction potential, such as hydration forces.

  11. Investigation of the hydration and bioactivity of radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and MTA Angelus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Josette; Sorrentino, François; Damidot, Denis

    2013-05-01

    Novel root-end filling materials are composed of tricalcium silicate (TCS) and radiopacifier as opposed to the traditional mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) which is made up of clinker derived from Portland cement and bismuth oxide. The aim of this research was to characterize and investigate the hydration of a tricalcium silicate-based proprietary brand cement (Biodentine™) and a laboratory manufactured cement made with a mixture of tricalcium silicate and zirconium oxide (TCS-20-Z) and compare their properties to MTA Angelus™. The materials investigated included a cement containing 80% of TCS and 20% zirconium oxide (TCS-20-Z), Biodentine™ and MTA Angelus™. The specific surface area and the particle size distribution of the un-hydrated cements and zirconium oxide were investigated using a gas adsorption method and scanning electron microscopy. Un-hydrated cements and set materials were tested for mineralogy and microstructure, assessment of bioactivity and hydration. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Rietveld refined X-ray diffraction and calorimetry were employed. The radiopacity of the materials was investigated using ISO 6876 methods. The un-hydrated cements were composed of tricalcium silicate and a radiopacifier phase; zirconium oxide for both Biodentine™ and TCS-20-Z whereas bismuth oxide for MTA Angelus™. In addition Biodentine™ contained calcium carbonate particles and MTA Angelus™ exhibited the presence of dicalcium silicate, tricalcium aluminate, calcium, aluminum and silicon oxides. TCS and MTA Angelus™ exhibited similar specific surface area while Biodentine™ had a greater specific surface area. The cements hydrated and produced some hydrates located either as reaction rim around the tricalcium silicate grain or in between the grains at the expense of volume containing the water initially present in the mixture. The rate of reaction of tricalcium

  12. A Hydrate Database: Vital to the Technical Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Sloan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates may contain more energy than all the combined other fossil fuels, causing hydrates to be a potentially vital aspect of both energy and climate change. This article is an overview of the motivation, history, and future of hydrate data management using a CODATA vehicle to connect international hydrate databases. The basis is an introduction to the Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML to connect various hydrate databases. The accompanying four articles on laboratory hydrate data by Smith et al., on field hydrate data by L?wner et al., on hydrate modeling by Wang et al., and on construction of a Chinese gas hydrate system by Xiao et al. provide details of GHML in their respective areas.

  13. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-like materials: an update review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Shalavi, Sousan; Soltani, Mohammad Karim

    2014-09-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a multi-application material used in endodontics. It is a mixture of a refined Portland cement and bismuth oxide and trace amounts of SiO₂, CaO, MgO, K₂SO₄, and Na₂SO₄. MTA powder is mixed with supplied sterile water in a 3:1 powder/liquid. Hydrated MTA has an initial pH of 10.2, which rises to 12.5 three hours after mixing. There are several materials derived from MTA such as Endo-CPM Sealer, Ortho MTA, MTA-Fillapex, DiaRoot BioAggregate, MTA Bio, light-cured MTA, tricalcium silicate, and iRoot SP. The purpose of this article is to review MTA-like materials.

  14. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    CERN Document Server

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  15. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoderbek, David; Farrell, Helen; Howard, James; Raterman, Kevin; Silpngarmlert, Suntichai; Martin, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Klein, Perry

    2013-06-30

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  16. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Thomas Williams; Bjorn Paulsson; Alexander Goertz

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a drilling hazard by the oil and gas industry for years. Drilling engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous problems, including drilling kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates as a potential energy source agree that the resource potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained from physical samples taken from actual hydrate-bearing rocks. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The project team drilled and continuously cored the Hot Ice No. 1 well on Anadarko-leased acreage beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and used for determining physical characteristics of hydrates and surrounding rock. After the well was logged, a 3D vertical seismic profile (VSP) was recorded to calibrate the shallow geologic section with seismic data and to investigate techniques to better resolve lateral subsurface variations of potential hydrate-bearing strata. Paulsson Geophysical Services, Inc. deployed their 80 level 3C clamped borehole seismic receiver array in the wellbore to record samples every 25 ft. Seismic vibrators were successively positioned at 1185 different surface positions in a circular pattern around the wellbore. This technique generated a 3D image of the subsurface. Correlations were

  17. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  18. Polyethylene oxide hydration in grafted layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Zilu

    Hydration of water soluble polymers is one of the key-factors defining their conformation and properties, similar to biopolymers. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most important biomedical-applications polymers and is known for its reverse temperature solubility due to hydrogen bonding with water. As in many practical applications PEO chains are grafted to surfaces, e.g. of nanoparticles or planar surfaces, it is important to understand PEO hydration in such grafted layers. Using atomistic molecular dynamic simulations we investigate the details of molecular conformation and hydration of PEO end-grafted to gold surfaces. We analyze polymer and water density distribution as a function of distance from the surface for different grafting densities. Based on a detailed analysis of hydrogen bonding between polymer and water in grafted PEO layers, we will discuss the extent of PEO hydration and its implication for polymer conformation, mobility and layer properties. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  19. Formulating formation mechanism of natural gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palodkar, Avinash V; Jana, Amiya K

    2017-07-25

    A large amount of energy, perhaps twice the total amount of all other hydrocarbon reserves combined, is trapped within gas hydrate deposits. Despite emerging as a potential energy source for the world over the next several hundred years and one of the key factors in causing future climate change, gas hydrate is poorly known in terms of its formation mechanism. To address this issue, a mathematical formulation is proposed in the form of a model to represent the physical insight into the process of hydrate growth that occurs on the surface and in the irregular nanometer-sized pores of the distributed porous particles. To evaluate the versatility of this rigorous model, the experimental data is used for methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrates grown in different porous media with a wide range of considerations.

  20. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  1. Quantifying hydrate formation and kinetic inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloan, E.D.; Subramanian, S.; Matthews, P.N.; Lederhos, J.P.; Khokhar, A.A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Hydrate Research

    1998-08-01

    In the Prausnitz tradition, molecular and macroscopic evidence of hydrate formation and kinetic inhibition is presented. On the microscopic level, the first Raman spectra are presented for the formation of both uninhibited and inhibited methane hydrates with time. This method has the potential to provide a microscopic-based kinetics model. Three macroscopic aspects of natural gas hydrate kinetic inhibition are also reported: (1) The effect of hydrate dissociation residual structures was measured, which has application in decreasing the time required for subsequent formation. (2) The performance of a kinetic inhibitor (poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) or PVCap) was measured and correlated as a function of PVCap molecular weight and concentrations of PVCap, methanol, and salt in the aqueous phase. (3) Long-duration test results indicated that the use of PVCap can prevent pipeline blockage for a time exceeding the aqueous phase residence time in some gas pipelines.

  2. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  3. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2004-11-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained

  4. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained

  5. Structural and magnetic properties of ultra-small scale eutectic CoFeZr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjura Hoque, S. [Dept. of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India); Materials Science Division, Atomic Energy Centre, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Makineni, S.K. [Dept. of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India); Pal, A.; Ayyub, P. [Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Chattopadhyay, K. [Dept. of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • Development of ultra-small scale eutectic CoFeZr alloys. • Hardness of 713 VHN was obtained for Co{sub 49.2}Fe{sub 49.2}Zr by lamellar spacing of 113 nm. • Highest moment of 1.92 μ{sub B} at 5 K was obtained for Co{sub 49.2}Fe{sub 49.2}Zr. • Decay of magnetization at low temperature can be described by spin wave excitation. - Abstract: Aiming to develop high mechanical strength and toughness by tuning ultrafine lamellar spacing of magnetic eutectic alloys, we report the mechanical and magnetic properties of the binary eutectic alloys Co{sub 90.5}Zr{sub 9.5} and Fe{sub 90.2}Zr{sub 9.8}, as well as the pseudo-binary eutectic alloys Co{sub 82.4}Fe{sub 8}Zr{sub 9.6}, Co{sub 78}Fe{sub 12.4}Zr{sub 9.6} and Co{sub 49.2}Fe{sub 49.2}Zr{sub 9.6} developed by suction-casting. The lower lamellar spacing around 100 nm of the eutectics Co{sub 49.2}Fe{sub 49.2}Zr{sub 9.6} yields a high hardness of 713(±20) VHN. Magnetic measurements reveal high magnetic moment of 1.92 μ{sub B} (at 5 K) and 1.82 μ{sub B} (at 300 K) per formula unit for this composition. The magnetization vs. applied field data at 5 K show a directional preference to some extent and therefore smaller non-collinear magnetization behavior compared to Co{sub 11}Zr{sub 2} reported in the literature due to exchange frustration and transverse spin freezing owing to the presence of smaller Zr content. The decay of magnetization as a function of temperature along the easy axis of magnetization of all the eutectic compositions can be described fairly well by the spin wave excitation equation ΔM/M(0) = BT{sup 3/2} + CT{sup 5/2}.

  6. Characterization and modeling of microstructural evolution of near-eutectic tin-silver-copper solder joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbrzezny, Adam R.

    Near-eutectic Sn-Ag-Cu (SAC) solders are currently considered as major lead-free replacement candidates for Sn-Pb eutectic alloys in microelectronics applications. In this thesis, the microstructural thermal stability including recrystallization, grain growth behavior, Pb and Au contamination effects and interaction of the SAC solder with Cu and Ni substrates were investigated. The true eutectic composition of the Sn-Ag-Cu alloy was verified to be Sn3.5Ag0.9Cu wt.%, and the eutectic melting temperature was determined to be 217.4 +/- 0.8°C. The system was classified as belonging to faceting (Cu6Sn5)-faceting (Ag3Sn)-nonfaceting (Sn matrix) ternary eutectic. The most significant consequence of Pb contamination was the formation of a quaternary eutectic phase (Sn-Ag-Cu-Pb) with a melting point at 176°C. Similarly, the presence of gold in the SAC alloy led to a development of a new quaternary phase (Sn-Ag-Cu-Au) melting at 204°C. Prolonged aging of SAC-4 wt.% Au on nickel resulted in the deposition of a new, previously unreported, intermetallic (IMC) layer, ((Au1-xCUx)6Sn 5, 15 wt.% of Au) on top of the existing (Cu1-yNi y)6Sn5 layer. The interfacial products that formed during soldering to copper were Cu6Sn5 and Cu3Sn. Soldering to nickel resulted in the formation of one layer, (Cu1-yNiy) 6Sn5, which was different from the expected Ni3Sn 4 layer. A small copper content in the SAC solder (0.7 wt.%) was sufficient to promote this thermodynamic shift. Intermetallic growth on Cu during solid state aging was established to be bulk diffusion controlled. The IMC layers in the SAC system grew at a slower rate than in the Sn-Pb system. It was found that the reliability of SAC solder joints on copper was considerably better than on nickel due to copper enrichment during reflow and subsequent Cu6Sn5 intermetallic precipitation. Enhanced copper and silver diffusion followed by tin recrystallization and grain growth, cavity nucleation and subsequent micro-crack linkage formed

  7. Microstructural and mechanical properties of binary Ni–Si eutectic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogebakan, Musa, E-mail: gogebakan@ksu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Sciences, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaras 46100 (Turkey); Kursun, Celal [Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Sciences, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaras 46100 (Turkey); Gunduz, Kerem Ozgur; Tarakci, Mehmet; Gencer, Yucel [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gebze Institute of Technology, Gebze, 41400 Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ni{sub 80}Si{sub 20}, Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30}, Ni{sub 55}Si{sub 45} and Ni{sub 45}Si{sub 55} were prepared by arc melting method. • The maximum microhardness value of 1126 HV obtained for Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30} alloy. • The microhardness values decreases with increase of Si/Ni ratio. • Ni{sub 80}Si{sub 20} and Ni{sub 55}Si{sub 45} are soft ferromagnetic, Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30} and Ni{sub 45}Si{sub 55} are paramagnetic. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Si eutectic alloys with nominal compositions of Ni{sub 80}Si{sub 20}, Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30}, Ni{sub 55}Si{sub 45} and Ni{sub 45}Si{sub 55} (Ni and Si with the purity of 99.99%) were prepared by arc melting method under vacuum/argon atmosphere. The effects of Si/Ni ratio on the microstructural properties, thermal transformation behavior, micro-hardness and magnetic properties of the Ni–Si eutectic alloys were investigated. These alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential thermal analysis (DTA), Vickers microhardness measurement and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). The phases expected according to Ni–Si phase diagram for conventional solidified eutectic Ni–Si alloys are considerably consistent with phase detected by XRD in this study. The quantitative results confirm that the chemical composition of the alloys very close to eutectic compositions and the microstructures are in typical lamellar eutectic morphology. The maximum microhardness value of 1126 HV obtained for Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30} alloy which has highest melting temperature amongst Ni–Si eutectics. The microhardness values decreases with increase of Si/Ni ratio. Ni{sub 80}Si{sub 20} and Ni{sub 55}Si{sub 45} alloys are soft ferromagnetic, Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30} and Ni{sub 45}Si{sub 55} alloys are paramagnetic with no magnetic saturation.

  8. THE INFLUENCE OF HEAT TREATMENT WITH THE LIQUID PHASE ON FORMATION OF A MICROSTRUCTURE OF EUTECTIC Al-Si-ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anikin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heat treatment on the structure of the eutectic Al-Si-alloy, a theoretical substantiation process based on thermal analyzer and cooked microstructures was presented in this paper.

  9. Microstructure and Eutectic Carbide Morphology of the High Speed Steel Strips Produced by Twin Roll Strip Casting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongshuang DI; Xiaoming ZHANG; Guodong WANG; Xianghua LIU

    2003-01-01

    The M2 high-speed steel strip was produced by using the laboratory scale twin roll strip caster. The microstructureand eutectic carbide morphology of thus produced products were observed and analyzed, and the comparison ofthose with conventional products was carried out. The effects of the processing parameters such as the meltingtemperature, the pouring temperature, rolling speed and separating force on the microstructure and eutectic carbidemorphology and their distribution were analyzed. The spheroidizing process of the strips in the annealing process wasinvestigated. The relations between the growth and spheroidizing of the eutectic carbide and the annealing technologywere obtained, and the mechanism of the twin roll strip casting process improving the eutectic carbide spheroidizingwas discussed. The theoretical instruction for determining the subsequent treatment process was provided.

  10. Automated detection and characterization of microstructural features: application to eutectic particles in single crystal Ni-based superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschopp, M. A.; Groeber, M. A.; Fahringer, R.; Simmons, J. P.; Rosenberger, A. H.; Woodward, C.

    2010-03-01

    Serial sectioning methods continue to produce an abundant amount of image data for quantifying the three-dimensional nature of material microstructures. Here, we discuss a methodology to automate detecting and characterizing eutectic particles taken from serial images of a production turbine blade made of a heat-treated single crystal Ni-based superalloy (PWA 1484). This method includes two important steps for unassisted eutectic particle characterization: automatically identifying a seed point within each particle and segmenting the particle using a region growing algorithm with an automated stop point. Once detected, the segmented eutectic particles are used to calculate microstructural statistics for characterizing and reconstructing statistically representative synthetic microstructures for single crystal Ni-based superalloys. The significance of this work is its ability to automate characterization for analysing the 3D nature of eutectic particles.

  11. Experimental Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Through Depressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgfeldt, T.; Flemings, P. B.; Meyer, D.; You, K.

    2015-12-01

    We dissociated methane hydrates by stepwise depressurization. The initial hydrates were formed by injecting gas into a cylindrical sample of brine-saturated, coarse-grained sand at hydrate-stable conditions with the intention of reaching three-phase equilibrium. The sample was initially at 1°C with a pore pressure of 1775 psi and a salinity of 7 wt. % NaBr. The depressurization setup consisted of one pump filled with tap water attached to the confining fluid port and a second pump attached to the inlet port where the methane was injected. Depressurization was conducted over sixteen hours at a constant temperature of 1°C. The pore pressure was stepwise reduced from 1775 psi to atmospheric pressure by pulling known volumes of gas from the sample. After each extraction, we recorded the instantaneous and equilibrium pore pressure. 0.503 moles of methane were removed from the sample. The pore pressure decreased smoothly and nonlinearly with the cumulative gas withdrawn from the sample. We interpret that hydrate began to dissociate immediately with depressurization, and it continued to dissociate when the pressure decreased below the three-phase pressure for 1°C and 0 wt. % salinity. Two breaks in slope in the pressure vs. mass extracted data are bounded by smooth, nonlinear curves with differing slopes on either side. We attribute the breaks to dissociation of three zones of hydrate concentration. We created a box model to simulate the experimental behavior. For a 10% initial gas saturation (estimated from the hydrate formation experiment and based on mass conservation), an initial hydrate saturation of 55% is required to match the total methane extracted from the sample. Future experiments will be conducted over a longer timespan while monitoring hydrate dissociation with CT imaging throughout the process.

  12. Hydration of polyethylene glycol-grafted liposomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Tirosh, O; Barenholz, Y.; Katzhendler, J; Priev, A

    1998-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the effect of polyethylene glycol of 2000 molecular weight (PEG2000) attached to a dialkylphosphatidic acid (dihexadecylphosphatidyl (DHP)-PEG2000) on the hydration and thermodynamic stability of lipid assemblies. Differential scanning calorimetry, densitometry, and ultrasound velocity and absorption measurements were used for thermodynamic and hydrational characterization. Using a differential scanning calorimetry technique we showed that each molecule of PEG...

  13. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  14. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  15. Surfactant effects on SF6 hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Young Bok; Lee, Man Sig; Kim, Young Seok; Englezos, Peter; Kim, Myung Hyun; Kim, Yang Do

    2009-03-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) has been widely used in a variety of industrial processes, but it is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. For this reason, it is necessary to separate or collect it from waste gas streams. One separation method is through hydrate crystal formation. In this study, SF(6) hydrate was formed in aqueous surfactant solutions of 0.00, 0.01, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.20 wt% to investigate the effects of surfactants on the hydrate formation rates. Three surfactants, Tween 20 (Tween), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LABS), were tested in a semi-batch stirred vessel at the constant temperature and pressures of 276.2 K and 0.78 MPa, respectively. All surfactants showed kinetic promoter behavior for SF(6) hydrate formation. It was also found that SF(6) hydrate formation proceeded in two stages with the second stage being the most rapid. In situ Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the increased gas consumption rate with the addition of surfactant was possibly due to the increased gas filling rate in the hydrate cavity.

  16. Production of Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) fibers with encapsulated natural deep eutectic solvent (NADES) using electrospinning

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized electrospun fibers are of great interest for biomedical applications such as in the design of drug delivery systems. Nevertheless, in some cases the molecules of interest have poor solubility in water or have high melting temperatures. These drawbacks can be overcome using deep eutectic solvents. In this work, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), a common biodegradable biopolymer, was used to produce new functionalized fibers with the eutectic mixture choline chloride:citric acid in a mo...

  17. Heat storage containers filled with the combination of a eutectic salt and a non-biodegradable filler material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, J.L.

    1980-09-23

    A heat storage article adapted for prevention of stratification of heat storage materials, such as eutectic salts contained within the container element. The article is comprised of a heavy thermally conductive container with an internal cavity. The internal cavity of the container is substantially completely filled with a combination of a non-biodegradable filler material such as glass fiber insulation and a eutectic salt.

  18. Influence of doping on the microstructure and kinetic parameters of GaSb-FeGa1.3 eutectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, I. Kh.; Ragimov, R. N.; Khalilova, A. A.; Arasly, D. G.; Aliev, M. I.

    2012-12-01

    Electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy analysis of GaSb-FeGa1.3 eutectic composite doped with tellurium atoms is performed. It is established that doping changes the GaSb-FeGa1.3 eutectics microstructure; sizes, shape, and density of FeGa1.3 metallic inclusions; and the interface regions between the matrix and inclusions. Influence of doping on the anisotropy of kinetic parameters is shown.

  19. Ternary phase behaviour and vesicle formation of a sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate hydrate/1-decanol/water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Nasima; Radiman, Shahidan; Mohamed, Faizal; Rahman, Irman Abdul; Reza, Mohammad Imam Hasan

    2011-08-01

    The phase behaviour of a system composed of amino acid-based surfactant (sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate hydrate), 1-decanol and deionised water was investigated for vesicle formation. Changing the molar ratio of the amphiphiles, two important aggregate structures were observed in the aqueous corner of the phase diagram. Two different sizes of microemulsions were found at two amphiphile-water boundaries. A stable single vesicle lobe was found for 1∶2 molar ratios in 92 wt% water with vesicles approximately 100 nm in size and with high zeta potential value. Structural variation arises due to the reduction of electrostatic repulsions among the ionic headgroups of the surfactants and the hydration forces due to adsorbed water onto monolayer's. The balance of these two forces determines the aggregate structures. Analysis was followed by the molecular geometrical structure. These findings may have implications for the development of drug delivery systems for cancer treatments, as well as cosmetic and food formulations.

  20. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  1. In Situ Raman Analyses of Natural Gas and Gas Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, E. T.; White, S. N.; Dunk, R. M.; Brewer, P. G.; Sherman, A. D.; Schmidt, K.; Hester, K. C.; Sloan, E. D.

    2004-12-01

    During a July 2004 cruise to Hydrate Ridge, Oregon, MBARI's sea-going laser Raman spectrometer was used to obtain in situ Raman spectra of natural gas hydrates and natural gas venting from the seafloor. This was the first in situ analysis of gas hydrates on the seafloor. The hydrate spectra were compared to laboratory analyses performed at the Center for Hydrate Research, Colorado School of Mines. The natural gas spectra were compared to MBARI gas chromatography (GC) analyses of gas samples collected at the same site. DORISS (Deep Ocean Raman In Situ Spectrometer) is a laboratory model laser Raman spectrometer from Kaiser Optical Systems, Inc modified at MBARI for deployment in the deep ocean. It has been successfully deployed to depths as great as 3600 m. Different sampling optics provide flexibility in adapting the instrument to a particular target of interest. An immersion optic was used to analyze natural gas venting from the seafloor at South Hydrate Ridge ( ˜780 m depth). An open-bottomed cube was placed over the vent to collect the gas. The immersion optic penetrated the side of the cube as did a small heater used to dissociate any hydrate formed during sample collection. To analyze solid hydrates at both South and North Hydrate Ridge ( ˜590 m depth), chunks of hydrate were excavated from the seafloor and collected in a glass cylinder with a mesh top. A stand-off optic was used to analyze the hydrate inside the cylinder. Due to the partial opacity of the hydrate and the small focal volume of the sampling optic, a precision underwater positioner (PUP) was used to focus the laser spot onto the hydrate. PUP is a stand-alone system with three degrees-of-freedom, capable of moving the DORISS probe head with a precision of 0.1 mm. In situ Raman analyses of the gas indicate that it is primarily methane. This is verified by GC analyses of samples collected from the same site. Other minor constituents (such as CO2 and higher hydrocarbons) are present but may be in

  2. Revealing heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si by AlP in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehua; Hage, Fredrik S; Liu, Xiangfa; Ramasse, Quentin; Schumacher, Peter

    2016-04-28

    The heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si can be attributed to the presence of AlP. Although P, in the form of AlP particles, is usually observed in the centre of primary Si, there is still a lack of detailed investigations on the distribution of P within primary Si and eutectic Si in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys at the atomic scale. Here, we report an atomic-scale experimental investigation on the distribution of P in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys. P, in the form of AlP particles, was observed in the centre of primary Si. However, no significant amount of P was detected within primary Si, eutectic Si and the Al matrix. Instead, P was observed at the interface between the Al matrix and eutectic Si, strongly indicating that P, in the form of AlP particles (or AlP 'patch' dependent on the P concentration), may have nucleated on the surface of the Al matrix and thereby enhanced the heterogeneous nucleation of eutectic Si. The present investigation reveals some novel insights into heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si by AlP in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys and can be used to further develop heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms based on adsorption.

  3. On the issues of resolving a low melting combination as a definite eutectic or an elusive cocrystal: A critical evaluation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suryanarayan Cherukuvada

    2016-04-01

    Cocrystals and eutectics are different yet related crystalline multi-component adducts with diverse applications in pharmaceutical and materials fields. Recently, they were shown to be alternate products of cocrystallization experiments. Whereas a cocrystal shows distinct diffraction, spectroscopic and thermal signatures as compared to parent components, the hallmark of a eutectic is its low melting nature. However, in certain cases, there can be a problem when one resorts to design a cocrystal and assess its formation vis-àvis a eutectic. In the absence of a gold standard method to make a cocrystal, it is often difficult to judge how exhaustive should the cocrystallization trials be to ensure the accomplishment of a desired/putative cocrystal. Further, a cocrystal can manifest with intermolecular interactions and/or crystal structure similar to that of its parent compounds such that the conventional diffraction and spectroscopic techniques will be of little help to conclusively infer the formation of cocrystal in the lack of single crystals. Such situations combined with low melting behavior of a combination brings the complication of resolving the combination as a cocrystal or eutectic since now both the adducts share common features. Based on the curious case of Caffeine–Benzoic acid combination, this study aims to unfold the intricate issues related to the design, formation and characterization of cocrystals and eutectics for a way forward. The utility of heteronuclear seeding methodology in establishing a given combination as a cocrystal-forming one or a eutectic-forming one in four known systems is appraised.

  4. Effects of cooling rate and B content on microstructure of near-eutectic Al-13wt%Si Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Xiao; Zhou Jianyuan; Lü Jianhua

    2008-01-01

    Under cooling rates of 2℃/s and 10℃/s.the Influences of B content on the microstructure of near eutectic Al-13.0wt%Si alloy have been investigated.Results showed that the addition of boron resulted in refinement of eutectic grains,and to some extent,had an inhibiting effect on precipitation of the primary phases,and the refining and inhibiting effects are much more obvious at higher cooling rate.When B was not added,higher cooling rate promoted the α-Al dendrites formation.At Iower cooling rate,the addition of B did not cause the so called"columnar to equiaxed transition(CET)",however,at higher cooling rate,this transition was obvious.After the addition of B,the nucleation temperature TN ascended and nucleation mode changed from nucleation mode of from wall towards centre(without B addition)to a nucleation mode that the eutectic nucleated evenly throughout whole sample (with B added).It can be concluded that the addition of B offers a Iarge amount of nuclei for eutectic solidification,as a result,the eutectic grains was refined.Higher cooling rate will lead to more nuclei,so the effects on the refinement of eutectic grains and on suppression of primary phases are increased.

  5. Role of hydration and water coordination in micellization of Pluronic block copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šturcová, Adriana; Schmidt, Pavel; Dybal, Jiří

    2010-12-15

    Raman, attenuated total reflectance FTIR, near-infrared spectroscopy, and DFT calculations have been used in a study of aqueous solutions of three tri-block copolymers poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) or PEO-PPO-PEO with commercial names Pluronic PE6200, PE6400 and F68. It is shown that the process of micellization as a response to increased temperature is reflected in the hydroxyl stretching region of infrared and Raman spectra, which contains information both about restructuring of water and changes of polymer chains in polymer/water aggregates. Raman spectra exhibit differences between individual Pluronics even at temperatures below the critical micellization temperature (CMT). According to the attenuated total reflection (ATR) FTIR spectra, the same five water coordination types defined by the number of donated/accepted hydrogen bonds are present in interacting water as in bulk water. It indicates that models considering mixed states of water with different hydrogen bonding environments provide appropriate descriptions of bound water both below and above the CMT. Above the CMT, aggregate hydration increases in the order PE6400 < PE6200 < F68, although that does not fully correspond to the EO/PO ratio, and points to the differences in microstructure of aggregates formed by each copolymer. This study relates nanoscale phenomena (hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration) with the mesoscale phenomenon of micellization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Phase field simulation of a directional solidification of a ternary eutectic Mo-Si-B Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, O.; Hasemann, G.; Krüger, M.; Halle, T.

    2016-03-01

    We present a eutectic Phase-Field Model for a Mo-Si-B alloy at ternary eutectic composition (Mo-17.5Si-8B), under a constant thermal gradient. The process parameters like cooling rate and thermal gradient were obtained directly from the experimental procedure of zone melting. The equilibrium interface geometries and interface mobility were calculated using an isotropic model. The phase equilibria and the other thermodynamic parameters are obtained by linearizing the Mo-Si-B ternary phase diagram. We have investigated the effect of process parameters on the lamellar growth pattern and lamella pattern stability with respect to the Jackson-Hunt minimum undercooling spacing theory. In order to examine the generated results by the model, they were validated with experimental observed microstructures and measurements and showed to be in a good agreement with the experimental observations.

  7. Directional solidification of Zn-Al-Cu eutectic alloy by the vertical Bridgman method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büyük U.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the effect of growth rate and temperature gradient on microstructure and mechanical properties of Zn-7wt.%Al-4wt.%Cu eutectic alloy has been investigated. Alloys prepared under steady-state conditions by vacuumed hot filing furnace. Then, the alloys were directionally solidified upward with different growth rates (V=11.62-230.77 mm/s at a constant temperature gradient (G=7.17 K/mm and with different temperature gradients (G=7.17-11.04 K/mm at a constant growth rate (V=11.62 mm/s by a Bridgman furnace. The microstructures were observed to be lamellae of Zn, Al and broken lamellae CuZn4 phases from quenched samples. The values of eutectic spacing, microhardness and ultimate tensile strength of alloys were measured. The dependency of the microstructure and mechanical properties on growth rate and temperature gradient were investigated using regression analysis.

  8. Phase selection during solidification of undercooled Ni_(70.2)Si_(29.8) eutectic alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiping Lu; Tingju Li; Fu Yabo; Sun Jianbo; Luo Dawei; Gencang Yang; Yaohe Zhou

    2009-01-01

    High undercooling (about 392 K) was achieved in the bulk eutectic Ni_(70.2)Si_(29.8) alloy melt through glass fluxing combined with cyclic superheating. It is found that the metastable phases Ni_3Si_2 and NiSi are obtained through slow post-solidification when undercooling exceeds 240 K. The metastable phases are confirmed by using the method of X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Based on the principle of the free energy minimum and the transient nucleation theory, the phase selection of melt is investigated with regard to the metastable phases formation in the bulk undercooled eutectic Ni_(70.2)Si_(29.8) melts. The formation of metastable phases from undercooled Ni_(70.2)Si_(29.8) melts is ascribed to competitive nucleation with the undercooling, I.e. High undercooling facilitates the pref-erential nucleation of metastable phases.

  9. Chip bonding of low-melting eutectic alloys by transmitted laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Christian; Venkatesh, Arjun; Schneider, Friedrich; Hermsdorf, Jörg; Bengsch, Sebastian; Wurz, Marc C.; Kaierle, Stefan; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2017-06-01

    Present-day thermode bond systems for the assembly of radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips are mechanically inflexible, difficult to control, and will not meet future manufacturing challenges sufficiently. Chip bonding, one of the key processes in the production of integrated circuits (ICs), has a high potential for optimization with respect to process duration and process flexibility. For this purpose, the technologies used, so far, are supposed to be replaced by a transmission laser-bonding process using low-melting eutectic alloys. In this study, successful bonding investigations of mock silicon chips and of RFID chips on flexible polymer substrates are presented using the low-melting eutectic alloy, 52In48Sn, and a laser with a wavelength of 2 μm.

  10. Filtration of aluminum alloys and its influence on mechanical properties and shape of eutectical silicium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brůna

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Filtration during casting of high quality aluminum alloys belongs to main refining methods. Even when there are many years of experiences and experimental works on this subject, there are still some specific anomalies. While using ceramic filtration media during casting of aluminum alloys, almost in all experiments occurred increase of strength limit and atypical increase of extension. This anomaly was not explained with classical metallurgical methods, black-white contrast after surface etching neither with color surface etching. For that reason was used deep etching on REM. By using pressed ceramic filters, by studying morphology eutectical silicon was observed modification morphology of eutectical silicon, this explains increase extension after filtration. Pressed ceramic filters were used on experimental works. Casting was executed on hardenable alloy AlSi10MgMn.

  11. Eutectic effect during mesophase formation in co-carbonization of ethylene tar pitch and polystyrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Xianglin; Song Shulei

    2012-01-01

    Ethylene tar pitch was co-carbonized with waste polystyrene to prepare mesophase pitch.The characteristics of mesophase pitches were examined using polarized light optical microscopy,apparent viscometry,Fourier transform infrared spectrometry,1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry,and X-ray diffractometry.The properties of the mesophase pitch were greatly improved because of the eutectic effect.The soluble content increased from 5% to 56%,the mesophase itself increased from 32% to 100%,and the optical texture was changed from a coarse mosaic into a flow domain after the waste polystyrene was added to the ethylene tar pitch.The apparent viscosity showed that the mesophase pitch changed from thixotropic to Newtonian suggesting improved rheological behavior during co-carbonization,The increased number of alkyl groups,which are mainly methylene groups,altered the molecular structure of the mesophase pitch in a way that resulted in the eutectic effect.

  12. DENDRITE REFINING AND EUTECTIC TRANSFORMATION BEHAVIOR OF NICKEL-BASE SINGLE CRYSTAL (NBSC) SUPERALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Because of the low temperature gradient and growth rate, the microstructure of the conventional single crystal superalloy made by HRS processing is coarse dendrite with well developed sidebranches and has serious segregation. With the help of the high temperature gradient directional solidification equipment (HGDS), the solidification cooling rate is greatly increased. Study on microstructure of the Ni-base single crystal superalloy solidified at much higher cooling rate shows that the dendrite arm spacing is highly refined, of which the primary dendrite arm spacing can be made to be 38μm, just as 1/10 as that by conventional HRS processing. With the increase of the cooling rate, the amount of the eutectic increases and then decreases. In the superfine columnar dendrite, the amount of γ/γ′eutectic is much fewer and its size is very small. This is useful to homogenize the microsegregation and improve the property of the material.

  13. Development of bulk metallic glasses based on the Dy-Al binary eutectic composition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Lin; TIAN Rui; XIAO Xueshan

    2008-01-01

    A series of dysprosium-based ternary, quadruple, and quintuple bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) based on Dy-Al binary eutectic compo-sition were obtained with the partial substitution of Co, Gd, and Ni elements, for dysprosium. The results showed that the Dy31Gd25Co20Al24 alloy, which had the best glass forming ability (GFA), could be cast into an amorphous rod with a diameter of 5 mm. The GFA of alloys was evaluated on the basis of the supercooled liquid region width, γ parameter, the formation enthalpy, and the equivalent electronegativity difference of amor-phous alloys. It was found that the eutectic composition was closely correlated with the GFA of the Dy-based BMGs.

  14. Directional solidification of (Ti, Zr) carbide-(Ti, Zr) diboride eutectics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorrell, C.C.; Beratan, H.R.; Bradt, R.C.; Stubican, V.C.

    1984-03-01

    The ZrC-ZrB2, ZrC-TiB2, and TiC-TiB2 metal diboride-metal carbide pseudo-binary eutectic systems have been successfully solidified directionally by means of the floating zone method. The first and third of these eutectics possess a morphology consisting of columnar grains of parallel lamellae with interlamellar spacings that adhere to the lambda-squared (R) C relationship, while the second is noted to solidify in a Chinese calligraphy-like morphology of broken and deformed lamellae. This phenomenon may be related to solid solution effects, but it did not prevent the interlamellar spacings from following the aforementioned law. The calligraphic effect's values are larger than those of the other two systems, and the constant, C, is accordingly about an order of magnitude larger. All three of these cubic-hexagonal systems exhibited identical epitaxial relationships. 24 references.

  15. Nucleation near the eutectic point in a Potts-lattice gas model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vishal; Peters, Baron

    2014-02-28

    We use the Potts-lattice gas model to study nucleation at and near the eutectic composition. We use rare-event methods to compute the free energy landscape for the competing nucleation products, and short trajectories at the barrier top to obtain prefactors. We introduce a procedure to tune the frequency of semigrand Monte Carlo moves so that the dynamics of a small closed system roughly resemble those of an infinite system. The non-dimensionalized nucleation rates follow trends as predicted by the classical nucleation theory. Finally, we develop corrections that convert free energy surfaces from closed (canonical) simulations into free energy surfaces from open (semigrand) simulations. The new corrections extend earlier corrections to now address situations like nucleation at the eutectic point where two products nucleate competitively.

  16. Effect of Rare Earth on Superplasticity of Zn-5Al Eutectic Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石志强; 叶以富; 李世春; 王焕荣; 滕新营

    2002-01-01

    The superplastic deformation curves of Zn-5Al eutectic alloy containing small amount of rare earth were measured, and the influence of rare earth on structure and superplasticity characteristics of the alloy was examined with optical microscope, XDF and TEM. The results show that the elongation of Zn-5Al eutectic alloy can be increased if less than 0.2 %(mass fraction) misch-metal was added. Rare earth which exists in the form of compounds Al2CeZn2 and CeZn3 can refrain the dissolution and diffusion of Zn to Al and postpone the saturation of the diffusion-dissolution zone(DDZ) above 350 ℃, and in such a way boost up α/β interface sliding which benefits the superplasticity.

  17. Metallurgical Parameters Controlling the Eutectic Silicon Charateristics in Be-Treated Al-Si-Mg Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was carried out on Al-7%Si-0.4%Mg-X alloy (where X = Mg, Fe, Sr or Be, where the effect of solidification rate on the eutectic silicon characteristics was investigated. Two solidification rates corresponding to dendrite arm spacings (DAS of 24 and 65 μm were employed. Samples with 24 μm DAS were solution heat-treated at 540 °C for 5 and 12 h prior to quenching in warm water at 65 °C. Eutectic Si particle charateristics were measured using an image analyzer. The results show that the addition of 0.05% Be leads to partial modification of the Si particles. Full modification was only obtained when Sr was added in an amount of 150–200 ppm, depending on the applied solidification rate. Increasing the amount of Mg to 0.8% in Sr-modified alloys leads to a reduction in the effectiveness of Sr as the main modifier. Similar observations were made when the Fe content was increased in Be-treated alloys due to the Be-Fe interaction. Over-modification results in the precipitation of hard Sr-rich particles, mainly Al4SrSi2, whereas overheating causes incipient melting of the Al-Cu eutectic and hence the surrounding matrix. Both factors lead to a deterioration in the alloy mechanical properties. Furthermore, the presence of long, acicular Si particles accelerates the occurrence of fracture and, as a result, yields poor ductility. In low iron (less than 0.1 wt% Al-Si-Mg alloys, the mechanical properties in the as cast, as well as heat treated conditions, are mainly controlled by the eutectic Si charatersitics. Increasing the iron content and, hence, the volume fraction of Fe-based intermetallics leads to a complex fracture mode.

  18. Selective Au-Si eutectic bonding for Si-based MEMS applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.; Lehew, S.; Yu, C. [and others

    1995-05-22

    A novel method of fabricating three-dimensional silicon micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) is presented, using selectivity thin film deposited Au-Si eutectic bond pads. Utilizing this process, complicated structures such as microgrippers and microchannels are fabricated. Bond strengths are higher than the silicon fracture strength and the bond areas can be localized and aligned to the processed wafer. The process and the applications are described in this paper.

  19. Compatibilization of HDPE/agar biocomposites with eutectic-based ionic liquid containing surfactant

    OpenAIRE

    Shamsuri, AA; Daik, R; Zainudin, ES; Tahir, PM

    2014-01-01

    In this research, eutectic-based ionic liquid specifically choline chloride/glycerol was prepared at a 1:2 mole ratio. The choline chloride/glycerol was added with the different content of surfactant (hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide). The choline chloride/glycerol-hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide was introduced into high-density polyethylene/agar biocomposites through melt mixing. The mechanical testing results indicated that the impact strength and tensile extension of the biocomposites...

  20. Pressure-induced structural change in liquid GaIn eutectic alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Q.; Ahmad, A. S.; Ståhl, Kenny

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction reveals a pressure induced crystallization at about 3.4 GPa and a polymorphic transition near 10.3 GPa when compressed a liquid GaIn eutectic alloy up to ~13 GPa at room temperature in a diamond anvil cell. Upon decompression, the high pressure crystalline phase rema...... in local atomic packing of the nearest neighbors as well as electronic structures at the transition pressure....

  1. Using magnetic resonance imaging to monitor CH4 hydrate formation and spontaneous conversion of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Bernard A; Stevens, Jim; Howard, James J; Graue, Arne; Kvamme, Bjorn; Aspenes, Erick; Ersland, Geir; Husebø, Jarle; Zornes, David R

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to monitor and quantify methane hydrate formation and exchange in porous media. Conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate, when exposed to liquid carbon dioxide at 8.27 MPa and approximately 4 degrees C, was experimentally demonstrated with MRI data and verified by mass balance calculations of consumed volumes of gases and liquids. No detectable dissociation of the hydrate was measured during the exchange process.

  2. Alkali Aggregate Reaction in Alkali Slag Cement Mortars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By means of "Mortar Bar Method",the ratio of cement to aggregate was kept as a constant 1∶2.25,the water-cement ratio of the mixture was 0.40,and six prism specimens were prepared for each batch of mixing proportions with dimensions of 10×10×60mm3 at 38±2℃ and RH≥95%, the influences of content and particle size of active aggregate, sort and content of alkali component and type of slag on the expansion ratios of alkali-activated slag cement(ASC) mortars due to alkali aggregate reaction(AAR) were studied. According to atomic absorption spectrometry,the amount of free alkali was measured in ASC mortars at 90d.The results show above factors affect AAR remarkably,but no dangerous AAR will occur in ASC system when the amount of active aggregate is below 15% and the mass fraction of alkali is not more than 5% (Na2O).Alkali participated in reaction as an independent component, and some hydrates containing alkali cations were produced, free alkalis in ASC system can be reduced enormously.Moreover,slag is an effective inhibitor, the possibility of generating dangerous AAR in ASC system is much lower at same conditions than that in ordinary Portland cement system.

  3. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  4. Solid state tungsten oxide hydrate/tin oxide hydrate electrochromic device prepared by electrochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Kentaro; Matsuo, Ryo; Sasano, Junji; Yokoyama, Seiji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2017-03-01

    The solid state electrochromic device composed of tungsten oxide hydrate (WO3(H2O)0.33) and tin oxide hydrate (Sn(O,OH)) has been constructed by anodic deposition of WO3(H2O)0.33 and Sn(O,OH) layers and showed the color change from clear to blue by applying voltage through an Au electrode.

  5. Kinetic studies of gas hydrate formation with low-dosage hydrate inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Pipeline blockage by gas hydrates is a serious problem in the petroleum industry.Low-dosage inhibitors have been developed for its cost-effective and environmentally acceptable characteristics.In a 1.072-L reactor with methane,ethane and propane gas mixture under the pressure of about 8.5 MPa at 4 °C,hydrate formation was investigated with low-dosage hydrate inhibitors PVP and GHI1,the change of the compressibility factor and gas composition in the gas phase was analyzed,the gas contents in hydrates were compared with PVP and GHI1 added,and the inhibition mechanism of GHI1 was discussed.The results show that PVP and GHI1 could effectively inhibit the growth of gas hydrates but not nucleation.Under the experimental condition with PVP added,methane and ethane occupied the small cavities of the hydrate crystal unit and the ability of ethane entering into hydrate cavities was weaker than that of methane.GHI1 could effectively inhibit molecules which could more readily form hydrates.The ether and hydroxy group of diethylene glycol monobutyl ether have the responsibility for stronger inhibition ability of GHI1 than PVP.

  6. Feasibility study of tungsten as a diffusion barrier between nickel-chromium-aluminum and Gamma/Gamma prime - Delta eutectic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S. G.; Zellars, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Coating systems proposed for potential use on eutectic alloy components in high-temperature gas turbine engines were studied with emphasis on deterioration of such systems by diffusion. A 1-mil thick W sheet was placed between eutectic alloys and a NiCrAl layer. Layered test specimens were aged at 1100 C for as long as long as 500 hours. Without the W barrier, the delta phase of the eutectic deteriorated by diffusion of Nb into the NiCrAl. Insertion of the W barrier stopped the diffusion of Nb from delta. Chromium diffusion from the NiCrAl into the gamma/gamma prime phase of the eutectic was greatly reduced by the barrier. However, the barrier thickness decreased with time; and W diffused into both the NiCrAl and the eutectic. When the delta platelets were alined parallel to the NiCrAl layer, rather than perpendicular, diffusion into the eutectic was reduced.

  7. Eutectic mixtures of capric acid and lauric acid applied in building wallboards for heat energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv Shilei; Zhu Neng [Tianjin University (China). School of Environmental Science and Technology; Feng Guohui [Shenyang Jianzhu University, Shenyang (China)

    2006-06-15

    Capric acid (CA) and lauric acid (LA), as phase change materials (PCM), can be applied for energy storage in low temperature. The phase transitions temperature and values of latent heat of eutectic mixtures of CA and LA are suitable for being incorporated with building materials to form phase change wallboards used for building energy storage. 120, 240 and 360 accelerated thermal cycle tests were conducted to study the changes in latent heat of fusion and melting temperature of phase change wallboards combined with the eutectic mixtures of CA and LA. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) tested the transition temperature and latent heat. The results showed that the melting temperature and latent heat of these phase change wallboards with eutectic mixtures have not obvious variations after repeated 360 thermal cycles, which proved that these phase change wallboards have good thermal stability for melting temperature and variations in latent heat of fusion for long time application. Therefore, they can be used for latent heat storage in the field of building energy conservation. (author)

  8. Eutectic mixtures of capric acid and lauric acid applied in building wallboards for heat energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shilei, L.; Neng, Z. [School of Environment Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Guohui, F. [Shenyang Jianzhu University, Shenyang (China)

    2006-07-01

    Capric acid (CA) and lauric acid (LA), as phase change materials (PCM), can be applied for energy storage in low temperature. The phase transition temperature and values of latent heat of eutectic mixtures of CA and LA are suitable for being incorporated with building materials to form phase change wallboards used for building energy storage. 120, 240 and 360 accelerated thermal cycle tests were conducted to study the changes in latent heat of fusion and melting temperature of phase change wallboards combined with the eutectic mixtures of CA and LA. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) tested the transition temperature and latent heat. The results showed that the melting temperature and latent heat of these phase change wallboards with eutectic mixtures have no obvious variations after repeated 360 thermal cycles, which proved that these phase change wallboards have good thermal stability for melting temperature and variations in latent heat of fusion for long time application. Therefore, they can be used for latent heat storage in the field of building energy conservation. (author)

  9. Investigation of tin-lithium eutectic as a liquid plasma facing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzic, David; Szott, Matthew; Christenson, Michael; Shchelkanov, Ivan; Kalathiparambil, Kishor Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Innovative materials and techniques need to be utilized to address the high heat and particle flux incident on plasma facing components in fusion reactors. A liquid metal diverter module developed at UIUC with self circulating lithium has been successfully demonstrated to be capable of handling the relevant heat flux in plasma gun based tests and on operational tokamaks. The proper geometry of the liquid lithium trenches to minimize droplet ejection during transient plasma events have also been identified. Although lithium has proven to be effective in improved plasma performance and contributes to other advantageous factors like reduction in the fuel recycling, impurity gettering and, owing to the low Z, a significantly reduced impact on plasma as compared to the solid wall materials, it still poses several drawbacks related to its high reactivity and high vapor pressure at the relevant tokamak wall temperatures. The evaporation properties of a new eutectic mixture of tin and lithium (20% Sn) shows that lithium segregates to the surface at melting temperatures and hence is an effective replacement for pure lithium. Also, the vapor from the eutectic is dominated by lithium, minimizing the entry of high Z Sn into the plasma. At UIUC experiments for the synthesis and characterization of the eutectic - measurement of the critical wetting parameters and Seebeck coefficients with respect to the trench materials have been performed to ensure lithium wetting and flow in the trenches. The results will be presented. DOE project DEFG02- 99ER54515.

  10. A Sustainable Redox-Flow Battery with an Aluminum-Based, Deep-Eutectic-Solvent Anolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changkun; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Leyuan; Wang, Xuelan; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Xiaohong; Yu, Guihua

    2017-06-19

    Nonaqueous redox-flow batteries are an emerging energy storage technology for grid storage systems, but the development of anolytes has lagged far behind that of catholytes due to the major limitations of the redox species, which exhibit relatively low solubility and inadequate redox potentials. Herein, an aluminum-based deep-eutectic-solvent is investigated as an anolyte for redox-flow batteries. The aluminum-based deep-eutectic solvent demonstrated a significantly enhanced concentration of circa 3.2 m in the anolyte and a relatively low redox potential of 2.2 V vs. Li(+) /Li. The electrochemical measurements highlight that a reversible volumetric capacity of 145 Ah L(-1) and an energy density of 189 Wh L(-1) or 165 Wh kg(-1) have been achieved when coupled with a I3(-) /I(-) catholyte. The prototype cell has also been extended to the use of a Br2 -based catholyte, exhibiting a higher cell voltage with a theoretical energy density of over 200 Wh L(-1) . The synergy of highly abundant, dendrite-free, multi-electron-reaction aluminum anodes and environmentally benign deep-eutectic-solvent anolytes reveals great potential towards cost-effective, sustainable redox-flow batteries. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. New eutectic ionic liquids for lipase activation and enzymatic preparation of biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A; Holmes, Shaletha

    2011-03-21

    The enzymatic preparation of biodiesel has been hampered by the lack of suitable solvents with desirable properties such as high lipase compatibility, low cost, low viscosity, high biodegradability, and ease of product separation. Recent interest in using ionic liquids (ILs) as advanced reaction media has led to fast reaction rates and high yields in the enzymatic synthesis of biodiesel. However, conventional (i.e., cation-anion paired) ILs based on imidazolium and other quaternary ammonium salts remain too expensive for wide application at industrial scales. In this study, we report on newly-synthesized eutectic ILs derived from choline acetate or choline chloride coupled with biocompatible hydrogen-bond donors, such as glycerol. These eutectic solvents have favorable properties including low viscosity, high biodegradability, and excellent compatibility with Novozym(®) 435, a commercial immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B. Furthermore, in a model biodiesel synthesis system, we demonstrate high reaction rates for the enzymatic transesterification of Miglyol(®) oil 812 with methanol, catalyzed by Novozym(®) 435 in choline acetate/glycerol (1:1.5 molar ratio). The high conversion (97%) of the triglyceride obtained within 3 h, under optimal conditions, suggests that these novel eutectic solvents warrant further exploration as potential media in the enzymatic production of biodiesel.

  12. Microstructure and properties of Si-TaSi2 eutectic in situ composite for field emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI ChunJuan; ZHANG Jun; HAN Min; CHEN Jun; XU NingSheng; LIU Lin; FU HengZhi

    2007-01-01

    The Si-TaSi2 eutectic in situ composite for field emission is prepared by electron beam floating zone melting (EBFZM) technique on the basis of Czochralski (CZ) crystal growth technique. The directional solidification microstructure and the field emission properties of the Si-TaSi2 eutectic in situ composite prepared by two kinds of crystal growth techniques have been systematically tested and compared.Researches demonstrated that the solidification microstructure of EBFZM can be fined obviously because of the relatively high solidification rate and very high temperature gradient, i.e. both the diameter and inter-rod spacing of the TaSi2 fibers prepared by EBFZM technique were decreased, and the density and the volume fraction of the TaSi2 fibers prepared by EBFZM technique were increased in comparison with that of the TaSi2 fibers prepared by CZ method. Therefore the field emission property of the Si-TaSi2 eutectic in situ composite prepared by EBFZM can be improved greatly, which exhibits better field emission uniformity and straighter F-N curve.

  13. Dendritic and eutectic growth in Sb60Ag20Cu20 ternary alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The rapid solidification of Sb60Ag20Cu20 ternary alloy was realized by high undercooling method, and the maximum undercooling is up to 142 K (0.18TL). Within the wide undercooling range of 40-142 K, the solidified microstructures are composed of (Sb), θand ε phases. High undercooling enlarges the solute solubility of (Sb) phase, which causes its crystal lattice to expand and its crystal lattice constants to increase. Primary (Sb) phase grows in two modes: at small undercoolings non-faceted dendrite growth is the main growth form; whereas at large undercoolings faceted dendrite growth takes the dominant place. The remarkable difference of crystal structures between (Sb) and θphases leads to (θ+ Sb) pseudobinary eutectic hard to form, whereas strips of θform when the alloy melt reaches the (θ + Sb) pseudobinary eutectic line. The cooperative growth of θand ε phases contributes to the formation of (ε +θ) pseudobinary eutectic easily. In addition, the crystallization route has been determined via microstructural characteristic analysis and DSC experiment.

  14. Brazing characteristics of a Zr-Ti-Cu-Fe eutectic alloy filler metal for Zircaloy-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung G.; Lim, C. H.; Kim, K. H.; Park, S. S.; Lee, M. K.; Rhee, C. K.

    2013-10-01

    A Zr-Ti-Cu-Fe quaternary eutectic alloy was employed as a new Be-free brazing filler metal for Zircaloy-4 to supersede physically vapor-deposited Be coatings used conventionally with several disadvantages. The quaternary eutectic composition of Zr58Ti16Cu10Fe16 (at.%) showing a low melting temperature range from 832 °C to 853 °C was designed by a partial substitution of Zr with Ti based on a Zr-Cu-Fe ternary eutectic system. By applying an alloy ribbon with the determined composition, a highly reliable joint was obtained with a homogeneous formation of predominantly grown α-Zr phases owing to a complete isothermal solidification, exhibiting strength higher than that of Zircaloy-4. The homogenization of the joint was rate-controlled by the diffusion of the filler elements (Ti, Cu, and Fe) into the Zircaloy-4 base metal, and the detrimental segregation of the Zr2Fe phase in the central zone was completely eliminated by an isothermal holding at a brazing temperature of 920 °C for 10 min.

  15. Brazing characteristics of a Zr–Ti–Cu–Fe eutectic alloy filler metal for Zircaloy-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung G.; Lim, C.H. [Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K.H. [University of Science and Technology, Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, S.S. [School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, M.K., E-mail: leeminku@kaeri.re.kr [Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, C.K. [Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    A Zr–Ti–Cu–Fe quaternary eutectic alloy was employed as a new Be-free brazing filler metal for Zircaloy-4 to supersede physically vapor-deposited Be coatings used conventionally with several disadvantages. The quaternary eutectic composition of Zr{sub 58}Ti{sub 16}Cu{sub 10}Fe{sub 16} (at.%) showing a low melting temperature range from 832 °C to 853 °C was designed by a partial substitution of Zr with Ti based on a Zr–Cu–Fe ternary eutectic system. By applying an alloy ribbon with the determined composition, a highly reliable joint was obtained with a homogeneous formation of predominantly grown α-Zr phases owing to a complete isothermal solidification, exhibiting strength higher than that of Zircaloy-4. The homogenization of the joint was rate-controlled by the diffusion of the filler elements (Ti, Cu, and Fe) into the Zircaloy-4 base metal, and the detrimental segregation of the Zr{sub 2}Fe phase in the central zone was completely eliminated by an isothermal holding at a brazing temperature of 920 °C for 10 min.

  16. The formalism of fractal aggregation phenomena of colloidal drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippa, Natassa; Demetzos, Costas; Danezis, Emmanuel

    2012-03-01

    Classical Newtonian Physics and Euclidean Geometry are currently used to describe biological phenomena and the processes of drug formulation, which are characterized by homogeneity and linearity. On the other hand, at the mesoscopic level, the principles and the laws of physics are quite different from the Classical Newtonian Physics and Euclidean approach especially at nanoscale dimension. The investigation of the aggregation process of liposomes is of paramount importance due to their applications in pharmaceutical nanotechnology as drug delivery systems and as membrane models, in biosciences. The physical stability and the aggregation process of colloidal systems as well as the surface phenomena are described using the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The elucidation of the dimensionality of liposome aggregates obeys the fractal approach because the aggregation phenomena are irreversible. This approach can be correlated with the extended DLVO theory, which includes the hydration energy, too.

  17. Hydrophobic aggregation of ultrafine kaolinite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-ping; HU Yue-hua; LIU Run-Qing

    2008-01-01

    The hydrophobic aggregation of ultrafine kaolinite in cationic surfactant suspension was investigated by sedimentation test, zeta potential measurement and SEM observation. SEM images reveal that kaolinite particles show the self-aggregation of edge-face in acidic media, the aggregation of edge-face and edge-edge in neutral media, and the dispersion in alkaline media due to electrostatic repulsion. In the presence of the dodecylammonium acetate cationic surfactant and in neutral and alkaline suspension, the hydrophobic aggregation of face-face is demonstrated. The zeta potential of kaolinite increases with increasing the concentration of cationic surfactant. The small and loose aggregation at a low concentration but big and tight aggregation at a high concentration is presented At pH=7 alkyl quarterly amine salt CTAB has the best hydrophobic aggregation among three cationic surfactants, namely, dodecylammonium acetate, alkyl quarterly amine salts 1227 and CTAB.

  18. Non-Arrhenius protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Roberts, Christopher J

    2013-07-01

    Protein aggregation presents one of the key challenges in the development of protein biotherapeutics. It affects not only product quality but also potentially impacts safety, as protein aggregates have been shown to be linked with cytotoxicity and patient immunogenicity. Therefore, investigations of protein aggregation remain a major focus in pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions. Due to the complexity of the aggregation process and temperature-dependent conformational stability, temperature-induced protein aggregation is often non-Arrhenius over even relatively small temperature windows relevant for product development, and this makes low-temperature extrapolation difficult based simply on accelerated stability studies at high temperatures. This review discusses the non-Arrhenius nature of the temperature dependence of protein aggregation, explores possible causes, and considers inherent hurdles for accurately extrapolating aggregation rates from conventional industrial approaches for selecting accelerated conditions and from conventional or more advanced methods of analyzing the resulting rate data.

  19. Experimental characterization of production behavior accompanying the hydrate reformation in methane hydrate bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, T.; Kang, J.M.; Nguyen, H.T. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, C. [Kangwon National Univ., (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. [Korea Inst., of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the production behaviour associated with gas hydrate reformation in methane hydrate-bearing sediment by hot-brine injection. A range of different temperature and brine injection rates were used to analyze the pressure and temperature distribution, the gas production behaviour and the movement of the dissociation front. The study showed that hydrate reformation reduces the production rate considerably at an early time. However, gas production increases during the dissociation, near the outlet because the dissociated methane around the inlet is consumed in reforming the hydrate and increases the hydrate saturation around the outlet. Higher temperature also increases the gas production rate and the speed of the dissociation front. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  20. Thessaloniki Mud Volcano, the Shallowest Gas Hydrate-Bearing Mud Volcano in the Anaximander Mountains, Eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Perissoratis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed multibeam survey and the subsequent gravity coring carried out in the Anaximander Mountains, Eastern Mediterranean, detected a new active gas hydrate-bearing mud volcano (MV that was named Thessaloniki. It is outlined by the 1315 m bathymetric contour, is 1.67 km2 in area, and has a summit depth of 1260 m. The sea bottom water temperature is 13.7∘C. The gas hydrate crystals generally have the form of flakes or rice, some larger aggregates of them are up to 2 cm across. A pressure core taken at the site contained 3.1 lt. of hydrocarbon gases composed of methane, nearly devoid of propane and butane. The sediment had a gas hydrate occupancy of 0.7% of the core volume. These characteristics place the gas hydrate field at Thessaloniki MV at the upper boundary of the gas hydrate stability zone, prone to dissociation with the slightest increase in sea water temperature, decrease in hydrostatic pressure, or change in the temperature of the advecting fluids.

  1. Authigenic gypsum found in gas hydrate-associated sediments from Hydrate Ridge, the eastern North Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Jiasheng; Erwin; Suess; Dirk; Rickert

    2004-01-01

    Characteristic gypsum micro-sphere and granular mass were discovered by binocular microscope in the gas hydrate-associated sediments at cores SO143-221 and SO143/TVG40-2A respectively on Hydrate Ridge of Cascadia margin, the eastern North Pacific. XRD patterns and EPA analyses show both micro-sphere and granular mass of the crystals have the typical peaks and the typical main chemical compositions of gypsum, although their weight percents are slightly less than the others in the non-gas hydrate-associated marine regions. SEM pictures show that the gypsum crystals have clear crystal boundaries, planes, edges and cleavages of gypsum in form either of single crystal or of twin crystals. In view of the fact that there are meanwhile gas hydrate-associated authigenic carbonates and SO42(-rich pore water in the same sediment cores, it could be inferred reasonably that the gypsums formed also authigenically in the gas hydrate-associated environment too, most probably at the interface between the downward advecting sulfate-rich seawater and the below gas hydrate, which spilled calcium during its formation on Hydrate Ridge. The two distinct forms of crystal intergrowth, which are the granular mass of series single gypsum crystals at core SO143/TVG40-2A and the microsphere of gypsum crystals accompanied with detrital components at core SO143-221 respectively, indicate that they precipitated most likely in different interstitial water dynamic environments. So, the distinct authigenic gypsums found in gas hydrate-associated sediments on Hydrate Ridge could also be believed as one of the parameters which could be used to indicate the presence of gas hydrate in an unknown marine sediment cores.

  2. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  3. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually....... For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems...

  4. Complex admixtures of clathrate hydrates in a water desalination method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Blake A.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Anderson, David W.

    2009-07-14

    Disclosed is a method that achieves water desalination by utilizing and optimizing clathrate hydrate phenomena. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds of gas and water that desalinate water by excluding salt molecules during crystallization. Contacting a hydrate forming gaseous species with water will spontaneously form hydrates at specific temperatures and pressures through the extraction of water molecules from the bulk phase followed by crystallite nucleation. Subsequent dissociation of pure hydrates yields fresh water and, if operated correctly, allows the hydrate-forming gas to be efficiently recycled into the process stream.

  5. Molecular simulations of beta-amyloid protein near hydrated lipids (PECASE).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Han, Kunwoo (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Ford, David M. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX)

    2005-12-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations of beta-amyloid (A{beta}) protein and A{beta} fragment(31-42) in bulk water and near hydrated lipids to study the mechanism of neurotoxicity associated with the aggregation of the protein. We constructed full atomistic models using Cerius2 and ran simulations using LAMMPS. MD simulations with different conformations and positions of the protein fragment were performed. Thermodynamic properties were compared with previous literature and the results were analyzed. Longer simulations and data analyses based on the free energy profiles along the distance between the protein and the interface are ongoing.

  6. Purification of used eutectic (LiCl-KCl) salt electrolyte from pyroprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yung-Zun; Lee, Tae-Kyo; Eun, Hee-Chul; Choi, Jung-Hoon; Kim, In-Tae; Park, Geun-Il

    2013-06-01

    The separation characteristics of surrogate rare-earth fission products in a eutectic (LiCl-KCl) molten salt were investigated. This system is based on the eutectic salt used for the pyroprocessing treatment of used nuclear fuel (UNF). The investigation was performed using an integrated rare-earth separation apparatus comprising a precipitation reactor, a solid detachment device, and a layer separation device. To separate rare-earth fission products, a phosphate precipitation method using both Li3PO4 and K3PO4 as a precipitant was performed. The use of an equivalent phosphate precipitant composed of 0.408 molar ratio-K3PO4 and 0.592 molar ratio-Li3PO4 can preserve the original eutectic ratio, LiCl-0.592 molar ratio (or 45.2 wt%), as well as provide a high separation efficiency of over 99.5% under conditions of 550 °C and Ar sparging when using La, Nd, Ce, and Pr chlorides. The mixture of La, Nd, Ce, and Pr phosphate had a typical monoclinic (or monazite) structure, which has been proposed as a reliable host matrix for the permanent disposal of a high-level waste form. To maximize the reusability of purified eutectic waste salt after rare-earth separation, the successive rare-earth separation process, which uses both phosphate precipitation and an oxygen sparging method, were introduced and tested with eight rare-earth (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd) chlorides. In the successive rare-earth separation process, the phosphate reaction was terminated within 1 h at 550 °C, and a 4-8 h oxygen sparging time were required to obtain over a 99% separation efficiency at 700-750 °C. The mixture of rare-earth precipitates separated by the successive rare-earth separation process was found to be phosphate, oxychloride, and oxide. Through the successive rare-earth separation process, the eutectic ratio of purified salt maintained its original value, and impurity content including the residual precipitant of purified salt can be minimized.

  7. Effect of scandium on structure and hardening of Al–Ca eutectic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, N.A., E-mail: nikolay-belov@yandex.ru [National Research and Technological University “MISIS”, 4, Leninsky pr., Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Naumova, E.A. [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, 5, 2 ul. Baumanskaya, Moscow, 105005 (Russian Federation); Alabin, A.N. [National Research and Technological University “MISIS”, 4, Leninsky pr., Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); UC RUSAL, 13/1, Nikoloyamskaya st., Moscow, 109240 (Russian Federation); Matveeva, I.A. [UC RUSAL, 13/1, Nikoloyamskaya st., Moscow, 109240 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    The phase composition, structure and hardening of alloys in the aluminium corner of the Al–Ca–Sc system were studied in the range up to 10% Ca and up to 1% S≿. The experimental study (optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy with electron-microprobe analysis, differential thermal analysis and hardness measurements) was combined with Thermo-Calc software simulation for the optimization of the alloy composition. It was shown that only phases of the binary systems (Al{sub 4}Ca and Al{sub 3}Sc) might be in equilibrium with the aluminium solid solution. It was shown that the (Al) + Al{sub 4}Ca eutectic had a much finer structure as compared with the Al–Si eutectic, which suggests a possibility of reaching higher mechanical properties as compared to commercial alloys of the A356 type. The influence of the annealing temperature within the range up to 600 °C on the structure and hardness of the Al–Ca–Sc experimental alloys was studied. It was determined that the maximum hardening corresponded to the annealing at 300 °C, which was due to the precipitation of Al{sub 3}Sc nanoparticles with their further coarsening. With an example of an Al-7.6% Ca-0.3% Sc model experimental alloy, a principal possibility of manufacturing aluminium casting alloys based on the (Al) + Al{sub 4}Ca eutectic was demonstrated. Unlike commercial alloys of the A356 type, the model alloy does not require quenching, as hardening particles are formed in the course of annealing of casting. - Highlights: • Al–Ca–Sc phase diagram in aluminum corner. • Formation of Al{sub 3}Sc nanoparticles in eutectic (Al) + Al{sub 4}Ca during heating at 300–450 °C. • Hardening and thermal stability of proposed (Al–Ca–Sc) and commercial (Al–Si–Mg, 356 type) eutectic alloys.

  8. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  9. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries.

  10. Research on Judgment Aggregation Based on Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Dai

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Preference aggregation and judgment aggregation are two basic research models of group decision making. And preference aggregation has been deeply studied in social choice theory. However, researches of social choice theory gradually focus on judgment aggregation which appears recently. Judgment aggregation focuses on how to aggregate many consistent logical formulas into one, from the perspective of logic. We try to start with judgment aggregation model based on logic and then explore different solutions to problem of judgment aggregation.

  11. Stability evaluation of hydrate-bearing sediments during thermally-driven hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, T.; Cho, G.; Santamarina, J.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrate-bearing sediments may destabilize spontaneously as part of geological processes, unavoidably during petroleum drilling/production operations, or intentionally as part of gas extraction from the hydrate itself. In all cases, high pore fluid pressure generation is anticipated during hydrate dissociation. This study examined how thermal changes destabilize gas hydrate-bearing sediments. First, an analytical formulation was derived for predicting fluid pressure evolution in hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to thermal stimulation without mass transfer. The formulation captures the self-preservation behavior, calculates the hydrate and free gas quantities during dissociation, considering effective stress-controlled sediment compressibility and gas solubility in aqueous phase. Pore fluid pressure generation is proportional to the initial hydrate fraction and the sediment bulk stiffness; is inversely proportional to the initial gas fraction and gas solubility; and is limited by changes in effective stress that cause the failure of the sediment. Second, the analytical formulation for hydrate dissociation was incorporated as a user-defined function into a verified finite difference code (FLAC2D). The underlying physical processes of hydrate-bearing sediments, including hydrate dissociation, self-preservation, pore pressure evolution, gas dissolution, and sediment volume expansion, were coupled with the thermal conduction, pore fluid flow, and mechanical response of sediments. We conducted the simulations for a duration of 20 years, assuming a constant-temperature wellbore transferred heat to the surrounding hydrate-bearing sediments, resulting in dissociation of methane hydrate in the well vicinity. The model predicted dissociation-induced excess pore fluid pressures which resulted in a large volume expansion and plastic deformation of the sediments. Furthermore, when the critical stress was reached, localized shear failure of the sediment around the borehole was

  12. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  13. Apparatus investigates geological aspects of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Dillon, William P.

    1999-01-01

    The US Geological Survey has developed a laboratory research system which allows the study of the creation and dissociation of gas hydrates under deepwater conditions and with different sediment types and pore fluids. The system called GHASTLI (gas hydrate and sediment test laboratory instrument) comprises a pressure chamber which holds a sediment specimen, and which can simulate water depths to 2,500m and different sediment overburden. Seawater and gas flow through a sediment specimen can be precisely controlled and monitored. It can simulate a wide range of geology and processes and help to improve understanding of gas hydrate processes and aid prediction of geohazards, their control and potential use as an energy source. This article describes GHASTLI and how it is able to simulate natural conditions, focusing on fluid volume, acoustic velocity-compressional and shear wave, electric resistance, temperature, pore pressure, shear strength, and permeability.

  14. Simulation of Methane Recovery from Gas Hydrates Combined with Storing Carbon Dioxide as Hydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Janicki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the medium term, gas hydrate reservoirs in the subsea sediment are intended as deposits for carbon dioxide (CO2 from fossil fuel consumption. This idea is supported by the thermodynamics of CO2 and methane (CH4 hydrates and the fact that CO2 hydrates are more stable than CH4 hydrates in a certain P-T range. The potential of producing methane by depressurization and/or by injecting CO2 is numerically studied in the frame of the SUGAR project. Simulations are performed with the commercial code STARS from CMG and the newly developed code HyReS (hydrate reservoir simulator especially designed for hydrate processing in the subsea sediment. HyReS is a nonisothermal multiphase Darcy flow model combined with thermodynamics and rate kinetics suitable for gas hydrate calculations. Two scenarios are considered: the depressurization of an area 1,000 m in diameter and a one/two-well scenario with CO2 injection. Realistic rates for injection and production are estimated, and limitations of these processes are discussed.

  15. Chemistry, isotopic composition, and origin of a methane-hydrogen sulfide hydrate at the Cascadia subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, M.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Lorenson, T.D.

    1998-01-01

    Although the presence of extensive gas hydrate on the Cascadia margin, offshore from the western U.S. and Canada, has been inferred from marine seismic records and pore water chemistry, solid gas hydrate has only been found at one location. At Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 892, offshore from central Oregon, gas hydrate was recovered close to the sediment - water interface at 2-19 m below the seafloor, (mbsf) at 670 m water depth. The gas hydrate occurs as elongated platy crystals or crystal aggregates, mostly disseminated irregularly, with higher concentrations occurring in discrete zones, thin layers, and/or veinlets parallel or oblique to the bedding. A 2-to 3-cm thick massive gas hydrate layer, parallel to bedding, was recovered at ???17 mbsf. Gas from a sample of this layer was composed of both CH4 and H2S. This sample is the first mixed-gas hydrate of CH4-H2S documented in ODP; it also contains ethane and minor amounts of CO2. Measured temperature of the recovered core ranged from 2 to - 18??C and are 6 to 8 degrees lower than in-situ temperatures. These temperature anomalies were caused by the partial dissociation of the CH4-H2S hydrate during recovery without a pressure core sampler. During this dissociation, toxic levels of H2S (??34S, +27.4???) were released. The ??13C values of the CH4 in the gas hydrate, -64.5 to -67.5???(PDB), together with ??D values of - 197 to - 199???(SMOW) indicate a primarily microbial source for the CH4. The ??18O value of the hydrate H2O is +2.9???(SMOW), comparable with the experimental fractionation factor for sea-ice. The unusual composition (CH4-H2S) and depth distribution (2-19 mbsf) of this gas hydrate indicate mixing between a methane-rich fluid with a pore fluid enriched in sulfide; at this site the former is advecting along an inclined fault into the active sulfate reduction zone. The facts that the CH4-H2S hydrate is primarily confined to the present day active sulfate reduction zone (2-19 mbsf), and that from here

  16. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  17. Simulation of subsea gas hydrate exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2014-05-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several subsea sediments and permafrost regions around the world is a promising perspective to overcome future shortages in natural gas supply. Being aware that conventional natural gas resources are limited, research is going on to develop technologies for the production of natural gas from such new sources. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, India, and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop required technologies. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of CO2 from combustion processes to reduce climate impact. While different natural or man-made reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid CO2, the storage of CO2 as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in the form of hydrates. Regarding technological implementation many problems have to be overcome. Especially mixing, heat and mass transfer in the reservoir are limiting factors causing very long process times. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR« different technological approaches for the optimized exploitation of gas hydrate deposits are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical processes are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs. Simulations based on geological field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the potential of gas production from turbidites and their fitness for CO2 storage. The effects occurring during gas production and CO2 storage within

  18. GLASS TRANSITION OF HYDRATED WHEAT GLIADIN POWDERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-min Sun; Li Zhao; Yi-hu Song; Qiang Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Modulated-temperature differential scanning calorimetric and dynamic mechanical analyses and dielectric spectroscopy were used to investigate the glass transition of hydrated wheat gliadin powders with moisture absorption ranged from 2.30 db% to 18.21 db%. Glass transition temperature (Tg) of dry wheat gliadin was estimated according to the GordonTaylor equation. Structural heterogeneity at high degrees of hydration was revealed in dielectric temperature and frequency spectra. The activation energies (Ea) of the two relaxations were calculated from Arrhenius equation.

  19. Component analysis of the protein hydration entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2012-05-01

    We report the development of an atomic decomposition method of the protein solvation entropy in water, which allows us to understand global change in the solvation entropy in terms of local changes in protein conformation as well as in hydration structure. This method can be implemented via a combined approach based on molecular dynamics simulation and integral-equation theory of liquids. An illustrative application is made to 42-residue amyloid-beta protein in water. We demonstrate how this method enables one to elucidate the molecular origin for the hydration entropy change upon conformational transitions of protein.

  20. Gas hydrate of Lake Baikal: Discovery and varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlystov, Oleg; De Batist, Marc; Shoji, Hitoshi; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Nishio, Shinya; Naudts, Lieven; Poort, Jeffrey; Khabuev, Andrey; Belousov, Oleg; Manakov, Andrey; Kalmychkov, Gennаdy

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent gas-hydrate studies in Lake Baikal, the only fresh-water lake in the world containing gas hydrates in its sedimentary infill. We provide a historical overview of the different investigations and discoveries and highlight some recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the Baikal hydrate system. So far, 21 sites of gas hydrate occurrence have been discovered. Gas hydrates are of structures I and II, which are of thermogenic, microbial, and mixed origin. At the 15 sites, gas hydrates were found in mud volcanoes, and the rest six - near gas discharges. Additionally, depending on type of discharge and gas hydrate structure, they were visually different. Investigations using MIR submersibles allowed finding of gas hydrates at the bottom surface of Lake Baikal at the three sites.

  1. Novel aspects of platelet aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roka-Moya Y. M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The platelet aggregation is an important process, which is critical for the hemostatic plug formation and thrombosis. Recent studies have shown that the platelet aggregation is more complex and dynamic than it was previously thought. There are several mechanisms that can initiate the platelet aggregation and each of them operates under specific conditions in vivo. At the same time, the influence of certain plasma proteins on this process should be considered. This review intends to summarize the recent data concerning the adhesive molecules and their receptors, which provide the platelet aggregation under different conditions.

  2. Fractal Aggregation Under Rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Feng-Min; WU Li-Li; LU Hang-Jun; LI Qiao-Wen; YE Gao-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    By means of the Monte Carlo simulation, a fractal growth model is introduced to describe diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) under rotation. Patterns which are different from the classical DLA model are observed and the fractal dimension of such clusters is calculated. It is found that the pattern of the clusters and their fractal dimension depend strongly on the rotation velocity of the diffusing particle. Our results indicate the transition from fractal to non-fractal behavior of growing cluster with increasing rotation velocity, i.e. for small enough angular velocity ω the fractal dimension decreases with increasing ω, but then, with increasing rotation velocity, the fractal dimension increases and the cluster becomes compact and tends to non-fractal.

  3. Fractal Aggregation Under Rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUFeng-Min; WULi-Li; LUHang-Jun; LIQiao-Wen; YEGao-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    By means of the Monte Carlo simulation, a fractal growth model is introduced to describe diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) under rotation. Patterns which are different from the classical DLA model are observed and the fractal dimension of such clusters is calculated. It is found that the pattern of the clusters and their fractal dimension depend strongly on the rotation velocity of the diffusing particle. Our results indicate the transition from fractal to non-fractal behavior of growing cluster with increasing rotation velocity, i.e. for small enough angular velocity ω; thefractal dimension decreases with increasing ω;, but then, with increasing rotation velocity, the fractal dimension increases and the cluster becomes compact and tends to non-fractal.

  4. Platelet aggregation following trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windeløv, Nis A; Sørensen, Anne M; Perner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate platelet function in trauma patients, as it is pivotal for hemostasis yet remains scarcely investigated in this population. We conducted a prospective observational study of platelet aggregation capacity in 213 adult trauma patients on admission to an emergency department (ED......). Inclusion criteria were trauma team activation and arterial cannula insertion on arrival. Blood samples were analyzed by multiple electrode aggregometry initiated by thrombin receptor agonist peptide 6 (TRAP) or collagen using a Multiplate device. Blood was sampled median 65 min after injury; median injury...... severity score (ISS) was 17; 14 (7%) patients received 10 or more units of red blood cells in the ED (massive transfusion); 24 (11%) patients died within 28 days of trauma: 17 due to cerebral injuries, four due to exsanguination, and three from other causes. No significant association was found between...

  5. Electrochemistry and the mechanisms of nucleation and growth of neodymium during electroreduction from LiCl–KCl eutectic salts on Mo substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Hao [Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Pesic, Batric, E-mail: pesic@uidaho.edu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The electrochemical behavior of NdCl{sub 3} was studied on a Mo electrode in molten LiCl–KCl eutectic salts. The electroreduction of Nd(III)/Nd(0) involved two reaction steps, as confirmed by three different electrochemical techniques. In the first reaction step, Nd(III) is converted into soluble Nd(II), which undergoes further reduction into metallic Nd(0) in the second reaction step. The standard reaction rate constants for each reaction step were determined by Nicholson method. The rate constant values were used in Matsuda-Ayabe’s criteria for testing the electrochemical reversibility. Accordingly, both reaction steps were quasi-reversible redox reactions. The nucleation mechanisms of neodymium metal deposited on a Mo substrate were predicted by using Scharifker–Hill model, and tested for the first time by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies of the electrode surface. The SEM studies confirmed that for the low initial concentration of NdCl{sub 3}, neodymium nucleates and grows progressively, while for higher NdCl{sub 3} concentrations, the related mechanism is instantaneous. Both are governed by the aggregative growth mechanisms based on surface mobility of formed nanoclusters.

  6. Eutectic mixtures of some fatty acids for latent heat storage: Thermal properties and thermal reliability with respect to thermal cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sari, Ahmet [Department of Chemistry, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60240 Tokat (Turkey)]. E-mail: asari@gop.edu.tr

    2006-06-15

    Accelerated thermal cycle tests have been conducted to study the change in melting temperatures and latent heats of fusion of the eutectic mixtures of lauric acid (LA)-myristic acid (MA), lauric acid (LA)-palmitic acid (PA) and myristic acid (MA)-stearic acid (SA) as latent heat storage materials. The thermal properties of these materials were determined by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis method. The thermal reliability of the eutectic mixtures after melt/freeze cycles of 720, 1080 and 1460 was also evaluated using the DSC curves. The accelerated thermal cycle tests indicate that the melting temperatures usually tend to decrease, and the variations in the latent heats of fusion are irregular with increasing number of thermal cycles. Moreover, the probable reasons for the change in thermal properties of the eutectic mixtures after repeated thermal cycles were investigated. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic analysis indicates that the accelerated melt/freeze processes do not cause any degradation in the chemical structure of the mixtures. The change in thermal properties of the eutectic mixtures with increasing number of thermal cycles is only because of the presence of certain amounts of impurities in the fatty acids used in their preparation. It is concluded that the tested eutectic mixtures have reasonable thermal properties and thermal reliability as phase change materials (PCMs) for latent heat storage in any solar heating applications that include a four year utilization period.

  7. Competitive Nucleation and Rapid Growth of Co-Si Intermetallic Compounds during Eutectic Solidification under Containerless Processing Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjing Yao; Zipeng Ye; Nan Wang; Xiujun Han; Jianyuan Wang; Xixing Wen

    2011-01-01

    The liquid-solid transitions of (Co2Si+CoSi) and (CoSi+CoSi2) eutectic alloys were realized in drop tube and the rapid eutectic growth mechanism of intermetallic compounds was examined. The experimental and calculated results indicate that with increasing Co content, the intermetallic compound prefers nucleating primarily. The eutectic microstructures experience the transitions of 'lamellar-anomalous-divorced' eutectic with undercooling. In undercooled state, the growth of CoSi intermetallic compound always lags behind others, and no matter how large the undercooling is, this intermetallic compound grows under the solutal diffusion control The calculated coupled zone demonstrates that (Co2Si+CoSi) eutectic can form within certain undercooling regime, when the composition is in the range from 23.6% to 25.4% Si. And the calculated coupled zone of (CoSi+CoSi2) covers a composition range from 40.8% to 43.8% Si.

  8. Formation of Al2O3-HfO2 Eutectic EBC Film on Silicon Carbide Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyosuke Seya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic structure, the preparation method, and the formation mechanism of the eutectic EBC layer on the silicon carbide substrate are summarized. Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic EBC film is prepared by optical zone melting method on the silicon carbide substrate. At high temperature, a small amount of silicon carbide decomposed into silicon and carbon. The components of Al2O3 and HfO2 in molten phase also react with the free carbon. The Al2O3 phase reacts with free carbon and vapor species of AlO phase is formed. The composition of the molten phase becomes HfO2 rich from the eutectic composition. HfO2 phase also reacts with the free carbon and HfC phase is formed on the silicon carbide substrate; then a high density intermediate layer is formed. The adhesion between the intermediate layer and the substrate is excellent by an anchor effect. When the solidification process finished before all of HfO2 phase is reduced to HfC phase, HfC-HfO2 functionally graded layer is formed on the silicon carbide substrate and the Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic structure grows from the top of the intermediate layer.

  9. Effects of Eutectic Si Particles on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Toughness of Cast A356 Aluminum Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyu Hong; Lee, Sung Hak [Pohang Univ. of Institute of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Yong Nam [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    The present study aims at investigating the effects of eutectic Si particles on mechanical properties and fracture toughness of three A356 aluminum alloys. These A356 alloys were fabricated by casting processes such as rheo-casting, squeeze-casting, and casting-forging, and their mechanical properties and fracture toughness were analyzed in relation with microfracture mechanism study. All the cast A356 alloys contained eutectic Si particles mainly segregated along solidification cells, and the distribution of Si particles was modified by squeeze-casting and casting-forging processes. Microfracture observation results showed that eutectic Si particles segregated along cells were cracked first, but that aluminum matrix played a role in blocking crack propagation. Tensile properties and fracture toughness of the squeeze cast and cast-forged alloys having homogeneous distribution of eutectic Si particles were superior to those of the rheo-cast alloy. In particular, the cast-forged alloy had excellent hardness, strength, ductility, and fracture toughness because of the matrix strengthening and homogeneous distribution of eutectic Si particles due to forging process.

  10. Buffering agents modify the hydration landscape at charged interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewby, William; Livesey, Duncan; Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2016-03-07

    Buffering agents are widely used to stabilise the pH of solutions in soft matter and biological sciences. They are typically composed of weak acids and bases mixed in an aqueous solution, and can interact electrostatically with charged surfaces such as biomembranes. Buffers can induce protein aggregation and structural modification of soft interfaces, but a molecular-level picture is still lacking. Here we use high-resolution atomic force microscopy to investigate the effect of five commonly used buffers, namely 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES), monosodium phosphate, saline sodium citrate (SSC) and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) on the hydration landscape of Muscovite mica in solution. Mica is an ideal model substrate due to its negative surface charge and identical lattice parameter when compared with gel-phase lipid bilayers. We show that buffer molecules can produce cohesive aggregates spanning over tens of nanometres of the interface. SSC, Tris and monosodium phosphate tend to create an amorphous mesh layer several molecules thick and with no preferential ordering. In contrast, MES and HEPES adopt epitaxial arrangements commensurate with the underlying mica lattice, suggesting that they offer the most suitable solution for high-resolution studies. To confirm that this effect persisted in biologically-relevant interfaces, the experiments were repeated on a silica-supported lipid bilayer. Similar trends were observed for this system using atomic force microscopy as well as ellipsometry. The effect of the buffering agents can be mitigated by the inclusion of salt which helps displace them from the interface.

  11. Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-06-20

    Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.

  12. Foam drilling in natural gas hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Na

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The key problem of foam drilling in natural gas hydrate is prediction of characteristic parameters of bottom hole. The simulation shows that when the well depth increases, the foam mass number reduces and the pressure increases. At the same depth, pressure in drill string is always higher than annulus. The research findings provide theoretical basis for safety control.

  13. Alkali binding in hydrated Portland cement paste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, W.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2010-01-01

    The alkali-binding capacity of C–S–H in hydrated Portland cement pastes is addressed in this study. The amount of bound alkalis in C–S–H is computed based on the alkali partition theories firstly proposed by Taylor (1987) and later further developed by Brouwers and Van Eijk (2003). Experimental data

  14. A positron annihilation study of hydrated DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warman, J. M.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1986-01-01

    Positron annihilation measurements are reported for hydrated DNA as a function of water content and as a function of temperature (20 to -180.degree. C) for samples containing 10 and 50% wt of water. The ortho-positronium mean lifetime and its intensity show distinct variations with the degree...

  15. Hydration of protein–RNA recognition sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Amita; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the role of water molecules in 89 protein–RNA complexes taken from the Protein Data Bank. Those with tRNA and single-stranded RNA are less hydrated than with duplex or ribosomal proteins. Protein–RNA interfaces are hydrated less than protein–DNA interfaces, but more than protein–protein interfaces. Majority of the waters at protein–RNA interfaces makes multiple H-bonds; however, a fraction do not make any. Those making H-bonds have preferences for the polar groups of RNA than its partner protein. The spatial distribution of waters makes interfaces with ribosomal proteins and single-stranded RNA relatively ‘dry’ than interfaces with tRNA and duplex RNA. In contrast to protein–DNA interfaces, mainly due to the presence of the 2′OH, the ribose in protein–RNA interfaces is hydrated more than the phosphate or the bases. The minor groove in protein–RNA interfaces is hydrated more than the major groove, while in protein–DNA interfaces it is reverse. The strands make the highest number of water-mediated H-bonds per unit interface area followed by the helices and the non-regular structures. The preserved waters at protein–RNA interfaces make higher number of H-bonds than the other waters. Preserved waters contribute toward the affinity in protein–RNA recognition and should be carefully treated while engineering protein–RNA interfaces. PMID:25114050

  16. Binding Hydrated Anions with Hydrophobic Pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokkalingam, Punidha; Shraberg, Joshua; Rick, Steven W; Gibb, Bruce C

    2016-01-13

    Using a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and quantum and molecular dynamics calculations, we demonstrate that relatively soft anions have an affinity for hydrophobic concavity. The results are consistent with the anions remaining partially hydrated upon binding, and suggest a novel strategy for anion recognition.

  17. Obsidian Hydration Dating in the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manche, Emanuel P.; Lakatos, Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Provides an overview of obsidian hydration dating for the instructor by presenting: (1) principles of the method; (2) procedures; (3) applications; and (4) limitations. The theory of the method and one or more laboratory exercises can be easily introduced into the undergraduate geology curriculum. (JN)

  18. Obsidian Hydration Dating in the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manche, Emanuel P.; Lakatos, Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Provides an overview of obsidian hydration dating for the instructor by presenting: (1) principles of the method; (2) procedures; (3) applications; and (4) limitations. The theory of the method and one or more laboratory exercises can be easily introduced into the undergraduate geology curriculum. (JN)

  19. [Terminal phase hydration, pain and delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heick, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hydration of the terminal patient may relieve confusion and complaints of "dry mouth". But it may worsen oedema of the brain, lungs, and extremities, worsen terminal rattling and cause a need for frequent changing of diapers. The decision of whether and how to treat a dying patient with fluids...

  20. Acoustic Determination of Methane Hydrate Disssociation Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    centered- cubic orientation which forms naturally in deep oceans from biogenic gases. It is worth not- ing that this molecular geometry can trap great...until January 2010. At that time, the hydrates were packed in a dewar with liquid nitrogen and shipped from the storage fa- cility at the Naval Research

  1. Hydration of Acetylene: A 125th Anniversary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Dmitry A.; Shevchenko, Sergey M.

    2007-01-01

    The year 2006 is the 125th anniversary of a chemical reaction, the discovery of which by Mikhail Kucherov had a profound effect on the development of industrial chemistry in the 19-20th centuries. This was the hydration of alkynes catalyzed by mercury ions that made possible industrial production of acetaldehyde from acetylene. Historical…

  2. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces.

  3. Biodiesel production from ethanolysis of palm oil using deep eutectic solvent (DES) as co-solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manurung, R.; Winarta, A.; Taslim; Indra, L.

    2017-06-01

    Biodiesel produced from ethanolysis is more renewable and have better properties (higher oxidation stability, lower cloud and pour point) compared to methanolysis, but it has a disadvantage such as complicated purification. To improve ethanolysis process, deep eutectic solvent (DES) can be prepared from choline chloride and glycerol and used as co-solvent in ethanolysis. The deep eutectic solvent is formed from a quaternary ammonium salt (choline chloride) and a hydrogen bond donor (Glycerol), it is a non-toxic, biodegradable solvent compared to a conventional volatile organic solvent such as hexane. The deep eutectic solvent is prepared by mixing choline chloride and glycerol with molar ratio 1:2 at temperature 80 °C, stirring speed 300 rpm for 1 hour. The DES is characterized by its density and viscosity. The ethanolysis is performed at a reaction temperature of 70 °C, ethanol to oil molar ratio of 9:1, potassium hydroxide as catalyst concentration of 1.2 wt. DES as co-solvent with concentration 0.5 to 3 wt. stirring speed 400 rpm, and a reaction time 1 hour. The obtained biodiesel is then characterized by its density, viscosity, and ester content. The oil - ethanol phase condition is observed in the reaction tube. The oil - ethanol phase with DES tends to form meniscus compared to without DES, showed that oil and ethanol become more slightly miscible, which favors the reaction. Using DES as co-solvent in ethanolysis showed increasing in yield and easier purification. The esters properties meet the international standards ASTM D6751, with the highest yield achieved 83,67 with 99,77 conversion at DES concentration 2 . Increasing DES concentration above 2 in ethanolysis decrease the conversion and yield, because of the excessive glycerol in the systems makes the reaction equilibrium moves to the reactant side.

  4. Anaerobic oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Boetius, A.; Knittel, K.;

    2003-01-01

    At Hydrate Ridge (HR), Cascadia convergent margin, surface sediments contain massive gas hydrates formed from methane that ascends together with fluids along faults from deeper reservoirs. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by a microbial consortium of archaea and sulfate-reducing...... bacteria, generates high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in the surface sediments. The production of sulfide supports chemosynthetic communities that gain energy from sulfide oxidation. Depending on fluid flow, the surface communities are dominated either by the filamentous sulfur bacteria Beggiatoa...

  5. Modeling DNA hydration: comparison of calculated and experimental hydration properties of nuclic acid bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltev, V I; Malenkov, G G; Gonzalez, E J; Teplukhin, A V; Rein, R; Shibata, M; Miller, J H

    1996-02-01

    Hydration properties of individual nucleic acid bases were calculated and compared with the available experimental data. Three sets of classical potential functions (PF) used in simulations of nucleic acid hydration were juxtaposed: (i) the PF developed by Poltev and Malenkov (PM), (ii) the PF of Weiner and Kollman (WK), which together with Jorgensen's TIP3P water model are widely used in the AMBER program, and (iii) OPLS (optimized potentials for liquid simulations) developed by Jorgensen (J). The global minima of interaction energy of single water molecules with all the natural nucleic acid bases correspond to the formation of two water-base hydrogen bonds (water bridging of two hydrophilic atoms of the base). The energy values of these minima calculated via PM potentials are in somewhat better conformity with mass-spectrometric data than the values calculated via WK PF. OPLS gave much weaker water-base interactions for all compounds considered, thus these PF were not used in further computations. Monte Carlo simulations of the hydration of 9-methyladenine, 1-methyluracil and 1-methylthymine were performed in systems with 400 water molecules and periodic boundary conditions. Results of simulations with PM potentials give better agreement with experimental data on hydration energies than WK PF. Computations with PM PF of the hydration energy of keto and enol tautomers of 9-methylguanine can account for the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium of guanine in aqueous media to a dominance of the keto form in spite of nearly equal intrinsic stability of keto and enol tautomers. The results of guanine hydration computations are discussed in relation to mechanisms of base mispairing errors in nucleic acid biosynthesis. The data presented in this paper along with previous results on simulation of hydration shell structures in DNA duplex grooves provide ample evidence for the advantages of PM PF in studies of nucleic-acid hydration.

  6. Exciton dynamics in molecular aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Augulis, R.; Pugžlys, A.; Loosdrecht, P.H.M. van; Pugzlys, A

    2006-01-01

    The fundamental aspects of exciton dynamics in double-wall cylindrical aggregates of cyanine dyes are studied by means of frequency resolved femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The collective excitations of the aggregates, resulting from intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions have the characteri

  7. Aggregate resources in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, M.J. van der; Gessel, S.F. van; Veldkamp, J.G.

    2005-01-01

    We have built a 3D lithological model of the Netherlands, for the purpose of mapping on-land aggregate resources down to 50 m below the surface. The model consists of voxel cells (1000 · 1000 · 1 m), with lithological composition and aggregate content estimates as primary attributes. These attribute

  8. Exciton dynamics in molecular aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Augulis, R.; Pugžlys, A.; Loosdrecht, P.H.M. van; Pugzlys, A

    2006-01-01

    The fundamental aspects of exciton dynamics in double-wall cylindrical aggregates of cyanine dyes are studied by means of frequency resolved femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The collective excitations of the aggregates, resulting from intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions have the

  9. Measurement of solid-liquid interfacial energy in the In-Bi eutectic alloy at low melting temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marasli, N [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Akbulut, S [Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Ocak, Y [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Keslioglu, K [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Boeyuek, U [Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Kaya, H [Department of Science Education, Education Faculty, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Cadirli, E [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Nigde University, Nigde (Turkey)

    2007-12-19

    The Gibbs-Thomson coefficient and solid-liquid interfacial energy of the solid In solution in equilibrium with In Bi eutectic liquid have been determined to be (1.46 {+-} 0.07) x 10{sup -7} K m and (40.4 {+-} 4.0) x 10{sup -3} J m{sup -2} by observing the equilibrated grain boundary groove shapes. The grain boundary energy of the solid In solution phase has been calculated to be (79.0 {+-} 8.7) x 10{sup -3} J m{sup -2} by considering force balance at the grain boundary grooves. The thermal conductivities of the In-12.4 at.% Bi eutectic liquid phase and the solid In solution phase and their ratio at the eutectic melting temperature (72 deg. C) have also been measured with radial heat flow apparatus and Bridgman-type growth apparatus.

  10. Phase relations near ternary eutectic point in the Ag-In-Sb system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jendrzejczyk-Handzlik D.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the phase relations near ternary eutectic point in the Ag-In-Sb system are investigated in this paper. Phase equilibrium calculation was done using Thermocalc software and experimental DTA results for the chosen alloys in the isopleths with molar ration of In:Sb = 7:3; 9:1 and 1:1. The structural characteristics of these alloys have been investigated using light optic microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, while hardness measurements have also been done. Solidification path for three ternary alloys located on three different investigated isopleths was calculated using Pandat software.

  11. Resistance of a gamma/gamma prime - delta directionally solidified eutectic alloy to recrystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, S. N.; Scheuermann, C. M.; Andrews, C. W.

    1975-01-01

    The lamellar directionally solidified nickel-base eutectic alloy gamma/gamma prime-delta has potential as an advanced turbine blade material. The microstructural stability of this alloy was investigated. Specimens were plastically deformed by uniform compression or Brinell indentation, then annealed between 705 and 1120 C. Microstructural changes observed after annealing included gamma prime coarsening, pinch-off and spheroidization of delta lamellae, and the appearance of an unidentified blocky phase in surface layers. All but the first of these was localized in severely deformed regions, suggesting that microstructural instability is not a serious problem in the use of this alloy.

  12. An electrochemical study of uranium behaviour in LiCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, D. S.; Volkovich, V. A.; Vasin, B. D.; Vladykin, E. N.

    2015-12-01

    Electrochemical behaviour of uranium was studied in the low melting ternary LiCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic at 573-1073 K employing potentiometry, cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry. Uranium electrode potentials were measured directly and U(III)/U(IV) red-ox potentials were determined from the results of cyclic voltammetry measurements. Formal standard electrode and red-ox potentials of uranium, and thermodynamic properties of uranium chlorides in the studied melt were calculated. Diffusion coefficients of U(III) and U(IV) ions were determined using cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry.

  13. Vibration Monitoring Using Fiber Optic Sensors in a Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Ben De Pauw; Alfredo Lamberti; Julien Ertveldt; Ali Rezayat; Katrien van Tichelen; Steve Vanlanduit; Francis Berghmans

    2016-01-01

    Excessive fuel assembly vibrations in nuclear reactor cores should be avoided in order not to compromise the lifetime of the assembly and in order to prevent the occurrence of safety hazards. This issue is particularly relevant to new reactor designs that use liquid metal coolants, such as, for example, a molten lead-bismuth eutectic. The flow of molten heavy metal around and through the fuel assembly may cause the latter to vibrate and hence suffer degradation as a result of, for example, fr...

  14. Compatibility of Lead-Bismuth Eutectic with SiC-Coated Graphite at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Poulami; Ghosh, Abhijit; Dey, Gautam Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Uniform coating of β-silicon carbide (β-SiC) was formed over a graphite pellet through slurry-based silicon coating followed by in situ reaction at 1873 K (1600 °C). The coated pellet was exposed to molten lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 1173 K (900 °C) in static condition for 200 h. Weight loss measurement, X-ray diffraction, and secondary electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy confirmed that the SiC coating could effectively prevent molten LBE from attacking the inner graphite material.

  15. MICROSTRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF HIGHLY UNDERCOOLED EUTECTIC Nii78.6Si21.4 ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.P. Lu; G.C. Yang; C.L. Yang; H.P. Wang; Y.H. Zhou

    2006-01-01

    A large undercooling level up to 550K(0.386TE) was achieved in eutectic Ni78.6Si21.4 melt by the combination of molten-glass and cyclic superheating. A microcrystalline structure is obtained at large undercooling. Surprisingly, the morphology of α(Ni) phase transits from the non-faceted phase to faceted phase at large undercooling of 390K. Based on the classical nucleation theory and transient nucleation theory, the process of microstructure evolution and competitive nucleation was analyzed, and the refinement of crystal structure is determined by the high nucleation rate under large undercooling.

  16. Effect of heat treatments in the silicon eutectic crystal evolution in Al-Si alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forn, A.; Baile, M.T.; Martin, E.; Ruperez, E. [Light Alloys and Surface Treatments Design Centre (CDAL), Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Vilanova I la Geltru (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the heat treatment effect on the eutectic silicon evolution in the A357 alloy, obtained by semisolid forming process (SSM). The coarsening rate of the silicon was determined by image analysis technique in specimens from rheocasting ingots and thixocasting components. The study was realized in the temperature range from 450 to 550 C by applying heating times between 1 and 24 hours. The results show that during the heat treatment the coarsening and sphereodization of the silicon particles is produced and the fragmentation stages, which are observed in conventional alloys, do not appear. Kinetic silicon growth has been adjusted to the Oswald's ripening equation. (orig.)

  17. Embedded binary eutectic alloy nanostructures: a new class of phase change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, S J; Guzman, J; Yuan, C-W; Liao, Christopher Y; Boswell-Koller, Cosima N; Stone, P R; Dubon, O D; Minor, A M; Watanabe, Masashi; Beeman, Jeffrey W; Yu, K M; Ager, J W; Chrzan, D C; Haller, E E

    2010-08-11

    Phase change materials are essential to a number of technologies ranging from optical data storage to energy storage and transport applications. This widespread interest has given rise to a substantial effort to develop bulk phase change materials well suited for desired applications. Here, we suggest a novel and complementary approach, the use of binary eutectic alloy nanoparticles embedded within a matrix. Using GeSn nanoparticles embedded in silica as an example, we establish that the presence of a nanoparticle/matrix interface enables one to stabilize both nanobicrystal and homogeneous alloy morphologies. Further, the kinetics of switching between the two morphologies can be tuned simply by altering the composition.

  18. Thermodynamic properties of gadolinium in Ga-Sn and Ga-Zn eutectic based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Dmitry S.; Volkovich, Vladimir A.; Yamshchikov, Leonid F.; Chukin, Andrey V.

    2016-09-01

    Thermodynamic properties of gadolinium in Ga-Sn and Ga-Zn eutectic based alloys were studied. Temperature dependences of gadolinium activity in the studied alloys were determined at 573-1073 K employing the EMF method. Solubility of gadolinium in the Ga-Sn and Ga-Zn alloys was measured at 462-1073 K using IMCs sedimentation method. Activity coefficients as well as partial and excess thermodynamic functions of gadolinium in the studied alloys were calculated on the basis of the obtained experimental data.

  19. Design of a Eutectic Freeze Crystallization process for multicomponent waste water stream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Alison E.; Nathoo, J.; Thomsen, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    Complex, hypersaline brines originating from the mining and extractive metallurgical industries have the potential to be treated using Eutectic Freeze Crystallization (EFC). Although EFC has been shown to be effective in separating a single salt and water, it has yet to be applied to the complex...... hypersaline brines that are typical of reverse osmosis retentates in South Africa. This paper focuses on the application of EFC for the purification of a typical brine containing high levels of sodium, chlorine, sulphate and ammonia that cannot be achieved with other separation techniques. The presence...

  20. The effect of low Au concentrations on the properties of eutectic Sn/Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, P.A.

    1992-05-01

    This study was of the effects moderately low Au concentrations ({le} 10 wt%) have on the mechanical properties and microstructure of an eutectic Sn/Pb alloy. Vibration (60--90 Hz swept sine wave for 30 hours) and thermal cycling (0--110C for 1450 cycles) reliability tests were performed on fine pitch leaded chip carriers using eutectic Sn/Pb solder on PCBs (printed circuit boards) with 0, 5, 10, 20, and 50{mu}in nominal Au thicknesses. Testing was also performed on double shear creep specimens consisting of arrays of regular pitch joints. There was a dramatic increase in the number of joints containing voids with increasing Au concentration, an effect more pronounced in the creep joints than in the reliability joints. These voids tended to coalesce and grow during rework simulation of the reliability joints. AuSn{sub 4} intermetallics present in toe of 4.8 wt% (50 {mu}in) Au vibration joints rotated from initial vertical perpendicular to surface of PCB metallization, solidification positions to roughly horizontal (parallel to plating surface) orientations during rework simulation and during aging of the parts. The AuSn{sub 4} intermetallics in the toe of the 4.8 wt% (50{mu}in) Au reflowed joints also rotated after vibration testing. No joint failures were observed in either vibration tested or thermally cycled specimens. Cracks formed in some of the vibration tested specimen joints under the heel of the gull-wing lead at Pb-rich phases. Thermally cycled specimens showed eutectic microstructure and intermetallic coarsening without crack formation. Creep tests showed loss of the superplasticity in eutectic Sn/Pb alloys with even the lowest Au concentration tested of 0.2 wt% Au. Intermetallic rotation was not a factor in crack propagation, but void presence was. Cracks tended to form in joints containing voids before forming in void-free joints. Crack propagation followed Sn/Sn grain boundaries and Sn/Pb phase boundaries from Pb-rich phase to Pb-rich phase.

  1. Long-time dynamics of the directional solidification of rodlike eutectics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrut, Mikaël; Akamatsu, Silvère; Bottin-Rousseau, Sabine; Faivre, Gabriel

    2009-03-01

    We report long-duration real-time observations of the dynamics of hexagonal (rodlike) directional-solidification patterns in bulk samples of a transparent eutectic alloy. A slight forward curvature of the isotherms induces a slow dilatation of the growth pattern at constant solidification rate and triggers the rod-splitting instability. At long times, the rod-splitting frequency exactly balances the dilatation driven by the curved isotherms. The growth pattern is then disordered and nonstationary but has a sharply selected mean spacing. Well-ordered growth patterns can be grown using time-dependent solidification rates.

  2. Equilibrium distribution of actinides including Cm between molten LiCl-KCl eutectic and liquid cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, T.; Kinoshita, K.; Inoue, T. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Ougier, M.; Malmbeck, R.; Glatz, J.P. [Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Transuranium Elements

    2008-07-01

    Equilibrium distribution of actinides both in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic and liquid cadmium were measured from the concentration data obtained in electrorefining tests and reductive extraction tests. Separation factors for U, Np, Am, Cm against Pu were derived in the practical temperature range of 700 K to 783 K. The derived separation factors are consistent with the reported values measured at 773 K and 723 K. The temperature dependence for Cm is different compared to the other actinides (U, Np and Am). This behavior remains unclear and additional experimental measurements of distribution coefficient of Cm are required before ruling on the real behavior. (orig.)

  3. Loss of anatomical landmarks with eutectic mixture of local anesthetic cream for neonatal male circumcision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Rebeca M; Kubiak, David W; Abdullahi, Rasak Bamidele; Ndubuka, Nnamdi; Nkgau, Maggie M; Dapaah-Siakwan, Fredrick; Powis, Kathleen M; Lockman, Shahin

    2013-02-01

    We report two cases of newborns who developed marked local edema after application of a eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA) topical anesthetic cream for neonatal male circumcision (NMC). Although local edema and erythema are known potential side effects of EMLA cream, a common anesthetic used for NMC, the loss of landmarks precluding safe NMC has not previously been reported, and is described here. Although we cannot recommend an alternate local anesthetic for neonates with this reaction to EMLA, based on a review of the published data we think that serious systemic adverse events related to EMLA are extremely rare.

  4. Spatial profile of thermoelectric effects during Peltier pulsing in Bi and Bi/MnBi eutectic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, R. P.; Larson, D. J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The spatial profile of the thermal transients that occur during and following the current pulsing associated with Peltier Interface Demarcation during directional solidification is studied. Results for pure Bi are presented in detail and compared with corresponding results for the Bi/MnBi eutectic. Significant thermal transients occur throughout the sample that can be accounted for by the Peltier effect, the Thomson effect, and Joule heating. These effects are separated and their behavior is studied as a function of time, current density, and position with respect to the solid/liquid interface.

  5. Design of a fusion reactor for eutectic alloys Pb- Li; Diseno de un reactor de fusion para aleaciones autecticas Pb-Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinones, J.; Barrena Perez, M. I.; Gomez de Salazar, J. M.; Serrano, L.; Duran, S.; Conde, E.; Barrado, A. I.; Fernandez, M.; Sedano, L.; Soria Munoz, A.

    2010-07-01

    Given the interest that have the Pb-Li eutectic alloys in the field of production of tritium, designed to optimize energy through nuclear fusion processes, in this paper, we present the design, construction and commissioning of a fusion reactor of Pb-Li alloys eutectic and the optimal process conditions, for these alloys.

  6. Direct measurement of methane hydrate composition along the hydrate equilibrium boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of methane hydrate, namely nW for CH 4??nWH2O, was directly measured along the hydrate equilibrium boundary under conditions of excess methane gas. Pressure and temperature conditions ranged from 1.9 to 9.7 MPa and 263 to 285 K. Within experimental error, there is no change in hydrate composition with increasing pressure along the equilibrium boundary, but nW may show a slight systematic decrease away from this boundary. A hydrate stoichiometry of n W = 5.81-6.10 H2O describes the entire range of measured values, with an average composition of CH4??5.99(??0.07) H2O along the equilibrium boundary. These results, consistent with previously measured values, are discussed with respect to the widely ranging values obtained by thermodynamic analysis. The relatively constant composition of methane hydrate over the geologically relevant pressure and temperature range investigated suggests that in situ methane hydrate compositions may be estimated with some confidence. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  7. Clathrate Hydrates for Thermal Energy Storage in Buildings: Overview of Proper Hydrate-Forming Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing energy costs are at the origin of the great progress in the field of phase change materials (PCMs. The present work aims at studying the application of clathrate hydrates as PCMs in buildings. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline structures in which guest molecules are enclosed in the crystal lattice of water molecules. Clathrate hydrates can form also at ambient pressure and present a high latent heat, and for this reason, they are good candidates for being used as PCMs. The parameter that makes a PCM suitable to be used in buildings is, first of all, a melting temperature at about 25 °C. The paper provides an overview of groups of clathrate hydrates, whose physical and chemical characteristics could meet the requirements needed for their application in buildings. Simulations with a dynamic building simulation tool are carried out to evaluate the performance of clathrate hydrates in enhancing thermal comfort through the moderation of summer temperature swings and, therefore, in reducing energy consumption. Simulations suggest that clathrate hydrates have a potential in terms of improvement of indoor thermal comfort and a reduction of energy consumption for cooling. Cooling effects of 0.5 °C and reduced overheating hours of up to 1.1% are predicted.

  8. MORPHOLOGY OF METHANE HYDRATE HOST SEDIMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.; TOMOV,S.; WINTER,W.J.; EATON,M.; MAHAJAN,D.

    2004-12-01

    Results from simulated experiments in several laboratories show that host sediments influence hydrate formation in accord with known heterogeneity of host sediments at sites of gas hydrate occurrence (1). For example, in Mackenzie Delta, NWT Canada (Mallik 2L-38 well), coarser-grained units (pore-filling model) are found whereas in the Gulf of Mexico, the found hydrate samples do not appear to be lithologically controlled. We have initiated a systematic study of sediments, initially focusing on samples from various depths at a specific site, to establish a correlation with hydrate occurrence (or variations thereof) to establish differences in their microstructure, porosity, and other associated properties. The synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) set-up at the X-27A tomography beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory was used as a tool to study sediments from Blake Ridge at three sub bottom depths of 0.2, 50, and 667 meters. Results from the tomographic analysis of the deepest sample (667 m) are presented here to illustrate how tomography can be used to obtain new insights into the structures of methane hydrate host sediments. The investigation shows the internal grain/pore space resolution in the microstructure and a 3-D visualization of the connecting pathways obtained following data segmentation into pore space and grains within the sediment sample. The analysis gives the sample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity, as well. An earlier report on the experimental program has been given by Mahajan et al. (2).

  9. Molecular aggregation of humic substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wershaw, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) form molecular aggregates in solution and on mineral surfaces. Elucidation of the mechanism of formation of these aggregates is important for an understanding of the interactions of HS in soils arid natural waters. The HS are formed mainly by enzymatic depolymerization and oxidation of plant biopolymers. These reactions transform the aromatic and lipid plant components into amphiphilic molecules, that is, molecules that consist of separate hydrophobic (nonpolar) and hydrophilic (polar) parts. The nonpolar parts of the molecules are composed of relatively unaltered segments of plant polymers and the polar parts of carboxylic acid groups. These amphiphiles form membrane-like aggregates on mineral surfaces and micelle-like aggregates in solution. The exterior surfaces of these aggregates are hydrophilic, and the interiors constitute separate hydrophobic liquid-like phases.

  10. Optical monitoring of particle aggregates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Methods for monitoring particle aggregation are briefly reviewed. Most of these techniques are based on some form of light scattering and may be greatly dependent on the optical properties of aggregates, which are not generally known. As fractal aggregates grow larger their density can become very low and this has important practical consequences for light scattering. For instance, the scattering coefficient may be much less than for solid objects, which means that the aggregates can appear much smaller than their actual size by a light transmission method. Also, for low-density objects, a high proportion of the scattered light energy is within a small angle of the incident beam, which may also be relevant for measurements with aggregates.Using the 'turbidity fluctuation' technique as an example, it is shown how the apparent size of hydroxide flocs depends mainly on the included impurity particles, rather than the hydroxide precipitate itself. Results using clay suspensions with hydrolyzing coagulants and under are discussed.

  11. Dye Aggregation in Ink Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas Paul; Sarfraz Hussain

    2004-01-01

    Dye aggregation has long been recognised as a key factor in performance, and this is no less so in ink jet applications. The aggregation state was shown to be important in many different areas ranging from the use of dyes in photodynamic therapies all the way to colorants for dying of fabrics. Therefore different methods to investigate dye association qualitatively and quantitatively were developed. A simple procedure to study aggregation could be a useful tool to characterise dyes for ink jet printing. It is critically reviewed the methods used to study dye aggregation, and discussed some of the main conclusions. This will be illustrated by examples of ink jet dye aggregation and its study in aqueous and ink systems. The results are used to correlate the solution behaviour of dyes with their print performance.

  12. DRAG ON SUBMICRON NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.; Einar; Kruis

    2005-01-01

    A new procedure was developed for estimating the effective collision diameter of an aggregate composed of primary particles of any size. The coagulation coefficient of two oppositely charged particles was measured experimentally and compared with classic Fuchs theory, including a new method to account for particle non-sphericity. A second set of experiments were performed on well-defined nanoparticle aggregates at different stages of sintering, i.e. from the aggregate to the fully sintered stage. Here, electrical mobility was used to characterize the particle drag. The aggregates are being built from two different size-fractionated nanoparticle aerosols, the non-aggregated particles are discarded by an electrofilter and then they are passed through a furnace at concentrations low enough not to induce coagulation.

  13. China's Research on Non-conventional Energy Resources- Gas Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Ming; Ma Jianguo

    2002-01-01

    @@ Methane exists in ice-like formations called gas hydrate. Hydrate traps methane molecules inside a cage of frozen water. The magnitude of this previously unknown global storehouse of methane is truly staggering and has raised serious inquiry into the possibility of using methane hydrate as a substitute source of energy for oil and conventional natural gas. According to the estimation by PGC, gas hydrate deposits amount to 7.6 × 1018m3 and contain more than twice as much organic carbon as all the world's coal, oil and non-hydrate natural gas combined.

  14. Effects of individual and combined additions of phosphorus, boron and cerium on primary and eutectic silicon in an Al-30Si alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Hongshang; LIU Xiangfa

    2009-01-01

    The modification of silicon in an Al-30Si alloy was studied using optical microscopy, electron probe micro-analysis, transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that phosphorus master alloys combined with boron master alloys have good modification effect on primary silicon but no evident modification effect on eutectic silicon, while boron combined with cerium has good modification effect on eutectic silicon. The results of differential scanning calorimetry show that phosphorus, boron or cerium addition and their combined addition have different undercooling effects on eutectic silicon. Many scholars thought that AlP particles were the nuclei of eutectic silicon when phosphorus was enough in the alloy. Our results show that β-(Al,Si,Fe) can still be the nucleus of plate-like eutectic silicon while AlP is the nucleus of prhnary silicon when there is enough phosphorus in the melt. In addition, the mechanism about the modi-fication was also discussed.

  15. Perspectives on Preference Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenwetter, Michel

    2009-07-01

    For centuries, the mathematical aggregation of preferences by groups, organizations, or society itself has received keen interdisciplinary attention. Extensive theoretical work in economics and political science throughout the second half of the 20th century has highlighted the idea that competing notions of rational social choice intrinsically contradict each other. This has led some researchers to consider coherent democratic decision making to be a mathematical impossibility. Recent empirical work in psychology qualifies that view. This nontechnical review sketches a quantitative research paradigm for the behavioral investigation of mathematical social choice rules on real ballots, experimental choices, or attitudinal survey data. The article poses a series of open questions. Some classical work sometimes makes assumptions about voter preferences that are descriptively invalid. Do such technical assumptions lead the theory astray? How can empirical work inform the formulation of meaningful theoretical primitives? Classical "impossibility results" leverage the fact that certain desirable mathematical properties logically cannot hold in all conceivable electorates. Do these properties nonetheless hold true in empirical distributions of preferences? Will future behavioral analyses continue to contradict the expectations of established theory? Under what conditions do competing consensus methods yield identical outcomes and why do they do so?

  16. Orthogonal flexible Rydberg aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, K.; Wüster, S.; Rost, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    We study the link between atomic motion and exciton transport in flexible Rydberg aggregates, assemblies of highly excited light alkali-metal atoms, for which motion due to dipole-dipole interaction becomes relevant. In two one-dimensional atom chains crossing at a right angle adiabatic exciton transport is affected by a conical intersection of excitonic energy surfaces, which induces controllable nonadiabatic effects. A joint exciton-motion pulse that is initially governed by a single energy surface is coherently split into two modes after crossing the intersection. The modes induce strongly different atomic motion, leading to clear signatures of nonadiabatic effects in atomic density profiles. We have shown how this scenario can be exploited as an exciton switch, controlling direction and coherence properties of the joint pulse on the second of the chains [K. Leonhardt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 223001 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.223001]. In this article we discuss the underlying complex dynamics in detail, characterize the switch, and derive our isotropic interaction model from a realistic anisotropic one with the addition of a magnetic bias field.

  17. Orthogonal flexible Rydberg aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Leonhardt, K; Rost, J M

    2015-01-01

    We study the link between atomic motion and exciton transport in flexible Rydberg aggregates, assemblies of highly excited light alkali atoms, for which motion due to dipole-dipole interaction becomes relevant. In two one-dimensional atom chains crossing at a right angle adiabatic exciton transport is affected by a conical intersection of excitonic energy surfaces, which induces controllable non-adiabatic effects. A joint exciton/motion pulse that is initially governed by a single energy surface is coherently split into two modes after crossing the intersection. The modes induce strongly different atomic motion, leading to clear signatures of non-adiabatic effects in atomic density profiles. We have shown how this scenario can be exploited as an exciton switch, controlling direction and coherence properties of the joint pulse on the second of the chains [K.~Leonhardt {\\it et al.}, Phys.~Rev.~Lett. {\\bf 113} 223001 (2014)]. In this article we discuss the underlying complex dynamics in detail, characterise the ...

  18. Effect of bariun on the refinement of primary aluminum and eutectics in a hypoeutectic Al-Si alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; FAN Hongyuan; ZHANG Xianju; SHEN Baoluo

    2003-01-01

    The effect of barium on the refinement of primary aluminum and on the modification of eutectics in a hypoeutectic aluminm-silicon alloy was investigated. The results indicate that barium not only modifies the eutectic silicon but also refines the primary aluminum and there is a relationship between the retained barium and the second spacing of primary aluminum. Experiments of barium-treated commercial Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy show that barium is a better modifier than sodium when there is a longer holding time.

  19. Ag3Sn plate formation in the solidification of near-ternary eutectic Sn-Ag-Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung K.; Shih, Da-Yuan; Donald, Ny.; Henderson, W.; Gosselin, Timothy; Sarkhel, Amit; Charles Goldsmith, Ny.; Puttlitz, Karl J.; Choi, Won Kyoung

    2003-06-01

    Near-ternary eutectic Sn-Ag-Cu alloys are leading lead-free candidate solders for various applications. These alloys yield three phases upon solidification: β-Sn,Ag3Sn, and Cu6Sn5. Large, plate-like, pro-eutectic Ag3Sn structures can grow rapidly within the liquid phase, potentially adversely affecting the mechanical behavior and reducing the fatigue life of solder joints. This article reports on the formation of such plates in Sn-Ag-Cu solder balls and joints and demonstrates how large Ag3Sn plate formation can be minimized.

  20. The size effect on solidification in eutectic bismuth-tin (Bi-Sn) nanowires by in-situ annealing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Hsun; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Chen, Lih-Juann; Liu, Tzeng-Feng; Chaol, Chuen-Guang

    2010-10-01

    The size effects on solidification and the formation mechanism of the segmented eutectic Bi-43Sn nanowires during in situ annealing have been investigated. A directional solidification along the wire axis limits the segmented eutectic nanowire to arrange axially during the in situ annealing processes due to directional solidification. In 70 nm nanowires, the small size confines the convection in liquid, which results in differences in the microstructure and composition profiles between 70 and 200 nm nanowires. In the vacuum hydraulic pressure injection process, the directional cooling helps the formation of single crystal, and the isotropic solidification leads to polycrystalline microstructure.

  1. Investigation on cored-eutectic structure in Ni60/WC composite coatings fabricated by wide-band laser cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qunshuang, E-mail: maqunshuang@126.com; Li, Yajiang, E-mail: yajli@sdu.edu.cn; Wang, Juan, E-mail: jwang@sdu.edu.cn; Liu, Kun, E-mail: liu_kun@163.com

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Perfect composite coatings were fabricated using wide-band laser cladding. • Special cored-eutectic structure was synthesized in Ni60/WC composite coatings. • Cored-eutectic consists of hard carbide compounds and fine lamellar eutectic of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides and γ-Ni(Fe). • Wear resistance of coating layer was significantly improved due to precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. - Abstract: Ni60 composite coatings reinforced with WC particles were fabricated on the surface of Q550 steel using LDF4000-100 fiber laser device. The wide-band laser and circular beam laser used in laser cladding were obtained by optical lens. Microstructure, elemental distribution, phase constitution and wear properties of different composite coatings were investigated. The results showed that WC particles were partly dissolved under the effect of wide-band fiber laser irradiation. A special cored-eutectic structure was synthesized due to dissolution of WC particles. According to EDS and XRD results, the inside cores were confirmed as carbides of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} enriched in Cr, W and Fe. These complex carbides were primarily separated out in the molten metal when solidification started. Eutectic structure composed of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides and γ-Ni(Fe) grew around carbides when cooling. Element content of Cr and W is lower at the bottom of cladding layer. In consequence, the eutectic structure formed in this region did not have inside carbides. The coatings made by circular laser beam were composed of dendritic matrix and interdendritic eutectic carbides, lacking of block carbides. Compared to coatings made by circular laser spot, the cored-eutectic structure formed in wide-band coatings had advantages of well-distribution and tight binding with matrix. The uniform power density and energy distribution and the weak liquid convection in molten pool lead to the unique microstructure evolution in composite coatings made by wide-band laser

  2. Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Riedel, M.; Boswell, R.; Presley, J.; Kumar, P.; Sathe, A.; Sethi, A.; Lall, M.; ,

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring “ice-like” combination of natural gas and water that has the potential to serve as an immense resource of natural gas from the world’s oceans and polar regions. However, gas-hydrate recovery is both a scientific and a technical challenge and much remains to be learned about the geologic, engineering, and economic factors controlling the ultimate energy resource potential of gas hydrate. The amount of natural gas contained in the world’s gas-hydrate accumulations is enormous, but these estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 2,800 to 8,000,000 trillion cubic meters of gas. By comparison, conventional natural gas accumulations (reserves and undiscovered, technically recoverable resources) for the world are estimated at approximately 440 trillion cubic meters. Gas recovery from gas hydrate is hindered because the gas is in a solid form and because gas hydrate commonly occurs in remote Arctic and deep marine environments. Proposed methods of gas recovery from gas hydrate generally deal with disassociating or “melting” in situ gas hydrate by heating the reservoir beyond the temperature of gas-hydrate formation, or decreasing the reservoir pressure below hydrate equilibrium. The pace of energy-related gas hydrate assessment projects has accelerated over the past several years.

  3. Solid state interconversion between anhydrous norfloxacin and its hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongcharoen, Wanchai; Byrn, Stephen R; Sutanthavibul, Narueporn

    2008-01-01

    This work is focused on characterizing and evaluating the solid state interconversion of norfloxacin (NF) hydrates. Four stoichiometric NF hydrates, dihydrate, hemipentahydrate, trihydrate, pentahydrate and a disordered NF state, were generated by various methods and characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), thermal analysis and Karl Fisher titrimetry. XRPD patterns of all NF hydrates exhibited crystalline structures. NF hydrate conversion was studied with respect to mild elevated temperature and various degrees of moisture levels. NF hydrates transformed to anhydrous NF Form A after gentle heating at 60 degrees C for 48 h except dihydrate and trihydrate where mixture in XRPD patterns between anhydrous NF Form A and former structures existed. Desiccation of NF hydrates at 0% RH for 7 days resulted in only partial removal of water molecules from the hydrated structures. The hydrated transitional phase and the disordered NF state were obtained from the incomplete dehydration of NF hydrates after thermal treatment and pentahydrate NF after desiccation, respectively. Anhydrous NF Form A and NF hydrates transformed to pentahydrate NF when exposed to high moisture environment except dihydrate. In conclusion, surrounding moisture levels, temperatures and the duration of exposure strongly influenced the interconversion pathways and stoichiometry of anhydrous NF and its hydrates. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Natural Gas Evolution in a Gas Hydrate Melt: Effect of Thermodynamic Hydrate Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujith, K S; Ramachandran, C N

    2017-01-12

    Natural gas extraction from gas hydrate sediments by injection of hydrate inhibitors involves the decomposition of hydrates. The evolution of dissolved gas from the hydrate melt is an important step in the extraction process. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we study the evolution of dissolved methane from its hydrate melt in the presence of two thermodynamic hydrate inhibitors, NaCl and CH3OH. An increase in the concentration of hydrate inhibitors is found to promote the nucleation of methane nanobubbles in the hydrate melt. Whereas NaCl promotes bubble formation by enhancing the hydrophobic interaction between aqueous CH4 molecules, CH3OH molecules assist bubble formation by stabilizing CH4 bubble nuclei formed in the solution. The CH3OH molecules accumulate around the nuclei leading to a decrease in the surface tension at their interface with water. The nanobubbles formed are found to be highly dynamic with frequent exchange of CH4 molecules between the bubble and the surrounding liquid. A quantitative analysis of the dynamic behavior of the bubble is performed by introducing a unit step function whose value depends on the location of CH4 molecules with respect to the bubble. It is observed that an increase in the concentration of thermodynamic hydrate inhibitors reduces the exchange process, making the bubble less dynamic. It is also found that for a given concentration of the inhibitor, larger bubbles are less dynamic compared to smaller ones. The dependence of the dynamic nature of nanobubbles on bubble size and inhibitor concentration is correlated with the solubility of CH4 and the Laplace pressure within the bubble. The effect of CO2 on the formation of nanobubble in the CH4-CO2 mixed gas hydrate melt in the presence of inhibitors is also examined. The simulations show that the presence of CO2 molecules significantly reduces the induction time for methane nanobubble nucleation. The role of CO2 in the early nucleation of bubble is explained

  5. Towards a green hydrate inhibitor: imaging antifreeze proteins on clathrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimond Gordienko

    Full Text Available The formation of hydrate plugs in oil and gas pipelines is a serious industrial problem and recently there has been an increased interest in the use of alternative hydrate inhibitors as substitutes for thermodynamic inhibitors like methanol. We show here that antifreeze proteins (AFPs possess the ability to modify structure II (sII tetrahydrofuran (THF hydrate crystal morphologies by adhering to the hydrate surface and inhibiting growth in a similar fashion to the kinetic inhibitor poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP. The effects of AFPs on the formation and growth rate of high-pressure sII gas mix hydrate demonstrated that AFPs are superior hydrate inhibitors compared to PVP. These results indicate that AFPs may be suitable for the study of new inhibitor systems and represent an important step towards the development of biologically-based hydrate inhibitors.

  6. Water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Santamarina, J. Carlos

    2013-11-01

    water retention curve plays a central role in numerical algorithms that model hydrate dissociation in sediments. The determination of the water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments faces experimental difficulties, and most studies assume constant water retention curves regardless of hydrate saturation. This study employs network model simulation to investigate the water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments. Results show that (1) hydrate in pores shifts the curve to higher capillary pressures and the air entry pressure increases as a power function of hydrate saturation; (2) the air entry pressure is lower in sediments with patchy rather than distributed hydrate, with higher pore size variation and pore connectivity or with lower specimen slenderness along the flow direction; and (3) smaller specimens render higher variance in computed water retention curves, especially at high water saturation Sw > 0.7. Results are relevant to other sediment pore processes such as bioclogging and mineral precipitation.

  7. A Wearable Hydration Sensor with Conformal Nanowire Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shanshan; Myers, Amanda; Malhotra, Abhishek; Lin, Feiyan; Bozkurt, Alper; Muth, John F; Zhu, Yong

    2017-01-27

    A wearable skin hydration sensor in the form of a capacitor is demonstrated based on skin impedance measurement. The capacitor consists of two interdigitated or parallel electrodes that are made of silver nanowires (AgNWs) in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The flexible and stretchable nature of the AgNW/PDMS electrode allows conformal contact to the skin. The hydration sensor is insensitive to the external humidity change and is calibrated against a commercial skin hydration system on an artificial skin over a wide hydration range. The hydration sensor is packaged into a flexible wristband, together with a network analyzer chip, a button cell battery, and an ultralow power microprocessor with Bluetooth. In addition, a chest patch consisting of a strain sensor, three electrocardiography electrodes, and a skin hydration sensor is developed for multimodal sensing. The wearable wristband and chest patch may be used for low-cost, wireless, and continuous monitoring of skin hydration and other health parameters.

  8. Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gay Hydrate Production Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. White; B. P. McGrail; S. K. Wurstner

    2009-06-30

    Displacing natural gas and petroleum with carbon dioxide is a proven technology for producing conventional geologic hydrocarbon reservoirs, and producing additional yields from abandoned or partially produced petroleum reservoirs. Extending this concept to natural gas hydrate production offers the potential to enhance gas hydrate recovery with concomitant permanent geologic sequestration. Numerical simulation was used to assess a suite of carbon dioxide injection techniques for producing gas hydrates from a variety of geologic deposit types. Secondary hydrate formation was found to inhibit contact of the injected CO{sub 2} regardless of injectate phase state, thus diminishing the exchange rate due to pore clogging and hydrate zone bypass of the injected fluids. Additional work is needed to develop methods of artificially introducing high-permeability pathways in gas hydrate zones if injection of CO{sub 2} in either gas, liquid, or micro-emulsion form is to be more effective in enhancing gas hydrate production rates.

  9. The study of pervious concrete mix proportion by the method of specific surface area of aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liguang; Jiang, Dawei

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to solve the shortcoming of the mix proportion of pervious concrete. So we have done the research on the measurement of the specific surface area of aggregate, and the research on the volume change of cement after hydration, and the research on the best water-binder ratio and thickness of gelled material package. The experimental results show that the equivalent method is more accurate for measuring the specific surface area of aggregate. It can better reflect the specific surface area of aggregate. Moreover, the calculation method of the mix proportion of the cementing material can improve the utilization ratio of material and the quality of pervious concrete.

  10. Impact of electric field on Hofmeister effects in aggregation of negatively charged colloidal minerals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ying Tang; Hang Li; Hualing Zhu; Rui Tian; Xiaodan Gao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the aggregation kinetics of negatively charged colloidal minerals in Na+, K+, NH+4 , Mg2+, Ca2+ and Cu2+ solutions were measured and Hofmeister effects therein were estimated through total average aggregation (TAA) rates and critical coagulation concentration (CCC). Hofmeister effects of TAA rates increased exponentially with the increase in electric field strength, which cannot be explained by the classical theories (i.e., ionic size, hydration and dispersion forces), indicating strong electric field at colloidal surface was an indispensable factor in studying Hofmeister effects. Meanwhile, Hofmeister series of CCC values Na+ > K+ > NH+4 > Mg2+ > Ca2+ > Cu2+ show fine correlation with the polarization of various cations, implying that onic polarization in strong electric field would be responsible for Hofmeister effects in aggregation of colloidal minerals, and the deduction was confirmed by the calculated results of electrostatic interactions between colloidal minerals.

  11. In-situ gas hydrate hydrate saturation estimated from various well logs at the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed detailed analysis and interpretation of available 2-D and 3-D seismic data and proposed a viable method for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the gas hydrate stability zone in the Milne Point area of northern Alaska. To validate the predictions of the USGS and to acquire critical reservoir data needed to develop a long-term production testing program, a well was drilled at the Mount Elbert prospect in February, 2007. Numerous well log data and cores were acquired to estimate in-situ gas hydrate saturations and reservoir properties.Gas hydrate saturations were estimated from various well logs such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), P- and S-wave velocity, and electrical resistivity logs along with pore-water salinity. Gas hydrate saturations from the NMR log agree well with those estimated from P- and S-wave velocity data. Because of the low salinity of the connate water and the low formation temperature, the resistivity of connate water is comparable to that of shale. Therefore, the effect of clay should be accounted for to accurately estimate gas hydrate saturations from the resistivity data. Two highly gas hydrate-saturated intervals are identified - an upper ???43 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 54% and a lower ???53 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 50%; both zones reach a maximum of about 75% saturation. ?? 2009.

  12. Role of Al2O3 fiber in eutectic Al-Si alloy composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of Al2O3 fiber on wear characteristics of eutectic Al-Si alloy composites were studied using a pin-on-disk tester under dry sliding condition. The results show that the Al2O3 fiber can make matrix grain be fine, specially the eutectic Si be finer and prevent the plastic flow of matrix and prohibit the crack propagation in the wear layer, thereby it can remarkably improve the mechanical property and the wear resistance of the MMCs. Since Al2O3 fiber plays a role of certain framework in protecting the matrix against crash, it can eliminate the severe wear of MMCs with higher φf of fiber from the beginning of test. At mild stage, when φf is in the range of 8%~10%, the wear rates are the lowest. With increasing φf of Al2O3 fiber, the wear mechanism of MMCs can be transformed from adhesive delamination to brittle breakaway.

  13. Nucleation and Growth of Graphite in Eutectic Spheroidal Cast Iron: Modeling and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carazo, Fernando D.; Dardati, Patricia M.; Celentano, Diego J.; Godoy, Luis A.

    2016-06-01

    A new model of graphite growth during the continuous cooling of eutectic spheroidal cast iron is presented in this paper. The model considers the nucleation and growth of graphite from pouring to room temperature. The microstructural model of solidification accounts for the eutectic as divorced and graphite growth rate as a function of carbon gradient at the liquid in contact with the graphite. In the solid state, the microstructural model takes into account three stages for graphite growth, namely (1) from the end of solidification to the upper bound of intercritical stable eutectoid, (2) during the intercritical stable eutectoid, and (3) from the lower bound of intercritical stable eutectoid to room temperature. The micro- and macrostructural models are coupled using a sequential multiscale approach. Numerical results for graphite fraction and size distribution are compared with experimental results obtained from a cylindrical cup, in which the graphite volumetric fraction and size distribution were obtained using the Schwartz-Saltykov approach. The agreements between the experimental and numerical results for the fraction of graphite and the size distribution of spheroids reveal the importance of numerical models in the prediction of the main aspects of graphite in spheroidal cast iron.

  14. Thermal Characterization of Lauric-Stearic Acid/Expanded Graphite Eutectic Mixture as Phase Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Peng; Meng, Zhaonan; Li, Ming

    2015-04-01

    The eutectic mixture of lauric acid (LA) and stearic acid (SA) is a desirable phase change material (PCM) due to the constant melting temperature and large latent heat. However, its poor thermal conductivity has hampered its broad utilization. In the present study, pure LA, SA and the mixtures with various mass fractions of LA-SA were used as the basic PCMs, and 10 wt% expanded graphite (EG) was added to enhance the thermal conductivities. The phase change behaviors, microstructural analysis, thermal conductivities and thermal stabilities of the mixtures of PCMs were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), transient plane source (TPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The results show that the LA-SA binary mixture of mixture ratio of 76.3 wt%: 23.7 wt% forms an eutectic mixture, which melts at 38.99 °C and has a latent heat of 159.94 J/g. The melted fatty acids are well absorbed by the porous network of EG and they have a good thermal stability. Furthermore, poor thermal conductivities can be well enhanced by the addition of EG.

  15. Natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) as green solvents for carbon dioxide capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulia, Kamarza; Putri, Sylvania; Krisanti, Elsa; Nasruddin

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of Natural Deep Eutectic Solvent (NADES), consisting of choline chloride and a hydrogen bonding donor (HBD) compound, in terms of carbon dioxide absorption. Solubility of carbon dioxide in NADES was found to be influenced HBD compound used and choline chloride to HBD ratio, carbon dioxide pressure, and contact time. HBD and choline/HBD ratios used were 1,2-propanediol (1:2), glycerol (1:2), and malic acid (1:1). The carbon dioxide absorption measurement was conducted using an apparatus that utilizes the volumetric method. Absorption curves were obtained up to pressures of 30 bar, showing a linear relationship between the amount absorbed and the final pressure of carbon dioxide. The choline and 1,2-propanediol eutectic mixture absorbs the highest amount of carbon dioxide, approaching 0.1 mole-fraction at 3.0 MPa and 50°C. We found that NADES ability to absorb carbon dioxide correlates with its polarity as tested using Nile Red as a solvatochromic probe.

  16. Microstructures in a ternary eutectic alloy: devising metrics based on neighbourhood relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennstedt, A.; Choudhury, A.; Ratke, L.; Nestler, B.

    2016-03-01

    Ternary eutectics, where three phases form simultaneously from the melt, present an opportunity to study the fundamental science of microstructural pattern formation during the process of solidification. In this paper we investigate these phenomena, both experimentally and by phase-field simulations. The aim is to develop necessary characterisation tools which can be applied to both experimentally determined and simulated microstructures for a quantitative comparison between simulations and experiments. In SEM images of experimental cross sections of directionally solidified Ag-Al-Cu ternary eutectic alloy at least six different types of microstructures are observed. Corresponding 3D phase-field simulations for different solidification conditions and compositions allow us to span and isolate the material parameters which influence the formation of three-phase patterns. Both experimental and simulated microstructures were analysed regarding interface lengths, triple points and number of neighbours. As a result of this integrated experimental and computational effort we conclude that neighbourhood relationships as described herein, turn out to be an appropriate basis to characterise order in patterns.

  17. Influence of Lanthanum on Solidification, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties of Eutectic Al-Si Piston Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, R.; Asmael, M. B. A.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of Lanthanum (La) concentration on the solidification parameters of the α-Al, Al-Si, and Al-Cu phases and on the microstructure, tensile, and hardness properties of eutectic Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloy were systematically investigated. The solidification parameters were examined using computer-aided cooling curve thermal analysis (CA-CCTA). The cooling curve and microstructure analysis showed that La altered the Si structure. The nucleation and growth temperatures of eutectic Si decreased when 0.3 wt.% La was added, and a high depression temperature was obtained with 1.0 wt.% La. High amounts of La considerably modified the Si structure and decreased the area and aspect ratio by 69.9 and 51%, respectively. The thermal analysis result recorded a faster freezing time with the La addition and a 36% alteration in the secondary dendrite arm spacing. Two secondary or ternary La-rich intermetallic phases were formed with needle- and plate-like structures. Furthermore, the mechanical properties were investigated by hardness and tensile tests with different La concentrations. The addition of small amounts of La (0.1 wt.%) significantly improved the ultimate tensile strength and quality index of the Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloy. In addition, the hardness value of Al-11Si-Cu increased by 7-8% with the increasing amount of La added.

  18. Vibration Monitoring Using Fiber Optic Sensors in a Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Nuclear Fuel Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pauw, Ben; Lamberti, Alfredo; Ertveldt, Julien; Rezayat, Ali; van Tichelen, Katrien; Vanlanduit, Steve; Berghmans, Francis

    2016-04-21

    Excessive fuel assembly vibrations in nuclear reactor cores should be avoided in order not to compromise the lifetime of the assembly and in order to prevent the occurrence of safety hazards. This issue is particularly relevant to new reactor designs that use liquid metal coolants, such as, for example, a molten lead-bismuth eutectic. The flow of molten heavy metal around and through the fuel assembly may cause the latter to vibrate and hence suffer degradation as a result of, for example, fretting wear or mechanical fatigue. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber sensors to measure the fuel assembly vibration in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation which can be used as input to assess vibration-related safety hazards. We show that the vibration characteristics of the fuel pins in the fuel assembly can be experimentally determined with minimal intrusiveness and with high precision owing to the small dimensions and properties of the sensors. In particular, we were able to record local strain level differences of about 0.2 μϵ allowing us to reliably estimate the vibration amplitudes and modal parameters of the fuel assembly based on optical fiber sensor readings during different stages of the operation of the facility, including the onset of the coolant circulation and steady-state operation.

  19. Vibration Monitoring Using Fiber Optic Sensors in a Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben De Pauw

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Excessive fuel assembly vibrations in nuclear reactor cores should be avoided in order not to compromise the lifetime of the assembly and in order to prevent the occurrence of safety hazards. This issue is particularly relevant to new reactor designs that use liquid metal coolants, such as, for example, a molten lead-bismuth eutectic. The flow of molten heavy metal around and through the fuel assembly may cause the latter to vibrate and hence suffer degradation as a result of, for example, fretting wear or mechanical fatigue. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber sensors to measure the fuel assembly vibration in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation which can be used as input to assess vibration-related safety hazards. We show that the vibration characteristics of the fuel pins in the fuel assembly can be experimentally determined with minimal intrusiveness and with high precision owing to the small dimensions and properties of the sensors. In particular, we were able to record local strain level differences of about 0.2 μϵ allowing us to reliably estimate the vibration amplitudes and modal parameters of the fuel assembly based on optical fiber sensor readings during different stages of the operation of the facility, including the onset of the coolant circulation and steady-state operation.

  20. Preparation of Magnesium, Cobalt and Nickel Ferrite Nanoparticles from Metal Oxides using Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söldner, Anika; Zach, Julia; Iwanow, Melanie; Gärtner, Tobias; Schlosser, Marc; Pfitzner, Arno; König, Burkhard

    2016-09-05

    Natural deep eutectic solvents (DESs) dissolve simple metal oxides and are used as a reaction medium to synthesize spinel-type ferrite nanoparticles MFe2 O4 (M=Mg, Zn, Co, Ni). The best results for phase-pure spinel ferrites are obtained with the DES consisting of choline chloride (ChCl) and maleic acid. By employing DESs, the reactions proceed at much lower temperatures than usual for the respective solid-phase reactions of the metal oxides and at the same temperatures as synthesis with comparable calcination processes using metal salts. The method therefore reduces the overall required energy for the nanoparticle synthesis. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the thermolysis process of the eutectic melts in air occurs in one major step. The phase-pure spinel-type ferrite particles are thoroughly characterized by X-ray diffraction, diffuse-reflectance UV/Vis spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The properties of the obtained nanoparticles are shown to be comparable to those obtained by other methods, illustrating the potential of natural DESs for processing metal oxides.

  1. Fabrication and Characterization of a Lead Zirconate Titanate Micro Energy Harvester Based on Eutectic Bonding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yi-Gui; SUN Jian; YANG Chun-Sheng; LIU Jing-Quan; SUGIYAMA Susumu; TANAKA Katsuhiko

    2011-01-01

    A lead zirconate titanate(PZT)-Si energy harvester cantilever with PZT bulk ceramics is fabricated by eutectic bonding, polishing and dicing processes. The feasibility of this process is studied using a successful operation of the cantilever in both actuation and harvesting modes. The first prototype made from a PZT-Au-Si cantiliever is tested. The testing results show the voltage output of 632mV at the frequency of 815Hz when the excitation acceleration is 0.5 g. The PZT and silicon layers are bonded together to form a sandwiched structure using a gold layer as an intermediate layer.%@@ A lead zirconate titanate(PZT)-Si energy harvester cantilever with PZT bulk ceramics is fabricated by eutectic bonding, polishing and dicing processes.The feasibility of this process is studied using a successful operation of the cantilever in both actuation and harvesting modes.The first prototype made from a PZT-Au-Si cantiliever is tested.The testing results show the voltage output of 632mV at the frequency of 815 Hz when the excitation acceleration is 0.5 g.The PZT and silicon layers are bonded together to form a sandwiched structure using a gold layer as an intermediate layer.

  2. Research on lamellar structure and micro-hardness of directionally solidified Sn-58Bi eutectic alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Xiaowu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the Sn-58Bi (weight percent eutectic alloy was directionally solidified at a constant temperature gradient (G = 12 K·mm-1 with different growth rates using a Bridgman type directional solidification furnace. A lamellar microstructure was observed in the Sn-58Bi samples. The lamellar spacing and micro-hardness of longitudinal and transversal sections were measured. The values of lamellar spacing of both longitudinal and transversal sections decrease with an increase in growth rate. The microhardness increases with an increase in the growth rate and decreases with an increase in the lamellar spacing. The dependence of lamellar spacing on growth rate, and micro-hardness on both growth rate and lamellar spacing were obtained by linear regression analysis. The relationships between the lamellar spacing and growth rate, microhardness and growth rate, and micro-hardness and lamellar spacing for transversal and longitudinal sections of Sn-58Bi eutectic alloy were given. The fitted exponent values obtained in this work were compared with the previous similar experimental results and a good agreement was obtained.

  3. Evolution of eutectic spacing during unidirectional solidification of Al-Ni alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Jefferson Cabral Araujo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoeutectic Al-Ni alloys show a ductile phase α distributed with a β phase Al3Ni fragile where β serves as reinforcement of the structure of the material. The eutectic composition alloys obey the relationship: λ2.v = C, where λ is the eutectic spacing, v is a tip growth rate and C is a constant. The aim of this study is to establish correlations between λ and v for hypoeutectic Al-1%, 3% and 5% Ni alloys. Unsteady-state upward directional solidification experiments were performed, as well as metallography, dissolution of the aluminum matrix and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The interphase spacing of the three Al-Ni alloys decreased with increasing tip growth rate, with a predominance of a rod-like morphology on intermetallic. It was observed that parameters such as tip growth rate, cooling rate and temperature gradient decreases as the solidification front advances. It was further observed that a single experimental law λ = 1.2 v-0, 5 illustrates the evolution of the interphase spacing for any examined alloy.

  4. Effect of Eutectic Concentration on Conductivity in PEO:LiX Based Solid Polymer Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Pengfei; Ganapatibhotla, Lalitha; Maranas, Janna

    Polyethylene oxide (PEO) and lithium salt based solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) have been widely proposed as a substitution for the liquid electrolyte in Li-ion batteries. As salt concentration varies, these systems demonstrate rich phase behavior. Conductivity as a function of salt concentration has been measured for decades and various concentration dependences have been observed. A PEO:LiX mixture can have one or two conductivity maximums, while some mixtures with salt of high ionic strength will have higher conductivity as the salt concentration decrease. The factors that affect the conductivity are specific for each sample. The universal factor that affects conductivity is still not clear. In this work, we measured the conductivity of a series of PEO:LiX mixtures and statistical analysis shows conductivity is affected by the concentration difference from the eutectic concentration (Δc). The correlation with Δc is stronger than the correlation with glass transition temperature. We believe that at the eutectic concentration, during the solidification process, unique structures can form which aid conduction. Currently at Dow Chemical.

  5. Green Processing of Lignocellulosic Biomass and Its Derivatives in Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xing; Zuo, Miao; Li, Zheng; Liu, Huai; Xiong, Caixia; Zeng, Xianhai; Sun, Yong; Hu, Lei; Liu, Shijie; Lei, Tingzhou; Lin, Lu

    2017-07-10

    The scientific community has been seeking cost-competitive and green solvents with good dissolving capacity for the valorization of lignocellulosic biomass. At this point, deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are currently emerging as a new class of promising solvents that are generally liquid eutectic mixtures formed by self-association (or hydrogen-bonding interaction) of two or three components. DESs are attractive solvents for the fractionation (or pretreatment) of lignocellulose and the valorization of lignin, owing to the high solubility of lignin in DESs. DESs are also employed as effective media for the modification of cellulose to afford functionalized cellulosic materials, such as cellulose nanocrystals. More interestingly, biomassderived carbohydrates, such as fructose, can be used as one of the constituents of DESs and then dehydrated to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in high yield. In this review, a comprehensive summary of recent contribution of DESs to the processing of lignocellulosic biomass and its derivatives is provided. Moreover, further discussion about the challenges of the application of DESs in biomass processing is presented. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Electrochemical behaviour of gadolinium ion in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravaca, C. [CIEMAT/Nuclear Fission Division/Radioactive Wastes Unit, Avda, Complutense, 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)]. E-mail: c.caravaca@ciemat.es; Cordoba, G. de [CIEMAT/Nuclear Fission Division/Radioactive Wastes Unit, Avda, Complutense, 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Tomas, M.J. [CIEMAT/Nuclear Fission Division/Radioactive Wastes Unit, Avda, Complutense, 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Rosado, M. [CIEMAT/Nuclear Fission Division/Radioactive Wastes Unit, Avda, Complutense, 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2007-01-15

    This work presents the electrochemical study of GdCl{sub 3} in the molten LiCl-KCl eutectic in the temperature range 723-823 K. Transient electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry, on an inert metallic tungsten working electrode, have been used in order to investigate the reduction mechanism and transport parameters. This study shows that Gd{sup 3+} ions are reduced to Gd metal by a single step mechanism with exchange of three electrons. Diffusion coefficient of GdCl{sub 3} ions was determined at various temperatures, at 723 K the value is D = 0.88 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. Apparent standard reduction potential of the redox couple Gd{sup 3+}/Gd has been determined by the open-circuit chronopotentiometry technique at several temperatures. Also the Gibbs free energy of GdCl{sub 3} formation was determined and compared with thermodynamic data for pure compounds in the supercooled state in order to estimate the activity coefficient of Gd{sup 3+} in the molten LiCl-KCl eutectic.

  7. Hydration index--a better parameter for explaining small molecule hydration in inhibition of ice recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Roger Y; Ferreira, Sandra S; Czechura, Pawel; Chaytor, Jennifer L; Ben, Robert N

    2008-12-24

    Several simple mono- and disaccharides have been assessed for their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization. Two carbohydrates were found to be effective recrystallization inhibitors. D-galactose (1) was the best monosaccharide and D-melibiose (5) was the most active disaccharide. The ability of each carbohydrate to inhibit ice growth was correlated to its respective hydration number reported in the literature. A hydration number reflects the number of tightly bound water molecules to the carbohydrate and is a function of carbohydrate stereochemistry. It was discovered that using the absolute hydration number of a carbohydrate does not allow one to accurately predict its ability to inhibit ice recrystallization. Consequently, we have defined a hydration index in which the hydration number is divided by the molar volume of the carbohydrate. This new parameter not only takes into account the number of water molecules tightly bound to a carbohydrate but also the size or volume of a particular solute and ultimately the concentration of hydrated water molecules. The hydration index of both mono- and disaccharides correlates well with experimentally measured RI activity. C-Linked derivatives of the monosaccharides appear to have RI activity comparable to that of their O-linked saccharides but a more thorough investigation is required. The relationship between carbohydrate concentration and RI activity was shown to be noncolligative and a 0.022 M solution of D-galactose (1) and C-linked galactose derivative (10) inhibited recrystallization as well as a 3% DMSO solution. The carbohydrates examined in this study did not possess any thermal hysteresis activity (selective depression of freezing point relative to melting point) or dynamic ice shaping. As such, we propose that they are inhibiting recrystallization at the interface between bulk water and the quasi liquid layer (a semiordered interface between ice and bulk water) by disrupting the preordering of water.

  8. Geologic implications of gas hydrates in the offshore of India: results of the National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Boswell, Ray; Cochran, J.R.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Lall, Malcolm; Mazumdar, Aninda; Ramana, Mangipudi Venkata; Ramprasad, Tammisetti; Riedel, Michael; Sain, Kalachand; Sathe, Arun Vasant; Vishwanath, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 (NGHP-01) is designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate along the passive continental margin of the Indian Peninsula and in the Andaman convergent margin, with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. The NGHP-01 expedition established the presence of gas hydrates in the Krishna-Godavari and Mahanadi Basins, and the Andaman Sea. The expedition discovered in the Krishna-Godavari Basin one of the thickest gas hydrate accumulations ever documented, in the Andaman Sea one of the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zones in the world, and established the existence of a fully developed gas hydrate petroleum system in all three basins.

  9. Origin and character of gaseous hydrocarbons in the hydrate and non-hydrate charged sediments on the Norway - Svalbard margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaular, Espen Nesheim

    2011-05-15

    Gas incubated in clathrate water-structures, stabilizes the hydrogen bonded substance termed gas hydrate. In the marine environment vast amount of carbon is stored as gas hydrates within the temperature and pressure zone these ice-like structures are stable. Natural gas hydrate mapping and characterization is important basic research that brings about critical knowledge concerning various topics. Natural gas hydrates is a vital part of the carbon cycle, it is a potential energy resource (and thereby a potential climate agent) and it is a potential geo-hazard. One of the goals the GANS initiative aimed at exploring, was the hydrate bearing sediment of the Norway -Svalbard margins, to investigate the character and expansion of natural gas hydrates. Part of the investigation was to define how the gas in the hydrated sediment was produced and where it came from. As a result this thesis addresses the matter of light hydrocarbon characterization and origin in two Norwegian hydrate deposits. On cruises to Vestnesa on the Svalbard margin and to Nyegga in the mid-Norwegian margin, samples of hydrate charged and non-hydrate charged sediments were obtained and analyzed. Through compositional and isotopic analyses the origin of the hydrate bound gas in the fluid escape feature G11 at Nyegga was determined. The hydrate incubated methane is microbial produced as well as parts of the hydrate bound ethane. The compositional analysis in both the Nyegga area and at the Vestnesa Ridge points at thermogenic contributions in the sediment interstitials and pore water. The two hydrate bearing margins show large differences in hydrocarbon content and microbial activity in the pockmarks investigated. The gravity cores from the penetrated pockmark at Vestnesa showed low hydrocarbon content and thus suggest ceased or periodic venting. The fluid flow escape features at Nyegga show large variety of flux rates based on ROV monitoring and headspace analysis of the sediment and pore water. The

  10. Theoretical study of chlorophyll a hydrates formation in aqueous organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Fredj, Arij; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2010-01-14

    must displace a solvent molecule coordinated to Mg, exhibit values of DeltaH > 0 and DeltaS > 0, in sharp contrast to first hydration processes in nonpolar media. The present results represent the first theoretical attempt to rationalize the large amount of experimental data on hydration and aggregation of Chla in aqueous organic media that have been accumulated over the past four decades. The data stress, in particular, the key role of Chla dihydrates, a point that has been the object of intense debate in the literature. Clearly, dihydrates are found to be more stable than monohydrates owing to a particular structure in which cooperative interactions occur between the water molecules and Chla. The calculations also explain the irregular behavior observed for Chla in aqueous THF or pyridine: In these media, Chla remains basically unhydrated because the Chla-solvent adducts are stabilized by strong dispersion interactions.

  11. A statistical mechanical description of biomolecular hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    We present an efficient and accurate theoretical description of the structural hydration of biological macromolecules. The hydration of molecules of almost arbitrary size (tRNA, antibody-antigen complexes, photosynthetic reaction centre) can be studied in solution and in the crystal environment. The biomolecular structure obtained from x-ray crystallography, NMR, or modeling is required as input information. The structural arrangement of water molecules near a biomolecular surface is represented by the local water density analogous to the corresponding electron density in an x-ray diffraction experiment. The water-density distribution is approximated in terms of two- and three-particle correlation functions of solute atoms with water using a potentials-of-mean-force expansion.

  12. Experimental techniques for cement hydration studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luttge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cement hydration kinetics is a complex problem of dissolution, nucleation and growth that is still not well understood, particularly in a quantitative way. While cement systems are unique in certain aspects they are also comparable to natural mineral systems. Therefore, geochemistry and particularly the study of mineral dissolution and growth may be able to provide insight and methods that can be utilized in cement hydration research. Here, we review mainly what is not known or what is currently used and applied in a problematic way. Examples are the typical Avrami approach, the application of Transition State Theory (TST to overall reaction kinetics and the problem of reactive surface area. Finally, we suggest an integrated approach that combines vertical scanning interferometry (VSI with other sophisticated analytical techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and theoretical model calculations based on a stochastic treatment.

  13. Predicting hydration energies for multivalent ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2014-01-01

    (TZVP) level. Agreement with experimental data for monovalent and divalent ions is good and shows no significant systematic errors. Predictions are noticeably better than with standard COSMO. The agreement with experimental data for trivalent and tetravalent ions is slightly worse and shows systematic...... errors. Our results indicate that quantum chemical calculations combined with COSMO-RS solvent treatment is a reliable method for treating multivalent ions in solution, provided one hydration shell of explicit water molecules is included for metal cations. The accuracy is not high enough to allow...... absolute predictions of hydration energies but could be used to investigate trends for several ions, thanks to the low computational cost, in particular for ligand exchange reactions....

  14. Obsidian hydration dating of volcanic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I.; Obradovich, J.

    1981-01-01

    Obsidian hydration dating of volcanic events had been compared with ages of the same events determined by the 14C and KAr methods at several localities. The localities, ranging in age from 1200 to over 1 million yr, include Newberry Craters, Oregon; Coso Hot Springs, California; Salton Sea, California; Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming; and Mineral Range, Utah. In most cases the agreement is quite good. A number of factors including volcanic glass composition and exposuretemperature history must be known in order to relate hydration thickness to age. The effect of composition can be determined from chemical analysis or the refractive index of the glass. Exposure-temperature history requires a number of considerations enumerated in this paper. ?? 1981.

  15. Methane hydrates and contemporary climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2011-01-01

    As the evidence for warming climate became better established in the latter part of the 20th century (IPCC 2001), some scientists raised the alarm that large quantities of methane (CH4) might be liberated by widespread destabilization of climate-sensitive gas hydrate deposits trapped in marine and permafrost-associated sediments (Bohannon 2008, Krey et al. 2009, Mascarelli 2009). Even if only a fraction of the liberated CH4 were to reach the atmosphere, the potency of CH4 as a greenhouse gas (GHG) and the persistence of its oxidative product (CO2) heightened concerns that gas hydrate dissociation could represent a slow tipping point (Archer et al. 2009) for Earth's contemporary period of climate change.

  16. Advances in understanding hydration of Portland cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scrivener, Karen L., E-mail: Karen.scrivener@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 (Switzerland); Juilland, Patrick [Sika Technology AG, Zürich (Switzerland); Monteiro, Paulo J.M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California at Berkeley (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Progress in understanding hydration is summarized. Evidence supports the geochemistry dissolution theory as an explanation for the induction period, in preference to the inhibiting layer theory. The growth of C–S–H is the principal factor controlling the main heat evolution peak. Electron microscopy indicates that C–S–H “needles” grow from the surface of grains. At the peak, the surface is covered, but deceleration cannot be attributed to diffusion control. The shoulder peak comes from renewed reaction of C{sub 3}A after depletion of sulfate in solution, but release of sulfate absorbed on C–S–H means that ettringite continues to form. After several days space becomes the major factor controlling hydration. The use of new analytical technique is improving our knowledge of the action of superplasticizers and leading to the design of molecules for different applications. Atomistic modeling is becoming a topic of increasing interest. Recent publications in this area are reviewed.

  17. Propane hydrate nucleation: Experimental investigation and correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    In this work the nucleation kinetics of propane gas hydrate has been investigated experimentally using a stirred batch reactor. The experiments have been performed isothermally recording the pressure as a function of time. Experiments were conducted at different stirring rates, but in the same......) to the aqueous phase was found to reduce the gas dissolution rate slightly. However the induction times were prolonged quite substantially upon addition of PVP.The induction time data were correlated using a newly developed induction time model based on crystallization theory also capable of taking into account...... the presence of additives. In most cases reasonable agreement between the data and the model could be obtained. The results revealed that especially the effective surface energy between propane hydrate and water is likely to change when the stirring rate varies from very high to low. The prolongation...

  18. Fractal aggregates induced by liposome-liposome interaction in the presence of Ca2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabín, J; Prieto, G; Ruso, J M; Sarmiento, F

    2007-10-01

    We present a study of the fractal dimension of clusters of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) formed by egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC), dimyristoylphosphocholine (DMPC) and dipalmitoylphosphocholine (DPPC) induced by Ca2+ . Fractal dimensions were calculated by application of two methods, measuring the angular dependency of the light scattered by the clusters and following the evolution of the cluster size. In all cases, the fractal dimensions fell in the range from 2.1 to 1.8, corresponding to two regimes: diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) and reaction-limited cluster aggregation (RLCA). Whereas DMPC clusters showed a typical transition from the RLCA to the DLCA aggregation, EYPC exhibited an unusual behaviour, since the aggregation was limited for a higher concentration than the critical aggregation concentration. The behaviour of DPPC was intermediate, with a transition from the RLCA to the DLCA regimes with cluster sizes depending on Ca2+ concentration. Studies on the reversibility of the aggregates show that EYPC and DPPC clusters can be re-dispersed by dilution with water. DMPC does not present reversibility. Reversibility is evidence of the existence of secondary minima in the DLVO potential between two liposomes. To predict these secondary minima, a correction of the DLVO model was necessary taking into account a repulsive force of hydration.

  19. Quantitative characterization of non-classic polarization of cations on clay aggregate stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feinan Hu

    Full Text Available Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+ at concentrations from10-5 to 10-1 mol L-1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation-surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability.

  20. Influence of the Aggregate Volume on the Eleetrieal Resistivity and Properties of Portland Cement Concretes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xiaosheng; XIAO Lianzhen

    2011-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of concretes with various aggregate volume fractions (Va) of 0%-70%at water/cement (W/C) ratios of 0.4 and 0.5 during l day was monitored.It is found that the addition of normal aggregate to cement paste leads to a regular increase in concrete resistivity at each hydration stage and the electrical resistivity has a deeper increase for the lower W/C at a fixed aggregate volume fraction.The number of normalized resistivity (NR) of concrete to its paste matrix was introduced,which is only a function of aggregate volume fraction (Va).The quantitative relationships give an alternative method for the prediction of aggregate volume in the concrete.A logarithmic relation is established between the elastic modulus of concrete at 7 days or 28 days and the electrical resistivity of concrete at 1 day.The equations are obtained,the compressive strength of concrete at 7 days or 28 days can be determined by the electrical resistivity of concrete at 1 day and the used aggregate content in the concrete.The quantitative relationships give a non-destructive test (NDT) method for prediction of concrete elastic modulus and compressive strength.