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Sample records for hydratase germline mutation

  1. Germline fumarate hydratase mutations in patients with ovarian mucinous cystadenoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ylisaukko-oja, Sanna K.; Cybulski, Cezary; Lehtonen, Rainer;

    2006-01-01

    analyzed for somatic FH mutations. Two patients diagnosed with ovarian mucinous cystadenoma (two out of 33, 6%) were found to be FH germline mutation carriers. One of the changes was a novel mutation (Ala231Thr) and the other one (435insAAA) was previously described in FH deficiency families. These results...

  2. Distinct expression profile in fumarate-hydratase-deficient uterine fibroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanharanta, S; Pollard, PJ; Lehtonen, HJ

    2006-01-01

    Defects in mitochondrial enzymes predispose to severe developmental defects as well as tumorigenesis. Heterozygous germline mutations in the nuclear gene encoding fumarate hydratase (FH), an enzyme catalyzing the hydration of fumarate in the Krebs tricarboxylic acid cycle, cause hereditary...

  3. Effects of naturally occurring missense mutations and G525V in the hydratase domain of human d-bifunctional protein on hydratase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirou Tsuchida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available d-bifunctional protein (d-BP deficiency is thought to lead to severe lipid metabolism disorders. To investigate the effect of naturally occurring missense mutations in the hydratase domain in d-BP, we constructed several d-BP hydratase variants and measured their activities. Missense mutations at sites whose conservation rates among 30 eukaryotes were < 70% did not affect hydratase activity. We predicted that missense mutations of highly conserved amino acids would markedly reduce activity. However, R562H and R562L, naturally occurring missense mutations of highly conserved amino acids, did not reduce activity. This result suggests that a missense mutation in a highly conserved amino acid does not always lead to severe lipid metabolism disorders. We also investigated the effect of G525V, which had been found in a mildly symptomatic patient with d-BP deficiency who was heterozygous for G525 and G658X. G525V markedly reduced hydratase activity. We had predicted that heterozygous G525V and G658X would lead to severely disordered lipid metabolism. However, the symptoms were inconsistent with this prediction. Characterizing mutations in the d-BP gene and the symptoms of d-BP deficiency may require pleiotropy, not only in vitro, studies.

  4. [Atypical leiomyoma in a patient with cutaneous leiomyomatosis and mutation of the enzyme fumarate hydratase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Komáromy, Angélica; Arias-Palomo, Dolores; Tardío, Juan C; Freites-Martínez, Azael; Borbujo, Jesús

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a 56 year-old male with an atypical leiomyoma in the context of a cutaneous leiomyomatosis and a family history of uterine leiomyomatosis. The genetic study revealed a mutation in the gene for the enzyme fumarate hydratase, but he has not had any renal malignancy so far. Atypical leiomyoma is a rare tumor that usually presents as a single lesion and is exceptional in patients with cutaneous leiomyomatosis. The relation between fumarate hydratase enzyme mutations with multiple leiomyomas, uterine leiomyomatosis and an increased risk of developing kidney cancer is widely known. However, the role of these mutations in the development of atypical leiomyomas is still impossible to clarify given the few cases reported in the literature.

  5. The FH mutation database: an online database of fumarate hydratase mutations involved in the MCUL (HLRCC tumor syndrome and congenital fumarase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomlinson Ian PM

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fumarate hydratase (HGNC approved gene symbol – FH, also known as fumarase, is an enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, involved in fundamental cellular energy production. First described by Zinn et al in 1986, deficiency of FH results in early onset, severe encephalopathy. In 2002, the Multiple Leiomyoma Consortium identified heterozygous germline mutations of FH in patients with multiple cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas, (MCUL: OMIM 150800. In some families renal cell cancer also forms a component of the complex and as such has been described as hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC: OMIM 605839. The identification of FH as a tumor suppressor was an unexpected finding and following the identification of subunits of succinate dehydrogenase in 2000 and 2001, was only the second description of the involvement of an enzyme of intermediary metabolism in tumorigenesis. Description The FH mutation database is a part of the TCA cycle gene mutation database (formerly the succinate dehydrogenase gene mutation database and is based on the Leiden Open (source Variation Database (LOVD system. The variants included in the database were derived from the published literature and annotated to conform to current mutation nomenclature. The FH database applies HGVS nomenclature guidelines, and will assist researchers in applying these guidelines when directly submitting new sequence variants online. Since the first molecular characterization of an FH mutation by Bourgeron et al in 1994, a series of reports of both FH deficiency patients and patients with MCUL/HLRRC have described 107 variants, of which 93 are thought to be pathogenic. The most common type of mutation is missense (57%, followed by frameshifts & nonsense (27%, and diverse deletions, insertions and duplications. Here we introduce an online database detailing all reported FH sequence variants. Conclusion The FH mutation database strives to systematically

  6. Risk profile of the RET A883F germline mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jes Sloth; Habra, Mouhammed Amir; Bassett, John Howard Duncan

    2017-01-01

    Context: The A883F germline mutation of the REarranged during Transfection proto-oncogene causes multiple endocrine neoplasia 2B. In the revised American Thyroid Association (ATA) guidelines for the management of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) the A883F mutation has been reclassified from...

  7. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Tao, Hou-Quan; He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment.

  8. Mutation rates and the evolution of germline structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequencing studies of de novo mutations in humans have revealed surprising incongruities in our understanding of human germline mutation. In particular, the mutation rate observed in modern humans is substantially lower than that estimated from calibration against the fossil record, and the paternal age effect in mutations transmitted to offspring is much weaker than expected from our long-standing model of spermatogenesis. I consider possible explanations for these discrepancies, including evolutionary changes in life-history parameters such as generation time and the age of puberty, a possible contribution from undetected post-zygotic mutations early in embryo development, and changes in cellular mutation processes at different stages of the germline. I suggest a revised model of stem-cell state transitions during spermatogenesis, in which ‘dark’ gonial stem cells play a more active role than hitherto envisaged, with a long cycle time undetected in experimental observations. More generally, I argue that the mutation rate and its evolution depend intimately on the structure of the germline in humans and other primates. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'. PMID:27325834

  9. CDH1 germline mutations and hereditary lobular breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Giovanni; Intra, Mattia; Trentin, Chiara; Veronesi, Paolo; Galimberti, Viviana

    2016-04-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is an autosomal dominant inherited disease associated of CDH1 germline mutations (that encodes for the E-cadherin protein), and lobular breast cancer is the second most frequent type of neoplasia. Recently, novel E-cadherin constitutional alterations have been identified in pedigree clustering only for lobular breast carcinoma without evidence of diffuse gastric tumors and in absence of BRCA1/2 mutations. This first evidence opens novel questions about the inherited correlation between diffuse gastric and lobular breast cancers. In this brief review we revise the literature data about the CDH1 mutation frequency affecting exclusively lobular breast cancer, providing clinical recommendation for asymptomatic mutation carriers.

  10. Human Germline Mutation and the Erratic Evolutionary Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przeworski, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the chronology of human evolution relies on the “molecular clock” provided by the steady accumulation of substitutions on an evolutionary lineage. Recent analyses of human pedigrees have called this understanding into question by revealing unexpectedly low germline mutation rates, which imply that substitutions accrue more slowly than previously believed. Translating mutation rates estimated from pedigrees into substitution rates is not as straightforward as it may seem, however. We dissect the steps involved, emphasizing that dating evolutionary events requires not “a mutation rate” but a precise characterization of how mutations accumulate in development in males and females—knowledge that remains elusive. PMID:27760127

  11. Germline TERT promoter mutations are rare in familial melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harland, Mark; Petljak, Mia; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela;

    2016-01-01

    Germline CDKN2A mutations occur in 40 % of 3-or-more case melanoma families while mutations of CDK4, BAP1, and genes involved in telomere function (ACD, TERF2IP, POT1), have also been implicated in melanomagenesis. Mutation of the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene (c.-57...... T>G variant) has been reported in one family. We tested for the TERT promoter variant in 675 multicase families wild-type for the known high penetrance familial melanoma genes, 1863 UK population-based melanoma cases and 529 controls. Germline lymphocyte telomere length was estimated in carriers....... The c.-57 T>G TERT promoter variant was identified in one 7-case family with multiple primaries and early age of onset (earliest, 15 years) but not among population cases or controls. One family member had multiple primary melanomas, basal cell carcinomas and a bladder tumour. The blood leukocyte...

  12. The molecular anatomy of spontaneous germline mutations in human testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jian; Calabrese, Peter; Tiemann-Boege, Irene; Shinde, Deepali Narendra; Yoon, Song-Ro; Gelfand, David; Bauer, Keith; Arnheim, Norman

    2007-09-01

    The frequency of the most common sporadic Apert syndrome mutation (C755G) in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2) is 100-1,000 times higher than expected from average nucleotide substitution rates based on evolutionary studies and the incidence of human genetic diseases. To determine if this increased frequency was due to the nucleotide site having the properties of a mutation hot spot, or some other explanation, we developed a new experimental approach. We examined the spatial distribution of the frequency of the C755G mutation in the germline by dividing four testes from two normal individuals each into several hundred pieces, and, using a highly sensitive PCR assay, we measured the mutation frequency of each piece. We discovered that each testis was characterized by rare foci with mutation frequencies 10(3) to >10(4) times higher than the rest of the testis regions. Using a model based on what is known about human germline development forced us to reject (p < 10(-6)) the idea that the C755G mutation arises more frequently because this nucleotide simply has a higher than average mutation rate (hot spot model). This is true regardless of whether mutation is dependent or independent of cell division. An alternate model was examined where positive selection acts on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonial cells (SrAp) carrying this mutation such that, instead of only replacing themselves, they occasionally produce two SrAp cells. This model could not be rejected given our observed data. Unlike the disease site, similar analysis of C-to-G mutations at a control nucleotide site in one testis pair failed to find any foci with high mutation frequencies. The rejection of the hot spot model and lack of rejection of a selection model for the C755G mutation, along with other data, provides strong support for the proposal that positive selection in the testis can act to increase the frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying a mutation deleterious to an

  13. The molecular anatomy of spontaneous germline mutations in human testes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Qin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of the most common sporadic Apert syndrome mutation (C755G in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2 is 100-1,000 times higher than expected from average nucleotide substitution rates based on evolutionary studies and the incidence of human genetic diseases. To determine if this increased frequency was due to the nucleotide site having the properties of a mutation hot spot, or some other explanation, we developed a new experimental approach. We examined the spatial distribution of the frequency of the C755G mutation in the germline by dividing four testes from two normal individuals each into several hundred pieces, and, using a highly sensitive PCR assay, we measured the mutation frequency of each piece. We discovered that each testis was characterized by rare foci with mutation frequencies 10(3 to >10(4 times higher than the rest of the testis regions. Using a model based on what is known about human germline development forced us to reject (p < 10(-6 the idea that the C755G mutation arises more frequently because this nucleotide simply has a higher than average mutation rate (hot spot model. This is true regardless of whether mutation is dependent or independent of cell division. An alternate model was examined where positive selection acts on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonial cells (SrAp carrying this mutation such that, instead of only replacing themselves, they occasionally produce two SrAp cells. This model could not be rejected given our observed data. Unlike the disease site, similar analysis of C-to-G mutations at a control nucleotide site in one testis pair failed to find any foci with high mutation frequencies. The rejection of the hot spot model and lack of rejection of a selection model for the C755G mutation, along with other data, provides strong support for the proposal that positive selection in the testis can act to increase the frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying a mutation

  14. Lynch Syndrome Caused by Germline PMS2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Brohet, Richard M; Tops, Carli M

    2015-01-01

    . Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to estimate risks for other Lynch syndrome-associated cancers. RESULTS: The cumulative risk (CR) of CRC for male mutation carriers by age 70 years was 19%. The CR among female carriers was 11% for CRC and 12% for EC. The mean age of CRC development was 52......PURPOSE: The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. METHODS: Data were collected from 98...... years, and there was a significant difference in mean age of CRC between the probands (mean, 47 years; range, 26 to 68 years) and other family members with a PMS2 mutation (mean, 58 years; range, 31 to 86 years; P

  15. Understanding what determines the frequency and pattern of human germline mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnheim, Norman; Calabrese, Peter

    2009-07-01

    Surprising findings about human germline mutation have come from applying new technologies to detect rare mutations in germline DNA, from analysing DNA sequence divergence between humans and closely related species, and from investigating human polymorphic variation. In this Review we discuss how these approaches affect our current understanding of the roles of sex, age, mutation hot spots, germline selection and genomic factors in determining human nucleotide substitution mutation patterns and frequencies. To enhance our understanding of mutation and disease, more extensive molecular data on the human germ line with regard to mutation origin, DNA repair, epigenetic status and the effect of newly arisen mutations on gamete development are needed.

  16. CDH1 germline mutation in hereditary gastric carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Dan Wang; Jun Ren; Lian Zhang

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a bird's-eye view both in preclinical and clinical aspects of E-cadherin germline gene (CDH1)in gastric cancer patients and their families. E-cadherin,a product of CDH1 gene, belonging to the functionally related trans-membrane glycoprotein family, is responsible for the Ca2+-dependent cell-cell adhesion mechanism and contributes to dissociation followed by acquisition of cell motility, which usually occurs in the first step of cancer invasion and metastasis. CDH1 gene germline mutation is common in many types of carcinoma,and occurs very frequent in hereditary gastric carcinoma (HGC) patients and their families. Recently, more and more researches support that E-cadherin plays an important role in the differentiation, growth and invasion of HGC. So it is of great value to clarify its mechanisms both for understanding HGC pathogenesis and for clinical therapy, especially in China, where there are a high risk population of gastric cancer and a high HGC incidence rate. In this paper, recent researches on CDH1 gene mutation, especially its role in tumor genesis and progress of HGC, are reviewed, and advances in evaluation of its mutation status for HGC diagnosis, therapy and prognosis,are also discussed briefly.

  17. Prevalence of low-penetrant germline TP53 D49H mutation in Japanese cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ken; Urakami, Kenichi; Nagashima, Takeshi; Shimoda, Yuji; Ohnami, Shumpei; Ohnami, Sumiko; Ohshima, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Tohru; Hatakeyama, Keiichi; Serizawa, Masakuni; Akiyama, Yasuto; Maruyama, Kouji; Katagiri, Hirohisa; Ishida, Yuji; Takahashi, Kaoru; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Terashima, Masanori; Kawamura, Taiichi; Kinugasa, Yusuke; Yamakawa, Yushi; Onitsuka, Tetsuro; Ohde, Yasuhisa; Sugino, Takashi; Ito, Ichiro; Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Horiuchi, Yasue; Mizuguchi, Maki; Yamazaki, Mutsumi; Inoue, Kengo; Wakamatsu, Kimiko; Sugiyama, Misato; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Kusuhara, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Using whole exome sequencing data obtained from 1,685 Japanese cancer patients, we examined genetic variations of germline TP53 and found 10 types of non-synonymous single nucleotide variants. In the present study, we focused on 6 patients with germline D49H mutation located in the transactivation domain 2 of p53 protein, since the mutation seemed to be prevalent in cancer patients and to be pathogenic. According to the initial survey for family history of the proband with the germline TP53 D49H mutation, one osteosarcoma patient and his pedigree fulfill the criteria for Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome and the 2009 Chompret criteria for germline TP53 mutation screening. Since this patient possesses double germline mutations of TP53 D49H and A159D, further studies are required to evaluate contribution of the D49H mutation in this morbidity. The remaining 5 patients had family histories of cancer, but none fulfills the criteria either for the Li-Fraumeni/Li-Fraumeni-like syndromes or the 2009 Chompret criteria for germline TP53 mutation screening. It is possible to postulate that the germline TP53 D49H mutation is likely to be low-penetrant in some pedigrees. The present study also indicates that the survey for the germline TP53 mutation plays an important role in clinical practice as it will prevent mistaking cancer patients with unusual heredities for sporadic cases.

  18. The fate of BRCA1-related germline mutations in triple-negative breast tumors

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    Kotoula, Vassiliki; Fostira, Florentia; Papadopoulou, Kyriaki; Apostolou, Paraskevi; Tsolaki, Eleftheria; Lazaridis, Georgios; Manoussou, Kyriaki; Zagouri, Flora; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Vlachos, Ioannis; Tikas, Ioannis; Lakis, Sotiris; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Pentheroudakis, George; Gogas, Helen; Papakostas, Pavlos; Christodoulou, Christos; Bafaloukos, Dimitrios; Razis, Evangelia; Karavasilis, Vasilios; Bamias, Christina; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Fountzilas, George

    2017-01-01

    The preservation of pathogenic BRCA1/2 germline mutations in tumor tissues is usually not questioned, while it remains unknown whether these interact with somatic genotypes for patient outcome. Herein we compared germline and tumor genotypes in operable triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and evaluated their combined effects on prognosis. We analyzed baseline germline and primary tumor genotype data obtained by Sanger and Next Generation Sequencing in 194 TNBC patients. We also performed multiple tests interrogating the preservation of germline mutations in matched tumors and breast tissue from carriers with available material. Patients had been treated within clinical trials with adjuvant anthracyclines-taxanes based chemotherapy. We identified 50 (26%) germline mutation carriers (78% in BRCA1) and 136 (71%) tumors with somatic mutations (83% in TP53). Tumor mutation patterns differed between carriers and non-carriers (P<0.001); PIK3CA mutations were exclusively present in non-carriers (P=0.007). Germline BRCA1/2 mutations were not detected in matched tumors and breast tissues from 14 out of 33 (42%) evaluable carriers. Microsatellite markers revealed tumor loss of the germline mutant allele in one case only. Tumors that had lost the germline mutation demonstrated a higher incidence of somatic TP53 mutations as compared to tumors with preserved germline mutations (P=0.036). Germline mutation status significantly interacted with tumor TP53 mutations for patient disease-free survival (interaction P=0.026): In non-carriers, tumor TP53 mutations did not affect outcome; In carriers, those with mutated TP53 tumors experienced more relapses compared to those with wild-type TP53 tumors (36% vs. 9% relapse rate, respectively). In conclusion, we show that loss of germline BRCA1/2 mutations is not a rare event in TNBC. This finding, the observed differences in tumor genotypes with respect to germline status and the prognostic interaction between germline BRCA1-related and

  19. Germline Mutations in Predisposition Genes in Pediatric Cancer

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    Edmonson, Michael N.; Gruber, Tanja A.; Easton, John; Hedges, Dale; Ma, Xiaotu; Zhou, Xin; Yergeau, Donald A.; Wilkinson, Mark R.; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Chen, Xiang; McGee, Rose B.; Hines-Dowell, Stacy; Nuccio, Regina; Quinn, Emily; Shurtleff, Sheila A.; Rusch, Michael; Patel, Aman; Becksfort, Jared B.; Wang, Shuoguo; Weaver, Meaghann S.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Gajjar, Amar; Ellison, David W.; Pappo, Alberto S.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Downing, James R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prevalence and spectrum of predisposing mutations among children and adolescents with cancer are largely unknown. Knowledge of such mutations may improve the understanding of tumorigenesis, direct patient care, and enable genetic counseling of patients and families. METHODS In 1120 patients younger than 20 years of age, we sequenced the whole genomes (in 595 patients), whole exomes (in 456), or both (in 69). We analyzed the DNA sequences of 565 genes, including 60 that have been associated with autosomal dominant cancer-predisposition syndromes, for the presence of germline mutations. The pathogenicity of the mutations was determined by a panel of medical experts with the use of cancer-specific and locus-specific genetic databases, the medical literature, computational predictions, and second hits identified in the tumor genome. The same approach was used to analyze data from 966 persons who did not have known cancer in the 1000 Genomes Project, and a similar approach was used to analyze data from an autism study (from 515 persons with autism and 208 persons without autism). RESULTS Mutations that were deemed to be pathogenic or probably pathogenic were identified in 95 patients with cancer (8.5%), as compared with 1.1% of the persons in the 1000 Genomes Project and 0.6% of the participants in the autism study. The most commonly mutated genes in the affected patients were TP53 (in 50 patients), APC (in 6), BRCA2 (in 6), NF1 (in 4), PMS2 (in 4), RB1 (in 3), and RUNX1 (in 3). A total of 18 additional patients had protein-truncating mutations in tumor-suppressor genes. Of the 58 patients with a predisposing mutation and available information on family history, 23 (40%) had a family history of cancer. CONCLUSIONS Germline mutations in cancer-predisposing genes were identified in 8.5% of the children and adolescents with cancer. Family history did not predict the presence of an underlying predisposition syndrome in most patients. (Funded by the American

  20. Age-dependent germline mosaicism of the most common noonan syndrome mutation shows the signature of germline selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Song-Ro; Choi, Soo-Kung; Eboreime, Jordan; Gelb, Bruce D; Calabrese, Peter; Arnheim, Norman

    2013-06-06

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is among the most common Mendelian genetic diseases (∼1/2,000 live births). Most cases (50%-84%) are sporadic, and new mutations are virtually always paternally derived. More than 47 different sites of NS de novo missense mutations are known in the PTPN11 gene that codes for the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. Surprisingly, many of these mutations are recurrent with nucleotide substitution rates substantially greater than the genome average; the most common mutation, c.922A>G, is at least 2,400 times greater. We examined the spatial distribution of the c.922A>G mutation in testes from 15 unaffected men and found that the mutations were not uniformly distributed across each testis as would be expected for a mutation hot spot but were highly clustered and showed an age-dependent germline mosaicism. Computational modeling that used different stem cell division schemes confirmed that the data were inconsistent with hypermutation, but consistent with germline selection: mutated spermatogonial stem cells gained an advantage that allowed them to increase in frequency. SHP-2 interacts with the transcriptional activator STAT3. Given STAT3's function in mouse spermatogonial stem cells, we suggest that this interaction might explain the mutant's selective advantage by means of repression of stem cell differentiation signals. Repression of STAT3 activity by cyclin D1 might also play a previously unrecognized role in providing a germline-selective advantage to spermatogonia for the recurrent mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinases that cause Apert syndrome and MEN2B. Looking at recurrent mutations driven by germline selection in different gene families can help highlight common causal signaling pathways.

  1. Identification of Germline Genetic Mutations in Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo-Mullen, Erin E.; O’Reilly, Eileen; Kelsen, David; Ashraf, Asad M.; Lowery, Maeve; Yu, Kenneth; Reidy, Diane; Epstein, Andrew S.; Lincoln, Anne; Saldia, Amethyst; Jacobs, Lauren M.; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Zhang, Liying; Kurtz, Robert; Saltz, Leonard; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Stadler, Zsofia K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is part of several cancer predisposition syndromes; however, indications for genetic counseling/testing are not well-defined. We sought to determine mutation prevalence and characteristics that predict for inherited predisposition to PAC. Methods We identified 175 consecutive PAC patients who underwent clinical genetics assessment at Memorial Sloan Kettering between 2011–2014. Clinical data, family history, and germline results were evaluated. Results Among 159 PAC patients who pursued genetic testing, 24 pathogenic mutations were identified (15.1%; 95%CI, 9.5%–20.7%), including BRCA2(n=13), BRCA1(n=4), p16(n=2), PALB2(n=1), and Lynch syndrome(n=4). BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence was 13.7% in Ashkenazi Jewish(AJ) (n=95) and 7.1% in non-AJ(n=56) patients. In AJ patients with strong, weak, or absent family history of BRCA-associated cancers, mutation prevalence was 16.7%, 15.8%, and 7.4%, respectively. Mean age at diagnosis in all mutation carriers was 58.5y(range 45–75y) compared to 64y(range 27–87y) in non-mutation carriers(P=0.02). Although BRCA2 was the most common mutation identified, no patients with early-onset PAC(≤50y) harbored a BRCA2 mutation and the mean age at diagnosis in BRCA2 carriers was equivalent to non-mutation carriers(P=0.34). Mutation prevalence in early-onset patients(n=21) was 28.6%, including BRCA1(n=2), p16(n=2), MSH2(n=1) and MLH1(n=1). Conclusion Mutations in BRCA2 account for over 50% of PAC patients with an identified susceptibility syndrome. AJ patients had high BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence regardless of personal/family history, suggesting that ancestry alone indicates a need for genetic evaluation. With the exception of BRCA2-associated PAC, inherited predisposition to PAC is associated with earlier age at PAC diagnosis suggesting that this subset of patients may also represent a population warranting further evaluation. PMID:26440929

  2. Breast cancer risk and clinical implications for germline PTEN mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeow, Joanne; Sesock, Kaitlin; Eng, Charis

    2017-08-01

    PTEN Hamartoma Tumor syndrome (PHTS) encompasses a clinical spectrum of heritable disorders including Cowden syndrome (CS), Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, and Proteus and Proteus-like syndrome that are associated with germline mutations in the PTEN tumor suppressor gene. Breast cancer risk estimates (67-85 %) for women with germline PTEN mutations are similar to those quoted for patients with germline mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes. With PTEN on several germline gene testing panels, finding PTEN mutations and variants have increased exponentially. PHTS can be differentiated from other hereditary cancer syndromes including Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, and hamartomatous polyposis syndromes based on personal as well as family history. However, many of the benign features of CS are common in the general population, making the diagnosis of CS challenging. Breast cancer patients with an identified germline PTEN mutation are at increased risk of endometrial, thyroid, renal, and colorectal cancers as well as a second breast cancer. Increased screening for the various component cancers as well as predictive testing in first-degree relatives is recommended. Prophylactic mastectomy may be considered especially if breast tissue is dense or if repeated breast biopsies have been necessary. Management of women with breast cancer suspected of CS who test negative for germline PTEN mutations should be managed as per a mutation carrier if she meets CS diagnostic criteria, and should be offered enrollment in research to identify other predisposition genes.

  3. A germline RET proto-oncogene mutation in multiple members of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Makia Marafie

    2016-09-17

    Sep 17, 2016 ... multiple members of an Arab family with variable onset of MEN type ... fashion and caused by germline mutation in RET proto- oncogene. The main .... ing sudden severe high blood pressure crises that required immediate ...

  4. Activating germline mutations in STAT3 cause early-onset multi-organ autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sarah E; Haapaniemi, Emma; Russell, Mark A; Caswell, Richard; Lango Allen, Hana; De Franco, Elisa; McDonald, Timothy J; Rajala, Hanna; Ramelius, Anita; Barton, John; Heiskanen, Kaarina; Heiskanen-Kosma, Tarja; Kajosaari, Merja; Murphy, Nuala P; Milenkovic, Tatjana; Seppänen, Mikko; Lernmark, Åke; Mustjoki, Satu; Otonkoski, Timo; Kere, Juha; Morgan, Noel G; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2014-08-01

    Monogenic causes of autoimmunity provide key insights into the complex regulation of the immune system. We report a new monogenic cause of autoimmunity resulting from de novo germline activating STAT3 mutations in five individuals with a spectrum of early-onset autoimmune disease, including type 1 diabetes. These findings emphasize the critical role of STAT3 in autoimmune disease and contrast with the germline inactivating STAT3 mutations that result in hyper IgE syndrome.

  5. Germline mutation analysis of MLH1 and MSH2 in Malaysian Lynch syndrome patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohd Nizam Zahary; Gurjeet Kaur; Muhammad Radzi Abu Hassan; Harjinder Singh; Venkatesh R Naik; Ravindran Ankathil

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the protein expression profile of mismatch repair (MMR) genes in suspected cases of Lynch syndrome and to characterize the associated germline mutations.METHODS:Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor samples was performed to determine the protein expression profile of MMR protein.Germline mutation screening was carried out on peripheral blood samples.The entire exon regions of MLH1 and MSH2 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction,screened by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) and analyzed by DNA sequencing to characterize the germline mutations.RESULTS:Three out of 34 tissue samples (8.8%) and four out of 34 tissue samples (11.8%) showed loss of nuclear staining by immunohistochemistry,indicating the absence of MLH1 and MSH2 protein expression in carcinoma cells,respectively.dHPLC analysis followed by DNA sequencing showed these samples to have germline mutations of MSH2 gene.However,no deleterious mutations were identified in any of the 19 exons or coding regions of MLH1 gene,but we were able to identify MLH1 promoter polymorphism,-93G >A (rs1800734),in 21 out of 34 patients (61.8%).We identified one novel mutation,transversion mutation c.2005G > C,which resulted in a missense mutation (Gly669Arg),a transversion mutation in exon 1,c.142G > T,which resulted in a nonsense mutation (Glu48Stop)and splice-site mutation,c.2006-6T > C,which was adjacent to exon 13 of MSH2 gene.CONCLUSION:Germline mutations were identified in four Malaysian Lynch syndrome patients.Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue proved to be a good pre-screening test before proceeding to germline mutation analysis of DNA MMR genes.

  6. Distinct expression profile in fumarate-hydratase-deficient uterine fibroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanharanta, S; Pollard, PJ; Lehtonen, HJ

    2006-01-01

    Defects in mitochondrial enzymes predispose to severe developmental defects as well as tumorigenesis. Heterozygous germline mutations in the nuclear gene encoding fumarate hydratase (FH), an enzyme catalyzing the hydration of fumarate in the Krebs tricarboxylic acid cycle, cause hereditary...... leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer; yet the connection between disruption of mitochondrial metabolic pathways and neoplasia remains to be discovered. We have used an expression microarray approach for studying differences in global gene expression pattern caused by mutations in FH. Seven uterine fibroids...... carrying FH mutations were compared with 15 fibroids with wild-type FH. The two groups showed markedly different expression profiles, and multiple differentially expressed genes were detected. The most significant increase in FH mutants was seen in the expression of carbohydrate metabolism- and glycolysis...

  7. Low prevalence of germline hMSH6 mutations in colorectal cancer families from Spain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana Sánchez de Abajo; Trinidad Caldes; Miguel de la Hoya; Alicia Tosar; Javier Godino; Juan Manuel Fernández; Jose Lopez Asenjo; Beatriz Perez Villamil; Pedro Perez Segura; Eduardo Diaz-Rubio

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence and penetrance of hMSH6 mutations in Spanish HNPCC families that was negative for mutation in hMLH1 or hMSH2.METHODS: We used PCR-based DGGE assay and direct Sequencing to screen for hMSH6 gene in 91 HNPCC families.RESULTS: we have identified 10 families with germ-line mutations in the DNA sequence. These mutations included two intronic variation, three missense mutation, one nonsense mutation, and four silent mutations. Among the 10 germ-line mutations identified in the Spanish cohort,8 were novel, perhaps, suggesting different mutational spectra in the Spanish population. Detailed pedigrees were constructed for the three families with a possible pathogenic hMSH6 mutation. The two silent mutations H388H and L758L, detected in a person affected of colorectal cancer at age 29, produce loss of the wild-type allele in the tumor sample. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that expression of MSH6 protein was lost only in the tumors from the carriers of V878A and Q263X mutations.CONCLUSION: Altogether, our results indicate that disease-causing germ-line mutations of hMSH6 are very less frequent in Spanish HNPCC families.

  8. Toward an improved definition of the genetic and tumor spectrum associated with SDH germ-line mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evenepoel, Lucie; Papathomas, Thomas G.; Krol, Niels; Korpershoek, Esther; De Krijger, Ronald R.; Persu, Alexandre; Dinjens, Winand N M

    2015-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid, or Krebs, cycle is central to the cellular metabolism of sugars, lipids, and amino acids; it fuels the mitochondrial respiratory chain for energy generation. In the past decade, mutations in the Krebs-cycle enzymes succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase, and isocitrate

  9. Germline mutation rates in mice following in utero exposure to diesel exhaust particles by maternal inhalation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritz, Caitlin; Ruminski, Wojciech; Hougaard, Karin S.

    2011-01-01

    (PAPs) from industrial environments cause DNA damage and mutations in the sperm of adult male mice. Effects on the female and male germline during critical stages of development (in utero) are unknown. In mice, previous studies have shown that expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci exhibit high rates...... and mated with control CBA mice. The F2 descendents were collected and ESTR germline mutation rates were derived from full pedigrees (mother, father, offspring) of F1 male and female mice. We found no evidence for increased ESTR mutation rates in females exposed in utero to DEP relative to control females...

  10. TP53 germline mutations in Portugal and genetic modifiers of age at cancer onset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinto, Carla; Veiga, Isabel; Pinheiro, Manuela; Peixoto, Ana; Pinto, Armando; Lopes, Jose M.; Reis, Rui M.; Oliveira, Carla; Baptista, Manuela; Roque, Lucia; Regateiro, Fernando; Cirnes, Luis; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Seruca, Raquel; Castedo, Sergio; Teixeira, Manuel R.

    2009-01-01

    The Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare, autosomal dominant disease caused by TP53 germline mutations. This study aimed to characterize the TP53 mutational spectrum in patients suspected to have LFS in Portugal and to evaluate the influence of the MDM2-SNP309 and TP53-72Arg variants and of telomere

  11. NF1 germline mutation differentially dictates optic glioma formation and growth in neurofibromatosis-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, Joseph A; Anastasaki, Corina; Smithson, Laura J; Gianino, Scott M; Li, Kairong; Kesterson, Robert A; Gutmann, David H

    2016-05-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common neurogenetic condition characterized by significant clinical heterogeneity. A major barrier to developing precision medicine approaches for NF1 is an incomplete understanding of the factors that underlie its inherent variability. To determine the impact of the germline NF1 gene mutation on the optic gliomas frequently encountered in children with NF1, we developed genetically engineered mice harboring two representative NF1-patient-derived Nf1 gene mutations (c.2542G>C;p.G848R and c.2041C>T;p.R681X). We found that each germline Nf1 gene mutation resulted in different levels of neurofibromin expression. Importantly, only R681X(CKO) but not G848R(CKO), mice develop optic gliomas with increased optic nerve volumes, glial fibrillary acid protein immunoreactivity, proliferation and retinal ganglion cell death, similar to Nf1 conditional knockout mice harboring a neomycin insertion (neo) as the germline Nf1 gene mutation. These differences in optic glioma phenotypes reflect both cell-autonomous and stromal effects of the germline Nf1 gene mutation. In this regard, primary astrocytes harboring the R681X germline Nf1 gene mutation exhibit increased basal astrocyte proliferation (BrdU incorporation) indistinguishable from neo(CKO) astrocytes, whereas astrocytes with the G848R mutation have lower levels of proliferation. Evidence for paracrine effects from the tumor microenvironment were revealed when R681X(CKO) mice were compared with conventional neo(CKO) mice. Relative to neo(CKO) mice, the optic gliomas from R681X(CKO) mice had more microglia infiltration and JNK(Thr183/Tyr185) activation, microglia-produced Ccl5, and glial AKT(Thr308) activation. Collectively, these studies establish that the germline Nf1 gene mutation is a major determinant of optic glioma development and growth through by both tumor cell-intrinsic and stromal effects.

  12. First report of a de novo germline mutation in the MLH1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rein P Stulp; Yvonne J Vos; Bart Mol; Arend Karrenbeld; Monique de Raad; Huub JC van der Mijle; Rolf H Sijmons

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC)is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with colorectal and endometrial cancer and a range of other tumor types. Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes, particularly MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6, underlie this disorder. The vast majority of these HNPCC-associated mutations have been proven,or assumed, given the family history of cancer, to be transmitted through several generations. To the best of our knowledge, only a single case of a de novo germline MMR gene mutation (in MSH2) has been reported till now. Here, we report a patient with a de novo mutation in MLH1. We identified a MLH1 Q701X truncating mutation in the blood lymphocytes of a male who had been diagnosed with rectal cancer at the age of 35. His family history of cancer was negative for the first- and second-degree relatives. The mutation could not be detected in the patient's parents and sibling and paternity was confirmed with a set of highly polymorphic markers. Non-penetrance and small family size is the common explanation of verified negative family histories of cancer in patients with a germline MMR gene mutation. However, in addition to some cases explained by non-paternity, de novo germline mutations should be considered as a possible explanation as well. As guidelines that stress not to restrict MMR gene mutation testing to patients with a positive family history are more widely introduced, more cases of de novo MMR gene germline mutations may be revealed.

  13. POLD1 Germline Mutations in Patients Initially Diagnosed with Werner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessel, Davor; Hisama, Fuki M; Szakszon, Katalin; Saha, Bidisha; Sanjuanelo, Alexander Barrios; Salbert, Bonnie A; Steele, Pamela D; Baldwin, Jennifer; Brown, W Ted; Piussan, Charles; Plauchu, Henri; Szilvássy, Judit; Horkay, Edit; Högel, Josef; Martin, George M; Herr, Alan J; Oshima, Junko; Kubisch, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are rare, heterogeneous disorders characterized by signs of premature aging affecting more than one tissue or organ. A prototypic example is the Werner syndrome (WS), caused by biallelic germline mutations in the Werner helicase gene (WRN). While heterozygous lamin A/C (LMNA) mutations are found in a few nonclassical cases of WS, another 10%-15% of patients initially diagnosed with WS do not have mutations in WRN or LMNA. Germline POLD1 mutations were recently reported in five patients with another segmental progeroid disorder: mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features syndrome. Here, we describe eight additional patients with heterozygous POLD1 mutations, thereby substantially expanding the characterization of this new example of segmental progeroid disorders. First, we identified POLD1 mutations in patients initially diagnosed with WS. Second, we describe POLD1 mutation carriers without clinically relevant hearing impairment or mandibular underdevelopment, both previously thought to represent obligate diagnostic features. These patients also exhibit a lower incidence of metabolic abnormalities and joint contractures. Third, we document postnatal short stature and premature greying/loss of hair in POLD1 mutation carriers. We conclude that POLD1 germline mutations can result in a variably expressed and probably underdiagnosed segmental progeroid syndrome.

  14. Analysis of haploinsufficiency in women carrying germline mutations in the BRCA1 gene: Different mutations, different phenotypes ?

    OpenAIRE

    Vaclová, Tereza

    2015-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Bioquímica. Fecha de lectura: 30-01-2015 BRCA1 germline mutations are associated with significantly increased lifetime risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers. However, taking into account considerable differences in disease manifestation among mutation carriers, it is probable that various BRCA1 mutations lead to formation of distinct phenotypes and haploinsufficiency ef...

  15. Germ-line origins of mutation in families with hemophilia B: The sex ratio varies with the type of mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.; Bottema, C.D.K.; Schaid, D.J.; Sommer, S.S. (Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)); Cohen, M.P. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)); Sexauer, C.L. (Children' s Hospital, Oklahoma City, OK (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Previous epidemiological and biochemical studies have generated conflicting estimates of the sex ratio of mutation. Direct genomic sequencing in combination with haplotype analysis extends previous analyses by allowing the precise mutation to be determined in a given family. From analysis of the factor IX gene of 260 consecutive families with hemophilia B, the authors report the germ-line origin of mutation in 25 families. When combined with 14 origins of mutation reported by others and with 4 origins previously reported by them, a total of 25 occur in the female germ line, and 18 occur in the male germ line. The excess of germ-line origins in females does not imply an overall excess mutation rate per base pair in the female germ line. Bayesian analysis of the data indicates that the sex ratio varies with the type of mutation. The aggregate of single-base substitutions shows a male predominance of germ-line mutations (P < .002). The maximum-likelihood estimate of the male predominance is 3.5-fold. Of the single-base substitutions, deletions display a sex ratio of unity. Analysis of the parental age at transmission of a new mutation suggests that germ-line mutations are associated with a small increase in parental age in females but little, if any, increase in males. Although direct genomic sequencing offers a general method for defining the origin of mutation in specific families, accurate estimates of the sex ratios of different mutational classes require large sample sizes and careful correction for multiple biases of ascertainment. The biases in the present data result in an underestimate of the enhancement of mutation in males. 62 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  16. Germline HABP2 Mutation Causing Familial Nonmedullary Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Jia, Li; Merino, Maria J.; Agarwal, Sunita K.; Zhang, Lisa; Cam, Maggie; Patel, Dhaval; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    Familial nonmedullary thyroid cancer accounts for 3 to 9% of all cases of thyroid cancer, but the susceptibility genes are not known. Here, we report a germline variant of HABP2 in seven affected members of a kindred with familial nonmedullary thyroid cancer and in 4.7% of 423 patients with thyroid cancer. This variant was associated with increased HABP2 protein expression in tumor samples from affected family members, as compared with normal adjacent thyroid tissue and samples from sporadic ...

  17. Familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors associated with dysphagia and novel type germline mutation of KIT gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Seiichi; Nishida, Toshirou; Isozaki, Koji; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Ohashi, Akiko; Takabayashi, Arimichi; Obayashi, Tadashi; Okuno, Tomoko; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Chen, Hui; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Kitamura, Yukihiko

    2002-05-01

    A family with multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), a new type of germline mutation of KIT gene, and dysphagia is reported. The mutation was observed at Asp-820 in tyrosine kinase (TK) II domain. Mutations in TK II domain have been found in mast cell and germ cell tumors but not in GISTs, and the present family members are the first reported cases of GISTs with TK II domain mutations, including sporadic GISTs. Because interleukin 3-dependent Ba/F3 murine lymphoid cells transfected with the mutant KIT complementary DNA grew autonomously without any growth factors and formed tumors in nude mice, the mutation was considered to be gain-of-function type. Family members with the germline KIT mutation reported dysphagia, but those without the mutation did not. The mechanism of dysphagia was examined with gastrointestinal fiberscopy, endoscopic ultrasonography, and esophageal manometry. No mechanical obstruction was found, and the esophagus was not remarkably dilated. In the family members with dysphagia, endoscopic ultrasonography at the esophagocardiac junction showed a thickened hyperechoic layer between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers, suggesting hyperplasia of interstitial cells of Cajal at the myenteric plexus layer. Manometry showed low resting lower esophageal sphincter pressure and abnormal simultaneous contractions of the esophagus without normal peristalsis. These findings indicate that the dysphagia of the present family is different from typical achalasia. This is the first report of familial dysphagia caused by germline gain-of-function mutation of the KIT gene at the TK II domain.

  18. Accumulation of Krebs cycle intermediates and over-expression of HIF1alpha in tumours which result from germline FH and SDH mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, P J; Brière, J J; Alam, N A; Barwell, J; Barclay, E; Wortham, N C; Hunt, T; Mitchell, M; Olpin, S; Moat, S J; Hargreaves, I P; Heales, S J; Chung, Y L; Griffiths, J R; Dalgleish, A; McGrath, J A; Gleeson, M J; Hodgson, S V; Poulsom, R; Rustin, P; Tomlinson, I P M

    2005-08-01

    The nuclear-encoded Krebs cycle enzymes, fumarate hydratase (FH) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB, -C and -D), act as tumour suppressors. Germline mutations in FH predispose individuals to leiomyomas and renal cell cancer (HLRCC), whereas mutations in SDH cause paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas (HPGL). In this study, we have shown that FH-deficient cells and tumours accumulate fumarate and, to a lesser extent, succinate. SDH-deficient tumours principally accumulate succinate. In situ analyses showed that these tumours also have over-expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF1alpha), activation of HIF1alphatargets (such as vascular endothelial growth factor) and high microvessel density. We found no evidence of increased reactive oxygen species in our cells. Our data provide in vivo evidence to support the hypothesis that increased succinate and/or fumarate causes stabilization of HIF1alpha a plausible mechanism, inhibition of HIF prolyl hydroxylases, has previously been suggested by in vitro studies. The basic mechanism of tumorigenesis in HPGL and HLRCC is likely to be pseudo-hypoxic drive, just as it is in von Hippel-Lindau syndrome.

  19. Identification of 3 novel VHL germ-line mutations in Danish VHL patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandanell Mette

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease is a hereditary cancer syndrome in which the patients develop retinal and central nervous system hemangioblastomas, pheochromocytomas and clear-cell renal tumors. The autosomal dominant disease is caused by mutations in the VHL gene. Methods VHL mutational analysis was carried out by sequencing of the coding sequence and by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis. The functional consequence of the variants was investigated using in silico prediction tools. Results A total of 289 probands suspected of having VHL syndrome have been screened for mutations in the VHL gene. Twenty-six different VHL mutations were identified in 36 families including one in-frame duplication, two frame-shift mutations, four nonsense mutations, twelve missense mutations, three intronic mutations and four large genomic rearrangements. Three of these mutations (c.319 C > T, c.342_343dupGGT and c.520_521dupAA were novel. Conclusions In this study we report the VHL germ-line mutations found in Danish families. We found three novel VHL mutations where two were classified as pathogenic and the latter was classified as a variant of unknown significance. Together, our findings contribute to the interpretation of the potential pathogenicity of VHL germ-line mutations.

  20. BRCA somatic and germline mutation detection in paraffin embedded ovarian cancers by next-generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafficini, Andrea; Simbolo, Michele; Parisi, Alice; Rusev, Borislav; Luchini, Claudio; Cataldo, Ivana; Piazzola, Elena; Sperandio, Nicola; Turri, Giona; Franchi, Massimo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bovo, Chiara; Lawlor, Rita T.; Scarpa, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    BRCA mutated ovarian cancers respond better to platinum-based therapy and to the recently approved PARP-inhibitors. There is the need for efficient and timely methods to detect both somatic and germline mutations using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and commercially available technology. We used a commercial kit exploring all exons and 50bp exon-intron junctions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, and semiconductor next-generation sequencing (NGS) on DNA from 47 FFPE samples of high-grade serous ovarian cancers. Pathogenic mutations were found in 13/47 (28%) cancers: eight in BRCA1 and five in BRCA2. All BRCA1 and two BRCA2 mutations were germline; three BRCA2 mutations were somatic. All mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. To evaluate the performance of the NGS panel, we assessed its capability to detect the 6,953 variants described for BRCA1 and BRCA2 in ClinVar and COSMIC databases using callability analysis. 6,059 (87.1%) variants were identified automatically by the software; 829 (12.0%) required visual verification. The remaining 65 (0.9%) variants were uncallable, and would require 15 Sanger reactions to be resolved. Thus, the sensitivity of the NGS-panel was 99.1%. In conclusion, NGS performed with a commercial kit is highly efficient for detection of germline and somatic mutations in BRCA genes using routine FFPE tissue. PMID:26745875

  1. BRCA somatic and germline mutation detection in paraffin embedded ovarian cancers by next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafficini, Andrea; Simbolo, Michele; Parisi, Alice; Rusev, Borislav; Luchini, Claudio; Cataldo, Ivana; Piazzola, Elena; Sperandio, Nicola; Turri, Giona; Franchi, Massimo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bovo, Chiara; Lawlor, Rita T; Scarpa, Aldo

    2016-01-12

    BRCA mutated ovarian cancers respond better to platinum-based therapy and to the recently approved PARP-inhibitors. There is the need for efficient and timely methods to detect both somatic and germline mutations using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and commercially available technology. We used a commercial kit exploring all exons and 50bp exon-intron junctions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, and semiconductor next-generation sequencing (NGS) on DNA from 47 FFPE samples of high-grade serous ovarian cancers. Pathogenic mutations were found in 13/47 (28%) cancers: eight in BRCA1 and five in BRCA2. All BRCA1 and two BRCA2 mutations were germline; three BRCA2 mutations were somatic. All mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. To evaluate the performance of the NGS panel, we assessed its capability to detect the 6,953 variants described for BRCA1 and BRCA2 in ClinVar and COSMIC databases using callability analysis. 6,059 (87.1%) variants were identified automatically by the software; 829 (12.0%) required visual verification. The remaining 65 (0.9%) variants were uncallable, and would require 15 Sanger reactions to be resolved. Thus, the sensitivity of the NGS-panel was 99.1%. In conclusion, NGS performed with a commercial kit is highly efficient for detection of germline and somatic mutations in BRCA genes using routine FFPE tissue.

  2. Prophylactic Laparoscopic Total Gastrectomy with Jejunal Pouch Reconstruction in Patients Carrying a CDH1 Germline Mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkamp, L.; Sluis, P.C. van der; Ausems, M.G.; Horst, S. van der; Siersema, P.D.; Ruurda, J.P.; Offerhaus, G.J.; Hillegersberg, R. van

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For patients with an identified germline E-cadherin-1 (CDH1) mutation, prophylactic gastrectomy is the treatment of choice to eliminate the high risk of developing diffuse gastric cancer. Laparoscopic total gastrectomy with jejunal pouch reconstruction is a novel approach that may be esp

  3. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: updated clinical guidelines with an emphasis on germline CDH1 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, R.S. van der; Vogelaar, I.P.; Carneiro, F.; Guilford, P.; Huntsman, D.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Caldas, C.; Schreiber, K.E.; Hardwick, R.H.; Ausems, M.G.; Bardram, L.; Benusiglio, P.R.; Bisseling, T.M.; Blair, V.; Bleiker, E.; Boussioutas, A.; Cats, A.; Coit, D.; DeGregorio, L.; Figueiredo, J.; Ford, J.M.; Heijkoop, E.; Hermens, R.; Humar, B.; Kaurah, P.; Keller, G.; Lai, J.; Ligtenberg, M.J.; O'Donovan, M.; Oliveira, C.; Pinheiro, H.; Ragunath, K.; Rasenberg, E.; Richardson, S.; Roviello, F.; Schackert, H.; Seruca, R.; Taylor, A.; Huurne, A. Ter; Tischkowitz, M.; Joe, S.T.; Dijck, B. van; Grieken, N.C. van; Hillegersberg, R. van; Sandick, J.W. van; Vehof, R.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Fitzgerald, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects, inc

  4. Morphological predictors of BRCA1 germline mutations in young women with breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Southey, M. C.; Ramus, S. J.; Dowty, J. G.; Smith, L. D.; Tesoriero, A. A.; Wong, E. E. M.; Dite, G. S.; Jenkins, M. A.; Byrnes, G. B.; Winship, I.; Phillips, K-A; Giles, G. G.; Hopper, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowing a young woman with newly diagnosed breast cancer has a germline BRCA1 mutation informs her clinical management and that of her relatives. We sought an optimal strategy for identifying carriers using family history, breast cancer morphology and hormone receptor status data. METHOD

  5. Elucidating the impact of neurofibromatosis-1 germline mutations on neurofibromin function and dopamine-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasaki, Corina; Woo, Albert S; Messiaen, Ludwine M; Gutmann, David H

    2015-06-15

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common autosomal dominant neurologic condition characterized by significant clinical heterogeneity, ranging from malignant cancers to cognitive deficits. Recent studies have begun to reveal rare genotype-phenotype correlations, suggesting that the specific germline NF1 gene mutation may be one factor underlying disease heterogeneity. The purpose of this study was to define the impact of the germline NF1 gene mutation on brain neurofibromin function relevant to learning. Herein, we employ human NF1-patient primary skin fibroblasts, induced pluripotent stem cells and derivative neural progenitor cells (NPCs) to demonstrate that NF1 germline mutations have dramatic effects on neurofibromin expression. Moreover, while all NF1-patient NPCs exhibit increased RAS activation and reduced cyclic AMP generation, there was a neurofibromin dose-dependent reduction in dopamine (DA) levels. Additionally, we leveraged two complementary Nf1 genetically-engineered mouse strains in which hippocampal-based learning and memory is DA-dependent to establish that neuronal DA levels and signaling as well as mouse spatial learning are controlled in an Nf1 gene dose-dependent manner. Collectively, this is the first demonstration that different germline NF1 gene mutations differentially dictate neurofibromin function in the brain. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. First report of a de novo germline mutation in the MLH1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulp, Rein P; Vos, Yvonne J; Mol, Bart; Karrenbeld, Arend; de Raad, Monique; van der Mijle, Huub J C; Sijmons, Rolf H

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with colorectal and endometrial cancer and a range of other tumor types. Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes, particularly MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6, underlie this disorder. The vast m

  7. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer : updated clinical guidelines with an emphasis on germline CDH1 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Post, Rachel S.; Vogelaar, Ingrid P.; Carneiro, Fatima; Guilford, Parry; Huntsman, David; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Caldas, Carlos; Schreiber, Karen E. Chelcun; Hardwick, Richard H.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Bardram, Linda; Benusiglio, Patrick R.; Bisseling, Tanya M.; Blair, Vanessa; Bleiker, Eveline; Boussioutas, Alex; Cats, Annemieke; Coit, Daniel; DeGregorio, Lynn; Figueiredo, Joana; Ford, James M.; Heijkoop, Esther; Hermens, Rosella; Humar, Bostjan; Kaurah, Pardeep; Keller, Gisella; Lai, Jennifer; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; O'Donovan, Maria; Oliveira, Carla; Pinheiro, Hugo; Ragunath, Krish; Rasenberg, Esther; Richardson, Susan; Roviello, Franco; Schackert, Hans; Seruca, Raquel; Taylor, Amy; ter Huurne, Anouk; Tischkowitz, Marc; Joe, Sheena Tjon A.; van Dijck, Benjamin; van Grieken, Nicole C. T.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; van Sandick, Johanna W.; Vehof, Rianne; van Krieken, J. Han; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects, inc

  8. A recurrent germline PAX5 mutation confers susceptibility to pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, S.; Schrader, K.A.; Waanders, E.; Timms, A.E.; Vijai, J.; Miething, C.; Wechsler, J.; Yang, J.; Hayes, J.; Klein, R.J.; Zhang, Jinghui; Wei, L.; Wu, G.; Rusch, M.; Nagahawatte, P.; Ma, J; Chen, S.C.; Song, G.; Cheng, J.; Meyers, P.; Bhojwani, D.; Jhanwar, S.; Maslak, P.; Fleisher, M.; Littman, J.; Offit, L.; Rau-Murthy, R.; Fleischut, M.H.; Corines, M.; Murali, R.; Gao, X.; Manschreck, C.; Kitzing, T.; Murty, V.V.; Raimondi, S.C.; Kuiper, R.P.; Simons, A.; Schiffman, J.D.; Onel, K.; Plon, S.E.; Wheeler, D.A.; Ritter, D.; Ziegler, D.S.; Tucker, K.; Sutton, R.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Li, J.; Huntsman, D.G.; Hansford, S.; Senz, J.; Walsh, T.; Lee, M. van der; Hahn, C.N.; Roberts, K.G.; King, M.C.; Lo, S.M.; Levine, R.L.; Viale, A.; Socci, N.D.; Nathanson, K.L.; Scott, H.S.; Daly, M.; Lipkin, S.M.; Lowe, S.W.; Downing, J.R.; Altshuler, D.; Sandlund, J.T.; Horwitz, M.S.; Mullighan, C.G.; Offit, K.

    2013-01-01

    Somatic alterations of the lymphoid transcription factor gene PAX5 (also known as BSAP) are a hallmark of B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), but inherited mutations of PAX5 have not previously been described. Here we report a new heterozygous germline variant, c.547G>A (p.Gly1

  9. Germline FAS gene mutation in a case of ALPS and NLP Hodgkin lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anke; Maggio, Ewerton; Diepstra, A; de Jong, Doetje; van Krieken, J; Poppema, S

    2002-01-01

    FAS germline mutations have been associated with the development of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). Occurrence of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) has been reported in 2 families with ALPS. In both families an uncle of the index patient developed HL. A 15-year-old boy with autoommune thrombopen

  10. Germline Stem Cell Competition, Mutation Hot Spots, Genetic Disorders, and Older Fathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnheim, Norman; Calabrese, Peter

    2016-08-31

    Some de novo human mutations arise at frequencies far exceeding the genome average mutation rate. Examples include the common mutations at one or a few sites in the genes that cause achondroplasia, Apert syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B, and Noonan syndrome. These mutations are recurrent, provide a gain of function, are paternally derived, and are more likely to be transmitted as the father ages. Recent experiments have tested whether the high mutation frequencies are due to an elevated mutation rate per cell division, as expected, or to an advantage of the mutant spermatogonial stem cells over wild-type stem cells. The evidence, which includes the surprising discovery of testis mutation clusters, rules out the former model but not the latter. We propose how the mutations might alter spermatogonial stem cell function and discuss how germline selection contributes to the paternal age effect, the human mutational load, and adaptive evolution.

  11. Absence of germline mutations in BAP1 in sporadic cases of malignant mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Sophie; Leon, Justine S; Dick, Ian M; Cadby, Gemma; Olsen, Nola; Brims, Fraser; Allcock, Richard J N; Moses, Eric K; Melton, Phillip E; de Klerk, Nicholas; Musk, A W Bill; Robinson, Bruce W S; Creaney, Jenette

    2015-05-25

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a uniformly fatal tumour caused predominantly by exposure to asbestos. It is not known why some exposed individuals get mesothelioma and others do not. There is some epidemiological evidence of host susceptibility. BAP1 gene somatic mutations and allelic loss are common in mesothelioma and recently a BAP1 cancer syndrome was described in which affected individuals and families had an increased risk of cancer of multiple types, including MM. To determine if BAP1 mutations could underlie any of the sporadic mesothelioma cases in our cohort of patients, we performed targeted deep sequencing of the BAP1 exome on the IonTorrent Proton sequencer in 115 unrelated MM cases. No exonic germline BAP1 mutations of known functional significance were observed, further supporting the notion that sporadic germline BAP1 mutations are not relevant to the genetic susceptibility of MM.

  12. TP53 germline mutation testing in 180 families suspected of Li-Fraumeni syndrome: mutation detection rate and relative frequency of cancers in different familial phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M.W.G.; Verhoef, S.; Rookus, M.A.; Pruntel, R.; van der Hout, A.H.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Aalfs, C.M.; Wagner, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; van Asperen, C.J.; Gómez García, E.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; ten Kate, L.P.; Menko, F.H.; van 't Veer, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. Most families fulfilling the classical diagnostic criteria harbour TP53 germline mutations. However, TP53 germline mutations may also occur in less obvious phenotypes. As a result, different criteria a

  13. Germline HABP2 Mutation Causing Familial Nonmedullary Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Jia, Li; Merino, Maria J; Agarwal, Sunita K; Zhang, Lisa; Cam, Maggie; Patel, Dhaval; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-07-30

    Familial nonmedullary thyroid cancer accounts for 3 to 9% of all cases of thyroid cancer, but the susceptibility genes are not known. Here, we report a germline variant of HABP2 in seven affected members of a kindred with familial nonmedullary thyroid cancer and in 4.7% of 423 patients with thyroid cancer. This variant was associated with increased HABP2 protein expression in tumor samples from affected family members, as compared with normal adjacent thyroid tissue and samples from sporadic cancers. Functional studies showed that HABP2 has a tumor-suppressive effect, whereas the G534E variant results in loss of function.

  14. A population-based analysis of germline BAP1 mutations in melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Shea, Sally J.; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Harrigan, Jeanine; Jacq, Xavier; Hewinson, James; Iyer, Vivek; Merchant, Will; Elliott, Faye; Harland, Mark; Bishop, D. Timothy; Newton-Bishop, Julia A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Germline mutation of the BRCA1 associated protein-1 (BAP1) gene has been linked to uveal melanoma, mesothelioma, meningioma, renal cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma. Germline variants have also been found in familial cutaneous melanoma pedigrees, but their contribution to sporadic melanoma has not been fully assessed. We sequenced BAP1 in 1,977 melanoma cases and 754 controls and used deubiquitinase assays, a pedigree analysis, and a histopathological review to assess the consequences of the mutations found. Sequencing revealed 30 BAP1 variants in total, of which 27 were rare (ExAc allele frequency <0.002). Of the 27 rare variants, 22 were present in cases (18 missense, one splice acceptor, one frameshift and two near splice regions) and five in controls (all missense). A missense change (S98R) in a case that completely abolished BAP1 deubiquitinase activity was identified. Analysis of cancers in the pedigree of the proband carrying the S98R variant and in two other pedigrees carrying clear loss-of-function alleles showed the presence of BAP1-associated cancers such as renal cell carcinoma, mesothelioma and meningioma, but not uveal melanoma. Two of these three probands carrying BAP1 loss-of-function variants also had melanomas with histopathological features suggestive of a germline BAP1 mutation. The remaining cases with germline mutations, which were predominantly missense mutations, were associated with less typical pedigrees and tumours lacking a characteristic BAP1-associated histopathological appearances, but may still represent less penetrant variants. Germline BAP1 alleles defined as loss-of-function or predicted to be deleterious/damaging are rare in cutaneous melanoma. PMID:28062663

  15. Sexual selection, germline mutation rate and sperm competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Møller AP

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important component of sexual selection arises because females obtain viability benefits for their offspring from their mate choice. Females choosing extra-pair fertilization generally favor males with exaggerated secondary sexual characters, and extra-pair paternity increases the variance in male reproductive success. Furthermore, females are assumed to benefit from 'good genes' from extra-pair sires. How additive genetic variance in such viability genes is maintained despite strong directional selection remains an evolutionary enigma. We propose that sexual selection is associated with elevated mutation rates, changing the balance between mutation and selection, thereby increasing variance in fitness and hence the benefits to be obtained from good genes sexual selection. Two hypotheses may account for such elevated mutation: (1 Increased sperm production associated with sperm competition may increase mutation rate. (2 Mutator alleles increase mutation rates that are revealed by the expression of condition-dependent secondary sexual characters used by choosy females during their mate choice. M Petrie has independently developed the idea that mutator alleles may account for the maintenance of genetic variation in viability despite strong directional selection. Results A comparative study of birds revealed a positive correlation between mutation rate at minisatellite loci and extra-pair paternity, but not between mutation rate and relative testes mass which is a measure of relative sperm production. Minisatellite mutation rates were not related to longevity, suggesting a meiotic rather than a mitotic origin of mutations. Conclusion We found evidence of increased mutation rate in species with more intense sexual selection. Increased mutation was not associated with increased sperm production, and we suggest that species with intense sexual selection may maintain elevated mutation rates because sexual selection continuously

  16. Congenital B cell lymphocytosis explained by novel germline CARD11 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Andrew L; Xiao, Wenming; Stinson, Jeffrey R; Lu, Wei; Chaigne-Delalande, Benjamin; Zheng, Lixin; Pittaluga, Stefania; Matthews, Helen F; Schmitz, Roland; Jhavar, Sameer; Kuchen, Stefan; Kardava, Lela; Wang, Wei; Lamborn, Ian T; Jing, Huie; Raffeld, Mark; Moir, Susan; Fleisher, Thomas A; Staudt, Louis M; Su, Helen C; Lenardo, Michael J

    2012-11-19

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) controls genes involved in normal lymphocyte functions, but constitutive NF-κB activation is often associated with B cell malignancy. Using high-throughput whole transcriptome sequencing, we investigated a unique family with hereditary polyclonal B cell lymphocytosis. We found a novel germline heterozygous missense mutation (E127G) in affected patients in the gene encoding CARD11, a scaffolding protein required for antigen receptor (AgR)-induced NF-κB activation in both B and T lymphocytes. We subsequently identified a second germline mutation (G116S) in an unrelated, phenotypically similar patient, confirming mutations in CARD11 drive disease. Like somatic, gain-of-function CARD11 mutations described in B cell lymphoma, these germline CARD11 mutants spontaneously aggregate and drive constitutive NF-κB activation. However, these CARD11 mutants rendered patient T cells less responsive to AgR-induced activation. By reexamining this rare genetic disorder first reported four decades ago, our findings provide new insight into why activating CARD11 mutations may induce B cell expansion and preferentially predispose to B cell malignancy without dramatically perturbing T cell homeostasis.

  17. Germline and somatic mutations in homologous recombination genes predict platinum response and survival in ovarian, fallopian tube, and peritoneal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Kathryn P; Walsh, Tom; Harrell, Maria I; Lee, Ming K; Pennil, Christopher C; Rendi, Mara H; Thornton, Anne; Norquist, Barbara M; Casadei, Silvia; Nord, Alexander S; Agnew, Kathy J; Pritchard, Colin C; Scroggins, Sheena; Garcia, Rochelle L; King, Mary-Claire; Swisher, Elizabeth M

    2014-02-01

    Hallmarks of germline BRCA1/2-associated ovarian carcinomas include chemosensitivity and improved survival. The therapeutic impact of somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and mutations in other homologous recombination DNA repair genes is uncertain. Using targeted capture and massively parallel genomic sequencing, we assessed 390 ovarian carcinomas for germline and somatic loss-of-function mutations in 30 genes, including BRCA1, BRCA2, and 11 other genes in the homologous recombination pathway. Thirty-one percent of ovarian carcinomas had a deleterious germline (24%) and/or somatic (9%) mutation in one or more of the 13 homologous recombination genes: BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, BARD1, BRIP1, CHEK1, CHEK2, FAM175A, MRE11A, NBN, PALB2, RAD51C, and RAD51D. Nonserous ovarian carcinomas had similar rates of homologous recombination mutations to serous carcinomas (28% vs. 31%, P = 0.6), including clear cell, endometrioid, and carcinosarcoma. The presence of germline and somatic homologous recombination mutations was highly predictive of primary platinum sensitivity (P = 0.0002) and improved overall survival (P = 0.0006), with a median overall survival of 66 months in germline homologous recombination mutation carriers, 59 months in cases with a somatic homologous recombination mutation, and 41 months for cases without a homologous recombination mutation. Germline or somatic mutations in homologous recombination genes are present in almost one third of ovarian carcinomas, including both serous and nonserous histologies. Somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and mutations in other homologous recombination genes have a similar positive impact on overall survival and platinum responsiveness as germline BRCA1/2 mutations. The similar rate of homologous recombination mutations in nonserous carcinomas supports their inclusion in PARP inhibitor clinical trials. ©2013 AACR.

  18. Germline mutations of STR-alleles include multi-step mutations as defined by sequencing of repeat and flanking regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauber, Eva-Maria; Kratzer, Adelgunde; Neuhuber, Franz; Parson, Walther; Klintschar, Michael; Bär, Walter; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2012-05-01

    Well defined estimates of mutation rates are a prerequisite for the use of short tandem repeat (STR-) loci in relationship testing. We investigated 65 isolated genetic inconsistencies, which were observed within 50,796 allelic transfers at 23 STR-loci (ACTBP2 (SE33), CD4, CSF1PO, F13A1, F13B, FES, FGA, vWA, TH01, TPOX, D2S1338, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1132, D8S1179, D12S391, D13S317, D16S539, D17S976, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11) in Caucasoid families residing in Austria and Switzerland. Sequencing data of repeat and flanking regions and the median of all theoretically possible mutational steps showed valuable information to characterise the mutational events with regard to parental origin, change of repeat number (mutational step size) and direction of mutation (losses and gains of repeats). Apart from predominant single-step mutations including one case with a double genetic inconsistency, two double-step and two apparent four-step mutations could be identified. More losses than gains of repeats and more mutations originating from the paternal than the maternal lineage were observed (31 losses, 22 gains, 12 losses or gains and 47 paternal, 11 maternal mutations and 7 unclear of parental origin). The mutation in the paternal germline was 3.3 times higher than in the maternal germline. The results of our study show, that apart from the vast majority of single-step mutations rare multi-step mutations can be observed. Therefore, the interpretation of mutational events should not rigidly be restricted to the shortest possible mutational step, because rare but true multi-step mutations can easily be overlooked, if haplotype analysis is not possible.

  19. Fitness loss and germline mutations in barn swallows breeding in Chernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellegren, Hans; Lindgren, Gabriella; Primmer, C.R. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Animal Breeding and Genetics Dept., Uppsala (Sweden); Moeller, A.P. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie. Lab. d`Ecologie, Paris, 75 (France)

    1997-10-09

    The severe nuclear accident at Chernobyl in 1986 resulted in the worst reported accidental exposure of radioactive material to free-living organisms. Short-term effects on human populations inhabiting polluted areas include increased incidence of thyroid cancer, infant leukaemia, and congenital malformations in newborns. Two recent studies have reported, although with some controversy, that germline mutation rates were increased in humans and voles living close to Chernobyl, but little is known about the viability of the organisms affected. Here we report an increased frequency of partial albinism, a morphological aberration associated with a loss of fitness, among barn swallows, Hirundo rustica, breeding close to Chernobyl. Heretability estimates indicate that mutations causing albinism were at least partly of germline origin. Furthermore, evidence for an increased germline mutation rate was obtained from segregation analysis at two hypervariable microsatellite loci, indicating that mutation events in barn swallows from Chernobyl were two- to tenfold higher than in birds from control areas in Ukraine and Italy. (author).

  20. Whole-genome sequencing of spermatocytic tumors provides insights into the mutational processes operating in the male germline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannoulatou, Eleni; Maher, Geoffrey J; Ding, Zhihao

    2017-01-01

    Adult male germline stem cells (spermatogonia) proliferate by mitosis and, after puberty, generate spermatocytes that undertake meiosis to produce haploid spermatozoa. Germ cells are under evolutionary constraint to curtail mutations and maintain genome integrity. Despite constant turnover...

  1. Increased oxidative damage in carriers of the germline TP53 p.R337H mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel S Macedo

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in TP53 are the underlying defect of Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS and Li-Fraumeni-like (LFL Syndrome, autosomal dominant disorders characterized by predisposition to multiple early onset cancers. In Brazil, a variant form of LFS/LFL is commonly detected because of the high prevalence of a founder mutation at codon 337 in TP53 (p.R337H. The p53 protein exerts multiple roles in the regulation of oxidative metabolism and cellular anti-oxidant defense systems. Herein, we analyzed the redox parameters in blood samples from p.R337H mutation carriers (C, n = 17 and non-carriers (NC, n = 17. We identified a significant increase in erythrocyte GPx activity and in plasma carbonyl content,an indicator of protein oxidative damage, in mutation carriers compared to non-carriers (P = 0.048 and P = 0.035, respectively. Mutation carriers also showed a four-fold increase in plasma malondialdehyde levels, indicating increased lipid peroxidation (NC = 40.20±0.71, C = 160.5±0.88, P<0.0001. Finally, carriers showed increased total antioxidant status but a decrease in plasma ascorbic acid content. The observed imbalance could be associated with deregulated cell bioenergetics and/or with increased inflammatory stress, two effects that may result from loss of wild-type p53 function. These findings provide the first evidence that oxidative damage occurs in carriers of a germline TP53 mutation, and these may have important implications regarding our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for germline TP53 p.R337H mutation-associated carcinogenesis.

  2. Report of 16 kindreds and one kindred with hMLH1 germline mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Zhao; Zhen-Jun Wang; Yu-Feng Xu; Yuan-Lian Wan; Peng Li; Yan-Ting Huang

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the diagnosis and treatment of 16 hereditarynonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, and toreport the first kindred with hMLH1 germline mutation inMainland China.METHODS: The diagnosis, treatment and follow-up study of16 HNPCC kindreds were retrospectively reviewed. Dataconceming site of the malignant tumor, age st the diagnosis,history of synchronous and/ or metachronous cancer, andhistopathology of tumors were recorded. All treatments hadwon formal consent. PCR and SSCP were used to screen thecoding region of hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes. Variant bandswere sequenced by a 377 DNA sequencer.RESULTS: Among sixteen kindreds, sixty-eight patients hada mean age of 50.8 years, including twenty-one multiplecancer patients and forty-six colorectal cancer patients(metachronous colorectal cancers in sixteen). A total of onehundred and one malignant neoplasms were found in thesesixty-eight patients, including 50 colonic, 17 rectal, 11gastric, 7 endometrial, and 4 esophageal cancers. 39.5%colorectal patients had metachronous cancers within tenyears who needed reopeertions. A germline G265T nonsensemutation was found in the third exon of hMLH1, resulting in astop codon and truncated protein. Three phenotypically normalfamily members were also found to carry the mutated gene.ONCLUSION: HNPCC is a typical auto-dominant hereditaryisease, the main characteristics include early onset andfrequency of cancers; predominance of colorectal,especially right-sided colon cancers; frequency of multipleprimary cancers (especially colorectal cancers). Segmentalresection for colorectal cancers is not eligible for colorectalcancer patient in HNPCC kindreds. Intensive follow-up isessential for all patients and possible gene carriers. The firstHNPCC kindred with hMUH1 gene germline mutation wasidentified in Mainland China, and three phenotypicallynormal family members were found to be carriers of themutated gene. The G265T germline (nonsense) mutation inthe third exon of hMLH1

  3. Risk of Cancer in Cases of Suspected Lynch Syndrome Without Germline Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Soler, María; Pérez-Carbonell, Lucía; Guarinos, Carla; Zapater, Pedro; Castillejo, Adela; Barberá, Víctor Manuel; Juárez, Miriam; Bessa, Xavier; Xicola, Rosa M; Clofent, Juan; Bujanda, Luis; Balaguer, Francesc; Reñé, Josep-Maria; de Castro, Luisa; Marín-Gabriel, José C.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims: Colorectal cancers (CRCs) with microsatellite instability (MSI) and a mismatch repair (MMR) immunohistochemical deficit without hypermethylation of the MLH1 promoter are likely to be caused by Lynch syndrome. Some patients with these cancers have not been found to have pathogenic germline mutations and are considered to have Lynch-like syndrome (LLS). The aim of this study was to determine the risk of cancer in families of patients with LLS. Methods: We studied a population...

  4. Identification of Two Novel HOXB13 Germline Mutations in Portuguese Prostate Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Sofia; Cardoso, Marta; Pinto, Pedro; Pinheiro, Manuela; Santos, Catarina; Peixoto, Ana; Bento, Maria José; Oliveira, Jorge; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen; Teixeira, Manuel R.

    2015-01-01

    The HOXB13 germline variant G84E (rs138213197) was recently described in men of European descent, with the highest prevalence in Northern Europe. The G84E mutation has not been found in patients of African or Asian ancestry, which may carry other HOXB13 variants, indicating allelic heterogeneity depending on the population. In order to gain insight into the full scope of coding HOXB13 mutations in Portuguese prostate cancer patients, we decided to sequence the entire coding region of the HOXB13 gene in 462 early-onset or familial/hereditary cases. Additionally, we searched for somatic HOXB13 mutations in 178 prostate carcinomas to evaluate their prevalence in prostate carcinogenesis. Three different patients were found to carry in their germline DNA two novel missense variants, which were not identified in 132 control subjects. Both variants are predicted to be deleterious by different in silico tools. No somatic mutations were found. These findings further support the hypothesis that different rare HOXB13 mutations may be found in different ethnic groups. Detection of mutations predisposing to prostate cancer may require re-sequencing rather than genotyping, as appropriate to the population under investigation. PMID:26176944

  5. Germline mutations in BMP9 are not identified in a series of Danish and French patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, P. M.; Dupuis-Girod, S.; Giraud, S

    2016-01-01

    had a different vascular-anomaly syndrome, the suspicion that BMP9 mutations might cause HHT remained. To evaluate if germline mutations in BMP9 can be identified in HHT patients, we investigated the Danish and the French Lyon cohort of mutation-negative and clinically definite HHT patients. Exons...

  6. Familial adenomatous polyposis patients without an identified APC germline mutation have a severe phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, M L; Ripa, R; Knudsen, Anne Louise;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Development of more than 100 colorectal adenomas is diagnostic of the dominantly inherited autosomal disease familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Germline mutations can be identified in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene in approximately 80% of patients. The APC protein...... comprises several regions and domains for interaction with other proteins, and specific clinical manifestations are associated with the mutation assignment to one of these regions or domains. AIMS: The phenotype in patients without an identified causative APC mutation was compared with the phenotype...... in patients with a known APC mutation and with the phenotypes characteristic of patients with mutations in specific APC regions and domains. PATIENTS: Data on 121 FAP probands and 149 call up patients from 70 different families were extracted from the Danish Polyposis register. METHODS: Differences in 16...

  7. Synchronous lung tumours in a patient with metachronous colorectal carcinoma and a germline MSH2 mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Canney, A

    2012-02-01

    Mutations of DNA mismatch repair genes are characterised by microsatellite instability and are implicated in carcinogenesis. This mutation susceptible phenotype has been extensively studied in patients with hereditary non-polyposis colon carcinoma, but little is known of the contribution of such mutations in other tumour types, particularly non-small-cell lung carcinoma. This report describes the occurrence of two synchronous lung tumours, one mimicking a metastatic colon carcinoma, in a male patient with a history of metachronous colonic carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry supported a pulmonary origin for both lesions. Mismatch repair protein immunohistochemistry showed loss of MSH2 and MSH6 expression in both colonic tumours and in one lung tumour showing enteric differentiation. Subsequent mutational analysis demonstrated a deleterious germline mutation of the MSH2 mismatch repair gene. The significance of these findings and the practical diagnostic difficulties encountered in this case are discussed.

  8. Familial adenomatous polyposis patients without an identified APC germline mutation have a severe phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, M L; Ripa, R; Knudsen, Anne Louise

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Development of more than 100 colorectal adenomas is diagnostic of the dominantly inherited autosomal disease familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Germline mutations can be identified in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene in approximately 80% of patients. The APC protein...... in patients with a known APC mutation and with the phenotypes characteristic of patients with mutations in specific APC regions and domains. PATIENTS: Data on 121 FAP probands and 149 call up patients from 70 different families were extracted from the Danish Polyposis register. METHODS: Differences in 16...... clinical manifestations were analysed according to the patient's mutational status. Two sided independent t sample test, two sided chi(2) test, and odds ratios were calculated. RESULTS: Patients without identified APC mutations had a unique and severe phenotype, which was roughly described as: young age...

  9. Disease evolution and outcomes in familial AML with germline CEBPA mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tawana, Kiran; Wang, Jun; Renneville, Aline

    2015-01-01

    therapies were observed, with prolonged median survival after relapse (8 years) and long-term overall survival (10-year overall survival, 67%). Our data reveal that familial CEBPA-mutated AML exhibits a unique model of disease progression, associated with favorable long-term outcomes.......In-depth molecular investigation of familial leukemia has been limited by the rarity of recognized cases. This study examines the genetic events initiating leukemia and details the clinical progression of disease across multiple families harboring germ-line CEBPA mutations. Clinical data were...

  10. Familial adenomatous polyposis patients without an identified APC germline mutation have a severe phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, M L; Ripa, R; Knudsen, Anne Louise;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Development of more than 100 colorectal adenomas is diagnostic of the dominantly inherited autosomal disease familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Germline mutations can be identified in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene in approximately 80% of patients. The APC protein compri...... they do not themselves more often represent an isolated case. CONCLUSIONS: The severe phenotype should be considered when counselling FAP families in which attenuated FAP is excluded and in which a causative APC mutation has not been identified.......BACKGROUND: Development of more than 100 colorectal adenomas is diagnostic of the dominantly inherited autosomal disease familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Germline mutations can be identified in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene in approximately 80% of patients. The APC protein...... in patients with a known APC mutation and with the phenotypes characteristic of patients with mutations in specific APC regions and domains. PATIENTS: Data on 121 FAP probands and 149 call up patients from 70 different families were extracted from the Danish Polyposis register. METHODS: Differences in 16...

  11. Second Malignant Neoplasms in Patients With Cowden Syndrome With Underlying Germline PTEN Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeow, Joanne; Stanuch, Kim; Mester, Jessica L.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Eng, Charis

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Patients with Cowden syndrome (CS) with underlying germline PTEN mutations are at increased risk of breast, thyroid, endometrial, and renal cancers. To our knowledge, risk of subsequent cancers in these patients has not been previously explored or quantified. Patients and Methods We conducted a 7-year multicenter prospective study (2005 to 2012) of patients with CS or CS-like disease, all of whom underwent comprehensive PTEN mutational analysis. Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) were ascertained by medical records and confirmed by pathology reports. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for all SMNs combined and for breast, thyroid, endometrial, and renal cancers were calculated. Results Of the 2,912 adult patients included in our analysis, 2,024 had an invasive cancer history. Germline pathogenic PTEN mutations (PTEN mutation positive) were identified in 114 patients (5.6%). Of these 114 patients, 46 (40%) had an SMN. Median age of SMN diagnosis was 50 years (range, 21 to 71 years). Median interval between primary cancer and SMN was 5 years (range, breast cancer, 11 (22%) had a subsequent new primary breast cancer and 10-year second breast cancer cumulative risk of 29% (95% CI, 15.3 to 43.7). Risk of SMNs compared with that of the general population was significantly elevated for all cancers (SIR, 7.74; 95% CI, 5.84 to 10.07), specifically for breast (SIR, 8.92; 95% CI, 5.85 to 13.07), thyroid (SIR, 5.83; 95% CI, 3.01 to 10.18), and endometrial SMNs (SIR, 14.08.07; 95% CI, 7.10 to 27.21). Conclusion Patients with CS with germline PTEN mutations are at higher risk for SMNs compared with the general population. Prophylactic mastectomy should be considered on an individual basis given the significant risk of subsequent breast cancer. PMID:24778394

  12. Germline mutation screening and predictive testing in families with von Hippel-Lindau disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauch, H.; Glavac, D.; Pausch, F. [Univ. of Munich (Germany)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal inheritable disease that predisposes gene carriers to develop tumors in the eyes, central nervous system, kidney, adrenal gland, pancreas and epididymis. VHL type 1 is without phenochromocytoma (P); VHL type 2 is with P. Screening for germline mutations and preclinical diagnosis in families with VHL disease has become feasible since the VHL gene was isolated. We applied Southern blotting and hybridization with g7cDNA to detect rearrangements, PCR-SSCP and sequencing to detect missense, nonsense and splice mutations, and primer-specified restriction map modification to detect a P-specific missense mutation. In 48 apparently unrelated VHL families mainly from Germany, we identified 20/48 (42%) VHL mutations: 7 (14.5%) rearrangements, 9/48 (19%) missense mutations affecting nt505, 1/48 (2%) splice site mutation, 2/48 (4%) other missense mutations, and 1/48 (2%) nonsense mutation. The predominance of the nt505 mutation in 9 German families with VHL type 2 suggests that this genotype expresses the VHL/P disease pattern. Predictive testing for VHL gene carriers in families with specific mutations identified 7 asymptomatic gene carriers. VHL manifestations have been confirmed by clinical examination in two individuals. Early molecular diagnosis may result in a successful management of VHL disease and prolong survival of VHL patients.

  13. Paternal Age Explains a Major Portion of De Novo Germline Mutation Rate Variability in Healthy Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Cynthia V.; Lemieux Perreault, Louis-Philippe; Legault, Marc-André; Barhdadi, Amina; Ambalavanan, Amirthagowri; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Noreau, Anne; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E.; Dion, Patrick A.; Boivin, Michel; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Rouleau, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    De novo mutations (DNM) are an important source of rare variants and are increasingly being linked to the development of many diseases. Recently, the paternal age effect has been the focus of a number of studies that attempt to explain the observation that increasing paternal age increases the risk for a number of diseases. Using disease-free familial quartets we show that there is a strong positive correlation between paternal age and germline DNM in healthy subjects. We also observed that germline CNVs do not follow the same trend, suggesting a different mechanism. Finally, we observed that DNM were not evenly distributed across the genome, which adds support to the existence of DNM hotspots. PMID:27723766

  14. Pediatric intracranial clear cell meningioma associated with a germline mutation of SMARCE1: a novel case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffalli-Ebezant, Helen; Rutherford, Scott A; Stivaros, Stavros; Kelsey, Anna; Smith, Miriam; Evans, D Gareth; Kilday, John-Paul

    2015-03-01

    Intracranial clear cell meningioma (CCM) represents a rare and potentially more aggressive subgroup of meningioma that is observed more frequently in children and adolescents. Despite its characterization as a histological entity, there is little evidence identifying tumorigenic etiologies. Recently, a novel mutation in SMARCE1, encoding a subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, was identified in a cohort of spinal CCMs. To date, no intracranial CCM has been subjected to analysis. We report the case of an isolated intracranial CCM in a 14-year-old girl. Gross total resection was achieved following a two-stage approach with no evidence of tumor recurrence 8 months following presentation. Exon sequencing identified a germline mutation in SMARCE1, which was also present in tumor DNA. Extensive literature review confirmed our study is the first to seek and report a genetic anomaly for childhood intracranial CCMs outside of the NF2 gene locus, and the first to make an association between a germline SMARCE1 mutation and childhood intracranial CCMs. Together with the previous description of SMARCE1 mutations in spinal CCMs, our report suggests that SMARCE1 aberrations may be implicated in establishing a clear cell histology irrespective of meningioma location. We would advocate that, where feasible, genetic sequencing is performed on future new cases of childhood neuraxial CCMs and includes interrogation of the SMARCE1 gene.

  15. Prevalence of pathological germline mutations of hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Li

    Full Text Available The prevalence of pathological germline mutations in colorectal cancer has been widely studied, as germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes hMLH1 and hMSH2 confer a high risk of colorectal cancer. However, because the sample size and population of previous studies are very different from each other, the conclusions still remain controversial. In this paper, Databases such as PubMed were applied to search for related papers. The data were imported into Comprehensive Meta-Analysis V2, which was used to estimate the weighted prevalence of hMLH1 and hMSH2 pathological mutations and compare the differences of prevalence among different family histories, ethnicities and related factors. This study collected and utilized data from 102 papers. In the Amsterdam-criteria positive group, the prevalence of pathological germline mutations of the hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes was 28.55% (95%CI 26.04%-31.19% and 19.41% (95%CI 15.88%-23.51%, respectively, and the prevalence of germline mutations in hMLH1/hMSH2 was 15.44%/10.02%, 20.43%/13.26% and 15.43%/11.70% in Asian, American multiethnic and European/Australian populations, respectively. Substitution mutations accounted for the largest proportion of germline mutations (hMLH1: 52.34%, hMSH2: 43.25%. The total prevalence of mutations of hMLH1 and hMSH2 in Amsterdam-criteria positive, Amsterdam-criteria negative and sporadic colorectal cancers was around 45%, 25% and 15%, respectively, and there were no obvious differences in the prevalence of germline mutations among different ethnicities.

  16. Prognostic impact of mismatch repair genes germline defects in colorectal cancer patients: are all mutations equal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccaroni, Elena; Bracci, Raffaella; Giampieri, Riccardo; Bianchi, Francesca; Belvederesi, Laura; Brugiati, Cristiana; Pagliaretta, Silvia; Del Prete, Michela; Scartozzi, Mario; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Background Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndrome, caused by germline mutations in MisMatch Repair (MMR) genes, particularly in MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Patients with LS seem to have a more favourable prognosis than those with sporadic CRC, although the prognostic impact of different mutation types is unknown. Aim of our study is to compare survival outcomes of different types of MMR mutations in patients with LS-related CRC. Methods 302 CRC patients were prospectively selected on the basis of Amsterdam or Revised Bethesda criteria to undergo genetic testing: direct sequencing of DNA and MLPA were used to examine the entire MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 coding sequence. Patients were classified as mutation-positive or negative according to the genetic testing result. Results A deleterious MMR mutation was found in 38/302 patients. Median overall survival (OS) was significantly higher in mutation-positive vs mutation-negative patients (102.6 vs 77.7 months, HR:0.63, 95%CI:0.46–0.89, p = 0.0083). Different types of mutation were significantly related with OS: missense or splicing-site mutations were associated with better OS compared with rearrangement, frameshift or non-sense mutations (132.5 vs 82.5 months, HR:0.46, 95%CI:0.16–0.82, p = 0.0153). Conclusions Our study confirms improved OS for LS-patients compared with mutation-negative CRC patients. In addition, not all mutations could be considered equal: the better prognosis in CRC patients with MMR pathogenic missense or splicing site mutation could be due to different functional activity of the encoded MMR protein. This matter should be investigated by use of functional assays in the future. PMID:26485756

  17. Accuracy of Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Testing Criteria and Outcomes in Patients With a Germline Mutation in CDH1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Post, Rachel S.; Vogelaar, Ingrid P.; Manders, Peggy; van der Kolk, Lizet E.; Cats, Annemieke; van Hest, Liselotte P.; Sijmons, Rolf; Aalfs, Cora M.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Wagner, Anja; Hes, Frederik J.; Arts, Neeltje; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; van Krieken, J. Han; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Germline mutations in the cadherin 1, type 1, E-cadherin gene (CDH1) cause a predisposition to gastric cancer. We evaluated the ability of the internationally accepted hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) criteria to identify individuals with pathogenic mutations in CDH1, and

  18. Accuracy of Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Testing Criteria and Outcomes in Patients With a Germline Mutation in CDH1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Post, Rachel S.; Vogelaar, Ingrid P.; Manders, Peggy; Van Der Kolk, Lizet E.; Cats, Annemieke; Van Hest, Liselotte P.; Sijmons, Rolf; Aalfs, Cora M.; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Wagner, Anja; Hes, Frederik J.; Arts, Neeltje; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Van Krieken, J. Han; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Germline mutations in the cadherin 1, type 1, E-cadherin gene (CDH1) cause a predisposition to gastric cancer. We evaluated the ability of the internationally accepted hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) criteria to identify individuals with pathogenic mutations in CDH1, and a

  19. Germline and somatic NF1 mutations in sporadic and NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottillo, Irene; Ahiquist, Terje; Brekke, Helge; Danielsen, Stine A.; van den Berg, Eva; Mertens, Fredrik; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNSTs) are a malignancy occurring with increased frequency in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). In contrast to the well-known spectrum of germline NF1 mutations, the information on somatic mutations in MPNSTs is limited. In this study, we scree

  20. Absence of loss of heterozygosity of BRCA1 in a renal tumor from a BRCA1 germline mutation carrier

    OpenAIRE

    Alanee, Shaheen; Shah, Sohela; Murali, Rajmohan; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Kasmintan A Schrader; Offit, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1 functions as a tumor suppressor gene and germline and somatic mutations in this gene have been shown to be associated with many types of cancer. We report the first tumor study of renal cell carcinoma in a carrier of the deleterious BRCA1 mutation-c.68_69delAG.

  1. Germline ETV6 Mutations Confer Susceptibility to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Thrombocytopenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Topka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations affecting ETV6 often occur in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, the most common childhood malignancy. The genetic factors that predispose to ALL remain poorly understood. Here we identify a novel germline ETV6 p. L349P mutation in a kindred affected by thrombocytopenia and ALL. A second ETV6 p. N385fs mutation was identified in an unrelated kindred characterized by thrombocytopenia, ALL and secondary myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia. Leukemic cells from the proband in the second kindred showed deletion of wild type ETV6 with retention of the ETV6 p. N385fs. Enforced expression of the ETV6 mutants revealed normal transcript and protein levels, but impaired nuclear localization. Accordingly, these mutants exhibited significantly reduced ability to regulate the transcription of ETV6 target genes. Our findings highlight a novel role for ETV6 in leukemia predisposition.

  2. Germline ETV6 Mutations Confer Susceptibility to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topka, Sabine; Vijai, Joseph; Walsh, Michael F; Jacobs, Lauren; Maria, Ann; Villano, Danylo; Gaddam, Pragna; Wu, Gang; McGee, Rose B; Quinn, Emily; Inaba, Hiroto; Hartford, Christine; Pui, Ching-Hon; Pappo, Alberto; Edmonson, Michael; Zhang, Michael Y; Stepensky, Polina; Steinherz, Peter; Schrader, Kasmintan; Lincoln, Anne; Bussel, James; Lipkin, Steve M; Goldgur, Yehuda; Harit, Mira; Stadler, Zsofia K; Mullighan, Charles; Weintraub, Michael; Shimamura, Akiko; Zhang, Jinghui; Downing, James R; Nichols, Kim E; Offit, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    Somatic mutations affecting ETV6 often occur in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood malignancy. The genetic factors that predispose to ALL remain poorly understood. Here we identify a novel germline ETV6 p. L349P mutation in a kindred affected by thrombocytopenia and ALL. A second ETV6 p. N385fs mutation was identified in an unrelated kindred characterized by thrombocytopenia, ALL and secondary myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia. Leukemic cells from the proband in the second kindred showed deletion of wild type ETV6 with retention of the ETV6 p. N385fs. Enforced expression of the ETV6 mutants revealed normal transcript and protein levels, but impaired nuclear localization. Accordingly, these mutants exhibited significantly reduced ability to regulate the transcription of ETV6 target genes. Our findings highlight a novel role for ETV6 in leukemia predisposition.

  3. Germline mutations in DNA repair genes predispose asbestos-exposed patients to malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, Marta; Casalone, Elisabetta; Ferrante, Daniela; Aspesi, Anna; Morleo, Giulia; Biasi, Alessandra; Sculco, Marika; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Guarrera, Simonetta; Righi, Luisella; Grosso, Federica; Libener, Roberta; Pavesi, Mansueto; Mariani, Narciso; Casadio, Caterina; Boldorini, Renzo; Mirabelli, Dario; Pasini, Barbara; Magnani, Corrado; Matullo, Giuseppe; Dianzani, Irma

    2017-10-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare, aggressive cancer caused by asbestos exposure. An inherited predisposition has been suggested to explain multiple cases in the same family and the observation that not all individuals highly exposed to asbestos develop the tumor. Germline mutations in BAP1 are responsible for a rare cancer predisposition syndrome that includes predisposition to mesothelioma. We hypothesized that other genes involved in hereditary cancer syndromes could be responsible for the inherited mesothelioma predisposition. We investigated the prevalence of germline variants in 94 cancer-predisposing genes in 93 MPM patients with a quantified asbestos exposure. Ten pathogenic truncating variants (PTVs) were identified in PALB2, BRCA1, FANCI, ATM, SLX4, BRCA2, FANCC, FANCF, PMS1 and XPC. All these genes are involved in DNA repair pathways, mostly in homologous recombination repair. Patients carrying PTVs represented 9.7% of the panel and showed lower asbestos exposure than did all the other patients (p = 0.0015). This suggests that they did not efficiently repair the DNA damage induced by asbestos and leading to carcinogenesis. This study shows that germline variants in several genes may increase MPM susceptibility in the presence of asbestos exposure and may be important for specific treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Germline mutation in NLRP2 (NALP2 in a familial imprinting disorder (Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Meyer

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS is a fetal overgrowth and human imprinting disorder resulting from the deregulation of a number of genes, including IGF2 and CDKN1C, in the imprinted gene cluster on chromosome 11p15.5. Most cases are sporadic and result from epimutations at either of the two 11p15.5 imprinting centres (IC1 and IC2. However, rare familial cases may be associated with germline 11p15.5 deletions causing abnormal imprinting in cis. We report a family with BWS and an IC2 epimutation in which affected siblings had inherited different parental 11p15.5 alleles excluding an in cis mechanism. Using a positional-candidate gene approach, we found that the mother was homozygous for a frameshift mutation in exon 6 of NLRP2. While germline mutations in NLRP7 have previously been associated with familial hydatidiform mole, this is the first description of NLRP2 mutation in human disease and the first report of a trans mechanism for disordered imprinting in BWS. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that NLRP2 has a previously unrecognised role in establishing or maintaining genomic imprinting in humans.

  5. Genetic and molecular analysis of chlorambucil-induced germ-line mutations in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinchik, E.M.; Bangham, J.W.; Hunsicker, P.R.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Russell, L.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Kwon, B.S. (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis (USA)); Jackson, I.J. (Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (England))

    1990-02-01

    Eighteen variants recovered from specific locus mutation rate experiments involving the mutagen chlorambucil were subjected to several genetic and molecular analyses. Most mutations were found to be homozygous lethal. Because lethality is often presumptive evidence for multilocus-deletion events, 10 mutations were analyzed by Southern blot analysis with probes at, or closely linked to, several of the specific locus test markers, namely, albino (c), brown (b), and dilute (d). All eight mutations (two c; three b; two d; and one dilute-short ear (Df(d se))) that arose in post-spermatogonial germ cells were deleted for DNA sequences. No evidence for deletion of two d-se region probes was obtained for the remaining two d mutations that arose in stem-cell spermatogonia. Six of the primary mutants also produced low litter sizes (semisterility). Karyotypic analysis has, to date, confirmed the presence of reciprocal translocations in four of the six. The high frequency of deletions and translocations among the mutations induced in post-spermatogonial stages by chlorambucil, combined with its overall high efficiency in inducing mutations in these stages, should make chlorambucil mutagenesis useful for generating experimentally valuable germ-line deletions throughout the mouse genome.

  6. Lack of GNAQ and GNA11 germ-line mutations in familial melanoma pedigrees with uveal melanoma or blue nevi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Ezra Hawkes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 10% of melanoma cases are familial, but only 25-40% of familial melanoma cases can be attributed to germ-line mutations in the CDKN2A - the most significant high-risk melanoma susceptibility locus identified to date. The pathogenic mutation(s in most of the remaining familial melanoma pedigrees have not yet been identified. The most common mutations in nevi and sporadic melanoma are found in BRAF and NRAS, both of which result in constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway. However, these mutations are not found in uveal melanomas or the intradermal melanocytic proliferations known as blue nevi. Rather, multiple studies report a strong association between these lesions and somatic mutations in Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(q subunit alpha (GNAQ, Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(q subunit alpha-11 (GNA11 and BRCA1 associated protein-1 (BAP1. Recently, germ-line mutations in BAP1, the gene encoding a tumor suppressing deubiquitinating enzyme, have been associated with predisposition to a variety of cancers including uveal melanoma, but no studies have examined the association of germ-line mutations in GNAQ and GNA11 with uveal melanoma and blue nevi. We have now done so by sequencing exon 5 of both of these genes in 13 unique familial melanoma pedigrees, members of which have had either uveal or cutaneous melanoma and/or blue nevi. Germ-line DNA from a total of 22 individuals was used for sequencing; however no deleterious mutations were detected. Nevertheless, such candidate gene studies and the discovery of novel germ-line mutations associated with an increased MM susceptibility can lead to a better understanding of the pathways involved in melanocyte transformation, formulation of risk assessment, and the development of specific drug therapies.

  7. A novel group of pumilio mutations affects the asymmetric division of germline stem cells in the Drosophila ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H; Spradling, A C

    1997-06-01

    Germline stem cells play a pivotal role in gametogenesis; yet little is known about how they are formed, how they divide to self-renew, and how these processes are genetically controlled. Here we describe the self-renewing asymmetric division of germline stem cells in the Drosophila ovarian germline, as marked by the spectrosome, a cytoplasmic structure rich in membrane skeletal proteins. The ontogeny of the spectrosome marks the lineage of germline stem cells. We identified two new groups of mutations in which the divisional asymmetry is disrupted. The first, which we refer to as ovarette (ovt) mutations, was shown to correspond to a novel class of mutations in the pumilio locus. Since pumilio is known to posttranscriptionally repress the expression of target genes at earlier stages of germ cell development, our results suggest that a similar activity is needed to maintain germ line stem cells. We have also identified a second and novel gene, piwi, whose mutations abolish germline stem cell division.

  8. NanoTIO2 (UV-Titan) does not induce ESTR mutations in the germline of prenatally exposed female mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anne Mette Zenner; Shipley, Thomas; Hougaard, Karin Sørig

    2012-01-01

    Particulate air pollution has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Animal studies have shown that inhalation of air particulates induces mutations in the male germline. Expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci in mice are sensitive markers of mutagenic effects...... on male germ cells resulting from environmental exposures; however, female germ cells have received little attention. Oocytes may be vulnerable during stages of active cell division (e.g., during fetal development). Accordingly, an increase in germline ESTR mutations in female mice prenatally exposed...... exposed by whole-body inhalation to the nanoTiO2 UV-Titan L181 (~42.4 mg UV-Titan/m3) or filtered clean air on gestation days (GD) 8–18. Female C57BL/6 F1 offspring were raised to maturity and mated with unexposed CBA males. The F2 descendents were collected and ESTR germline mutation rates...

  9. Screening for germline mutations in the neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene in NF2 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andermann, A.A.; Ruttledge, M.H.; Rangaratnam, A. [McGill Univ. and Montreal General Hospital Research Institute, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant disease with over 95% penetrance which predisposes gene carriers to develop multiple tumors of the central nervous system. The NF2 gene is a putative tumor suppressor gene which was previously mapped to the long arm of chromosome 22, and has recently been identified, using positional cloning techniques. The gene encodes a protein, schwannomin (SCH), which is highly homologous to the band 4.1 protein family. In an attempt to identify and characterize mutations which lead to the manifestation of the disease, we have used single strand conformation analysis (SSCA) to screen for germline mutations in all 17 exons of the NF2 gene in 59 unrelated NF2 patients, representing both familial and new mutations. A total of 27 migration abnormalities was found in 26 patients. Using direct sequencing analysis, the majority of these variants were found to result in nonsense, splice-site or frameshift mutations. Mutations identified in familial NF2 patients segregate in the family, and may prove to be useful tools for a simple and direct SSCA-based technique of presymptomatic or prenatal diagnosis in relatives of patients with NF2. This may be of particular importance in children of patients who have new mutations in the NF2 gene, where linkage analysis may not be feasible.

  10. Novel germline c-MET mutation in a family with hereditary papillary renal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, Karin; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas V O;

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary papillary renal carcinoma (HPRC) is a highly penetrant hereditary renal cancer syndrome caused by germline missense mutations in the c-MET proto-oncogene. HPRC is clinically characterized by multiple bilateral papillary renal-cell carcinomas. Here we report a family with a novel missense...... mutation in c-MET. The original pathology report of four primary kidney cancers (1988-1997) revealed renal-cell carcinoma. A revised report described multiple adenomas and papillary renal-cell carcinomas with focal clear cells and a mixture of type 1 and type 2 pattern, emphasizing the importance...... of revised pathology examinations in possible hereditary renal-cell carcinomas especially when described before 1997....

  11. Secondary breast cancer in patients presenting with osteosarcoma: possible involvement of germline p53 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, C L; McIntyre, J; Goorin, A M; Link, M P; Gebhardt, M C; Friend, S H

    1994-01-01

    Second malignancies following treatment for osteosarcoma are unusual. Breast cancer occurring in patients with osteosarcoma has been reported following therapeutic chest irradiation. We now report three cases of breast cancer occurring in young women who were successfully treated for osteosarcoma. These women had not received therapeutic chest irradiation and in two of the three women there was no family history of breast cancer. Peripheral blood was available for study from one case. Of import, this case demonstrated a germline mutation in exon 7 of the tumor suppressor gene, p53. The mutation was detected by constant denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and confirmed by DNA sequencing. In this particular patient, inactivation of the p53 gene may be involved in the development of both the first and second malignancy.

  12. Scarce evidence of the causal role of germline mutations in UNC5C in hereditary colorectal cancer and polyposis

    OpenAIRE

    Pilar Mur; Sánchez-Cuartielles Elena; Susanna Aussó; Gemma Aiza; Valdés-Mas Rafael; Marta Pineda; Matilde Navarro; Joan Brunet; Miguel Urioste; Conxi Lázaro; Victor Moreno; Gabriel Capellá; Puente, Xose S; Laura Valle

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations in UNC5C have been suggested to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, thus causing hereditary CRC. However, the evidence gathered thus far is insufficient to include the study of the UNC5C gene in the routine genetic testing of familial CRC. Here we aim at providing a more conclusive answer about the contribution of germline UNC5C mutations to genetically unexplained hereditary CRC and/or polyposis cases. To achieve this goal we sequenced the coding region and exon-intron ...

  13. Estimating Exceptionally Rare Germline and Somatic Mutation Frequencies via Next Generation Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Eboreime

    Full Text Available We used targeted next generation deep-sequencing (Safe Sequencing System to measure ultra-rare de novo mutation frequencies in the human male germline by attaching a unique identifier code to each target DNA molecule. Segments from three different human genes (FGFR3, MECP2 and PTPN11 were studied. Regardless of the gene segment, the particular testis donor or the 73 different testis pieces used, the frequencies for any one of the six different mutation types were consistent. Averaging over the C>T/G>A and G>T/C>A mutation types the background mutation frequency was 2.6x10-5 per base pair, while for the four other mutation types the average background frequency was lower at 1.5x10-6 per base pair. These rates far exceed the well documented human genome average frequency per base pair (~10-8 suggesting a non-biological explanation for our data. By computational modeling and a new experimental procedure to distinguish between pre-mutagenic lesion base mismatches and a fully mutated base pair in the original DNA molecule, we argue that most of the base-dependent variation in background frequency is due to a mixture of deamination and oxidation during the first two PCR cycles. Finally, we looked at a previously studied disease mutation in the PTPN11 gene and could easily distinguish true mutations from the SSS background. We also discuss the limits and possibilities of this and other methods to measure exceptionally rare mutation frequencies, and we present calculations for other scientists seeking to design their own such experiments.

  14. Estimating Exceptionally Rare Germline and Somatic Mutation Frequencies via Next Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eboreime, Jordan; Choi, Soo-Kung; Yoon, Song-Ro; Arnheim, Norman; Calabrese, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We used targeted next generation deep-sequencing (Safe Sequencing System) to measure ultra-rare de novo mutation frequencies in the human male germline by attaching a unique identifier code to each target DNA molecule. Segments from three different human genes (FGFR3, MECP2 and PTPN11) were studied. Regardless of the gene segment, the particular testis donor or the 73 different testis pieces used, the frequencies for any one of the six different mutation types were consistent. Averaging over the C>T/G>A and G>T/C>A mutation types the background mutation frequency was 2.6x10-5 per base pair, while for the four other mutation types the average background frequency was lower at 1.5x10-6 per base pair. These rates far exceed the well documented human genome average frequency per base pair (~10-8) suggesting a non-biological explanation for our data. By computational modeling and a new experimental procedure to distinguish between pre-mutagenic lesion base mismatches and a fully mutated base pair in the original DNA molecule, we argue that most of the base-dependent variation in background frequency is due to a mixture of deamination and oxidation during the first two PCR cycles. Finally, we looked at a previously studied disease mutation in the PTPN11 gene and could easily distinguish true mutations from the SSS background. We also discuss the limits and possibilities of this and other methods to measure exceptionally rare mutation frequencies, and we present calculations for other scientists seeking to design their own such experiments.

  15. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: updated clinical guidelines with an emphasis on germline CDH1 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Post, Rachel S; Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Carneiro, Fátima; Guilford, Parry; Huntsman, David; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Caldas, Carlos; Schreiber, Karen E Chelcun; Hardwick, Richard H; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Bardram, Linda; Benusiglio, Patrick R; Bisseling, Tanya M; Blair, Vanessa; Bleiker, Eveline; Boussioutas, Alex; Cats, Annemieke; Coit, Daniel; DeGregorio, Lynn; Figueiredo, Joana; Ford, James M; Heijkoop, Esther; Hermens, Rosella; Humar, Bostjan; Kaurah, Pardeep; Keller, Gisella; Lai, Jennifer; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; O'Donovan, Maria; Oliveira, Carla; Pinheiro, Hugo; Ragunath, Krish; Rasenberg, Esther; Richardson, Susan; Roviello, Franco; Schackert, Hans; Seruca, Raquel; Taylor, Amy; Ter Huurne, Anouk; Tischkowitz, Marc; Joe, Sheena Tjon A; van Dijck, Benjamin; van Grieken, Nicole C T; van Hillegersberg, Richard; van Sandick, Johanna W; Vehof, Rianne; van Krieken, J Han; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2015-06-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects, including diet post gastrectomy. The updated guidelines include revised CDH1 testing criteria (taking into account first-degree and second-degree relatives): (1) families with two or more patients with gastric cancer at any age, one confirmed DGC; (2) individuals with DGC before the age of 40 and (3) families with diagnoses of both DGC and LBC (one diagnosis before the age of 50). Additionally, CDH1 testing could be considered in patients with bilateral or familial LBC before the age of 50, patients with DGC and cleft lip/palate, and those with precursor lesions for signet ring cell carcinoma. Given the high mortality associated with invasive disease, prophylactic total gastrectomy at a centre of expertise is advised for individuals with pathogenic CDH1 mutations. Breast cancer surveillance with annual breast MRI starting at age 30 for women with a CDH1 mutation is recommended. Standardised endoscopic surveillance in experienced centres is recommended for those opting not to have gastrectomy at the current time, those with CDH1 variants of uncertain significance and those that fulfil hereditary DGC criteria without germline CDH1 mutations. Expert histopathological confirmation of (early) signet ring cell carcinoma is recommended. The impact of gastrectomy and mastectomy should not be underestimated; these can have severe consequences on a psychological, physiological and metabolic level. Nutritional problems should be carefully monitored.

  16. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: updated clinical guidelines with an emphasis on germline CDH1 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Post, Rachel S; Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Carneiro, Fátima; Guilford, Parry; Huntsman, David; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Caldas, Carlos; Schreiber, Karen E Chelcun; Hardwick, Richard H; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Bardram, Linda; Benusiglio, Patrick R; Bisseling, Tanya M; Blair, Vanessa; Bleiker, Eveline; Boussioutas, Alex; Cats, Annemieke; Coit, Daniel; DeGregorio, Lynn; Figueiredo, Joana; Ford, James M; Heijkoop, Esther; Hermens, Rosella; Humar, Bostjan; Kaurah, Pardeep; Keller, Gisella; Lai, Jennifer; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; O'Donovan, Maria; Oliveira, Carla; Ragunath, Krish; Rasenberg, Esther; Richardson, Susan; Roviello, Franco; Schackert, Hans; Seruca, Raquel; Taylor, Amy; ter Huurne, Anouk; Tischkowitz, Marc; Joe, Sheena Tjon A; van Dijck, Benjamin; van Grieken, Nicole C T; van Hillegersberg, Richard; van Sandick, Johanna W; Vehof, Rianne; van Krieken, J Han; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects, including diet post gastrectomy. The updated guidelines include revised CDH1 testing criteria (taking into account first-degree and second-degree relatives): (1) families with two or more patients with gastric cancer at any age, one confirmed DGC; (2) individuals with DGC before the age of 40 and (3) families with diagnoses of both DGC and LBC (one diagnosis before the age of 50). Additionally, CDH1 testing could be considered in patients with bilateral or familial LBC before the age of 50, patients with DGC and cleft lip/palate, and those with precursor lesions for signet ring cell carcinoma. Given the high mortality associated with invasive disease, prophylactic total gastrectomy at a centre of expertise is advised for individuals with pathogenic CDH1 mutations. Breast cancer surveillance with annual breast MRI starting at age 30 for women with a CDH1 mutation is recommended. Standardised endoscopic surveillance in experienced centres is recommended for those opting not to have gastrectomy at the current time, those with CDH1 variants of uncertain significance and those that fulfil hereditary DGC criteria without germline CDH1 mutations. Expert histopathological confirmation of (early) signet ring cell carcinoma is recommended. The impact of gastrectomy and mastectomy should not be underestimated; these can have severe consequences on a psychological, physiological and metabolic level. Nutritional problems should be carefully monitored. PMID:25979631

  17. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Germline Mutations in Asian and European Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Hamann

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Women who carry a pathogenic mutation in the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA have markedly increased risks of developing breast and ovarian cancers during their lifetime. It has been estimated that their breast and ovarian cancer risks are in the range of 46-87% and 15-68%, respectively. Therefore it is of utmost clinical importance to identify BRCA mutation carriers in order to target unaffected women for prevention and/or close surveillance and to help affected women choose the best chemotherapy regimen. Genetic testing for BRCA germline mutations is expanding in clinical oncology centers worldwide. Given the high costs of complete BRCA gene screens, a lot of effort has been expended on deciding upon whom to test. Relevant issues involved in decision making include the prior probability of a woman having a BRCA mutation, which is a function of her age and her disease status, her ethnic group, and her family history of breast or ovarian cancer. The frequency and spectrum of mutations in these genes show considerable variation by ethnic groups and by geographic regions. Most studies have been conducted in European and North American populations, while studies in Asian, Hispanic, and African populations are fewer. In most populations, many BRCA mutations were identified, which were distributed all over the genes. However, in some populations, a relatively small number of specific BRCA mutations are recurrent and account for the majority of all mutations in that population. Many of the recurrent mutations are founder mutations, which were derived from a common ancestor. Founder mutations are present in Ashkenazi Jewish, European, and Islander (Faroe, Easter, and Pitcairn populations. Such mutations have also been identified in patients from several Asian, South American, and African countries. Population-specific genetic risk assessment and genetic mutation screening have been facilitated at low costs. Given that mutations

  18. Germline De Novo Mutations in GNB1 Cause Severe Neurodevelopmental Disability, Hypotonia, and Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovski, Slavé; Küry, Sébastien; Myers, Candace T.; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Cogné, Benjamin; Bialer, Martin; Xia, Fan; Hemati, Parisa; Riviello, James; Mehaffey, Michele; Besnard, Thomas; Becraft, Emily; Wadley, Alexandrea; Politi, Anya Revah; Colombo, Sophie; Zhu, Xiaolin; Ren, Zhong; Andrews, Ian; Dudding-Byth, Tracy; Schneider, Amy L.; Wallace, Geoffrey; Rosen, Aaron B.I.; Schelley, Susan; Enns, Gregory M.; Corre, Pierre; Dalton, Joline; Mercier, Sandra; Latypova, Xénia; Schmitt, Sébastien; Guzman, Edwin; Moore, Christine; Bier, Louise; Heinzen, Erin L.; Karachunski, Peter; Shur, Natasha; Grebe, Theresa; Basinger, Alice; Nguyen, Joanne M.; Bézieau, Stéphane; Wierenga, Klaas; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Mefford, Heather C.; Isidor, Bertrand; Goldstein, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing of 13 individuals with developmental delay commonly accompanied by abnormal muscle tone and seizures identified de novo missense mutations enriched within a sub-region of GNB1, a gene encoding the guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-1, Gβ. These 13 individuals were identified among a base of 5,855 individuals recruited for various undiagnosed genetic disorders. The probability of observing 13 or more de novo mutations by chance among 5,855 individuals is very low (p = 7.1 × 10−21), implicating GNB1 as a genome-wide-significant disease-associated gene. The majority of these 13 mutations affect known Gβ binding sites, which suggests that a likely disease mechanism is through the disruption of the protein interface required for Gα-Gβγ interaction (resulting in a constitutively active Gβγ) or through the disruption of residues relevant for interaction between Gβγ and certain downstream effectors (resulting in reduced interaction with the effectors). Strikingly, 8 of the 13 individuals recruited here for a neurodevelopmental disorder have a germline de novo GNB1 mutation that overlaps a set of five recurrent somatic tumor mutations for which recent functional studies demonstrated a gain-of-function effect due to constitutive activation of G protein downstream signaling cascades for some of the affected residues. PMID:27108799

  19. A Patient with an Extra-adrenal Pheochromocytoma and Germ-line SDHB Mutation Accompanied by an Atypical Meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwa, Tsuguka; Oki, Kenji; Yoneda, Masayasu; Arihiro, Koji; Ohno, Haruya; Kishimoto, Rui; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2015-01-01

    The gene succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) encodes a protein comprising part of the mitochondrial complex II, which links the Krebs cycle and the electron-transport chain. Heterozygous germ-line SDHB mutations causes familial pheochromocytoma-paraganglioma syndrome and has also been linked to gastrointestinal stromal tumors, as well as renal cell carcinomas. We herein report a patient with a germ-line SDHB mutation who presented with an atypical meningioma that was identified as originating from a somatic SDHB mutation. The 41-year-old man, who had a surgical history of extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma at 23 years of age, recently developed gait disorder and hypertension. At the radiological examination, a tumor was detected in the cervical spinal cord at the C6-7 intervertebral level. The pathological findings of the isolated tumor were atypical meningioma assessed as grade II according to the World Health Organization criteria. Inherited neoplasia syndrome was suspected because of the patient's history of early-onset extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma and the development of meningioma. We therefore performed molecular genetic analyses. A direct sequence analysis revealed a heterozygous germ-line frameshift mutation in SDHB, specifically an 11-nucleotide deletion, c.305-315delCAATGAACATC, in exon 4, resulting in a frameshift p.A102EfsX12. Additionally, the sequence analysis of the tumor DNA revealed only a mutated allele with a frameshift mutation in the germ-line SDHB. Our findings suggest that SDHB plays an important role in the pathogenesis of meningiomas as well as pheochromocytomas. Therefore, a differential diagnosis for metastatic pheochromocytoma and other new onset tumors, including meningioma, particularly in patients with germ-line SDHB mutations and a previous history of pheochromocytoma should be carefully made.

  20. A recurrent germline BAP1 mutation and extension of the BAP1 tumor predisposition spectrum to include basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, K A W; Aoude, L G; Johansson, P;

    2015-01-01

    We report four previously undescribed families with germline BAP1 mutations and expand the clinical phenotype of this tumor syndrome. The tumor spectrum in these families is predominantly uveal malignant melanoma (UMM), cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and mesothelioma, as previously reported f...

  1. Germline mutations in DIS3L2 cause the Perlman syndrome of overgrowth and Wilms tumor susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astuti, Dewi; Morris, Mark R.; Cooper, Wendy N.; Staals, Raymond H. J.; Wake, Naomi C.; Fews, Graham A.; Gill, Harmeet; Gentle, Dean; Shuib, Salwati; Ricketts, Christopher J.; Cole, Trevor; van Essen, Anthonie J.; van Lingen, Richard A.; Neri, Giovanni; Opitz, John M.; Rump, Patrick; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Mueller, Ferenc; Pruijn, Ger J. M.; Latif, Farida; Maher, Eamonn R.

    2012-01-01

    Perlman syndrome is a congenital overgrowth syndrome inherited in an autosomal recessive manner that is associated with Wilms tumor susceptibility. We mapped a previously unknown susceptibility locus to 2q37.1 and identified germline mutations in DIS3L2, a homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe di

  2. High burden of copy number alterations and c-MYC amplification in prostate cancer from BRCA2 germline mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro, E.; Jugurnauth-Little, S.; Karlsson, Q.; Al-Shahrour, F.; Pineiro-Yanez, E.; Van de Poll, F.; Leongamornlert, D.; Dadaev, T.; Govindasami, K.; Guy, M.; Eeles, R.; Kote-Jarai, Z.; Oosterwijk, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Germline BRCA2 mutations are associated with poorer outcome prostate cancer ( PCa) compared with sporadic tumours but this association remains to be characterised. In this study, we aim to assess if there is a signature set of copy number alterations ( CNA) that could aid to the identifi

  3. PALB2 germline mutations in familial breast cancer cases with personal and family history of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    PALB2 germline mutations in familial breast cancer cases with personal and family history of pancreatic cancer phone: +39-02-23903224 (Radice, Paolo) (Radice, Paolo) IFOM, Fondazione Istituto FIRC di Oncologia Molecolare - Milan - ITALY (Peterlongo, Paolo) Department of Preventive and Predictive Medicine, Unit of Molecular Bases of Genetic Risk and Genetic Testing, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori - Milan - ITALY (Peterlongo, Pao...

  4. Germline mutation of CBL is associated with moyamoya disease in a child with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and Noonan syndrome-like disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyakuna, Nobuyuki; Muramatsu, Hideki; Higa, Takeshi; Chinen, Yasutsugu; Wang, Xinan; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-03-01

    Germline mutations in CBL have been identified in patients with Noonan syndrome-like phenotypes, while juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) harbors duplication of a germline CBL, resulting in acquired isodisomy. The association between moyamoya disease and Noonan syndrome carrying a PTPN11 mutation has recently been reported. We present a patient with JMML who developed moyamoya disease and neovascular glaucoma. Our patient exhibited a Noonan syndrome-like phenotype. Genetic analysis revealed acquired isodisomy and a germline heterozygous mutation in CBL. This is a rare case of CBL mutation associated with moyamoya disease. Prolonged RAS pathway signaling may cause disruption of cerebrovascular development.

  5. Inherited germline ATRX mutation in two brothers with ATR-X syndrome and osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jianling; Quindipan, Catherine; Parham, David; Shen, Lishuang; Ruble, David; Bootwalla, Moiz; Maglinte, Dennis T; Gai, Xiaowu; Saitta, Sulagna C; Biegel, Jaclyn A; Mascarenhas, Leo

    2017-05-01

    We report a family in which two brothers had an undiagnosed genetic disorder comprised of dysmorphic features, microcephaly, severe intellectual disability (non-verbal), mild anemia, and cryptorchidism. Both developed osteosarcoma. Trio exome sequencing (using blood samples from the younger brother and both parents) was performed and a nonsense NM_000489.4:c.7156C>T (p.Arg2386*) mutation in the ATRX gene was identified in the proband (hemizygous) and in the mother's peripheral blood DNA (heterozygous). The mother is healthy, does not exhibit any clinical manifestations of ATR-X syndrome and there was no family history of cancer. The same hemizygous pathogenic variant was confirmed in the affected older brother's skin tissue by subsequent Sanger sequencing. Chromosomal microarray studies of both brothers' osteosarcomas revealed complex copy number alterations consistent with the clinical diagnosis of osteosarcoma. Recently, somatic mutations in the ATRX gene have been observed as recurrent alterations in both osteosarcoma and brain tumors. However, it is unclear if there is any association between osteosarcoma and germline ATRX mutations, specifically in patients with constitutional ATR-X syndrome. This is the first report of osteosarcoma diagnosed in two males with ATR-X syndrome, suggesting a potential increased risk for cancer in patients with this disorder. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Association of the germline TP53 R337H mutation with breast cancer in southern Brazil

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    Srivastava Kumar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The germline TP53-R337H mutation is strongly associated with pediatric adrenocortical tumors (ACT in southern Brazil; it has low penetrance and limited tissue specificity in most families and therefore is not associated with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. However, other tumor types, mainly breast cancer, have been observed in carriers of several unrelated kindreds, raising the possibility that the R337H mutation may also contribute to breast tumorigenesis in a genetic background-specific context. Methods We conducted a case-control study to determine the prevalence of the R337H mutation by sequencing TP53 exon 10 in 123 women with breast cancer and 223 age- and sex-matched control subjects from southern Brazil. Fisher's test was used to compare the prevalence of the R337H. Results The R337H mutation was found in three patients but in none of the controls (p = 0.0442. Among the carriers, two had familial history of cancer meeting the Li-Fraumeni-like criteria. Remarkably, tumors in each of these three cases underwent loss of heterozygosity by eliminating the mutant TP53 allele rather than the wild-type allele. Polymorphisms were identified within the TP53 (R72P and Ins16 and MDM2 (SNP309 genes that may further diminish TP53 tumor suppressor activity. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the R337H mutation can significantly increase the risk of breast cancer in carriers, which likely depends on additional cooperating genetic factors. These findings are also important for understanding how low-penetrant mutant TP53 alleles can differentially influence tumor susceptibility.

  7. Germline met mutations in mice reveal mutation- and background-associated differences in tumor profiles.

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    Carrie R Graveel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The receptor tyrosine kinase Met is involved in the progression and metastasis of numerous human cancers. Although overexpression and autocrine activation of the Met signaling pathway are commonly found in human cancers, mutational activation of Met has been observed in small cell and non-small cell lung cancers, lung adenocarcinomas, renal carcinomas, and mesotheliomas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the influence of mutationally activated Met in tumorigenesis, we utilized a novel mouse model. Previously, we observed that various Met mutations developed unique mutation-specific tumor spectra on a C57BL/6 background. Here, we assessed the effect of genetic background on the tumorigenic potential of mutationally activated Met. For this purpose, we created congenic knock-in lines of the Met mutations D1226N, M1248T, and Y1228C on the FVB/N background. Consistent with the mutation-specific tumor spectra, several of the mutations were associated with the same tumor types as observed on C57BL/6 background. However, on the FVB/N background most developed a high incidence of mammary carcinomas with diverse histopathologies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that on two distinct mouse backgrounds, Met is able to initiate tumorigenesis in multiple cell types, including epithelial, hematopoietic, and endothelial. Furthermore, these observations emphasize that even a modest increase in Met activation can initiate tumorigenesis with both the Met mutational spectra and host background having profound influence on the type of tumor generated. Greater insight into the interaction of genetic modifiers and Met signaling will significantly enhance our ability to tailor combination therapies for Met-driven cancers.

  8. A novel germline mutation in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene in an Italian family with gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, C; Russo, D; Raggi, F; Lombardi, M; Sardella, C; Scattina, I; Lupi, I; Manetti, L; Tomisti, L; Marcocci, C; Martino, E; Bogazzi, F

    2014-10-01

    Acromegaly usually occurs as a sporadic disease, but it may be a part of familial pituitary tumor syndromes in rare cases. Germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene have been associated with a predisposition to familial isolated pituitary adenoma. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the AIP gene in a patient with gigantism and in her relatives. Direct sequencing of AIP gene was performed in fourteen members of the family, spanning among three generations. The index case was an 18-year-old woman with gigantism due to an invasive GH-secreting pituitary adenoma and a concomitant tall-cell variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. A novel germline mutation in the AIP gene (c.685C>T, p.Q229X) was identified in the proband and in two members of her family, who did not present clinical features of acromegaly or other pituitary disorders. Eleven subjects had no mutation in the AIP gene. Two members of the family with clinical features of acromegaly refused either the genetic or the biochemical evaluation. The Q229X mutation was predicted to generate a truncated AIP protein, lacking the last two tetratricopeptide repeat domains and the final C-terminal α-7 helix. We identified a new AIP germline mutation predicted to produce a truncated AIP protein, lacking its biological properties due to the disruption of the C-terminus binding sites for both the chaperones and the client proteins of AIP.

  9. Mutation analysis of SDHB and SDHC : novel germline mutations in sporadic head and neck paraganglioma and familial paraganglioma and/or pheochromocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayley, JP; van Minderhout, [No Value; Weiss, MM; Jansen, JC; Menko, FH; Pasini, B; Ferrando, B; Wong, N; Alpert, LC; Blair, E; Devilee, P; Taschner, PEM; Williams, O.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Germline mutations of the SDHD, SDHB and SDHC genes, encoding three of the four subunits of succinate dehydrogenase, are a major cause of hereditary paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma, and demonstrate that these genes are classic tumor suppressors. Succinate dehydrogenase is a heterotetr

  10. Mutation analysis of SDHB and SDHC: novel germline mutations in sporadic head and neck paraganglioma and familial paraganglioma and/or pheochromocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayley, J.P.; van Minderhout, I.; Weiss, M.M.; Jansen, J.C.; Oomen, P.H.N.; Menko, F.H.; Pasini, B.; Ferrando, B.; Wong, N.; Alpert, L.C.; Williams, R; Blair, E.; Devilee, P.; Taschner, P.E.M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Germline mutations of the SDHD, SDHB and SDHC genes, encoding three of the four subunits of succinate dehydrogenase, are a major cause of hereditary paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma, and demonstrate that these genes are classic tumor suppressors. Succinate dehydrogenase is a heterotetr

  11. Endometrial tumour BRAF mutations and MLH1 promoter methylation as predictors of germline mismatch repair gene mutation status: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Alexander M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) that displays high microsatellite instability (MSI-H) can be caused by either germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, or non-inherited transcriptional silencing of the MLH1 promoter. A correlation between MLH1 promoter methylation, specifically the 'C' region, and BRAF V600E status has been reported in CRC studies. Germline MMR mutations also greatly increase risk of endometrial cancer (EC), but no systematic review has been undertaken to determine if these tumour markers may be useful predictors of MMR mutation status in EC patients. Endometrial cancer cohorts meeting review inclusion criteria encompassed 2675 tumours from 20 studies for BRAF V600E, and 447 tumours from 11 studies for MLH1 methylation testing. BRAF V600E mutations were reported in 4/2675 (0.1%) endometrial tumours of unknown MMR mutation status, and there were 7/823 (0.9%) total sequence variants in exon 11 and 27/1012 (2.7%) in exon 15. Promoter MLH1 methylation was not observed in tumours from 32 MLH1 mutation carriers, or for 13 MSH2 or MSH6 mutation carriers. MMR mutation-negative individuals with tumour MLH1 and PMS2 IHC loss displayed MLH1 methylation in 48/51 (94%) of tumours. We have also detailed specific examples that show the importance of MLH1 promoter region, assay design, and quantification of methylation. This review shows that BRAF mutations occurs so infrequently in endometrial tumours they can be discounted as a useful marker for predicting MMR-negative mutation status, and further studies of endometrial cohorts with known MMR mutation status are necessary to quantify the utility of tumour MLH1 promoter methylation as a marker of negative germline MMR mutation status in EC patients.

  12. CHEK2 1100DELC germline mutation: a frequency study in hereditary breast and colon cancer Brazilian families

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    Jamile Abud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: CHEK2 encodes a cell cycle checkpoint kinase that plays an important role in the DNA damage repair pathway, activated mainly by ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. A germline mutation in CHEK2, 1100delC, has been described as a low penetrance allele in a significant number of families with breast and colorectal cancer in certain countries and is also associated with increased risk of contralateral breast cancer in women previously affected by the disease. About 5%-10% of all breast and colorectal cancers are associated with hereditary predisposition and its recognition is of great importance for genetic counseling and cancer risk management. OBJECTIVES: Here, we have assessed the frequency of the CHEK2 1100delC mutation in the germline of 59 unrelated Brazilian individuals with clinical criteria for the hereditary breast and colorectal cancer syndrome. METHODS: A long-range PCR strategy followed by gene sequencing was used. RESULTS: The 1100delC mutation was encountered in the germline of one (1.7% individual in this high risk cohort. This indicates that the CHEK2 1100delC is not commonly encountered in Brazilian families with multiple diagnoses of breast and colorectal cancer. CONCLUSION: These results should be confirmed in a larger series of families and further testing should be undertaken to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the hereditary breast and colorectal cancer phenotype.

  13. Scarce evidence of the causal role of germline mutations in UNC5C in hereditary colorectal cancer and polyposis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mur, Pilar; Elena, Sánchez-Cuartielles; Aussó, Susanna; Aiza, Gemma; Rafael, Valdés-Mas; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Brunet, Joan; Urioste, Miguel; Lázaro, Conxi; Moreno, Victor; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S.; Valle, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations in UNC5C have been suggested to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, thus causing hereditary CRC. However, the evidence gathered thus far is insufficient to include the study of the UNC5C gene in the routine genetic testing of familial CRC. Here we aim at providing a more conclusive answer about the contribution of germline UNC5C mutations to genetically unexplained hereditary CRC and/or polyposis cases. To achieve this goal we sequenced the coding region and exon-intron boundaries of UNC5C in 544 familial CRC or polyposis patients (529 families), using a technique that combines pooled DNA amplification and massively parallel sequencing. A total of eight novel or rare variants, all missense, were identified in eight families. Co-segregation data in the families and association results in case-control series are not consistent with a causal effect for 7 of the 8 identified variants, including c.1882_1883delinsAA (p.A628K), previously described as a disease-causing mutation. One variant, c.2210G > A (p.S737N), remained unclassified. In conclusion, our results suggest that the contribution of germline mutations in UNC5C to hereditary colorectal cancer and to polyposis cases is negligible. PMID:26852919

  14. NanoTIO2 (UV-Titan does not induce ESTR mutations in the germline of prenatally exposed female mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boisen Anne Mette

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particulate air pollution has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Animal studies have shown that inhalation of air particulates induces mutations in the male germline. Expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR loci in mice are sensitive markers of mutagenic effects on male germ cells resulting from environmental exposures; however, female germ cells have received little attention. Oocytes may be vulnerable during stages of active cell division (e.g., during fetal development. Accordingly, an increase in germline ESTR mutations in female mice prenatally exposed to radiation has previously been reported. Here we investigate the effects of nanoparticles on the female germline. Since pulmonary exposure to nanosized titanium dioxide (nanoTiO2 produces a long-lasting inflammatory response in mice, it was chosen for the present study. Findings Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were exposed by whole-body inhalation to the nanoTiO2 UV-Titan L181 (~42.4 mg UV-Titan/m3 or filtered clean air on gestation days (GD 8–18. Female C57BL/6 F1 offspring were raised to maturity and mated with unexposed CBA males. The F2 descendents were collected and ESTR germline mutation rates in this generation were estimated from full pedigrees (mother, father, offspring of F1 female mice (192 UV-Titan-exposed F2 offspring and 164 F2 controls. ESTR mutation rates of 0.029 (maternal allele and 0.047 (paternal allele in UV-Titan-exposed F2 offspring were not statistically different from those of F2 controls: 0.037 (maternal allele and 0.061 (paternal allele. Conclusions We found no evidence for increased ESTR mutation rates in F1 females exposed in utero to UV-Titan nanoparticles from GD8-18 relative to control females.

  15. Frequency of CDH1 germline mutations in gastric carcinoma coming from high- and low-risk areas: metanalysis and systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corso Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequency of E-cadherin germline mutations in countries with different incidence rates for gastric carcinoma has not been well established. The goal of this study was to assess the worldwide frequency of CDH1 germline mutations in gastric cancers coming from low- and high-risk areas. Methods English articles using MEDLINE access (from 1998 to 2011. Search terms included CDH1, E-cadherin, germline mutation, gastric cancer, hereditary, familial and diffuse histotype. The study included all E-cadherin germline mutations identified in gastric cancer patients; somatic mutations and germline mutations reported in other tumors were excluded. The method of this study was scheduled in accordance with the "PRISMA statement for reporting systematic reviews and meta-analyses". Countries were classified as low- or middle/high risk-areas for gastric carcinoma incidence. Statistical analysis was performed to correlate the CDH1 mutation frequency with gastric cancer incidence areas. Results A total of 122 E-cadherin germline mutations have been identified; the majority (87.5% occurred in gastric cancers coming from low-risk areas. In high-risk areas, we identified 16 mutations in which missense mutations were predominant. (68.8%. We verified a significant association between the mutation frequency and the gastric cancer risk area (p Conclusions E-cadherin genetic screenings performed in low-risk areas for gastric cancer identified a higher frequency of CDH1 germline mutations. This data could open new approaches in the gastric cancer prevention test; before proposing a proband candidate for the CDH1 genetic screening, geographic variability, alongside the family history should be considered.

  16. Germline mutations in MAP3K6 are associated with familial gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gaston

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is among the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While heritable forms of gastric cancer are relatively rare, identifying the genes responsible for such cases can inform diagnosis and treatment for both hereditary and sporadic cases of gastric cancer. Mutations in the E-cadherin gene, CDH1, account for 40% of the most common form of familial gastric cancer (FGC, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC. The genes responsible for the remaining forms of FGC are currently unknown. Here we examined a large family from Maritime Canada with FGC without CDH1 mutations, and identified a germline coding variant (p.P946L in mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 6 (MAP3K6. Based on conservation, predicted pathogenicity and a known role of the gene in cancer predisposition, MAP3K6 was considered a strong candidate and was investigated further. Screening of an additional 115 unrelated individuals with non-CDH1 FGC identified the p.P946L MAP3K6 variant, as well as four additional coding variants in MAP3K6 (p.F849Sfs*142, p.P958T, p.D200Y and p.V207G. A somatic second-hit variant (p.H506Y was present in DNA obtained from one of the tumor specimens, and evidence of DNA hypermethylation within the MAP3K6 gene was observed in DNA from the tumor of another affected individual. These findings, together with previous evidence from mouse models that MAP3K6 acts as a tumor suppressor, and studies showing the presence of somatic mutations in MAP3K6 in non-hereditary gastric cancers and gastric cancer cell lines, point towards MAP3K6 variants as a predisposing factor for FGC.

  17. An immunohistochemical procedure to detect patients with paraganglioma and phaeochromocytoma with germline SDHB, SDHC, or SDHD gene mutations: a retrospective and prospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.H. van Nederveen (Francien); J. Gaal (José); J. Favier (Judith); E. Korpershoek (Esther); R.A. Oldenburg (Rogier); E.M. de Bruyn (Elly); H.F. Sleddens (Hein); P. Derkx (Pieter); J. Rivière (Julie); H. Dannenberg (Hilde); B.J. Petri; P. Komminoth (Paul); K. Pacak (Karel); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); P.J. Pollard (Patrick); M. Mannelli (Massimo); J.P. Bayley; A. Perren (Aurel); S. Niemann (Stephan); A.A. Verhofstad (Albert); A.P. de Bruïne (Adriaan); E.R. Maher (Eamonn); F. Tissier (Frédérique); T. Méatchi (Tchao); C. Badoual (Cécile); J. Bertherat (Jerome); L. Amar (Laurence); D. Alataki (Despoina); E.A. van Marck (Eric); F. Ferrau (Francesco); J.F. François (Joseph); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); M.P.F.V. Peeters; A. van Linge (Anne); J.W. Lenders (Jacques); A.P. Gimenez-Roqueplo; R.R. de Krijger (Ronald); W.N.M. Dinjens (Winand)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas are neuro-endocrine tumours that occur sporadically and in several hereditary tumour syndromes, including the phaeochromocytoma-paraganglioma syndrome. This syndrome is caused by germline mutations in succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB), C

  18. Predominant RET Germline Mutations in Exons 10, 11, and 16 in Iranian Patients with Hereditary Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

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    Mehdi Hedayati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Medullary thyroid carcinoma occurs in both sporadic (75% and hereditary (25% forms. The missense mutations of RET proto-oncogene in MTC development have been well demonstrated. To investigate the spectrum of predominant RET germline mutations in exons 10, 11, and 16 in hereditary MTC in Iranian population, 217 participants were included. Genomic DNAs were extracted from the leukocytes using the standard Salting Out/Proteinase K method. Mutation detection was performed through PCR-RFLP and DNA sequencing. In 217 participants, 43 missense mutations were identified in exons 10 (6%, 11 (13%, and 16 (0.9%. Moreover, a novel germline mutation was detected in exon 11 (S686N. Also four different polymorphisms were found in intron 16 in eight patients. The obtained data showed the frequency profile of RET mutations in Iranian individuals with MTC (19.8%. The most frequent mutation in our population was C634G whereas in most population it was C634R. Altogether, these results underline the importance of the genetic background of family members of any patient with MTC.

  19. Radiation-induced mutation at tandem repeat DNA Loci in the mouse germline: spectra and doubling doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrova, Yuri E

    2005-02-01

    The spectra and dose response for mutations at expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci in the germline of male mice acutely exposed to low-LET X or gamma rays at pre-meiotic stages of spermatogenesis were compared in five strains of laboratory mice. Most mutation events involved the gain or loss of a relatively small number of repeat units, and the distributions of length changes were indistinguishable between the exposed and control males. Overall, a significant bias toward gains of repeats was detected, with approximately 60% of mutants showing gains. The values for ESTR mutation induction did not differ substantially between strains. The highest values of doubling dose were obtained for two genetically related strains, BALB/c and C.B17 (mean value 0.98 Gy). The estimates of doubling dose for three other strains (CBA/H, C57BL/6 x CBA/H F1 and 129SVJ x C57BL/6) were lower, with a mean value of 0.44 Gy. The dose response for ESTR mutation across all five strains was very close to that for the specific loci (Russell 7-locus test). The mechanisms of ESTR mutation induction and applications of this system for monitoring radiation-induced mutation in the mouse germline are discussed.

  20. Factors that affect the molecular nature of germ-line mutations recovered in the mouse specific-locus test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The morphological specific locus test (SLT), which allows the scoring of 2,000 loci/hr/person, has been in use for four decades for measuring mammalian germ-line mutation rates under various conditions of exposure. More recently, the SLT's capabilities for the qualitative characterization of mutations have been exploited. The large sets of mutations centered on specific loci that have been accumulated over the years, including sets of nested deletions, have provided prime material for fine-structure genetic analyses. Subsequent molecular entry to these regions has led to intensive physical/functional mapping of megabase segments of the genome. In turn, these investigations have generated genetic and molecular tools for analyzing individual mutations as to extent and nature of the genomic lesion. These and related quantitative findings now make it possible to optimize conditions for the use of mutagens in providing desired types of mutations as tools.

  1. Germline Mutations in Mtap Cooperate with Myc to Accelerate Tumorigenesis in Mice.

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    Yuwaraj Kadariya

    Full Text Available The gene encoding the methionine salvage pathway methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP is a tumor suppressor gene that is frequently inactivated in a wide variety of human cancers. In this study, we have examined if heterozygosity for a null mutation in Mtap (Mtap(lacZ could accelerate tumorigenesis development in two different mouse cancer models, Eμ-myc transgenic and Pten(+/- .Mtap Eμ-myc and Mtap Pten mice were generated and tumor-free survival was monitored over time. Tumors were also examined for a variety of histological and protein markers. In addition, microarray analysis was performed on the livers of Mtap(lacZ/+ and Mtap (+/+ mice.Survival in both models was significantly decreased in Mtap(lacZ/+ compared to Mtap(+/+ mice. In Eµ-myc mice, Mtap mutations accelerated the formation of lymphomas from cells in the early pre-B stage, and these tumors tended to be of higher grade and have higher expression levels of ornithine decarboxylase compared to those observed in control Eµ-myc Mtap(+/+ mice. Surprisingly, examination of Mtap status in lymphomas in Eµ-myc Mtap(lacZ/+ and Eµ-myc Mtap(+/+ animals did not reveal significant differences in the frequency of loss of Mtap protein expression, despite having shorter latency times, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of Mtap may be playing a direct role in accelerating tumorigenesis. Consistent with this idea, microarray analysis on liver tissue from age and sex matched Mtap(+/+ and Mtap(lacZ/+ animals found 363 transcripts whose expression changed at least 1.5-fold (P<0.01. Functional categorization of these genes reveals enrichments in several pathways involved in growth control and cancer.Our findings show that germline inactivation of a single Mtap allele alters gene expression and enhances lymphomagenesis in Eµ-myc mice.

  2. Mutation analysis of SDHB and SDHC: novel germline mutations in sporadic head and neck paraganglioma and familial paraganglioma and/or pheochromocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Nora

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline mutations of the SDHD, SDHB and SDHC genes, encoding three of the four subunits of succinate dehydrogenase, are a major cause of hereditary paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma, and demonstrate that these genes are classic tumor suppressors. Succinate dehydrogenase is a heterotetrameric protein complex and a component of both the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase or complex II. Methods Using conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE and direct DNA sequencing to analyse genomic DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes, here we describe the mutation analysis of the SDHB and SDHC genes in 37 patients with sporadic (i.e. no known family history head and neck paraganglioma and five pheochromocytoma and/or paraganglioma families. Results Two sporadic patients were found to have a SDHB splice site mutation in intron 4, c.423+1G>A, which produces a mis-spliced transcript with a 54 nucleotide deletion, resulting in an 18 amino acid in-frame deletion. A third patient was found to carry the c.214C>T (p.Arg72Cys missense mutation in exon 4 of SDHC, which is situated in a highly conserved protein motif that constitutes the quinone-binding site of the succinate: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (SQR complex in E. coli. Together with our previous results, we found 27 germline mutations of SDH genes in 95 cases (28% of sporadic head and neck paraganglioma. In addition all index patients of five families showing hereditary pheochromocytoma-paraganglioma were found to carry germline mutations of SDHB: four of which were novel, c.343C>T (p.Arg115X, c.141G>A (p.Trp47X, c.281G>A (p.Arg94Lys, and c.653G>C (p.Trp218Ser, and one reported previously, c.136C>T, p.Arg46X. Conclusion In conclusion, these data indicate that germline mutations of SDHB and SDHC play a minor role in sporadic head and neck paraganglioma and further underline the importance of germline SDHB mutations in cases of

  3. Prevalence and Spectrum of Germline Cancer Susceptibility Gene Mutations Among Patients With Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Rachel; Frankel, Wendy L; Swanson, Benjamin; Zhao, Weiqiang; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Miller, Kristin; Bacher, Jason; Bigley, Christopher; Nelsen, Lori; Goodfellow, Paul J; Goldberg, Richard M; Paskett, Electra; Shields, Peter G; Freudenheim, Jo L; Stanich, Peter P; Lattimer, Ilene; Arnold, Mark; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Kalady, Matthew; Heald, Brandie; Greenwood, Carla; Paquette, Ian; Prues, Marla; Draper, David J; Lindeman, Carolyn; Kuebler, J Philip; Reynolds, Kelly; Brell, Joanna M; Shaper, Amy A; Mahesh, Sameer; Buie, Nicole; Weeman, Kisa; Shine, Kristin; Haut, Mitchell; Edwards, Joan; Bastola, Shyamal; Wickham, Karen; Khanduja, Karamjit S; Zacks, Rosemary; Pritchard, Colin C; Shirts, Brian H; Jacobson, Angela; Allen, Brian; de la Chapelle, Albert; Hampel, Heather

    2017-04-01

    Hereditary cancer syndromes infer high cancer risks and require intensive cancer surveillance, yet the prevalence and spectrum of these conditions among unselected patients with early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) is largely undetermined. To determine the frequency and spectrum of cancer susceptibility gene mutations among patients with early-onset CRC. Overall, 450 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer younger than 50 years were prospectively accrued from 51 hospitals into the Ohio Colorectal Cancer Prevention Initiative from January 1, 2013, to June 20, 2016. Mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency was determined by microsatellite instability and/or immunohistochemistry. Germline DNA was tested for mutations in 25 cancer susceptibility genes using next-generation sequencing. Mutation prevalence and spectrum in patients with early-onset CRC was determined. Clinical characteristics were assessed by mutation status. In total 450 patients younger than 50 years were included in the study, and 75 gene mutations were found in 72 patients (16%). Forty-eight patients (10.7%) had MMR-deficient tumors, and 40 patients (83.3%) had at least 1 gene mutation: 37 had Lynch syndrome (13, MLH1 [including one with constitutional MLH1 methylation]; 16, MSH2; 1, MSH2/monoallelic MUTYH; 2, MSH6; 5, PMS2); 1 patient had the APC c.3920T>A, p.I1307K mutation and a PMS2 variant; 9 patients (18.8%) had double somatic MMR mutations (including 2 with germline biallelic MUTYH mutations); and 1 patient had somatic MLH1 methylation. Four hundred two patients (89.3%) had MMR-proficient tumors, and 32 patients (8%) had at least 1 gene mutation: 9 had mutations in high-penetrance CRC genes (5, APC; 1, APC/PMS2; 2, biallelic MUTYH; 1, SMAD4); 13 patients had mutations in high- or moderate-penetrance genes not traditionally associated with CRC (3, ATM; 1, ATM/CHEK2; 2, BRCA1; 4, BRCA2; 1, CDKN2A; 2, PALB2); 10 patients had mutations in low-penetrance CRC genes (3, APC c.3920T>A, p.I1307K; 7

  4. Positive selection for new disease mutations in the human germline: evidence from the heritable cancer syndrome multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Kyung Choi

    Full Text Available Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN2B is a highly aggressive thyroid cancer syndrome. Since almost all sporadic cases are caused by the same nucleotide substitution in the RET proto-oncogene, the calculated disease incidence is 100-200 times greater than would be expected based on the genome average mutation frequency. In order to determine whether this increased incidence is due to an elevated mutation rate at this position (true mutation hot spot or a selective advantage conferred on mutated spermatogonial stem cells, we studied the spatial distribution of the mutation in 14 human testes. In donors aged 36-68, mutations were clustered with small regions of each testis having mutation frequencies several orders of magnitude greater than the rest of the testis. In donors aged 19-23 mutations were almost non-existent, demonstrating that clusters in middle-aged donors grew during adulthood. Computational analysis showed that germline selection is the only plausible explanation. Testes of men aged 75-80 were heterogeneous with some like middle-aged and others like younger testes. Incorporating data on age-dependent death of spermatogonial stem cells explains the results from all age groups. Germline selection also explains MEN2B's male mutation bias and paternal age effect. Our discovery focuses attention on MEN2B as a model for understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of germline selection. Since RET function in mouse spermatogonial stem cells has been extensively studied, we are able to suggest that the MEN2B mutation provides a selective advantage by altering the PI3K/AKT and SFK signaling pathways. Mutations that are preferred in the germline but reduce the fitness of offspring increase the population's mutational load. Our approach is useful for studying other disease mutations with similar characteristics and could uncover additional germline selection pathways or identify true mutation hot spots.

  5. Positive selection for new disease mutations in the human germline: evidence from the heritable cancer syndrome multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Kyung; Yoon, Song-Ro; Calabrese, Peter; Arnheim, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN2B) is a highly aggressive thyroid cancer syndrome. Since almost all sporadic cases are caused by the same nucleotide substitution in the RET proto-oncogene, the calculated disease incidence is 100-200 times greater than would be expected based on the genome average mutation frequency. In order to determine whether this increased incidence is due to an elevated mutation rate at this position (true mutation hot spot) or a selective advantage conferred on mutated spermatogonial stem cells, we studied the spatial distribution of the mutation in 14 human testes. In donors aged 36-68, mutations were clustered with small regions of each testis having mutation frequencies several orders of magnitude greater than the rest of the testis. In donors aged 19-23 mutations were almost non-existent, demonstrating that clusters in middle-aged donors grew during adulthood. Computational analysis showed that germline selection is the only plausible explanation. Testes of men aged 75-80 were heterogeneous with some like middle-aged and others like younger testes. Incorporating data on age-dependent death of spermatogonial stem cells explains the results from all age groups. Germline selection also explains MEN2B's male mutation bias and paternal age effect. Our discovery focuses attention on MEN2B as a model for understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of germline selection. Since RET function in mouse spermatogonial stem cells has been extensively studied, we are able to suggest that the MEN2B mutation provides a selective advantage by altering the PI3K/AKT and SFK signaling pathways. Mutations that are preferred in the germline but reduce the fitness of offspring increase the population's mutational load. Our approach is useful for studying other disease mutations with similar characteristics and could uncover additional germline selection pathways or identify true mutation hot spots.

  6. Germline Mutations in the BRIP1, BARD1, PALB2, and NBN Genes in Women With Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Song, Honglin; Dicks, Ed; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Rosenthal, Adam N.; Intermaggio, Maria P.; Fraser, Lindsay; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Hayward, Jane; Philpott, Susan; Anderson, Christopher; Edlund, Christopher K.; Conti, David; Harrington, Patricia; Barrowdale, Daniel; Bowtell, David D.; Alsop, Kathryn; Mitchell, Gillian; Cicek, Mine S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Alsop, Jennifer; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Poblete, Samantha; Lele, Shashi; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Lester, Jenny; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Odunsi, Kunle; Whittemore, Alice S.; Karlan, Beth Y; Dörk, Thilo; Goode, Ellen L.; Menon, Usha; Jacobs, Ian J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Gayther, Simon A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy, responsible for 13 000 deaths per year in the United States. Risk prediction based on identifying germline mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes could have a clinically significant impact on reducing disease mortality. Methods: Next generation sequencing was used to identify germline mutations in the coding regions of four candidate susceptibility genes—BRIP1, BARD1, PALB2 and NBN—in 3236 invasive EOC case patients and 3431 control patients of European origin, and in 2000 unaffected high-risk women from a clinical screening trial of ovarian cancer (UKFOCSS). For each gene, we estimated the prevalence and EOC risks and evaluated associations between germline variant status and clinical and epidemiological risk factor information. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We found an increased frequency of deleterious mutations in BRIP1 in case patients (0.9%) and in the UKFOCSS participants (0.6%) compared with control patients (0.09%) (P = 1 x 10–4 and 8 x 10–4, respectively), but no differences for BARD1 (P = .39), NBN1 (P = .61), or PALB2 (P = .08). There was also a difference in the frequency of rare missense variants in BRIP1 between case patients and control patients (P = 5.5 x 10–4). The relative risks associated with BRIP1 mutations were 11.22 for invasive EOC (95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.22 to 34.10, P = 1 x 10–4) and 14.09 for high-grade serous disease (95% CI = 4.04 to 45.02, P = 2 x 10–5). Segregation analysis in families estimated the average relative risks in BRIP1 mutation carriers compared with the general population to be 3.41 (95% CI = 2.12 to 5.54, P = 7×10–7). Conclusions: Deleterious germline mutations in BRIP1 are associated with a moderate increase in EOC risk. These data have clinical implications for risk prediction and prevention approaches for ovarian cancer and emphasize the critical need for risk estimates based

  7. Bone marrow findings in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome with germline FAS mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yi; Pittaluga, Stefania; Price, Susan; Raffeld, Mark; Hahn, Jamie; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Rao, V. Koneti; Maric, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by defective FAS-mediated apoptosis, autoimmune disease, accumulation of mature T-cell receptor alpha/beta positive, CD4 and CD8 double-negative T cells and increased risk of lymphoma. Despite frequent hematologic abnormalities, literature is scarce regarding the bone marrow pathology in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. We retrospectively reviewed 3l bone marrow biopsies from a cohort of 240 patients with germline FAS mutations. All biopsies were performed for the evaluation of cytopenias or to rule out lymphoma. Clinical information was collected and morphological, immunohistochemical, flow cytometric and molecular studies were performed. Bone marrow lymphocytosis was the predominant feature, present in 74% (23/31) of biopsies. The lymphoid cells showed several different patterns of infiltration, most often forming aggregates comprising T cells in 15 cases, B cells in one and a mixture of T and B cells in the other seven cases. Double-negative T cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in the minority of cases (10/31; 32%); significantly, all but one of these cases had prominent double-negative T-lymphoid aggregates, which in four cases diffusely replaced the marrow space. One case showed features of Rosai-Dorfman disease, containing scattered S-100+ cells with emperipolesis and double-negative T cells. No clonal B or T cells were detected by polymerase chain reaction in any evaluated cases. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma was identified in three cases. Our results demonstrate that infiltrates of T cells, or rarely B cells, can be extensive in patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, mimicking lymphoma. A multi-modality approach, integrating clinical, histological, immunohistochemical as well as other ancillary tests, can help avoid this diagnostic pitfall. This study is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov ID # NCT00001350 PMID:27846610

  8. RAD51C germline mutations in breast and ovarian cancer cases from high-risk families.

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    Jessica Clague

    Full Text Available BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the most well-known breast cancer susceptibility genes. Additional genes involved in DNA repair have been identified as predisposing to breast cancer. One such gene, RAD51C, is essential for homologous recombination repair. Several likely pathogenic RAD51C mutations have been identified in BRCA1- and BRCA2-negative breast and ovarian cancer families. We performed complete sequencing of RAD51C in germline DNA of 286 female breast and/or ovarian cancer cases with a family history of breast and ovarian cancers, who had previously tested negative for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. We screened 133 breast cancer cases, 119 ovarian cancer cases, and 34 with both breast and ovarian cancers. Fifteen DNA sequence variants were identified; including four intronic, one 5' UTR, one promoter, three synonymous, and six non-synonymous variants. None were truncating. The in-silico SIFT and Polyphen programs were used to predict possible pathogenicity of the six non-synonomous variants based on sequence conservation. G153D and T287A were predicted to be likely pathogenic. Two additional variants, A126T and R214C alter amino acids in important domains of the protein such that they could be pathogenic. Two-hybrid screening and immunoblot analyses were performed to assess the functionality of these four non-synonomous variants in yeast. The RAD51C-G153D protein displayed no detectable interaction with either XRCC3 or RAD51B, and RAD51C-R214C displayed significantly decreased interaction with both XRCC3 and RAD51B (p<0.001. Immunoblots of RAD51C-Gal4 activation domain fusion peptides showed protein levels of RAD51C-G153D and RAD51C-R214C that were 50% and 60% of the wild-type, respectively. Based on these data, the RAD51C-G153D variant is likely to be pathogenic, while the RAD51C- R214C variant is hypomorphic of uncertain pathogenicity. These results provide further support that RAD51C is a rare breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene.

  9. Comprehensive analysis of BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53 germline mutation and tumor characterization: a portrait of early-onset breast cancer in Brazil.

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    Dirce Maria Carraro

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53 genes have been identified as one of the most important disease-causing issues in young breast cancer patients worldwide. The specific defective biological processes that trigger germline mutation-associated and -negative tumors remain unclear. To delineate an initial portrait of Brazilian early-onset breast cancer, we performed an investigation combining both germline and tumor analysis. Germline screening of the BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2 (c.1100delC and TP53 genes was performed in 54 unrelated patients <35 y; their tumors were investigated with respect to transcriptional and genomic profiles as well as hormonal receptors and HER2 expression/amplification. Germline mutations were detected in 12 out of 54 patients (22% [7 in BRCA1 (13%, 4 in BRCA2 (7% and one in TP53 (2% gene]. A cancer familial history was present in 31.4% of the unrelated patients, from them 43.7% were carriers for germline mutation (37.5% in BRCA1 and in 6.2% in the BRCA2 genes. Fifty percent of the unrelated patients with hormone receptor-negative tumors carried BRCA1 mutations, percentage increasing to 83% in cases with familial history of cancer. Over-representation of DNA damage-, cellular and cell cycle-related processes was detected in the up-regulated genes of BRCA1/2-associated tumors, whereas cell and embryo development-related processes were over-represented in the up-regulated genes of BRCA1/2-negative tumors, suggesting distinct mechanisms driving the tumorigenesis. An initial portrait of the early-onset breast cancer patients in Brazil was generated pointing out that hormone receptor-negative tumors and positive familial history are two major risk factors for detection of a BRCA1 germline mutation. Additionally, the data revealed molecular factors that potentially trigger the tumor development in young patients.

  10. Novel germline mutation (Leu512Met) in the thyrotropin receptor gene (TSHR) leading to sporadic non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Stephanie A; Moon, Jennifer E; Dauber, Andrew; Smith, Jessica R

    2017-03-01

    Primary nonautoimmune hyperthyroidism is a rare cause of neonatal hyperthyroidism. This results from an activating mutation in the thyrotropin-receptor (TSHR). It can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner or occur sporadically as a de novo mutation. Affected individuals display a wide phenotype from severe neonatal to mild subclinical hyperthyroidism. We describe a 6-month-old boy with a de novo mutation in the TSHR gene who presented with accelerated growth, enlarging head circumference, tremor and thyrotoxicosis. Genomic DNA from the patient's and parents' peripheral blood leukocytes was extracted. Exons 9 and 10 of the TSHR gene were amplified by PCR and sequenced. Sequencing exon 10 of the TSHR gene revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation substituting cytosine to adenine at nucleotide position 1534 in the patient's peripheral blood leukocytes. This leads to a substitution of leucine to methionine at amino acid position 512. The mutation was absent in the parents. In silico modeling by PolyPhen-2 and SIFT predicted the mutation to be deleterious. The p.Leu512Met mutation (c.1534C>A) of the TSHR gene has not been previously described in germline or somatic mutations. This case presentation highlights the possibility of mild thyrotoxicosis in affected individuals and contributes to the understanding of sporadic non-autoimmune primary hyperthyroidism.

  11. The BRCA1-Δ11q Alternative Splice Isoform Bypasses Germline Mutations and Promotes Therapeutic Resistance to PARP Inhibition and Cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yifan; Bernhardy, Andrea J; Cruz, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Breast and ovarian cancer patients harboring BRCA1/2 germline mutations have clinically benefitted from therapy with PARP inhibitor (PARPi) or platinum compounds, but acquired resistance limits clinical impact. In this study, we investigated the impact of mutations on BRCA1 isoform expression and...

  12. Risk Profiles and Penetrance Estimations in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A Caused by Germline RET Mutations Located in Exon 10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank-Raue, Karin; Rybicki, Lisa A.; Erlic, Zoran; Schweizer, Heiko; Winter, Aurelia; Milos, Ioana; Toledo, Sergio P. A.; Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Tavares, Marcos R.; Alevizaki, Maria; Mian, Caterina; Siggelkow, Heide; Huefner, Michael; Wohllk, Nelson; Opocher, Giuseppe; Dvorakova, Sarka; Bendlova, Bela; Czetwertynska, Malgorzata; Skasko, Elzbieta; Barontini, Marta; Sanso, Gabriela; Vorlaender, Christian; Maia, Ana Luiza; Patocs, Attila; Links, Thera P.; de Groot, Jan Willem; Kerstens, Michiel N.; Valk, Gerlof D.; Miehle, Konstanze; Musholt, Thomas J.; Biarnes, Josefina; Damjanovic, Svetozar; Muresan, Mihaela; Wuester, Christian; Fassnacht, Martin; Peczkowska, Mariola; Fauth, Christine; Golcher, Henriette; Walter, Martin A.; Pichl, Josef; Raue, Friedhelm; Eng, Charis; Neumann, Hartmut P. H.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 is characterized by germline mutations in RET. For exon 10, comprehensive molecular and corresponding phenotypic data are scarce. The International RET Exon 10 Consortium, comprising 27 centers from 15 countries, analyzed patients with RET exon 10 mutations for cl

  13. ExScalibur: A High-Performance Cloud-Enabled Suite for Whole Exome Germline and Somatic Mutation Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Riyue; Hernandez, Kyle; Huang, Lei; Kang, Wenjun; Bartom, Elizabeth; Onel, Kenan; Volchenboum, Samuel; Andrade, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing has facilitated the discovery of causal genetic variants associated with human diseases at deep coverage and low cost. In particular, the detection of somatic mutations from tumor/normal pairs has provided insights into the cancer genome. Although there is an abundance of publicly-available software for the detection of germline and somatic variants, concordance is generally limited among variant callers and alignment algorithms. Successful integration of variants detected by multiple methods requires in-depth knowledge of the software, access to high-performance computing resources, and advanced programming techniques. We present ExScalibur, a set of fully automated, highly scalable and modulated pipelines for whole exome data analysis. The suite integrates multiple alignment and variant calling algorithms for the accurate detection of germline and somatic mutations with close to 99% sensitivity and specificity. ExScalibur implements streamlined execution of analytical modules, real-time monitoring of pipeline progress, robust handling of errors and intuitive documentation that allows for increased reproducibility and sharing of results and workflows. It runs on local computers, high-performance computing clusters and cloud environments. In addition, we provide a data analysis report utility to facilitate visualization of the results that offers interactive exploration of quality control files, read alignment and variant calls, assisting downstream customization of potential disease-causing mutations. ExScalibur is open-source and is also available as a public image on Amazon cloud.

  14. ExScalibur: A High-Performance Cloud-Enabled Suite for Whole Exome Germline and Somatic Mutation Identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyue Bao

    Full Text Available Whole exome sequencing has facilitated the discovery of causal genetic variants associated with human diseases at deep coverage and low cost. In particular, the detection of somatic mutations from tumor/normal pairs has provided insights into the cancer genome. Although there is an abundance of publicly-available software for the detection of germline and somatic variants, concordance is generally limited among variant callers and alignment algorithms. Successful integration of variants detected by multiple methods requires in-depth knowledge of the software, access to high-performance computing resources, and advanced programming techniques. We present ExScalibur, a set of fully automated, highly scalable and modulated pipelines for whole exome data analysis. The suite integrates multiple alignment and variant calling algorithms for the accurate detection of germline and somatic mutations with close to 99% sensitivity and specificity. ExScalibur implements streamlined execution of analytical modules, real-time monitoring of pipeline progress, robust handling of errors and intuitive documentation that allows for increased reproducibility and sharing of results and workflows. It runs on local computers, high-performance computing clusters and cloud environments. In addition, we provide a data analysis report utility to facilitate visualization of the results that offers interactive exploration of quality control files, read alignment and variant calls, assisting downstream customization of potential disease-causing mutations. ExScalibur is open-source and is also available as a public image on Amazon cloud.

  15. Germline and somatic polymerase ε and δ mutations define a new class of hypermutated colorectal and endometrial cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Sarah; Tomlinson, Ian

    2013-06-01

    Polymerases ε and δ are the main enzymes that replicate eukaryotic DNA. Accurate replication occurs through Watson-Crick base pairing and also through the action of the polymerases' exonuclease (proofreading) domains. We have recently shown that germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) of POLE and POLD1 confer a high risk of multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma (CRC). POLD1 mutations also predispose to endometrial cancer (EC). These mutations are associated with high penetrance and dominant inheritance, although the phenotype can be variable. We have named the condition polymerase proofreading-associated polyposis (PPAP). Somatic POLE EDMs have also been found in sporadic CRCs and ECs, although very few somatic POLD1 EDMs have been detected. Both the germline and the somatic DNA polymerase EDMs cause an 'ultramutated', apparently microsatellite-stable, type of cancer, sometimes leading to over a million base substitutions per tumour. Here, we present the evidence for POLE and POLD1 as important contributors to the pathogenesis of CRC and EC, and highlight some of the key questions in this emerging field.

  16. Detection of germline mutations of hMLH1 and hMSH2 based on cDNA sequencing in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-Fu Wang; Xiao-Yan Zhou; Tai-Ming Zhang; Meng-Hong Sun; Da-Ren Shi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To detect the germline mutations of hMLH1 and hMSH2based on mRNA sequencing to identify hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families.METHODS: Total RNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 14 members from 12 different families fulfilling Amsterdam criteria Ⅱ. mRNA of hMLH1 and hMSH2 was reversed with special primers and heat-resistant reverse transcriptase. cDNA was amplified with expand long template PCR and cDNA sequendng analysis was followed.RESULT: Seven germline mutations were found in 6families (6/12, 50%), in 4 hMLH1 and 3 hMSH2 mutations (4/12, 33.3%); (3/12, 25%). The mutation types involved 4 missense, 1 silent and 1 frame shift mutations as well as 1 mutation in the non-coding area. Four out of the seven mutations have not been reported previously. The 4 hMLH1mutations were distributed in exons 8, 12, 16, and 19. The 3hMSH2 mutations were distributed in exons 1 and 2. Six out of the 7 mutations were pathological, which were distributed in 5 HNPCC families.CONCLUSION: Germline mutations of hMLH1 and hMSH2 can be found based on cDNA sequencing so as to identify HNPCC family, which is highly sensitive and has the advantages of cost and time saving.

  17. Two novel germline mutations of MLH1 and investigation of their pathobiology in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer families in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To detect germline mutations of MLH1, and investigate microsatellite instability and expression of MLH1 in tumor tissues of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) with two novel germline mutations, and further investigate the pathobiology of the two novel mutations of MLH1.METHODS: RNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of 12 patients from 12 different families that fulfilled the Amsterdam Ⅱ Criteria for HNPCC. Germline mutations of MLH1 were determined by RT-PCR,followed by cDNA sequencing analysis. PCR-GeneScan analysis was used to investigate microsatellite instability with a panel of five microsatellite markers (BAT26,BAT25, D5S346, D2S123 and mfd15), along with immunohistochemical staining to detect the expression of MLH1 protein in two patients' tumor tissues with novel mutations.RESULTS: Three germline mutations were found in four patients, one of the mutations has previously been reported, but the other two, CGC→TGC at codon 217 of exon 8 and CCG→CTG at codon 581 of exon 16, have not been reported. The two patients' tumor tissues with novel mutations had high-frequency microsatellite instability that showed more than two unstable loci, and both tumors lost their MLH1 protein expression.CONCLUSION: The two novel germline mutations of MLH1 in HNPCC families i.e. CGC→TGC at codon 217 of exon 8 and CCG→CTG at codon 581 of exon 16, are very likely to have pathological significance.

  18. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in Malaysian women with early-onset breast cancer without a family history.

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    Gaik Theng Toh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Asia, breast cancer is characterised by an early age of onset: In Malaysia, approximately 50% of cases occur in women under the age of 50 years. A proportion of these cases may be attributable, at least in part, to genetic components, but to date, the contribution of genetic components to breast cancer in many of Malaysia's ethnic groups has not been well-characterised. METHODOLOGY: Given that hereditary breast carcinoma is primarily due to germline mutations in one of two breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, we have characterised the spectrum of BRCA mutations in a cohort of 37 individuals with early-onset disease (Mutational analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 was conducted by full sequencing of all exons and intron-exon junctions. CONCLUSIONS: Here, we report a total of 14 BRCA1 and 17 BRCA2 sequence alterations, of which eight are novel (3 BRCA1 and 5 BRCA2. One deleterious BRCA1 mutation and 2 deleterious BRCA2 mutations, all of which are novel mutations, were identified in 3 of 37 individuals. This represents a prevalence of 2.7% and 5.4% respectively, which is consistent with other studies in other Asian ethnic groups (4-9%.

  19. Germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 and ten-year survival for women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candido-dos-Reis, Francisco J; Song, Honglin; Goode, Ellen L

    2015-01-01

    ,314 patients from previously reported studies. All participants had been screened for deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Survival time was analyzed for the combined data using Cox proportional hazard models with BRCA1 and BRCA2 as time-varying covariates. Competing risks were analyzed using......PURPOSE: To analyze the effect of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 on mortality in patients with ovarian cancer up to 10 years after diagnosis. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We used unpublished survival time data for 2,242 patients from two case-control studies and extended survival time data for 4...... Fine and Gray model. RESULTS: The combined 10-year overall survival rate was 30% [95% confidence interval (CI), 28%-31%] for non-carriers, 25% (95% CI, 22%-28%) for BRCA1 carriers, and 35% (95% CI, 30%-41%) for BRCA2 carriers. The HR for BRCA1 was 0.53 at time zero and increased over time becoming...

  20. Discrimination of germline V genes at different sequencing lengths and mutational burdens: A new tool for identifying and evaluating the reliability of V gene assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bochao; Meng, Wenzhao; Prak, Eline T Luning; Hershberg, Uri

    2015-12-01

    Immune repertoires are collections of lymphocytes that express diverse antigen receptor gene rearrangements consisting of Variable (V), (Diversity (D) in the case of heavy chains) and Joining (J) gene segments. Clonally related cells typically share the same germline gene segments and have highly similar junctional sequences within their third complementarity determining regions. Identifying clonal relatedness of sequences is a key step in the analysis of immune repertoires. The V gene is the most important for clone identification because it has the longest sequence and the greatest number of sequence variants. However, accurate identification of a clone's germline V gene source is challenging because there is a high degree of similarity between different germline V genes. This difficulty is compounded in antibodies, which can undergo somatic hypermutation. Furthermore, high-throughput sequencing experiments often generate partial sequences and have significant error rates. To address these issues, we describe a novel method to estimate which germline V genes (or alleles) cannot be discriminated under different conditions (read lengths, sequencing errors or somatic hypermutation frequencies). Starting with any set of germline V genes, this method measures their similarity using different sequencing lengths and calculates their likelihood of unambiguous assignment under different levels of mutation. Hence, one can identify, under different experimental and biological conditions, the germline V genes (or alleles) that cannot be uniquely identified and bundle them together into groups of specific V genes with highly similar sequences.

  1. DNA methylation patterns of candidate genes regulated by thymine DNA glycosylase in patients with TP53 germline mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.P. Fortes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS is a rare, autosomal dominant, hereditary cancer predisposition disorder. In Brazil, the p.R337H TP53 founder mutation causes the variant form of LFS, Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome. The occurrence of cancer and age of disease onset are known to vary, even in patients carrying the same mutation, and several mechanisms such as genetic and epigenetic alterations may be involved in this variability. However, the extent of involvement of such events has not been clarified. It is well established that p53 regulates several pathways, including the thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG pathway, which regulates the DNA methylation of several genes. This study aimed to identify the DNA methylation pattern of genes potentially related to the TDG pathway (CDKN2A, FOXA1, HOXD8, OCT4, SOX2, and SOX17 in 30 patients with germline TP53 mutations, 10 patients with wild-type TP53, and 10 healthy individuals. We also evaluated TDG expression in patients with adrenocortical tumors (ADR with and without the p.R337H TP53 mutation. Gene methylation patterns of peripheral blood DNA samples assessed by pyrosequencing revealed no significant differences between the three groups. However, increased TDG expression was observed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in p.R337H carriers with ADR. Considering the rarity of this phenotype and the relevance of these findings, further studies using a larger sample set are necessary to confirm our results.

  2. DNA methylation patterns of candidate genes regulated by thymine DNA glycosylase in patients with TP53 germline mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, F.P. [CIPE, Laboratrio de Oncogentica Molecular, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kuasne, H. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Marchi, F.A. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Programa Inter-Institucional em Bioinformtica, Instituto de Matemtica e Estatstica, Universidade So Paulo, So Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miranda, P.M. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rogatto, S.R. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Achatz, M.I. [CIPE, Laboratrio de Oncogentica Molecular, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Oncogentica, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, So Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-04-28

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, hereditary cancer predisposition disorder. In Brazil, the p.R337H TP53 founder mutation causes the variant form of LFS, Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome. The occurrence of cancer and age of disease onset are known to vary, even in patients carrying the same mutation, and several mechanisms such as genetic and epigenetic alterations may be involved in this variability. However, the extent of involvement of such events has not been clarified. It is well established that p53 regulates several pathways, including the thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) pathway, which regulates the DNA methylation of several genes. This study aimed to identify the DNA methylation pattern of genes potentially related to the TDG pathway (CDKN2A, FOXA1, HOXD8, OCT4, SOX2, and SOX17) in 30 patients with germline TP53mutations, 10 patients with wild-type TP53, and 10 healthy individuals. We also evaluated TDG expression in patients with adrenocortical tumors (ADR) with and without the p.R337H TP53 mutation. Gene methylation patterns of peripheral blood DNA samples assessed by pyrosequencing revealed no significant differences between the three groups. However, increased TDG expression was observed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in p.R337H carriers with ADR. Considering the rarity of this phenotype and the relevance of these findings, further studies using a larger sample set are necessary to confirm our results.

  3. Survey of familial glioma and role of germline p16INK4A/p14ARF and p53 mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Lindsay B; Armstrong, Georgina N; Olver, Bianca D

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of familial propensity to glioma as a distinct clinical entity beyond a few rare syndromes; however its genetic basis is poorly understood. The role of p16(INK4A)/p14(ARF) and p53 mutations in sporadic glioma provides a strong rationale for investigating germline...... mutations in these genes as a cause of familial glioma. To survey the familial glioma phenotype and examine the contribution of germline mutation in p16(INK4A)/p14(ARF) and p53 to the disease we have analyzed a series of 101 index familial cases collected through the GLIOGENE Consortium (http......://braintumor.epigenetic.org/). There was little evidence for within family correlations for tumour histology, suggesting generic susceptibility to glial tumors. We did not detect any functional mutations in p16(INK4A) or p14(ARF). One index case with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) diagnosed at age 54 and had a family history comprised...

  4. Bone marrow pathologic abnormalities in familial platelet disorder with propensity for myeloid malignancy and germline RUNX1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Loghavi, Sanam; DiNardo, Courtney D; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Jabbour, Elias; Routbort, Mark J; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Khoury, Joseph D

    2017-06-28

    A subset of patients with familial platelet disorder with propensity to myeloid malignancy and germline RUNX1 mutation develops hematological malignancies, often myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia, currently recognized in the 2016 WHO classification. Patients who develop hematologic malignancies are typically young, respond poorly to conventional therapy, and need allogeneic stem cell transplant from non-familial donors. Understanding the spectrum of bone marrow morphologic and genetic findings in these patients is critical to ensure diagnostic accuracy and develop criteria to recognize the onset of hematologic malignancies, particularly myelodysplastic syndrome. However, bone marrow features remain poorly characterized. To address this knowledge gap, we analyzed the clinicopathologic and genetic findings of 11 patients from 7 pedigrees. Of these, 6 patients did not develop hematologic malignancies over a 22-month follow-up period; 5 patients developed hematologic malignancies (3 acute myeloid leukemia; 2 myelodysplastic syndrome). All patients had thrombocytopenia at initial presentation. All 6 patients who did not develop hematologic malignancies showed baseline bone marrow abnormalities: low-for-age cellularity (n=4), dysmegakaryopoiesis (n=5), megakaryocytic hypoplasia/hyperplasia (n=5), and eosinophilia (n=4). Two patients had multiple immunophenotypic alterations in CD34-positive myeloblasts; 1 patient had clonal hematopoiesis. In contrast, patients who developed hematologic malignancies had additional cytopenia(s) (n=4), abnormal platelet granulation (n=5), bone marrow hypercellularity (n=4), dysplasia in ≥2 lineages including megakaryocytes (n=3) and acquired clonal genetic aberrations (n=5). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that specific bone marrow abnormalities and acquired genetic alterations may be harbingers of progression to hematological malignancies in patients with familial platelet disorder with germline RUNX1 mutation

  5. Effects of MDM2, MDM4 and TP53 codon 72 polymorphisms on cancer risk in a cohort study of carriers of TP53 germline mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenying Fang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that MDM2 SNP309 and p53 codon 72 have modifier effects on germline P53 mutations, but those studies relied on case-only studies with small sample sizes. The impact of MDM4 polymorphism on tumor onset in germline mutation carriers has not previously been studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed 213 p53 germline mutation carriers including 168(78.9% affected with cancer and 174 who had genotypic data. We analyzed time to first cancer using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards methods, comparing risks according to polymorphism genotypes. For MDM2 SNP309, a significant difference of 9.0 years in the average age of cancer diagnosis was observed between GG/GT and TT carriers (18.6 versus 27.6 years, P = 0.0087. The hazards ratio was 1.58 (P = 0.03 comparing risks among individuals with GG/GT to risk among TT, but this effect was only significant in females (HR = 1.60, P = 0.02. Compared to other genotypes, P53 codon 72 PP homozygotes had a 2.24 times (P = 0.03 higher rate for time to develop cancer. We observed a multiplicative joint effect of MDM2 and p53 codon72 polymorphism on risk. The MDM4 polymorphism had no significant effects. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that the MDM2 SNP309 G allele is associated with cancer risk in p53 germline mutation carriers and accelerates time to cancer onset with a pronounced effect in females. A multiplicative joint effect exists between the MDM2 SNP309 G allele and the p53 codon 72 G allele in the risk of cancer development. Our results further define cancer risk in carriers of germline p53 mutations.

  6. A novel germline SDHB mutation in a gastrointestinal stromal tumor patient without bona fide features of the Carney-Stratakis dyad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestino, Ricardo; Lima, Jorge; Faustino, Alexandra; Máximo, Valdemar; Gouveia, António; Vinagre, João; Soares, Paula; Lopes, José Manuel

    2012-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchyme neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Gain-of-function somatic mutations of the KIT or PDGFRA genes represent the most prevalent molecular alterations in GISTs. In Carney-Stratakis dyad, patients portray germline mutations of the succinate dehydrogenase subunits B (SDHB), C (SDHC) and D (SDHD) and develop multifocal GISTs and multicentric paragangliomas (PGLs). We herein report a novel germline SDHB mutation (c.T282A--Ile44Asn) occurring in a 26 years-old patient diagnosed with a spindle cell intermediate risk GIST that did not present KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF gene mutations. Further analyses revealed loss of the wild-type SDHB allele and complete loss of SDHB expression in the tumor tissue. After genetic screening of other family members, we detected in the patient's mother a SDHB mutation without any clinical/laboratorial evidence of GIST or PGL. Altogether, our findings (germline SDHB mutation with absence of PGL in the index case and of GIST and/or PGL in his mother) raise the possibility that this familiar setting corresponds to an incomplete phenotype of the Carney-Stratakis dyad.

  7. Evolutionary pattern of mutation in the factor IX genes of great apes: How does it compare to the pattern of recent germline mutation in patients with hemophilia B?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grouse, L.H.; Ketterling, R.P.; Sommer, S.S. [Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Most mutations causing hemophilia B have arisen within the past 150 years. By correcting for multiple biases, the underlying rates of spontaneous germline mutation have been estimated in the factor IX gene. From these rates, an underlying pattern of mutation has emerged. To determine if this pattern compares to a underlying pattern found in the great apes, sequence changes were determined in intronic regions of the factor IX gene. The following species were studied: Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee), Pongo pygmacus (orangutan) and Homo sapiens. Intronic sequences at least 200 bp from a splice junction were randomly chosen, amplified by cross-species PCR, and sequenced. These regions are expected to be subject to little if any selective pressure. Early diverged species of Old World monkeys were also studied to help determine the direction of mutational changes. A total of 62 sequence changes were observed. Initial data suggest that the average pattern since evolution of the great apes has a paucity of transitions at CpG dinucleotides and an excess of microinsertions to microdeletions when compared to the pattern observed in humans during the past 150 years (p<.05). A larger study is in progress to confirm these results.

  8. Deleterious Germline BLM Mutations and the Risk for Early-onset Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voer, R.M. de; Hahn, M.M.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Hoischen, A.; Gilissen, C.F.; Henkes, A.; Spruijt, L.; Zelst-Stams, W.A. van; Kets, C.M.; Verwiel, E.T.P.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Schackert, H.K.; Kessel, A.G. van; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ligtenberg, M.J.; Kuiper, R.P.

    2015-01-01

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and increased cancer risk, caused by biallelic mutations in the RECQL-helicase gene BLM. Previous studies have led to conflicting conclusions as to whether carriers of heterozygous BLM mutations have an increa

  9. Whole-genome sequencing in autism identifies hot spots for de novo germline mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelson, Jacob J.; Shi, Yujian; Gujral, Madhusudan

    2012-01-01

    De novo mutation plays an important role in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Notably, pathogenic copy number variants (CNVs) are characterized by high mutation rates. We hypothesize that hypermutability is a property of ASD genes and may also include nucleotide-substitution hot spots. We...

  10. Deleterious Germline BLM Mutations and the Risk for Early-onset Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voer, R.M. de; Hahn, M.M.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Hoischen, A.; Gilissen, C.F.; Henkes, A.; Spruijt, L.; Zelst-Stams, W.A. van; Kets, C.M.; Verwiel, E.T.P.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Schackert, H.K.; Kessel, A.G. van; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ligtenberg, M.J.; Kuiper, R.P.

    2015-01-01

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and increased cancer risk, caused by biallelic mutations in the RECQL-helicase gene BLM. Previous studies have led to conflicting conclusions as to whether carriers of heterozygous BLM mutations have an increa

  11. Regulation of epsilon germline transcription and switch region mutations by IgH locus 3' enhancers in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurencikiene, Jurga; Tamosiunas, Vytas; Severinson, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Germline (GL) transcription is regulated by specific promoters and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) 3' locus enhancers and is necessary for Ig class-switch recombination (CSR). We have generated different transgenic lines containing the GL epsilon promoter, switch (S) epsilon region, and constant (C) epsilon region with or without the DNase I-sensitive regions (HS) 3A-HS1,2 or HS3B-HS4 3' IgH enhancer pairs. The enhancerless construct was expressed in B cells activated by interleukin (IL)-4 and CD40, thus resembling regulation of the endogenous gene. Both enhancer-containing transgenes efficiently increased expression in B cells and were strongly up-regulated by stimuli. In addition, Sepsilon regions of the transgene containing HS3B-HS4 were mutated in activated, sorted B cells. Such mutations are known to precede CSR and are dependent on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Our findings show that all elements necessary for recruitment of the recombination machinery are present in the transgene containing HS3 and HS4. These enhancers probably provide something more specific than mere increased accessibility of switch regions. We propose that transcription factors binding the enhancers help to target the recombination machinery to the switch regions.

  12. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas in a Patient with Germline BRCA2 Mutation-Response to Neoadjuvant Radiochemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheis, Anne M; Nguyen, Gia Phuong; Ortmann, Monika; Kruis, Wolfgang; Büttner, Reinhard; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Markiefka, Birgid

    2014-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare malignant neoplasia, accounting for approximately 0.5-2% of all malignant pancreatic tumors. These lesions are characterized by poor prognosis. Here we report on a case of a 57-year-old female patient with known BRCA2 germline mutation presenting with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas as the only malignancy. The tumor was locally advanced at the first presentation but responded almost completely to neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy. Our case highlights the facts (i) that pancreatic carcinomas belong to the tumor spectrum of patients with the BRCA2-associated hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and (ii) that tumors of the pancreas can represent the first or even the only manifestation of HBOC. Furthermore, this case of a nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma indicates that HBOC-associated carcinomas of the pancreas might be characterized by a broader morphological spectrum than was previously thought. Since BRCA mutations cause deficiency of DNA double-strand breakage repair in tumors, neoadjuvant treatment regimens might become a reasonable option in HBOC-associated pancreatic carcinomas. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a primary pancreatic squamous cell carcinoma in a patient with this particular genetic background of BRCA2-associated HBOC.

  13. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas in a Patient with Germline BRCA2 Mutation-Response to Neoadjuvant Radiochemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Schultheis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare malignant neoplasia, accounting for approximately 0.5–2% of all malignant pancreatic tumors. These lesions are characterized by poor prognosis. Here we report on a case of a 57-year-old female patient with known BRCA2 germline mutation presenting with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas as the only malignancy. The tumor was locally advanced at the first presentation but responded almost completely to neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy. Our case highlights the facts (i that pancreatic carcinomas belong to the tumor spectrum of patients with the BRCA2-associated hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC and (ii that tumors of the pancreas can represent the first or even the only manifestation of HBOC. Furthermore, this case of a nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma indicates that HBOC-associated carcinomas of the pancreas might be characterized by a broader morphological spectrum than was previously thought. Since BRCA mutations cause deficiency of DNA double-strand breakage repair in tumors, neoadjuvant treatment regimens might become a reasonable option in HBOC-associated pancreatic carcinomas. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a primary pancreatic squamous cell carcinoma in a patient with this particular genetic background of BRCA2-associated HBOC.

  14. Evidence for clinical efficacy of mitomycin C in heavily pretreated ovarian cancer patients carrying germ-line BRCA1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseyenko, Vladimir M; Chubenko, Vyacheslav A; Moiseyenko, Fedor V; Zhabina, Albina S; Gorodnova, Tatiana V; Komarov, Yuri I; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Sokolenko, Anna P; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2014-10-01

    Ovarian carcinomas (OC) arising in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers demonstrate pronounced sensitivity to platinum-based therapy due to deficiency of double-strand break DNA repair. However, the choice of subsequent treatment lines for this category of women remains complicated. We considered mitomycin C for heavily pretreated hereditary OC patients, based on multiple evidence for BRCA-specific activity of this drug. Twelve patients carrying BRCA1 germ-line mutation were included in the study. All women had a history of surgical intervention followed by adjuvant platinum-based therapy; three patients also received platinating agents prior the operation. The number of preceding treatment lines for metastatic disease was one for three patients, two for four patients, three for two patients, four for two patients and six for one woman. Administration of mitomycin C (10 mg/m2, every 4 weeks) resulted in one complete response (duration 36 weeks), two partial responses (duration 36 and 48 weeks) and six instances of disease stabilization (duration 12, 16, 20, 24, 24 and 24 weeks). In addition, three patients with the stable disease showed a decline of CA-125 level. We conclude that mitomycin C may deserve further evaluation in clinical trials involving BRCA1/2-related cancers.

  15. Contributions of intrinsic mutation rate and selfish selection to levels of de novo HRAS mutations in the paternal germline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannoulatou, Eleni; McVean, Gilean; Taylor, Indira B

    2013-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS), a congenital disorder associated with predisposition to malignancy. Based on the epidemiology of CS and the occurrence of HRAS mutations in spermatocytic seminoma, we proposed that activating HRAS mutations become enriched in sperm through a process akin to tumorigenesis, termed...

  16. NRAS germline variant G138R and multiple rare somatic mutations on APC in colorectal cancer patients in Taiwan by next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pi-Yueh; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Chang, Nai-Chung; Chang, Shih-Cheng; Wang, Mei-Chia; Tsai, Shu-Hui; Wen, Ying-Hao; Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chan, Err-Cheng; Lu, Jang-Jih

    2016-06-21

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) arises from mutations in a subset of genes. We investigated the germline and somatic mutation spectrum of patients with CRC in Taiwan by using the AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel V2. Fifty paired freshly frozen stage 0-IV CRC tumors and adjacent normal tissue were collected. Blood DNA from 20 healthy donors were used for comparison of germline mutations. Variants were identified using an ion-torrent personal genomic machine and subsequently confirmed by Sanger sequencing or pyrosequencing. Five nonsynonymous germline variants on 4 cancer susceptible genes, CDH1, APC, MLH1, and NRAS, were observed in 6 patients with CRC (12%). Among them, oncogene NRAS G138R variant was identified as having a predicted damaging effect on protein function, which has never been reported by other laboratories. CDH1 T340A variants were presented in 3 patients. The germline variants in the cancer patients differed completely from those found in asymptomatic controls. Furthermore, a total of 56 COSMIC and 21 novel somatic variants distributed in 20 genes were detected in 44 (88%) of the CRC samples. High inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity levels were observed. Nine rare variants located in the β-catenin binding region of the APC gene were discovered, 7 of which could cause amino acid frameshift and might have a pathogenic effect. In conclusion, panel-based mutation detection by using a high-throughput sequencing platform can elucidate race-dependent cancer genomes. This approach facilitates identifying individuals at high risk and aiding the recognition of novel mutations as targets for drug development.

  17. Is Increased Low-dose somatic Radiosensitivity Associated with Increased Transgenerational Germline Mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, David J.

    2008-10-02

    Using single-molecule polymerase chain reaction, the frequency of spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation at an expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) locus was studied in DNA samples extracted from sperm and bone marrow of Atm knockout (Atm+/–) heterozygous male mice. The frequency of spontaneous mutation in sperm and bone marrow in Atm+/– males did not significantly differ from that in wild-type BALB/c mice. Acute gamma-ray exposure did not affect ESTR mutation frequency in bone marrow and resulted in similar increases in sperm samples taken from Atm+/– and BALB/c males. Taken together, these results suggest that the Atm haploinsufficiency analyzed in our study does not affect spontaneous and radiation-induced ESTR mutation frequency in mice.

  18. Identification of 3 novel VHL germ-line mutations in Danish VHL patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandanell, Mette; Friis-Hansen, Lennart Jan; Sunde, Lone

    2012-01-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a hereditary cancer syndrome in which the patients develop retinal and central nervous system hemangioblastomas, pheochromocytomas and clear-cell renal tumors. The autosomal dominant disease is caused by mutations in the VHL gene.......von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a hereditary cancer syndrome in which the patients develop retinal and central nervous system hemangioblastomas, pheochromocytomas and clear-cell renal tumors. The autosomal dominant disease is caused by mutations in the VHL gene....

  19. A series of 38 novel germline and somatic mutations of NIPBL in Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizon, M; Henry, M; Michot, C; Baumann, C; Bazin, A; Bessières, B; Blesson, S; Cordier-Alex, M-P; David, A; Delahaye-Duriez, A; Delezoïde, A-L; Dieux-Coeslier, A; Doco-Fenzy, M; Faivre, L; Goldenberg, A; Layet, V; Loget, P; Marlin, S; Martinovic, J; Odent, S; Pasquier, L; Plessis, G; Prieur, F; Putoux, A; Rio, M; Testard, H; Bonnefont, J-P; Cormier-Daire, V

    2016-05-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome is a multisystemic developmental disorder mainly related to de novo heterozygous NIPBL mutation. Recently, NIPBL somatic mosaicism has been highlighted through buccal cell DNA study in some patients with a negative molecular analysis on leukocyte DNA. Here, we present a series of 38 patients with a Cornelia de Lange syndrome related to a heterozygous NIPBL mutation identified by Sanger sequencing. The diagnosis was based on the following criteria: (i) intrauterine growth retardation and postnatal short stature, (ii) feeding difficulties and/or gastro-oesophageal reflux, (iii) microcephaly, (iv) intellectual disability, and (v) characteristic facial features. We identified 37 novel NIPBL mutations including 34 in leukocytes and 3 in buccal cells only. All mutations shown to have arisen de novo when parent blood samples were available. The present series confirms the difficulty in predicting the phenotype according to the NIPBL mutation. Until now, somatic mosaicism has been observed for 20 cases which do not seem to be consistently associated with a milder phenotype. Besides, several reports support a postzygotic event for those cases. Considering these elements, we recommend a first-line buccal cell DNA analysis in order to improve gene testing sensitivity in Cornelia de Lange syndrome and genetic counselling. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Multiple jejunal cancers resulting from combination of germline APC and MLH1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindor, Noralane M; Smyrk, Tom C; Buehler, Sheila; Gunawardena, Shanaka R; Thomas, Brittany C; Limburg, Paul; Kirmani, Salman; Thibodeau, Stephen N

    2012-12-01

    Double heterozygotes for mutations in APC and a DNA mismatch repair gene are extremely rare. We report on an individual who had truncating mutations in APC and MLH1 whose clinical presentation initially resembled Familial Adenomatous Polyposis but then emerged as a novel phenotype with multiple jejunal carcinomas. We have reviewed the relevant literature on double heterozygotes and based on what has been reported to date, this phenotype was not anticipated. It may be useful for clinicians to be aware of this observation as clinical screening guidelines are proposed for such individuals.

  1. Germline mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility gene PTEN are rare in high-risk non-BRCA1/2 French Canadian breast cancer families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guénard, Frédéric; Labrie, Yvan; Ouellette, Geneviève; Beauparlant, Charles Joly; Bessette, Paul; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Laframboise, Rachel; Lépine, Jean; Lespérance, Bernard; Pichette, Roxane; Plante, Marie; Durocher, Francine

    2007-01-01

    Cowden syndrome is a disease associated with an increase in breast cancer susceptibility. Alleles in PTEN and other breast cancer susceptibility genes would be responsible for approximately 25% of the familial component of breast cancer risk, BRCA1 and BRCA2 being the two major genes responsible for this inherited risk. In order to evaluate the proportion of high-risk French Canadian non-BRCA1/BRCA2 breast/ovarian cancer families potentially harboring a PTEN germline mutation, the whole coding and flanking intronic sequences were analyzed in a series of 98 breast cancer cases. Although no germline mutation has been identified in the coding region, our study led to the identification of four intronic variants. Further investigations were performed to analyze the effect of these variants, alone and/or in combination, on splicing and PTEN protein levels. Despite suggestive evidence emerging from in silico analyses, the presence of these intronic variants do not seem to alter RNA splicing or PTEN protein levels. In addition, as loss of PTEN or part of it has been reported, Western blot analysis has also been performed. No major deletion could be identified in our cohort. Therefore, assuming a Poisson distribution for the frequency of deleterious mutation in our cohort, if the frequency of such deleterious mutation was 2%, we would have had a 90% or greater chance of observing at least one such mutation. These results suggest that PTEN germline mutations are rare and are unlikely to account for a significant proportion of familial breast cancer cases in the French Canadian population.

  2. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Germline Mutations Screening in Algerian Breast/Ovarian Cancer Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Cherbal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women in Algeria. The contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations to hereditary breast/ovarian cancer in Algerian population is largely unknown. Here, we describe analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 86 individuals from 70 families from an Algerian cohort with a personal and family history suggestive of genetic predisposition to breast cancer.

  3. Identification of a KEAP1 germline mutation in a family with multinodular goitre.

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    Risa Teshiba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The familial clustering of multinodular goitres (MNGs with a dominant mode of inheritance has been repeatedly reported. Linkage studies have revealed several genetic loci responsible for familial MNG; however, most of the causative variants remain unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Through linkage analysis using single-nucleotide polymorphism markers, we identified a new MNG locus on 19p13.2-q12 in a five-generation Japanese MNG family. Subsequent mutation searches focusing on the candidate 25-Mb region of chromosome 19 identified a heterozygous mutation, c.879_880delinsA, p.Asp294Thr, fs*23, in exon 3 of the KEAP1, which plays a central role in the cytoprotection pathway against oxidative stress. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed low expression of wild type KEAP1 accompanied by no transcription product of mutant allele in the normal and goitre region of thyroid tissues obtained from the proband. In agreement with previous studies showing that KEAP1 negatively regulates NFE2L2, the NFE2L2 target genes GSTA4 and GCLC were up-regulated in the thyroid tissues of the patient. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified the first KEAP1 mutation in MNG. The results provide insights into the pathogenesis of goitre which develops in the organ continuously exposed to oxidative stress during hormone synthesis.

  4. Germline RAD51B truncating mutation in a family with cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, Karin A W; Aoude, Lauren G; Golmard, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Known melanoma predisposition genes only account for around 40% of high-density melanoma families. Other rare mutations are likely to play a role in melanoma predisposition. RAD51B plays an important role in DNA repair through homologous recombination, and inactivation of RAD51B has been implicated...... this case report is consistent with melanoma being part of the RAD51B cancer spectrum further population-based screening of large case-control sample series will be needed to definitively establish if this is the case....

  5. Germline inactivating mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein gene in a large cohort of sporadic acromegaly: mutations are found in a subset of young patients with macroadenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazabat, Laure; Libè, Rossella; Perlemoine, Karine; René-Corail, Fernande; Burnichon, Nelly; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Dupasquier-Fediaevsky, Laurence; Bertagna, Xavier; Clauser, Eric; Chanson, Philippe; Bertherat, Jérôme; Raffin-Sanson, Marie-Laure

    2007-07-01

    Germline mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein gene (AIP) have recently been described in three families with GH or prolactin-secreting tumors, as well as in a few patients with apparently sporadic somatotropinomas. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of AIP mutations in a large cohort of patients with apparently sporadic GH-secreting tumors. One hundred and fifty-four patients were included in a prospective cohort designed to study the genetic predisposition to GH-secreting tumors together with 270 controls. In all these subjects, the entire coding sequence of the AIP gene was screened for germline mutations. AIP mutations were detected in 5 out of 154 patients (3%): nonsense mutations in exon 4 (p.Lys201X; n = 2) and in exon 6 (p.Arg304X), one deletion in exon 3 (c.404delA; pHis135LeufsX21), and one mutation affecting the splice acceptor site of exon 4 (c.469-2 A > G). The five patients with an AIP mutation were significantly younger (mean age +/- S.D.: 25 +/- 10 vs 43 +/- 14 years, P = 0.005) and three of them presented with gigantism. One missense mutation (p.Arg304Gln) was found in a single patient that was absent in all controls. Germline mutations of the AIP gene were found in a small proportion of patients with sporadic pituitary somatotropinomas. This study shows that age and gigantism are simple clinical features which can help to select patients for mutation screening. It also supports the role of AIP in pituitary tumorigenesis.

  6. Patient affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 and thyroid C-cell hyperplasia harboring pathogenic germ-line mutations in both NF1 and RET genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolino, Tonino; Lai, Roberta; Giachè, Valentino; Melchionda, Salvatore; Carella, Massimo; Delitala, Alessandro; Mannelli, Massimo; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2014-02-25

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a rare autosomal dominant disease with an estimated incidence of 1 in 3000/3500 live births. NF1 is caused by a mutation in a gene which encodes a protein known as neurofibromin. In up to 5% of cases, NF1 is associated with pheochromocytomas. RET proto-oncogene encodes a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family involved in the normal development or the neoplastic growth of neural crest cell lineages. Germ-line RET mutations account for cases of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), an autosomal dominant genetic syndrome where medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is the major and more clinically severe feature, with nearly complete penetrance. C-cell hyperplasia (CCH) is described in MEN2 patients, and it has been implicated as the precursor of in situ MTC. Patients with RET mutations develop pheochromocytomas in 50% of cases. Rarely, patients with NF1 have been found to present, in addition to the NF1 clinical picture, other lesions, such as parathyroid hyperplasia/adenoma and/or medullary thyroid carcinoma. In spite of the presence of these MEN2 lesions, in none of these patients mutations of gene RET have been found so far. In this report, we describe the first case of a patient affected by a germ-line mutation in both NF1 and RET genes.

  7. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Domagala

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs and to poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors.Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers.Thirty five (22.2% of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7% of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%, and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%. In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group.Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  8. Mutational status of overexpressed p16 in head and neck cancer: evidence for germline mutation of p16/p14ARF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J C; Borchers, J; Danahey, D; Smith, S; Stover, D G; Agrawal, A; Malone, J P; Schuller, D E; Weghorst, C M; Holinga, A J; Lingam, K; Patel, C R; Esham, B

    2002-08-01

    least, p14ARF may be a selective target for alteration, independently of p16. Analysis of a normal tissue specimen obtained from a negative tumor margin, and a blood sample obtained approximately five years after surgery indicate that this p14ARF-specific alteration may represent a germline mutation.

  9. Lack of germline A339V mutation in thyroid transcription factor-1 (TITF-1/NKX2.1 gene in familial papillary thyroid cancer

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    Cantara Silvia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thyroid cancer may have a familial predisposition but a specific germline alteration responsible for the disease has not been discovered yet. We have shown that familial papillary thyroid cancer (FPTC patients have an imbalance in telomere-telomerase complex with short telomeres and increased telomerase activity. A germline mutation (A339V in thyroid transcription factor-1 has been described in patients with multinodular goiter and papillary thyroid cancer. In this report, the presence of the A339V mutation and the telomere length has been studied in FPTC patients and unaffected family members. All samples analyzed displayed a pattern typical of the homozygous wild type revealing the absence of the A339V mutation. Shortening of telomeres was confirmed in all patients. We concluded that the A339V mutation in thyroid transcription factor-1 (TITF-1/NKX2.1 is not correlated with the familial form of PTC, even when the tumor was in the context of multinodular goiter.

  10. Late manifestation of subclinical hyperthyroidism after goitrogenesis in an index patient with a N670S TSH receptor germline mutation masquerading as TSH receptor antibody negative Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaarschmidt, J; Paschke, S; Özerden, M; Jäschke, H; Huth, S; Eszlinger, M; Meller, J; Paschke, R

    2012-12-01

    In 27 families with familial non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism (FNAH) reported up to date, the onset of hyperthyroidism varies from 18 months to 60 years. Also the manifestation of goitres is variable in these families. A 74-year-old woman first presented at the age of 69 years with tachyarrhythmia and hypertension. After initial treatment of her hypertension and oral anticoagulation for her intermittent atrial fibrillation, a thyroid workup revealed a suppressed TSH and normal fT3 and fT4. TPO, TSH receptor (TSHR), and thyroglobulin antibodies were negative. Thyroid ultrasound revealed a thyroid volume of 102 ml with several nodules with diameters of up to 2.6 cm right and up to 1.8 cm left. Scintigraphy showed a homogeneous Technetium-99 m ((99 m)Tc) uptake of 1.27%. She was subsequently treated with 1 GBq radioiodine ((131)I). At the age of 74, her thyroid function was normal and her thyroid volume decreased to 90 ml. Because of the diffuse (99 m)Tc uptake and the negative TPO, TSHR, and thyroglobulin antibodies, genetic analysis of her TSHR gene was performed, in spite of her negative family history for hyperthyroidism. Sequencing revealed a N670S TSHR germline mutation. Previous in vitro characterisation of this TSHR mutation suggests a weak constitutive activity, yet the experimental data are ambiguous. This case illustrates the necessity to analyse patients with hyperthyroidism accompanied by diffuse (99 m)Tc uptake and negative TPO, TSHR, and thyroglobulin antibodies for TSHR germline mutations. Moreover, it demonstrates that TSHR germline mutations may first lead to longstanding nodular goitrogenesis before the late manifestation of subclinical hyperthyroidism.

  11. A Phase I-II Study of the Oral PARP Inhibitor Rucaparib in Patients with Germline BRCA1/2-Mutated Ovarian Carcinoma or Other Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristeleit, Rebecca; Shapiro, Geoffrey I; Burris, Howard A; Oza, Amit M; LoRusso, Patricia; Patel, Manish R; Domchek, Susan M; Balmaña, Judith; Drew, Yvette; Chen, Lee-May; Safra, Tamar; Montes, Ana; Giordano, Heidi; Maloney, Lara; Goble, Sandra; Isaacson, Jeff; Xiao, Jim; Borrow, Jen; Rolfe, Lindsey; Shapira-Frommer, Ronnie

    2017-08-01

    Purpose: Rucaparib is a potent, oral, small-molecule PARP inhibitor. This phase I-II study was the first to evaluate single-agent oral rucaparib at multiple doses.Experimental Design: Part 1 (phase I) sought to determine the MTD, recommended phase II dose (RP2D), and pharmacokinetics of oral rucaparib administered in 21-day continuous cycles in patients with advanced solid tumors. Part 2A (phase II) enrolled patients with platinum-sensitive, high-grade ovarian carcinoma (HGOC) associated with a germline BRCA1/2 mutation who received two to four prior regimens and had a progression-free interval of 6 months or more following their most recent platinum therapy. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed objective response rate (ORR) by RECIST version 1.1.Results: In part 1, 56 patients received oral rucaparib (40 to 500 mg once daily and 240 to 840 mg twice daily). No MTD was identified per protocol-defined criteria; 600 mg twice daily was selected as the RP2D based on manageable toxicity and clinical activity. Pharmacokinetics were approximately dose-proportional across all dose levels. In part 2A, 42 patients with germline BRCA1/2-mutated HGOC received rucaparib 600 mg twice daily. Investigator-assessed ORR was 59.5%. The most common treatment-emergent adverse events (all grades) were asthenia/fatigue (85.7%; 36/42), nausea (83.3%; 35/42), anemia (71.4%; 30/42), alanine transaminase and/or aspartate transaminase elevations (57.1%; 24/42), and vomiting (54.8%; 23/42). Among 98 patients, 5 (5.1%) discontinued because of an adverse event (excluding disease progression).Conclusions: Rucaparib was tolerable and had activity in patients with platinum-sensitive germline BRCA1/2-mutated HGOC. Clin Cancer Res; 23(15); 4095-106. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. High male: Female ratio of germ-line mutations: An alternative explanation for postulated gestational lethality in males in X-linked dominant disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.H. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1996-06-01

    In this paper I suggest that a vastly higher rate of de novo mutations in males than in females would explain some, if not most, X-linked dominant disorders associated with a low incidence of affected males. It is the inclusion of the impact of a high ratio of male:female de novo germ-line mutations that makes this model new and unique. Specifically, it is concluded that, if an X-linked disorder results in a dominant phenotype with a significant reproductive disadvantage (genetic lethality), affected females will, in virtually all cases, arise from de novo germ-line mutations inherited from their fathers rather than from their mothers. Under this hypothesis, the absence of affected males is explained by the simple fact that sons do not inherit their X chromosome (normal or abnormal) from their fathers. Because females who are heterozygous for a dominant disorder will be clinically affected and will, in most cases, either be infertile or lack reproductive opportunities, the mutant gene will not be transmitted by them to the next generation (i.e., it will be a genetic lethal). This, not gestational lethality in males, may explain the absence of affected males in most, if not all, of the 13 known X-linked dominant diseases characterized by high ratios of affected female to male individuals. Evidence suggesting that this mechanism could explain the findings in the Rett syndrome is reviewed in detail. 34 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Germline mutations in NF1 and BRCA1 in a family with neurofibromatosis type 1 and early-onset breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Berta; Balmaña, Judith; Gardenyes, Josep; Valenzuela, Irene; Abad, Oscar; Fàbregas, Pere; Volpini, Víctor; Díez, Orland

    2013-06-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common dominant autosomal disorder caused by mutations in the NF1 gene. The main manifestations of NF1 are café-au-lait spots, neurofibromas, intertriginous freckling, Lisch nodules, and malignancy, including peripheral nerve sheath tumors, central nervous system gliomas, and a variety of other tumors not so clearly defined. The association between NF1 and breast cancer or other gynecologic malignancies seems uncommon and has been scarcely referred in the literature. We describe a family with two females affected by both NF1 and early-onset breast cancer, and a male with NF1. We evaluated whether the concomitance of both disorders could be attributed to a NF1 mutation and its supposed increased risk of breast cancer or to the concurrence of two NF1 and BRCA1/2 germline mutations. Mutation analyses identified a frameshift mutation in BRCA1 and a nonsense mutation in NF1. Our findings stress the importance of considering all phenotypic features in families with both NF1 and breast tumors. To offer a specific risk assessment and management of both conditions, NF1 and BRCA1/2 cancer predisposing genes should be analyzed.

  14. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome due to somatic FAS mutation (ALPS-sFAS) combined with a germline caspase-10 (CASP10) variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Feito, Ana; Melero, Josefa; Mora-Díaz, Sergio; Rodríguez-Vigil, Carmen; Elduayen, Ramón; González-Granado, Luis I; Pérez-Méndez, Dolores; Sánchez-Zapardiel, Elena; Ruiz-García, Raquel; Menchén, Miguela; Díaz-Madroñero, Josefa; Paz-Artal, Estela; Del Orbe-Barreto, Rafael; Riñón, Marta; Allende, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by impaired Fas/FasL-mediated apoptosis of lymphocytes and is characterized by chronic nonmalignant or benign lymphoproliferation, autoimmune manifestations and expansion of double negative (DN) T-cells (TCRαβ+CD4-CD8-). Most cases of ALPS are associated with germline (ALPS-FAS) or somatic (ALPS-sFAS) heterozygous FAS mutations or a combination of both. Here we report three unrelated patients with ALPS-sFAS. Only one of them showed impaired Fas function in PHA-activated T-cells. In this patient, the genetic analysis of the caspase-10 gene (CASP10) identified a heterozygous germline change in exon 9 (c.1337A>G) causing Y446C substitution in the caspase-10 protein. In addition, this patient had a dysregulated T- and B-cell phenotype; circulating lymphocytes showed expansion of T effector memory CD45RA+ (TEMRA) CD4 T-cells, effector memory CD8 T-cells, CD21(low) B-cells and reduced memory switched B-cells. Additionally, this patient showed altered expression in T-cells of several molecules that change during differentiation from naïve to effector cells (CD27, CD95, CD57 and perforin). Molecular alterations in genes of the Fas pathway are necessary for the development of ALPS and this syndrome could be influenced by the concurrent effect of other mutations hitting different genes involved in Fas or related pathways.

  15. Identification of a novel germ-line mutation in the TP53 gene in a Mexican family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Cruz-Hernández Erick

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germ-line mutations of the TP53 gene are known to cause Li-Fraumeni syndrome, an autosomal, dominantly inherited, high-penetrance cancer-predisposition syndrome characterized by the occurrence of a variety of cancers, mainly soft tissue sarcomas, adrenocortical carcinoma, leukemia, breast cancer, and brain tumors. Methods Mutation analysis was based on Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC screening of exons 2-11 of the TP53 gene, sequencing, and cloning of DNA obtained from peripheral blood lymphocytes. Results We report herein on Li Fraumeni syndrome in a family whose members are carriers of a novel TP53 gene mutation at exon 4. The mutation comprises an insertion/duplication of seven nucleotides affecting codon 110 and generating a new nucleotide sequence and a premature stop codon at position 150. With this mutation, the p53 protein that should be translated lacks the majority of the DNA binding domain. Conclusion To our knowledge, this specific alteration has not been reported previously, but we believe it is the cause of the Li-Fraumeni syndrome in this family.

  16. A novel germline PIGA mutation in Ferro-Cerebro-Cutaneous syndrome: a neurodegenerative X-linked epileptic encephalopathy with systemic iron-overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Kathryn J; Margraf, Rebecca L; Carey, John C; Zhou, Holly; Newcomb, Tara M; Coonrod, Emily; Durtschi, Jacob; Mallempati, Kalyan; Kumanovics, Attila; Katz, Ben E; Voelkerding, Karl V; Opitz, John M

    2014-01-01

    Three related males presented with a newly recognized x-linked syndrome associated with neurodegeneration, cutaneous abnormalities, and systemic iron overload. Linkage studies demonstrated that they shared a haplotype on Xp21.3-Xp22.2 and exome sequencing was used to identify candidate variants. Of the segregating variants, only a PIGA mutation segregated with disease in the family. The c.328_330delCCT PIGA variant predicts, p.Leu110del (or c.1030_1032delCTT, p.Leu344del depending on the reference sequence). The unaffected great-grandfather shared his X allele with the proband but he did not have the PIGA mutation, indicating that the mutation arose de novo in his daughter. A single family with a germline PIGA mutation has been reported; affected males had a phenotype characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and severe neurologic impairment resulting in infantile lethality. In contrast, affected boys in the family described here were born without anomalies and were neurologically normal prior to onset of seizures after 6 months of age, with two surviving to the second decade. PIGA encodes an enzyme in the GPI anchor biosynthesis pathway. An affected individual in the family studied here was deficient in GPI anchor proteins on granulocytes but not erythrocytes. In conclusion, the PIGA mutation in this family likely causes a reduction in GPI anchor protein cell surface expression in various cell types, resulting in the observed pleiotropic phenotype involving central nervous system, skin, and iron metabolism.

  17. Prevalence of germline PTEN, BMPR1A, SMAD4, STK11, and ENG mutations in patients with moderate-load colorectal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeow, Joanne; Heald, Brandie; Rybicki, Lisa A; Orloff, Mohammed S; Chen, Jin Lian; Liu, Xiuli; Yerian, Lisa; Willis, Joseph; Lehtonen, Heli J; Lehtonen, Rainer; Mester, Jessica L; Moline, Jessica; Burke, Carol A; Church, James; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Eng, Charis

    2013-06-01

    Gastrointestinal polyposis is a common clinical problem, yet there is no consensus on how to best manage patients with moderate-load polyposis. Identifying genetic features of this disorder could improve management and especially surveillance of these patients. We sought to determine the prevalence of hamartomatous polyposis-associated mutations in the susceptibility genes PTEN, BMPR1A, SMAD4, ENG, and STK11 in individuals with ≥5 gastrointestinal polyps, including at least 1 hamartomatous or hyperplastic/serrated polyp. We performed a prospective, referral-based study of 603 patients (median age: 51 years; range, 2-89 years) enrolled from June 2006 through January 2012. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral lymphocytes and analyzed for specific mutations and large rearrangements in PTEN, BMPR1A, SMAD4, and STK11, as well as mutations in ENG. Recursive partitioning analysis was used to determine cutoffs for continuous variables. The prevalence of mutations was compared using Fisher's exact test. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine univariate and multivariate risk factors. Of 603 patients, 119 (20%) had a personal history of colorectal cancer and most (n = 461 [76%]) had ENG (1.8%), 13 in PTEN (2.2%), 13 in STK11 (2.2%), 20 in BMPR1A (3.3%), and 21 in SMAD4 (3.5%). Univariate clinical predictors for risk of having these mutations included age at presentation younger than 40 years (19% vs 10%; P = .008), a polyp burden of ≥30 (19% vs 11%; P = .014), and male sex (16% vs 10%; P = .03). Patients who had ≥1 ganglioneuroma (29% vs 2%; P < .001) or presented with polyps of ≥3 histologic types (20% vs 2%; P = .003) were more likely to have germline mutations in PTEN. Age younger than 40 years, male sex, and specific polyp histologies are significantly associated with risk of germline mutations in hamartomatous-polyposis associated genes. These associations could guide clinical decision making and further investigations. Copyright © 2013 AGA

  18. A wide range of 3243A>G/tRNALeu(UUR (MELAS mutation loads may segregate in offspring through the female germline bottleneck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pallotti

    Full Text Available Segregation of mutant mtDNA in human tissues and through the germline is debated, with no consensus about the nature and size of the bottleneck hypothesized to explain rapid generational shifts in mutant loads. We investigated two maternal lineages with an apparently different inheritance pattern of the same pathogenic mtDNA 3243A>G/tRNALeu(UUR (MELAS mutation. We collected blood cells, muscle biopsies, urinary epithelium and hair follicles from 20 individuals, as well as oocytes and an ovarian biopsy from one female mutation carrier, all belonging to the two maternal lineages to assess mutant mtDNA load, and calculated the theoretical germline bottleneck size (number of segregating units. We also evaluated "mother-to-offspring" segregations from the literature, for which heteroplasmy assessment was available in at least three siblings besides the proband. Our results showed that mutation load was prevalent in skeletal muscle and urinary epithelium, whereas in blood cells there was an inverse correlation with age, as previously reported. The histoenzymatic staining of the ovarian biopsy failed to show any cytochrome-c-oxidase defective oocyte. Analysis of four oocytes and one offspring from the same unaffected mother of the first family showed intermediate heteroplasmic mutant loads (10% to 75%, whereas very skewed loads of mutant mtDNA (0% or 81% were detected in five offspring of another unaffected mother from the second family. Bottleneck size was 89 segregating units for the first mother and 84 for the second. This was remarkably close to 88, the number of "segregating units" in the "mother-to-offspring" segregations retrieved from literature. In conclusion, a wide range of mutant loads may be found in offspring tissues and oocytes, resulting from a similar theoretical bottleneck size.

  19. Germline mutation screening of the Saethre-Chotzen-associated genes TWIST1 and FGFR3 in families with BRCA1/2-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Annika; Sahlin, Pelle; Emanuelsson, Monica; Carén, Helena; Tarnow, Peter; Martinsson, Tommy; Grönberg, Henrik; Stenman, Göran

    2009-01-01

    Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is one of the most common craniosynostosis syndromes. It is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder with variable expression that is caused by germline mutations in the TWIST1 gene or more rarely in the FGFR2 or FGFR3 genes. We have previously reported that patients with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome have an increased risk of developing breast cancer. Here we have analysed a cohort of 26 women with BRCA1/2-negative hereditary breast cancer to study whether a proportion of these families might have mutations in Saethre-Chotzen-associated genes. DNA sequence analysis of TWIST1 showed no pathogenic mutations in the coding sequence in any of the 26 patients. MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification)-analysis also showed no alterations in copy numbers in any of the craniofacial disorder genes MSX2, ALX4, RUNX2, EFNB1, TWIST1, FGFR1, FGFR2,FGFR3, or FGFR4. Taken together, our findings indicate that mutations in Saethre-Chotzen-associated genes are uncommon or absent in BRCA1/2-negative patients with hereditary breast cancer.

  20. Ovarian metastasis from uveal melanoma with MLH1/PMS2 protein loss in a patient with germline MLH1 mutated Lynch syndrome: consequence or coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, João; Pinto, Carla; Freitas, Micaela; Pinheiro, Manuela; Vizcaino, Rámon; Oliva, Esther; Teixeira, Manuel R; Jerónimo, Carmen; Bartosch, Carla

    2017-03-01

    Currently, uveal melanoma is not considered within the Lynch syndrome tumor spectrum. However, there are studies suggesting a contribution of microsatellite instability in sporadic uveal melanoma tumorigenesis. We report a 45-year-old woman who was referred for genetic counseling due to a family history of Lynch syndrome caused by a MLH1 mutation. She originally underwent enucleation of the right eye secondary to a uveal spindle cell melanoma diagnosed at age 25. The tumor recurred 22 years later presenting as an ovarian metastasis and concurrently a microscopic endometrial endometrioid carcinoma, grade 1/3 was diagnosed. Subsequent studies highlighted that the uveal melanoma showed high microsatellite instability and loss of MLH1 and PMS2 protein expression, with no MLH1 promoter methylation or BRAF mutation. Additionally, a GNAQ mutation was found. We conclude that our patient's uveal melanoma is most likely related to MLH1 germline mutation and thus Lynch syndrome related. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of uveal melanoma showing MLH1/PMS2 protein loss in the context of Lynch syndrome.

  1. Lampe1: an ENU-germline mutation causing spontaneous hepatosteatosis identified through targeted exon-enrichment and next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Sheridan

    Full Text Available Using a small scale ENU mutagenesis approach we identified a recessive germline mutant, designated Lampe1 that exhibited growth retardation and spontaneous hepatosteatosis. Low resolution mapping based on 20 intercrossed Lampe1 mice revealed linkage to a ∼14 Mb interval on the distal site of chromosome 11 containing a total of 285 genes. Exons and 50 bp flanking sequences within the critical region were enriched with sequence capture microarrays and subsequently analyzed by next-generation sequencing. Using this approach 98.1 percent of the targeted DNA was covered with a depth of 10 or more reads per nucleotide and 3 homozygote mutations were identified. Two mutations represented intronic nucleotide changes whereas one mutation affected a splice donor site in intron 11-12 of Palmitoyl Acetyl-coenzyme A oxygenase-1 (Acox1, causing skipping of exon 12. Phenotyping of Acox1(Lampe1 mutants revealed a progression from hepatosteatosis to steatohepatitis, and ultimately hepatocellular carcinoma. The current approach provides a highly efficient and affordable method to identify causative mutations induced by ENU mutagenesis and animal models relevant to human pathology.

  2. A Recurrent Germline Mutation in the 5'UTR of the Androgen Receptor Causes Complete Androgen Insensitivity by Activating Aberrant uORF Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornig, Nadine C; de Beaufort, Carine; Denzer, Friederike; Cools, Martine; Wabitsch, Martin; Ukat, Martin; Kulle, Alexandra E; Schweikert, Hans-Udo; Werner, Ralf; Hiort, Olaf; Audi, Laura; Siebert, Reiner; Ammerpohl, Ole; Holterhus, Paul-Martin

    2016-01-01

    A subset of patients with monogenic disorders lacks disease causing mutations in the protein coding region of the corresponding gene. Here we describe a recurrent germline mutation found in two unrelated patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) generating an upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. We show in patient derived primary genital skin fibroblasts as well as in cell-based reporter assays that this mutation severely impacts AR function by reducing AR protein levels without affecting AR mRNA levels. Importantly, the newly generated uORF translates into a polypeptide and the expression level of this polypeptide inversely correlates with protein translation from the primary ORF of the AR thereby providing a model for AR-5'UTR mediated translational repression. Our findings not only add a hitherto unrecognized genetic cause to complete androgen insensitivity but also underline the importance of 5'UTR mutations affecting uORFs for the pathogenesis of monogenic disorders in general.

  3. A Recurrent Germline Mutation in the 5'UTR of the Androgen Receptor Causes Complete Androgen Insensitivity by Activating Aberrant uORF Translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine C Hornig

    Full Text Available A subset of patients with monogenic disorders lacks disease causing mutations in the protein coding region of the corresponding gene. Here we describe a recurrent germline mutation found in two unrelated patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS generating an upstream open reading frame (uORF in the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR of the androgen receptor (AR gene. We show in patient derived primary genital skin fibroblasts as well as in cell-based reporter assays that this mutation severely impacts AR function by reducing AR protein levels without affecting AR mRNA levels. Importantly, the newly generated uORF translates into a polypeptide and the expression level of this polypeptide inversely correlates with protein translation from the primary ORF of the AR thereby providing a model for AR-5'UTR mediated translational repression. Our findings not only add a hitherto unrecognized genetic cause to complete androgen insensitivity but also underline the importance of 5'UTR mutations affecting uORFs for the pathogenesis of monogenic disorders in general.

  4. A Recurrent Germline Mutation in the 5’UTR of the Androgen Receptor Causes Complete Androgen Insensitivity by Activating Aberrant uORF Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornig, Nadine C.; de Beaufort, Carine; Denzer, Friederike; Cools, Martine; Wabitsch, Martin; Ukat, Martin; Kulle, Alexandra E.; Schweikert, Hans-Udo; Werner, Ralf; Hiort, Olaf; Audi, Laura; Siebert, Reiner; Ammerpohl, Ole; Holterhus, Paul-Martin

    2016-01-01

    A subset of patients with monogenic disorders lacks disease causing mutations in the protein coding region of the corresponding gene. Here we describe a recurrent germline mutation found in two unrelated patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) generating an upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the 5’ untranslated region (5’-UTR) of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. We show in patient derived primary genital skin fibroblasts as well as in cell-based reporter assays that this mutation severely impacts AR function by reducing AR protein levels without affecting AR mRNA levels. Importantly, the newly generated uORF translates into a polypeptide and the expression level of this polypeptide inversely correlates with protein translation from the primary ORF of the AR thereby providing a model for AR-5′UTR mediated translational repression. Our findings not only add a hitherto unrecognized genetic cause to complete androgen insensitivity but also underline the importance of 5′UTR mutations affecting uORFs for the pathogenesis of monogenic disorders in general. PMID:27110943

  5. Nitrile Hydratase Genes Are Present in Multiple Eukaryotic Supergroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marron, Alan O.; Akam, Michael; Walker, Giselle

    2012-01-01

    Background Nitrile hydratases are enzymes involved in the conversion of nitrile-containing compounds into ammonia and organic acids. Although they are widespread in prokaryotes, nitrile hydratases have only been reported in two eukaryotes: the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis and the stramenopile Aureococcus anophagefferens. The nitrile hydratase gene in M. brevicollis was believed to have arisen by lateral gene transfer from a prokaryote, and is a fusion of beta and alpha nitrile hydratase subunits. Only the alpha subunit has been reported in A. anophagefferens. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report the detection of nitrile hydratase genes in five eukaryotic supergroups: opisthokonts, amoebozoa, archaeplastids, CCTH and SAR. Beta-alpha subunit fusion genes are found in the choanoflagellates, ichthyosporeans, apusozoans, haptophytes, rhizarians and stramenopiles, and potentially also in the amoebozoans. An individual alpha subunit is found in a dinoflagellate and an individual beta subunit is found in a haptophyte. Phylogenetic analyses recover a clade of eukaryotic-type nitrile hydratases in the Opisthokonta, Amoebozoa, SAR and CCTH; this is supported by analyses of introns and gene architecture. Two nitrile hydratase sequences from an animal and a plant resolve in the prokaryotic nitrile hydratase clade. Conclusions/Significance The evidence presented here demonstrates that nitrile hydratase genes are present in multiple eukaryotic supergroups, suggesting that a subunit fusion gene was present in the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes. The absence of nitrile hydratase from several sequenced species indicates that subunits were lost in multiple eukaryotic taxa. The presence of nitrile hydratases in many other eukaryotic groups is unresolved due to insufficient data and taxon sampling. The retention and expression of the gene in distantly related eukaryotic species suggests that it plays an important metabolic role. The novel family of eukaryotic

  6. Pediatric inherited cancer predisposition syndromes and TP53 germ-line mutation%儿童遗传性肿瘤易感综合征和TP53基因种系突变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐月佳; 高怡瑾

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric inherited cancer predisposition syndromes are a group of diseases caused by germ-line mutation of cancer related genes. The patients are susceptible to cancers. TP53 germ-line mutation is the most commonly seen mutant gene in cancers that accounts for 20%-30%of all germ-line mutations of inherited cancers. TP53 gene mutation screening could help clinicians to better manage the patients and their family members.%儿童遗传性肿瘤易感综合征是由于肿瘤相关基因的种系突变所导致的一类遗传性疾病,患者具有明显的肿瘤易感倾向。TP53基因的种系突变占到所有遗传性肿瘤的20%~30%,是最常见的肿瘤突变基因。通过对TP53基因的检测,可以帮助临床医师更好的对遗传性肿瘤患者及家庭成员进行管理。

  7. Clinical features and hMSH2/hMLH1 germ-line mutations in Chinese patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Xuan-san; ZHAO Bo; WANG Zhen-jun

    2008-01-01

    Background At least five mismatch repair (MMR) genes, including hMSH2, hMLH1, hPMS, hPMS2, and hMSH6/GTBP, are associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). More than 90% of families with HNPCC harbor the hMSH2 and hMLH1 gene mutations. We have analyzed the clinical features of HNPCC among Chinese patients and report the results of screening for mutations in the hMSH2 and hMLH1 genes.Methods The data concerning gender, site of colorectal cancer (CRC), age at diagnosis, history of synchronous and/or metachronous colorectal cancer, instance of extracolonic cancers, and histopathology of tumors for 126 patients from 28 independent families with HNPCC were collected. Fifteen of the families met the Amsterdam I criteria, and 13 met the Japanese clinical criteria for diagnosis. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral lymphocytes. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) were used to screen the coding region of the hMSH2 and hMLH1 genes. Samples showing abnormal DHPLC profiles were sequenced.Results One hundred and seventy malignant neoplasms were found in the 126 patients, of whom 23 had multiple cancers. Ninety-eight of the patients (77.8%) had colorectal cancers, with an average age at onset of 45.9 years and a right-sided predominance. Eight hMSH2 or hMLH1 gene sequence variations were found in 12 families, and a germ-line G204X nonsense mutation in the third exon of hMSH2 was found, representing the first mutation in an MMR gene ever found in people of Chinese Mongolian ethnicity.Conclusions HNPCC is a typical autosomally dominant hereditary disease, characterized by early onset, a predominance of proximal colorectal cancer, and multiple synchronous and metachronous colorectal cancers. DHPLC is a powerful tool for detecting mutations in the hMSH2 and hMLH1 genes. Mutations in the first nine exons of the hMLH1 gene were more common in Chinese patients.

  8. Is the BRCA germline mutation a prognostic factor in Korean patients with early-onset breast carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Doo Ho; Lee, Min Hyuk [College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Haffty, Bruce G. [College of Medicine, Yale Univ., New Haven, (United States)

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there were prognostic differences between BRCA related and BRCA non-related Korean patients with early-onset breast carcinomas. Sixty women who had developed breast cancers before the age of 40 and who were treated at the Soonchunhyang University Hospital, were studied independently of their family histories. The age range was 18 to 40 with a median of 34.5 years. Lymphocyte specimens from peripheral blood were studied for the heterozygous mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 using direct sequencing methods. Immunohistochemistry was performed on the paraffin-embedded tissue blocks that were available. Eleven deleterious mutations (18.3%, 6 in BRCA1 and 5 in BRCA2) and 7 missense mutations of unknown significance (11.7%), were found among the 60 patients. More than half of the mutation were novel, and were not reported in the database. Most of the BRCA-associated patients had no history of breast cancer. No treatment related failures were observed in the BRCA carriers, with the exception of one patient that had experienced a new primary tumor of the contralateral breast. The seven year relapse free survival rate were 50 and 79% in the BRCA carrier and BRCA negative patients, respectively, Although the expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors were less common, and histological features more aggressive, in the BRCA associated tumors, the outcome of the patients with BRCA mutations was not poorer than that of the patients without deleterious mutations. Despite the BRCA mutation carriers having adverse prognostic features, the recurrence rate was relatively lower than that in the BRCA non-carrying Korean patients with early-onset breast carcinomas. In addition, although the prevalence of the BRCA mutation in Korean patients was higher than that in white patients, the penetrance of the cancer seemed to be relatively low in Korean women carrying BRCA mutations. A large population based study of the BRCA mutation, with a long

  9. Full-exon pyrosequencing screening of BRCA germline mutations in Mexican women with inherited breast and ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Vaca-Paniagua

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer comprises 10% of all breast cancers. The most prevalent genes causing this pathology are BRCA1 and BRCA2 (breast cancer early onset 1 and 2, which also predispose to other cancers. Despite the outstanding relevance of genetic screening of BRCA deleterious variants in patients with a history of familial cancer, this practice is not common in Latin American public institutions. In this work we assessed mutations in the entire exonic and splice-site regions of BRCA in 39 patients with breast and ovarian cancer and with familial history of breast cancer or with clinical features suggestive for BRCA mutations by massive parallel pyrosequencing. First we evaluated the method with controls and found 41-485 reads per sequence in BRCA pathogenic mutations. Negative controls did not show deleterious variants, confirming the suitability of the approach. In patients diagnosed with cancer we found 4 novel deleterious mutations (c.2805_2808delAGAT and c.3124_3133delAGCAATATTA in BRCA1; c.2639_2640delTG and c.5114_5117delTAAA in BRCA2. The prevalence of BRCA mutations in these patients was 10.2%. Moreover, we discovered 16 variants with unknown clinical significance (11 in exons and 5 in introns; 4 were predicted as possibly pathogenic by in silico analyses, and 3 have not been described previously. This study illustrates how massive pyrosequencing technology can be applied to screen for BRCA mutations in the whole exonic and splice regions in patients with suspected BRCA-related cancers. This is the first effort to analyse the mutational status of BRCA genes on a Mexican-mestizo population by means of pyrosequencing.

  10. Novel germline mutations in FLCN gene identified in two Chinese patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Teng; Ning, Xianghui; He, Qun; Gong, Kan

    2017-01-09

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, a hereditary renal cancer syndrome caused by mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene, is characterized by the presence of fibrofolliculomas, pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Few BHD syndrome cases have been reported in Asian countries, and cutaneous presentations are relatively rare in Asian patients. Asian BHD patients may be misdiagnosed due to their atypical manifestations. Here, we report two Chinese BHD patients with novel FLCN mutations (c.946-947delAG in exon 9 and c.770-772delCCT in exon 7). Both of them had RCC and spontaneous pneumothorax without fibrofolliculomas. In patients with RCC and pulmonary cysts but without cutaneous lesions, screening for mutations in the FLCN gene should be performed, especially for those with a family history of RCC or pulmonary cysts (pneumothorax).

  11. Somatic mosaicism in families with hemophilia B: 11% of germline mutations originate within a few cell divisions post-fertilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoell, A.; Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E. [Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Previous molecular estimates of mosaicism in the dystrophin and other genes generally have focused on the transmission of the mutated allele to two or more children by an individual without the mutation in leukocyte DNA. We have analyzed 414 families with hemophilia B by direct genomic sequencing and haplotype analysis, and have deduced the origin of mutation in 56 families. There was no origin individual who transmitted a mutant allele to more than one child. However, somatic mosaicism was detected by sequence analysis of four origin individuals (3{female} and 1{male}). The sensitivity of this analysis is typically one part in ten. In one additional female who had close to a 50:50 ratio of mutant to normal alleles, three of four noncarrier daughters inherited the haplotype associated with the mutant allele. This highlights a caveat in molecular analysis: a presumptive carrier in a family with sporadic disease does not necessarily have a 50% probability of transmitting the mutant allele to her offspring. After eliminating those families in which mosaicism could not be detected because of a total gene deletion or absence of DNA from a deduced origin individual, 5 of 43 origin individuals exhibited somatic mosaicism at a level that reflects a mutation within the first few cell divisions after fertilization. In one patient, analysis of cervical scrapings and buccal mucosa confirm the generalized distribution of somatic mutation. Are the first few cell divisions post-fertilization highly mutagenic, or do mutations at later divisions also give rise to somatic mosaicism? To address this question, DNA from origin individuals are being analyzed to detect somatic mosaicism at a sensitivity of 1:1000. Single nucleotide primer extension (SNuPE) has been utilized in eight families to date and no mosaicism has been detected. When the remaining 30 samples are analyzed, it will be possible to compare the frequency of somatic mosaicism at 0.1-10% with that of {ge}10%.

  12. Frequent germ-line succinate dehydrogenase subunit D gene mutations in patients with apparently sporadic parasympathetic paraganglioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Dannenberg (Hilde); W.N.M. Dinjens (Winand); M. Abbou; H. van Urk (Hero); B.K. Pauw; D. Mouwen; W.J. Mooi (Wolter); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: Recently, familial paraganglioma (PGL) was shown to be caused bymutations in the gene encoding succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD). However, the prevalence of SDHD mutations in apparently sporadic PGL is unknown. We studied the frequency and spectrum of ge

  13. p.N78S and p.R161Q germline mutations of the VHL gene are present in von Hippel-Lindau syndrome in two pedigrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Wen-Ting; Li, Jin-Yu; Dai, Yun; Ma, Ju-Ming; Zhao, Yan; Fei, Jun; Li, Feng; Shen, Mao; Jin, Hang-Yang; Chen, Zhen-Guang; Du, Zhen-Fang; Chen, Xiao-Ling; Zhang, Xian-Ning

    2013-09-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal dominant familial cancer syndrome. VHL is characterized by the development of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), hemangioblastomas of the central nervous system or retina and pheochromocytoma (PCC). RCC and PCC are known to be caused by germline mutations of six and ten genes, respectively. In the present study, 30 individuals from two unrelated pedigrees with type 2A and 2C VHL syndrome were investigated. The patients were clinically examined and treated by radical nephrectomy [or nephron‑sparing surgery (NSS)] and cortical-sparing adrenalectomy (CSA), and all members of the two families underwent genetic screening. Two members from the first family were diagnosed with PCC and RCC, and three individuals from the second family who had only hypertension were diagnosed with PCC. Heterozygous variants of the VHL gene, c.A233G (p.N78S) within exon 1 and c.G482A (p.R161Q) within exon 3, were verified, respectively. Surgery was performed on all the patients, with the exception of an asymptomatic 5-year-old p.N78S male in family 1, in addition to genetic testing and genetic counseling. Further patient follow-up was warranted with regard to blood pressure and health, although normal blood pressure and no local recurrence and distant metastasis of VHL were observed previously. The present study suggests that molecular genetic testing may aid the diagnosis and clinical management of VHL syndrome.

  14. Molecular Characterization of a Novel Germline VHL Mutation by Extensive In Silico Analysis in an Indian Family with Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautham Arunachal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Von Hippel-Lindau [VHL] disease, an autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndrome, is well known for its complex genotype-phenotype correlations. We looked for germline mutations in the VHL gene in an affected multiplex family with Type 1 VHL disease. Real-Time quantitative PCR for deletions and Sanger sequencing of coding regions along with flanking intronic regions were performed in two affected individuals and one related individual. Direct sequencing identified a novel heterozygous single nucleotide base substitution in both the affected members tested, segregating with VHL phenotype in this family. This variant in exon 3, c.473T>A, results in substitution of leucine, a highly conserved acid, to glutamine at position 158 [p.L158Q] and has not been reported thus far as a variant associated with disease causation. Further, this variant was not observed in 50 age and ethnicity matched healthy individuals. Extensive in silico prediction analysis along with molecular dynamics simulation revealed significant deleterious nature of the substitution L158Q on pVHL. The results of this study when collated support the view that the missense variation p.L158Q in the Elongin C binding domain of pVHL may be disease causing.

  15. FDA Approval Summary: Olaparib Monotherapy in Patients with Deleterious Germline BRCA-Mutated Advanced Ovarian Cancer Treated with Three or More Lines of Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geoffrey; Ison, Gwynn; McKee, Amy E; Zhang, Hui; Tang, Shenghui; Gwise, Thomas; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Lee, Eunice; Tzou, Abraham; Philip, Reena; Chiu, Haw-Jyh; Ricks, Tiffany K; Palmby, Todd; Russell, Anne Marie; Ladouceur, Gaetan; Pfuma, Elimika; Li, Hongshan; Zhao, Liang; Liu, Qi; Venugopal, Rajesh; Ibrahim, Amna; Pazdur, Richard

    2015-10-01

    On December 19, 2014, the FDA approved olaparib capsules (Lynparza; AstraZeneca) for the treatment of patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious germline BRCA-mutated (gBRCAm) advanced ovarian cancer who have been treated with three or more prior lines of chemotherapy. The BRACAnalysis CDx (Myriad Genetic Laboratories, Inc.) was approved concurrently. An international multicenter, single-arm trial enrolled 137 patients with measurable gBRCAm-associated ovarian cancer treated with three or more prior lines of chemotherapy. Patients received olaparib at a dose of 400 mg by mouth twice daily until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The objective response rate (ORR) was 34% with median response duration of 7.9 months in this cohort. The most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients treated with olaparib were anemia, nausea, fatigue (including asthenia), vomiting, diarrhea, dysgeusia, dyspepsia, headache, decreased appetite, nasopharyngitis/pharyngitis/upper respiratory infection, cough, arthralgia/musculoskeletal pain, myalgia, back pain, dermatitis/rash, and abdominal pain/discomfort. Myelodysplatic syndrome and/or acute myeloid leukemia occurred in 2% of the patients enrolled on this trial. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Adrenocortical tumors associated with the TP53 p.R337H germline mutation can be identified during child-care consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastellaro, Maria J; Ribeiro, Raul C; Oliveira-Filho, Antônio G; Seidinger, Ana L; Cardinalli, Izilda A; Miranda, Eliana C M; Aguiar, Simone S; Brandalise, Silvia R; Yunes, José A; Barros-Filho, Antônio A

    2017-08-30

    To evaluate the clinical features associated with adrenocortical hormone overexpression and familial cancer profiling as potential markers for early detection of adrenocortical tumors in children from South and Southeast Brazil. The clinical manifestations and anthropometric measurements of 103 children diagnosed with adrenocortical tumors were analyzed. Between 1982 and 2011, 69 girls and 34 boys diagnosed with adrenocortical tumors were followed-up for a median time of 9.0 years (0-34 years). Signs of androgen overproduction alone (n=75) or associated with cortisol (n=18) were present in 90.3%. TP53 p.R337H mutation was found in 90.5% of patients. Stages I, II, III, and IV were observed in 45.6%, 27.2%, 19.4%, and 7.8% of patients, respectively. At diagnosis, there were no significant differences in height (p=0.92) and weight (p=0.22) among children with adrenocortical tumors, but children with virilization alone had significantly higher height-for-age Z-scores (0.92±1.4) than children with hypercortisolism alone or combined (-0.32±1.8; p=0.03). The five-year overall survival was 76.7% (SD±4.2). Patients with advanced-stage disease had a significantly worse prognosis than those with limited disease (pp.R337H carrier parents developed cancer, whereas none of the 55 non-carriers did. Signs of adrenocortical hormone overproduction appear early, even in cases with early-stage. These signs can be identified at the physical examination and anthropometric measurements. In southern Brazil, pediatric adrenocortical tumor is a sentinel cancer for detecting families with germline p.R337H mutation in TP53 gene. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional characterization of a rare germline mutation in the gene encoding the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 (CDKN1B) in a Spanish patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Donatella; De Gisi, Silvia; Riccardi, Miriam; Scrima, Marianna; De Marco, Carmela; Robledo, Mercedes; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of germline mutations in the CDKN1B gene that encodes the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p27 in multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN1)-like Spanish index patients. The CDKN1B gene has recently been identified as a tumor susceptibility gene for MEN4, with six germline mutations reported so far in patients with a MEN-like phenotype but negative for MEN1 mutations. Fifteen Spanish index cases with MEN-like symptoms were screened for mutations in the CDKN1B gene and the mutant variant was studied functionally by transcription/translation assays in vitro and in transiently transfected HeLa cells. We report the identification of a heterozygous GAGA deletion in the 5'-UTR of CDKN1B, NM_004064.3:c.-32_-29del, in a patient affected by gastric carcinoid tumor and hyperparathyroidism. This deletion falls inside the region that is responsible for CDKN1B transcription and is predicted to destroy a secondary stem and loop structure that includes the GAGAGA element responsible for ribosome recruitment. Accordingly, in vitro studies of coupled transcription/translation assays and transient transfection in HeLa cells showed that the GAGA deletion in the CDKN1B 5'-UTR significantly impairs the transcription of downstream reporter luciferase (of ∼40-60%) and, possibly, the translation of the corresponding mRNA. This mutation was associated with a significant reduction in the amount of CDKN1B mRNA in peripheral blood leukocytes from the patient, as demonstrated by quantitative real-time PCR. Our results confirm that germline CDKN1B mutations may predispose to a human MEN4 condition and add novel evidence that alteration in the transcription/translation rate of CDKN1B mRNA might be the mechanism implicated in tumor susceptibility.

  18. Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome: report of two novel germline mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmirotta, Raffaele; Donati, Pietro; Savonarola, Annalisa; Cota, Carlo; Ferroni, Patrizia; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2008-01-01

    Molecular analysis of the folliculin (FLCN) gene was performed in four consenting patients from two families with Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, showing the occurrence of two frameshift mutations located respectively in exons 5 (802insA) and 9 (1345delAAAG) of the FLCN gene. A novel homozygous sequence variant in the intron 9 (IVS9 +5C>T) was also found. 1345delAAAG was associated with a wide variety of tumors, including stomach, colon, breast and parotid cancer. Conversely, the family carrying 802insA only had clinical evidence of dermatological lesions. These findings further suggest the relevance of exon 9 mutations in cancer predisposition for BHD.

  19. Targeting and germ-line transmission of a null mutation at the metallothionein I and II loci in mouse.

    OpenAIRE

    Michalska, A E; Choo, K. H.

    1993-01-01

    We report the generation of transgenic mice deficient in the metallothionein MT-I and MT-II genes. The mutations were introduced into embryonic stem cells by homologous recombination. Chimeric mice resulting from the targeted embryonic stem cells transmitted the disrupted alleles through their germ line. Homozygous animals were born alive and appeared phenotypically normal and fertile. Absence of MT proteins was confirmed by direct measurement in liver extracts. Challenging the mutant animals...

  20. Germline Mutations in NFKB2 Implicate the Noncanonical NF-κB Pathway in the Pathogenesis of Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Karin; Coonrod, Emily M.; Kumánovics, Attila; Franks, Zechariah F.; Durtschi, Jacob D.; Margraf, Rebecca L.; Wu, Wilfred; Heikal, Nahla M.; Augustine, Nancy H.; Ridge, Perry G.; Hill, Harry R.; Jorde, Lynn B.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Gundlapalli, Adi V.

    2013-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by antibody deficiency, poor humoral response to antigens, and recurrent infections. To investigate the molecular cause of CVID, we carried out exome sequence analysis of a family diagnosed with CVID and identified a heterozygous frameshift mutation, c.2564delA (p.Lys855Serfs∗7), in NFKB2 affecting the C terminus of NF-κB2 (also known as p100/p52 or p100/p49). Subsequent screening of NFKB2 in 33 unrelated CVID-a...

  1. A de novo germline MLH1 mutation in a Lynch syndrome patient with discordant immunohistochemical and molecular biology test results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabrice Airaud; Sébastien Küry; Isabelle Valo; Ingrid Maury; Dominique Bonneau; Olivier Ingster; Stéphane Bezieau

    2012-01-01

    We describe a patient with a Homo sapiens mutL homolog 1 (MLH1)-associated Lynch syndrome with previous diagnoses of two distinct primary cancers:a sigmoid colon cancer at the age of 39 years,and a right colon cancer at the age of 50 years.The mutation identified in his blood and buccal cells,c.1771delG,p.Asp591Ilefs*25,appears to be a de novo event,as it was not transmitted by either of his parents.This type of de novo event is rare in MLH1 as only three cases have been reported in the literature so far.Furthermore,the discordant results observed between replication error phenotyping and immunohistochemistry highlight the importance of the systematic use of both pre-screening tests in the molecular diagnosis of Lynch syndrome.

  2. Targeting and germ-line transmission of a null mutation at the metallothionein I and II loci in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, A E; Choo, K H

    1993-09-01

    We report the generation of transgenic mice deficient in the metallothionein MT-I and MT-II genes. The mutations were introduced into embryonic stem cells by homologous recombination. Chimeric mice resulting from the targeted embryonic stem cells transmitted the disrupted alleles through their germ line. Homozygous animals were born alive and appeared phenotypically normal and fertile. Absence of MT proteins was confirmed by direct measurement in liver extracts. Challenging the mutant animals with moderate levels of CdSO4 indicated their greater susceptibility to cadmium toxicity than wild-type animals. These mice should provide a useful model to allow detailed study of the physiological roles of MT-I and MT-II.

  3. Germline Mutation in EXPH5 Implicates the Rab27B Effector Protein Slac2-b in Inherited Skin Fragility

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, John A.; Stone, Kristina L.; Begum, Rumena; Simpson, Michael A.; Dopping-Hepenstal, Patricia J.; Liu, Lu; McMillan, James R.; South, Andrew P.; Pourreyron, Celine; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Martinez, Anna E.; Mellerio, Jemima E.; Parsons, Maddy

    2012-01-01

    The Rab GTPase Rab27B and one of its effector proteins, Slac2-b (also known as EXPH5, exophilin-5), have putative roles in intracellular vesicle trafficking but their relevance to human disease is not known. By using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation in EXPH5 in three siblings with inherited skin fragility born to consanguineous Iraqi parents. All three individuals harbor the mutation c.5786delC (p.Pro1929Leufs∗8) in EXPH5, which truncates the 1,989 amino acid Slac2-b protein by 52 residues. The clinical features comprised generalized scale-crusts and occasional blisters, mostly induced by trauma, as well as mild diffuse pigmentary mottling on the trunk and proximal limbs. There was no increased bleeding tendency, no neurologic abnormalities, and no increased incidence of infection. Analysis of an affected person's skin showed loss of Slac2-b immunostaining (C-terminal antibody), disruption of keratinocyte adhesion within the lower epidermis, and an increased number of perinuclear vesicles. A role for Slac2-b in keratinocyte biology was supported by findings of cytoskeletal disruption (mainly keratin intermediate filaments) and decreased keratinocyte adhesion in both keratinocytes from an affected subject and after shRNA knockdown of Slac2-b in normal keratinocytes. Slac2-b was also shown to colocalize with Rab27B and β4 integrin to early adhesion initiation sites in spreading normal keratinocytes. Collectively, our findings identify an unexpected role for Slac2-b in inherited skin fragility and expand the clinical spectrum of human disorders of GTPase effector proteins. PMID:23176819

  4. Germline mutations in people descendants occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation from Cesium 137; Mutacoes germinativas na prole de pessoas expostas ocupacionalmente a radiacao ionizante de Cesio 137

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Juliana Ferreira da

    2016-07-01

    frequency of CNVs showed statistically significant differences between exposed and control groups using the Mann-Whitney U test. Thus, our data showed that CNVs are induced by IR exposure in a human population, while the losses were more frequent the gains in the exposed group. In addition, progeny from a population occupationally exposed to IR ∼ 1.15x showed CNV more new than healthy controls. Therefore, with the present study was possible to validate the use of a high resolution method to describe a mutagenic exposure by IR signature, thus legitimized the use of CNVs as a useful biomarker to assess germline mutation military occupationally exposed to RI. In addition to validating the use of this marker, the study also pioneered research germline mutation in humans exposed to RI. (author)

  5. Structure reveals regulatory mechanisms of a MaoC-like hydratase from Phytophthora capsici involved in biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs.

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    Huizheng Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs have attracted increasing attention as "green plastic" due to their biodegradable, biocompatible, thermoplastic, and mechanical properties, and considerable research has been undertaken to develop low cost/high efficiency processes for the production of PHAs. MaoC-like hydratase (MaoC, which belongs to (R-hydratase involved in linking the β-oxidation and the PHA biosynthetic pathways, has been identified recently. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms of (R-hydratase catalysis is critical for efficient production of PHAs that promise synthesis an environment-friendly plastic. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have determined the crystal structure of a new MaoC recognized from Phytophthora capsici. The crystal structure of the enzyme was solved at 2.00 Å resolution. The structure shows that MaoC has a canonical (R-hydratase fold with an N-domain and a C-domain. Supporting its dimerization observed in structure, MaoC forms a stable homodimer in solution. Mutations that disrupt the dimeric MaoC result in a complete loss of activity toward crotonyl-CoA, indicating that dimerization is required for the enzymatic activity of MaoC. Importantly, structure comparison reveals that a loop unique to MaoC interacts with an α-helix that harbors the catalytic residues of MaoC. Deletion of the loop enhances the enzymatic activity of MaoC, suggesting its inhibitory role in regulating the activity of MaoC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data in our study reveal the regulatory mechanism of an (R-hydratase, providing information on enzyme engineering to produce low cost PHAs.

  6. Somatic mutations in the Ig variable region genes and expression of novel Cmu-germline transcripts in a B-lymphoma cell line ("Farage") not producing Ig polypeptide chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, M; Gabay, C; Laskov, R

    1998-08-01

    Non-Hodgkin's B-lymphomas (B-NHL) are a very heterogeneous group of B-cell neoplasias originating from the germinal centers of lymphatic follicles. Thus, they represent a suitable experimental model to study the molecular basis of certain key events which take place in the lymphatic follicles, including somatic hypermutation and heavy chain isotypic switch. An unusual B-NHL cell line ("Farage") not producing Ig polypeptide chains was previously shown to rearrange its IgH and Igkappa genes and transcribe seemingly normal size mu and kappa mRNAs. In an attempt to characterize the phenotype of Farage cells better and to elucidate the molecular basis of the failure of Farage cells to synthesize Ig chains, we sequenced its VH and Vkappa rearranged gene segments by PCR and RT-PCR. It was found that both V genes are somatically, heavily mutated compared to their germline counterparts. In addition, this rearranged VDJ gene of the heavy chain is not transcribed. Instead, the Farage cells express a low level of a new family of germline transcripts starting with a VH like sequence, continuing with a small segment of the 3'VH germline flanking region, and ending within the Cmu region. These transcripts lack D and J segments and do not contain the open reading frame of the full-length Cmu protein. Thus, Farage cells fail to produce mu heavy chains due to silencing of the expression of the conventional VDJCmu transcript and expression of unusual Cmu-germline transcripts. In contrast to the IgH genes, the rearranged VJ gene of Farage is transcribed and gives rise to a full-size kappa-mRNA. This transcript, however, is not translated to a full-length kappa-chain, as it contains a stop codon in its coding region. All the above show that Farage cells are unable to produce Ig polypeptide chains, due to somatic mutations altering the kappa-chain gene, and mutations and/or regulatory events that shutoff the transcription of the IgH gene. The heavily mutated Vkappa and Vkappa genes

  7. Germline TP53 mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms in children Mutaciones y polimorfismos de un único nucleótido del gen TP53 en línea germinal en niños

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    Pamela Valva

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene TP53, which codifies the tumor suppressor protein p53, are found in about 50% of tumors. These mutations can occur not only at somatic level, but also in germline. Pediatric cancer patients, mostly with additional family history of malignancy, should be considered as potential TP53 germline mutation carriers. Germline TP53 mutations and polymorphisms have been widely studied to determine their relation with different tumors' pathogenesis. Our aim was to analyze the occurrence frequency of germline TP53 mutations and polymorphisms and to relate these to tumor development in a pediatric series. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from 26 children with solid tumors [PST] and 21 pediatric healthy donors [HD] were analyzed for germline mutations and polymorphisms in TP53 gene spanning from exon 5 to 8 including introns 5 and 7. These PCR amplified fragments were sequenced to determine variations. A heterozygous mutation at codon 245 was found in 1/26 PST and 0/21 HD. Comparative polymorphisms distribution, at position 14181 and 14201(intron 7, between HD and PST revealed a trend of association (p= 0.07 with cancer risk. HD group disclosed a similar polymorphism distribution as published data for Caucasian and Central/South American populations. This is the first study about TP53 variant frequency and distribution in healthy individuals and cancer patients in Argentina.El gen que codifica para la proteína supresora de tumor p53 (TP53 se encuentra mutado en aproximadamente el 50% de los tumores. Estas mutaciones pueden presentarse como somáticas o en línea germinal. Los niños con tumores, sobre todo aquellos con historia familiar de enfermedad oncológica, deben considerarse potenciales portadores de mutaciones en línea germinal. Las mutaciones de TP53 y los polimorfismos son estudiados para determinar su relación con la patogénesis de diferentes tumores. El objetivo del trabajo fue analizar la frecuencia de

  8. A cancer-predisposing "hot spot" mutation of the fumarase gene creates a dominant negative protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Olivero, Martina; Perro, Mario; Brière, Jean Jacques; Rustin, Pierre; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2008-02-15

    The Fumarase (Fumarate Hydratase, FH) is a tumor suppressor gene whose germline heterozygous mutations predispose to hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). The FH gene encodes an enzyme of the Krebs cycle, functioning as a homotetramer and catalyzing the hydration of fumarate to malate. Among the numerous FH mutations reported so far, the R190H missense mutation is the most frequent in HLRCC patients. Here we show the functional analyses of the R190H, in comparison to the better characterized E319Q mutation. We first expressed wild-type and mutated proteins in FH deficient human skin fibroblasts, using lentiviral vectors. The wild-type transgene was able to restore the FH enzymatic activity in cells, while the R190H- and E319Q-FH were not. More interestingly, when the same transgenes were expressed in normal, FH-proficient cells, only the R190H-FH reduced the endogenous FH enzymatic activity. By enforcing the expression of equal amount of wild-type and R190H-FH in the same cell, we showed that the mutated FH protein directly inhibited enzymatic activity by nearly abrogating the FH homotetramer formation. These data demonstrate the dominant negative effect of the R190H missense mutation in the FH gene and suggest that the FH tumor-suppressing activity might be impaired in cells carrying a heterozygous mutation. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutation analysis among Indian women from south India: identification of four novel mutations and high-frequency occurrence of 185delAG mutation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kannan Vaidyanathan; Smita Lakhotia; H M Ravishankar; Umaira Tabassum; Geetashree Mukherjee; Kumaravel Somasundaram

    2009-09-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes profoundly increase the risk of developing breast and/or ovarian cancer among women. To explore the contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in the development of hereditary breast cancer among Indian women, we carried out mutation analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 61 breast or ovarian cancer patients from south India with a positive family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Mutation analysis was carried out using conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) followed by sequencing. Mutations were identified in 17 patients (28.0%); 15 (24.6%) had BRCA1 mutations and two (3.28%) had BRCA2 mutations. While no specific association between BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations with cancer type was seen, mutations were more often seen in families with ovarian cancer. While 40% (4/10) and 30.8% (4/12) of families with ovarian or breast and ovarian cancer had mutations, only 23.1% (9/39) of families with breast cancer carried mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. In addition, while BRCA1 mutations were found in all age groups, BRCA2 mutations were found only in the age group of ≤ 40 years. Of the BRCA1 mutations, there were three novel mutations (295delCA; 4213T → A; 5267T → G) and three mutations that have been reported earlier. Interestingly, 185delAG, a BRCA1 mutation which occurs at a very high frequency in Ashkenazi Jews, was found at a frequency of 16.4% (10/61). There was one novel mutation (4866insT) and one reported mutation in BRCA2. Thus, our study emphasizes the importance of mutation screening in familial breast and/or ovarian cancers, and the potential implications of these findings in genetic counselling and preventive therapy.

  10. The aconitate hydratase family from Citrus

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    Cercos Manuel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on citrus fruit ripening has received considerable attention because of the importance of citrus fruits for the human diet. Organic acids are among the main determinants of taste and organoleptic quality of fruits and hence the control of fruit acidity loss has a strong economical relevance. In citrus, organic acids accumulate in the juice sac cells of developing fruits and are catabolized thereafter during ripening. Aconitase, that transforms citrate to isocitrate, is the first step of citric acid catabolism and a major component of the citrate utilization machinery. In this work, the citrus aconitase gene family was first characterized and a phylogenetic analysis was then carried out in order to understand the evolutionary history of this family in plants. Gene expression analyses of the citrus aconitase family were subsequently performed in several acidic and acidless genotypes to elucidate their involvement in acid homeostasis. Results Analysis of 460,000 citrus ESTs, followed by sequencing of complete cDNA clones, identified in citrus 3 transcription units coding for putatively active aconitate hydratase proteins, named as CcAco1, CcAco2 and CcAco3. A phylogenetic study carried on the Aco family in 14 plant species, shows the presence of 5 Aco subfamilies, and that the ancestor of monocot and dicot species shared at least one Aco gene. Real-time RT-PCR expression analyses of the three aconitase citrus genes were performed in pulp tissues along fruit development in acidic and acidless citrus varieties such as mandarins, oranges and lemons. While CcAco3 expression was always low, CcAco1 and CcAco2 genes were generally induced during the rapid phase of fruit growth along with the maximum in acidity and the beginning of the acid reduction. Two exceptions to this general pattern were found: 1 Clemenules mandarin failed inducing CcAco2 although acid levels were rapidly reduced; and 2 the acidless "Sucreña" orange

  11. A role for cytosolic fumarate hydratase in urea cycle metabolism and renal neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Julie; Yang, Ming; Bauerschmidt, Christina; Kitagawa, Mitsuhiro; O'Flaherty, Linda; Maheswaran, Pratheesh; Özkan, Gizem; Sahgal, Natasha; Baban, Dilair; Kato, Keiko; Saito, Kaori; Iino, Keiko; Igarashi, Kaori; Stratford, Michael; Pugh, Christopher; Tennant, Daniel A; Ludwig, Christian; Davies, Benjamin; Ratcliffe, Peter J; El-Bahrawy, Mona; Ashrafian, Houman; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Pollard, Patrick J

    2013-05-30

    The identification of mutated metabolic enzymes in hereditary cancer syndromes has established a direct link between metabolic dysregulation and cancer. Mutations in the Krebs cycle enzyme, fumarate hydratase (FH), predispose affected individuals to leiomyomas, renal cysts, and cancers, though the respective pathogenic roles of mitochondrial and cytosolic FH isoforms remain undefined. On the basis of comprehensive metabolomic analyses, we demonstrate that FH1-deficient cells and tissues exhibit defects in the urea cycle/arginine metabolism. Remarkably, transgenic re-expression of cytosolic FH ameliorated both renal cyst development and urea cycle defects associated with renal-specific FH1 deletion in mice. Furthermore, acute arginine depletion significantly reduced the viability of FH1-deficient cells in comparison to controls. Our findings highlight the importance of extramitochondrial metabolic pathways in FH-associated oncogenesis and the urea cycle/arginine metabolism as a potential therapeutic target.

  12. A Role for Cytosolic Fumarate Hydratase in Urea Cycle Metabolism and Renal Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Adam

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The identification of mutated metabolic enzymes in hereditary cancer syndromes has established a direct link between metabolic dysregulation and cancer. Mutations in the Krebs cycle enzyme, fumarate hydratase (FH, predispose affected individuals to leiomyomas, renal cysts, and cancers, though the respective pathogenic roles of mitochondrial and cytosolic FH isoforms remain undefined. On the basis of comprehensive metabolomic analyses, we demonstrate that FH1-deficient cells and tissues exhibit defects in the urea cycle/arginine metabolism. Remarkably, transgenic re-expression of cytosolic FH ameliorated both renal cyst development and urea cycle defects associated with renal-specific FH1 deletion in mice. Furthermore, acute arginine depletion significantly reduced the viability of FH1-deficient cells in comparison to controls. Our findings highlight the importance of extramitochondrial metabolic pathways in FH-associated oncogenesis and the urea cycle/arginine metabolism as a potential therapeutic target.

  13. Evaluation of TP53 Pro72Arg and MDM2 SNP285-SNP309 polymorphisms in an Italian cohort of LFS suggestive patients lacking identifiable TP53 germline mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Francesca; Corsini, Serena; Gnoli, Maria; Pedrini, Elena; Mordenti, Marina; Sangiorgi, Luca

    2016-10-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare genetic cancer predisposition disease, partly determined by the presence of a TP53 germline mutation; lacking thereof, in presence of a typical LFS phenotype, defines a wide group of 'LFS Suggestive' patients. Alternative LFS susceptibility genes have been investigated without promising results, thus suggesting other genetic determinants involvement in cancer predisposition. Hence, this study explores the single and combined effects of cancer risk, age of onset and cancer type of three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)-TP53 Pro72Arg, MDM2 SNP285 and SNP309-already described as modifiers on TP53 mutation carriers but not properly investigated in LFS Suggestive patients. This case-control study examines 34 Italian LFS Suggestive lacking of germline TP53 mutations and 95 tumour-free subjects. A significant prevalence of homozygous MDM2 SNP309 G in the LFS Suggestive group (p TP53 positive families. Conversely its anticipating role on tumour onset has not been confirmed, as in our results it was associated with the SNP309 T allele. A strong combined outcome with a 'dosage' effect has also been reported for TP53 P72 and MDM2 SNP309 G allele on cancer susceptibility (p < 0.0005). Whereas the MDM2 SNP285 C allele neutralizing effect on MDM2 SNP309 G variant is not evident in our population. Although it needs further evaluations, obtained results strengthen the role of MDM2 SNP309 as a genetic factor in hereditary predisposition to cancer, so improving LFS Suggestive patients management.

  14. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Resch, V.A.; Jin, J.; Chen, B.S.; Hanefeld, U.

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a

  15. The Application of Nitrile Hydratases in Organic Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Pelt, S.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrile hydratases (NHases, E.C. 4.2.1.84) catalyse the transformation of nitriles into the corresponding amides and were first discovered 30 years ago in studies on the microbial degradation of toxic cyano-group-containing compounds. The use of NHases in synthetic chemistry is especially

  16. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Resch, V.A.; Jin, J.; Chen, B.S.; Hanefeld, U.

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a s

  17. Screening for germline BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and CHEK2 mutations in families at-risk for hereditary breast cancer identified in a population-based study from Southern Brazil

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    Edenir Inêz Palmero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Brazil, breast cancer is a public health care problem due to its high incidence and mortality rates. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer syndromes (HBCS in a population-based cohort in Brazils southernmost capital, Porto Alegre. All participants answered a questionnaire about family history (FH of breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer and those with a positive FH were invited for genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA. If pedigree analysis was suggestive of HBCS, genetic testing of the BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHEK2 genes was offered. Of 902 women submitted to GCRA, 214 had pedigrees suggestive of HBCS. Fifty of them underwent genetic testing: 18 and 40 for BRCA1/BRCA2 and TP53 mutation screening, respectively, and 7 for CHEK2 1100delC testing. A deleterious BRCA2 mutation was identified in one of the HBOC probands and the CHEK2 1100delC mutation occurred in one of the HBCC families. No deleterious germline alterations were identified in BRCA1 or TP53. Although strict inclusion criteria and a comprehensive testing approach were used, the suspected genetic risk in these families remains unexplained. Further studies in a larger cohort are necessary to better understand the genetic component of hereditary breast cancer in Southern Brazil.

  18. Identification of a novel TP53 germline mutation in one child with adrenocortical carcinoma%肾上腺皮质癌患儿TP53基因的一个新生殖系突变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司锘; 孙淼; 卢超霞; 刘彦山; 齐展; 杨威; 赵秀丽; 张学

    2009-01-01

    Objective To detect the germline TP53 gene mutation in a child with pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma (ADCC) in order to provide genetic diagnosis and counseling. Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood from a girl with ADCC and her parents. All TP53 exons and their flanking intronic sequences were PCR-amplified and subjected to automatic DNA sequencing. Results Direct sequencing of PCR products revealed a heterozygous G insertion between nucleotide 522 and 523 (c.522-523insG) in TP53 exon 5. This novel mutation is predicted to result in a frame shift at codon 175, producing a new reading frame ending in a stop at position 6 (p.R175AfsX6). The same heterozygous mutation was also found in her father, but not in her mother. Conclusion A novel germline mutation in the TP53 gene has been identified in one case with pediatric ADCC.%目的 研究1例肾上腺皮质癌患儿TP53基因突变情况,为该病的基因诊断与遗传咨询提供依据.方法 提取1例肾上腺皮质癌患儿及父母外周血基因组DNA,针对TP53基因设计特异性引物,采用聚合酶链式反应(PCR)扩增基因的全部编码及侧翼序列,对扩增产物进行直接测序.结果 PCR结合DNA测序发现患者TP53基因第5外显子存在异常:第522与523位核苷酸间插入一个鸟嘌呤(c.522-523insG),导致P53蛋白DNA结合域第175位密码子由精氨酸(R)变为丙氨酸(A),并从突变位置起发生移码,产生移码突变(p.R175AfsX6).患者父亲带有相同的突变,而母亲未发现此突变.结论 TP53基因p.R175AfsX6生殖系突变是导致该例患者肾上腺皮质癌的特异突变.

  19. Case Report of Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome: Germline Mutations of FLCN Detected in Patients With Renal Cancer and Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Gao, Ming; Hao, Wei-Jing; Zheng, Xiang-Qian; Li, Yi-Gong; Li, Xiao-Long; Yu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited syndrome that is characterized by the presence of fibrofolliculomas and/or trichodiscomas, pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, and renal tumors. Here, the 2 patients we reported with renal cell carcinomas and dermatological features were suspected to be suffering from BHD syndrome. Blood samples of these patients were sent for whole exon sequencing performed by Sanger sequencing. Eight mutations, including 5 mutations, which were mapped in noncoding region, 1 synonymous mutation, and 2 missense mutations, were detected in the FLCN gene in both patients. The 2 missense mutations, predicted to be disease-causing mutation or affecting protein function by MutationTaster and SIFT, confirmed the diagnosis. In addition, the 2 patients were also affected with papillary thyroid cancer. Total thyroidectomy and prophylactic bilateral central lymph node dissection were performed for them and the BHD-2 also received lateral lymph node dissection. Pathology reports showed that the patients had lymph node metastasis in spite of small size of thyroid lesions.The 2 missense mutations, not reported previously, expand the mutation spectrum of FLCN gene associated with BHD syndrome. For the thyroid cancer patients with BHD syndrome, total thyroidectomy and prophylactic bilateral central lymph node dissection may be suitable and the neck ultrasound may benefit BHD patients and their family members.

  20. 中国乳腺癌高风险人群中TP53基因胚系突变的研究%Germline mutations of TP53 gene among Chinese families with high risk for breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓晨; 胡震; 吴炅; 柳光宇; 狄根红; 陈灿铭; 侯意枫; 黄晓燕; 刘哲斌

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the role of germline mutations of TP53 gene among a Chinese population with high risk for breast cancer.Methods A total of 81 BRCA-negative breast cancer probands from cancer families were analyzed using targeted capture and next-generation sequencing.Candidate mutations were verified with Sanger sequencing.Co-segregation analyses were carried out to explore the likely pathogenicity of the mutation.Results Of the 81 BRCA-negative patients, 3 exonic mutations in the TP53 gene were identified in 3 breast cancer patients.Of these, 2 mutations were previously reported and 1 was novel.One family with TP53 mutation has met the criteria for Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) and accounted for 9.1% of all families who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for LFS.Two of the carriers were diagnosed with breast cancer under the age of 30, and have accounted for 11.8% (2/17) of all very young (≤30 years) breast cancer patients in our study.Conclusion The TP53 germline mutation is more common in Chinese population with a high risk for breast cancer than previously thought.TP53 gene mutation screening should be considered particularly for patients with a family history of LFS and very young age of onset.%目的 研究中国乳腺癌高风险人群中TP53基因胚系突变的情况.方法 应用目标区域捕获和大规模平行测序的方法,对81个来自肿瘤高风险家系、BRCA1/2突变阴性的乳腺癌先证者基因组DNA进行TP53基因的突变检测.挑选候选突变进行Sanger测序验证及共分离研究.结果 在81例BRCA1/2突变阴性的乳腺癌先证者中,分别在3例乳腺癌先证者中发现3个位于TP53外显子区的突变.其中两个为已知突变,一个为新发现的突变.1例TP53突变携带者的家族史符合Li-Fraumeni综合征的标准,占所有符合Li-Fraumeni综合征标准家系的9.1%(1/11).2例TP53突变携带者诊断乳腺癌时的年龄小于30岁,占所有非常年轻乳腺癌患者(≤30岁)的11.8%(2

  1. Rapidly progressive adenomatous polyposis in a patient with germline mutations in both the APC and MLH1 genes : the worst of two worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenstra, R; Rijcken, FEM; Koornstra, JJ; Hollema, H; Fodde, R; Menko, FH; Sijmons, RH; Bijleveld, CMA; Kleibeuker, JH

    2003-01-01

    The two most common inherited forms of colorectal cancer are familial adenomatous polyposis and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. Simultaneous inheritance of both an APC gene mutation and a mismatch repair gene (for example, MLH1) mutation has never been described. In the present case repo

  2. Rapidly progressive adenomatous polyposis in a patient with germline mutations in both the APC and MLH1 genes: the worst of two worlds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenstra, R; Rijcken, FE; Koornstra, JJ; Hollema, H; Fodde, R; Menko, F.H.; Sijmons, RH; Bijleveld, CM; Kleibeuker, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    The two most common inherited forms of colorectal cancer are familial adenomatous polyposis and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. Simultaneous inheritance of both an APC gene mutation and a mismatch repair gene (for example, MLH1) mutation has never been described. In the present case repo

  3. Pancreatic cancer-associated gene polymorphisms in a nation-wide cohort of p16-Leiden germline mutation carriers; A case-control study Medical Genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.P. Potjer (Thomas P.); N. van der Stoep (Nienke); J.J. Houwing-Duistermaat (Jeanine); I.C.A.W. Konings (Ingrid C.A.W.); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); P.C. van den Akker (Peter); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); C.J. Dommering (Charlotte); L. van der Kolk (Lizet); M.C. Maiburg (Merel C.); L. Spruijt (Liesbeth); A. Wagner (Anja); H. Vasen (Hans); F.J. Hes (Frederik)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The p16-Leiden founder mutation in the CDKN2A gene is the most common cause of Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome in the Netherlands. Individuals with this mutation are at increased risk for developing melanoma of the skin, as well as pancreatic cancer.

  4. Pancreatic cancer-associated gene polymorphisms in a nation-wide cohort of p16-Leiden germline mutation carriers; a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.P. Potjer (Thomas P.); N. van der Stoep (Nienke); J.J. Houwing-Duistermaat (Jeanine); I.C.A.W. Konings (Ingrid C.A.W.); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); P.C. van den Akker (Peter); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); C.J. Dommering (Charlotte); L. van der Kolk (Lizet); M.C. Maiburg (Merel C.); L. Spruijt (Liesbeth); A. Wagner (Anja); H. Vasen (Hans); F.J. Hes (Frederik)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The p16-Leiden founder mutation in the CDKN2A gene is the most common cause of Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome in the Netherlands. Individuals with this mutation are at increased risk for developing melanoma of the skin, as well as pancreatic cancer.

  5. Very low prevalence of germline MSH6 mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer suspected patients with colorectal cancer without microsatellite instability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kets, M.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Hebeda, K.M.; Wezenberg, S.J.; Goossens, M.; Brunner, H.G.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is caused by mutations in one of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, or PMS2 and results in high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-high) in tumours of HNPCC patients. The MSI test is considered reliable for indicating mutations in MLH1

  6. Identification of eight novel SDHB, SDHC, SDHD germline variants in Danish pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedbæk, Marc; Rossing, Maria; Rasmussen, Åse K

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Germline mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase complex genes SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD predispose to pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas. Here, we examine the SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD mutation spectrum in the Danish population by screening of 143 Danish pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma...

  7. Contribution of Germline Mutations in the RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D Genes to Ovarian Cancer in the Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Honglin; Dicks, Ed; Ramus, Susan J;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to estimate the contribution of deleterious mutations in the RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D genes to invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) in the population and in a screening trial of individuals at high risk of ovarian cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The coding s...

  8. Parental somatic and germ-line mosaicism for a FBN2 mutation and analysis of FBN2 transcript levels in dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, E A; Park, E S; Aalfs, C M; Hennekam, R C; Milewicz, D M

    1997-01-01

    Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) is an autosomal dominant disorder that is phenotypically related to the Marfan syndrome. CCA has recently been shown to result from mutations in the FBN2 gene, which encodes an elastin-associated microfibrillar protein called fibrillin-2. Two siblings are reported here with classic manifestations of CCA with unaffected parents. Analysis of the FBN2 cDNA from dermal fibroblasts from one of the affected siblings revealed a heterozygous exon splicing error deleting nt 3722-3844 of the FBN2 mRNA. This cDNA deletion resulted in selective removal of one of the 43 calcium-binding EGF-like domains of the fibrillin-2 protein. Analysis of the FBN2 gene in the affected siblings' DNA indicated that the splicing error resulted from an A-to-G transition 15 nt upstream from the 3' splice site of the intron. The genomic mutation resulting in the splicing error alters a putative branch point sequence important for lariat formation, an intermediate structure of normal splicing. The mutation was detectable in DNA from the father's hair bulbs and buccal cells but not his white blood cell DNA, indicating that the father was a somatic mosaic. Analysis of transcript levels by use of dermal fibroblasts from the proband demonstrated that the FBN2 allele containing the exon deletion was expressed at a higher level than the allele inherited from the mother. These results indicate that FBN2 exon splicing errors are a cause of CCA, furthering the understanding of the molecular basis of this disorder. In addition, the demonstration of gonadal mosaicism in the FBN2 gene is important for accurate genetic counseling of families with sporadic cases of CCA. Finally, the preferential expression of the mutated FBN2 allele in dermal fibroblasts may have implications for understanding the pathogenesis and rarity of CCA. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9106527

  9. Germline mutations of the RET proto-oncogene in pedigree with MEN type 2A: DNA analysis and its implications for pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotake, T; Iwai, N; Inoue, K; Inazawa, J; Nishisho, I

    1996-06-01

    To assess the feasibility of screening for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A), the authors used DNA sequence analysis to evaluate the RET proto-oncogene in a kindred with MEN 2A. The kindred consisted of 95 members (1 to 79 years of age) and their spouses, and spanned five generations. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes or lymphoblastoid cell lines established from the family members, and the RET gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using RET-specific primers (10q 11.2) and was sequenced. Periodic endocrine screening also was performed, by measuring the plasma calcitonin concentration after provocation with pentagastrin (0.5 microgram/kg intravenously) to assess its reliability for detecting the associated neoplasms. Nineteen patients were confirmed to have MEN 2A by medical records or the screening program. The DNA sequence of the PCR products from clinically established MEN 2A patients showed a mutation at codon 634 (TGC-->CGC) that resulted in an amino acid change from cysteine to arginine. Endocrine screening tests showed that six other family members had a mutated RET protooncogene. DNA sequencing can detect high-risk cases at a preclinical stage of the disease. The establishment of mutated MEN 2A gene carriers allows pediatric surgeons to consider total thyroidectomy at a very early stage of neoplasm development (C-cell hyperplasia) or even prophylactically.

  10. BRCA1, BRCA2 and CHEK2 (1100 del C) germline mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Soumittra, Nagasamy; Nancy, Nirmala Karunakaran; Swaminathan, Rajaraman; Sridevi, Veluswami; Shanta, Vishwanathan

    2003-01-01

    Cancer of the breast is the second most common cancer seen among Indian women. This study describes the use of DHPLC for mutation analysis for BRCA1, BRCA2 and CHEK2 (1100delC) in 22 patients with a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer and early onset breast cancer (codon, potentially leading to a truncated protein. Two of these were in BRCA1 (one was a novel 5 base deletion) and one in the BRCA2 gene. No patient was found in our series to have the CHEK2 (1100delC) mutation. DNA from a healthy blood donor and all but one of the 22 patients, demonstrated polymorphisms in BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 genes. This is the first study from South India, on BRCA1, BRCA2 & CHEK2 (1100 del C) mutations in patients with a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer and early onset breast/ovarian cancer, using the sensitive DHPLC approach.

  11. Characterisation of nitrilase and nitrile hydratase biocatalytic systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Brady, D

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available and Nagasawa 2000). Other compounds commercially produced using nitrilase bioca- talysts are (R)-mandelic acid and (R)-3-chloromandelic acid (Mitsubishi Rayon Co). Although few commercial processes that utilise nitrilase and nitrile hydratase exist... acid (HClO4) eluent at pH 2, 0.6 ml/min flow rate, Waters 625 LC pump, and a Waters 486 UV detector. The Chiracel OD column (Daicel, Japan) was used for determination of methyl ester derivatives of mandelic acid, and Chiracel OB-H was used...

  12. High-level expression in Corynebacterium glutamicum of nitrile hydratase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous for acrylamide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Suk; Han, Sang-Soo; Kim, Mi-Young; Kim, Bu-Youn; Huh, Jong-Pil; Kim, Hak-Sung; Lee, Jin-Ho

    2014-05-01

    The nhhBAG gene of Rhodococcus rhodochrous M33 that encodes nitrile hydratase (NHase), converting acrylonitrile into acrylamide, was cloned and expressed in Corynebacterium glutamicum under the control of an ilvC promoter. The specific enzyme activity in recombinant C. glutamicum cells was about 13.6 μmol/min/mg dry cell weight (DCW). To overexpress the NHase, five types of plasmid variants were constructed by introducing mutations into 80 nucleotides near the translational initiation region (TIR) of nhhB. Of them, pNBM4 with seven mutations showed the highest NHase activity, exhibiting higher expression levels of NhhB and NhhA than wild-type pNBW33, mainly owing to decreased secondary-structure stability and an introduction of a conserved Shine-Dalgarno sequence in the translational initiation region. In a fed-batch culture of recombinant Corynebacterium cells harboring pNBM4, the cell density reached 53.4 g DCW/L within 18 h, and the specific and total enzyme activities were estimated to be 37.3 μmol/min/mg DCW and 1,992 μmol/min/mL, respectively. The use of recombinant Corynebacterium cells for the production of acrylamide from acrylonitrile resulted in a conversion yield of 93 % and a final acrylamide concentration of 42.5 % within 6 h when the total amount of fed acrylonitrile was 456 g.

  13. Germline Mutations in RASA1 Are Not Found in Patients with Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome or Capillary Malformation with Limb Overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revencu, N; Boon, L M; Dompmartin, A; Rieu, P; Busch, W L; Dubois, J; Forzano, F; van Hagen, J M; Halbach, S; Kuechler, A; Lachmeijer, A M A; Lähde, J; Russell, L; Simola, K O J; Mulliken, J B; Vikkula, M

    2013-04-01

    The RASA1 gene encodes p120RASGAP, a multidomain cytoplasmic protein that acts as a negative regulator of the RAS signalling pathway. Heterozygous loss-of-function RASA1 mutations were identified in patients with Parkes Weber syndrome and multifocal capillary malformations. This syndrome is characterised by a capillary blush on an extremity, arteriovenous microfistulas, and bony and soft tissue hypertrophy. The aim of this study was to test RASA1 in 2 disorders characterised by asymmetric limb enlargement and vascular malformations, namely Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome and regional capillary malformation with overgrowth. We did not identify any clear pathogenic change in these patients. Thus, besides clinical and radiological criteria, RASA1 testing constitutes an additional tool to differentiate Parkes Weber syndrome of capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM) from overlapping disorders.

  14. Phase 2 multicentre trial investigating intermittent and continuous dosing schedules of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor rucaparib in germline BRCA mutation carriers with advanced ovarian and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Yvette; Ledermann, Jonathan; Hall, Geoff; Rea, Daniel; Glasspool, Ros; Highley, Martin; Jayson, Gordon; Sludden, Julieann; Murray, James; Jamieson, David; Halford, Sarah; Acton, Gary; Backholer, Zoe; Mangano, Raffaella; Boddy, Alan; Curtin, Nicola; Plummer, Ruth

    2016-03-29

    Rucaparib is an orally available potent selective small-molecule inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1 and 2. Rucaparib induces synthetic lethality in cancer cells defective in the homologous recombination repair pathway including BRCA-1/2. We investigated the efficacy and safety of single-agent rucaparib in germline (g) BRCA mutation carriers with advanced breast and ovarian cancers. Phase II, open-label, multicentre trial of rucaparib in proven BRCA-1/2 mutation carriers with advanced breast and or ovarian cancer, WHO PS 0-1 and normal organ function. Intravenous (i.v.) and subsequently oral rucaparib were assessed, using a range of dosing schedules, to determine the safety, tolerability, dose-limiting toxic effects and pharmacodynamic (PD) and pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles. Rucaparib was well tolerated in patients up to doses of 480 mg per day and is a potent inhibitor of PARP, with sustained inhibition ⩾24 h after single doses. The i.v. rucaparib (intermittent dosing schedule) resulted in an objective response rate (ORR) of only 2% but with 41% (18 out of 44) patients achieved stable disease for ⩾12 weeks and 3 patients maintaining disease stabilisation for >52 weeks. The ORR for oral rucaparib (across all six dose levels) was 15%. In the oral cohorts, 81% (22 out of 27) of the patients had ovarian cancer and 12 out of 13, who were dosed continuously, achieved RECIST complete response/partial response (CR/PR) or stable disease (SD) ⩾12 weeks, with a median duration of response of 179 days (range 84-567 days). Rucaparib is well tolerated and results in high levels of PARP inhibition in surrogate tissues even at the lowest dose levels. Rucaparib is active in gBRCA-mutant ovarian cancer and this activity correlates with platinum-free interval. The key lessons learned from this study is that continuous rucaparib dosing is required for optimal response, the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) for continuous oral scheduling has not been established

  15. Clinical Report: Germline Mosaicism in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Thomas P.; Lazebnik, Noam; Clark, Dinah M.; Vengoechea, Jaime; Cohen, Leslie; Kaur, Maninder; Konczal, Laura; Crowe, Carol A.; Corteville, Jane E.; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J.; Byrne, Janice L.; Jackson, Laird G.; Krantz, Ian D.

    2012-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a genetic disorder associated with delayed growth, intellectual disability, limb reduction defects and characteristic facial features. Germline mosaicism has been a described mechanism for CdLS when there are several affected offspring of apparently unaffected parents. Presently, the recurrence risk for CdLS has been estimated to be as high as 1.5%; however, this figure may be an underrepresentation. We report on the molecularly defined germline mosaicism cases from a large CdLS database, representing the first large case series on germline mosaicism in CdLS. Of the 12 families, eight have been previously described; however, four have not. No one specific gene mutation, either in the NIPBL or the SMC1A gene, was associated with an increased risk for germline mosaicism. Suspected or confirmed cases of germline mosaicism in our database range from a conservative 3.4% up to 5.4% of our total cohort. In conclusion, the potential reproductive recurrence risk due to germline mosiacism should be addressed in prenatal counseling for all families who have had a previously affected pregnancy or child with CdLS. PMID:22581668

  16. Familial Myelodysplastic/Acute Leukemia Syndromes—Myeloid Neoplasms with Germline Predisposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Renata Lyrio Rafael; dos Santos, Anna Cláudia Evangelista; Gutiyama, Luciana Mayumi; Solza, Cristiana; Zalcberg, Ilana Renault

    2017-01-01

    Although most cases of myeloid neoplasms are sporadic, a small subset has been associated with germline mutations. The 2016 revision of the World Health Organization classification included these cases in a myeloid neoplasm group with a predisposing germline mutational background. These patients must have a different management and their families should get genetic counseling. Cases identification and outline of the major known syndromes characteristics will be discussed in this text. PMID:28955657

  17. Stereochemical Consequences of Vinylpyruvate Hydratase-Catalyzed Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William H; Stack, Tyler M M; Taylor, Stephanie M; Burks, Elizabeth A; Whitman, Christian P

    2016-07-26

    A stereochemical analysis has been carried out on two vinylpyruvate hydratases (VPH), which convert 2-hydroxy-2,4-pentadienoate to 2-keto-4S-hydroxypentanoate in meta-fission pathways. Bacterial strains with this pathway can use aromatic compounds as sole sources of energy and carbon. The analysis was carried out using the 5-methyl and 5-chloro derivatives of 2-hydroxy-2,4-pentadienoate with the enzymes from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 (Pp) and Leptothrix cholodnii SP-6 (Lc). In both organisms, VPH is in a complex with the preceding enzyme in the pathway, 4-oxalocrotonate decarboxylase (4-OD). In D2O, a deuteron is incorporated stereospecifically at the C-3 and C-5 positions of product by both Pp and Lc enzymes. Accordingly, the complexes generate (3S,5S)-3,5-[di-D]-2-keto-4S-hydroxyhexanoate and (3S,5R)-3,5-[di-D]-2-keto-4R-hydroxy-5-chloropentanoate (4R and 5R due to a priority numbering change). The substitution at C-5 (CH3 or Cl) or the source of the enzyme (Pp or Lc) does not change the stereochemical outcome. One mechanism that can account for the results is the ketonization of the 5-substituted dienol to the α,β-unsaturated ketone (placing a deuteron at C-5 in D2O), followed by the conjugate addition of water (placing a deuteron at C-3). The stereochemical outcome for VPH (from Pp and Lc) is the same as that reported for a related enzyme, 2-oxo-hept-4-ene-1,7-dioate hydratase, from Escherichia coli C. The combined observations suggest similar mechanisms for these three enzymes that could possibly be common to this group of enzymes.

  18. Targeted Germline Modifications in Rats Using CRISPR/Cas9 and Spermatogonial Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M. Chapman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Organisms with targeted genomic modifications are efficiently produced by gene editing in embryos using CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided DNA endonuclease. Here, to facilitate germline editing in rats, we used CRISPR/Cas9 to catalyze targeted genomic mutations in rat spermatogonial stem cell cultures. CRISPR/Cas9-modified spermatogonia regenerated spermatogenesis and displayed long-term sperm-forming potential following transplantation into rat testes. Targeted germline mutations in Epsti1 and Erbb3 were vertically transmitted from recipients to exclusively generate “pure,” non-mosaic mutant progeny. Epsti1 mutant rats were produced with or without genetic selection of donor spermatogonia. Monoclonal enrichment of Erbb3 null germlines unmasked recessive spermatogenesis defects in culture that were buffered in recipients, yielding mutant progeny isogenic at targeted alleles. Thus, spermatogonial gene editing with CRISPR/Cas9 provided a platform for generating targeted germline mutations in rats and for studying spermatogenesis.

  19. Germline modification of domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, L; González, R; Dobrinski, I

    2015-01-01

    is introduced into the male germ line just before the onset of spermatogenesis, the time required for the production of genetically modified sperm is significantly shorter using germ cell transplantation compared to cloning or embryonic stem (ES) cell based technology. Moreover, the GSC-mediated germline modification circumvents problems associated with embryo manipulation and nuclear reprogramming. Currently, engineering targeted mutations in domestic animals using GSCs remains a challenge as GSCs from those animals are difficult to maintain in vitro for an extended period of time. Recent advances in genome editing techniques such as Zinc-Finger Nucleases (ZFNs), Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) greatly enhance the efficiency of engineering targeted genetic change in domestic animals as demonstrated by the generation of several gene knock-out pig and cattle models using those techniques. The potential of GSC-mediated germline modification in making targeted genetic modifications in domestic animal models will be maximized if those genome editing techniques can be applied in GSCs.

  20. Differences in Strength and Timing of the mtDNA Bottleneck between Zebrafish Germline and Non-germline Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auke B.C. Otten

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the mtDNA bottleneck in zebrafish to elucidate size, timing, and variation in germline and non-germline cells. Mature zebrafish oocytes contain, on average, 19.0 × 106 mtDNA molecules with high variation between oocytes. During embryogenesis, the mtDNA copy number decreases to ∼170 mtDNA molecules per primordial germ cell (PGC, a number similar to that in mammals, and to ∼50 per non-PGC. These occur at the same developmental stage, implying considerable variation in mtDNA copy number in (non-PGCs of the same female, dictated by variation in the mature oocyte. The presence of oocytes with low mtDNA numbers, if similar in humans, could explain how (de novo mutations can reach high mutation loads within a single generation. High mtDNA copy numbers in mature oocytes are established by mtDNA replication during oocyte development. Bottleneck differences between germline and non-germline cells, due to early differentiation of PGCs, may account for different distribution patterns of familial mutations.

  1. Identification of catalytically important residues of the carotenoid 1,2-hydratases from Rubrivivax gelatinosus and Thiocapsa roseopersicina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiseni, A.; Otten, L.G.; Arends, I.W.C.E.

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoid 1,2-hydratases (CrtC) catalyze the selective addition of water to an isolated carbon–carbon double bond. Although their involvement in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is well understood, little is known about the mechanism by which these hydratases transform carotenoids such as lycope

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans MES-3 is a target of GLD-1 and functions epigenetically in germline development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L; Paulsen, J; Yoo, Y; Goodwin, E B; Strome, S

    2001-11-01

    The maternal-effect sterile (MES) proteins are maternally supplied regulators of germline development in Caenorhabditis elegans. In the hermaphrodite progeny from mes mutant mothers, the germline dies during larval development. On the basis of the similarities of MES-2 and MES-6 to known transcriptional regulators and on the basis of the effects of mes mutations on transgene expression in the germline, the MES proteins are predicted to be transcriptional repressors. One of the MES proteins, MES-3, is a novel protein with no recognizable motifs. In this article we show that MES-3 is localized in the nuclei of embryos and germ cells, consistent with its predicted role in transcriptional regulation. Its distribution in the germline and in early embryos does not depend on the wild-type functions of the other MES proteins. However, its nuclear localization in midstage embryos and its persistence in the primordial germ cells depend on wild-type MES-2 and MES-6. These results are consistent with biochemical data showing that MES-2, MES-3, and MES-6 associate in a complex in embryos. The distribution of MES-3 in the adult germline is regulated by the translational repressor GLD-1: MES-3 is absent from the region of the germline where GLD-1 is known to be present, MES-3 is overexpressed in the germline of gld-1 mutants, and GLD-1 specifically binds the mes-3 3' untranslated region (3' UTR). Analysis of temperature-shifted mes-3(bn21ts) worms and embryos indicates that MES-3 function is required in the mother's germline and during embryogenesis to ensure subsequent normal germline development. We propose that MES-3 acts epigenetically to induce a germline state that is inherited through both meiosis and mitosis and that is essential for survival of the germline.

  3. PARENTAL ORIGIN AND GERMLINE MOSAICISM OF DELETIONS AND DUPLICATIONS OF THE DYSTROPHIN GENE - A EUROPEAN STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANESSEN, AJ; ABBS, S; BAIGET, M; BAKKER, E; BOILEAU, C; VANBROECKHOVEN, C; BUSHBY, K; CLARKE, A; CLAUSTRES, M; COVONE, AE; FERRARI, M; FERLINI, A; GALLUZZI, G; GRIMM, T; GRUBBEN, C; JEANPIERRE, M; KAARIAINEN, H; LIECHTIGALLATI, S; MELIS, MA; VANOMMEN, GJB; PONCIN, JE; SCHEFFER, H; SCHWARTZ, M; SPEER, A; STUHRMANN, M; VERELLENDUMOULIN, C; WILCOX, DE; TENKATE, LP

    1992-01-01

    Knowledge about the parental origin of new mutations and the occurrence of germline mosaicism is important for estimating recurrence risks in Duchenne (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). However, there are problems in resolving these issues partly because not all mutations can as yet be direc

  4. Germline mosaicism at the fragile X locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, A.C.; Snyder, P.J.; Sedra, M.S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The fragile X full mutation, which is associated with the phenotypic expression of the disorder, is characterized by an expansion of CGG repeat and hypermethylation of the CpG island adjacent to the FMR1 gene. New mutations leading to amplification of the CGG repeat have not been reported. We have identified a fragile X syndrome pedigree where the disorder is associated with a molecular deletion. The deletion was present in the DNA of two affected sons but was absent in the mother`s somatic cell (lymphocyte) DNA. This was confirmed by dosage analysis of the Southern blot using StB12-3 and an additional probe against the dystrophin gene and by PCR analysis of DXS548 alleles. The results are consistent with the deletion arising as a postzygotic event in the mother, who therefore is germinally mosaic. The case reported here clearly demonstrates that FMR1 deletions, unlike the expansions, are not always inherited and the finding of heterozygosity or normal dosage from lymphocyte DNA in the mother of a deletion case does not necessarily rule out the possibility of having a second affected child. The deletion of FMR1 gene may be responsible for a small but significant number of fragile X cases. Therefore, it is imperative that those involved in genetic counseling recognize this diagnostic pitfall. Since it depends upon the size of the mutant clone in the mosaic mother, the exact recurrence risk in germline carriers is unknown. However, prenatal and carrier testing should be performed independently of the outcome of the mother. Furthermore, it is possible that the deletion may not be restricted to the germline, and therefore the mother may actually be a somatic mosaic.

  5. Purification, characterization, and cloning of a bifunctional molybdoenzyme with hydratase and alcohol dehydrogenase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, J.; Straathof, A.J.J.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Hanefeld, U.

    2010-01-01

    A bifunctional hydratase/alcohol dehydrogenase was isolated from the cyclohexanol degrading bacterium Alicycliphilus denitrificans DSMZ 14773. The enzyme catalyzes the addition of water to α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and the subsequent alcohol oxidation. The purified enzyme showed three

  6. Purification, characterization, and cloning of a bifunctional molybdoenzyme with hydratase and alcohol dehydrogenase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, J.; Straathof, A.J.J.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Hanefeld, U.

    2010-01-01

    A bifunctional hydratase/alcohol dehydrogenase was isolated from the cyclohexanol degrading bacterium Alicycliphilus denitrificans DSMZ 14773. The enzyme catalyzes the addition of water to α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and the subsequent alcohol oxidation. The purified enzyme showed three subun

  7. Biochemical characterization and FAD-binding analysis of oleate hydratase from Macrococcus caseolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Young-Chul; Jeong, Ki-Woong; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Yeong-Su; Kim, Yangmee; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2012-03-01

    A putative fatty acid hydratase gene from Macrococcus caseolyticus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme was a 68 kDa dimer with a molecular mass of 136 kDa. The enzymatic products formed from fatty acid substrates by the putative enzyme were isolated with high purity (>99%) by solvent fractional crystallization at low temperature. After the identification by GC-MS, the purified hydroxy fatty acids were used as standards to quantitatively determine specific activities and kinetic parameters for fatty acids as substrates. Among the fatty acids evaluated, specific activity and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) were highest for oleic acid, indicating that the putative fatty acid hydratase was an oleate hydratase. Hydration occurred only for cis-9-double and cis-12-double bonds of unsaturated fatty acids without any trans-configurations. The maximum activity for oleate hydration was observed at pH 6.5 and 25 °C with 2% (v/v) ethanol and 0.2 mM FAD. Without FAD, all catalytic activity was abolished. Thus, the oleate hydratase is an FAD-dependent enzyme. The residues G29, G31, S34, E50, and E56, which are conserved in the FAD-binding motif of fatty acid hydratases (GXGXXG((A/S))X((15-21))E((D))), were selected by alignment, and the spectral properties and kinetic parameters of their alanine-substituted variants were analyzed. Among the five variants, G29A, G31A, and E56A showed no interaction with FAD and exhibited no activity. These results indicate that G29, G31, and E56 are essential for FAD-binding.

  8. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  9. Lessons for Inductive Germline Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seervai, Riyad N.H.; Wessel, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Formation of the germline in an embryo marks a fresh round of reproductive potential, yet the developmental stage and location within the embryo where the primordial germ cells (PGCs) form differs wildly among species. In most animals, the germline is formed either by an inherited mechanism, in which maternal provisions within the oocyte drive localized germ-cell fate once acquired in the embryo, or an inductive mechanism that involves signaling between cells that directs germ-cell fate. The inherited mechanism has been widely studied in model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Xenopus laevis, and Danio rerio. Given the rapid generation time and the effective adaptation for laboratory research of these organisms, it is not coincidental that research on these organisms has led the field in elucidating mechanisms for germline specification. The inductive mechanism, however, is less well understood and is studied primarily in the mouse (Mus musculus). In this review, we compare and contrast these two fundamental mechanisms for germline determination, beginning with the key molecular determinants that play a role in the formation of germ cells across all animal taxa. We next explore the current understanding of the inductive mechanism of germ-cell determination in mice, and evaluate the hypotheses for selective pressures on these contrasting mechanisms. We then discuss the hypothesis that the transition between these determination mechanisms, which has happened many times in phylogeny, is more of a continuum than a binary change. Finally, we propose an analogy between germline determination and sex determination in vertebrates—two of the milestones of reproduction and development—in which animals use contrasting strategies to activate similar pathways. PMID:23450642

  10. Lessons for inductive germline determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seervai, Riyad N H; Wessel, Gary M

    2013-08-01

    Formation of the germline in an embryo marks a fresh round of reproductive potential, yet the developmental stage and location within the embryo where the primordial germ cells (PGCs) form differs wildly among species. In most animals, the germline is formed either by an inherited mechanism, in which maternal provisions within the oocyte drive localized germ-cell fate once acquired in the embryo, or an inductive mechanism that involves signaling between cells that directs germ-cell fate. The inherited mechanism has been widely studied in model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Xenopus laevis, and Danio rerio. Given the rapid generation time and the effective adaptation for laboratory research of these organisms, it is not coincidental that research on these organisms has led the field in elucidating mechanisms for germline specification. The inductive mechanism, however, is less well understood and is studied primarily in the mouse (Mus musculus). In this review, we compare and contrast these two fundamental mechanisms for germline determination, beginning with the key molecular determinants that play a role in the formation of germ cells across all animal taxa. We next explore the current understanding of the inductive mechanism of germ-cell determination in mice, and evaluate the hypotheses for selective pressures on these contrasting mechanisms. We then discuss the hypothesis that the transition between these determination mechanisms, which has happened many times in phylogeny, is more of a continuum than a binary change. Finally, we propose an analogy between germline determination and sex determination in vertebrates-two of the milestones of reproduction and development-in which animals use contrasting strategies to activate similar pathways.

  11. Neurofibromatosis type 1 in two siblings due to maternal germline mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisson, E; Forzan, M; Salviati, L; Clementi, M

    2014-04-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is caused by loss of function mutations of the NF1 gene, which are de novo in 50% of cases. Although this gene shows one of the highest mutation rates in the human genome, germline mosaicism is very rare in this condition. We describe the molecular analysis of a family in which neurofibromatosis type 1 occurred in two out of four siblings born to unaffected parents. Molecular analysis of the NF1 gene identified in both patients the same splicing mutation c.1392+1G>A, which was absent in parental lymphocytes. Microsatellite analysis showed that the two affected siblings shared the same maternal allele, however a specific PCR-RFLP assay excluded the presence of the NF1 splicing mutation in multiple maternal tissues. Our molecular and clinical findings are consistent with a germline mosaicism for the NF1 splicing mutation. This is the first case of maternal germline mosaicism for a NF1 mutation characterized so far at the molecular level. Our data confirm that germline mosaicism is rare in neurofibromatosis 1, but it has important implications for genetic counseling.

  12. Defending the genome from the enemy within: mechanisms of retrotransposon suppression in the mouse germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, James H; Dunican, Donncha S; Maclennan, Marie; Meehan, Richard R; Adams, Ian R

    2014-05-01

    The viability of any species requires that the genome is kept stable as it is transmitted from generation to generation by the germ cells. One of the challenges to transgenerational genome stability is the potential mutagenic activity of transposable genetic elements, particularly retrotransposons. There are many different types of retrotransposon in mammalian genomes, and these target different points in germline development to amplify and integrate into new genomic locations. Germ cells, and their pluripotent developmental precursors, have evolved a variety of genome defence mechanisms that suppress retrotransposon activity and maintain genome stability across the generations. Here, we review recent advances in understanding how retrotransposon activity is suppressed in the mammalian germline, how genes involved in germline genome defence mechanisms are regulated, and the consequences of mutating these genome defence genes for the developing germline.

  13. Detection of APC gene germline mutation in Chinese familial adenomatous polyposis by direct sequencing in combination with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification%直接测序联合多重连接依赖探针扩增法检测家族性腺瘤性息肉病APC基因胚系突变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金鹏; 崔伟佳; 盛剑秋; 付蕾; 安贺娟; 李爱琴; 张明智; 韩英; 李世荣

    2010-01-01

    目的 研究中国家族性腺瘤性息肉病(FAP)患者APC基因胚系突变的特点.方法 对来自北京、河北、河南、安徽、内蒙古、山西、福建等地区的14个FAP家系先证者用直接测序法进行APC基因突变检测,对突变检测阴性者应用多重连接依赖探针扩增(MLPA)技术进行APE基因大片段缺失检测.结果 14例先证者中9例(64.3%)检测出APC基因微小突变,其中移码突变6例,剪接区突变2例,无义突变1例;2例(14.3%)检测出APC基因大片段缺失,微小突变与大片段缺失的总检出率为78.6%.c.2336-2337insT、c.3923-3929delAAGAAAA、c.532-2A>T和c.4179-4180GAdelinsT等4个微小突变和外显子11、10A缺失、外显子15 start缺失等2个大片段缺失为首次报道.结论 中国FAP患者APC基因的胚系突变类型多样,以移码突变居多,突变位点以第15外显子居多;直接测序法联合MLPA法检测大片段缺失可提高APC基因突变的检出率.%Objective To investigate the characteristics of APC gene germline mutation in Chinese patients with familial adenomatous polyposis ( FAP). Methods The genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral venous blood drawn from probands of 14 Chinese FAP families from Beijing, Hebei, Henan,Anhui, Inner Mongolia, Shanxi and Fujian. The APC gene was amplified by PCR and underwent direct sequencing. Large fragment deletion was detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) only in micromutation-negative samples found by sequencing. Results APC gene micromutations were found in 9 probands and the mieromutation detection rate was 64. 3%, including 6 frameshift mutations, 2 splicing mutations and 1 nonsense mutation. Large fragment deletions of APC gene were detected in 2 probands ( 14. 3% ). The total mutation detection rate of micromutation and large fragment deletion was 78. 6%. Four novel micmromutations and 2 novel large fragment deletions were found, including c. 2336-2337insT, c. 3923-3929delAAGAAAA, c

  14. [Effects of nitriles and amides on the growth and the nitrile hydratase activity of the Rhodococcus sp. strain gt1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, A Iu; Kuznetsova, M V; Ovechkina, G V; Kozlov, S V; Maksimova, Iu G; Demakov, V A

    2003-01-01

    Effects of some nitriles and amides, as well as glucose and ammonium, on the growth and the nitrile hydratase (EC 4.2.1.84) activity of the Rhodococcus sp. strain gt1 isolated from soil were studied. The activity of nitrile hydratase mainly depended on carbon and nitrogen supply to cells. The activity of nitrile hydratase was high in the presence of glucose and ammonium at medium concentrations and decreased at concentrations of glucose more than 0.3%. Saturated unsubstituted aliphatic nitriles and amides were found to be a good source of nitrogen and carbon. However, the presence of nitriles and amides in the medium was not absolutely necessary for the expression of the activity of nitrile hydratase isolated from the Rhodococcus sp. strain gt1.

  15. Elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 – the germline/maturation hypothesis

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    Prabakaran ePonraj

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We have previously observed that all known broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs against HIV-1 are highly divergent from their putative germline predecessors in contrast to bnAbs against henipaviruses and SARS coronavirus, which are much less divergent from their germline counterparts. We have hypothesized that because the germline antibodies are so different compared to the highly somatically mutated HIV-1 bnAbs they may not bind to the Env. This led us to the hypothesis that the immunogenicity of the highly conserved epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs is reduced or eliminated by their very weak or absent interactions with germline antibodies. Thus immune responses leading to elicitation of bnAbs may not be initiated and/or sustained; even if they are, the maturation pathways are so complex that prolonged periods of time may be required for elicitation of such bnAbs. In support of the hypothesis, our initial experiments showed that germline-like precursors of several bnAbs do not bind to their epitopes. Recently, a number of research groups working in the HIV vaccine field have obtained data supporting and further expanding the germline/maturation hypothesis. Vaccine immunogens that could bind putative germline antibody predecessors of known bnAbs were successfully generated. However, guiding the immune system through the exceptionally complex antibody maturation pathways in order to elicit those bnAbs remains a major challenge. Here, we summarize developments in the HIV-1 vaccine field based on the germline/maturation hypothesis including our recent data demonstrating germline-like VRC01 antibodies in a human cord blood IgM library.

  16. Expression control of nitrile hydratase and amidase genes in Rhodococcus erythropolis and substrate specificities of the enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucká, Lenka; Volkova, Olga; Pavlík, Adam; Kaplan, Ondřej; Kracík, Martin; Nešvera, Jan; Martínková, Ludmila; Pátek, Miroslav

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial amidases and nitrile hydratases can be used for the synthesis of various intermediates and products in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries and for the bioremediation of toxic pollutants. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of the amidase and nitrile hydratase genes of Rhodococcus erythropolis and test the stereospecific nitrile hydratase and amidase activities on chiral cyanohydrins. The nucleotide sequences of the gene clusters containing the oxd (aldoxime dehydratase), ami (amidase), nha1, nha2 (subunits of the nitrile hydratase), nhr1, nhr2, nhr3 and nhr4 (putative regulatory proteins) genes of two R. erythropolis strains, A4 and CCM2595, were determined. All genes of both of the clusters are transcribed in the same direction. RT-PCR analysis, primer extension and promoter fusions with the gfp reporter gene showed that the ami, nha1 and nha2 genes of R. erythropolis A4 form an operon transcribed from the Pami promoter and an internal Pnha promoter. The activity of Pami was found to be weakly induced when the cells grew in the presence of acetonitrile, whereas the Pnha promoter was moderately induced by both the acetonitrile or acetamide used instead of the inorganic nitrogen source. However, R. erythropolis A4 cells showed no increase in amidase and nitrile hydratase activities in the presence of acetamide or acetonitrile in the medium. R. erythropolis A4 nitrile hydratase and amidase were found to be effective at hydrolysing cyanohydrins and 2-hydroxyamides, respectively.

  17. CHEK2 1100DELC germline mutation: a frequency study in hereditary breast and colon cancer Brazilian families Mutação germinativa 1100delC no gene CHEK2: estudo da frequência em famílias brasileiras com câncer de mama e cólon hereditários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamile Abud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: CHEK2 encodes a cell cycle checkpoint kinase that plays an important role in the DNA damage repair pathway, activated mainly by ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. A germline mutation in CHEK2, 1100delC, has been described as a low penetrance allele in a significant number of families with breast and colorectal cancer in certain countries and is also associated with increased risk of contralateral breast cancer in women previously affected by the disease. About 5%-10% of all breast and colorectal cancers are associated with hereditary predisposition and its recognition is of great importance for genetic counseling and cancer risk management. OBJECTIVES: Here, we have assessed the frequency of the CHEK2 1100delC mutation in the germline of 59 unrelated Brazilian individuals with clinical criteria for the hereditary breast and colorectal cancer syndrome. METHODS: A long-range PCR strategy followed by gene sequencing was used. RESULTS: The 1100delC mutation was encountered in the germline of one (1.7% individual in this high risk cohort. This indicates that the CHEK2 1100delC is not commonly encountered in Brazilian families with multiple diagnoses of breast and colorectal cancer. CONCLUSION: These results should be confirmed in a larger series of families and further testing should be undertaken to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the hereditary breast and colorectal cancer phenotype.INTRODUÇÃO: CHEK2 codifica uma proteína quinase envolvida em um ponto de checagem do ciclo celular que desempenha um papel importante na via de reparação do DNA, danos ativados principalmente por ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutado em resposta a danos na dupla hélice do DNA. A mutação germinativa 1100delC no gene CHEK2 tem sido descrita como um alelo de baixa penetrância em um número significativo de famílias com câncer de mama e cólon em certos países e também está associada com risco

  18. MAX mutations cause hereditary and sporadic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burnichon, N.; Cascon, A.; Schiavi, F.; Morales, N.P.; Comino-Mendez, I.; Abermil, N.; Inglada-Perez, L.; Cubas, A.A. de; Amar, L.; Barontini, M.; Quiros, S.B. de; Bertherat, J.; Bignon, Y.J.; Blok, M.J.; Bobisse, S.; Borrego, S.; Castellano, M.; Chanson, P.; Chiara, M.D.; Corssmit, E.P.; Giacche, M.; Krijger, R.R. de; Ercolino, T.; Girerd, X.; Gomez-Garcia, E.B.; Gomez-Grana, A.; Guilhem, I.; Hes, F.J.; Honrado, E.; Korpershoek, E.; Lenders, J.W.; Leton, R.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Merlo, A.; Mori, L.; Murat, A.; Pierre, P.; Plouin, P.F.; Prodanov, T.; Quesada-Charneco, M.; Qin, N.; Rapizzi, E.; Raymond, V.; Reisch, N.; Roncador, G.; Ruiz-Ferrer, M.; Schillo, F.; Stegmann, A.P.; Suarez, C.; Taschin, E.; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Tops, C.M.; Urioste, M.; Beuschlein, F.; Pacak, K.; Mannelli, M.; Dahia, P.L.; Opocher, G.; Eisenhofer, G.; Gimenez-Roqueplo, A.P.; Robledo, M.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Pheochromocytomas (PCC) and paragangliomas (PGL) are genetically heterogeneous neural crest-derived neoplasms. Recently we identified germline mutations in a new tumor suppressor susceptibility gene, MAX (MYC-associated factor X), which predisposes carriers to PCC. How MAX mutations

  19. Germline mosaicism in osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis--recurrence in siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, James J; Phelan, Ethna; Steenackers, Ellen; van Hul, Wim; Reardon, William

    2016-04-01

    We report recurrence of osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis (OSCS) in two full siblings conceived by unaffected parents. Molecular confirmation of OSCS in both siblings was achieved by identification of a novel heterozygous mutation in the WTX gene. Neither parent had clinical features of OSCS nor was the pathogenic mutation demonstrable in DNA extracted from both peripheral blood leucocytes and buccal cells. This case demonstrates germline mosaicism in OSCS and represents the third report of mosaicism affecting the germline in families with OSCS. Previous reports were of parental gonadosomal mosaicism, with one showing recurrence in multiple children. Our observation adds to a body of evidence that suggests that germline mosaicism in OSCS may occur more frequently than believed previously and may have implications for counselling families with OSCS.

  20. The bacterial catabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Characterization of three hydratase-aldolase-catalyzed reactions

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    Jake A. LeVieux

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are highly toxic, pervasive environmental pollutants with mutagenic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic properties. There is interest in exploiting the nutritional capabilities of microbes to remove PAHs from various environments including those impacted by improper disposal or spills. Although there is a considerable body of literature on PAH degradation, the substrates and products for many of the enzymes have never been identified and many proposed activities have never been confirmed. This is particularly true for high molecular weight PAHs (e.g., phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene. As a result, pathways for the degradation of these compounds are proposed to follow one elucidated for naphthalene with limited experimental verification. In this pathway, ring fission produces a species that can undergo a non-enzymatic cyclization reaction. An isomerase opens the ring and catalyzes a cis to trans double bond isomerization. The resulting product is the substrate for a hydratase-aldolase, which catalyzes the addition of water to the double bond of an α,β-unsaturated ketone, followed by a retro-aldol cleavage. Initial kinetic and mechanistic studies of the hydratase-aldolase in the naphthalene pathway (designated NahE and two hydratase-aldolases in the phenanthrene pathway (PhdG and PhdJ have been completed. Crystallographic work on two of the enzymes (NahE and PhdJ provides a rudimentary picture of the mechanism and a platform for future work to identify the structural basis for catalysis and the individual specificities of these hydratase-aldolases.

  1. An Aeroplysinin-1 Specific Nitrile Hydratase Isolated from the Marine Sponge Aplysina cavernicola

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    Peter Proksch

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A nitrile hydratase (NHase that specifically accepts the nitrile aeroplysinin-1 (1 as a substrate and converts it into the dienone amide verongiaquinol (7 was isolated, partially purified and characterized from the Mediterranean sponge Aplysina cavernicola; although it is currently not known whether the enzyme is of sponge origin or produced by its symbiotic microorganisms. The formation of aeroplysinin-1 and of the corresponding dienone amide is part of the chemical defence system of A. cavernicola. The latter two compounds that show strong antibiotic activity originate from brominated isoxazoline alkaloids that are thought to protect the sponges from invasion of bacterial pathogens. The sponge was shown to contain at least two NHases as two excised protein bands from a non denaturating Blue Native gel showed nitrile hydratase activity, which was not observed for control samples. The enzymes were shown to be manganese dependent, although cobalt and nickel ions were also able to recover the activity of the nitrile hydratases. The temperature and pH optimum of the studied enzymes were found at 41 °C and pH 7.8. The enzymes showed high substrate specificity towards the physiological substrate aeroplysinin-1 (1 since none of the substrate analogues that were prepared either by partial or by total synthesis were converted in an in vitro assay. Moreover de-novo sequencing by mass spectrometry was employed to obtain information about the primary structure of the studied NHases, which did not reveal any homology to known NHases.

  2. An Aeroplysinin-1 Specific Nitrile Hydratase Isolated from the Marine Sponge Aplysina cavernicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipowicz, Bartosz; Hanekop, Nils; Schmitt, Lutz; Proksch, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A nitrile hydratase (NHase) that specifically accepts the nitrile aeroplysinin-1 (1) as a substrate and converts it into the dienone amide verongiaquinol (7) was isolated, partially purified and characterized from the Mediterranean sponge Aplysina cavernicola; although it is currently not known whether the enzyme is of sponge origin or produced by its symbiotic microorganisms. The formation of aeroplysinin-1 and of the corresponding dienone amide is part of the chemical defence system of A. cavernicola. The latter two compounds that show strong antibiotic activity originate from brominated isoxazoline alkaloids that are thought to protect the sponges from invasion of bacterial pathogens. The sponge was shown to contain at least two NHases as two excised protein bands from a non denaturating Blue Native gel showed nitrile hydratase activity, which was not observed for control samples. The enzymes were shown to be manganese dependent, although cobalt and nickel ions were also able to recover the activity of the nitrile hydratases. The temperature and pH optimum of the studied enzymes were found at 41 °C and pH 7.8. The enzymes showed high substrate specificity towards the physiological substrate aeroplysinin-1 (1) since none of the substrate analogues that were prepared either by partial or by total synthesis were converted in an in vitro assay. Moreover de-novo sequencing by mass spectrometry was employed to obtain information about the primary structure of the studied NHases, which did not reveal any homology to known NHases. PMID:23966036

  3. Ferrous and ferric ions-based high-throughput screening strategy for nitrile hydratase and amidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhi-Jian; Zheng, Ren-Chao; Lei, Li-Hua; Zheng, Yu-Guo; Shen, Yin-Chu

    2011-06-01

    Rapid and direct screening of nitrile-converting enzymes is of great importance in the development of industrial biocatalytic process for pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals. In this paper, a combination of ferrous and ferric ions was used to establish a novel colorimetric screening method for nitrile hydratase and amidase with α-amino nitriles and α-amino amides as substrates, respectively. Ferrous and ferric ions reacted sequentially with the cyanide dissociated spontaneously from α-amino nitrile solution, forming a characteristic deep blue precipitate. They were also sensitive to weak basicity due to the presence of amino amide, resulting in a yellow precipitate. When amino amide was further hydrolyzed to amino acid, it gave a light yellow solution. Mechanisms of color changes were further proposed. Using this method, two isolates with nitrile hydratase activity towards 2-amino-2,3-dimethyl butyronitrile, one strain capable of hydrating 2-amino-4-(hydroxymethyl phosphiny) butyronitrile and another microbe exhibiting amidase activity against 2-amino-4-methylsulfanyl butyrlamide were obtained from soil samples and culture collections of our laboratory. Versatility of this method enabled it the first direct and inexpensive high-throughput screening system for both nitrile hydratase and amidase. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of Linoleate 10-Hydratase of Lactobacillus plantarum and Novel Antifungal Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan Y.; Liang, Nuan Y.; Curtis, Jonathan M.; Gänzle, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacilli convert linoleic acid to the antifungal compound 10-hydroxy-12-octadecenoic acid (10-HOE) by linoleate 10-hydratase (10-LAH). However, the effect of this conversion on cellular membrane physiology and properties of the cell surface have not been demonstrated. Moreover, Lactobacillus plantarum produces 13-hydroxy-9-octadecenoic acid (13-HOE) in addition to 10-HOE, but the antifungal activity of 13-HOE was unknown. Phylogenetic analyses conducted in this study did not differentiate between 10-LAH and linoleate 13-hydratase (13-LAH). Thus, linoleate hydratases (LAHs) must be characterized through their differences in their activities of linoleate conversion. Four genes encoding putative LAHs from lactobacilli were cloned, heterologous expressed, purified and identified as FAD-dependent 10-LAH. The unsaturated fatty acid substrates stimulated the growth of lactobacilli. We also investigated the role of 10-LAH in ethanol tolerance, membrane fluidity and hydrophobicity of cell surfaces in lactobacilli by disruption of lah. Compared with the L. plantarum lah deficient strain, 10-LAH in wild-type strain did not exert effect on cell survival and membrane fluidity under ethanol stress, but influenced the cell surface hydrophobicity. Moreover, deletion of 10-LAH in L. plantarum facilitated purification of 13-HOE and demonstration of its antifungal activity against Penicillium roqueforti and Aspergillus niger. PMID:27757104

  5. Cell lineage analysis of the mammalian female germline.

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    Yitzhak Reizel

    Full Text Available Fundamental aspects of embryonic and post-natal development, including maintenance of the mammalian female germline, are largely unknown. Here we employ a retrospective, phylogenetic-based method for reconstructing cell lineage trees utilizing somatic mutations accumulated in microsatellites, to study female germline dynamics in mice. Reconstructed cell lineage trees can be used to estimate lineage relationships between different cell types, as well as cell depth (number of cell divisions since the zygote. We show that, in the reconstructed mouse cell lineage trees, oocytes form clusters that are separate from hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, both in young and old mice, indicating that these populations belong to distinct lineages. Furthermore, while cumulus cells sampled from different ovarian follicles are distinctly clustered on the reconstructed trees, oocytes from the left and right ovaries are not, suggesting a mixing of their progenitor pools. We also observed an increase in oocyte depth with mouse age, which can be explained either by depth-guided selection of oocytes for ovulation or by post-natal renewal. Overall, our study sheds light on substantial novel aspects of female germline preservation and development.

  6. Cell lineage analysis of the mammalian female germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reizel, Yitzhak; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Adar, Rivka; Elbaz, Judith; Jinich, Adrian; Chapal-Ilani, Noa; Maruvka, Yosef E; Nevo, Nava; Marx, Zipora; Horovitz, Inna; Wasserstrom, Adam; Mayo, Avi; Shur, Irena; Benayahu, Dafna; Skorecki, Karl; Segal, Eran; Dekel, Nava; Shapiro, Ehud

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental aspects of embryonic and post-natal development, including maintenance of the mammalian female germline, are largely unknown. Here we employ a retrospective, phylogenetic-based method for reconstructing cell lineage trees utilizing somatic mutations accumulated in microsatellites, to study female germline dynamics in mice. Reconstructed cell lineage trees can be used to estimate lineage relationships between different cell types, as well as cell depth (number of cell divisions since the zygote). We show that, in the reconstructed mouse cell lineage trees, oocytes form clusters that are separate from hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, both in young and old mice, indicating that these populations belong to distinct lineages. Furthermore, while cumulus cells sampled from different ovarian follicles are distinctly clustered on the reconstructed trees, oocytes from the left and right ovaries are not, suggesting a mixing of their progenitor pools. We also observed an increase in oocyte depth with mouse age, which can be explained either by depth-guided selection of oocytes for ovulation or by post-natal renewal. Overall, our study sheds light on substantial novel aspects of female germline preservation and development.

  7. Proven germline mosaicism in a father of two children with CHARGE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, S; Pieper, L; Häberle, J; Grzmil, P; Burfeind, P; Steckel, M; Lenz, U; Michelmann, H W

    2009-05-01

    CHARGE syndrome is an autosomal dominant malformation syndrome caused by mutations in the CHD7 gene. The majority of cases are sporadic and only few familial cases have been reported. In these families, mosaicism in one parent, as well as parent- to-child transmission of a CHD7 mutation, has been described. In some further cases, germline mosaicism has been suggested. Here, we report the first case in which germline mosaicism could be demonstrated in a father of two affected children with CHARGE syndrome. The truncating mutation c.7302dupA in exon 34 of the CHD7 gene was found in both affected children but was not detected in parental lymphocytes. However, in DNA extracted from the father's spermatozoa, the c.7302dupA mutation could be identified. Furthermore, mutation analysis of DNA isolated from 59 single spermatozoa revealed that the c.7302dupA mutation occurs in 16 spermatozoa, confirming germline mosaicism in the father of the affected children. This result has a high impact for genetic counselling of the family and for their recurrence risk in further pregnancies.

  8. Identification of Unique, Heterozygous Germline Mutation, STK11 (p.F354L), in a Child with an Encapsulated Follicular Variant of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma within Six Months of Completing Treatment for Neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buryk, Melissa A; Picarsic, Jennifer L; Creary, Susan E; Shaw, Peter H; Simons, Jeffrey P; Deutsch, Melvin; Monaco, Sara E; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Witchel, Selma Feldman

    2015-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is rare in children, although it is a known secondary malignancy after treatment for neuroblastoma (NB). The interval between NB treatment completion and PTC is usually more than 5 years. A 4-year-old, female patient with a high risk adrenal NB was found to have a 2.9-cm, right thyroid nodule on surveillance chest computed tomography (CT) 6 months after completion of her NB treatment (induction chemotherapy, tumor resection, autologous stem cell transplantation, external beam radiation to the abdominal tumor site, immunotherapy, and retinoic acid). Posttreatment surveillance included iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine scans and CT scans. Fine-needle aspiration of the thyroid nodule diagnosed a follicular neoplasm, which was negative for BRAF, NRAS, KRAS, HRAS, PAX8/PPARg, and RET/PTC mutations, without evidence of metastatic NB. Nodule histology demonstrated an encapsulated follicular variant of PTC (FVPTC). Next-generation sequence analysis for a 46 cancer-gene profile was performed on both tumors with subsequent peripheral blood DNA testing. A heterozygous missense mutation in STK11 (F354L) was identified in both the NB and FVPTC. This mutation was also detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Two additional heterozygous somatic missense mutations of uncertain significance were identified: KDR/VEGF receptor 2 (Q472H) on chromosome 4 and MET (N375S) on chromosome 7. To our knowledge, this is the shortest reported duration from completion of NB treatment to detection of thyroid cancer. The association of the STK11 gene with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, lung adenocarcinomas, and medullary thyroid cancer leads to a possible association between this genetic variant and our patient's tumors.

  9. Identification and characterization of an oleate hydratase-encoding gene from Bifidobacterium breve

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Kerry Joan; Motherway, Mary O'Connell; Hennessey, Alan A; Brodhun, Florian; Ross, R Paul; Feussner, Ivo; Stanton, Catherine; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are common commensals of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. Previous studies have suggested that a bifidobacterial myosin cross reactive antigen (MCRA) protein plays a role in bacterial stress tolerance, while this protein has also been linked to the biosynthesis of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in bifidobacteria. In order to increase our understanding on the role of MCRA in bifidobacteria we created and analyzed an insertion mutant of the MCRA-encoding gene of B. breve NCFB 2258. Our results demonstrate that the MCRA protein of B. breve NCFB 2258 does not appear to play a role in CLA production, yet is an oleate hydratase, which contributes to bifidobacterial solvent stress protection. PMID:23851389

  10. HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody precursor B cells revealed by germline-targeting immunogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Joseph G; Kulp, Daniel W; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Sarkar, Anita; Briney, Bryan; Sok, Devin; Sesterhenn, Fabian; Ereño-Orbea, June; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Deresa, Isaiah; Hu, Xiaozhen; Spencer, Skye; Jones, Meaghan; Georgeson, Erik; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; deCamp, Allan C; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Wilson, Ian A; Burton, Dennis R; Crotty, Shane; Schief, William R

    2016-03-25

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a major HIV vaccine goal. Germline-targeting immunogens aim to initiate bnAb induction by activating bnAb germline precursor B cells. Critical unmet challenges are to determine whether bnAb precursor naïve B cells bind germline-targeting immunogens and occur at sufficient frequency in humans for reliable vaccine responses. Using deep mutational scanning and multitarget optimization, we developed a germline-targeting immunogen (eOD-GT8) for diverse VRC01-class bnAbs. We then used the immunogen to isolate VRC01-class precursor naïve B cells from HIV-uninfected donors. Frequencies of true VRC01-class precursors, their structures, and their eOD-GT8 affinities support this immunogen as a candidate human vaccine prime. These methods could be applied to germline targeting for other classes of HIV bnAbs and for Abs to other pathogens.

  11. Finding all BRCA pathogenic mutation carriers : best practice models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jongmans, Marjolijn CJ

    2016-01-01

    Identifying germline BRCA pathogenic mutations in patients with ovarian or breast cancer is a crucial component in the medical management of affected patients. Furthermore, the relatives of affected patients can be offered genetic testing. Relatives who test positive for a germline BRCA pathogenic m

  12. 3-Methylglutaconyl-Coenzyme-A Hydratase Deficiency and the Development of Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spergel, Craig D.; Milko, Mariya; Edwards, Christopher; Steinhoff, Jeff P.

    2014-01-01

    A 25-year-old Canadian male with a history of 3-methylglutaconyl-coenzyme-A hydratase deficiency, also known as 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type I, a very rare inborn error of metabolism, presented with respiratory distress, nausea, vomiting and signs of multisystem organ failure due to a suspected underlying infectious process. An electrocardiogram revealed bilateral atrial enlargement and an elevated brain natriuretic peptide on the initial laboratory studies, which prompted a more thorough cardiac workup. The transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a dilated cardiomyopathy with severe systolic dysfunction. The deficient enzyme present in this patient is involved in the pathway of leucine catabolism and is particularly important in various tissues for energy production and sterol synthesis. The dilated cardiomyopathy in this patient possibly had a variety of potential mechanisms including: a mitochondrial myopathy due to the deficiency of this enzyme leading to a defect in energy production inside cardiac myocytes; or a direct toxicity from 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGA) and its toxic metabolites; or a cardiac dysfunction due to a variety of other potential mechanisms. In conclusion, this patient’s clinical presentation suggested that 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency could cause a severe dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure.

  13. Refined histopathological predictors of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status: A large-scale analysis of breast cancer characteristics from the BCAC, CIMBA, and ENIGMA consortia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); F.J. Couch (Fergus); M. Parsons (Marilyn); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); S. Healey (Sue); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); E. Hahnen (Eric); C. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); D. Steinemann (Doris); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); S.D. Ellis (Steve); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); J. Perkins (Jo); D.G. Evans (Gareth); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Adlard; R. Davidson (Rosemarie); T.J. Cole (Trevor); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); F. Mariette (F.); S. Fortuzzi (S.); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Pasini (Barbara); L. Papi (Laura); L. Varesco (Liliana); R. Balleine (Rosemary); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K. Offitt (Kenneth); A. Jakubowska (Anna); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; J. Rantala (Johanna); Å. Borg (Åke); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A. Miron (Alexander); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); T. Caldes (Trinidad); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); A.E. Toland (Amanda); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); M. Montagna (Marco); J. Garber (Judy); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); A. Osorio (Ana); R.E. Factor (Rachel E.); M.B. Terry (Mary B.); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B. Karlan; M.C. Southey (Melissa); M.U. Rashid (Muhammad); N. Tung (Nadine); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); F. Blows (Fiona); A.M. Dunning (Alison); E. Provenzano (Elena); P. Hall (Per); K. Czene (Kamila); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Cornelissen (Sten); S. Verhoef; P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A.B. Ekici (Arif); D.J. Slamon (Dennis); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A. Muranen (Taru); P. Heikkilä (Päivi); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Brinton (Louise); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); J.E. Olson (Janet); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); E.M. John (Esther); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); D. van West; U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); D. Eccles (Diana); W. Tapper (William); L. Durcan (Lorraine); L. Jones (Louise); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); O. Fletcher (Olivia); N. Johnson (Nichola); M. Dwek (Miriam); R. Swann (Ruth); A.L. Bane (Anita L.); G. Glendon (Gord); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); L. Baglietto (Laura); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); J. Carpenter (Jane); C. Clarke (Christine); R.J. Scott (Rodney); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); J. Gronwald (Jacek); T. Dörk (Thilo); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); T.-W. Park-Simon; P. Hillemanns (Peter); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); H. Surovy (Harald); R. Yang (Rongxi); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); J.M. Collee (Margriet); J.W.M. Martens (John); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); V. Joseph (Vijai); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); A. González-Neira (Anna); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Zamora (Pilar); J. Benítez (Javier); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); D. Zaffaroni (D.); M. Barile (Monica); F. Capra (Fabio); P. Radice (Paolo); S.-H. Teo; D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D. Goldgar (David)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The distribution of histopathological features of invasive breast tumors in BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation carriers differs from that of individuals with no known mutation. Histopathological features thus have utility for mutation prediction, including statistical

  14. No recombination of mtDNA after heteroplasmy for 50 generations in the mouse maternal germline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagström, Erik; Freyer, Christoph; Battersby, Brendan J.; Stewart, James B.; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-01-01

    Variants of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are commonly used as markers to track human evolution because of the high sequence divergence and exclusive maternal inheritance. It is assumed that the inheritance is clonal, i.e. that mtDNA is transmitted between generations without germline recombination. In contrast to this assumption, a number of studies have reported the presence of recombinant mtDNA molecules in cell lines and animal tissues, including humans. If germline recombination of mtDNA is frequent, it would strongly impact phylogenetic and population studies by altering estimates of coalescent time and branch lengths in phylogenetic trees. Unfortunately, this whole area is controversial and the experimental approaches have been widely criticized as they often depend on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of mtDNA and/or involve studies of transformed cell lines. In this study, we used an in vivo mouse model that has had germline heteroplasmy for a defined set of mtDNA mutations for more than 50 generations. To assess recombination, we adapted and validated a method based on cloning of single mtDNA molecules in the λ phage, without prior PCR amplification, followed by subsequent mutation analysis. We screened 2922 mtDNA molecules and found no germline recombination after transmission of mtDNA under genetically and evolutionary relevant conditions in mammals. PMID:24163253

  15. 4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase, its homologue YwhB, and active vinylpyruvate hydratase : Synthesis and evaluation of 2-fluoro substrate analogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, William H; Wang, Susan C; Stanley, Thanuja M; Czerwinski, Robert M; Almrud, Jeffrey J; Poelarends, Gerrit J; Murzin, Alexey G; Whitman, Christian P

    2004-01-01

    A series of 2-fluoro-4-alkene and 2-fluoro-4-alkyne substrate analogues were synthesized and examined as potential inhibitors of three enzymes: 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT) and vinylpyruvate hydratase (VPH) from the catechol meta-fission pathway and a closely related 4-OT homologue found in B

  16. Biochemical characterization of the carotenoid 1,2-hydratases (CrtC) from Rubrivivax gelatinosus and Thiocapsa roseopersicina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiseni, A.; Arends, I.W.C.E.; Otten, L.G.

    2011-01-01

    Two carotenoid 1,2-hydratase (CrtC) genes from the photosynthetic bacteria Rubrivivax gelatinosus and Thiocapsa roseopersicina were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli in an active form and purified by affinity chromatography. The biochemical properties of the recombinant enzymes and their subs

  17. 4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase, its homologue YwhB, and active vinylpyruvate hydratase : Synthesis and evaluation of 2-fluoro substrate analogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, William H; Wang, Susan C; Stanley, Thanuja M; Czerwinski, Robert M; Almrud, Jeffrey J; Poelarends, Gerrit J; Murzin, Alexey G; Whitman, Christian P

    2004-01-01

    A series of 2-fluoro-4-alkene and 2-fluoro-4-alkyne substrate analogues were synthesized and examined as potential inhibitors of three enzymes: 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT) and vinylpyruvate hydratase (VPH) from the catechol meta-fission pathway and a closely related 4-OT homologue found in B

  18. A report of familial male-limited precocious puberty caused by a germ-line heterozygous mutation (M398T) in luteinizing hormone receptor gene%生殖细胞系黄体生成素受体基因杂合突变(M398T)导致家族性男性性早熟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    茅江峰; 伍学焱; 聂敏; 卢双玉; 龚凤英; 戴宇飞

    2010-01-01

    目的 阐明1个家族性男性性早熟(familial male-limited precocious puberty)家系的黄体生成素(luteinizing hormone,LH)受体基因的突变状态,增加对LH受体激活突变导致男性性早熟发病机制的认识.方法 (1)描述1例5岁男孩假性性早熟患者临床表现、辅助检查特点和治疗过程;(2)对患者及其父母外周血白细胞LH受体基因的11个外显子进行 PCR扩增和DNA自接测序,同时对20例正常男性LH受体基因的外显子进行测定.结果 (1)患者临床确诊为男性假性性早熟,应用芳香化酶抑制剂后,身高增长速度减缓;(2)患者及其母亲LH受体基因存在杂合突变,c1193 T→C,导致398位的甲硫氨酸变为苏氨酸(M398T),持续性激活LH受体;(3)患者及其父母和20例正常男性均存在c935 A→G和c1065 T→C碱基改变.结论 (1)生殖细胞系LH受体基因杂合突变(c1193 T→C,M398T)导致LH受体功能持续激活,不断刺激睾丸Leydig细胞分泌雄激素,引起非LH依赖性男性性早熟的临床表现;(2)患者母亲存在相同杂合突变,但无异常临床表现,表明女性可为本病携带者,能将突变基因传给子代,但仅限男性患病;(3)汉族人群LH受体基因可能存在多态性.%Objective To clarify the possible gene mutations in luteinizing hormone(LH) receptor gene in a boy with LH independent precocious puberty and probe the mechanism the of diseases caused by LH receptor activating mutations. Methods ( 1 ) Describe the clinical manifestations and laboratory data in a 5-year-old boy with LH independent precocious puberty. (2) Peripheral leukocytes were collected from the proband, his parents and other 20 normal puberty developed males. PCR and direct DNA sequence of 11 exons in LH receptors gene were conducted. Results (1) The proband was diagnosed to have LH independent precocious puberty according to the clinical symptoms and the laboratory tests. (2) A germ-line heterozygous point mutation in the 11 exon of LH

  19. ELLI-1, a novel germline protein, modulates RNAi activity and P-granule accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andralojc, Karolina M; Campbell, Anne C; Kelly, Ashley L; Terrey, Markus; Tanner, Paige C; Gans, Ian M; Senter-Zapata, Michael J; Khokhar, Eraj S; Updike, Dustin L

    2017-02-01

    Germ cells contain non-membrane bound cytoplasmic organelles that help maintain germline integrity. In C. elegans they are called P granules; without them, the germline undergoes partial masculinization and aberrant differentiation. One key P-granule component is the Argonaute CSR-1, a small-RNA binding protein that antagonizes accumulation of sperm-specific transcripts in developing oocytes and fine-tunes expression of proteins critical to early embryogenesis. Loss of CSR-1 complex components results in a very specific, enlarged P-granule phenotype. In a forward screen to identify mutants with abnormal P granules, ten alleles were recovered with a csr-1 P-granule phenotype, eight of which contain mutations in known components of the CSR-1 complex (csr-1, ego-1, ekl-1, and drh-3). The remaining two alleles are in a novel gene now called elli-1 (enlarged germline granules). ELLI-1 is first expressed in primordial germ cells during mid-embryogenesis, and continues to be expressed in the adult germline. While ELLI-1 forms cytoplasmic aggregates, they occasionally dock, but do not co-localize with P granules. Instead, the majority of ELLI-1 aggregates accumulate in the shared germline cytoplasm. In elli-1 mutants, several genes that promote RNAi and P-granule accumulation are upregulated, and embryonic lethality, sterility, and RNAi resistance in a hypomorphic drh-3 allele is enhanced, suggesting that ELLI-1 functions with CSR-1 to modulate RNAi activity, P-granule accumulation, and post-transcriptional expression in the germline.

  20. Expansion of ribosomally produced natural products: a nitrile hydratase- and Nif11-related precursor family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Douglas A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new family of natural products has been described in which cysteine, serine and threonine from ribosomally-produced peptides are converted to thiazoles, oxazoles and methyloxazoles, respectively. These metabolites and their biosynthetic gene clusters are now referred to as thiazole/oxazole-modified microcins (TOMM. As exemplified by microcin B17 and streptolysin S, TOMM precursors contain an N-terminal leader sequence and C-terminal core peptide. The leader sequence contains binding sites for the posttranslational modifying enzymes which subsequently act upon the core peptide. TOMM peptides are small and highly variable, frequently missed by gene-finders and occasionally situated far from the thiazole/oxazole forming genes. Thus, locating a substrate for a particular TOMM pathway can be a challenging endeavor. Results Examination of candidate TOMM precursors has revealed a subclass with an uncharacteristically long leader sequence closely related to the enzyme nitrile hydratase. Members of this nitrile hydratase leader peptide (NHLP family lack the metal-binding residues required for catalysis. Instead, NHLP sequences display the classic Gly-Gly cleavage motif and have C-terminal regions rich in heterocyclizable residues. The NHLP family exhibits a correlated species distribution and local clustering with an ABC transport system. This study also provides evidence that a separate family, annotated as Nif11 nitrogen-fixing proteins, can serve as natural product precursors (N11P, but not always of the TOMM variety. Indeed, a number of cyanobacterial genomes show extensive N11P paralogous expansion, such as Nostoc, Prochlorococcus and Cyanothece, which replace the TOMM cluster with lanthionine biosynthetic machinery. Conclusions This study has united numerous TOMM gene clusters with their cognate substrates. These results suggest that two large protein families, the nitrile hydratases and Nif11, have been retailored for

  1. Gene and pathway level analyses of germline DNA-repair gene variants and prostate cancer susceptibility using the iCOGS-genotyping array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Edward J; Dadaev, Tokhir; Leongamornlert, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Germline mutations within DNA-repair genes are implicated in susceptibility to multiple forms of cancer. For prostate cancer (PrCa), rare mutations in BRCA2 and BRCA1 give rise to moderately elevated risk, whereas two of B100 common, low-penetrance PrCa susceptibility variants identif...

  2. Lethal neonatal case and review of primary short-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase (SCEH) deficiency associated with secondary lymphocyte pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoyan, Jirair K; Yang, Samuel P; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Jack, Rhona M; Miron, Alexander; Grahame, George; DeBrosse, Suzanne D; Hoppel, Charles L; Kerr, Douglas S; Wanders, Ronald J A

    2017-04-01

    Mutations in ECHS1 result in short-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase (SCEH) deficiency which mainly affects the catabolism of various amino acids, particularly valine. We describe a case compound heterozygous for ECHS1 mutations c.836T>C (novel) and c.8C>A identified by whole exome sequencing of proband and parents. SCEH deficiency was confirmed with very low SCEH activity in fibroblasts and nearly absent immunoreactivity of SCEH. The patient had a severe neonatal course with elevated blood and cerebrospinal fluid lactate and pyruvate concentrations, high plasma alanine and slightly low plasma cystine. 2-Methyl-2,3-dihydroxybutyric acid was markedly elevated as were metabolites of the three branched-chain α-ketoacids on urine organic acids analysis. These urine metabolites notably decreased when lactic acidosis decreased in blood. Lymphocyte pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity was deficient, but PDC and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex activities in cultured fibroblasts were normal. Oxidative phosphorylation analysis on intact digitonin-permeabilized fibroblasts was suggestive of slightly reduced PDC activity relative to control range in mitochondria. We reviewed 16 other cases with mutations in ECHS1 where PDC activity was also assayed in order to determine how common and generalized secondary PDC deficiency is associated with primary SCEH deficiency. For reasons that remain unexplained, we find that about half of cases with primary SCEH deficiency also exhibit secondary PDC deficiency. The patient died on day-of-life 39, prior to establishing his diagnosis, highlighting the importance of early and rapid neonatal diagnosis because of possible adverse effects of certain therapeutic interventions, such as administration of ketogenic diet, in this disorder. There is a need for better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and phenotypic variability in this relatively recently discovered disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Achieving immortality in the C. elegans germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelick, Chris; Ahmed, Shawn

    2005-01-01

    Germline immortality is a topic that has intrigued theoretical biologists interested in aging for over a century. The germ cell lineage can be passed from one generation to the next, indefinitely. In contrast, somatic cells are typically only needed for a single generation and are then discarded. Germ cells may, therefore, harbor rejuvenation mechanisms that enable them to proliferate for eons. Such processes are thought to be either absent from or down-regulated in somatic cells, although cell non-autonomous forms of rejuvenation are formally possible. A thorough description of mechanisms that foster eternal youth in germ cells is lacking. The mysteries of germline immortality are being addressed in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans by studying mutants that reproduce normally for several generations but eventually become sterile. The mortal germline mutants probably become sterile as a consequence of accumulating various forms of heritable cellular damage. Such mutants are abundant, indicating that several different biochemical pathways are required to rejuvenate the germline. Thus, forward genetics should help to define mechanisms that enable the germline to achieve immortality.

  4. Nitrile Hydratase and Amidase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous Hydrolyze Acrylic Fibers and Granular Polyacrylonitriles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, M. M.; Cavaco-Paulo, A.; Robra, K.-H.; Gübitz, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 11216 produced nitrile hydratase (320 nkat mg of protein−1) and amidase activity (38.4 nkat mg of protein−1) when grown on a medium containing propionitrile. These enzymes were able to hydrolyze nitrile groups of both granular polyacrylonitriles (PAN) and acrylic fibers. Nitrile groups of PAN40 (molecular mass, 40 kDa) and PAN190 (molecular mass, 190 kDa) were converted into the corresponding carbonic acids to 1.8 and 1.0%, respectively. In contrast, surfacial nitrile groups of acrylic fibers were only converted to the corresponding amides. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that 16% of the surfacial nitrile groups were hydrolyzed by the R. rhodochrous enzymes. Due to the enzymatic modification, the acrylic fibers became more hydrophilic and thus, adsorption of dyes was enhanced. This was indicated by a 15% increase in the staining level (K/S value) for C.I. Basic Blue 9. PMID:10742253

  5. Real-time PCR detection of Fe-type nitrile hydratase genes from environmental isolates suggests horizontal gene transfer between multiple genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Lee; Owens, Erica; Tambling, Karen; O'Neill, David; O'Connor, Laura; O'Reilly, Catherine

    2010-11-01

    Nitriles are widespread in the environment as a result of biological and industrial activity. Nitrile hydratases catalyse the hydration of nitriles to the corresponding amide and are often associated with amidases, which catalyze the conversion of amides to the corresponding acids. Nitrile hydratases have potential as biocatalysts in bioremediation and biotransformation applications, and several successful examples demonstrate the advantages. In this work a real-time PCR assay was designed for the detection of Fe-type nitrile hydratase genes from environmental isolates purified from nitrile-enriched soils and seaweeds. Specific PCR primers were also designed for amplification and sequencing of the genes. Identical or highly homologous nitrile hydratase genes were detected from isolates of numerous genera from geographically diverse sites, as were numerous novel genes. The genes were also detected from isolates of genera not previously reported to harbour nitrile hydratases. The results provide further evidence that many bacteria have acquired the genes via horizontal gene transfer. The real-time PCR assay should prove useful in searching for nitrile hydratases that could have novel substrate specificities and therefore potential in industrial applications.

  6. Unveiling of novel regio-selective fatty acid double bond hydratases from Lactobacillus acidophilus involved in the selective oxyfunctionalization of mono- and di-hydroxy fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Rok; Oh, Hye-Jin; Park, Chul-Soon; Hong, Seung-Hye; Park, Ji-Young; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is the first time demonstration of cis-12 regio-selective linoleate double-bond hydratase. Hydroxylation of fatty acids, abundant feedstock in nature, is an emerging alternative route for many petroleum replaceable products thorough hydroxy fatty acids, carboxylic acids, and lactones. However, chemical route for selective hydroxylation is still quite challenging owing to low selectivity and many environmental concerns. Hydroxylation of fatty acids by hydroxy fatty acid forming enzymes is an important route for selective biocatalytic oxyfunctionalization of fatty acids. Therefore, novel fatty acid hydroxylation enzymes should be discovered. The two hydratase genes of Lactobacillus acidophilus were identified by genomic analysis, and the expressed two recombinant hydratases were identified as cis-9 and cis-12 double-bond selective linoleate hydratases by in vitro functional validation, including the identification of products and the determination of regio-selectivity, substrate specificity, and kinetic parameters. The two different linoleate hydratases were the involved enzymes in the 10,13-dihydroxyoctadecanoic acid biosynthesis. Linoleate 13-hydratase (LHT-13) selectively converted 10 mM linoleic acid to 13S-hydroxy-9(Z)-octadecenoic acid with high titer (8.1 mM) and yield (81%). Our study will expand knowledge for microbial fatty acid-hydroxylation enzymes and facilitate the designed production of the regio-selective hydroxy fatty acids for useful chemicals from polyunsaturated fatty acid feedstocks.

  7. Risks of lynch syndrome cancers for msh6 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Baglietto (Laura); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); J.G. Dowty (James); D.M. White (Darren); A. Wagner (Anja); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); A.H.J.T. Vriends (Anette); N.R. Cartwright (Nicola); R.A. Barnetson (Rebecca); S.M. Farrington (Susan); A. Tenesa (Albert); H. Hampel (Heather); D. Buchanan (Daniel); S. Arnold (Sven); J. Young (Joanne); M.D. Walsh (Michael); J. Jass (Jeremy); F.A. Macrae (Finlay); Y. Antill (Yoland); I.M. Winship (Ingrid); G.G. Giles (Graham); J. Goldblatt (Jack); S. Parry (Susan); G. Suthers (Graeme); B. Leggett (Barbara); M. Butz (Malinda); M. Aronson (Melyssa); J.N. Poynter (Jenny); J.A. Baron (John); L. Le Marchand (Loic); R. Haile (Robert); S. Gallinger (Steve); J.L. Hopper (John); J. Potter (John); A. de La Chapelle (Albert); H. Vasen (Hans); M.G. Dunlop (Malcolm); S.N. Thibodeau (Stephen); M.A. Jenkins (Mark)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Germline mutations in MSH6 account for 10%-20% of Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers caused by hereditary DNA mismatch repair gene mutations. Because there have been only a few studies of mutation carriers, their cancer risks are uncertain. Methods: We identified 113 families

  8. Heterologous expression, purification, and enzymatic characterization of the acyclic carotenoid 1,2-hydratase from Rubrivivax gelatinosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Sabine; Mazet, Andreas; Sandmann, Gerhard

    2003-06-01

    The carotenoid 1,2-hydratase CrtC from Rubrivivax gelatinosus has been expressed in Escherichia coli in an active form and purified by affinity chromatography. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of various acyclic carotenes including 1-hydroxy derivatives. This broad substrate specificity reflects the participation of CrtC in 1'-HO-spheroidene and in spirilloxanthin biosynthesis. Enzyme kinetic studies including the determination of substrate specificity constants indicate that among the alternative biosynthetic routes to 1'-HO-spheroidene the one via spheroidene is the dominating pathway. In contrast to CrtC from Rvi. gelatinosus, the equivalent enzyme from Rhodobacter capsulatus, a closely related bacterium which lacks the biosynthetic branch to spirilloxanthin and accumulates spheroidene instead of substantial amounts of 1'-HO-spheroidene, is extremely poor in converting 1-HO-carotenoids. The individual catalytic properties of both carotenoid 1,2-hydratases reflect the in situ carotenogenic pathways in both purple photosynthetic bacteria.

  9. Functional characterization of a fatty acid double-bond hydratase from Lactobacillus plantarum and its interaction with biosynthetic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Anaya, Joana; Hernández-Santoyo, Alejandra

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogenation of linoleic acid and other polyunsaturated fatty acids is a detoxification mechanism that is present in the Lactobacillus genus of lactic bacteria. The first stage in this multi-step process is hydration of the substrate with formation of 10-hydroxy-9-cis-octadecenoic acid due to fatty-acid hydratase activity that has been detected only in the membrane-associated cell fraction; however, its interaction with the cell membrane is unknown. To provide information in this respect we characterized the homotrimeric 64.7 kDa-native protein from Lactobacillus plantarum; afterwards, it was reconstituted in proteoliposomes and analyzed by confocal fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that hydratase is an extrinsic-membrane protein and hence, the enzymatic reaction occurs at the periphery of the cell. This location may be advantageous in the detoxifying process since the toxic linoleic acid molecule can be bound to hydratase and converted to non-toxic 10-hydroxy-9-cis-octadecenoic acid before it reaches cell membrane. Additionally, we propose that the interaction with membrane periphery occurs through electrostatic contacts. Finally, the structural model of L. plantarum hydratase was constructed based on the amino acid sequence and hence, the putative binding sites with linoleic acid were identified: site 1, located in an external hydrophobic pocket at the C-terminus of the protein and site 2, located at the core and in contact with a FAD molecule. Interestingly, it was found that the linoleic acid molecule arranges around a methionine residue in both sites (Met154 and Met81, respectively) that acts as a rigid pole, thus playing a key role in binding unsaturated fatty acids.

  10. GERMLINE MOLECULAR MUTATION ASSAY IN DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER. (R825810)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  11. Risk profile of the RET A883F germline mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jes Sloth; Habra, Mouhammed Amir; Bassett, John Howard Duncan

    2017-01-01

    883F carriers. Intervention: The intervention was thyroidectomy. Main Outcome Measures: Earliest age of MTC, regional lymph node metastases, distant metastases, age-related penetrance of MTC and pheochromocytoma (PHEO), overall and disease-specific survival and biochemical cure rate. Results: One...

  12. GERMLINE MOLECULAR MUTATION ASSAY IN DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER. (R825810)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  13. Epigenetic inheritance and plasticity: The responsive germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonka, Eva

    2013-04-01

    Developmental plasticity, the capacity of a single genotype to give rise to different phenotypes, affects evolutionary dynamics by influencing the rate and direction of phenotypic change. It is based on regulatory changes in gene expression and gene products, which are partially controlled by epigenetic mechanisms. Plasticity involves not just epigenetic changes in somatic cells and tissues; it can also involve changes in germline cells. Germline epigenetic plasticity increases evolvability, the capacity to generate heritable, selectable, phenotypic variations, including variations that lead to novel functions. I discuss studies that show that some complex adaptive responses to new challenges are mediated by germline epigenetic processes, which can be transmitted over variable number of generations, and argue that the heritable variations that are generated epigenetically have an impact on both small-scale and large-scale aspects of evolution. First, I review some recent ecological studies and models that show that germline (gametic) epigenetic inheritance can lead to cumulative micro-evolutionary changes that are rapid and semi-directional. I suggest that "priming" and "epigenetic learning" may be of special importance in generating heritable, fine-tuned adaptive responses in populations. Second, I consider work showing how genomic and environmental stresses can also lead to epigenome repatterning, and produce changes that are saltational.

  14. Biochemical characterization of the carotenoid 1,2-hydratases (CrtC) from Rubrivivax gelatinosus and Thiocapsa roseopersicina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiseni, Aida; Arends, Isabel W C E; Otten, Linda G

    2011-08-01

    Two carotenoid 1,2-hydratase (CrtC) genes from the photosynthetic bacteria Rubrivivax gelatinosus and Thiocapsa roseopersicina were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli in an active form and purified by affinity chromatography. The biochemical properties of the recombinant enzymes and their substrate specificities were studied. The purified CrtCs catalyze cofactor independently the conversion of lycopene to 1-HO- and 1,1'-(HO)(2)-lycopene. The optimal pH and temperature for hydratase activity was 8.0 and 30°C, respectively. The apparent K (m) and V (max) values obtained for the hydration of lycopene were 24 μM and 0.31 nmol h(-1) mg(-1) for RgCrtC and 9.5 μM and 0.15 nmol h(-1) mg(-1) for TrCrtC, respectively. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed two protein bands of 44 and 38 kDa for TrCrtC, which indicate protein processing. Both hydratases are also able to convert the unnatural substrate geranylgeraniol (C20 substrate), which functionally resembles the natural substrate lycopene.

  15. Germline variants in Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndrome-associated genes from patients with one or few hamartomatous polyps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Brusgaard, Klaus; Hansen, Tine Plato;

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing, DNA samples from 77 patients with 84 hamartomatous polyps were sequenced. The detected germline variants were classified into pathogenicity classes. RESULTS: We detected several germline variants, among them three in ENG, two in BMPR1A, one in PTEN, and one in SMAD4. Although some of the detected......OBJECTIVE: A subgroup of patients with hamartomatous polyps in the GI tract has a hereditary Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndrome with an increased risk of cancer. The distinction between patients with one or few polyps and patients with a syndrome can be difficult. A pathogenic germline mutation can...... be detected in a majority of HPS patients. This study investigates whether patients with one or few hamartomatous polyps could have a syndrome based on genetic screening of relevant genes. METHODS: We designed a gene panel including 26 hamartomatous polyposis-associated genes. Using targeted Next Generation...

  16. Recombinant HIV envelope proteins fail to engage germline versions of anti-CD4bs bNAbs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Hoot

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine candidates for HIV-1 so far have not been able to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs although they express the epitopes recognized by bNAbs to the HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env. To understand whether and how Env immunogens interact with the predicted germline versions of known bNAbs, we screened a large panel (N:56 of recombinant Envs (from clades A, B and C for binding to the germline predecessors of the broadly neutralizing anti-CD4 binding site antibodies b12, NIH45-46 and 3BNC60. Although the mature antibodies reacted with diverse Envs, the corresponding germline antibodies did not display Env-reactivity. Experiments conducted with engineered chimeric antibodies combining the mature and germline heavy and light chains, respectively and vice-versa, revealed that both antibody chains are important for the known cross-reactivity of these antibodies. Our results also indicate that in order for b12 to display its broad cross-reactivity, multiple somatic mutations within its VH region are required. A consequence of the failure of the germline b12 to bind recombinant soluble Env is that Env-induced B-cell activation through the germline b12 BCR does not take place. Our study provides a new explanation for the difficulties in eliciting bNAbs with recombinant soluble Env immunogens. Our study also highlights the need for intense efforts to identify rare naturally occurring or engineered Envs that may engage the germline BCR versions of bNAbs.

  17. Recombinant HIV envelope proteins fail to engage germline versions of anti-CD4bs bNAbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoot, Sam; McGuire, Andrew T; Cohen, Kristen W; Strong, Roland K; Hangartner, Lars; Klein, Florian; Diskin, Ron; Scheid, Johannes F; Sather, D Noah; Burton, Dennis R; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2013-01-01

    Vaccine candidates for HIV-1 so far have not been able to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) although they express the epitopes recognized by bNAbs to the HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env). To understand whether and how Env immunogens interact with the predicted germline versions of known bNAbs, we screened a large panel (N:56) of recombinant Envs (from clades A, B and C) for binding to the germline predecessors of the broadly neutralizing anti-CD4 binding site antibodies b12, NIH45-46 and 3BNC60. Although the mature antibodies reacted with diverse Envs, the corresponding germline antibodies did not display Env-reactivity. Experiments conducted with engineered chimeric antibodies combining the mature and germline heavy and light chains, respectively and vice-versa, revealed that both antibody chains are important for the known cross-reactivity of these antibodies. Our results also indicate that in order for b12 to display its broad cross-reactivity, multiple somatic mutations within its VH region are required. A consequence of the failure of the germline b12 to bind recombinant soluble Env is that Env-induced B-cell activation through the germline b12 BCR does not take place. Our study provides a new explanation for the difficulties in eliciting bNAbs with recombinant soluble Env immunogens. Our study also highlights the need for intense efforts to identify rare naturally occurring or engineered Envs that may engage the germline BCR versions of bNAbs.

  18. Detection and precise mapping of germline rearrangements in BRCA1, BRCA2, MSH2, and MLH1 using zoom-in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staaf, Johan; Törngren, Therese; Rambech, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Disease-predisposing germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes may consist of large genomic rearrangements that are challenging to detect and characterize using standard PCR-based mutation screening methods. Here, we describe a custom-made zoom-in microarray comparative genomic...... hybridization (CGH) platform of 60mer oligonucleotides. The 4 x 44 K array format provides high-resolution coverage (200-300 bp) of 400-700 kb genomic regions surrounding six cancer susceptibility genes. We evaluate its performance to accurately detect and precisely map earlier described or novel large germline...

  19. Chk2 and p53 regulate the transmission of healed chromosomes in the Drosophila male germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titen, Simon W A; Lin, Ho-Chen; Bhandari, Jayaram; Golic, Kent G

    2014-02-01

    When a dicentric chromosome breaks in mitosis, the broken ends cannot be repaired by normal mechanisms that join two broken ends since each end is in a separate daughter cell. However, in the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a broken end may be healed by de novo telomere addition. We find that Chk2 (encoded by lok) and P53, major mediators of the DNA damage response, have strong and opposite influences on the transmission of broken-and-healed chromosomes: lok mutants exhibit a large increase in the recovery of healed chromosomes relative to wildtype control males, but p53 mutants show a strong reduction. This contrasts with the soma, where mutations in lok and p53 have the nearly identical effect of allowing survival and proliferation of cells with irreparable DNA damage. Examination of testes revealed a transient depletion of germline cells after dicentric chromosome induction in the wildtype controls, and further showed that P53 is required for the germline to recover. Although lok mutant males transmit healed chromosomes at a high rate, broken chromosome ends can also persist through spermatogonial divisions without healing in lok mutants, giving rise to frequent dicentric bridges in Meiosis II. Cytological and genetic analyses show that spermatid nuclei derived from such meiotic divisions are eliminated during spermiogenesis, resulting in strong meiotic drive. We conclude that the primary responsibility for maintaining genome integrity in the male germline lies with Chk2, and that P53 is required to reconstitute the germline when cells are eliminated owing to unrepaired DNA damage.

  20. Chk2 and p53 regulate the transmission of healed chromosomes in the Drosophila male germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon W A Titen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available When a dicentric chromosome breaks in mitosis, the broken ends cannot be repaired by normal mechanisms that join two broken ends since each end is in a separate daughter cell. However, in the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a broken end may be healed by de novo telomere addition. We find that Chk2 (encoded by lok and P53, major mediators of the DNA damage response, have strong and opposite influences on the transmission of broken-and-healed chromosomes: lok mutants exhibit a large increase in the recovery of healed chromosomes relative to wildtype control males, but p53 mutants show a strong reduction. This contrasts with the soma, where mutations in lok and p53 have the nearly identical effect of allowing survival and proliferation of cells with irreparable DNA damage. Examination of testes revealed a transient depletion of germline cells after dicentric chromosome induction in the wildtype controls, and further showed that P53 is required for the germline to recover. Although lok mutant males transmit healed chromosomes at a high rate, broken chromosome ends can also persist through spermatogonial divisions without healing in lok mutants, giving rise to frequent dicentric bridges in Meiosis II. Cytological and genetic analyses show that spermatid nuclei derived from such meiotic divisions are eliminated during spermiogenesis, resulting in strong meiotic drive. We conclude that the primary responsibility for maintaining genome integrity in the male germline lies with Chk2, and that P53 is required to reconstitute the germline when cells are eliminated owing to unrepaired DNA damage.

  1. Synchronous Onset of Breast and Pancreatic Cancers: Results of Germline and Somatic Genetic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Castro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Synchronous cancers have occasionally been detected at initial diagnosis among patients with breast and ovarian cancer. However, simultaneous coexistence and diagnosis of breast and pancreas cancer has not previously been reported. Case Report: Paternal transmission of a germline BRCA2 mutation to a patient who was diagnosed at age 40 with locally advanced breast and pancreas cancer is presented. Somatic genomic analysis of both cancers with next-generation DNA sequencing confirmed the germline result and reported a variety of variants of unknown significance alterations, of which two were present in both the breast and pancreas cancers. Discussion: The possibility that genomic alterations could have been responsible for modulating the phenotypic or clinical expression of this rare presentation is considered. The authors call attention to the practice of privatizing the clinicogenetic information gained from genetic testing and call for health policy that will facilitate sharing in order to advance the outcomes of patients diagnosed with hereditary cancers.

  2. Germline Chd8 haploinsufficiency alters brain development in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompers, Andrea L; Su-Feher, Linda; Ellegood, Jacob; Copping, Nycole A; Riyadh, M Asrafuzzaman; Stradleigh, Tyler W; Pride, Michael C; Schaffler, Melanie D; Wade, A Ayanna; Catta-Preta, Rinaldo; Zdilar, Iva; Louis, Shreya; Kaushik, Gaurav; Mannion, Brandon J; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Afzal, Veena; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A; Dickel, Diane E; Lerch, Jason P; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Zarbalis, Konstantinos S; Silverman, Jill L; Nord, Alex S

    2017-08-01

    The chromatin remodeling gene CHD8 represents a central node in neurodevelopmental gene networks implicated in autism. We examined the impact of germline heterozygous frameshift Chd8 mutation on neurodevelopment in mice. Chd8(+/del5) mice displayed normal social interactions with no repetitive behaviors but exhibited cognitive impairment correlated with increased regional brain volume, validating that phenotypes of Chd8(+/del5) mice overlap pathology reported in humans with CHD8 mutations. We applied network analysis to characterize neurodevelopmental gene expression, revealing widespread transcriptional changes in Chd8(+/del5) mice across pathways disrupted in neurodevelopmental disorders, including neurogenesis, synaptic processes and neuroimmune signaling. We identified a co-expression module with peak expression in early brain development featuring dysregulation of RNA processing, chromatin remodeling and cell-cycle genes enriched for promoter binding by Chd8, and we validated increased neuronal proliferation and developmental splicing perturbation in Chd8(+/del5) mice. This integrative analysis offers an initial picture of the consequences of Chd8 haploinsufficiency for brain development.

  3. The oogenic germline starvation response in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah S Seidel

    Full Text Available Many animals alter their reproductive strategies in response to environmental stress. Here we have investigated how L4 hermaphrodites of Caenorhabditis elegans respond to starvation. To induce starvation, we removed food at 2 h intervals from very early- to very late-stage L4 animals. The starved L4s molted into adulthood, initiated oogenesis, and began producing embryos; however, all three processes were severely delayed, and embryo viability was reduced. Most animals died via 'bagging,' because egg-laying was inhibited, and embryos hatched in utero, consuming their parent hermaphrodites from within. Some animals, however, avoided bagging and survived long term. Long-term survival did not rely on embryonic arrest but instead upon the failure of some animals to produce viable progeny during starvation. Regardless of the bagging fate, starved animals showed two major changes in germline morphology: All oogenic germlines were dramatically reduced in size, and these germlines formed only a single oocyte at a time, separated from the remainder of the germline by a tight constriction. Both changes in germline morphology were reversible: Upon re-feeding, the shrunken germlines regenerated, and multiple oocytes formed concurrently. The capacity for germline regeneration upon re-feeding was not limited to the small subset of animals that normally survive starvation: When bagging was prevented ectopically by par-2 RNAi, virtually all germlines still regenerated. In addition, germline shrinkage strongly correlated with oogenesis, suggesting that during starvation, germline shrinkage may provide material for oocyte production. Finally, germline shrinkage and regeneration did not depend upon crowding. Our study confirms previous findings that starvation uncouples germ cell proliferation from germline stem cell maintenance. Our study also suggests that when nutrients are limited, hermaphrodites scavenge material from their germlines to reproduce. We discuss

  4. Cyanide hydratases and cyanide dihydratases: emerging tools in the biodegradation and biodetection of cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínková, Ludmila; Veselá, Alicja Barbara; Rinágelová, Anna; Chmátal, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to summarize the current knowledge of the enzymes which are involved in the hydrolysis of cyanide, i.e., cyanide hydratases (CHTs; EC 4.2.1.66) and cyanide dihydratases (CynD; EC 3.5.5.1). CHTs are probably exclusively produced by filamentous fungi and widely occur in these organisms; in contrast, CynDs were only found in a few bacterial genera. CHTs differ from CynDs in their reaction products (formamide vs. formic acid and ammonia, respectively). Several CHTs were also found to transform nitriles but with lower relative activities compared to HCN. Mutants of CynDs and CHTs were constructed to study the structure-activity relationships in these enzymes or to improve their catalytic properties. The effect of the C-terminal part of the protein on the enzyme activity was determined by constructing the corresponding deletion mutants. CynDs are less active at alkaline pH than CHTs. To improve its bioremediation potential, CynD from Bacillus pumilus was engineered by directed evolution combined with site-directed mutagenesis, and its operation at pH 10 was thus enabled. Some of the enzymes have been tested for their potential to eliminate cyanide from cyanide-containing wastewaters. CynDs were also used to construct cyanide biosensors.

  5. Mechanism of tungsten-dependent acetylene hydratase from quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Rong-Zhen; Yu, Jian-Guo; Himo, Fahmi

    2010-01-01

    Acetylene hydratase is a tungsten-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the nonredox hydration of acetylene to acetaldehyde. Density functional theory calculations are used to elucidate the reaction mechanism of this enzyme with a large model of the active site devised on the basis of the native X-ray crystal structure. Based on the calculations, we propose a new mechanism in which the acetylene substrate first displaces the W-coordinated water molecule, and then undergoes a nucleophilic attack by the water molecule assisted by an ionized Asp13 residue at the active site. This is followed by proton transfer from Asp13 to the newly formed vinyl anion intermediate. In the subsequent isomerization, Asp13 shuttles a proton from the hydroxyl group of the vinyl alcohol to the α-carbon. Asp13 is thus a key player in the mechanism, but also W is directly involved in the reaction by binding and activating acetylene and providing electrostatic stabilization to the transition states and intermediates. Several other mechanisms are also considered but the energetic barriers are found to be very high, ruling out these possibilities. PMID:21149684

  6. Self-subunit swapping occurs in another gene type of cobalt nitrile hydratase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    Full Text Available Self-subunit swapping is one of the post-translational maturation of the cobalt-containing nitrile hydratase (Co-NHase family of enzymes. All of these NHases possess a gene organization of , which allows the activator protein to easily form a mediatory complex with the α-subunit of the NHase after translation. Here, we discovered that the incorporation of cobalt into another type of Co-NHase, with a gene organization of , was also dependent on self-subunit swapping. We successfully isolated a recombinant NHase activator protein (P14K of Pseudomonas putida NRRL-18668 by adding a Strep-tag N-terminal to the P14K gene. P14K was found to form a complex [α(StrepP14K(2] with the α-subunit of the NHase. The incorporation of cobalt into the NHase of P. putida was confirmed to be dependent on the α-subunit substitution between the cobalt-containing α(StrepP14K(2 and the cobalt-free NHase. Cobalt was inserted into cobalt-free α(StrepP14K(2 but not into cobalt-free NHase, suggesting that P14K functions not only as a self-subunit swapping chaperone but also as a metallochaperone. In addition, NHase from P. putida was also expressed by a mutant gene that was designed with a order. Our findings expand the general features of self-subunit swapping maturation.

  7. Discovery of acetylene hydratase activity of the iron-sulphur protein IspH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Span, Ingrid; Wang, Ke; Wang, Weixue; Zhang, Yonghui; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Li, Kai; Schulz, Charles; Oldfield, Eric; Groll, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The final step of the methylerythritol phosphate isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway is catalysed by the iron-sulphur enzyme IspH, producing the universal precursors of terpenes: isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. Here we report an unforeseen reaction discovered during the investigation of the interaction of IspH with acetylene inhibitors by X-ray crystallography, Mößbauer, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition to its role as a 2H(+)/2e(-) reductase, IspH can hydrate acetylenes to aldehydes and ketones via anti-Markovnikov/Markovnikov addition. The reactions only occur with the oxidised protein and proceed via η(1)-O-enolate intermediates. One of these is characterized crystallographically and contains a C4 ligand oxygen bound to the unique, fourth iron in the 4Fe-4S cluster: this intermediate subsequently hydrolyzes to produce an aldehyde product. This unexpected side to IspH reactivity is of interest in the context of the mechanism of action of other acetylene hydratases, as well as in the design of antiinfectives targeting IspH.

  8. Self-Subunit Swapping Occurs in Another Gene Type of Cobalt Nitrile Hydratase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yuanyuan; Cui, Youtian; Kobayashi, Michihiko; Zhou, Zhemin

    2012-01-01

    Self-subunit swapping is one of the post-translational maturation of the cobalt-containing nitrile hydratase (Co-NHase) family of enzymes. All of these NHases possess a gene organization of , which allows the activator protein to easily form a mediatory complex with the α-subunit of the NHase after translation. Here, we discovered that the incorporation of cobalt into another type of Co-NHase, with a gene organization of , was also dependent on self-subunit swapping. We successfully isolated a recombinant NHase activator protein (P14K) of Pseudomonas putida NRRL-18668 by adding a Strep-tag N-terminal to the P14K gene. P14K was found to form a complex [α(StrepP14K)2] with the α-subunit of the NHase. The incorporation of cobalt into the NHase of P. putida was confirmed to be dependent on the α-subunit substitution between the cobalt-containing α(StrepP14K)2 and the cobalt-free NHase. Cobalt was inserted into cobalt-free α(StrepP14K)2 but not into cobalt-free NHase, suggesting that P14K functions not only as a self-subunit swapping chaperone but also as a metallochaperone. In addition, NHase from P. putida was also expressed by a mutant gene that was designed with a order. Our findings expand the general features of self-subunit swapping maturation. PMID:23226397

  9. Germline genome-editing research and its socioethical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    Genetically modifying eggs, sperm, and zygotes ('germline' modification) can impact on the entire body of the resulting individual and on subsequent generations. With the advent of genome-editing technology, human germline gene modification is no longer theoretical. Owing to increasing concerns about human germline gene modification, a voluntary moratorium on human genome-editing research and/or the clinical application of human germline genome editing has recently been called for. However, whether such research should be suspended or encouraged warrants careful consideration. The present article reviews recent research on mammalian germline genome editing, discusses the importance of public dialogue on the socioethical implications of human germline genome-editing research, and considers the relevant guidelines and legislation in different countries.

  10. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer presenting as metastatic kidney cancer at 18 years of age : implications for surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.; Badeloe, Sadhanna; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Hovenga, Sjoerd; Semmelink, Harry J. F.; van Moorselaar, R. Jeroen A.; van Waesberghe, Jan Hein; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Menko, Fred H.

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skin piloleiomyomas, uterine leiomyomas and papillary type 2 renal cancer caused by germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Previously, we proposed renal imaging for FH mutation

  11. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer presenting as metastatic kidney cancer at 18 years of age: implications for surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaendonck-Zwarts, K.Y. van; Badeloe, S.; Oosting, S.F.; Hovenga, S.; Semmelink, H.J.; Moorselaar, R.J. van; Waesberghe, J.H. van; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Menko, F.H.

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skin piloleiomyomas, uterine leiomyomas and papillary type 2 renal cancer caused by germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Previously, we proposed renal imaging for FH mutation

  12. Constitutional NRAS mutations are rare among patients with Noonan syndrome or juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraoua, Lilia; Journel, Hubert; Bonnet, Philippe; Amiel, Jeanne; Pouvreau, Nathalie; Baumann, Clarisse; Verloes, Alain; Cavé, Hélène

    2012-10-01

    Recently, germline mutations of NRAS have been shown to be associated with Noonan syndrome (NS), a relatively common developmental disorder characterized by short stature, congenital heart disease, and distinctive facial features. We report on the mutational analysis of NRAS in a cohort of 125 French patients with NS and no known mutation for PTPN11, KRAS, SOS1, MEK1, MEK2, RAF1, BRAF, and SHOC2. The c.179G>A (p.G60E) mutation was identified in two patients with typical NS, confirming that NRAS germline mutations are a rare cause of this syndrome. We also screened our cohort of 95 patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). Among 17 patients with NRAS-mutated JMML, none had clinical features suggestive of NS. None of the 11 JMML patients for which germline DNA was available had a constitutional NRAS mutation.

  13. ELLI-1, a novel germline protein, modulates RNAi activity and P-granule accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andralojc, Karolina M.; Kelly, Ashley L.; Tanner, Paige C.

    2017-01-01

    Germ cells contain non-membrane bound cytoplasmic organelles that help maintain germline integrity. In C. elegans they are called P granules; without them, the germline undergoes partial masculinization and aberrant differentiation. One key P-granule component is the Argonaute CSR-1, a small-RNA binding protein that antagonizes accumulation of sperm-specific transcripts in developing oocytes and fine-tunes expression of proteins critical to early embryogenesis. Loss of CSR-1 complex components results in a very specific, enlarged P-granule phenotype. In a forward screen to identify mutants with abnormal P granules, ten alleles were recovered with a csr-1 P-granule phenotype, eight of which contain mutations in known components of the CSR-1 complex (csr-1, ego-1, ekl-1, and drh-3). The remaining two alleles are in a novel gene now called elli-1 (enlarged germline granules). ELLI-1 is first expressed in primordial germ cells during mid-embryogenesis, and continues to be expressed in the adult germline. While ELLI-1 forms cytoplasmic aggregates, they occasionally dock, but do not co-localize with P granules. Instead, the majority of ELLI-1 aggregates accumulate in the shared germline cytoplasm. In elli-1 mutants, several genes that promote RNAi and P-granule accumulation are upregulated, and embryonic lethality, sterility, and RNAi resistance in a hypomorphic drh-3 allele is enhanced, suggesting that ELLI-1 functions with CSR-1 to modulate RNAi activity, P-granule accumulation, and post-transcriptional expression in the germline. PMID:28182654

  14. ELLI-1, a novel germline protein, modulates RNAi activity and P-granule accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina M Andralojc

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Germ cells contain non-membrane bound cytoplasmic organelles that help maintain germline integrity. In C. elegans they are called P granules; without them, the germline undergoes partial masculinization and aberrant differentiation. One key P-granule component is the Argonaute CSR-1, a small-RNA binding protein that antagonizes accumulation of sperm-specific transcripts in developing oocytes and fine-tunes expression of proteins critical to early embryogenesis. Loss of CSR-1 complex components results in a very specific, enlarged P-granule phenotype. In a forward screen to identify mutants with abnormal P granules, ten alleles were recovered with a csr-1 P-granule phenotype, eight of which contain mutations in known components of the CSR-1 complex (csr-1, ego-1, ekl-1, and drh-3. The remaining two alleles are in a novel gene now called elli-1 (enlarged germline granules. ELLI-1 is first expressed in primordial germ cells during mid-embryogenesis, and continues to be expressed in the adult germline. While ELLI-1 forms cytoplasmic aggregates, they occasionally dock, but do not co-localize with P granules. Instead, the majority of ELLI-1 aggregates accumulate in the shared germline cytoplasm. In elli-1 mutants, several genes that promote RNAi and P-granule accumulation are upregulated, and embryonic lethality, sterility, and RNAi resistance in a hypomorphic drh-3 allele is enhanced, suggesting that ELLI-1 functions with CSR-1 to modulate RNAi activity, P-granule accumulation, and post-transcriptional expression in the germline.

  15. A novel carotenoid 1,2-hydratase (CruF) from two species of the non-photosynthetic bacterium Deinococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zongtao; Shen, Shaochuan; Wang, Chao; Wang, Hu; Hu, Yaping; Jiao, Jiandong; Ma, Tingting; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2009-08-01

    A novel carotenoid 1,2-hydratase (CruF) responsible for the C-1',2' hydration of gamma-carotene was identified in the non-photosynthetic bacteria Deinococcus radiodurans R1 and Deinococcus geothermalis DSM 11300. Gene expression and disruption experiments demonstrated that dr0091 and dgeo2309 encode CruF in D. radiodurans and D. geothermalis, respectively. Their homologues were also found in the genomes of cyanobacteria, and exhibited little homology to the hydroxyneurosporene synthase (CrtC) proteins found mainly in photosynthetic bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CruF homologues form a separate family, which is evolutionarily distant from the known CrtC family.

  16. MORC-1 Integrates Nuclear RNAi and Transgenerational Chromatin Architecture to Promote Germline Immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Natasha E; Yang, Danny X; Feng, Suhua; Kalinava, Natallia; Brown, Kristen C; Khanikar, Jayshree; Freeberg, Mallory A; Snyder, Martha J; Csankovszki, Györgyi; Chan, Raymond C; Gu, Sam G; Montgomery, Taiowa A; Jacobsen, Steven E; Kim, John K

    2017-05-22

    Germline-expressed endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) transmit multigenerational epigenetic information to ensure fertility in subsequent generations. In Caenorhabditis elegans, nuclear RNAi ensures robust inheritance of endo-siRNAs and deposition of repressive H3K9me3 marks at target loci. How target silencing is maintained in subsequent generations is poorly understood. We discovered that morc-1 is essential for transgenerational fertility and acts as an effector of endo-siRNAs. Unexpectedly, morc-1 is dispensable for siRNA inheritance but is required for target silencing and maintenance of siRNA-dependent chromatin organization. A forward genetic screen identified mutations in met-1, which encodes an H3K36 methyltransferase, as potent suppressors of morc-1(-) and nuclear RNAi mutant phenotypes. Further analysis of nuclear RNAi and morc-1(-) mutants revealed a progressive, met-1-dependent enrichment of H3K36me3, suggesting that robust fertility requires repression of MET-1 activity at nuclear RNAi targets. Without MORC-1 and nuclear RNAi, MET-1-mediated encroachment of euchromatin leads to detrimental decondensation of germline chromatin and germline mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Germline allele-specific expression of DAPK1 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan-Xiang Wei

    Full Text Available We previously reported a rare germline variant (c.1-6531 that resulted in allele-specific expression (ASE of death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1 and predisposition to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. We investigated a cohort of CLL patients lacking this mutation for the presence of ASE of DAPK1. We developed a novel strategy that combines single-nucleotide primer extension (SNuPE with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and detected germline DAPK1 ASE in 17 out of 120 (14.2% CLL patients associated with a trend towards younger age at diagnosis. ASE was absent in 63 healthy controls. Germline cells of CLL patients with ASE showed increased levels of DNA methylation in the promoter region, however, neither genetic nor further epigenetic aberrations could be identified in the DAPK1 5' upstream regulatory region, within distinct exons or in the 3'-UTR. We identified B-lymphoid malignancy related cell line models harboring allelic imbalance and found that allele-specific methylation in DAPK1 is associated with ASE. Our data indicate that ASE at the DAPK1 gene locus is a recurrent event, mediated by epigenetic mechanisms and potentially predisposing to CLL.

  18. The Fanconi anemia DNA damage repair pathway in the spotlight for germline predisposition to colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Franch-Expósito, Sebastià; Muñoz, Jenifer; Ocaña, Teresa; Carballal, Sabela; López-Cerón, Maria; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Lozano, Juan José; Serra, Enric; Beltran, Sergi; Brea-Fernández, Alejandro; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Castells, Antoni; Bujanda, Luis; Garre, Pilar; Caldés, Trinidad; Cubiella, Joaquín; Balaguer, Francesc; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common neoplasms in the world. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a very rare genetic disease causing bone marrow failure, congenital growth abnormalities and cancer predisposition. The comprehensive FA DNA damage repair pathway requires the collaboration of 53 proteins and it is necessary to restore genome integrity by efficiently repairing damaged DNA. A link between FA genes in breast and ovarian cancer germline predisposition has been previously suggested. We selected 74 CRC patients from 40 unrelated Spanish families with strong CRC aggregation compatible with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and without mutations in known hereditary CRC genes and performed germline DNA whole-exome sequencing with the aim of finding new candidate germline predisposition variants. After sequencing and data analysis, variant prioritization selected only those very rare alterations, producing a putative loss of function and located in genes with a role compatible with cancer. We detected an enrichment for variants in FA DNA damage repair pathway genes in our familial CRC cohort as 6 families carried heterozygous, rare, potentially pathogenic variants located in BRCA2/FANCD1, BRIP1/FANCJ, FANCC, FANCE and REV3L/POLZ. In conclusion, the FA DNA damage repair pathway may play an important role in the inherited predisposition to CRC. PMID:27165003

  19. Point mutations as a source of de novo genetic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligt, J. de; Veltman, J.A.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Family-based next generation sequencing (NGS) has recently pointed to an important role for de novo germline point mutations in both rare and common genetic disorders associated with reduced fitness. In this review we highlight the impact of the mutational target size on the frequency of diseases ca

  20. MAX mutations cause hereditary and sporadic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Burnichon (Nelly); A. Cascoń (Alberto); F. Schiavi (Francesca); N. Morales (NicolePaes); I. Comino-Méndez (Iñaki); N. Abermil (Nasséra); L. Inglada-Pérez (Lucía); A.A. de Cubas (Aguirre); L. Amar (Laurence); M. Barontini (Marta); S.B. de Quiroś (Sandra Bernaldo); J. Bertherat (Jerome); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); M.J. Blok (Marinus); S. Bobisse (Sara); S. Borrego (Salud); M. Castellano (Maurizio); P. Chanson (Philippe); A. de Chiara; E.P. Corssmit (Eleonora); M. Giacchè (Mara); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald); T. Ercolino (Tonino); X. Girerd (Xavier); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); Á. Gómez-Graña (Álvaro); I. Guilhem (Isabelle); F.J. Hes (Frederik); E. Honrado (Emiliano); E. Korpershoek (Esther); J.W. Lenders (Jacques); R. Letón (Rocío); A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); A. Merlo (Anna); L. Mori (Luigi); A. Murat (Arnaud); P. Pierre (Peggy); P.F. Plouin (Pierre-Franco̧is); T. Prodanov (Tamara); M. Quesada-Charneco (Miguel); N. Qin (Nan); E. Rapizzi (Elena); E. Raymond (Eric); N. Reisch (Nicole); G. Roncador (Giovanna); M. Ruiz-Ferrer (Macarena); F. Schillo (Frank); A.P.A. Stegmann (Sander); C. Suarez (Carlos); E. Taschin (Elisa); H.J.L.M. Timmers; C. Tops (Carli); M. Urioste (Miguel); F. Beuschlein (Felix); K. Pacak (Karel); M. Mannelli (Massimo); P.L. Dahia (Patricia); G. Opocher (Giuseppe); G. Eisenhofer (Graeme); A.P. Gimenez-Roqueplo; M. Robledo (Mercedes)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Pheochromocytomas (PCC) and paragangliomas (PGL) are genetically heterogeneous neural crest-derived neoplasms. Recently we identified germline mutations in a new tumor suppressor susceptibility gene, MAX (MYC-associated factor X), which predisposes carriers to PCC. How MAX mutat

  1. Defining "mutation" and "polymorphism" in the era of personal genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Roshan; Pandya, Deep; Elston, Robert C; Ferlini, Cristiano

    2015-07-15

    The growing advances in DNA sequencing tools have made analyzing the human genome cheaper and faster. While such analyses are intended to identify complex variants, related to disease susceptibility and efficacy of drug responses, they have blurred the definitions of mutation and polymorphism. In the era of personal genomics, it is critical to establish clear guidelines regarding the use of a reference genome. Nowadays DNA variants are called as differences in comparison to a reference. In a sequencing project Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and DNA mutations are defined as DNA variants detectable in >1 % or genomic sequence. We propose to solve this nomenclature dilemma by defining mutations as DNA variants obtained in a paired sequencing project including the germline DNA of the same individual as a reference. Moreover, the term mutation should be accompanied by a qualifying prefix indicating whether the mutation occurs only in somatic cells (somatic mutation) or also in the germline (germline mutation). We believe this distinction in definition will help avoid confusion among researchers and support the practice of sequencing the germline and somatic tissues in parallel to classify the DNA variants thus defined as mutations.

  2. Enoyl-CoA hydratase mediates polyhydroxyalkanoate mobilization in Haloferax mediterranei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guiming; Cai, Shuangfeng; Hou, Jing; Zhao, Dahe; Han, Jing; Zhou, Jian; Xiang, Hua

    2016-04-07

    Although polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation and mobilization are one of the most general mechanisms for haloarchaea to adapt to the hypersaline environments with changeable carbon sources, the PHA mobilization pathways are still not clear for any haloarchaea. In this study, the functions of five putative (R)-specific enoyl-CoA hydratases (R-ECHs) in Haloferax mediterranei, named PhaJ1 to PhaJ5, respectively, were thoroughly investigated. Through gene deletion and complementation, we demonstrated that only certain of these ECHs had a slight contribution to poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) biosynthesis. But significantly, PhaJ1, the only R-ECH that is associated with PHA granules, was shown to be involved in PHA mobilization in this haloarchaeon. PhaJ1 catalyzes the dehydration of (R)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA, the common product of PHA degradation, to enoyl-CoA, the intermediate of the β-oxidation cycle, thus could link PHA mobilization to β-oxidation pathway in H. mediterranei. This linkage was further indicated from the up-regulation of the key genes of β-oxidation under the PHA mobilization condition, as well as the obvious inhibition of PHA degradation upon inhibition of the β-oxidation pathway. Interestingly, 96% of phaJ-containing haloarchaeal species possess both phaC (encoding PHA synthase) and the full set genes of β-oxidation, implying that the mobilization of carbon storage in PHA through the β-oxidation cycle would be general in haloarchaea.

  3. Characterization of cryptic splicing in germline PTEN intronic variants in Cowden syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hannah Jinlian; Romigh, Todd; Sesock, Kaitlin; Eng, Charis

    2017-10-01

    Germline mutations in the tumor-suppressor gene PTEN predispose to subsets of Cowden syndrome (CS), Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, and autism. Evidence-based classification of PTEN variants as either deleterious or benign is urgently needed for accurate molecular diagnosis and gene-informed genetic counseling. We studied 34 different germline PTEN intronic variants from 61 CS patients, characterized their PTEN mRNA processing, and analyzed PTEN expression and downstream readouts of P-AKT and P-ERK1/2. While we found that many mutations near splice junctions result in exon skipping, we also identified the presence of cryptic splicing that resulted in premature termination or a shift in isoform usage. PTEN protein expression is significantly lower in the group with splicing changes while P-AKT, but not P-ERK1/2, is significantly increased. Our observations of these PTEN intronic variants should contribute to the determination of pathogenicity of PTEN intronic variants and aid in genetic counseling. © 2017 The Authors. Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Germline large genomic alterations on 7q in patients with multiple primary cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villacis, Rolando A R; Basso, Tatiane R; Canto, Luisa M

    2017-01-01

    triple negative breast tumors and no mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53 genes. Germline rearrangements on chromosome 7q, involving over 40 Mb of the same region, were found in both patients: one with mosaic loss (80% of cells) and the other with cnLOH (copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity) secondary...... to maternal allele duplication. Five children tested had no alterations on 7q. The patients shared 330 genes in common on 7q22.1-q34, including several tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) previously related to breast cancer risk and imprinted genes. The analysis of the triple negative BC from one patient revealed...

  5. Translational control in germline stem cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaidina, Maija; Lehmann, Ruth

    2014-10-13

    Stem cells give rise to tissues and organs during development and maintain their integrity during adulthood. They have the potential to self-renew or differentiate at each division. To ensure proper organ growth and homeostasis, self-renewal versus differentiation decisions need to be tightly controlled. Systematic genetic studies in Drosophila melanogaster are revealing extensive regulatory networks that control the switch between stem cell self-renewal and differentiation in the germline. These networks, which are based primarily on mutual translational repression, act via interlocked feedback loops to provide robustness to this important fate decision.

  6. Specific combination of compound heterozygous mutations in 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4 (HSD17B4 defines a new subtype of D-bifunctional protein deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillan Hugh J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background D-bifunctional protein (DBP deficiency is typically apparent within the first month of life with most infants demonstrating hypotonia, psychomotor delay and seizures. Few children survive beyond two years of age. Among patients with prolonged survival all demonstrate severe gross motor delay, absent language development, and severe hearing and visual impairment. DBP contains three catalytically active domains; an N-terminal dehydrogenase, a central hydratase and a C-terminal sterol carrier protein-2-like domain. Three subtypes of the disease are identified based upon the domain affected; DBP type I results from a combined deficiency of dehydrogenase and hydratase activity; DBP type II from isolated hydratase deficiency and DBP type III from isolated dehydrogenase deficiency. Here we report two brothers (16½ and 14 years old with DBP deficiency characterized by normal early childhood followed by sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cerebellar and sensory ataxia and subclinical retinitis pigmentosa. Methods and results Biochemical analysis revealed normal levels of plasma VLCFA, phytanic acid and pristanic acid, and normal bile acids in urine; based on these results no diagnosis was made. Exome analysis was performed using the Agilent SureSelect 50Mb All Exon Kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 next-generation-sequencing (NGS platform. Compound heterozygous mutations were identified by exome sequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing within the dehydrogenase domain (c.101C>T; p.Ala34Val and hydratase domain (c.1547T>C; p.Ile516Thr of the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4 gene (HSD17B4. These mutations have been previously reported in patients with severe-forms of DBP deficiency, however each mutation was reported in combination with another mutation affecting the same domain. Subsequent studies in fibroblasts revealed normal VLCFA levels, normal C26:0 but reduced pristanic acid beta-oxidation activity. Both DBP

  7. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease caused by somatic and germline mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A Y; Blumenfeld, J; Michaeel, A; Donahue, S; Bobb, W; Parker, T; Levine, D; Rennert, H

    2015-04-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a heterogeneous genetic disorder caused by loss of function mutations of PKD1 or PKD2 genes. Although PKD1 is highly polymorphic and the new mutation rate is relatively high, the role of mosaicism is incompletely defined. Herein, we describe the molecular analysis of ADPKD in a 19-year-old female proband and her father. The proband had a PKD1 truncation mutation c.10745dupC (p.Val3584ArgfsX43), which was absent in paternal peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). However, very low quantities of this mutation were detected in the father's sperm DNA, but not in DNA from his buccal cells or urine sediment. Next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis determined the level of this mutation in the father's PBL, buccal cells and sperm to be ∼3%, 4.5% and 10%, respectively, consistent with somatic and germline mosaicism. The PKD1 mutation in ∼10% of her father's sperm indicates that it probably occurred early in embryogenesis. In ADPKD cases where a de novo mutation is suspected because of negative PKD gene testing of PBL, additional evaluation with more sensitive methods (e.g. NGS) of the proband PBL and paternal sperm can enhance detection of mosaicism and facilitate genetic counseling.

  8. Suppressor screen and phenotype analyses revealed an emerging role of the Monofunctional peroxisomal enoyl-CoA hydratase 2 in compensated cell enlargement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mana eKatano

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Efficient use of seed nutrient reserves is crucial for germination and establishment of plant seedlings. Mobilizing seed oil reserves in Arabidopsis involves β-oxidation, the glyoxylate cycle, and gluconeogenesis, which provide essential energy and the carbon skeletons needed to sustain seedling growth until photoautotrophy is acquired. We demonstrated that H+-PPase activity is required for gluconeogenesis. Lack of H+-PPase in fugu5 mutants increases cytosolic pyrophosphate (PPi levels, which partially reduces sucrose synthesis de novo and inhibits cell division. In contrast, post-mitotic cell expansion in cotyledons was unusually enhanced, a phenotype called compensation. Therefore, it appears that PPi inhibits several cellular functions, including cell cycling, to trigger compensated cell enlargement (CCE. Here, we mutagenized fugu5-1 seeds with 12C6+ heavy-ion irradiation and screened mutations that restrain CCE to gain insight into the genetic pathway(s involved in CCE. We isolated A#3-1, in which cell size was severely reduced, but cell number remained similar to that of original fugu5-1. Moreover, cell number decreased in A#3-1 single mutant (A#3-1sm, similar to that of fugu5-1, but cell size was almost equal to that of the wild type. Surprisingly, A#3-1 mutation did not affect CCE in other compensation exhibiting mutant backgrounds, such as an3-4 and fugu2-1/fas1-6. Subsequent map-based cloning combined with genome sequencing and HRM curve analysis identified enoyl-CoA hydratase 2 (ECH2 as the causal gene of A#3-1. The above phenotypes were consistently observed in the ech2-1 allele and supplying sucrose restored the morphological and cellular phenotypes in fugu5-1, ech2-1, A#3-1sm, fugu5-1 ech2-1 and A#3-1;fugu5-1. Taken together, these results suggest that defects in either H+-PPase or ECH2 compromise cell proliferation due to defects in mobilizing stored lipids. In contrast, ECH2 alone likely promotes CCE during the post-mitotic cell

  9. The integration of cyanide hydratase and tyrosinase catalysts enables effective degradation of cyanide and phenol in coking wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínková, Ludmila; Chmátal, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to design an effective method for the bioremediation of coking wastewaters, specifically for the concurrent elimination of their highly toxic components - cyanide and phenols. Almost full degradation of free cyanide (0.32-20 mM; 8.3-520 mg L(-1)) in the model and the real coking wastewaters was achieved by using a recombinant cyanide hydratase in the first step. The removal of cyanide, a strong inhibitor of tyrosinase, enabled an effective degradation of phenols by this enzyme in the second step. Phenol (16.5 mM, 1,552 mg L(-1)) was completely removed from a real coking wastewater within 20 h and cresols (5.0 mM, 540 mg L(-1)) were removed by 66% under the same conditions. The integration of cyanide hydratase and tyrosinase open up new possibilities for the bioremediation of wastewaters with complex pollution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Enzyme-substrate binding landscapes in the process of nitrile biodegradation mediated by nitrile hydratase and amidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zeng, Zhuotong; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Xuanming; Chen, Ming; Liu, Lifeng; Liu, Zhifeng; Xie, Gengxin

    2013-08-01

    The continuing discharge of nitriles in various industrial processes has caused serious environmental consequences of nitrile pollution. Microorganisms possess several nitrile-degrading pathways by direct interactions of nitriles with nitrile-degrading enzymes. However, these interactions are largely unknown and difficult to experimentally determine but important for interpretation of nitrile metabolisms and design of nitrile-degrading enzymes with better nitrile-converting activity. Here, we undertook a molecular modeling study of enzyme-substrate binding modes in the bi-enzyme pathway for degradation of nitrile to acid. Docking results showed that the top substrates having favorable interactions with nitrile hydratase from Rhodococcus erythropolis AJ270 (ReNHase), nitrile hydratase from Pseudonocardia thermophila JCM 3095 (PtNHase), and amidase from Rhodococcus sp. N-771 (RhAmidase) were benzonitrile, 3-cyanopyridine, and L-methioninamide, respectively. We further analyzed the interactional profiles of these top poses with corresponding enzymes, showing that specific residues within the enzyme's binding pockets formed diverse contacts with substrates. This information on binding landscapes and interactional profiles is of great importance for the design of nitrile-degrading enzyme mutants with better oxidation activity toward nitriles or amides in the process of pollutant treatments.

  11. Refined histopathological predictors of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spurdle, Amanda B; Couch, Fergus J; Parsons, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The distribution of histopathological features of invasive breast tumors in BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation carriers differs from that of individuals with no known mutation. Histopathological features thus have utility for mutation prediction, including statistical modeling to asse...

  12. Gene cloning of an efficiency oleate hydratase from Stenotrophomonas nitritireducens for polyunsaturated fatty acids and its application in the conversion of plant oils to 10-hydroxy fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Woo-Ri; Seo, Min-Ju; Shin, Kyung-Chul; Park, Jin-Byung; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2017-01-01

    Hydroxy fatty acids are used as precursors of lactones and dicarboxylic acids, as starting materials of polymers, and as additives in coatings and paintings. Stenotrophomonas nitritireducens efficiently converts cis-9 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to 10-hydroxy fatty acids. However, gene encoding enzyme involved in this conversion has not been identified to date. We purified a putative fatty acid double-bond hydratase from S. nitritireducens by ultrafiltration and HiPrep DEAE FF and Resource Q ion exchange chromatographies. Peptide sequences of the purified enzyme were obtained by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Sequence of the partial gene encoding this putative fatty acid double-bond hydratase was determined by degenerate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the peptide sequences. The remaining gene sequence was identified by rapid amplification of cDNA ends using cDNA of S. nitritireducens as a template, and the full-length gene was cloned subsequently. The expressed enzyme was identified as an oleate hydratase by determining its kinetic parameters toward unsaturated fatty acids. S. nitritireducens oleate hydratase showed higher activity toward PUFAs compared with other available oleate hydratases. This suggested that the enzyme could be used effectively to convert plant oils to 10-hydroxy fatty acids because these oils contained unsaturated fatty acids such as oleic acid (OA) and linoleic acid (LA) and PUFAs such as α-linolenic acid and/or γ-linolenic acid. The enzyme converted soybean oil and perilla seed oil hydrolyzates containing 10 mM total unsaturated fatty acids, including OA, LA, and ALA, to 8.87 and 8.70 mM total 10-hydroxy fatty acids, respectively, in 240 min. To our knowledge, this is the first study on the biotechnological conversion of PUFA-containing oils to hydroxy fatty acids. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 74-82. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. POLE mutations in families predisposed to cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aoude, Lauren G; Heitzer, Ellen; Johansson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancers and adenomas. POLE is an enzyme involved in DNA repair and chromosomal DNA replication. In order to assess whether such mutations might also predispose to cutaneous melanoma, we interrogated...... whole-genome and exome data from probands of 34 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, TERT, POT1, ACD and TERF2IP. We found a novel germline mutation, POLE p.(Trp347Cys), in a 7-case cutaneous melanoma family....... Functional assays in S. pombe showed that this mutation led to an increased DNA mutation rate comparable to that seen with a Pol ε mutant with no exonuclease activity. We then performed targeted sequencing of POLE in 1243 cutaneous melanoma cases and found that a further ten probands had novel or rare...

  14. Incidence and Outcome of BRCA Mutations in Unselected Patients with Triple Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the incidence of germline and somatic BRCA1\\/2 mutations in unselected patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and determine the prognostic significance of carrying a mutation. Methods: DNA was obtained from 77 TNBC and normal tissues. BRCA1\\/2 exons\\/flanking regions were sequenced from tumor and patients classified as mutant or wild type (WT). Sequencing was repeated from normal tissue to identify germline and somatic mutations. Patient characteristics were compared with chi-square. Survival was estimated by Kaplan-Meier method and compared with log-rank. Cox proportional hazards models were fit to determine the independent association of mutation status with outcome.

  15. Methods in Molecular Biology: Germline Stem Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The protocols in Germline Stem Cells are intended to present selected genetic, molecular, and cellular techniques used in germline stem cell research. The book is divided into two parts. Part I covers germline stem cell identification and regulation in model organisms. Part II covers current techniques used in in vitro culture and applications of germline stem cells.

  16. Metabolic reprogramming for producing energy and reducing power in fumarate hydratase null cells from hereditary leiomyomatosis renal cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youfeng Yang

    Full Text Available Fumarate hydratase (FH-deficient kidney cancer undergoes metabolic remodeling, with changes in mitochondrial respiration, glucose, and glutamine metabolism. These changes represent multiple biochemical adaptations in glucose and fatty acid metabolism that supports malignant proliferation. However, the metabolic linkages between altered mitochondrial function, nucleotide biosynthesis and NADPH production required for proliferation and survival have not been elucidated. To characterize the alterations in glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and the pentose phosphate pathways (PPP that either generate NADPH (oxidative or do not (non-oxidative, we utilized [U-(13C]-glucose, [U-(13C,(15N]-glutamine, and [1,2- (13C2]-glucose tracers with mass spectrometry and NMR detection to track these pathways, and measured the oxygen consumption rate (OCR and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR of growing cell lines. This metabolic reprogramming in the FH null cells was compared to cells in which FH has been restored. The FH null cells showed a substantial metabolic reorganization of their intracellular metabolic fluxes to fulfill their high ATP demand, as observed by a high rate of glucose uptake, increased glucose turnover via glycolysis, high production of glucose-derived lactate, and low entry of glucose carbon into the Krebs cycle. Despite the truncation of the Krebs cycle associated with inactivation of fumarate hydratase, there was a small but persistent level of mitochondrial respiration, which was coupled to ATP production from oxidation of glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate through to fumarate. [1,2- (13C2]-glucose tracer experiments demonstrated that the oxidative branch of PPP initiated by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity is preferentially utilized for ribose production (56-66% that produces increased amounts of ribose necessary for growth and NADPH. Increased NADPH is required to drive reductive carboxylation of α-ketoglutarate and fatty acid

  17. Metabolic reprogramming for producing energy and reducing power in fumarate hydratase null cells from hereditary leiomyomatosis renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Youfeng; Lane, Andrew N; Ricketts, Christopher J; Sourbier, Carole; Wei, Ming-Hui; Shuch, Brian; Pike, Lisa; Wu, Min; Rouault, Tracey A; Boros, Laszlo G; Fan, Teresa W-M; Linehan, W Marston

    2013-01-01

    Fumarate hydratase (FH)-deficient kidney cancer undergoes metabolic remodeling, with changes in mitochondrial respiration, glucose, and glutamine metabolism. These changes represent multiple biochemical adaptations in glucose and fatty acid metabolism that supports malignant proliferation. However, the metabolic linkages between altered mitochondrial function, nucleotide biosynthesis and NADPH production required for proliferation and survival have not been elucidated. To characterize the alterations in glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and the pentose phosphate pathways (PPP) that either generate NADPH (oxidative) or do not (non-oxidative), we utilized [U-(13)C]-glucose, [U-(13)C,(15)N]-glutamine, and [1,2- (13)C2]-glucose tracers with mass spectrometry and NMR detection to track these pathways, and measured the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) of growing cell lines. This metabolic reprogramming in the FH null cells was compared to cells in which FH has been restored. The FH null cells showed a substantial metabolic reorganization of their intracellular metabolic fluxes to fulfill their high ATP demand, as observed by a high rate of glucose uptake, increased glucose turnover via glycolysis, high production of glucose-derived lactate, and low entry of glucose carbon into the Krebs cycle. Despite the truncation of the Krebs cycle associated with inactivation of fumarate hydratase, there was a small but persistent level of mitochondrial respiration, which was coupled to ATP production from oxidation of glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate through to fumarate. [1,2- (13)C2]-glucose tracer experiments demonstrated that the oxidative branch of PPP initiated by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity is preferentially utilized for ribose production (56-66%) that produces increased amounts of ribose necessary for growth and NADPH. Increased NADPH is required to drive reductive carboxylation of α-ketoglutarate and fatty acid synthesis

  18. ROBO1 deletion as a novel germline alteration in breast and colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villacis, Rolando A R; Abreu, Francine B; Miranda, Priscila M

    2016-01-01

    interrogated in 113 unrelated cases fulfilling the criteria for hereditary BC/CRC and presenting non-pathogenic mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, MLH1, MSH2, TP53, and CHEK2 genes. An identical germline deep intronic deletion of ROBO1 was identified in three index patients using two microarray platforms (Agilent 4x......180K and Affymetrix CytoScan HD). The ROBO1 deletion was confirmed by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Six relatives were also evaluated by CytoScan HD Array. Genomic analysis confirmed a co-segregation of the ROBO1 deletion with the occurrence of cancer in two families. Direct sequencing revealed...... no pathogenic ROBO1 point mutations. Transcriptomic analysis (HTA 2.0, Affymetrix) in two breast carcinomas from a single patient revealed ROBO1 down-expression with no splicing events near the intronic deletion. Deeper in silico analysis showed several enhancer regions and a histone methylation mark...

  19. Comprehensive detection of germline variants by MSK-IMPACT, a clinical diagnostic platform for solid tumor molecular oncology and concurrent cancer predisposition testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Donavan T; Prasad, Meera; Chekaluk, Yvonne; Benayed, Ryma; Sadowska, Justyna; Zehir, Ahmet; Syed, Aijazuddin; Wang, Yan Elsa; Somar, Joshua; Li, Yirong; Yelskaya, Zarina; Wong, Donna; Robson, Mark E; Offit, Kenneth; Berger, Michael F; Nafa, Khedoudja; Ladanyi, Marc; Zhang, Liying

    2017-05-19

    The growing number of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) tests is transforming the routine clinical diagnosis of hereditary cancers. Identifying whether a cancer is the result of an underlying disease-causing mutation in a cancer predisposition gene is not only diagnostic for a cancer predisposition syndrome, but also has significant clinical implications in the clinical management of patients and their families. Here, we evaluated the performance of MSK-IMPACT (Memorial Sloan Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets) in detecting genetic alterations in 76 genes implicated in cancer predisposition syndromes. Output from hybridization-based capture was sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2500. A custom analysis pipeline was used to detect single nucleotide variants (SNVs), small insertions/deletions (indels) and copy number variants (CNVs). MSK-IMPACT detected all germline variants in a set of 233 unique patient DNA samples, previously confirmed by previous single gene testing. Reproducibility of variant calls was demonstrated using inter- and intra- run replicates. Moreover, in 16 samples, we identified additional pathogenic mutations other than those previously identified through a traditional gene-by-gene approach, including founder mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2 and APC, and truncating mutations in TP53, TSC2, ATM and VHL. This study highlights the importance of the NGS-based gene panel testing approach in comprehensively identifying germline variants contributing to cancer predisposition and simultaneous detection of somatic and germline alterations.

  20. Spontaneous germline excision of Tol1, a DNA-based transposable element naturally occurring in the medaka fish genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kohei; Koga, Hajime; Nakamura, Kodai; Fujita, Akiko; Hattori, Akimasa; Matsuda, Masaru; Koga, Akihiko

    2014-04-01

    DNA-based transposable elements are ubiquitous constituents of eukaryotic genomes. Vertebrates are, however, exceptional in that most of their DNA-based elements appear to be inactivated. The Tol1 element of the medaka fish, Oryzias latipes, is one of the few elements for which copies containing an undamaged gene have been found. Spontaneous transposition of this element in somatic cells has previously been demonstrated, but there is only indirect evidence for its germline transposition. Here, we show direct evidence of spontaneous excision in the germline. Tyrosinase is the key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis. In an albino laboratory strain of medaka fish, which is homozygous for a mutant tyrosinase gene in which a Tol1 copy is inserted, we identified de novo reversion mutations related to melanin pigmentation. The gamete-based reversion rate was as high as 0.4%. The revertant fish carried the tyrosinase gene from which the Tol1 copy had been excised. We previously reported the germline transposition of Tol2, another DNA-based element that is thought to be a recent invader of the medaka fish genome. Tol1 is an ancient resident of the genome. Our results indicate that even an old element can contribute to genetic variation in the host genome as a natural mutator.

  1. GENE MUTATIONS, GENETIC DISEASE AND PHARMACOGENETIC GENES DISORDER

    OpenAIRE

    Ishak

    2010-01-01

    Somatic cell mutation is able to create genetic variance in a cell population and can induce cancer and tumor when gene mutations took place at repressor gene in controlling cell cycles such as p53 gene. Whereas germline cell mutation can cause genetic disease such as sickle cell anemia, breast cancer, thalassemia, parkinson’s as well as defect of biochemical pathway that influence drug-receptor interaction, which has negative effect and lead to hospitalized of patient. Most of reports mentio...

  2. HNPCC: Six new pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epplen Joerg T

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is an autosomal dominant disease with a high risk for colorectal and endometrial cancer caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch-repair genes (MMR. HNPCC accounts for approximately 2 to 5% of all colorectal cancers. Here we present 6 novel mutations in the DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Methods Patients with clinical diagnosis of HNPCC were counselled. Tumor specimen were analysed for microsatellite instability and immunohistochemistry for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 protein was performed. If one of these proteins was not detectable in the tumor mutation analysis of the corresponding gene was carried out. Results We identified 6 frameshift mutations (2 in MLH1, 3 in MSH2, 1 in MSH6 resulting in a premature stop: two mutations in MLH1 (c.2198_2199insAACA [p.N733fsX745], c.2076_2077delTG [p.G693fsX702], three mutations in MSH2 (c.810_811delGT [p.C271fsX282], c.763_766delAGTGinsTT [p.F255fsX282], c.873_876delGACT [p.L292fsX298] and one mutation in MSH6 (c.1421_1422dupTG [p.C475fsX480]. All six tumors tested for microsatellite instability showed high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H. Conclusions HNPCC in families with MSH6 germline mutations may show an age of onset that is comparable to this of patients with MLH1 and MSH2 mutations.

  3. A BAP1 mutation in a Danish family predisposes to uveal melanoma and other cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aoude, Lauren G; Wadt, Karin; Bojesen, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    with predominantly uveal melanoma but also a range of other tumor types including lung, neuroendocrine, stomach, and breast cancer; as well as pigmented skin lesions. Whole-exome sequencing identified a BAP1 splice mutation located at c.581-2A>G, which leads to a premature truncation of BAP1 in an individual......Truncating germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene BRCA-1 associated protein-1 (BAP1) have been reported in families predisposed to developing a wide range of different cancer types including uveal melanoma and cutaneous melanoma. There has also been an association between amelanotic tumor...... development and germline BAP1 mutation suggesting a possible phenotypic characteristic of BAP1 mutation carriers. Though there have been many types of cancer associated with germline BAP1 mutation, the full spectrum of disease association is yet to be ascertained. Here we describe a Danish family...

  4. MLH1 promoter germline-methylation in selected probands of Chinese hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng-Hua Zhou; Shi-Yan Yan; Xiao-Yan Zhou; Xiang Du; Tai-Ming Zhang; Xu Cai; Yong-Ming Lu; San-Jun Cai; Da-Ren Shi

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To detect the MLH1 gene promoter germlinemethylation in probands of Chinese hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC),and to evaluate the role of methylation in MLH1 gene promoter and molecular genetics in screening for HNPCC.METHODS:The promoter germline methylation of MLH1 gene was detected by methylation-specific PCR (MSP) in 18 probands from unrelated HNPCC families with high microsatellite-instability (MSI-H) phenotype but without germline mutations in MSH2,MLH1 and MSH6 genes.At the same time,6 kindreds were collected with microsatellite-stability (MSS) phenotype but without germline mutations in MSH2,MLH1 and MSH6 genes as controls.The results of MSP were confirmed by clone sequencing.To ensure the reliability of the results,family H65 with nonsense germline mutation at c.2228C>A in MSH2 gene was used as the negative control and the cell line sw48 was used as the known positive control along with water as the blank control.Immunochemical staining of MLH1 protein was performed with Envision two-step method in those patients with aberrant methylation to judge whether the status of MLH1 gene methylation affects the expression of MLH1 protein.RESULTS:Five probands with MLH1 gene promoter methylation were detected in 18 Chinese HNPCC families with MSI-H phenotype but without germline mutations in MSH2,MLH1 and MSH6 genes.Two of the five probands from families H10 and H29 displayed exhaustive-methylation,fulfilling the Japanese criteria (JC) and the Amsterdam criteria (AC),respectively.The other 3 probands presented part-methylation fulfilling the AC.Of the 13 probands with unmethylation phenotype,8 fulfilled the JC and the Bethesda guidelines (BG),5 fulfilled the AC.The rate of aberrant methylation in MLH1 gene in the AC group (22.2%,4/18) was higher than that in the JC/BG groups (5.6%,1/18) in all HNPCC families with MSI-H phenotype but without germline mutations in MSH2,MLH1 and MSH6 genes.However,no proband with methylation in MLH1 gene was found

  5. Aldol reactions of the trans-o-hydroxybenzylidenepyruvate hydratase-aldolase (tHBP-HA) from Pseudomonas fluorescens N3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sello, Guido; Di Gennaro, Patrizia

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, a recombinant trans-o-hydroxybenzylidenepyruvate hydratase-aldolase (tHBP-HA) of Pseudomonas fluorescens N3 was used as a new catalyst for aldol condensation reactions. The reaction of some aldehydes with a different electronic activation catalyzed by tHBP-HA is presented and discussed together with some hints on the product structure. The enzyme is strictly pyruvate-dependent but uses different aldehydes as acceptors. The structure of the products is highly dependent on the electronic characteristics of the aldehyde. The results are interesting for both their synthetic importance and the mechanism of the formation of the products. Not only the products obtained and the recognition power are reported, but also some characteristics of its mechanism are analyzed. The results clearly show that the enzyme is efficiently prepared, purified, and stored, that it recognizes many different substrates, and that the products depend on the substrate electronic nature.

  6. Enzymatic hydrolysis of nitriles by an engineered nitrile hydratase (papain Gln19Glu) in aqueous-organic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versari, Andrea; Ménard, Robert; Lortie, Robert

    2002-07-05

    A mutant of the cysteine protease papain, displaying nitrile hydratase and amidase activities, was expressed in Pichia pastoris and used for the hydrolysis of peptide nitriles in aqueous-organic media. The rate of hydrolysis of these nitriles is lowered by increasing acetone concentration. This is caused by an increase of the Michaelis constant, and a variation of Vmax proportional to the amount of water in the mixture. The hydrolysis of the amide is less affected by the increase in co-solvent, which results in lower accumulation of this intermediate product. With the peptide nitrile tested, high nitrile concentrations could be used to promote the production of the amide and prevent its hydrolysis to the acid by diminishing the relative rate of amide hydrolysis. A number of non-peptidyl nitriles were also tested as potential substrates but activity was detected for only one compound with structural resemblance to peptide nitriles.

  7. Whole-exome identifies RXRG and TH germline variants in familial isolated prolactinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Flavia M; Couto, Patrícia P; Bale, Allen E; Bastos-Rodrigues, Luciana; Passos, Flavia M; Lisboa, Raony G C; Ng, Jessica M Y; Curran, Tom; Dias, Eduardo P; Friedman, Eitan; De Marco, Luiz

    2016-06-01

    Familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) is a rare genetic disorder. In a subset of FIPA families AIP germline mutations have been reported, but in most FIPA cases the exact genetic defect remains unknown. The present study aimed to determine the genetic basis of FIPA in a Brazilian family. Three siblings presented with isolated prolactin genes. Further mutation screening was performed using whole-exome sequencing and all likely causative mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing. In silico analysis and secreting pituitary adenoma diagnosed through clinical, biochemical and imaging testing. Sanger sequencing was used to genotype candidate prolactinoma-mutated additional predictive algorithms were applied to prioritize likely pathogenic variants. No mutations in the coding and flanking intronic regions in the MEN1, AIP and PRLR genes were detected. Whole-exome sequencing of three affected siblings revealed novel, predicted damaging, heterozygous variants in three different genes: RXRG, REXO4 and TH. In conclusion, the RXRG and TH possibly pathogenic variants may be associated with isolated prolactinoma in the studied family. The possible contribution of these genes to additional FIPA families should be explored.

  8. The first example of a nitrile hydratase model complex that reversibly binds nitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Jason; Jackson, Henry L; Schweitzer, Dirk; Rittenberg, Durrell K; Leavy, Tanya M; Kaminsky, Werner; Scarrow, Robert C; Kovacs, Julie A

    2002-09-25

    Nitrile hydratase (NHase) is an iron-containing metalloenzyme that converts nitriles to amides. The mechanism by which this biochemical reaction occurs is unknown. One mechanism that has been proposed involves nucleophilic attack of an Fe-bound nitrile by water (or hydroxide). Reported herein is a five-coordinate model compound ([Fe(III)(S(2)(Me2)N(3)(Et,Pr))](+)) containing Fe(III) in an environment resembling that of NHase, which reversibly binds a variety of nitriles, alcohols, amines, and thiocyanate. XAS shows that five-coordinate [Fe(III)(S(2)(Me2)N(3)(Et,Pr))](+) reacts with both methanol and acetonitrile to afford a six-coordinate solvent-bound complex. Competitive binding studies demonstrate that MeCN preferentially binds over ROH, suggesting that nitriles would be capable of displacing the H(2)O coordinated to the iron site of NHase. Thermodynamic parameters were determined for acetonitrile (DeltaH = -6.2(+/-0.2) kcal/mol, DeltaS = -29.4(+/-0.8) eu), benzonitrile (-4.2(+/-0.6) kcal/mol, DeltaS = -18(+/-3) eu), and pyridine (DeltaH = -8(+/-1) kcal/mol, DeltaS = -41(+/-6) eu) binding to [Fe(III)(S(2)(Me2)N(3)(Et,Pr))](+) using variable-temperature electronic absorption spectroscopy. Ligand exchange kinetics were examined for acetonitrile, iso-propylnitrile, benzonitrile, and 4-tert-butylpyridine using (13)C NMR line-broadening analysis, at a variety of temperatures. Activation parameters for ligand exchange were determined to be DeltaH(+ +) = 7.1(+/-0.8) kcal/mol, DeltaS(+ +) = -10(+/-1) eu (acetonitrile), DeltaH(+ +) = 5.4(+/-0.6) kcal/mol, DeltaS(+ +) = -17(+/-2) eu (iso-propionitrile), DeltaH(+ +) = 4.9(+/-0.8) kcal/mol, DeltaS(+ +) = -20(+/-3) eu (benzonitrile), and DeltaH(+ +) = 4.7(+/-1.4) kcal/mol DeltaS(+ +) = -18(+/-2) eu (4-tert-butylpyridine). The thermodynamic parameters for pyridine binding to a related complex, [Fe(III)(S(2)(Me2)N(3)(Pr,Pr))](+) (DeltaH = -5.9(+/-0.8) kcal/mol, DeltaS = -24(+/-3) eu), are also reported, as well as kinetic

  9. The First Example of a Nitrile Hydratase Model Complex that Reversibly Binds Nitriles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Jason; Jackson, Henry L.; Schweitzer, Dirk; Rittenberg, Durrell K.; Leavy, Tanya M.; Kaminsky, Werner; Scarrow, Robert C.; Kovacs, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrile hydratase (NHase) is an iron-containing metalloenzyme that converts nitriles to amides. The mechanism by which this biochemical reaction occurs is unknown. One mechanism that has been proposed involves nucleophilic attack of an Fe-bound nitrile by water (or hydroxide). Reported herein is a five-coordinate model compound ([FeIII(S2Me2N3(Et,Pr))]+) containing Fe(III) in an environment resembling that of NHase, which reversibly binds a variety of nitriles, alcohols, amines, and thiocyanate. XAS shows that five-coordinate [FeIII(S2Me2N3(Et,Pr))]+ reacts with both methanol and acetonitrile to afford a six-coordinate solvent-bound complex. Competitive binding studies demonstrate that MeCN preferentially binds over ROH, suggesting that nitriles would be capable of displacing the H2O coordinated to the iron site of NHase. Thermodynamic parameters were determined for acetonitrile (ΔH = −6.2(±0.2) kcal/mol, ΔS = −29.4(±0.8) eu), benzonitrile (−4.2(±0.6) kcal/mol, ΔS = −18(±3) eu), and pyridine (ΔH = −8(±1) kcal/mol, ΔS = −41(±6) eu) binding to [FeIII(S2Me2N3(Et,Pr))]+ using variable-temperature electronic absorption spectroscopy. Ligand exchange kinetics were examined for acetonitrile, iso-propylnitrile, benzonitrile, and 4-tert-butylpyridine using 13C NMR line-broadening analysis, at a variety of temperatures. Activation parameters for ligand exchange were determined to be ΔH‡ = 7.1(±0.8) kcal/mol, ΔS‡ = −10(±1) eu (acetonitrile), ΔH‡ = 5.4(±0.6) kcal/mol, ΔS‡ = −17(±2) eu (iso-propionitrile), ΔH‡ = 4.9(±0.8) kcal/mol, ΔS‡ = −20(±3) eu (benzonitrile), and ΔH‡ = 4.7(±1.4) kcal/mol ΔS‡ = −18(±2) eu (4-tert-butylpyridine). The thermodynamic parameters for pyridine binding to a related complex, [FeIII(S2Me2N3(Pr,Pr))]+ (ΔH = −5.9(±0.8) kcal/mol, ΔS = −24(±3) eu), are also reported, as well as kinetic parameters for 4-tert-butylpyridine exchange (ΔH‡ = 3.1(±0.8) kcal/mol, ΔS‡)−25(±3) eu

  10. Identification of germline transcriptional regulatory elements in Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Omar S.; Papathanos, Philippos A.; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Kennedy, Katie; Hay, Bruce A.

    2014-02-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the principal vector for the yellow fever and dengue viruses, and is also responsible for recent outbreaks of the alphavirus chikungunya. Vector control strategies utilizing engineered gene drive systems are being developed as a means of replacing wild, pathogen transmitting mosquitoes with individuals refractory to disease transmission, or bringing about population suppression. Several of these systems, including Medea, UDMEL, and site-specific nucleases, which can be used to drive genes into populations or bring about population suppression, utilize transcriptional regulatory elements that drive germline-specific expression. Here we report the identification of multiple regulatory elements able to drive gene expression specifically in the female germline, or in the male and female germline, in the mosquito Aedes aegypti. These elements can also be used as tools with which to probe the roles of specific genes in germline function and in the early embryo, through overexpression or RNA interference.

  11. Mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients with retinoblastoma reveals 11 novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Katia; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; Mari, Francesca; Speciale, Caterina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Cetta, Francesco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Giachino, Daniela; Pasini, Barbara; Acquaviva, Antonio; Caporossi, Aldo; Frezzotti, Renato; Renieri, Alessandra; Bruttini, Mirella

    2006-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB, OMIM#180200) is the most common intraocular tumour in infancy and early childhood. Constituent mutations in the RB1 gene predispose individuals to RB development. We performed a mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients affected by RB referred to the Medical Genetics of the University of Siena. In 35 unrelated patients, we identified germline RB1 mutations in 6 out of 9 familial cases (66%) and in 7 out of 26 with no family history of RB (27%). Using the single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique, 11 novel mutations were detected, including 3 nonsense, 5 frameshift and 4 splice-site mutations. Only two of these mutations (1 splice site and 1 missense) were previously reported. The mutation spectrum reflects the published literature, encompassing predominately nonsense or frameshift and splicing mutations. RB1 germline mutation was detected in 37% of our cases. Gross rearrangements outside the investigated region, altered DNA methylation, or mutations in non-coding regions, may be the cause of disease in the remainder of the patients. Some cases, e.g. a case of incomplete penetrance, or variable expressivity ranging from retinoma to multiple tumours, are discussed in detail. In addition, a case of pre-conception genetic counselling resolved by rescue of banked cordonal blood of the affected deceased child is described.

  12. RNF43 germline and somatic mutation in serrated neoplasia pathway and its association with BRAF mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Helen H N; Lai, Jeffrey C W; Ho, Siu Lun; Leung, Wai Keung; Law, Wai Lun; Lee, Janet F Y; Chan, Anthony K W; Tsui, Wai Yin; Chan, Annie S Y; Lee, Bernard C H; Yue, Sarah S K; Man, Alice H Y; Clevers, Hans; Yuen, Siu Tsan; Leung, Suet Yi

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Serrated polyps (hyperplastic polyps, sessile or traditional serrated adenomas), which can arise in a sporadic or polyposis setting, predispose to colorectal cancer (CRC), especially those with microsatellite instability (MSI) due to MLH1 promoter methylation (MLH1(me+)). We investigate g

  13. Revertant mosaicism in junctional epidermolysis bullosa due to multiple correcting second-site mutations in LAMB3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasmooij, Anna M. G.; Pas, Hendri H.; Boiling, Maria C.; Jonkman, Marcel F.

    2007-01-01

    Revertant mosaicism due to in vivo reversion of an inherited mutation has been described in the genetic skin disease epidermolysis bullosa (EB) for the genes KRT14 and COL17A1. Here we demonstrate the presence of multiple second-site mutations, all correcting the germline mutation LAMB3:c.628G -> A;

  14. Mutation Analysis of the LH Receptor Gene in Leydig Cell Adenoma and Hyperplasia and Functional and Biochemical Studies of Activating Mutations of the LH Receptor Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, Annemieke M.; Lumbroso, Serge; Verhoef-Post, Miriam; Richter-Unruh, Annette; Looijenga, Leendert H. J.; Funaro, Ada; Beishuizen, Auke; van Marle, Andre; Drop, Stenvert L. S.; Themmen, Axel P. N.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Germline and somatic activating mutations in the LH receptor (LHR) gene have been reported. Objective: Our objective was to perform mutation analysis of the LHR gene of patients with Leydig cell adenoma or hyperplasia. Functional studies were conducted to compare the D578H-LHR mutant with t

  15. FGFR3 mutations and the skin: report of a patient with a FGFR3 gene mutation, acanthosis nigricans, hypochondroplasia and hyperinsulinemia and review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, M; Jeppesen, E M; Skovby, F

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene mutations in the germline are well-known causes of skeletal syndromes. Somatic FGFR3 mutations have been found in malignant neoplasms and more recently in several cutaneous elements. We present a 14-year-old girl with mild hypochondroplasia who dev...

  16. Exome mutation burden predicts clinical outcome in ovarian cancer carrying mutated BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Kochupurakkal, Bose; Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria;

    2013-01-01

    Reliable biomarkers predicting resistance or sensitivity to anti-cancer therapy are critical for oncologists to select proper therapeutic drugs in individual cancer patients. Ovarian and breast cancer patients carrying germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are often sensitive to DNA damaging...... drugs and relative to non-mutation carriers present a favorable clinical outcome following therapy. Genome sequencing studies have shown a high number of mutations in the tumor genome in patients carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (mBRCA). The present study used exome-sequencing and SNP 6 array data...... had either germlines or somatic mutations of BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. The results revealed that the Nmut was significantly lower in the chemotherapy-resistant mBRCA HGSOC defined by progression within 6 months after completion of first line platinum-based chemotherapy. We found a significant association...

  17. Repression of germline RNAi pathways in somatic cells by retinoblastoma pathway chromatin complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyun Wu

    Full Text Available The retinoblastoma (Rb tumor suppressor acts with a number of chromatin cofactors in a wide range of species to suppress cell proliferation. The Caenorhabditis elegans retinoblastoma gene and many of these cofactors, called synMuv B genes, were identified in genetic screens for cell lineage defects caused by growth factor misexpression. Mutations in many synMuv B genes, including lin-35/Rb, also cause somatic misexpression of the germline RNA processing P granules and enhanced RNAi. We show here that multiple small RNA components, including a set of germline-specific Argonaute genes, are misexpressed in the soma of many synMuv B mutant animals, revealing one node for enhanced RNAi. Distinct classes of synMuv B mutants differ in the subcellular architecture of their misexpressed P granules, their profile of misexpressed small RNA and P granule genes, as well as their enhancement of RNAi and the related silencing of transgenes. These differences define three classes of synMuv B genes, representing three chromatin complexes: a LIN-35/Rb-containing DRM core complex, a SUMO-recruited Mec complex, and a synMuv B heterochromatin complex, suggesting that intersecting chromatin pathways regulate the repression of small RNA and P granule genes in the soma and the potency of RNAi. Consistent with this, the DRM complex and the synMuv B heterochromatin complex were genetically additive and displayed distinct antagonistic interactions with the MES-4 histone methyltransferase and the MRG-1 chromodomain protein, two germline chromatin regulators required for the synMuv phenotype and the somatic misexpression of P granule components. Thus intersecting synMuv B chromatin pathways conspire with synMuv B suppressor chromatin factors to regulate the expression of small RNA pathway genes, which enables heightened RNAi response. Regulation of small RNA pathway genes by human retinoblastoma may also underlie its role as a tumor suppressor gene.

  18. Use of Germline Polymorphisms in Predicting Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Response in Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pei-Chun [Department of Statistics and Informatics Science, Providence University, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Ching [Institute of Epidemiology Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Gene, Environment, and Human Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, Institute of Epidemiology, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Lai, Liang-Chuan [Graduate Institute of Physiology, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Mong-Hsun [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shin-Kuang [National Clinical Trial and Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan (China); Yang, Pei-Wen; Lee, Yung-Chie [Department of Surgery, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Chuhsing K. [Research Center for Gene, Environment, and Human Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, Institute of Epidemiology, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Bioinformatics and Biostatistics Core, Research Center for Medical Excellence, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jang-Ming, E-mail: jangming@ntuh.gov.tw [Department of Surgery, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Eric Y., E-mail: chuangey@ntu.edu.tw [National Clinical Trial and Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan (China); Bioinformatics and Biostatistics Core, Research Center for Medical Excellence, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To identify germline polymorphisms to predict concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) response in esophageal cancer patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 139 esophageal cancer patients treated with CCRT (cisplatin-based chemotherapy combined with 40 Gy of irradiation) and subsequent esophagectomy were recruited at the National Taiwan University Hospital between 1997 and 2008. After excluding confounding factors (i.e., females and patients aged {>=}70 years), 116 patients were enrolled to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with specific CCRT responses. Genotyping arrays and mass spectrometry were used sequentially to determine germline polymorphisms from blood samples. These polymorphisms remain stable throughout disease progression, unlike somatic mutations from tumor tissues. Two-stage design and additive genetic models were adopted in this study. Results: From the 26 SNPs identified in the first stage, 2 SNPs were found to be significantly associated with CCRT response in the second stage. Single nucleotide polymorphism rs16863886, located between SGPP2 and FARSB on chromosome 2q36.1, was significantly associated with a 3.93-fold increase in pathologic complete response to CCRT (95% confidence interval 1.62-10.30) under additive models. Single nucleotide polymorphism rs4954256, located in ZRANB3 on chromosome 2q21.3, was associated with a 3.93-fold increase in pathologic complete response to CCRT (95% confidence interval 1.57-10.87). The predictive accuracy for CCRT response was 71.59% with these two SNPs combined. Conclusions: This is the first study to identify germline polymorphisms with a high accuracy for predicting CCRT response in the treatment of esophageal cancer.

  19. Biallelic DICER1 mutations occur in Wilms tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M K; Sabbaghian, N; Xu, B; Addidou-Kalucki, S; Bernard, C; Zou, D; Reeve, A E; Eccles, M R; Cole, C; Choong, C S; Charles, A; Tan, T Y; Iglesias, D M; Goodyer, P R; Foulkes, W D

    2013-06-01

    DICER1 is an endoribonuclease central to the generation of microRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Germline mutations in DICER1 have been associated with a pleiotropic tumour predisposition syndrome and Wilms tumour (WT) is a rare manifestation of this syndrome. Three WTs, each in a child with a deleterious germline DICER1 mutation, were screened for somatic DICER1 mutations and were found to bear specific mutations in either the RNase IIIa (n = 1) or the RNase IIIb domain (n = 2). In the two latter cases, we demonstrate that the germline and somatic DICER1 mutations were in trans, suggesting that the two-hit hypothesis of tumour formation applies for these examples of WT. Among 191 apparently sporadic WTs, we identified five different missense or deletion somatic DICER1 mutations (2.6%) in four individual WTs; one tumour had two very likely deleterious somatic mutations in trans in the RNase IIIb domain (c.5438A>G and c.5452G>A). In vitro studies of two somatic single-base substitutions (c.5429A>G and c.5438A>G) demonstrated exon 25 skipping from the transcript, a phenomenon not previously reported in DICER1. Further we show that DICER1 transcripts lacking exon 25 can be translated in vitro. This study has demonstrated that a subset of WTs exhibits two 'hits' in DICER1, suggesting that these mutations could be key events in the pathogenesis of these tumours.

  20. [Effect of melaxen and valdoxan on free radical processes intensity, aconitate hydratase activity and citrate content in rats tissues under hyperthyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbenko, M V; Popova, T N; Shul'gin, K K; Popov, S S; Agarkov, A A

    2014-01-01

    The influence of melaxen and valdoxan on the biochemiluminescence parameters, aconitate hydratase activity and citrate level in rats heart and liver during development of experimental hyperthyroidism has been investigated. Administration of these substances promoted a decrease of biochemiluminescence parameters, which had been increased in tissues of rats in response to the development of oxidative stress under hyperthyroidism. Aconitate hydratase activity and citrate concentration in rats liver and heart, growing at pathological conditions, changed towards control value after administration of the drugs correcting melatonin level. The results indicate the positive effect of valdoxan and melaxen on oxidative status of the organism under the development of experimental hyperthyroidism that is associated with antioxidant action of melatonin.

  1. Association of Germline CHEK2 Gene Variants with Risk and Prognosis of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Havranek

    Full Text Available The checkpoint kinase 2 gene (CHEK2 codes for the CHK2 protein, an important mediator of the DNA damage response pathway. The CHEK2 gene has been recognized as a multi-cancer susceptibility gene; however, its role in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL remains unclear. We performed mutation analysis of the entire CHEK2 coding sequence in 340 NHL patients using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. Identified hereditary variants were genotyped in 445 non-cancer controls. The influence of CHEK2 variants on disease risk was statistically evaluated. Identified CHEK2 germline variants included four truncating mutations (found in five patients and no control; P = 0.02 and nine missense variants (found in 21 patients and 12 controls; P = 0.02. Carriers of non-synonymous variants had an increased risk of NHL development [odds ratio (OR 2.86; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.42-5.79] and an unfavorable prognosis [hazard ratio (HR of progression-free survival (PFS 2.1; 95% CI 1.12-4.05]. In contrast, the most frequent intronic variant c.319+43dupA (identified in 22% of patients and 31% of controls was associated with a decreased NHL risk (OR = 0.62; 95% CI 0.45-0.86, but its positive prognostic effect was limited to NHL patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL treated by conventional chemotherapy without rituximab (HR-PFS 0.4; 94% CI 0.17-0.74. Our results show that germ-line CHEK2 mutations affecting protein coding sequence confer a moderately-increased risk of NHL, they are associated with an unfavorable NHL prognosis, and they may represent a valuable predictive biomarker for patients with DLBCL.

  2. Maternal age effect and severe germ-line bottleneck in the inheritance of human mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolledo-Jaramillo, Boris; Su, Marcia Shu-Wei; Stoler, Nicholas; McElhoe, Jennifer A; Dickins, Benjamin; Blankenberg, Daniel; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Nielsen, Rasmus; Holland, Mitchell M; Paul, Ian M; Nekrutenko, Anton; Makova, Kateryna D

    2014-10-28

    The manifestation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diseases depends on the frequency of heteroplasmy (the presence of several alleles in an individual), yet its transmission across generations cannot be readily predicted owing to a lack of data on the size of the mtDNA bottleneck during oogenesis. For deleterious heteroplasmies, a severe bottleneck may abruptly transform a benign (low) frequency in a mother into a disease-causing (high) frequency in her child. Here we present a high-resolution study of heteroplasmy transmission conducted on blood and buccal mtDNA of 39 healthy mother-child pairs of European ancestry (a total of 156 samples, each sequenced at ∼20,000× per site). On average, each individual carried one heteroplasmy, and one in eight individuals carried a disease-associated heteroplasmy, with minor allele frequency ≥1%. We observed frequent drastic heteroplasmy frequency shifts between generations and estimated the effective size of the germ-line mtDNA bottleneck at only ∼30-35 (interquartile range from 9 to 141). Accounting for heteroplasmies, we estimated the mtDNA germ-line mutation rate at 1.3 × 10(-8) (interquartile range from 4.2 × 10(-9) to 4.1 × 10(-8)) mutations per site per year, an order of magnitude higher than for nuclear DNA. Notably, we found a positive association between the number of heteroplasmies in a child and maternal age at fertilization, likely attributable to oocyte aging. This study also took advantage of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) to validate heteroplasmies and confirm a de novo mutation. Our results can be used to predict the transmission of disease-causing mtDNA variants and illuminate evolutionary dynamics of the mitochondrial genome.

  3. Production of 13S-hydroxy-9(Z)-octadecenoic acid from linoleic acid by whole recombinant cells expressing linoleate 13-hydratase from Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Young; Lee, Seon-Hwa; Kim, Kyoung-Rok; Park, Jin-Byung; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2015-08-20

    Linoleate 13-hydratase from Lactobacillus acidophilus LMG 11470 converted linoleic acid to hydroxyl fatty acid, which was identified as 13S-hydroxy-9(Z)-octadecenoic acid (13-HOD) by GC-MS and NMR. The expression of linoleate 13-hydratase gene in Escherichia coli was maximized by using pACYC plasmid and super optimal broth with catabolite repression (SOC) medium containing 40mM Mg(2+). To optimize induction conditions, recombinant cells were cultivated at 37°C, 1mM isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside was added at 2h, and the culture was further incubated at 16°C for 18h. Recombinant cells expressing linoleate 13-hydratase from L. acidophilus were obtained under the optimized expression conditions and used for 13-HOD production from linoleic acid. The optimal reaction conditions were pH 6.0, 40°C, 0.25% (v/v) Tween 40, 25gl(-1) cells, and 100gl(-1) linoleic acid, and under these conditions, whole recombinant cells produced 79gl(-1) 13-HOD for 3h with a conversion yield of 79% (w/w), a volumetric productivity of 26.3gl(-1)h(-1), and a specific productivity of 1.05g g-cells(-1)h(-1). To the best of our knowledge, the recombinant cells produced hydroxy fatty acid with the highest concentration and productivity reported so far.

  4. The arrest gene is required for germline cyst formation during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, M J; Deng, W; Wang, Z; Lin, H

    2001-04-01

    In Drosophila, oogenesis is initiated when a germline stem cell produces a differentiating daughter cell called the cystoblast. The cystoblast undergoes four rounds of synchronous divisions with incomplete cytokinesis to generate a syncytial cyst of 16 interconnected cystocytes, in which one cystocyte differentiates into an oocyte. Strong mutations of the arrest (aret) gene disrupt cyst formation and cause the production of clusters of ill-differentiated germline cells that retain cellular and molecular characteristics of cystoblasts. These mutant germ cells express high levels of BAM-C and SXL proteins in the cytoplasm but do not accumulate markers for advanced cystocytes or differentiating oocytes, such as the nuclear localization of SXL or the accumulation of osk mRNA, orb mRNA, and cytoplasmic dynein. However, the mutant germ cells do not contain spectrosomes, the cytoplasmic structure that objectifies the divisional asymmetry of the cystoblast. The aret mutant germ cells undergo active mitosis with complete cytokinesis. Their mitosis is accompanied by massive necrosis, so that the number of germ cells in a stem cell-derived cluster ranges from one to greater than 70. These defects of aret mutants reveal a novel function of aret as the first gene with a defined function in the cystoblast to cyst transition during early oogenesis.

  5. Germline cell death is inhibited by P-element insertions disrupting the dcp-1/pita nested gene pair in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundrie, Bonni; Peterson, Jeanne S; Baum, Jason S; Chang, Jeffrey C; Fileppo, Dana; Thompson, Sharona R; McCall, Kimberly

    2003-12-01

    Germline cell death in Drosophila oogenesis is controlled by distinct signals. The death of nurse cells in late oogenesis is developmentally regulated, whereas the death of egg chambers during mid-oogenesis is induced by environmental stress or developmental abnormalities. P-element insertions in the caspase gene dcp-1 disrupt both dcp-1 and the outlying gene, pita, leading to lethality and defective nurse cell death in late oogenesis. By isolating single mutations in the two genes, we have found that the loss of both genes contributes to this ovary phenotype. Mutants of pita, which encodes a C2H2 zinc-finger protein, are homozygous lethal and show dumpless egg chambers and premature nurse cell death in germline clones. Early nurse cell death is not observed in the dcp-1/pita double mutants, suggesting that dcp-1+ activity is required for the mid-oogenesis cell death seen in pita mutants. dcp-1 mutants are viable and nurse cell death in late oogenesis occurs normally. However, starvation-induced germline cell death during mid-oogenesis is blocked, leading to a reduction and inappropriate nuclear localization of the active caspase Drice. These findings suggest that the combinatorial loss of pita and dcp-1 leads to the increased survival of abnormal egg chambers in mutants bearing the P-element alleles and that dcp-1 is essential for cell death during mid-oogenesis.

  6. Prevalence and phenotypes of APC and MUTYH mutations in patients with multiple colorectal adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Grover (Shilpa); F. Kastrinos (Fay); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); E.F. Cook (E. Francis); A. Dewanwala (Akriti); L.A. Burbidge; R.J. Wenstrup (Richard); S. Syngal (Sapna)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractContext: Patients with multiple colorectal adenomas may carry germline mutations in the APC or MUTYH genes. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of pathogenic APC and MUTYH mutations in patients with multiple colorectal adenomas who had undergone genetic testing and to compare the pre

  7. SDH Subunit Mutation Status in Saliva : Genetic Testing in Patients with Pheochromocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osinga, T E; Xekouki, P; Nambuba, J; Faucz, F R; de la Luz Sierra, M; Links, T P; Kema, I P; Adams, K; Stratakis, C A; van der Horst-Schrivers, A N A; Pacak, K

    Germline mutations occur in up to 30-40% of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma, with mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits B (SDHB) and D (SDHD) being the most common. Blood samples are favored for obtaining high quality DNA, however, leukocytes can also be obtained by collecting

  8. Post-zygotic Point Mutations Are an Underrecognized Source of De Novo Genomic Variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acuna-Hidalgo, R.; Bo, T.; Kwint, M.P.; Vorst, M. van de; Pinelli, M.; Veltman, J.A.; Hoischen, A.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Gilissen, C.

    2015-01-01

    De novo mutations are recognized both as an important source of genetic variation and as a prominent cause of sporadic disease in humans. Mutations identified as de novo are generally assumed to have occurred during gametogenesis and, consequently, to be present as germline events in an individual.

  9. CDH1 mutations in gastric cancer patients from northern Brazil identified by Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Husny, Antonette; Raiol-Moraes, Milene; Amador, Marcos; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, André M; Montagnini, André; Barbosa, Silvanira; Silva, Artur; Assumpção, Paulo; Ishak, Geraldo; Santos, Sidney; Pinto, Pablo; Cruz, Aline; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-05-13

    Gastric cancer is considered to be the fifth highest incident tumor worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. Developing regions report a higher number of sporadic cases, but there are only a few local studies related to hereditary cases of gastric cancer in Brazil to confirm this fact. CDH1 germline mutations have been described both in familial and sporadic cases, but there is only one recent molecular description of individuals from Brazil. In this study we performed Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to assess CDH1 germline mutations in individuals who match the clinical criteria for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC), or who exhibit very early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Among five probands we detected CDH1 germline mutations in two cases (40%). The mutation c.1023T > G was found in a HDGC family and the mutation c.1849G > A, which is nearly exclusive to African populations, was found in an early-onset case of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mutations described highlight the existence of gastric cancer cases caused by CDH1 germline mutations in northern Brazil, although such information is frequently ignored due to the existence of a large number of environmental factors locally. Our report represent the first CDH1 mutations in HDGC described from Brazil by an NGS platform.

  10. MAX mutations cause hereditary and sporadic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Burnichon (Nelly); A. Cascoń (Alberto); F. Schiavi (Francesca); N. Morales (NicolePaes); I. Comino-Méndez (Iñaki); N. Abermil (Nasséra); L. Inglada-Pérez (Lucía); A.A. de Cubas (Aguirre); L. Amar (Laurence); M. Barontini (Marta); S.B. de Quiroś (Sandra Bernaldo); J. Bertherat (Jerome); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); M.J. Blok (Marinus); S. Bobisse (Sara); S. Borrego (Salud); M. Castellano (Maurizio); P. Chanson (Philippe); A. de Chiara; E.P. Corssmit (Eleonora); M. Giacchè (Mara); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald); T. Ercolino (Tonino); X. Girerd (Xavier); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); Á. Gómez-Graña (Álvaro); I. Guilhem (Isabelle); F.J. Hes (Frederik); E. Honrado (Emiliano); E. Korpershoek (Esther); J.W. Lenders (Jacques); R. Letón (Rocío); A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); A. Merlo (Anna); L. Mori (Luigi); A. Murat (Arnaud); P. Pierre (Peggy); P.F. Plouin (Pierre-Franco̧is); T. Prodanov (Tamara); M. Quesada-Charneco (Miguel); N. Qin (Nan); E. Rapizzi (Elena); E. Raymond (Eric); N. Reisch (Nicole); G. Roncador (Giovanna); M. Ruiz-Ferrer (Macarena); F. Schillo (Frank); A.P.A. Stegmann (Sander); C. Suarez (Carlos); E. Taschin (Elisa); H.J.L.M. Timmers; C. Tops (Carli); M. Urioste (Miguel); F. Beuschlein (Felix); K. Pacak (Karel); M. Mannelli (Massimo); P.L. Dahia (Patricia); G. Opocher (Giuseppe); G. Eisenhofer (Graeme); A.P. Gimenez-Roqueplo; M. Robledo (Mercedes)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Pheochromocytomas (PCC) and paragangliomas (PGL) are genetically heterogeneous neural crest-derived neoplasms. Recently we identified germline mutations in a new tumor suppressor susceptibility gene, MAX (MYC-associated factor X), which predisposes carriers to PCC. How MAX

  11. Mutations associated with succinate dehydrogenase D-related malignant paragangliomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Pacak, K.; Bertherat, J.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Duet, M.; Eisenhofer, G.; Stratakis, C.A.; Niccoli-Sire, P.; Tran, B.H.; Burnichon, N.; Gimenez-Roqueplo, A.P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hereditary paraganglioma (PGL) syndromes result from germline mutations in genes encoding subunits B, C and D of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB, SDHC and SDHD). SDHB-related PGLs are known in particular for their high malignant potential. Recently, however, maligna

  12. Variable Autosomal and X Divergence Near and Far from Genes Affects Estimates of Male Mutation Bias in Great Apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Pooja; Wilson Sayres, Melissa A

    2016-12-31

    Male mutation bias, when more mutations are passed on via the male germline than via the female germline, is observed across mammals. One common way to infer the magnitude of male mutation bias, α, is to compare levels of neutral sequence divergence between genomic regions that spend different amounts of time in the male and female germline. For great apes, including human, we show that estimates of divergence are reduced in putatively unconstrained regions near genes relative to unconstrained regions far from genes. Divergence increases with increasing distance from genes on both the X chromosome and autosomes, but increases faster on the X chromosome than autosomes. As a result, ratios of X/A divergence increase with increasing distance from genes and corresponding estimates of male mutation bias are significantly higher in intergenic regions near genes versus far from genes. Future studies in other species will need to carefully consider the effect that genomic location will have on estimates of male mutation bias.

  13. A novel PTEN gene promoter mutation and untypical Cowden syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Liu; Guangbing Li; Rongrong Chen; Xiaobo Yang; Xue Zhao; Haitao Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Cowden syndrome (CS),an autosomal dominant disorder,is one of a spectrum of clinical disorders that have been linked to germline mutations in the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene.Although 70-80% of patients with CS have an identifiable germline PTEN mutation,the clinical diagnosis presents many challenges because of the phenotypic and genotypic variations.In the present study,we sequenced the exons and the promoter of PTEN gene,mutations and variations in the promoter and exons were identified,and a PTEN protein expression negative region was determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC).In conclusion,a novel promoter mutation we found in PTEN gene may turn off PTEN protein expression occasionally,leading to the disorder of PTEN and untypical CS manifestations.

  14. A simplified and efficient germline-specific CRISPR/Cas9 system for Drosophila genomic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebo, Zachary L; Lee, Han B; Peng, Ying; Guo, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The type II CRISPR/Cas9 system (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) has recently emerged as an efficient and simple tool for site-specific engineering of eukaryotic genomes. To improve its applications in Drosophila genome engineering, we simplified the standard two-component CRISPR/Cas9 system by generating a stable transgenic fly line expressing the Cas9 endonuclease in the germline (Vasa-Cas9 line). By injecting vectors expressing engineered target-specific guide RNAs into Vasa-Cas9 fly embryos, mutations were generated from site-specific DNA cleavages and efficiently transmitted into progenies. Because Cas9 endonuclease is the universal component of the type II CRISPR/Cas9 system, site-specific genomic engineering based on this improved platform can be achieved with lower complexity and toxicity, greater consistency, and excellent versatility.

  15. Germline and somatic genetics of osteosarcoma - connecting aetiology, biology and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianferante, D Matthew; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A

    2017-08-01

    Clinical outcomes and treatment modalities for osteosarcoma, the most common primary cancer of bone, have changed very little over the past 30 years. The peak incidence of osteosarcoma occurs during the adolescent growth spurt, which suggests that bone growth and pubertal hormones are important in the aetiology of the disease. Tall stature, high birth weight and certain inherited cancer predisposition syndromes are well-described risk factors for osteosarcoma. Common genetic variants are also associated with osteosarcoma. The somatic genome of osteosarcoma is highly aneuploid, exhibits extensive intratumoural heterogeneity and has a higher mutation rate than most other paediatric cancers. Complex pathways related to bone growth and development and tumorigenesis are also important in osteosarcoma biology. In this Review, we discuss the contributions of germline and somatic genetics, tumour biology and animal models in improving our understanding of osteosarcoma aetiology, and their potential to identify novel therapeutic targets and thus improve the lives of patients with osteosarcoma.

  16. Key Signaling Events for Committing Mouse Pluripotent Stem Cells to the Germline Fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Qi; Cao, Wen-Guang

    2016-01-01

    The process of germline development carries genetic information and preparatory totipotency across generations. The last decade has witnessed remarkable successes in the generation of germline cells from mouse pluripotent stem cells, especially induced germline cells with the capacity for producing viable offspring, suggesting clinical applications of induced germline cells in humans. However, to date, the culture systems for germline induction with accurate sex-specific meiosis and epigenetic reprogramming have not been well-established. In this study, we primarily focus on the mouse model to discuss key signaling events for germline induction. We review mechanisms of competent regulators on primordial germ cell induction and discuss current achievements and difficulties in inducing sex-specific germline development. Furthermore, we review the developmental identities of mouse embryonic stem cells and epiblast stem cells under certain defined culture conditions as it relates to the differentiation process of becoming germline cells.

  17. Fumarate hydratase inactivation in renal tumors: HIF1α, NRF2, and "cryptic targets" of transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aikseng Ooi; Kyle A.Furge

    2012-01-01

    Biallelic inactivation of fumarate hydratase (FH) causes type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC2),uterine fibroids,and cutaneous leimyomas,a condition known as hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC).The most direct effect of FH inactivation is intracellular fumarate accumulation.A majority of studies on FH inactivation over the past decade have focused on the theory that intracellular fumarate stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1A) through competitive inhibition of HIF prolyl hydroxylases.Recently,a competing theory that intracellular fumarate activates nuclear factor (erythroidderived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) through post-translational modification of its negative regulator.Kelch-like ECH- associated protein 1 (KEAP1) has emerged from a computational modeling study and mouse model studies.This review dissects the origin of these two governing theories and highlights the presence of chromatin-structure-regulated targets of transcription factors,which we refer to as "cryptic targets" of transcription factors.One such cryptic target is heme oxygenase Ⅰ (HMOX1),the expression of which is known to be modulated by the gene product of SWI/SNF-related,matrix-associated,actin-dependent regulator of chromatin,subfamily a,member 4 (SMARCA4,also known as BRG1).

  18. Enhancement of thermo-stability and product tolerance of Pseudomonas putida nitrile hydratase by fusing with self-assembling peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Cui, Wenjing; Liu, Zhongmei; Cui, Youtian; Xia, Yuanyuan; Kobayashi, Michihiko; Zhou, Zhemin

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembling amphipathic peptides (SAPs) are the peptides that can spontaneously assemble into ordered nanostructures. It has been reported that the attachment of SAPs to the N- or C-terminus of an enzyme can benefit the thermo-stability of the enzyme. Here, we discovered that the thermo-stability and product tolerance of nitrile hydratase (NHase) were enhanced by fusing with two of the SAPs (EAK16 and ELK16). When the ELK16 was fused to the N-terminus of β-subunit, the resultant NHase (SAP-NHase-2) became an active inclusion body; EAK16 fused NHase in the N-terminus of β-subunit (SAP-NHase-1) and ELK16 fused NHase in the C-terminus of β-subunit (SAP-NHase-10) did not affect NHase solubility. Compared with the deactivation of the wild-type NHase after 30 min incubation at 50°C, SAP-NHase-1, SAP-NHase-2 and SAP-NHase-10 retained 45%, 30% and 50% activity; after treatment in the buffer containing 10% acrylamide, the wild-type retained 30% activity, while SAP-NHase-1, SAP-NHase-2 and SAP-NHase-10 retained 52%, 42% and 55% activity. These SAP-NHases with enhanced thermo-stability and product tolerance would be helpful for further industrial applications of the NHase.

  19. Nitrile hydratase of Rhodococcus erythropolis: characterization of the enzyme and the use of whole cells for biotransformation of nitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Ashwini L; Banoth, Linga; Meena, Vachan Singh; Singh, Amit; Chisti, Yusuf; Banerjee, U C

    2013-08-01

    The intracellular cobalt-type nitrile hydratase was purified from the bacterium Rhodococcuserythropolis. The pure enzyme consisted of two subunits of 29 and 30 kDa. The molecular weight of the native enzyme was estimated to be 65 kDa. At 25 °C the enzyme had a half-life of 25 h. The Michaelis-Menten constants Km and vmax for the enzyme were 0.624 mM and 5.12 μmol/min/mg, respectively, using 3-cyanopyridine as the substrate. The enzyme-containing freely-suspended bacterial cells and the cells immobilized within alginate beads were evaluated for converting the various nitriles to amides. In a packed bed reactor, alginate beads (2 % alginate; 3 mm bead diameter) containing 200 mg/mL of cells, achieved a conversion of >90 % for benzonitrile and 4-cyanopyridine in 38 h (25 °C, pH 7.0) at a feed substrate concentration of 100 mM. The beads could be reused for up to six reaction cycles.

  20. Adipose-Specific Deficiency of Fumarate Hydratase in Mice Protects Against Obesity, Hepatic Steatosis, and Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Wu, Jiang W; Wang, Shu P; Severi, Ilenia; Sartini, Loris; Frizzell, Norma; Cinti, Saverio; Yang, Gongshe; Mitchell, Grant A

    2016-11-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with impaired mitochondrial function in adipose tissue. To study the effects of primary deficiency of mitochondrial energy metabolism in fat, we generated mice with adipose-specific deficiency of fumarate hydratase (FH), an integral Krebs cycle enzyme (AFHKO mice). AFHKO mice have severe ultrastructural abnormalities of mitochondria, ATP depletion in white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue, low WAT mass with small adipocytes, and impaired thermogenesis with large unilocular brown adipocytes. AFHKO mice are strongly protected against obesity, insulin resistance, and fatty liver despite aging and high-fat feeding. AFHKO white adipocytes showed normal lipolysis but low triglyceride synthesis. ATP depletion in normal white adipocytes by mitochondrial toxins also decreased triglyceride synthesis, proportionally to ATP depletion, suggesting that reduced triglyceride synthesis may result nonspecifically from adipocyte energy deficiency. At thermoneutrality, protection from insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis was diminished. Taken together, the results show that under the cold stress of regular animal room conditions, adipocyte-specific FH deficiency in mice causes mitochondrial energy depletion in adipose tissues and protects from obesity, hepatic steatosis, and insulin resistance, suggesting that in cold-stressed animals, mitochondrial function in adipose tissue is a determinant of fat mass and insulin sensitivity. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  1. Towards Structural-Functional Mimics of Acetylene Hydratase: Reversible Activation of Acetylene using a Biomimetic Tungsten Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschel, Lydia M; Belaj, Ferdinand; Mösch-Zanetti, Nadia C

    2015-10-26

    The synthesis and characterization of a biomimetic system that can reversibly bind acetylene (ethyne) is reported. The system has been designed to mimic catalytic intermediates of the tungstoenzyme acetylene hydratase. The thiophenyloxazoline ligand S-Phoz (2-(4',4'-dimethyloxazolin-2'-yl)thiophenolate) is used to generate a bioinspired donor environment around the W center, facilitating the stabilization of W-acetylene adducts. The featured complexes [W(C2 H2 )(CO)(S-Phoz)2 ] (2) and [WO(C2 H2 )(S-Phoz)2 ] (3) are extremely rare from a synthetic and structural point of view as very little is known about W-C2 H2 adducts. Upon exposure to visible light, 3 can release C2 H2 from its coordination sphere to yield the 14-electron species [WO(S-Phoz)2 ] (4). Under light-exclusion 4 re-activates C2 H2 making this the first fully characterized system for the reversible activation of acetylene.

  2. Phenotype comparison of MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers in a cohort of 1,914 individuals undergoing clinical genetic testing in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Kastrinos (Fay); E.M. Stoffel (Elena); J. Balmana (Judith); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); R. Mercado (Rowena); S. Syngal (Sapna)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Aims: Lynch syndrome is caused by germ-line mismatch repair gene mutations. We examined the phenotypic differences between MLH1 and MSH2 gene mutation carriers and whether mutation type (point versus large rearrangement) affected phenotypic expression. Methods: This is a

  3. Refined histopathological predictors of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status: A large-scale analysis of breast cancer characteristics from the BCAC, CIMBA, and ENIGMA consortia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); F.J. Couch (Fergus); M. Parsons (Marilyn); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); S. Healey (Sue); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); E. Hahnen (Eric); C. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); D. Steinemann (Doris); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); S.D. Ellis (Steve); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); J. Perkins (Jo); D.G. Evans (Gareth); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Adlard; R. Davidson (Rosemarie); T.J. Cole (Trevor); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); F. Mariette (F.); S. Fortuzzi (S.); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Pasini (Barbara); L. Papi (Laura); L. Varesco (Liliana); R. Balleine (Rosemary); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K. Offitt (Kenneth); A. Jakubowska (Anna); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; J. Rantala (Johanna); Å. Borg (Åke); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A. Miron (Alexander); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); T. Caldes (Trinidad); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); A.E. Toland (Amanda); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); M. Montagna (Marco); J. Garber (Judy); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); A. Osorio (Ana); R.E. Factor (Rachel E.); M.B. Terry (Mary B.); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B. Karlan; M.C. Southey (Melissa); M.U. Rashid (Muhammad); N. Tung (Nadine); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); F. Blows (Fiona); A.M. Dunning (Alison); E. Provenzano (Elena); P. Hall (Per); K. Czene (Kamila); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Cornelissen (Sten); S. Verhoef; P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A.B. Ekici (Arif); D.J. Slamon (Dennis); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A. Muranen (Taru); P. Heikkilä (Päivi); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Brinton (Louise); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); J.E. Olson (Janet); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); E.M. John (Esther); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); D. van West; U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); D. Eccles (Diana); W. Tapper (William); L. Durcan (Lorraine); L. Jones (Louise); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); O. Fletcher (Olivia); N. Johnson (Nichola); M. Dwek (Miriam); R. Swann (Ruth); A.L. Bane (Anita L.); G. Glendon (Gord); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); L. Baglietto (Laura); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); J. Carpenter (Jane); C. Clarke (Christine); R.J. Scott (Rodney); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); J. Gronwald (Jacek); T. Dörk (Thilo); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); T.-W. Park-Simon; P. Hillemanns (Peter); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); H. Surovy (Harald); R. Yang (Rongxi); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); J.M. Collee (Margriet); J.W.M. Martens (John); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); V. Joseph (Vijai); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); A. González-Neira (Anna); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Zamora (Pilar); J. Benítez (Javier); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); D. Zaffaroni (D.); M. Barile (Monica); F. Capra (Fabio); P. Radice (Paolo); S.-H. Teo; D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D. Goldgar (David)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The distribution of histopathological features of invasive breast tumors in BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation carriers differs from that of individuals with no known mutation. Histopathological features thus have utility for mutation prediction, including statistical modelin

  4. Mutational analyses of BRCA1 and BRCA2 with Ashkenazi and non-Ashkenazi Jewish women with familial breast and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shiri-Sverdlov, R; Oefner, P; Green, L; Baruch, RG; Wagner, T; Kruglikova, A; Haitchick, S; Hofstra, RMW; Papa, MZ; Mulder, [No Value; Rizel, S; Sade, RBB; Dagan, E; Abdeen, Z; Goldman, B; Friedman, E

    2000-01-01

    In Ashkenazi (East European) Jews, three predominant mutations in BRCA1 (185delAG and 5382insC) and BRCA2 (6174-delT) account for the majority of germline mutations in high risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families. Among non-Ashkenazi Jews, the 185delAG, Tyr978Ter, and a handful of "private" mutat

  5. File list: Oth.Gon.05.AllAg.Germline_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Oth.Gon.50.AllAg.Germline_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: His.Gon.50.AllAg.Germline_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. File list: His.Gon.10.AllAg.Germline_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  5. File list: DNS.Gon.20.AllAg.Germline_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  6. File list: ALL.Gon.10.AllAg.Germline_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. Germline mosaicism at the fragile X locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Guida, M; Enrile, B G

    1995-01-30

    We have identified a fragile X syndrome pedigree where the disorder is associated with a molecular deletion. The deletion was present in the DNA of 2 sons but was absent in the mother's somatic cell (lymphocyte) DNA. The results are consistent with the deletion arising as a postzygotic event in the mother, who therefore is germinally mosaic. This finding has important implications for counseling fragile X families with deletion mutations.

  8. Differential Impact of P16 Mutations with or without Coexpression of MC1R Mutation on the UV Response of Melanocytes and Hence on the Risk for Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0348 TITLE: Differential Impact of P16 Mutations With or Without Coexpression of MC1R Mutation on the UV Response of...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES P16 and the melanocortin 1 receptor genes are two important melanoma predisposition genes. We hypothesize...that co- inheritance of certain germline mutations in p16 and MC1R RHC alleles synergistically sensitizes melanocytes to the damaging effects of

  9. Candidate predisposing germline copy number variants in early onset colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea-Fernandez, A J; Fernandez-Rozadilla, C; Alvarez-Barona, M; Azuara, D; Ginesta, M M; Clofent, J; de Castro, L; Gonzalez, D; Andreu, M; Bessa, X; Llor, X; Xicola, R; Jover, R; Castells, A; Castellvi-Bel, S; Capella, G; Carracedo, A; Ruiz-Ponte, C

    2017-05-01

    A great proportion of the heritability of colorectal cancer (CRC) still remains unexplained, and rare variants, as well as copy number changes, have been proposed as potential candidates to explain the so-called 'missing heritability'. We aimed to identify rare high-to-moderately penetrant copy number variants (CNVs) in patients suspected of having hereditary CRC due to an early onset. We have selected for genome-wide copy number analysis, 27 MMR-proficient early onset CRC patients (1% in the in-house control CNV database (n = 629 healthy controls). Copy number assignment was checked by duplex real-time quantitative PCR or multiplex ligation probe amplification. Somatic mutation analysis in candidate genes included: loss of heterozygosity studies, point mutation screening, and methylation status of the promoter. We have identified two rare germline deletions involving the AK3 and SLIT2 genes in two patients. The search for a second somatic mutational event in the corresponding CRC tumors showed loss of heterozygosity in AK3, and promoter hypermethylation in SLIT2. Both genes have been previously related to colorectal carcinogenesis. These findings suggest that AK3 and SLIT2 may be potential candidates involved in genetic susceptibility to CRC.

  10. Frequent large germline HRPT2 deletions in a French National cohort of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricaire, Léopoldine; Odou, Marie-Françoise; Cardot-Bauters, Catherine; Delemer, Brigitte; North, Marie-Odile; Salenave, Sylvie; Vezzosi, Delphine; Kuhn, Jean-Marc; Murat, Arnaud; Caron, Philippe; Sadoul, Jean-Louis; Silve, Caroline; Chanson, Philippe; Barlier, Anne; Clauser, Eric; Porchet, Nicole; Groussin, Lionel

    2013-02-01

    Hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome (HPT-JT) is an autosomal dominant syndrome with incomplete penetrance that can associate in a single patient parathyroid adenoma or carcinoma, fibro-osseous jaw tumor, cystic kidney lesion, and uterine tumor. Germline mutations of the HRPT2 gene (CDC73) coding for parafibromin are identified in approximately 50%-75% of HPT-JT cases and in approximately 14% of familial isolated hyperparathyroidism. A whole deletion of this gene has recently been reported in 1 sporadic case and in a family presenting with HPT-JT. The objective of the study was to report molecular abnormalities of the HRPT2 gene in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism in a French National cohort from the Groupe d'Étude des Tumeurs Endocrines. Patients' genomic DNA was screened by PCR-based sequencing for point mutations affecting HRPT2 and real-time quantitative PCR analysis for gross deletions. We report 20 index patients with a germinal HRPT2 abnormality. Median age at diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism was 23 years (range 14-65 years). Median serum total calcium level at diagnosis was 3.19 mmol/L (range 2.8-4.3 mmol/L). Thirteen different mutations were identified by routine sequencing, including 7 mutations never reported. Seven patients (35%) carried a gross deletion of this gene (3 complete and 4 partial deletions). No genotype-phenotype correlation could be identified. A gross deletion of the HRPT2 gene was identified in 7% of patients for whom a routine screening by direct sequencing came up as negative. Gross deletion analysis of the HRPT2 gene is indicated for all patients negative for mutation, presenting with HPT-JT or familial isolated hyperparathyroidism, parathyroid carcinoma, or in patients with apparently sporadic parathyroid adenoma diagnosed at a young age, having a severe hypercalcemia.

  11. Germline variant FGFR4  p.G388R exposes a membrane-proximal STAT3 binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaganathan, Vijay K; Sperl, Bianca; Rapp, Ulf R; Ullrich, Axel

    2015-12-24

    Variant rs351855-G/A is a commonly occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism of coding regions in exon 9 of the fibroblast growth factor receptor FGFR4 (CD334) gene (c.1162G>A). It results in an amino-acid change at codon 388 from glycine to arginine (p.Gly388Arg) in the transmembrane domain of the receptor. Despite compelling genetic evidence for the association of this common variant with cancers of the bone, breast, colon, prostate, skin, lung, head and neck, as well as soft-tissue sarcomas and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the underlying biological mechanism has remained elusive. Here we show that substitution of the conserved glycine 388 residue to a charged arginine residue alters the transmembrane spanning segment and exposes a membrane-proximal cytoplasmic signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) binding site Y(390)-(P)XXQ(393). We demonstrate that such membrane-proximal STAT3 binding motifs in the germline of type I membrane receptors enhance STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation by recruiting STAT3 proteins to the inner cell membrane. Remarkably, such germline variants frequently co-localize with somatic mutations in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database. Using Fgfr4 single nucleotide polymorphism knock-in mice and transgenic mouse models for breast and lung cancers, we validate the enhanced STAT3 signalling induced by the FGFR4 Arg388-variant in vivo. Thus, our findings elucidate the molecular mechanism behind the genetic association of rs351855 with accelerated cancer progression and suggest that germline variants of cell-surface molecules that recruit STAT3 to the inner cell membrane are a significant risk for cancer prognosis and disease progression.

  12. Common germline polymorphisms associated with breast cancer-specific survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Pirie (Ailith); Q. Guo (Qi); P. Kraft (Peter); S. Canisius (Sander); D. Eccles (Diana); N. Rahman (Nazneen); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); C. Chen (Constance); S. Khan (Sofia); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M. Lush (Michael); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mats); D. Lambrechts (Diether); C. Weltens (Caroline); K. Leunen; C. van Ongeval (Chantal); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); C. Blomqvist (Carl); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); R. Fagerholm (Rainer); T.A. Muranen (Taru); J.E. Olsen (Janet E.); B. Hallberg (Boubou); C. Vachon (Celine); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Cornelissen (Sten); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F. Schumacher (Frederick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); J.L. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.W.M. Martens (John); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); R. Yang (Rongxi); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); H. Brenner (Hermann); K. Butterbach (Katja); B. Holleczek (B.); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); J. Li (Jingmei); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); F. Ficarazzi (Filomena); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); R. Hein (Rebecca); A.B. Ekici (Arif); R. Balleine (Rosemary); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I.A. Perez (Jose Ignacio Arias); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Durda (Katarzyna); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Kabisch (Maria); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); S. Margolin (Sara); V. Kristensen (Vessela); S. Nord (Siljie); D.G. Evans (Gareth); J. Abraham (Jean); H. Earl (Helena); C.J. Poole (Christopher J.); L. Hiller (Louise); J.A. Dunn (J.); S. Bowden (Sarah); R. Yang (Rose); D. Campa (Daniele); W.R. Diver (Ryan); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); R.N. Hoover (Robert); A. Hüsing (Anika); R. Kaaks (Rudolf); M.J. Machiela (Mitchell J.); W.C. Willett (Walter C.); M. Barrdahl (Myrto); F. Canzian (Federico); S.-F. Chin (Suet-Feung); C. Caldas (Carlos); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A. Mannermaa (Arto); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); P. Hall (Per); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D.F. Easton (Douglas); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); A. Cox (Angela); P.A. Fasching (Peter); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Previous studies have identified common germline variants nominally associated with breast cancer survival. These associations have not been widely replicated in further studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of previously reported SNPs with brea

  13. Common germline polymorphisms associated with breast cancer-specific survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirie, Ailith; Guo, Qi; Kraft, Peter

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have identified common germline variants nominally associated with breast cancer survival. These associations have not been widely replicated in further studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of previously reported SNPs with breast cancer...

  14. Common germline polymorphisms associated with breast cancer-specific survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Pirie (Ailith); Q. Guo (Qi); P. Kraft (Peter); S. Canisius (Sander); D. Eccles (Diana); N. Rahman (Nazneen); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); C. Chen (Constance); S. Khan (Sofia); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M. Lush (Michael); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mats); D. Lambrechts (Diether); C. Weltens (Caroline); K. Leunen; C. van Ongeval (Chantal); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); C. Blomqvist (Carl); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); R. Fagerholm (Rainer); T.A. Muranen (Taru); J.E. Olsen (Janet E.); B. Hallberg (Boubou); C. Vachon (Celine); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Cornelissen (Sten); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F. Schumacher (Frederick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); J.L. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.W.M. Martens (John); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); R. Yang (Rongxi); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); H. Brenner (Hermann); K. Butterbach (Katja); B. Holleczek (B.); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); J. Li (Jingmei); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); F. Ficarazzi (Filomena); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); R. Hein (Rebecca); A.B. Ekici (Arif); R. Balleine (Rosemary); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I.A. Perez (Jose Ignacio Arias); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Durda (Katarzyna); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Kabisch (Maria); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); S. Margolin (Sara); V. Kristensen (Vessela); S. Nord (Siljie); D.G. Evans (Gareth); J. Abraham (Jean); H. Earl (Helena); C.J. Poole (Christopher J.); L. Hiller (Louise); J.A. Dunn (J.); S. Bowden (Sarah); R. Yang (Rose); D. Campa (Daniele); W.R. Diver (Ryan); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); R.N. Hoover (Robert); A. Hüsing (Anika); R. Kaaks (Rudolf); M.J. Machiela (Mitchell J.); W.C. Willett (Walter C.); M. Barrdahl (Myrto); F. Canzian (Federico); S.-F. Chin (Suet-Feung); C. Caldas (Carlos); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A. Mannermaa (Arto); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); P. Hall (Per); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D.F. Easton (Douglas); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); A. Cox (Angela); P.A. Fasching (Peter); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Previous studies have identified common germline variants nominally associated with breast cancer survival. These associations have not been widely replicated in further studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of previously reported SNPs with

  15. Autosomal P[ovoD1] dominant female-sterile insertions in Drosophila and their use in generating germ-line chimeras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, T B; Noll, E; Perrimon, N

    1993-12-01

    The 'dominant female-sterile' technique used to generate germ-line mosaics in Drosophila is a powerful tool to determine the tissue specificity (germ line versus somatic) of recessive female-sterile mutations as well as to analyze the maternal effect of recessive zygotic lethal mutations. This technique requires the availability of germ-line-dependent, dominant female-sterile (DFS) mutations that block egg laying but do not affect viability. To date only one X-linked mutation, ovoD1 has been isolated that completely fulfills these criteria. Thus the 'DFS technique' has been largely limited to the X-chromosome. To extend this technique to the autosomes, we have cloned the ovoD1 mutation into a P-element vector and recovered fully expressed P[ovoD1] insertions on each autosomal arm. We describe the generation of these P[ovoD1] strains as well as demonstrate their use in generating germ-line chimeras. Specifically, we show that the Gap1 gene, which encodes a Drosophila homologue of mammalian GTPase-activating protein, is required in somatic follicle cells for embryonic dorsoventral polarity determination.

  16. Splicing Machinery Facilitates Post-Transcriptional Regulation by FBFs and Other RNA-Binding Proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans Germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Preston; Wang, Xiaobo; Ellenbecker, Mary; Feilzer, Sara; Voronina, Ekaterina

    2015-08-11

    Genetic interaction screens are an important approach for understanding complex regulatory networks governing development. We used a genetic interaction screen to identify cofactors of FBF-1 and FBF-2, RNA-binding proteins that regulate germline stem cell proliferation in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that components of splicing machinery contribute to FBF activity as splicing factor knockdowns enhance sterility of fbf-1 and fbf-2 single mutants. This sterility phenocopied multiple aspects of loss of fbf function, suggesting that splicing factors contribute to stem cell maintenance. However, previous reports indicate that splicing factors instead promote the opposite cell fate, namely, differentiation. We explain this discrepancy by proposing that splicing factors facilitate overall RNA regulation in the germline. Indeed, we find that loss of splicing factors produces synthetic phenotypes with a mutation in another RNA regulator, FOG-1, but not with a mutation in a gene unrelated to posttranscriptional regulation (dhc-1). We conclude that inefficient pre-mRNA splicing may interfere with multiple posttranscriptional regulatory events, which has to be considered when interpreting results of genetic interaction screens.

  17. Germline promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu-Yuan Wu; Zheng Zhang; Jing-Mei Wang; Wen-Wen Guo; Nong Xiao; Qiong He; Ya-Ping Wang; Yi-Mei Fan

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To explore germline hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor genes MLH1 , CDH1 and P16INK4a in suspected cases of hereditary gastric cancer (GC). METHODS: A group of 140 Chinese GC patients in whom the primary cancer had developed before the age of 60 or who had a familial history of cancer were screened for germline hypermethylation of the MLH1 , CDH1 and P16INK4a tumor suppressor genes. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes and modified by sodium bisulfite. The treated DNA was then subjected to bisulfite DNA sequencing for a specific region of the MLH1 promoter. The methylation status of CDH1 or P16INK4a was assayed using methylation- specific PCR. Clonal bisulfite allelic sequencing in positive samples was performed to obtain a comprehensive analysis of the CpG island methylation status of these promoter regions. RESULTS: Methylation of the MLH1 gene promoter was detected in the peripheral blood DNA of only 1/140 (0.7%) of the GC patient group. However, this methylation pattern was mosaic rather than the allelic pattern which has previously been reported for MLH1 in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients. We found that 10% of the MLH1 alleles in the peripheral blood DNA of this patient were methylated, consistent with 20% of cells having one methylated allele. No germline promoter methylation of the CDH1 or P16INK4a genes was detected. CONCLUSION: Mosaic germline epimutation of the MLH1 gene is present in suspected hereditary GC patients in China but at a very low level. Germline epimutation of the CDH1 or P16INK4a gene is not a frequent event.

  18. Founding BRCA1 mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in southern Sweden.

    OpenAIRE

    Johannsson, O; Ostermeyer, E A; Håkansson, S; Friedman, L S; Johansson, U; Sellberg, G.; Brøndum-Nielsen, K; Sele, V.; Olsson, H.; King, M C; Borg, A.

    1996-01-01

    Nine different germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene were identified in 15 of 47 kindreds from southern Sweden, by use of SSCP and heteroduplex analysis of all exons and flanking intron region and by a protein-truncation test for exon 11, followed by direct sequencing. All but one of the mutations are predicted to give rise to premature translation termination and include seven frameshift insertions or deletions, a nonsense mutation, and a splice accep...

  19. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Ramus (Susan); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); S.A. Gayther (Simon); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); J. Beesley (Jonathan); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Roversi (Gaia); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); A. Allavena (Anna); L. Ottini (Laura); L. Papi (Laura); V. Gismondi (Viviana); F. Capra (Fabio); P. Radice (Paolo); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.A. Kruse (Torben); D. Cruger (Dorthe); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); H. Olsson (Hkan); U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); P. Karlsson (Per); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); Å. Borg (Åke); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); J. Gronwald (Jacek); B. Górski (Bohdan); C. Cybulski (Cezary); T. Dbniak (Tadeusz); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Durán (Mercedes); M.-I. Tejada; J. Benitez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); M.A. Rookus (Matti); S. Verhoef; M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); D. Bodmer (Danielle); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); M.J. Blok (Marinus); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); A.M. Dunning (Alison); D.G. Evans (Gareth); R. Eeles (Rosalind); G. Pichert (Gabriella); T.J. Cole (Trevor); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); C. Brewer (Carole); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); M.E. Porteous (Mary); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); L. Side (Lucy); A. Donaldson (Alan); H. Gregory (Helen); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); V. Moncoutier (Virginie); L. Castera (Laurent); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. Barjhoux (Laure); V. Bonadona (Valérie); D. Leroux (Dominique); L. Faivre (Laurence); R. Lidereau (Rosette); C. Nogues (Catherine); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); F. Prieur (Fabienne); M.-A. Collonge-Rame; L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); S. Fert-Ferrer (Sandra); A. Miron (Alexander); S.S. Buys (Saundra); J. Hopper (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); E.M. John (Esther); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); D. Goldgar (David); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); K. Offit (Kenneth); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); J. Vijai (Joseph); A. Dutra-Clarke (Ana); J.A. Przybylo (Jennifer); M. Montagna (Marco); C. Casella (Cinzia); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Gross (Jenny); M.S. Beattie (Mary); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); B. Fiebig (Britta); C. Sutter (Christian); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Deissler (Helmut); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); K. Kast (Karin); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); H. Holland (Helene); D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); C.J. van Asperen (Christi)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer suscep

  20. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A genome-w...

  1. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility....

  2. Genetic Variation at 9p22.2 and Ovarian Cancer Risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Roversi, Gaia; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Gismondi, Viviana; Capra, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Ake; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Gorski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Debniak, Tadeusz; Osorio, Ana; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; Verhoef, Senno; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine A.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Bodmer, Danielle; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Os, Theo A.; Asperen, Christi J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Dunning, Alison M.; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Pichert, Gabriella; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Gregory, Helen; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Moncoutier, Virginie; Castera, Laurent; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Bonadona, Valerie; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Lidereau, Rosette; Nogues, Catherine; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Prieur, Fabienne; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnes; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Miron, Alex; Buys, Saundra S.; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Jonson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Vijai, Joseph; Dutra-Clarke, Ana V. C.; Przybylo, Jennifer A.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Fiebig, Britta; Sutter, Christian; Arnold, Norbert; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Niederacher, Dieter; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A

  3. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Ramus (Susan); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); S.A. Gayther (Simon); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); J. Beesley (Jonathan); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Roversi (Gaia); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); A. Allavena (Anna); L. Ottini (Laura); L. Papi (Laura); V. Gismondi (Viviana); F. Capra (Fabio); P. Radice (Paolo); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.A. Kruse (Torben); D. Cruger (Dorthe); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); H. Olsson (Hkan); U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); P. Karlsson (Per); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); Å. Borg (Åke); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); J. Gronwald (Jacek); B. Górski (Bohdan); C. Cybulski (Cezary); T. Dbniak (Tadeusz); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Durán (Mercedes); M.-I. Tejada; J. Benitez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); M.A. Rookus (Matti); S. Verhoef; M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); D. Bodmer (Danielle); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); M.J. Blok (Marinus); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); A.M. Dunning (Alison); D.G. Evans (Gareth); R. Eeles (Rosalind); G. Pichert (Gabriella); T.J. Cole (Trevor); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); C. Brewer (Carole); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); M.E. Porteous (Mary); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); L. Side (Lucy); A. Donaldson (Alan); H. Gregory (Helen); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); V. Moncoutier (Virginie); L. Castera (Laurent); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. Barjhoux (Laure); V. Bonadona (Valérie); D. Leroux (Dominique); L. Faivre (Laurence); R. Lidereau (Rosette); C. Nogues (Catherine); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); F. Prieur (Fabienne); M.-A. Collonge-Rame; L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); S. Fert-Ferrer (Sandra); A. Miron (Alexander); S.S. Buys (Saundra); J. Hopper (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); E.M. John (Esther); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); D. Goldgar (David); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); K. Offit (Kenneth); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); J. Vijai (Joseph); A. Dutra-Clarke (Ana); J.A. Przybylo (Jennifer); M. Montagna (Marco); C. Casella (Cinzia); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Gross (Jenny); M.S. Beattie (Mary); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); B. Fiebig (Britta); C. Sutter (Christian); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Deissler (Helmut); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); K. Kast (Karin); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); H. Holland (Helene); D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); C.J. van Asperen (Christi)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer

  4. Genetic Variation at 9p22.2 and Ovarian Cancer Risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Roversi, Gaia; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Gismondi, Viviana; Capra, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Ake; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Gorski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Debniak, Tadeusz; Osorio, Ana; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; Verhoef, Senno; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine A.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Bodmer, Danielle; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Os, Theo A.; Asperen, Christi J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Dunning, Alison M.; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Pichert, Gabriella; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Gregory, Helen; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Moncoutier, Virginie; Castera, Laurent; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Bonadona, Valerie; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Lidereau, Rosette; Nogues, Catherine; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Prieur, Fabienne; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnes; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Miron, Alex; Buys, Saundra S.; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Jonson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Vijai, Joseph; Dutra-Clarke, Ana V. C.; Przybylo, Jennifer A.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Fiebig, Britta; Sutter, Christian; Arnold, Norbert; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Niederacher, Dieter; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A

  5. Finding all BRCA pathogenic mutation carriers: best practice models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jongmans, Marjolijn Cj

    2016-09-01

    Identifying germline BRCA pathogenic mutations in patients with ovarian or breast cancer is a crucial component in the medical management of affected patients. Furthermore, the relatives of affected patients can be offered genetic testing. Relatives who test positive for a germline BRCA pathogenic mutation can take appropriate action to prevent cancer or have cancer diagnosed as early as possible for better treatment options. The recent discovery that BRCA pathogenic mutation status can inform treatment decisions in patients with ovarian cancer has led to an increased demand for BRCA testing, with testing taking place earlier in the patient care pathway. New approaches to genetic counselling may be required to meet this greater demand for BRCA testing. This review discusses the need for best practices for genetic counselling and BRCA testing; it examines the challenges facing current practice and looks at adapted models of genetic counselling.

  6. Terminal osseous dysplasia with pigmentary defects (TODPD) due to a recurrent filamin A (FLNA) mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Torrado, Maria; Fernandez, Maria Del Carmen; Tello, Ana Maria; Arberas, Claudia L; Cardinale, Antonella; Piccolo, Pasquale; Bacino, Carlos A

    2014-11-01

    Terminal osseous dysplasia with pigmentary defects (TODPD) is an X-linked dominant syndrome with distal limb anomalies, pigmentary skin defects, digital fibromas, and generalized bone involvement due to a recurrent mutation in the filamin A (FLNA) gene. We here report the mutation c.5217G>A in FLNA in three families with TODPD and we found possible germline and somatic mosaicism in two out of the three families. The occurrence of somatic and germline mosaicism for TODPD indicates that caution should be taken in counseling recurrence risks for these conditions upon presentation of an isolated case.

  7. Chlorambucil effectively induces deletion mutations in mouse germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, L B; Hunsicker, P R; Cacheiro, N L; Bangham, J W; Russell, W L; Shelby, M D

    1989-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent chlorambucil was found to be more effective than x-rays or any chemical investigated to date in inducing high yields of mouse germ-line mutations that appear to be deletions or other structural changes. Induction of mutations involving seven specific loci was studied after exposures of various male germ-cell stages to chlorambucil at 10-25 mg/kg. A total of 60,750 offspring was scored. Mutation rates in spermatogonial stem cells were not significantly increased over control values; this negative result is not attributable to selective elimination of mutant cells. Mutations were, however, clearly induced in treated post-stem-cell stages, among which marked variations in mutational response were found. Maximum yield occurred after exposure of early spermatids, with approximately 1% of all offspring carrying a specific-locus mutation in the 10 mg/kg group. The stage-response pattern for chlorambucil differs from that of all other chemicals investigated to date in the specific-locus test. Thus far, all but one of the tested mutations induced by chlorambucil in post-stem-cell stages have been proved deletions or other structural changes by genetic, cytogenetic, and/or molecular criteria. Deletion mutations have recently been useful for molecular mapping and for structure-function correlations of genomic regions. For generating presumed large-lesion germ-line mutations at highest frequencies, chlorambucil may be the mutagen of choice. Images PMID:2726748

  8. Chlorambucil effectively induces deletion mutations in mouse germ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B.; Hunsicker, P.R.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Bangham, J.W.; Russell, W.L.; Shelby, M.D. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (USA))

    1989-05-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent chlorambucil was found to be more effective than x-rays or any chemical investigated to data in inducing high yields of mouse germ-line mutations that appear to be deletions or other structural changes. Induction of mutations involving seven specific loci was studied after exposures of various male germ-cell stages to chlorambucil at 10-25 mg/kg. A total of 60,750 offspring was scored. Mutation rates in spermatogonial stem cells were not significantly increased over control values; this negative result is not attributable to selective elimination of mutant cells. Mutations were, however, clearly induced in treated post-stem-cell stages, among which marked variations in mutational response were found. Maximum yield occurred after exposure of early spermatids, with {approx} 1% of all offspring carrying a specific-locus mutation in the 10 mg/kg group. The stage-response pattern for chlorambucil differs from that of all other chemicals investigated to date in the specific-locus test. Thus far, all but one of the tested mutations induced by chlorambucil in post-stem-cell stages have been proved deletions or other structural changes by genetic, cytogenetic, and/or molecular criteria. Deletion mutations have recently been useful for molecular mapping and for structure-function correlations of genomic regions. For generating presumed large-lesion germline mutations at highest frequencies, chlorambucil may be the mutagen of choice.

  9. Kinetic effects of sulfur oxidation on catalytic nitrile hydration: nitrile hydratase insights from bioinspired ruthenium(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Davinder; Nguyen, Tho N; Grapperhaus, Craig A

    2014-12-01

    Kinetic investigations inspired by the metalloenzyme nitrile hydratase were performed on a series of ruthenium(II) complexes to determine the effect of sulfur oxidation on catalytic nitrile hydration. The rate of benzonitrile hydration was quantified as a function of catalyst, nitrile, and water concentrations. Precatalysts L(n)RuPPh3 (n = 1-3; L(1) = 4,7-bis(2'-methyl-2'-mercapto-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane; L(2) = 4-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfinatopropyl)-7-(2'-methyl-2'-mercapto-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane; L(3) = 4-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfinatopropyl)-7-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfenato-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane) were activated by substitution of triphenylphosphine with substrate in hot dimethylformamide solution. Rate measurements are consistent with a dynamic equilibrium between inactive aqua (L(n)Ru-OH2) and active nitrile (L(n)Ru-NCR) derivatives with K = 21 ± 1, 9 ± 0.9, and 23 ± 3 for L(1) to L(3), respectively. Subsequent hydration of the L(n)Ru-NCR intermediate yields the amide product with measured hydration rate constants (k's) of 0.37 ± 0.01, 0.82 ± 0.07, and 1.59 ± 0.12 M(-1) h(-1) for L(1) to L(3), respectively. Temperature dependent studies reveal that sulfur oxidation lowers the enthalpic barrier by 27 kJ/mol, but increases the entropic barrier by 65 J/(mol K). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations (B3LYP/LanL2DZ (Ru); 6-31G(d) (all other atoms)) support a nitrile bound catalytic cycle with lowering of the reaction barrier as a consequence of sulfur oxidation through enhanced nitrile binding and attack of the water nucleophile through a highly organized transition state.

  10. 2-haloacrylate hydratase, a new class of flavoenzyme that catalyzes the addition of water to the substrate for dehalogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowafy, Amr M; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Kurata, Atsushi; Uemura, Tadashi; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2010-09-01

    Enzymes catalyzing the conversion of organohalogen compounds are useful in the chemical industry and environmental technology. Here we report the occurrence of a new reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) (FADH(2))-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the removal of a halogen atom from an unsaturated aliphatic organohalogen compound by the addition of a water molecule to the substrate. A soil bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain YL, inducibly produced a protein named Caa67(YL) when the cells were grown on 2-chloroacrylate (2-CAA). The caa67(YL) gene encoded a protein of 547 amino acid residues (M(r) of 59,301), which shared weak but significant sequence similarity with various flavoenzymes and contained a nucleotide-binding motif. We found that 2-CAA is converted into pyruvate when the reaction was carried out with purified Caa67(YL) in the presence of FAD and a reducing agent [NAD(P)H or sodium dithionite] under anaerobic conditions. The reducing agent was not stoichiometrically consumed during this reaction, suggesting that FADH(2) is conserved by regeneration in the catalytic cycle. When the reaction was carried out in the presence of H(2)(18)O, [(18)O]pyruvate was produced. These results indicate that Caa67(YL) catalyzes the hydration of 2-CAA to form 2-chloro-2-hydroxypropionate, which is chemically unstable and probably spontaneously dechlorinated to form pyruvate. 2-Bromoacrylate, but not other 2-CAA analogs such as acrylate and methacrylate, served as the substrate of Caa67(YL). Thus, we named this new enzyme 2-haloacrylate hydratase. The enzyme is very unusual in that it requires the reduced form of FAD for hydration, which involves no net change in the redox state of the coenzyme or substrate.

  11. Mutational profiling of familial male breast cancers reveals similarities with luminal A female breast cancer with rare TP53 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, S; Wong, S Q; Li, J; Do, H; Weiss, J; Byrne, D; Chakrabarti, A; Bosma, T; Fellowes, A; Dobrovic, A; Fox, S B

    2014-12-09

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is still poorly understood with a large proportion arising in families with a history of breast cancer. Genomic studies have focused on germline determinants of MBC risk, with minimal knowledge of somatic changes in these cancers. Using a TruSeq amplicon cancer panel, this study evaluated 48 familial MBCs (3 BRCA1 germline mutant, 17 BRCA2 germline mutant and 28 BRCAX) for hotspot somatic mutations and copy number changes in 48 common cancer genes. Twelve missense mutations included nine PIK3CA mutations (seven in BRCAX patients), two TP53 mutations (both in BRCA2 patients) and one PTEN mutation. Common gains were seen in GNAS (34.1%) and losses were seen in GNAQ (36.4%), ABL1 (47.7%) and ATM (34.1%). Gains of HRAS (37.5% vs 3%, P=0.006), STK11 (25.0% vs 0%, P=0.01) and SMARCB1 (18.8% vs 0%, P=0.04) and the loss of RB1 (43.8% vs 13%, P=0.03) were specific to BRCA2 tumours. This study is the first to perform high-throughput somatic sequencing on familial MBCs. Overall, PIK3CA mutations are most commonly seen, with fewer TP53 and PTEN mutations, similar to the profile seen in luminal A female breast cancers. Differences in mutation profiles and patterns of gene gains/losses are seen between BRCA2 (associated with TP53/PTEN mutations, loss of RB1 and gain of HRAS, STK11 and SMARCB1) and BRCAX (associated with PIK3CA mutations) tumours, suggesting that BRCA2 and BRCAX MBCs may be distinct and arise from different tumour pathways. This has implications on potential therapies, depending on the BRCA status of MBC patients.

  12. Mutational analysis of the RB1 gene and the inheritance patterns of retinoblastoma in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Yacoub A; Tbakhi, Abdelghani; Al-Hussaini, Maysa; AlNawaiseh, Ibrahim; Saab, Ala; Afifi, Amal; Naji, Maysa; Mohammad, Mona; Deebajah, Rasha; Jaradat, Imad; Sultan, Iyad; Mehyar, Mustafa

    2017-08-12

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is a childhood cancer developing in the retina due to RB1 pathologic variant. Herein we are evaluating the oncogenic mutations in the RB1 gene and the inheritance patterns of RB in the Jordanian patients. In this prospective study, the peripheral blood of 50 retinoblastoma patients was collected, genomic DNA was extracted, mutations were identified using Quantitative multiplex PCR (QM-PCR), Allele-specific PCR, Next Generation Sequencing analysis, and Sanger sequencing. In this cohort of 50 patients, 20(40%) patients had unilateral RB and 30(60%) were males. Overall, 36(72%) patients had germline disease, 17(47%) of whom had the same RB1 pathologic variant detected in one of the parents (inherited disease). In the bilateral group, all (100%) patients had germline disease; 13(43%) of them had inherited mutation. In the unilateral group, 6(30%) had germline disease, 4(20%) of them had inherited mutation. Nonsense mutation generating a stop codon and producing a truncated non-functional protein was the most frequent detected type of mutations (n = 15/36, 42%). Only one (2%) of the patients had mosaic mutation, and of the 17 inherited cases, 16(94%) had an unaffected carrier parent. In conclusion, in addition to all bilateral RB patients in our cohort, 30% of unilateral cases showed germline mutation. Almost half (47%) of germline cases had inherited disease from affected (6%) parent or unaffected carrier (94%). Therefore molecular screening is critical for the genetic counseling regarding the risk for inherited RB in both unilateral and bilateral cases including those with no family history.

  13. The folliculin mutation database: an online database of mutations associated with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ming-Hui; Blake, Patrick W; Shevchenko, Julia; Toro, Jorge R

    2009-09-01

    The folliculin gene (FLCN), also known as BHD, is the only known susceptibility gene for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome. BHDS is the autosomal dominant predisposition to the development of follicular hamartomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, and/or kidney neoplasms. To date, 53 unique germline mutations have been reported. FLCN mutation detection rate is 88%. FLCN encodes a predicted 579-amino acid protein, designated folliculin that is highly conserved between humans and homologs in mice, Drosophila, and C. elegans. We developed the first online database detailing all FLCN variants identified in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The FLCN database applies, and assists researchers in applying HGVS nomenclature guidelines. To date, the FCLN database includes 84 variants: 53 unique germline mutations and 31 SNPs. The majority of FLCN germline mutations are predicted to produce a truncated folliculin, resulting in loss of function. The FLCN mutations consist of: 45% (24/53) deletions, 32% (17/53) substitutions (10 putative-splice site, 5 nonsense, and 2 missense), 15% (8/53) duplications, 6% (3/53) insertion/deletions and 2% (1/53) insertions. The database strives to systematically unify current knowledge of FLCN variants and will be useful to geneticists and genetic counselors while also providing a rapid and systematic resource for investigators.

  14. Mutational spectrum of APC and genotype-phenotype correlations in Greek FAP patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fountzilas George

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial adenomatous polyposis, an autosomal dominant inherited disease caused by germline mutations within the APC gene, is characterized by early onset colorectal cancer as a consequence of the intrinsic phenotypic feature of multiple colorectal adenomatic polyps. The genetic investigation of Greek adenomatous polyposis families was performed in respects to APC and MUTYH germline mutations. Additionally, all available published mutations were considered in order to define the APC mutation spectrum in Greece. Methods A cohort of 25 unrelated adenomatous polyposis families of Greek origin has been selected. Genetic testing included direct sequencing of APC and MUTYH genes. APC gene was also checked for large genomic rearrangements by MLPA. Results Analysis of the APC gene performed in a Greek cohort of twenty five FAP families revealed eighteen different germline mutations in twenty families (80%, four of which novel. Mutations were scattered between exon 3 and codon 1503 of exon 15, while no large genomic rearrangements were identified. Conclusion This concise report describes the spectrum of all APC mutations identified in Greek FAP families, including four novel mutations. It is concluded that the Greek population is characterized by genetic heterogeneity, low incidence of genomic rearrangements in APC gene and lack of founder mutation in FAP syndrome.

  15. Tumor Mutation Burden Forecasts Outcome in Ovarian Cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Kochupurakkal, Bose; Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Increased number of single nucleotide substitutions is seen in breast and ovarian cancer genomes carrying disease-associated mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The significance of these genome-wide mutations is unknown. We hypothesize genome-wide mutation burden mirrors deficiencies in DNA...... repair and is associated with treatment outcome in ovarian cancer. Methods and Results: The total number of synonymous and non-synonymous exome mutations (Nmut), and the presence of germline or somatic mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (mBRCA) were extracted from whole-exome sequences of high-grade serous...... ovarian cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier methods were used to correlate Nmut with chemotherapy response and outcome. Higher Nmut correlated with a better response to chemotherapy after surgery. In patients with mBRCA-associated cancer, low Nmut was associated...

  16. Germline disruption of Pten localization causes enhanced sex-dependent social motivation and increased glial production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilot, Amanda K; Gaugler, Mary K; Yu, Qi; Romigh, Todd; Yu, Wanfeng; Miller, Robert H; Frazier, Thomas W; Eng, Charis

    2014-06-15

    PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (PHTS) is an autosomal-dominant genetic condition underlying a subset of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with macrocephaly. Caused by germline mutations in PTEN, PHTS also causes increased risks of multiple cancers via dysregulation of the PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways. Conditional knockout models have shown that neural Pten regulates social behavior, proliferation and cell size. Although much is known about how the intracellular localization of PTEN regulates signaling in cancer cell lines, we know little of how PTEN localization influences normal brain physiology and behavior. To address this, we generated a germline knock-in mouse model of cytoplasm-predominant Pten and characterized its behavioral and cellular phenotypes. The homozygous Pten(m3m4) mice have decreased total Pten levels including a specific drop in nuclear Pten and exhibit region-specific increases in brain weight. The Pten(m3m4) model displays sex-specific increases in social motivation, poor balance and normal recognition memory-a profile reminiscent of some individuals with high functioning ASD. The cytoplasm-predominant protein caused cellular hypertrophy limited to the soma and led to increased NG2 cell proliferation and accumulation of glia. The animals also exhibit significant astrogliosis and microglial activation, indicating a neuroinflammatory phenotype. At the signaling level, Pten(m3m4) mice show brain region-specific differences in Akt activation. These results demonstrate that differing alterations to the same autism-linked gene can cause distinct behavioral profiles. The Pten(m3m4) model is the first murine model of inappropriately elevated social motivation in the context of normal cognition and may expand the range of autism-related behaviors replicated in animal models.

  17. Enzymatic hydration activity assessed by selective spectrophotometric detection of alcohols: a novel screening assay using oleate hydratase as a model enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiseni, Aida; Medici, Rosario; Arends, Isabel W C E; Otten, Linda G

    2014-06-01

    Hydroxy fatty acids (HFAs) are high-added-value compounds, which are incorporated in polymers, lubricants, emulsifiers and stabilizers and have potential medicinal use. In nature, HFAs are regio-specifically synthesized by several enzymes, including P450 monooxygenases, lipoxygenases, hydratases, 12-hydroxylases, and diol synthases. The growing demand for HFAs warrants the development of simple and efficient analytical methods that enable high-throughput detection of the hydroxylated product in the presence of its unsaturated precursor. Herein a novel high-throughput assay for the detection of alcohols is described using oleate hydratase (OHase, EC 4.2.1.53) from Elizabethkingia meningoseptica as the model enzyme. The developed assay is based on the selective spectrophotometric detection of alkyl nitrites formed upon the reaction between the hydroxyl group and nitrous acid. The assay proved to discriminate between unsaturated fatty acids as well as small cyclic and acyclic unsaturated alkenes and their corresponding alcohols. Lower detection limits were 1.5-3 mM with excellent Z'-factors. Enzymatic reactions using OHase with oleic acid resulted in somewhat lower Z-factors for various enzyme preparations. This small scale assay can enable fast discovery of new microorganisms or improved enzymes from mutant libraries and will be useful for biocatalytic strategies involving fatty acid (de)hydrating enzymes.

  18. Myosin-cross-reactive antigen (MCRA) protein from Bifidobacterium breve is a FAD-dependent fatty acid hydratase which has a function in stress protection

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rosberg-Cody, Eva

    2011-02-17

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine the catalytic activity and physiological role of myosin-cross-reactive antigen (MCRA) from Bifidobacterium breve NCIMB 702258. MCRA from B. breve NCIMB 702258 was cloned, sequenced and expressed in heterologous hosts (Lactococcus and Corynebacterium) and the recombinant proteins assessed for enzymatic activity against fatty acid substrates. Results MCRA catalysed the conversion of palmitoleic, oleic and linoleic acids to the corresponding 10-hydroxy fatty acids, but shorter chain fatty acids were not used as substrates, while the presence of trans-double bonds and double bonds beyond the position C12 abolished hydratase activity. The hydroxy fatty acids produced were not metabolised further. We also found that heterologous Lactococcus and Corynebacterium expressing MCRA accumulated increasing amounts of 10-HOA and 10-HOE in the culture medium. Furthermore, the heterologous cultures exhibited less sensitivity to heat and solvent stresses compared to corresponding controls. Conclusions MCRA protein in B. breve can be classified as a FAD-containing double bond hydratase, within the carbon-oxygen lyase family, which may be catalysing the first step in conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) production, and this protein has an additional function in bacterial stress protection.

  19. BRCA somatic mutations and epigenetic BRCA modifications in serous ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetta, M; George, A; Kaye, S B; Banerjee, S

    2016-08-01

    The significant activity of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in the treatment of germline BRCA mutation-associated ovarian cancer, which represents ∼15% of HGS cases, has recently led to European Medicines Agency and food and drug administration approval of olaparib. Accumulating evidence suggests that PARP inhibitors may have a wider application in the treatment of sporadic ovarian cancers. Up to 50% of HGS ovarian cancer patients may exhibit homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) through mechanisms including germline BRCA mutations, somatic BRCA mutations, and BRCA promoter methylation. In this review, we discuss the role of somatic BRCA mutations and BRCA methylation in ovarian cancer. There is accumulating evidence for routine somatic BRCA mutation testing, but the relevance of BRCA epigenetic modifications is less clear. We explore the challenges that need to be addressed if the full potential of these markers of HRD is to be utilised in clinical practice.

  20. Understanding TERT Promoter Mutations: A Common Path to Immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Robert J A; Rube, H Tomas; Xavier-Magalhães, Ana; Costa, Bruno M; Mancini, Andrew; Song, Jun S; Costello, Joseph F

    2016-04-01

    Telomerase (TERT) activation is a fundamental step in tumorigenesis. By maintaining telomere length, telomerase relieves a main barrier on cellular lifespan, enabling limitless proliferation driven by oncogenes. The recently discovered, highly recurrent mutations in the promoter of TERT are found in over 50 cancer types, and are the most common mutation in many cancers. Transcriptional activation of TERT, via promoter mutation or other mechanisms, is the rate-limiting step in production of active telomerase. Although TERT is expressed in stem cells, it is naturally silenced upon differentiation. Thus, the presence of TERT promoter mutations may shed light on whether a particular tumor arose from a stem cell or more differentiated cell type. It is becoming clear that TERT mutations occur early during cellular transformation, and activate the TERT promoter by recruiting transcription factors that do not normally regulate TERT gene expression. This review highlights the fundamental and widespread role of TERT promoter mutations in tumorigenesis, including recent progress on their mechanism of transcriptional activation. These somatic promoter mutations, along with germline variation in the TERT locus also appear to have significant value as biomarkers of patient outcome. Understanding the precise molecular mechanism of TERT activation by promoter mutation and germline variation may inspire novel cancer cell-specific targeted therapies for a large number of cancer patients. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Mutation rate analysis at 19 autosomal microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiao-Qin; Yin, Cai-Yong; Ji, Qiang; Li, Kai; Fan, Han-Ting; Yu, Yan-Fang; Bu, Fan-Li; Hu, Ling-Li; Wang, Jian-Wen; Mu, Hao-Fang; Haigh, Steven; Chen, Feng

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a large sample size is needed to reliably estimate population- and locus-specific microsatellite mutation rates. Therefore, we conducted a long-term collaboration study and performed a comprehensive analysis on the mutation characteristics of 19 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci. The STR loci located on 15 of 22 autosomal chromosomes were analyzed in a total of 21,106 samples (11,468 parent-child meioses) in a Chinese population. This provided 217,892 allele transfers at 19 STR loci. An overall mutation rate of 1.20 × 10(-3) (95% CI, 1.06-1.36 × 10(-3) ) was observed in the populations across 18 of 19 STR loci, except for the TH01 locus with no mutation found. Most STR mutations (97.7%) were single-step mutations, and only a few mutations (2.30%) comprised two and multiple steps. Interestingly, approximately 93% of mutation events occur in the male germline. The mutation ratios increased with the paternal age at child birth (r = 0.99, ptesting, kinship analysis, and population genetics.

  2. Federal Regulation of Gene Therapy: Who Will Save our Germline?

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    This paper will attempt to address some of these more complex issues involving human gene therapy and the encompassing regulations. The first section will deal with the science of gene therapy and will briefly touch upon the scientific hurdles that remain for scientists in this field, as this is important to understanding many of the ethical issues. This section will be divided into a basic genetic overview, a description of somatic gene therapy, and a summary of germline gene therapy. The se...

  3. Mutations of microsatellite autosomal loci in paternity investigations of the Southern Poland population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtas, Marta; Piniewska, Danuta; Polańska, Nina; Stawowiak, Agnieszka; Sanak, Marek

    2013-05-01

    In this study, germline mutations were analyzed for 26,040 parent-child allelic transfers among subjects referred to paternity testing and originating from the Slavonic population of the Southern Poland. Mutation rates were estimated for 15 autosomal microsatellite loci: D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818 and FGA. There were 35 mutation events observed at 11 from 15 analyzed loci. No mutations were found at TH01, D2S1338, D19S433 and TPOX loci. The mutation rate estimate was 0.0019 [0.0012-0.0028 95% CI] for paternal and 0.0004 [0.0002-0.0009] for maternal meiosis, while 25% mutations remained unassigned. The locus-specific mutation rate ranged from 0.0000 [0.0000-0.0014] to 0.0046 [0.0022-0.0087]. Mutations observed in male germlines were more frequent than in female germlines.

  4. Further evidence for elevated human minisatellite mutation rate in Belarus eight years after the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubrova, Yuri E.; Buard, Jerome; Jeffreys, Alec J. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Adrian Building, University Road, Leicester (United Kingdom); Nesterov, Valeri N.; Krouchinsky, Nicolay G.; Ostapenko, Vladislav A. [Research Institute for Radiation Medicine, Mogilev (Belarus); Vergnaud, Gilles; Giraudeau, Fabienne [Laboratoire de Recherche en Genetique des Especes, Institut de Biologie, Nantes (France)

    1997-11-28

    Analysis of germline mutation rate at human minisatellites among children born in areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus heavily polluted after the Chernobyl accident has been extended, both by recruiting more families from the affected region and by using five additional minisatellite probes, including multi-locus probe 33.6 and four hypervariable single-locus probes. These additional data confirmed a twofold higher mutation rate in exposed families compared with non-irradiated families from the United Kingdom. An elevated rate was seen at all three independent sets of minisatellites (detected separately by multi-locus probes 33.15, 33.6 and six single-locus probes), indicating a generalised increase in minisatellite germline mutation rate in the Belarus families. Within the Belarus cohort, mutation rate was significantly greater in families with higher parental radiation dose estimated for chronic external and internal exposure to caesium-137, consistent with radiation induction of germline mutation. The spectra of mutation seen in the unexposed and exposed families were indistinguishable, suggesting that increased mutation observed over multiple loci arises indirectly by some mechanism that enhances spontaneous minisatellite mutation.

  5. Ovarian cancer patients at high risk of BRCA mutation: the constitutional genetic characterization does not change prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatier, Renaud; Lavit, Elise; Moretta, Jessica; Lambaudie, Eric; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Cherau, Elisabeth; Provansal, Magali; Livon, Doriane; Rabayrol, Laetitia; Popovici, Cornel; Charaffe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Sobol, Hagay; Viens, Patrice

    2016-10-01

    Ovarian neoplasms secondary to germline BRCA mutations had been described to have a more favourable survival. There is only few data concerning the prognosis of non mutated patients presenting clinical features evocative of BRCA alterations. We retrospectively collected data from patients treated in our institution for an invasive ovarian carcinoma between 1995 and 2011. Patients considered at high risk of BRCA mutation were tested for BRCA1/2 germline mutations. We described clinical, pathological and therapeutic features and compared prognosis of BRCA mutation carriers and non-mutated patients. Out of 617 ovarian cancer patients, we identified 104 patients who were considered at high risk of mutation. The 33 mutated patients were more likely to present a personal (33 vs. 10 %, p = 0.003) or a family (42 vs. 24 %, p = 0.06) history of breast/ovarian cancers. BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and wild type patients displayed similar prognosis: median progression-free survival (PFS) of 20.9 versus 37.7 months (p = 0.21); median overall survival (OS) of 151.2 versus 122.5 months (p = 0.52). Personal history of breast cancer increased both PFS [HR = 0.45 (95CI 0.25-0.81)] and OS [HR = 0.35 (95CI 0.16-0.75)]. In multivariate analysis, this parameter was an independent prognostic feature, whereas the identification of a BRCA1/2 mutation was not. In our cohort, all patients at high risk of BRCA mutation share a similar prognosis, whatever is their germline mutation status. Prognosis seems to be more influenced by clinical history than by germline mutations identification. If it is confirmed in larger and independent series, this result suggests that the hypothesis of other BRCA pathway alterations (BRCAness phenotype) deserves to be deeply explored.

  6. Effect of growth media on cell envelope composition and nitrile hydratase stability in Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain DAP 96253.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Trudy-Ann; Crow, Sidney A; Pierce, George E

    2012-11-01

    Rhodococcus is an important industrial microorganism that possesses diverse metabolic capabilities; it also has a cell envelope, composed of an outer layer of mycolic acids and glycolipids. Selected Rhodococcus species when induced are capable of transforming nitriles to the corresponding amide by the enzyme nitrile hydratase (NHase), and subsequently to the corresponding acid via an amidase. This nitrile biochemistry has generated interest in using the rhodococci as biocatalysts. It was hypothesized that altering sugars in the growth medium might impact cell envelope components and have effects on NHase. When the primary carbon source in growth media was changed from glucose to fructose, maltose, or maltodextrin, the NHase activity increased. Cells grown in the presence of maltose and maltodextrin showed the highest activities against propionitrile, 197 and 202 units/mg cdw, respectively. Stability of NHase was also affected as cells grown in the presence of maltose and maltodextrin retained more NHase activity at 55 °C (45 and 23 %, respectively) than cells grown in the presence of glucose or fructose (19 and 10 %, respectively). Supplementation of trehalose in the growth media resulted in increased NHase stability at 55 °C, as cells grown in the presence of glucose retained 40 % NHase activity as opposed to 19 % without the presence of trehalose. Changes in cell envelope components, such mycolic acids and glycolipids, were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thin-layer chromatography (TLC), respectively. Changing sugars and the addition of inducing components for NHase, such as cobalt and urea in growth media, resulted in changes in mycolic acid profiles. Mycolic acid content increased 5 times when cobalt and urea were added to media with glucose. Glycolipids levels were also affected by the changes in sugars and addition of inducing components. This research demonstrates that carbohydrate selection impacts NHase activity and

  7. Use of Metallopeptide Based Mimics Demonstrates That the Metalloprotein Nitrile Hydratase Requires Two Oxidized Cysteinates for Catalytic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, J.; Callan, P; Amie, J

    2010-01-01

    Nitrile hydratases (NHases) are non-heme Fe{sup III} or non-corrin Co{sup III} containing metalloenzymes that possess an N{sub 2}S{sub 3} ligand environment with nitrogen donors derived from amidates and sulfur donors derived from cysteinates. A closely related enzyme is thiocyanate hydrolase (SCNase), which possesses a nearly identical active-site coordination environment as CoNHase. These enzymes are redox inactive and perform hydrolytic reactions; SCNase hydrolyzes thiocyanate anions while NHase converts nitriles into amides. Herein an active CoNHase metallopeptide mimic, [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] (NHase-m1 = AcNH-CCDLP-CGVYD-PA-COOH), that contains Co{sup III} in a similar N{sub 2}S{sub 3} coordination environment as CoNHase is reported. [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] was characterized by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), gel-permeation chromatography (GPC), Co K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Co-S: 2.21 {angstrom}; Co-N: 1.93 {angstrom}), vibrational, and optical spectroscopies. We find that [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] will perform the catalytic conversion of acrylonitrile into acrylamide with up to 58 turnovers observed after 18 h at 25 C (pH 8.0). FTIR data used in concert with calculated vibrational data (mPWPW91/aug-cc-TZVPP) demonstrates that the active form of [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] has a ligated SO{sub 2} (? = 1091 cm{sup -1}) moiety and a ligated protonated SO(H) (? = 928 cm{sup -1}) moiety; when only one oxygenated cysteinate ligand (i.e., a mono-SO{sub 2} coordination motif) or the bis-SO{sub 2} coordination motif are found within [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] no catalytic activity is observed. Calculations of the thermodynamics of ligand exchange (B3LYP/aug-cc-TZVPP) suggest that the reason for this is that the SO{sub 2}/SO(H) equatorial ligand motif promotes both water dissociation from the Co{sup III}-center and nitrile coordination to the Co{sup III}-center. In contrast, the under- or overoxidized motifs will either strongly favor a five coordinate Co

  8. Mutation analysis of 24 short tandem repeats in Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dejian; Liu, Qiuling; Wu, Weiwei; Zhao, Hu

    2012-03-01

    Germline mutations of 24 short tandem repeat (STR) loci (TPOX, D3S1358, FGA, D5S818, CSF1PO, D7S820, D8S1179, TH01, vWA, D13S317, Penta E, D16S539, D18S51, Penta D, D21S11, D2S1772, D6S1043, D7S3048, D8S1132, D11S2368, D12S391, D13S325, D18S1364, and GATA198B05) were studied for 6,441 parent-child meioses taken from the paternity testing cases in Chinese Han population. In total, 195 mutations were identified at 22 of the 24 loci. Among them, 189 (96.92%) mutations were one step, five mutations (2.56%) were two step, and one mutation (0.51%) was three step. No mutation was found at the TH01 and TPOX loci. The overall mutation rate estimated was 0.0013 (95% CI 0.0011-0.0015), and the locus-specific mutation rate estimated ranged from 0 to 0.0034. There was a bias in the STR mutations that repeat gains were more common than losses (∼1.7:1). Mutation events in the male germline were more frequent than in the female germline (∼4.3:1). Furthermore, loci with a larger heterozygosity tended to have a higher mutation rate. Mutation in short alleles was biased towards expansion, whereas mutation in long alleles favored contraction. The long alleles have a higher allelic mutational probability than short alleles.

  9. Novel strategies for comprehensive mutation screening of the APC gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsmannova, L; Mego, M; Stevurkova, V; Zajac, V; Ciernikova, S

    2017-03-03

    Colorectal cancer is the 4th most common cause of cancer related deaths worldwide and new possibilities in accurate diagnosis and targeted treatment are highly required. Mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene play a pivotal role in adenoma-carcinoma pathway of colorectal tumorigenesis. The quarter century from its´ first cloning, APC became one of the most frequently mutated, known driver genes in colorectal cancer. Intensive routine molecular testing of APC has brought the benefits for patients with family history of polyposis or colorectal cancer. Nevertheless, multiple mutational disease-causing mechanisms make the genetic testing still challenging. This minireview is focused on implementation of novel APC mutation screening diagnostic strategies for polyposis families according to the current findings. A further understanding and improved algorithms may help to increase the mutation detection rate. APC germline mutations achieve close to 100% penetrance, so more comprehensive approach followed by preventive and therapeutic strategies might reflect in decrease in burden of colorectal cancer.

  10. A common Greenlandic Inuit BRCA1 RING domain founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.v.O.; Ejlertsen, B.; Albrechtsen, Anders;

    2009-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. We examined 32 breast and/or ovarian cancer patients from Greenland for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Whereas no mutations were identified in 19 families, 13 families exhibited a BRCA1...... exon 3 nucleotide 234 T > G mutation, which has not previously been reported in the breast cancer information core (BIC) database. The mutation changes a conserved cysteine 39 to a glycine in the Zn(2+) site II of the RING domain, which is essential for BRCA1 ubiquitin ligase activity. Eight...... of the families had members with ovarian cancer, suggesting that the RING domain may be an ovarian cancer hotspot. By SNP array analysis, we find that all 13 families share a 4.5 Mb genomic fragment containing the BRCA1 gene, showing that the mutation originates from a founder. Finally, analysis of 1152 Inuit...

  11. The origins, determinants, and consequences of human mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendure, Jay; Akey, Joshua M

    2015-09-25

    Germline mutations are the principal cause of heritable disease and the ultimate source of evolutionary change. Similarly, somatic mutations are the primary cause of cancer and may contribute to the burden of human disease more broadly than previously appreciated. Here, we review recent insights into the rates, spectrum, and determinants of genomic mutations and how these parameters inform our understanding of both Mendelian and complex human diseases. We also consider models for conceptualizing mutational consequences and outline several key areas for future research, including the development of new technologies to access and quantify the full spectrum of mutations, as well as to better interpret the consequences of mutations with respect to molecular functionality, evolutionary fitness, and disease pathogenicity.

  12. Activating mutations in FGFR3 and HRAS reveal a shared genetic origin for congenital disorders and testicular tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goriely, Anne; Hansen, Ruth M S; Taylor, Indira B;

    2009-01-01

    cells that show a paternal age effect. Screening of 30 spermatocytic seminomas for oncogenic mutations in 17 genes identified 2 mutations in FGFR3 (both 1948A>G, encoding K650E, which causes thanatophoric dysplasia in the germline) and 5 mutations in HRAS. Massively parallel sequencing of sperm DNA...... showed that levels of the FGFR3 mutation increase with paternal age and that the mutation spectrum at the Lys650 codon is similar to that observed in bladder cancer. Most spermatocytic seminomas show increased immunoreactivity for FGFR3 and/or HRAS. We propose that paternal age-effect mutations activate...

  13. Germline TRAV5D-4 T-cell receptor sequence targets a primary insulin peptide of NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Maki; Castoe, Todd; Sosinowski, Tomasz; He, XiangLing; Johnson, Kelly; Haskins, Kathryn; Vignali, Dario A A; Gapin, Laurent; Pollock, David; Eisenbarth, George S

    2012-04-01

    There is accumulating evidence that autoimmunity to insulin B chain peptide, amino acids 9-23 (insulin B:9-23), is central to development of autoimmune diabetes of the NOD mouse model. We hypothesized that enhanced susceptibility to autoimmune diabetes is the result of targeting of insulin by a T-cell receptor (TCR) sequence commonly encoded in the germline. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that a particular Vα gene TRAV5D-4 with multiple junction sequences is sufficient to induce anti-islet autoimmunity by studying retrogenic mouse lines expressing α-chains with different Vα TRAV genes. Retrogenic NOD strains expressing Vα TRAV5D-4 α-chains with many different complementarity determining region (CDR) 3 sequences, even those derived from TCRs recognizing islet-irrelevant molecules, developed anti-insulin autoimmunity. Induction of insulin autoantibodies by TRAV5D-4 α-chains was abrogated by the mutation of insulin peptide B:9-23 or that of two amino acid residues in CDR1 and 2 of the TRAV5D-4. TRAV13-1, the human ortholog of murine TRAV5D-4, was also capable of inducing in vivo anti-insulin autoimmunity when combined with different murine CDR3 sequences. Targeting primary autoantigenic peptides by simple germline-encoded TCR motifs may underlie enhanced susceptibility to the development of autoimmune diabetes.

  14. Somatic variation precedes extensive diversification of germline sequences and combinatorial joining in the evolution of immunoglobulin heavy chain diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds-Frey, K R; Nishikata, H; Litman, R T; Litman, G W

    1993-09-01

    In Heterodontus, a phylogenetically primitive shark species, the variable (VH), diversity (DH), joining (JH) segments, and constant (CH) exons are organized in individual approximately 18-20-kb "clusters." A single large VH family with > 90% nucleic acid homology and a monotypic second gene family are identified by extensive screening of a genomic DNA library. Little variation in the nucleotide sequences of DH segments from different germline gene clusters is evident, suggesting that the early role for DH was in promoting junctional diversity rather than contributing unique coding specificities. A gene-specific oligodeoxynucleotide screening method was used to relate specific transcription products (cDNAs) to individual gene clusters and showed that gene rearrangements are intra- rather than intercluster. This provides further evidence for restricted diversity in the immunoglobulin heavy chain of Heterodontus, from which it is inferred that combinatorial diversity is a more recently acquired means for generating diversity. The observed differences between cDNA sequences selected and the sequences of segmental elements derived from conventional genomic libraries as well as from VH segment-specific libraries generated by direct PCR amplification of genomic DNA indicate that the VH repertoire is diversified by both junctional diversity and somatic mutation. Taken together, these findings suggest a heretofore unrecognized contribution of somatic variation that preceded both extensive diversification of the germline repertoire and the combinatorial joining process in the evolution of humoral immunity.

  15. Is the NBN gene mutation I171V a potential risk factor for malignant solid tumors in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jerzy; Mosor, Maria; Nowicka, Karina; Rembowska, Jolanta; Januszkiewicz, Danuta

    2011-08-01

    NBN gene is considered as one of the low-to-moderate cancer susceptibility gene. At least 4 germline NBN mutations have been found in several malignancies in adults. In our studies, we observed the high incidence of germline mutation I171V of NBN gene in breast, colorectal, larynx cancer, and in multiple primary tumors. In this study, we would like to answer the question whether I171V germline mutation of NBN gene may constitute risk factor for solid tumors in children. The frequency of this mutation has been analyzed in patients with neuroblastoma (n=66), Wilms tumor (n=54), medulloblastoma (n=57), and rhabdomyosarcoma (n=82) hospitalized in Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation Department in the years between 1987 and 2010. About 2947 anonymous blood samples collected on Guthrie cards drawn from the newborn screening program of the Wielkopolska region have been used as controls. All the patients and controls came from the same geographical region. I171V mutation of the NBN gene has been observed in 5 controls. Among children with solid tumors only in 1 child with medulloblastoma I171V variant has been found. In conclusion, I171V germline mutation in contrary to adults cannot be considered as a risk factor for children malignancies. However, owing to low number of patients with solid tumors the possibility of a Type II error may exist.

  16. Guanine holes are prominent targets for mutation in cancer and inherited disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino Bacolla

    Full Text Available Single base substitutions constitute the most frequent type of human gene mutation and are a leading cause of cancer and inherited disease. These alterations occur non-randomly in DNA, being strongly influenced by the local nucleotide sequence context. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying such sequence context-dependent mutagenesis are not fully understood. Using bioinformatics, computational and molecular modeling analyses, we have determined the frequencies of mutation at G • C bp in the context of all 64 5'-NGNN-3' motifs that contain the mutation at the second position. Twenty-four datasets were employed, comprising >530,000 somatic single base substitutions from 21 cancer genomes, >77,000 germline single-base substitutions causing or associated with human inherited disease and 16.7 million benign germline single-nucleotide variants. In several cancer types, the number of mutated motifs correlated both with the free energies of base stacking and the energies required for abstracting an electron from the target guanines (ionization potentials. Similar correlations were also evident for the pathological missense and nonsense germline mutations, but only when the target guanines were located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. Likewise, pathogenic splicing mutations predominantly affected positions in which a purine was located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. Novel candidate driver mutations and tissue-specific mutational patterns were also identified in the cancer datasets. We conclude that electron transfer reactions within the DNA molecule contribute to sequence context-dependent mutagenesis, involving both somatic driver and passenger mutations in cancer, as well as germline alterations causing or associated with inherited disease.

  17. dSETDB1 and SU(VAR3-9 sequentially function during germline-stem cell differentiation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongheon Yoon

    Full Text Available Germline-stem cells (GSCs produce gametes and are thus true "immortal stem cells". In Drosophila ovaries, GSCs divide asymmetrically to produce daughter GSCs and cystoblasts, and the latter differentiate into germline cysts. Here we show that the histone-lysine methyltransferase dSETDB1, located in pericentric heterochromatin, catalyzes H3-K9 trimethylation in GSCs and their immediate descendants. As germline cysts differentiate into egg chambers, the dSETDB1 function is gradually taken over by another H3-K9-specific methyltransferase, SU(VAR3-9. Loss-of-function mutations in dsetdb1 or Su(var3-9 abolish both H3K9me3 and heterochromatin protein-1 (HP1 signals from the anterior germarium and the developing egg chambers, respectively, and cause localization of H3K9me3 away from DNA-dense regions in most posterior germarium cells. These results indicate that dSETDB1 and SU(VAR3-9 act together with distinct roles during oogenesis, with dsetdb1 being of particular importance due to its GSC-specific function and more severe mutant phenotype.

  18. Genome sequencing of pediatric medulloblastoma links catastrophic DNA rearrangements with TP53 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rausch, Tobias; Jones, David T W; Zapatka, Marc

    2012-01-01

    of a Sonic-Hedgehog medulloblastoma (SHH-MB) brain tumor from a patient with a germline TP53 mutation (Li-Fraumeni syndrome), uncovering massive, complex chromosome rearrangements. Integrating TP53 status with microarray and deep sequencing-based DNA rearrangement data in additional patients reveals...

  19. Genetic screening of the FLCN gene identify six novel variants and a Danish founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Maria; Albrechtsen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic germline mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) tumor suppressor gene predispose to Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, a rare disease characterized by the development of cutaneous hamartomas (fibrofolliculomas), multiple lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothoraces and renal cell cancer. In this study...

  20. Contralateral breast cancer after radiotherapy among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Jonine L; Thomas, Duncan C; Shore, Roy E

    2013-01-01

    Women with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/BRCA2) mutations are at very high risk of developing breast cancer, including asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (CBC). BRCA1/BRCA2 genes help maintain genome stability and assist in DNA repair. We examined whether the risk of CBC associated with ra...

  1. Screening of 99 Danish patients with congenital heart disease for GATA4 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Litu; Tümer, Zeynep; Jacobsen, Joes Ramsøe;

    2006-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects nearly 1% of the population, but only few genes involved in human CHD are presently known. Germ-line mutations in the zinc finger transcription factor GATA4 have been associated with familial cases of atrial and ventricular septal defects and pulmonary...

  2. 7 NEW MUTATIONS IN HMSH2, AN HNPCC GENE, IDENTIFIED BY DENATURING GRADIENT-GEL ELECTROPHORESIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIJNEN, J; VASEN, H; KHAN, PM; MENKO, FH; VANDERKLIFT, H; VANLEEUWEN, C; VANDENBROEK, M; VANLEEUWENCORNELISSE, [No Value; NAGENGAST, F; MEIJERSHEIJBOER, A; LINDHOUT, D; GRIFFIOEN, G; CATS, A; KLEIBEUKER, J; VARESCO, L; BERTARIO, L; BISGAARD, ML; MOHR, J; FODDE, R

    1995-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a relatively common autosomal dominant cancer-susceptibility condition. The recent isolation of the DNA mismatch repair genes (hMSH2, hMLH1, hPMS1, and hPMS2) responsible for HNPCC has allowed the search for germ-line mutations in affected individ

  3. The CHEK2*1100delC mutation has no major contribution in oesophageal carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.B. Koppert (Linetta); A.E.M. Schutte (Mieke); M. Abbou; H.W. Tilanus (Hugo); W.N.M. Dinjens (Winand)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn response to DNA damage, the cell cycle checkpoint kinase 2 (CHEK2) may phosphorylate p53, Cdc25A and Cdc25C, and regulate BRCA1 function, leading to cell cycle arrest and DNA repair. The truncating germline mutation CHEK2*1100delC abrogates kinase activity and confers low-penetrance s

  4. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Three DNA polymerases - Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ - are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson-Crick base pairing and 3'exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to 'polymerase proofreading associated polyposis' (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an 'ultramutator' phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions.

  5. Mutation Rate at Commonly Used Forensic STR Loci: Paternity Testing Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Aşıcıoğlua

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Paternity tests are carried out by the analysis of hypervariable short tandem repeat DNA loci. These microsatellite sequences mutate at a higher rate than that of bulk DNA. The occurrence of germline mutations at STR loci posses problems in interpretation of resulting genetic profiles. We recently analyzed 59–159 parent/child allele transfers at 13 microsatellite loci. We identified 12 mutations in 7 microsatellite loci. No mutations were occurred in other 6 loci. The highest mutation rate was observed with 5 mutations at D8S1179 locus at different alleles. The event was always single repeat related. The mutation rate was between 0 and 1.5 x 10-2 per locus per gamete per generation. The mutation event is very crucial for forensic DNA testing and accumulation of STR mutation data is extremely important for genetic profile interpretation.

  6. Closely spaced multiple mutations as potential signatures of transient hypermutability in human genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Min; Férec, Claude; Cooper, David N

    2009-10-01

    Data from diverse organisms suggests that transient hypermutability is a general mutational mechanism with the potential to generate multiple synchronous mutations, a phenomenon probably best exemplified by closely spaced multiple mutations (CSMMs). Here we have attempted to extend the concept of transient hypermutability from somatic cells to the germline, using human inherited disease-causing multiple mutations as a model system. Employing stringent criteria for data inclusion, we have retrospectively identified numerous potential examples of pathogenic CSMMs that exhibit marked similarities to the CSMMs reported in other systems. These examples include (1) eight multiple mutations, each comprising three or more components within a sequence tract of mutation showers"; and (3) numerous highly informative "homocoordinate" mutations. Using the proportion of CpG substitution as a crude indicator of the relative likelihood of transient hypermutability, we present evidence to suggest that CSMMs comprising at least one pair of mutations separated by mutation screening.

  7. Common germline polymorphisms associated with breast cancer-specific survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirie, Ailith; Guo, Qi; Kraft, Peter; Canisius, Sander; Eccles, Diana M; Rahman, Nazneen; Nevanlinna, Heli; Chen, Constance; Khan, Sofia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lush, Michael; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Lambrechts, Dieter; Weltens, Caroline; Leunen, Karin; van Ongeval, Chantal; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Fagerholm, Rainer; Muranen, Taru A; Olsen, Janet E; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Frederick; Le Marchand, Loic; Hopper, John L; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm Wr; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John Wm; van den Ouweland, Ans Mw; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Yang, Rongxi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Holleczek, Bernd; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S; Humphreys, Keith; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert Aem; Seynaeve, Caroline; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Balleine, Rosemary; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Hamann, Ute; Kabisch, Maria; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Rüdiger, Thomas; Margolin, Sara; Kristensen, Vessela; Nord, Siljie; Evans, D Gareth; Abraham, Jean; Earl, Helena; Poole, Christopher J; Hiller, Louise; Dunn, Janet A; Bowden, Sarah; Yang, Rose; Campa, Daniele; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Hankinson, Susan; Hoover, Robert N; Hüsing, Anika; Kaaks, Rudolf; Machiela, Mitchell J; Willett, Walter; Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Chin, Suet-Feung; Caldas, Carlos; Hunter, David J; Lindstrom, Sara; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Mannermaa, Arto; Andrulis, Irene L; Hall, Per; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Easton, Douglas F; Bojesen, Stig E; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A; Pharoah, Paul Dp; Schmidt, Marjanka K

    2015-04-22

    Previous studies have identified common germline variants nominally associated with breast cancer survival. These associations have not been widely replicated in further studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of previously reported SNPs with breast cancer-specific survival using data from a pooled analysis of eight breast cancer survival genome-wide association studies (GWAS) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. A literature review was conducted of all previously published associations between common germline variants and three survival outcomes: breast cancer-specific survival, overall survival and disease-free survival. All associations that reached the nominal significance level of P value pooled analysis of over 37,000 breast cancer cases for association with breast cancer-specific survival. Previous associations were evaluated using a one-sided test based on the reported direction of effect. Fifty-six variants from 45 previous publications were evaluated in the meta-analysis. Fifty-four of these were evaluated in the full set of 37,954 breast cancer cases with 2,900 events and the two additional variants were evaluated in a reduced sample size of 30,000 samples in order to ensure independence from the previously published studies. Five variants reached nominal significance (P pooled GWAS data compared to 2.8 expected under the null hypothesis. Seven additional variants were associated (P <0.05) with ER-positive disease. Although no variants reached genome-wide significance (P <5 x 10(-8)), these results suggest that there is some evidence of association between candidate common germline variants and breast cancer prognosis. Larger studies from multinational collaborations are necessary to increase the power to detect associations, between common variants and prognosis, at more stringent significance levels.

  8. Parallel germline infiltration of a lentivirus in two Malagasy lemurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Gilbert

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses normally infect the somatic cells of their host and are transmitted horizontally, i.e., in an exogenous way. Occasionally, however, some retroviruses can also infect and integrate into the genome of germ cells, which may allow for their vertical inheritance and fixation in a given species; a process known as endogenization. Lentiviruses, a group of mammalian retroviruses that includes HIV, are known to infect primates, ruminants, horses, and cats. Unlike many other retroviruses, these viruses have not been demonstrably successful at germline infiltration. Here, we report on the discovery of endogenous lentiviral insertions in seven species of Malagasy lemurs from two different genera -- Cheirogaleus and Microcebus. Combining molecular clock analyses and cross-species screening of orthologous insertions, we show that the presence of this endogenous lentivirus in six species of Microcebus is the result of one endogenization event that occurred about 4.2 million years ago. In addition, we demonstrate that this lentivirus independently infiltrated the germline of Cheirogaleus and that the two endogenization events occurred quasi-simultaneously. Using multiple proviral copies, we derive and characterize an apparently full length and intact consensus for this lentivirus. These results provide evidence that lentiviruses have repeatedly infiltrated the germline of prosimian species and that primates have been exposed to lentiviruses for a much longer time than what can be inferred based on sequence comparison of circulating lentiviruses. The study sets the stage for an unprecedented opportunity to reconstruct an ancestral primate lentivirus and thereby advance our knowledge of host-virus interactions.

  9. Orbit/CLASP is required for germline cyst formation through its developmental control of fusomes and ring canals in Drosophila males.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chie Miyauchi

    Full Text Available Orbit, a Drosophila ortholog of microtubule plus-end enriched protein CLASP, plays an important role in many developmental processes involved in microtubule dynamics. Previous studies have shown that Orbit is required for asymmetric stem cell division and cystocyte divisions in germline cysts and for the development of microtubule networks that interconnect oocyte and nurse cells during oogenesis. Here, we examined the cellular localization of Orbit and its role in cyst formation during spermatogenesis. In male germline stem cells, distinct localization of Orbit was first observed on the spectrosome, which is a spherical precursor of the germline-specific cytoskeleton known as the fusome. In dividing stem cells and spermatogonia, Orbit was localized around centrosomes and on kinetochores and spindle microtubules. After cytokinesis, Orbit remained localized on ring canals, which are cytoplasmic bridges between the cells. Thereafter, it was found along fusomes, extending through the ring canal toward all spermatogonia in a cyst. Fusome localization of Orbit was not affected by microtubule depolymerization. Instead, our fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments suggested that Orbit is closely associated with F-actin, which is abundantly found in fusomes. Surprisingly, F-actin depolymerization influenced neither fusome organization nor Orbit localization on the germline-specific cytoskeleton. We revealed that two conserved regions of Orbit are required for fusome localization. Using orbit hypomorphic mutants, we showed that the protein is required for ring canal formation and for fusome elongation mediated by the interaction of newly generated fusome plugs with the pre-existing fusome. The orbit mutation also disrupted ring canal clustering, which is essential for folding of the spermatogonia after cytokinesis. Orbit accumulates around centrosomes at the onset of spermatogonial mitosis and is required for the capture of one of the

  10. ZTF-8 interacts with the 9-1-1 complex and is required for DNA damage response and double-strand break repair in the C. elegans germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Min Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in DNA repair genes are linked to tumor progression. Furthermore, failure in either activating a DNA damage checkpoint or repairing programmed meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs can impair chromosome segregation. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis for DNA damage response (DDR and DSB repair (DSBR within the germline is highly important. Here we define ZTF-8, a previously uncharacterized protein conserved from worms to humans, as a novel factor involved in the repair of both mitotic and meiotic DSBs as well as in meiotic DNA damage checkpoint activation in the C. elegans germline. ztf-8 mutants exhibit specific sensitivity to γ-irradiation and hydroxyurea, mitotic nuclear arrest at S-phase accompanied by activation of the ATL-1 and CHK-1 DNA damage checkpoint kinases, as well as accumulation of both mitotic and meiotic recombination intermediates, indicating that ZTF-8 functions in DSBR. However, impaired meiotic DSBR progression partially fails to trigger the CEP-1/p53-dependent DNA damage checkpoint in late pachytene, also supporting a role for ZTF-8 in meiotic DDR. ZTF-8 partially co-localizes with the 9-1-1 DDR complex and interacts with MRT-2/Rad1, a component of this complex. The human RHINO protein rescues the phenotypes observed in ztf-8 mutants, suggesting functional conservation across species. We propose that ZTF-8 is involved in promoting repair at stalled replication forks and meiotic DSBs by transducing DNA damage checkpoint signaling via the 9-1-1 pathway. Our findings define a conserved function for ZTF-8/RHINO in promoting genomic stability in the germline.

  11. The glycolytic shift in fumarate-hydratase-deficient kidney cancer lowers AMPK levels, increases anabolic propensities and lowers cellular iron levels

    KAUST Repository

    Tong, Winghang

    2011-09-01

    Inactivation of the TCA cycle enzyme, fumarate hydratase (FH), drives a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis in FH-deficient kidney tumors and cell lines from patients with hereditary leiomyomatosis renal cell cancer (HLRCC), resulting in decreased levels of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) and p53 tumor suppressor, and activation of the anabolic factors, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and ribosomal protein S6. Reduced AMPK levels lead to diminished expression of the DMT1 iron transporter, and the resulting cytosolic iron deficiency activates the iron regulatory proteins, IRP1 and IRP2, and increases expression of the hypoxia inducible factor HIF-1α, but not HIF-2α. Silencing of HIF-1α or activation of AMPK diminishes invasive activities, indicating that alterations of HIF-1α and AMPK contribute to the oncogenic growth of FH-deficient cells. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  12. Germ-line gene therapy and the medical imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Ronald; Davis, Lawrence H

    1992-06-01

    Somatic cell gene therapy has yielded promising results. If germ cell gene therapy can be developed, the promise is even greater: hundreds of genetic diseases might be virtually eliminated. But some claim the procedure is morally unacceptable. We thoroughly and sympathetically examine several possible reasons for this claim but find them inadequate. There is no moral reason, then, not to develop and employ germ-line gene therapy. Taking the offensive, we argue next that medicine has a prima facie moral obligation to do so.

  13. Generation of germline ablated male pigs by CRISPR/Cas9 editing of the NANOS2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki-Eun; Kaucher, Amy V; Powell, Anne; Waqas, Muhammad Salman; Sandmaier, Shelley E S; Oatley, Melissa J; Park, Chi-Hun; Tibary, Ahmed; Donovan, David M; Blomberg, Le Ann; Lillico, Simon G; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Mileham, Alan; Telugu, Bhanu P; Oatley, Jon M

    2017-01-10

    Genome editing tools have revolutionized the generation of genetically modified animals including livestock. In particular, the domestic pig is a proven model of human physiology and an agriculturally important species. In this study, we utilized the CRISPR/Cas9 system to edit the NANOS2 gene in pig embryos to generate offspring with mono-allelic and bi-allelic mutations. We found that NANOS2 knockout pigs phenocopy knockout mice with male specific germline ablation but other aspects of testicular development are normal. Moreover, male pigs with one intact NANOS2 allele and female knockout pigs are fertile. From an agriculture perspective, NANOS2 knockout male pigs are expected to serve as an ideal surrogate for transplantation of donor spermatogonial stem cells to expand the availability of gametes from genetically desirable sires.

  14. Generation of germline ablated male pigs by CRISPR/Cas9 editing of the NANOS2 gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki-Eun; Kaucher, Amy V.; Powell, Anne; Waqas, Muhammad Salman; Sandmaier, Shelley E.S.; Oatley, Melissa J.; Park, Chi-Hun; Tibary, Ahmed; Donovan, David M.; Blomberg, Le Ann; Lillico, Simon G.; Whitelaw, C. Bruce A.; Mileham, Alan; Telugu, Bhanu P.; Oatley, Jon M.

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing tools have revolutionized the generation of genetically modified animals including livestock. In particular, the domestic pig is a proven model of human physiology and an agriculturally important species. In this study, we utilized the CRISPR/Cas9 system to edit the NANOS2 gene in pig embryos to generate offspring with mono-allelic and bi-allelic mutations. We found that NANOS2 knockout pigs phenocopy knockout mice with male specific germline ablation but other aspects of testicular development are normal. Moreover, male pigs with one intact NANOS2 allele and female knockout pigs are fertile. From an agriculture perspective, NANOS2 knockout male pigs are expected to serve as an ideal surrogate for transplantation of donor spermatogonial stem cells to expand the availability of gametes from genetically desirable sires. PMID:28071690

  15. Breast cancer risk and germline genomic profiling of women with neurofibromatosis type 1 who developed breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Teer, Jamie K; Tousignant, Renee N; Levin, Albert M; Boulware, David; Chitale, Dhananjay A; Shaw, Brandon M; Chen, Zhihua; Zhang, Yonghong; Blakeley, Jaishri O; Acosta, Maria T; Messiaen, Ludwine M; Korf, Bruce R; Tainsky, Michael A

    2017-09-10

    NF1 mutations predispose to neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and women with NF1 have a moderately elevated risk for breast cancer, especially under age 50. Germline genomic analysis may better define the risk so screening and prevention can be applied to the individuals who benefit the most. Survey conducted in several neurofibromatosis clinics in the United States has demonstrated a 17.2% lifetime risk of breast cancer in women affected with NF1. Cumulated risk to age 50 is estimated to be 9.27%. For genomic profiling, fourteen women with NF1 and a history of breast cancer were recruited and underwent whole exome sequencing (WES), targeted genomic DNA based and RNA-based analysis of the NF1 gene. Deleterious NF1 pathogenic variants were identified in each woman. Frameshift mutations because of deletion/duplication/complex rearrangement were found in 50% (7/14) of the cases, nonsense mutations in 21% (3/14), in-frame splice mutations in 21% (3/14), and one case of missense mutation (7%, 1/14). No deleterious mutation was found in the following high/moderate-penetrance breast cancer genes: ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, BARD1, BRIP1, CDH1, CHEK2, FANCC, MRE11A, NBN, PALB2, PTEN, RAD50, RAD51C, TP53, and STK11. Twenty-five rare or common variants in cancer related genes were discovered and may have contributed to the breast cancers in these individuals. Breast cancer predisposition modifiers in women with NF1 may involve a great variety of molecular and cellular functions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Roles for ROS and hydrogen sulfide in the longevity response to germline loss in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuehua; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, removing germ cells slows aging and extends life. Here we show that transcription factors that extend life and confer protection to age-related protein-aggregation toxicity are activated early in adulthood in response to a burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a shift in sulfur metabolism. Germline loss triggers H2S production, mitochondrial biogenesis, and a dynamic pattern of ROS in specific somatic tissues. A cytoskeletal protein, KRI-1, plays a key role in the generation of H2S and ROS. These kri-1–dependent redox species, in turn, promote life extension by activating SKN-1/Nrf2 and the mitochondrial unfolded-protein response, respectively. Both H2S and, remarkably, kri-1–dependent ROS are required for the life extension produced by low levels of the superoxide-generator paraquat and by a mutation that inhibits respiration. Together our findings link reproductive signaling to mitochondria and define an inducible, kri-1–dependent redox-signaling module that can be invoked in different contexts to extend life and counteract proteotoxicity. PMID:27140632

  17. Atrial fibrillation-linked germline GJA5/connexin40 mutants showed an increased hemichannel function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiguo Sun

    Full Text Available Mutations in GJA5 encoding the gap junction protein connexin40 (Cx40 have been linked to lone atrial fibrillation. Some of these mutants result in impaired gap junction function due to either abnormal connexin localization or impaired gap junction channels, which may play a role in promoting atrial fibrillation. However, the effects of the atrial fibrillation-linked Cx40 mutants on hemichannel function have not been studied. Here we investigated two atrial fibrillation-linked germline Cx40 mutants, V85I and L221I. These two mutants formed putative gap junction plaques at cell-cell interfaces, with similar gap junction coupling conductance as that of wild-type Cx40. Connexin deficient HeLa cells expressing either one of these two mutants displayed prominent propidium iodide-uptake distinct from cells expressing wild-type Cx40 or other atrial fibrillation-linked Cx40 mutants, I75F, L229M, and Q49X. Propidium iodide-uptake was sensitive to [Ca2+]o and the hemichannel blockers, carbenoxolone, flufenamic acid and mefloquine, but was not affected by the pannexin 1 channel blocking agent, probenecid, indicating that uptake is most likely mediated via connexin hemichannels. A gain-of-hemichannel function in these two atrial fibrillation-linked Cx40 mutants may provide a novel mechanism underlying the etiology of atrial fibrillation.

  18. Roles for ROS and hydrogen sulfide in the longevity response to germline loss in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuehua; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2016-05-17

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, removing germ cells slows aging and extends life. Here we show that transcription factors that extend life and confer protection to age-related protein-aggregation toxicity are activated early in adulthood in response to a burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a shift in sulfur metabolism. Germline loss triggers H2S production, mitochondrial biogenesis, and a dynamic pattern of ROS in specific somatic tissues. A cytoskeletal protein, KRI-1, plays a key role in the generation of H2S and ROS. These kri-1-dependent redox species, in turn, promote life extension by activating SKN-1/Nrf2 and the mitochondrial unfolded-protein response, respectively. Both H2S and, remarkably, kri-1-dependent ROS are required for the life extension produced by low levels of the superoxide-generator paraquat and by a mutation that inhibits respiration. Together our findings link reproductive signaling to mitochondria and define an inducible, kri-1-dependent redox-signaling module that can be invoked in different contexts to extend life and counteract proteotoxicity.

  19. Open-ended question: is immortality exclusively inherent to the germline?--A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepperdinger, Günter

    2009-01-01

    All somatic cells are subject to aging. Germline links generations, and thus, pluripotent germ cells are considered potentially immortal. The current understanding how the germline escapes this otherwise inevitable phenomenon is outlined in this article. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Recombination, transcription, and diversity of a partially germline-joined VH in a mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinxin; Miller, Robert D

    2012-09-01

    Full or partially germline-joined V genes have been described in a number of different vertebrate lineages where they can contribute to the expressed antibody repertoire through different mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that VH3.1, a partially germline-joined VH gene in the opossum Monodelphis domestica, can undergo V(D)J recombination to generate productive IgH transcripts. VH3.1 is fused to a DH gene segment in the germline DNA and is the only known example of a germline-joined VH in a mammal. B cells that have recombined VH3.1 were not detected until nearly 2 months of age, around the time of weaning, and much later than B cells using the conventional VH. Compared to opossum IgH transcripts using the conventional VH genes, those with VH3.1 have unusually long CDR3 due to the length of the germline-joined DH.

  1. C. elegans germline-deficient mutants respond to pathogen infection using shared and distinct mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael TeKippe

    Full Text Available Reproduction extracts a cost in resources that organisms are then unable to utilize to deal with a multitude of environmental stressors. In the nematode C. elegans, development of the germline shortens the lifespan of the animal and increases its susceptibility to microbial pathogens. Prior studies have demonstrated germline-deficient nematodes to have increased resistance to gram negative bacteria. We show that germline-deficient strains display increased resistance across a broad range of pathogens including gram positive and gram negative bacteria, and the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Furthermore, we show that the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16, which regulates longevity and immunity in C. elegans, appears to be crucial for maintaining longevity in both wild-type and germline-deficient backgrounds. Our studies indicate that germline-deficient mutants glp-1 and glp-4 respond to pathogen infection using common and different mechanisms that involve the activation of DAF-16.

  2. Germline methylation patterns determine the distribution of recombination events in the dog genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Jonas; Quilez, Javier; Arndt, Peter F; Webster, Matthew T

    2014-12-19

    The positive-regulatory domain containing nine gene, PRDM9, which strongly associates with the location of recombination events in several vertebrates, is inferred to be inactive in the dog genome. Here, we address several questions regarding the control of recombination and its influence on genome evolution in dogs. First, we address whether the association between CpG islands (CGIs) and recombination hotspots is generated by lack of methylation, GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), or both. Using a genome-wide dog single nucleotide polymorphism data set and comparisons of the dog genome with related species, we show that recombination-associated CGIs have low CpG mutation rates, and that CpG mutation rate is negatively correlated with recombination rate genome wide, indicating that nonmethylation attracts the recombination machinery. We next use a neighbor-dependent model of nucleotide substitution to disentangle the effects of CpG mutability and gBGC and analyze the effects that loss of PRDM9 has on these rates. We infer that methylation patterns have been stable during canid genome evolution, but that dog CGIs have experienced a drastic increase in substitution rate due to gBGC, consistent with increased levels of recombination in these regions. We also show that gBGC is likely to have generated many new CGIs in the dog genome, but these mostly occur away from genes, whereas the number of CGIs in gene promoter regions has not increased greatly in recent evolutionary history. Recombination has a major impact on the distribution of CGIs that are detected in the dog genome due to the interaction between methylation and gBGC. The results indicate that germline methylation patterns are the main determinant of recombination rates in the absence of PRDM9. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: InP.Gon.05.AllAg.Germline_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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