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Sample records for hybrid single-particle lagrangian

  1. A Simple Parametrization for the Concentration Variance Dissipation in a Lagrangian Single-Particle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Enrico; Mortarini, Luca; Purghè, Federico

    2016-11-01

    A model for the evaluation of the concentration fluctuation variance is coupled with a one-particle Lagrangian stochastic model and results compared to a wind-tunnel simulation experiment. In this model the concentration variance evolves along the particle trajectories according to the same Langevin equation used for the simulation of the velocity field, and its dissipation is taken into account through a decay term with a finite time scale. Indeed, while the mean concentration is conserved, the concentration variance is not and our model takes into account its dissipation. A simple parametrization for the dissipation time scale is proposed and it is found that it depends linearly on time and on the ratio between the size and the height of the source through a scaling factor of 1 / 3.

  2. A hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian flow solver

    CERN Document Server

    Palha, Artur; Ferreira, Carlos Simao; van Bussel, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Currently, Eulerian flow solvers are very efficient in accurately resolving flow structures near solid boundaries. On the other hand, they tend to be diffusive and to dampen high-intensity vortical structures after a short distance away from solid boundaries. The use of high order methods and fine grids, although alleviating this problem, gives rise to large systems of equations that are expensive to solve. Lagrangian solvers, as the regularized vortex particle method, have shown to eliminate (in practice) the diffusion in the wake. As a drawback, the modelling of solid boundaries is less accurate, more complex and costly than with Eulerian solvers (due to the isotropy of its computational elements). Given the drawbacks and advantages of both Eulerian and Lagrangian solvers the combination of both methods, giving rise to a hybrid solver, is advantageous. The main idea behind the hybrid solver presented is the following. In a region close to solid boundaries the flow is solved with an Eulerian solver, where th...

  3. Single-Particle Cryo-EM and 3D Reconstruction of Hybrid Nanoparticles with Electron-Dense Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guimei; Yan, Rui; Zhang, Chuan; Mao, Chengde; Jiang, Wen

    2015-10-01

    Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), accompanied with 3D reconstruction, is a broadly applicable tool for the structural characterization of macromolecules and nanoparticles. Recently, the cryo-EM field has pushed the limits of this technique to higher resolutions and samples of smaller molecular mass, however, some samples still present hurdles to this technique. Hybrid particles with electron-dense components, which have been studied using single-particle cryo-EM yet with limited success in 3D reconstruction due to the interference caused by electron-dense elements, constitute one group of such challenging samples. To process such hybrid particles, a masking method is developed in this work to adaptively remove pixels arising from electron-dense portions in individual projection images while maintaining maximal biomass signals for subsequent 2D alignment, 3D reconstruction, and iterative refinements. As demonstrated by the success in 3D reconstruction of an octahedron DNA/gold hybrid particle, which has been previously published without a 3D reconstruction, the devised strategy that combines adaptive masking and standard single-particle 3D reconstruction approach has overcome the hurdle of electron-dense elements interference, and is generally applicable to cryo-EM structural characterization of most, if not all, hybrid nanomaterials with electron-dense components.

  4. HybridN-order Lagrangian Interpolation Eulerian-Lagrangian Method for Salinity Calculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴炎成; 朱首贤; 周林; 游小宝; 张文静

    2016-01-01

    The Eulerian−Lagrangian method (ELM) has been used by many ocean models as the solution of the advection equation, but the numerical error caused by interpolation imposes restriction on its accuracy. In the present study, hybrid N-order Lagrangian interpolation ELM (LiELM) is put forward in which theN-order Lagrangian interpolation is used at first, then the lower order Lagrangian interpolation is applied in the points where the interpolation results are abnormally higher or lower. The calculation results of a step-shaped salinity advection model are analyzed, which show that higher order (N=3−8) LiELM can reduce the mean numerical error of salinity calculation, but the numerical oscillation error is still significant. Even number order LiELM makes larger numerical oscillation error than its adjacent odd number order LiELM. HybridN-order LiELM can remove numerical oscillation, and it significantly reduces the mean numerical error whenN is even and the current is in fixed direction, while it makes less effect on mean numerical error whenNis odd or the current direction changes periodically. Hybrid odd number order LiELM makes less mean numerical error than its adjacent even number order LiELM when the current is in the fixed direction, while the mean numerical error decreases asN increases when the current direction changes periodically, so odd number ofN may be better for application. Among various types of HybridN-order LiELM, the scheme reducingN-order directly to 1st-order may be the optimal for synthetic selection of accuracy and computational efficiency.

  5. The hybrid Eulerian Lagrangian numerical scheme tested with Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Hansen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed advection scheme, the Hybrid Eulerian Lagrangian (HEL scheme, has been tested, including a module for atmospheric chemistry, including 58 chemical species, and compared to two other traditional advection schemes; a classical pseudospectral Eulerian method the Accurate Space Derivative (ASD scheme and the bi-cubic semi-Lagrangian (SL scheme using classical rotation tests. The rotation tests have been designed to test and compare the advection schemes for different spatial and temporal resolutions in different chemical conditions (rural and urban and for different shapes (cone and slotted cylinder giving the advection schemes different challenges with respect to relatively slow or fast chemistry and smooth or sharp gradients, respectively. In every test, error measures have been calculated and used for ranking of the advection schemes with respect to performance, i.e. lowest overall errors for all chemical species. Furthermore, the HEL and SL schemes have been compared in a shallow water model, demonstrating the performance in a more realistic non-linear deformation flow.

    The results in this paper show that the new advection scheme, HEL, by far outperforms both the Eulerian and semi-Lagrangian schemes with very low error estimates compared to the two other schemes. Although no analytic solution can be obtained for the performance in the non-linear shallow water model flow, the tracer distribution appears realistic as compared to LMCSL when a mixing between local parcel concentrations is introduced in HEL.

  6. A hybrid Eulerian Lagrangian numerical scheme for solving prognostic equations in fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kaas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new hybrid Eulerian Lagrangian numerical scheme (HEL for solving prognostic equations in fluid dynamics is proposed. The basic idea is to use an Eulerian as well as a fully Lagrangian representation of all prognostic variables. The time step in Lagrangian space is obtained as a translation of irregularly spaced Lagrangian parcels along downstream trajectories. Tendencies due to other physical processes than advection are calculated in Eulerian space, interpolated, and added to the Lagrangian parcel values. A directionally biased mixing amongst neighboring Lagrangian parcels is introduced. The rate of mixing is proportional to the local deformation rate of the flow. The time stepping in Eulerian representation is achieved in two steps: first a mass conserving Eulerian or semi-Lagrangian scheme is used to obtain a provisional forecast. This forecast is then nudged towards target values defined from the irregularly spaced Lagrangian parcel values. The nudging procedure is defined in such a way that mass conservation and shape preservation is ensured in Eulerian space. The HEL scheme has been designed to be accurate, multi-tracer efficient, mass conserving, and shape preserving. In Lagrangian space only physically based mixing takes place, i.e., the problem of artificial numerical mixing is avoided. This property is desirable in atmospheric chemical transport models since spurious numerical mixing can impact chemical concentrations severely. The properties of HEL are here verified in two-dimensional tests. These include deformational passive transport on the sphere, and simulations with a semi-implicit shallow water model including topography.

  7. A hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian numerical model for sea-ice dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian (HLE) method is developed for sea ice dynamics, which combines the high computational efficiency of finite difference method (FDM) with the high numerical accuracy of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In this HLE model, the sea ice cover is represented by a group of Lagrangian ice particles with their own thicknesses and concentrations. These ice variables are interpolated to the Eularian gird nodes using the Gaussian interpolation function. The FDM is used to determine the ice velocities at Eulerian grid nodes, and the velocities of Lagrangian ice particles are interpolated from these grid velocities with the Gaussian function also. The thicknesses and concentrations of ice particles are determined based on their new locations. With the HLE numerical model, the ice ridging process in a rectangular basin is simulated, and the simulated results are validated with the analytical solution. This method is also applied to the simulation of sea ice dynamics in a vortex wind field. At last, this HLE model is applied to the Bohai Sea, and the simulated concentration, thickness and velocity match the satellite images and the field observed data well.

  8. Signals of single particle production at the earliest LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, Riccardo [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Fibonacci 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Torre, Riccardo, E-mail: riccardo.torre@pi.infn.i [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Fibonacci 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, Largo Fibonacci 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-01-10

    Based on simple phenomenological Lagrangians, fulfilling reasonable consistency conditions, we consider under which circumstances the production of a single particle might be an early signal of new physics at the LHC. Effective final states are {gamma}{gamma} and {gamma}+jet already with tens of inverse picobarns of integrated luminosity at 7 TeV.

  9. A new hybrid-Lagrangian numerical scheme for gyrokinetic simulation of tokamak edge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Hager, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Chang, C. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kwon, J. M. [National Fusion Research Institute, Republic of Korea; Parker, S. E. [University of Colorado Boulder, USA

    2016-06-01

    In order to enable kinetic simulation of non-thermal edge plasmas at a reduced computational cost, a new hybrid-Lagrangian δf scheme has been developed that utilizes the phase space grid in addition to the usual marker particles, taking advantage of the computational strengths from both sides. The new scheme splits the particle distribution function of a kinetic equation into two parts. Marker particles contain the fast space-time varying, δf, part of the distribution function and the coarse-grained phase-space grid contains the slow space-time varying part. The coarse-grained phase-space grid reduces the memory-requirement and the computing cost, while the marker particles provide scalable computing ability for the fine-grained physics. Weights of the marker particles are determined by a direct weight evolution equation instead of the differential form weight evolution equations that the conventional delta-f schemes use. The particle weight can be slowly transferred to the phase space grid, thereby reducing the growth of the particle weights. The non-Lagrangian part of the kinetic equation – e.g., collision operation, ionization, charge exchange, heat-source, radiative cooling, and others – can be operated directly on the phase space grid. Deviation of the particle distribution function on the velocity grid from a Maxwellian distribution function – driven by ionization, charge exchange and wall loss – is allowed to be arbitrarily large. The numerical scheme is implemented in the gyrokinetic particle code XGC1, which specializes in simulating the tokamak edge plasma that crosses the magnetic separatrix and is in contact with the material wall.

  10. A new hybrid-Lagrangian numerical scheme for gyrokinetic simulation of tokamak edge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, S., E-mail: sku@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Hager, R.; Chang, C.S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Kwon, J.M. [National Fusion Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Parker, S.E. [University of Colorado Boulder (United States)

    2016-06-15

    In order to enable kinetic simulation of non-thermal edge plasmas at a reduced computational cost, a new hybrid-Lagrangian δf scheme has been developed that utilizes the phase space grid in addition to the usual marker particles, taking advantage of the computational strengths from both sides. The new scheme splits the particle distribution function of a kinetic equation into two parts. Marker particles contain the fast space-time varying, δf, part of the distribution function and the coarse-grained phase-space grid contains the slow space-time varying part. The coarse-grained phase-space grid reduces the memory-requirement and the computing cost, while the marker particles provide scalable computing ability for the fine-grained physics. Weights of the marker particles are determined by a direct weight evolution equation instead of the differential form weight evolution equations that the conventional delta-f schemes use. The particle weight can be slowly transferred to the phase space grid, thereby reducing the growth of the particle weights. The non-Lagrangian part of the kinetic equation – e.g., collision operation, ionization, charge exchange, heat-source, radiative cooling, and others – can be operated directly on the phase space grid. Deviation of the particle distribution function on the velocity grid from a Maxwellian distribution function – driven by ionization, charge exchange and wall loss – is allowed to be arbitrarily large. The numerical scheme is implemented in the gyrokinetic particle code XGC1, which specializes in simulating the tokamak edge plasma that crosses the magnetic separatrix and is in contact with the material wall.

  11. A new hybrid-Lagrangian numerical scheme for gyrokinetic simulation of tokamak edge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, S.; Hager, R.; Chang, C. S.; Kwon, J. M.; Parker, S. E.

    2016-06-01

    In order to enable kinetic simulation of non-thermal edge plasmas at a reduced computational cost, a new hybrid-Lagrangian δf scheme has been developed that utilizes the phase space grid in addition to the usual marker particles, taking advantage of the computational strengths from both sides. The new scheme splits the particle distribution function of a kinetic equation into two parts. Marker particles contain the fast space-time varying, δf, part of the distribution function and the coarse-grained phase-space grid contains the slow space-time varying part. The coarse-grained phase-space grid reduces the memory-requirement and the computing cost, while the marker particles provide scalable computing ability for the fine-grained physics. Weights of the marker particles are determined by a direct weight evolution equation instead of the differential form weight evolution equations that the conventional delta-f schemes use. The particle weight can be slowly transferred to the phase space grid, thereby reducing the growth of the particle weights. The non-Lagrangian part of the kinetic equation - e.g., collision operation, ionization, charge exchange, heat-source, radiative cooling, and others - can be operated directly on the phase space grid. Deviation of the particle distribution function on the velocity grid from a Maxwellian distribution function - driven by ionization, charge exchange and wall loss - is allowed to be arbitrarily large. The numerical scheme is implemented in the gyrokinetic particle code XGC1, which specializes in simulating the tokamak edge plasma that crosses the magnetic separatrix and is in contact with the material wall.

  12. A single particle energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Usmani, Q.N.; Sami, M. [Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Physics

    1993-09-01

    We consider the binding energies of {Lambda} hypernuclei (HN), in particular the single-particle (s.p.) energy data, which have been obtained for a wide range of HN with mass numbers A {le} 89 and for orbital angular momenta {ell}{sub {Lambda}} {le} 4. We briefly review some of the relevant properties of A hypernuclei. These are nuclei {sub {Lambda}}{sup A}Z with baryon number A in which a single {Lambda} hyperon (baryon number = 1) is bound to an ordinary nucleus {sup A}Z consisting of A - 1 nucleons = Z protons + N neutrons. The {Lambda} hyperon is neutral, has spin 1/2, strangeness S = {minus}1, isospin I = O and a mass M{sub {Lambda}} = 1116 MeV/c{sup 2}. Although the {Lambda} interacts with a nucleon, its interaction is only about half as strong as that between two nucleons, and thus very roughly V{sub {Lambda}N} {approx} 0.5 V{sub NN}. As a result, the two-body {Lambda}N system is unbound, and the lightest bound HN is the three-body hypertriton {sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H in which the {Lambda} is bound to a deuteron with the {Lambda}-d separation energy being only {approx} 0.1 MeV corresponding to an exponential tail of radius {approx} 15 fm! In strong interactions the strangeness S is of course conserved, and the {Lambda} is distinct from the nucleons. In a HN strangeness changes only in the weak decays of the {Lambda} which can decay either via ``free`` pionic decay {Lambda} {yields} N + {pi} or via induced decay {Lambda} + N {yields} N + N which is only possible in the presence of nucleons. Because of the small energy release the pionic decay is strongly suppressed in all but the lightest HN and the induced decay dominates. However, the weak decay lifetime {approx} 10{sup {minus}10}s is in fact close to the lifetime of a free {Lambda}. Since this is much longer than the strong interaction time {approx} 10{sup {minus}22}s we can ignore the weak interactions when considering the binding of HN, just as for ordinary nuclei.

  13. Single Particle Difraction at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogan, M.; Boutet, S.; Starodub, Dmitri; Decorwin-Martin, Philippe; /SLAC; Chapman, H.; Bajt, S.; Schulz, J.; /DESY; Hajdu, Janos; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; /Uppsala U.; Marchesini, Stefano; /LBL, Berkeley; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Woods, Bruce; /LLNL, Livermore; Rohner, Urs; /Tofwerk AG, Thun

    2010-06-11

    Single-pulse coherent diffraction patterns have been collected from randomly injected single particles with a soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL). The intense focused FEL pulse gives a high-resolution low-noise coherent diffraction pattern of the object before that object turns into a plasma and explodes. A diffraction pattern of a single particle will only be recorded when the particle arrival into the FEL interaction region coincides with FEL pulse arrival and detector integration. The properties of the experimental apparatus coinciding with these three events set the data acquisition rate. For our single particle FLASH diffraction imaging experiments: (1) an aerodynamic lens stack prepared a particle beam that consisted of particles moving at 150-200 m/s positioned randomly in space and time, (2) the 10 fs long FEL pulses were delivered at a fixed rate, and (3) the detector was set to integrate and readout once every two seconds. The effect of these experimental parameters on the rate of data acquisition using randomly injected particles will be discussed. Overall, the ultrashort FEL pulses do not set the limit of the data acquisition, more important is the effective interaction time of the particle crossing the FEL focus, the pulse sequence structure and the detector readout rate. Example diffraction patterns of randomly injected ellipsoidal iron oxide nanoparticles in different orientations are presented. This is the first single particle diffraction data set of identical particles in different orientations collected on a shot-to-shot basis. This data set will be used to test algorithms for recovering 3D structure from single particle diffraction.

  14. Hybrid Eulerian and Lagrangian Simulation of Steep and Breaking Waves and Surface Fluxes in High Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    codes are parallelized using message passing interface (MPI) based on domain decomposition. For SPH , graphics processing unit (GPU) computing, which is...aims at developing a numerical capability using a Lagrangian Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics ( SPH ) method and an Eulerian Level-Set Method (LSM) for...the SPH and LSM with environmental input provided by coupled wind and wave simulations at far field; (2) Use the numerical method developed in (1

  15. Investigation of Bubble-Slag Layer Behaviors with Hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian Modeling and Large Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan

    2016-08-01

    In ladle metallurgy, bubble-liquid interaction leads to complex phase structures. Gas bubble behavior, as well as the induced slag layer behavior, plays a significant role in the refining process and the steel quality. In the present work, a mathematical model using the large eddy simulation (LES) is developed to investigate the bubble transport and slag layer behavior in a water model of an argon-stirred ladle. The Eulerian volume of fluid model is adopted to track the liquid steel-slag-air free surfaces while the Lagrangian discrete phase model is used for tracking and handling the dynamics of discrete bubbles. The bubble coalescence is considered using O'Rourke's algorithm to solve the bubble diameter redistribution and bubbles are removed after leaving the air-liquid interface. The turbulent liquid flow that is induced by bubble-liquid interaction is solved by LES. The slag layer fluactuation, slag droplet entrainment and spout eye open-close phenomenon are well revealed. The bubble diameter distribution and the spout eye size are compared with the experiment. The results show that the hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian-LES model provides a valid modeling framework to predict the unsteady gas bubble-slag layer coupled behaviors.

  16. Characteristics of atmospheric single particles during haze periods in a typical urban area of Beijing: A case study in October, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lang; Wang, Yanli; Du, Shiyong; Zhang, Wenjie; Hou, Lujian; Vedal, Sverre; Han, Bin; Yang, Wen; Chen, Mindong; Bai, Zhipeng

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the composition and possible sources of particles, especially during heavy haze pollution, a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was deployed to measure the changes of single particle species and sizes during October of 2014, in Beijing. A total of 2,871,431 particles with both positive and negative spectra were collected and characterized in combination with the adaptive resonance theory neural network algorithm (ART-2a). Eight types of particles were classified: dust particles (dust, 8.1%), elemental carbon (EC, 29.0%), organic carbon (OC, 18.0%), EC and OC combined particles (ECOC, 9.5%), Na-K containing particles (NaK, 7.9%), K-containing particles (K, 21.8%), organic nitrogen and potassium containing particles (KCN, 2.3%), and metal-containing particles (metal, 3.6%). Three haze pollution events (P1, P2, P3) and one clean period (clean) were analyzed, based on the mass and number concentration of PM2.5 and the back trajectory results from the hybrid single particle Lagrangian integrated trajectory model (Hysplit-4 model). Results showed that EC, OC and K were the major components of single particles during the three haze pollution periods, which showed clearly increased ratios compared with those in the clean period. Results from the mixing state of secondary species of different types of particles showed that sulfate and nitrate were more readily mixed with carbon-containing particles during haze pollution episodes than in clean periods.

  17. An efficient and stable hybrid extended Lagrangian/self-consistent field scheme for solving classical mutual induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albaugh, Alex [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Demerdash, Omar [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Head-Gordon, Teresa, E-mail: thg@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-11-07

    We have adapted a hybrid extended Lagrangian self-consistent field (EL/SCF) approach, developed for time reversible Born Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for quantum electronic degrees of freedom, to the problem of classical polarization. In this context, the initial guess for the mutual induction calculation is treated by auxiliary induced dipole variables evolved via a time-reversible velocity Verlet scheme. However, we find numerical instability, which is manifested as an accumulation in the auxiliary velocity variables, that in turn results in an unacceptable increase in the number of SCF cycles to meet even loose convergence tolerances for the real induced dipoles over the course of a 1 ns trajectory of the AMOEBA14 water model. By diagnosing the numerical instability as a problem of resonances that corrupt the dynamics, we introduce a simple thermostating scheme, illustrated using Berendsen weak coupling and Nose-Hoover chain thermostats, applied to the auxiliary dipole velocities. We find that the inertial EL/SCF (iEL/SCF) method provides superior energy conservation with less stringent convergence thresholds and a correspondingly small number of SCF cycles, to reproduce all properties of the polarization model in the NVT and NVE ensembles accurately. Our iEL/SCF approach is a clear improvement over standard SCF approaches to classical mutual induction calculations and would be worth investigating for application to ab initio molecular dynamics as well.

  18. Some Effects on A Single Particle Energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiu-Ling; LUO Yan-An; CAI Chong-Hai; NING Ping-Zhi

    2002-01-01

    With the phenomenological A-nucleus potentials of Woods-Saxon shape,the effects of the maas-number dependence of the shrinkage,the effective mass m*^ and the charge-symmetry breaking (CSB) on the single particle energies are discussed.It is found that the single particle energies are not sensitive to the effective mass m*^.But the radius parameter depended on the mass number (ro (Ac) = r1 + r2A-2/3) can substantially improve the results.We also found that CSB effect is significant for heavy hypernuclei with a large neutron excess.

  19. Lagrangians Galore

    OpenAIRE

    Nucci, M. C.; Leach, P. G. L.

    2007-01-01

    Searching for a Lagrangian may seem either a trivial endeavour or an impossible task. In this paper we show that the Jacobi last multiplier associated with the Lie symmetries admitted by simple models of classical mechanics produces (too?) many Lagrangians in a simple way. We exemplify the method by such a classic as the simple harmonic oscillator, the harmonic oscillator in disguise [H Goldstein, {\\it Classical Mechanics}, 2nd edition (Addison-Wesley, Reading, 1980)] and the damped harmonic ...

  20. Lagrangians galore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucci, M. C.; Leach, P. G. L.

    2007-12-01

    Searching for a Lagrangian may seem either a trivial endeavor or an impossible task. In this paper, we show that the Jacobi last multiplier associated with the Lie symmetries admitted by simple models of classical mechanics produces (too?) many Lagrangians in a simple way. We exemplify the method by such a classic as the simple harmonic oscillator, the harmonic oscillator in disguise [H. Goldstein, Classical Mechanics, 2nd edition (Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA, 1980)], and the damped harmonic oscillator. This is the first paper in a series dedicated to this subject.

  1. Single-particle states in transcurium nuclei.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I.

    1999-09-30

    Identification of single-particle states in the heaviest known nuclei is important because their energies can be used to test the single-particle potential in these high-Z elements. These states can be identified by studying the decay schemes of very heavy odd-mass nuclides. For neutrons, the heaviest odd-mass nuclide available in milliCurie quantities is the 20-h {sup 255}Fm and for protons the heaviest nuclide available is the 20-d {sup 253}Es. These two isotopes were obtained from the Transplutonium Element Production Program at Oak Ridge and their spectra were measured with high-resolution germanium spectrometers. From the results of these measurements we have identified states in {sup 251}Cf and {sup 249}Bk up to 1 MeV excitation energy.

  2. Efficiency of single-particle engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proesmans, Karel; Driesen, Cedric; Cleuren, Bart; Van den Broeck, Christian

    2015-09-01

    We study the efficiency of a single-particle Szilard and Carnot engine. Within a first order correction to the quasistatic limit, the work distribution is found to be Gaussian and the correction factor to average work and efficiency only depends on the piston speed. The stochastic efficiency is studied for both models and the recent findings on efficiency fluctuations are confirmed numerically. Special features are revealed in the zero-temperature limit.

  3. Efficiency of single-particle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proesmans, Karel; Driesen, Cedric; Cleuren, Bart; Van den Broeck, Christian

    2015-09-01

    We study the efficiency of a single-particle Szilard and Carnot engine. Within a first order correction to the quasistatic limit, the work distribution is found to be Gaussian and the correction factor to average work and efficiency only depends on the piston speed. The stochastic efficiency is studied for both models and the recent findings on efficiency fluctuations are confirmed numerically. Special features are revealed in the zero-temperature limit.

  4. Maxwell-like Lagrangians for higher spins

    CERN Document Server

    Campoleoni, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    We show how implementing invariance under divergence-free gauge transformations leads to a remarkably simple Lagrangian description of massless bosons of any spin. Our construction covers both flat and (A)dS backgrounds and extends to tensors of arbitrary mixed-symmetry type. Irreducible and traceless fields produce single-particle actions, while whenever trace constraints can be dispensed with the resulting Lagrangians display the same reducible, multi-particle spectra as those emerging from the tensionless limit of free open-string field theory. For all explored options the corresponding kinetic operators take essentially the same form as in the spin-one, Maxwell case.

  5. Single-Particle States in $^{133}$Sn

    CERN Multimedia

    Huck, A

    2002-01-01

    % IS338 \\\\ \\\\ It is suggested to investigate the $\\beta^- $-decay of $^{133}$In and $^{134}$In in order to determine the single-particle states in $^{133}$Sn, which are so far unknown and needed for the shell-model description of the region close to $^{132}$Sn. Large hyper-pure Ge-detectors will be used for the $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy. In the experiments with $^{134}$In, delayed neutrons in coincidence with $\\gamma$-rays from excited states in $^{133}$Sn provide the opportunity for a very selective detection of the states in question.

  6. Single-particle excitations in 89Y

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, J. E.; Hersman, F. W.; Heisenberg, J. H.; Milliman, T. E.; Connelly, J. P.; Calarco, J. R.; Papanicolas, C. N.

    1990-09-01

    Inelastic-electron-scattering cross sections have been measured for the first three excitations in 89Y at forward angles for momentum transfers of 1.25single-particle model. The inclusion of core polarization from the operator renormalization approximation for shell models gives good agreement with experimental results.

  7. Carnot process with a single particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppenau, J; Niemann, M; Engel, A

    2013-06-01

    We determine the statistics of work in isothermal volume changes of a classical ideal gas consisting of a single particle. Combining our results with the findings of Lua and Grosberg [J. Chem. Phys. B 109, 6805 (2005)] on adiabatic expansions and compressions we then analyze the joint probability distribution of heat and work for a microscopic, nonequilibrium Carnot cycle. In the quasistatic limit we recover Carnot efficiency, however, combined with nontrivial distributions of work and heat. With increasing piston speed the efficiency decreases. The efficiency at maximum power stays within recently derived bounds.

  8. The probe rules in single particle tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mathias P.; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer

    2011-01-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) enables light microscopy at a sub-diffraction limited spatial resolution by a combination of imaging at low molecular labeling densities and computational image processing. SPT and related single molecule imaging techniques have found a rapidly expanded use within...... the life sciences. This expanded use is due to an increased demand and requisite for developing a comprehensive understanding of the spatial dynamics of bio-molecular interactions at a spatial scale that is equivalent to the size of the molecules themselves, as well as by the emergence of new imaging...

  9. Single-particle study of protein assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2001-10-01

    A study of protein assembly in solution with single-particle imaging and reconstruction techniques using cryoelectron microscopy is reported. The human glutamine synthetase enzyme, important in brain metabolism, and previously assumed to be assembled into a homogeneous quaternary structure, is found to be heterogeneous, with three oligomeric states that co-exist at room temperature. This result corrects an old structural and kinetic model determined by ensemble averaging techniques that assumed a homogeneous system. Unexpectedly fast protein dissociation kinetics results from a stabilized transition state.

  10. Modeling of Quasi-Four-Phase Flow in Continuous Casting Mold Using Hybrid Eulerian and Lagrangian Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Sun, Zhenbang; Li, Baokuan

    2016-12-01

    Lagrangian tracking model combined with Eulerian multi-phase model is employed to predict the time-dependent argon-steel-slag-air quasi-four-phase flow inside a slab continuous casting mold. The Eulerian approach is used for the description of three phases (molten steel, liquid slag, and air at the top of liquid slag layer). The dispersed argon bubble injected from the SEN is treated in the Lagrangian way. The complex interfacial momentum transfers between various phases are considered. Validation is supported by the measurement data of cold model experiments and industrial practice. Close agreements were achieved for the gas volume fraction, liquid flow pattern, level fluctuation, and exposed slag eye phenomena. Many known phenomena and new predictions were successfully reproduced using this model. The vortex slag entrapment phenomenon at the slag-steel interface was obtained using this model, some small slag drops are sucked deep into the liquid pool of molten steel. Varying gas flow rates have a large effect on the steel flow pattern in the upper recirculation zone. Three typical flow patterns inside the mold with different argon gas flow rates have been obtained: double roll, three roll, and single roll. Effects of argon gas flow rate, casting speed, and slag layer thickness on the exposed slag eye and level fluctuation at the slag-steel interface were studied. A dimensionless value of H ave/h was proposed to describe the time-averaged level fluctuation of slag-steel interface. The exposed slag eye near the SEN would be formed when the value of H ave/h is larger than 0.4.

  11. Multiplex single particle analysis in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannhauser, D; Romeo, G; Causa, F; De Santo, I; Netti, P A

    2014-10-21

    A straightforward way to measure separated micrometric sized particles in microfluidic flow is reported. The light scattering profile (LSP) of each single particle is fully characterized by using a CMOS-camera based small angle light scattering (SALS) apparatus, ranging from 2° up to 30°. To ensure controlled particle passage through the incident laser, a viscoelastic 3D alignment effect by viscoelastic induced particle migration has been implemented in a simple and cost-effective microfluidic device. Different polystyrene particle sizes are measured in microfluidic flows and the obtained scattering signatures are matched with the Lorenz-Mie based scattering theory. The results confirm the possibility of using this apparatus for real multiplex particle analyses in microfluidic particle flows.

  12. Controlling chemical reactions of a single particle

    CERN Document Server

    Ratschbacher, Lothar; Sias, Carlo; Köhl, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The control of chemical reactions is a recurring theme in physics and chemistry. Traditionally, chemical reactions have been investigated by tuning thermodynamic parameters, such as temperature or pressure. More recently, physical methods such as laser or magnetic field control have emerged to provide completely new experimental possibilities, in particular in the realm of cold collisions. The control of reaction pathways is also a critical component to implement molecular quantum information processing. For these undertakings, single particles provide a clean and well-controlled experimental system. Here, we report on the experimental tuning of the exchange reaction rates of a single trapped ion with ultracold neutral atoms by exerting control over both their quantum states. We observe the influence of the hyperfine interaction on chemical reaction rates and branching ratios, and monitor the kinematics of the reaction products. These investigations advance chemistry with single trapped particles towards achi...

  13. Lagrangian optics

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan; Thyagarajan, K

    2002-01-01

    Ingeometrical optics, light propagation is analyzed in terms of light rays which define the path of propagation of light energy in the limitofthe optical wavelength tending to zero. Many features oflight propagation can be analyzed in terms ofrays,ofcourse, subtle effects near foci, caustics or turning points would need an analysis based on the wave natureoflight. Allofgeometric optics can be derived from Fermat's principle which is an extremum principle. The counterpart in classical mechanics is of course Hamilton's principle. There is a very close analogy between mechanics ofparticles and optics oflight rays. Much insight (and useful results) can be obtained by analyzing these analogies. Asnoted by H. Goldstein in his book Classical Mechanics (Addison Wesley, Cambridge, MA, 1956), classical mechanics is only a geometrical optics approximation to a wave theory! In this book we begin with Fermat's principle and obtain the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian pictures of ray propagation through various media. Given the ...

  14. Lagrangian Quantum Homology for Lagrangian cobordism

    OpenAIRE

    Singer, Berit

    2015-01-01

    We extend the definition of Lagrangian quantum homology to monotone Lagrangian cobordism and establish its general algebraic properties. In particular we develop a relative version of Lagrangian quantum homology associated to a cobordism relative to a part of its boundary and study relations of this invariant to the ambient quantum homology.

  15. Single-particle stochastic heat engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Shubhashis; Pal, P S; Saha, Arnab; Jayannavar, A M

    2014-10-01

    We have performed an extensive analysis of a single-particle stochastic heat engine constructed by manipulating a Brownian particle in a time-dependent harmonic potential. The cycle consists of two isothermal steps at different temperatures and two adiabatic steps similar to that of a Carnot engine. The engine shows qualitative differences in inertial and overdamped regimes. All the thermodynamic quantities, including efficiency, exhibit strong fluctuations in a time periodic steady state. The fluctuations of stochastic efficiency dominate over the mean values even in the quasistatic regime. Interestingly, our system acts as an engine provided the temperature difference between the two reservoirs is greater than a finite critical value which in turn depends on the cycle time and other system parameters. This is supported by our analytical results carried out in the quasistatic regime. Our system works more reliably as an engine for large cycle times. By studying various model systems, we observe that the operational characteristics are model dependent. Our results clearly rule out any universal relation between efficiency at maximum power and temperature of the baths. We have also verified fluctuation relations for heat engines in time periodic steady state.

  16. Unsupervised single-particle deep classification via statistical manifold learning

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiayi; Condgon, Charles; Brett, Bevin; Chen, Shuobing; Ouyang, Qi; Mao, Youdong

    2016-01-01

    Structural heterogeneity in single-particle images presents a major challenge for high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure determination. Here we introduce a statistical manifold learning approach for unsupervised single-particle deep classification. When optimized for Intel high-performance computing (HPC) processors, our approach can generate thousands of reference-free class averages within several hours from hundreds of thousands of single-particle cryo-EM images. Deep classification thus assists in computational purification of single-particle datasets for high-resolution reconstruction.

  17. Automated data collection in single particle electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yong Zi; Cheng, Anchi; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Automated data collection is an integral part of modern workflows in single particle electron microscopy (EM) research. This review surveys the software packages available for automated single particle EM data collection. The degree of automation at each stage of data collection is evaluated, and the capabilities of the software packages are described. Finally, future trends in automation are discussed. PMID:26671944

  18. Microprocessor-based single particle calibration of scintillation counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, G. K. D.; Pathak, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    A microprocessor-base set-up is fabricated and tested for the single particle calibration of the plastic scintillator. The single particle response of the scintillator is digitized by an A/D converter, and a 8085 A based microprocessor stores the pulse heights. The digitized information is printed. Facilities for CRT display and cassette storing and recalling are also made available.

  19. Optical microresonators as single-particle absorption spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heylman, Kevin D.; Thakkar, Niket; Horak, Erik H.; Quillin, Steven C.; Cherqui, Charles; Knapper, Kassandra A.; Masiello, David J.; Goldsmith, Randall H.

    2016-12-01

    Optical measurements of nanoscale objects offer major insights into fundamental biological, material and photonic properties. In absorption spectroscopy, sensitivity limits applications at the nanoscale. Here, we present a new single-particle double-modulation photothermal absorption spectroscopy method that employs on-chip optical whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microresonators as ultrasensitive thermometers. Optical excitation of a nanoscale object on the microresonator produces increased local temperatures that are proportional to the absorption cross-section of the object. We resolve photothermal shifts in the resonance frequency of the microresonator that are smaller than 100 Hz, orders of magnitude smaller than previous WGM sensing schemes. The application of our new technique to single gold nanorods reveals a dense array of sharp Fano resonances arising from the coupling between the localized surface plasmon of the gold nanorod and the WGMs of the resonator, allowing for the exploration of plasmonic-photonic hybridization. In terms of the wider applicability, our approach adds label-free spectroscopic identification to microresonator-based detection schemes.

  20. Multi-color single particle tracking with quantum dots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva C Arnspang

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs have long promised to revolutionize fluorescence detection to include even applications requiring simultaneous multi-species detection at single molecule sensitivity. Despite the early promise, the unique optical properties of QDs have not yet been fully exploited in e. g. multiplex single molecule sensitivity applications such as single particle tracking (SPT. In order to fully optimize single molecule multiplex application with QDs, we have in this work performed a comprehensive quantitative investigation of the fluorescence intensities, fluorescence intensity fluctuations, and hydrodynamic radii of eight types of commercially available water soluble QDs. In this study, we show that the fluorescence intensity of CdSe core QDs increases as the emission of the QDs shifts towards the red but that hybrid CdSe/CdTe core QDs are less bright than the furthest red-shifted CdSe QDs. We further show that there is only a small size advantage in using blue-shifted QDs in biological applications because of the additional size of the water-stabilizing surface coat. Extending previous work, we finally also show that parallel four color multicolor (MC-SPT with QDs is possible at an image acquisition rate of at least 25 Hz. We demonstrate the technique by measuring the lateral dynamics of a lipid, biotin-cap-DPPE, in the cellular plasma membrane of live cells using four different colors of QDs; QD565, QD605, QD655, and QD705 as labels.

  1. Single-particle nonlocality and entanglement with the vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Björk, G; Sánchez-Soto, L L

    2001-01-01

    We propose a single-particle experiment that is equivalent to the conventional two-particle experiment used to demonstrate a violation of Bell's inequalities. Hence, we argue that quantum mechanical nonlocality can be demonstrated by single-particle states. The validity of such a claim has been discussed in the literature, but without reaching a clear consensus. We show that the disagreement can be traced to what part of the total state of the experiment one assigns to the (macroscopic) measurement apparatus. However, with a conventional and legitimate interpretation of the measurement process one is led to the conclusion that even a single particle can show nonlocal properties.

  2. Determining Complex Structures using Docking Method with Single Particle Scattering Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiguang Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein complexes are critical for many molecular functions. Due to intrinsic flexibility and dynamics of complexes, their structures are more difficult to determine using conventional experimental methods, in contrast to individual subunits. One of the major challenges is the crystallization of protein complexes. Using X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs, it is possible to collect scattering signals from non-crystalline protein complexes, but data interpretation is more difficult because of unknown orientations. Here, we propose a hybrid approach to determine protein complex structures by combining XFEL single particle scattering data with computational docking methods. Using simulations data, we demonstrate that a small set of single particle scattering data collected at random orientations can be used to distinguish the native complex structure from the decoys generated using docking algorithms. The results also indicate that a small set of single particle scattering data is superior to spherically averaged intensity profile in distinguishing complex structures. Given the fact that XFEL experimental data are difficult to acquire and at low abundance, this hybrid approach should find wide applications in data interpretations.

  3. Multi-Color Single Particle Tracking with Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Brewer, J. R.; Lagerholm, B. C.

    2012-01-01

    . multiplex single molecule sensitivity applications such as single particle tracking (SPT). In order to fully optimize single molecule multiplex application with QDs, we have in this work performed a comprehensive quantitative investigation of the fluorescence intensities, fluorescence intensity fluctuations...

  4. Application of the extended discrete element method (XDEM) in the melting of a single particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniasadi, Mehdi; Baniasadi, Maryam; Peters, Bernhard

    2017-07-01

    In this contribution, a new method referred to as Extended Discrete Element Method (XDEM) is usedto model melting of a single particle in the fluid media. The XDEM as a Lagrangian-Eulerian framework is the extension of Discrete Element Method (DEM) by considering thermodynamic state such as temperature distribution and is able to link with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for fluid phase. In order to provide more accurate results, multiscale method was used. The model is validated by comparing predicted results with existing experimental data for melting of a single ice particle in a water bath. In addition, the model has the capability to be extended to the packed bed of particles with different size and properties to produce different liquid phases.

  5. Thermodiffusion of charged colloids: single-particle diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, Jan K G; Wiegand, S; Duhr, S; Braun, D

    2007-02-13

    An expression for the single-particle thermal diffusion coefficient of a charged colloidal sphere is derived on the basis of force balance on the Brownian time scale in combination with thermodynamics. It is shown that the single-particle thermal diffusion coefficient is related to the temperature dependence of the reversible work necessary to build the colloidal particle, including the core, the solvation layer, and the electrical double layer. From this general expression, an explicit expression for the contribution of the electrical double layer to the single-particle thermal diffusion coefficient is derived in terms of the surface charge density of the colloidal sphere, the electrostatic screening length, and its core radius, to within the Debye-Hückel approximation. This result is shown to explain experimental data, for both thin and thick double layers. In addition, a comparison with other theories is made.

  6. Error analysis in correlation computation of single particle reconstruction technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡悦; 隋森芳

    1999-01-01

    The single particle reconstruction technique has become particularly important in the structure analysis of hiomaeromolecules. The problem of reconstructing a picture from identical samples polluted by colored noises is studied, and the alignment error in the correlation computation of single particle reconstruction technique is analyzed systematically. The concept of systematic error is introduced, and the explicit form of the systematic error is given under the weak noise approximation. The influence of the systematic error on the reconstructed picture is discussed also, and an analytical formula for correcting the distortion in the picture reconstruction is obtained.

  7. An airborne perfluorocarbon tracer system and its first application for a Lagrangian experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y.; Baumann, R.; Schlager, H.

    2015-01-01

    A perfluorocarbon tracer system (PERTRAS), specifically designed for Lagrangian aircraft experiments, has been developed by the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (German Aerospace Center, DLR). It consists of three main parts: a tracer release unit (RU), an adsorption tube sampler (ATS), and a tracer analytical system. The RU was designed for airborne tracer release experiments; meanwhile, it can be used on various platforms for different experimental purposes (here research vessel). PERTRAS was for the first time applied in the field campaign Stratospheric ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere (SHIVA) in November 2011. An amount of 8.8 kg perfluoromethylcyclopentane (PMCP) was released aboard the research vessel Sonne (RV Sonne) near the operational site of this campaign, Miri, Malaysia, on 21 November. The tracer samples collected using the ATS onboard the DLR research aircraft Falcon were analyzed in the laboratory using a thermal desorber-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) system. Guided by forecasts calculated with the Lagrangian model Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT), 64 tracer samples were collected onboard the Falcon approximately 5 and 25 h after the release, mostly with a time resolution of 1 min. Enhanced PMCP concentrations relative to ambient PMCP background values (mean: 6.62 fmol mol-1) were detected during three intersects of the fresh tracer plume (age 5 h), with a maximum value of 301.33 fmol mol-1. This indicates that the fresh tracer plume was successfully intercepted at the forecast position. During the second flight, 25 h after the release, the center of tracer plume was not detected by the sampling system due to a faster advection of the plume than forecast. The newly developed PERTRAS system has been successfully deployed for the first time. The instrumental setup and comparisons between the measurements and HYSPLIT simulations are presented in this study.

  8. An airborne perfluorocarbon tracer system and its first application for a Lagrangian experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ren

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A perfluorocarbon tracer system (PERTRAS, specifically designed for Lagrangian aircraft experiments, has been developed by the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (German Aerospace Center, DLR. It consists of three main parts: a tracer release unit (RU, an adsorption tube sampler (ATS and a tracer analytical system. The RU was designed for airborne tracer release experiments; meanwhile, it can be used on various platforms for different experimental purpose (here research vessel. PERTRAS was for the first time applied in the field campaign Stratospheric ozone: halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere (SHIVA in November 2011. An amount of 8.8 kg perfluoromethylcyclopentane (PMCP was released aboard the research vessel Sonne (RV Sonne near the operational site of this campaign, Miri, Malaysia, on 21 November. The tracer samples collected using the ATS on board the DLR research aircraft Falcon were analyzed in the laboratory using a thermal desorber/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS system. Guided by forecasts calculated with the Lagrangian model, Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT, 64 tracer samples were collected onboard the Falcon approximately 5 and 25 h after the release, respectively, mostly with a time resolution of 1 min. Enhanced PMCP concentrations relative to ambient PMCP background values (mean: 6.62 fmol mol−1 were detected during three intersects of the fresh tracer plume (age 5 h, with a maximum value of 301.33 fmol mol−1. This indicates that the fresh tracer plume was successfully intercepted at the forecasted position. During the second flight, 25 h after the release, the center of tracer plume was not detected by the sampling system due to a faster advection of the plume than forecasted. The newly developed PERTRAS system has been successfully deployed for the first time. The instrumental set-up and comparisons between the measurements and HYSPLIT simulations are presented in

  9. Single-particle behaviour in circulating fluidized beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinell, Claus Erik; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of single-particle behaviour in a cold pilot-scale model of a circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC). In the system, sand is recirculated by means of air. Pressure measurements along the riser are used to determine the suspension density...

  10. Influence of Torrefaction on Single Particle Combustion of Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Zhimin; Jian, Jie; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the influence of torrefaction on the char reactivity, char yield, and combustion time of 3-5 mm spherical wood particles in a single particle combustion reactor (SPC) operating at a nominal temperature of 1231 °C. The devolatilization times were reduced and the char burnout...

  11. Single-particle mechanism of magnetostriction in magnetoactive elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Viktor M; Snarskii, Andrei A; Zorinets, Denis; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2016-06-01

    Magnetoactive elastomers (MAEs) are composite materials comprised of micrometer-sized ferromagnetic particles in a nonmagnetic elastomer matrix. A single-particle mechanism of magnetostriction in MAEs, assuming the rotation of a soft magnetic, mechanically rigid particle with uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in magnetic fields is identified and considered theoretically within the framework of an alternative model. In this mechanism, the total magnetic anisotropy energy of the filling particles in the matrix is the sum over single particles. Matrix displacements in the vicinity of the particle and the resulting direction of the magnetization vector are calculated. The effect of matrix deformation is pronounced well if the magnetic anisotropy coefficient K is much larger than the shear modulus µ of the elastic matrix. The feasibility of the proposed magnetostriction mechanism in soft magnetoactive elastomers and gels is elucidated. The magnetic-field-induced internal stresses in the matrix lead to effects of magnetodeformation and may increase the elastic moduli of these composite materials.

  12. High resolution single particle refinement in EMAN2.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James M; Chen, Muyuan; Baldwin, Philip R; Ludtke, Steven J

    2016-05-01

    EMAN2.1 is a complete image processing suite for quantitative analysis of grayscale images, with a primary focus on transmission electron microscopy, with complete workflows for performing high resolution single particle reconstruction, 2-D and 3-D heterogeneity analysis, random conical tilt reconstruction and subtomogram averaging, among other tasks. In this manuscript we provide the first detailed description of the high resolution single particle analysis pipeline and the philosophy behind its approach to the reconstruction problem. High resolution refinement is a fully automated process, and involves an advanced set of heuristics to select optimal algorithms for each specific refinement task. A gold standard FSC is produced automatically as part of refinement, providing a robust resolution estimate for the final map, and this is used to optimally filter the final CTF phase and amplitude corrected structure. Additional methods are in-place to reduce model bias during refinement, and to permit cross-validation using other computational methods.

  13. SPEDEN: Reconstructing single particles from their diffraction patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Hau-Riege, S P; Chapman, H N; Szoke, A; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; He, H; Howells, M R; Weierstall, U; Spence, J C H

    2004-01-01

    Speden is a computer program that reconstructs the electron density of single particles from their x-ray diffraction patterns, using a single-particle adaptation of the Holographic Method in crystallography. (Szoke, A., Szoke, H., and Somoza, J.R., 1997. Acta Cryst. A53, 291-313.) The method, like its parent, is unique that it does not rely on ``back'' transformation from the diffraction pattern into real space and on interpolation within measured data. It is designed to deal successfully with sparse, irregular, incomplete and noisy data. It is also designed to use prior information for ensuring sensible results and for reliable convergence. This article describes the theoretical basis for the reconstruction algorithm, its implementation and quantitative results of tests on synthetic and experimentally obtained data. The program could be used for determining the structure of radiation tolerant samples and, eventually, of large biological molecular structures without the need for crystallization.

  14. Single-particle mechanism of magnetostriction in magnetoactive elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Viktor M.; Snarskii, Andrei A.; Zorinets, Denis; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2016-06-01

    Magnetoactive elastomers (MAEs) are composite materials comprised of micrometer-sized ferromagnetic particles in a nonmagnetic elastomer matrix. A single-particle mechanism of magnetostriction in MAEs, assuming the rotation of a soft magnetic, mechanically rigid particle with uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in magnetic fields is identified and considered theoretically within the framework of an alternative model. In this mechanism, the total magnetic anisotropy energy of the filling particles in the matrix is the sum over single particles. Matrix displacements in the vicinity of the particle and the resulting direction of the magnetization vector are calculated. The effect of matrix deformation is pronounced well if the magnetic anisotropy coefficient K is much larger than the shear modulus µ of the elastic matrix. The feasibility of the proposed magnetostriction mechanism in soft magnetoactive elastomers and gels is elucidated. The magnetic-field-induced internal stresses in the matrix lead to effects of magnetodeformation and may increase the elastic moduli of these composite materials.

  15. Single-Particle Response in the CMS Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The single-particle response in the prototype CMS calorimeters has been measured in a test beam environment using hadron beams over a large range of energy and the data were used to tune the CMS simulation software. Strategies for measuring single-particle response from collision data at the Large Hadron Collider have been developed using isolated charged hadrons. The criteria to select isolated charged particles are optimized in order to maximize the signal containment, while minimizing contamination from other sources. Response functions are determined for the final detector configuration, which includes effects from additional dead material not present in the test beam environment, using collision data with the center of mass energy of 7 TeV. These measurements are compared with Monte Carlo predictions tuned to the test beam data.

  16. Generalized seniority on a deformed single-particle basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, L. Y.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, I proposed a fast computing scheme for generalized seniority on a spherical single-particle basis [J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 42, 115105 (2015), 10.1088/0954-3899/42/11/115105]. This work redesigns the scheme to make it applicable to deformed single-particle basis. The algorithm is applied to the rare-earth-metal nucleus 94 64 158Gd for intrinsic (body-fixed frame) neutron excitations under the low-momentum NN interaction Vlow -k. By allowing as many as four broken pairs, I compute the lowest 300 intrinsic states of several multipolarities. These states converge well to the exact ones, showing generalized seniority is very effective in truncating the deformed shell model. Under realistic interactions, the picture remains approximately valid: The ground state is a coherent pair condensate and the pairs gradually break up as excitation energy increases.

  17. Fluorescence preselection of bioaerosol for single-particle mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowers, M. A.; van Wuijckhuijse, A. L.; Marijnissen, J. C. M.; Kientz, Ch. E.; Ciach, T.

    2006-11-01

    We have designed, constructed, and tested a system that preselects the biological fraction of airborne particles from the overall aerosol. The preselection is based on fluorescence emission excited by a continuous 266 nm laser beam. This beam is one of two cw beams used to measure the aerodynamic particle size of sampled particles. The intention in our system is that single particles, based on size and fluorescence emission, can be selected and further examined for chemical composition by mass spectrometry.

  18. Fluorescence preselection of bioaerosol for single-particle mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Stowers, M.A.; van Wuijckhuijse, A.L.; Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Kientz, C.E.; Ciach, T.

    2006-01-01

    We have designed, constructed, and tested a system that preselects the biological fraction of airborne particles from the overall aerosol. The preselection is based on fluorescence emission excited by a continuous 266 nm laser beam. This beam is one of two cw beams used to measure the aerodynamic particle size of sampled particles. The intention in our system is that single particles, based on size and fluorescence emission, can be selected and further examined for chemical composition by mas...

  19. Single particle detection in CMOS compatible photonic crystal nanobeam cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Qimin; Floyd, Daniel L; Burgess, Ian B; Deotare, Parag B; Frank, Ian W; Tang, Sindy K Y; Ilic, Rob; Loncar, Marko

    2013-12-30

    We report the label-free detection of single particles using photonic crystal nanobeam cavities fabricated in silicon-on-insulator platform, and embedded inside microfluidic channels fabricated in poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Our system operates in the telecommunication wavelength band, thus leveraging the widely available, robust and tunable telecom laser sources. Using this approach, we demonstrated the detection of polystyrene nanoparticles with dimensions down to 12.5nm in radius. Furthermore, binding events of a single streptavidin molecule have been observed.

  20. Spin resonance strength calculation through single particle tracking for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dutheil, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The strengths of spin resonances for the polarized-proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are currently calculated with the code DEPOL, which numerically integrates through the ring based on an analytical approximate formula. In this article, we test a new way to calculate the spin resonance strengths by performing Fourier transformation to the actual transverse magnetic fields seen by a single particle traveling through the ring. Comparison of calculated spin resonance strengths is made between this method and DEPOL.

  1. Collective and single-particle states at high excitation energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, AM; Akimune, H; Daito, [No Value; Fujimura, H; Fujiwara, M; Fujita, Y; Harakeh, MN; Ihara, F; Inomata, T; Ishibashi, K; Janecke, J; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Laurent, H; Lhenry, [No Value; van der Molen, HKT; O'Donnell, T; Rodin, VA; Tamii, A; Toyokawa, H; Urin, MH; Yoshida, H; Yosoi, M

    2001-01-01

    Damping of high-lying single-particle states was investigated by the study of decay by proton emission from high-lying states in Nb-91, populated by the Zr-90(alpha, t) reaction at E-alpha = 180 MeV. In addition to decay to the ground state of Zr-90, semi-direct decay was observed to the low-lying (

  2. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of macromolecular assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Kimberley

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) was used to study the structure of three macromolecular assemblies: the two hemocyanin isoforms from Rapana thomasiana, the Pyrococcus furiosus chaperonin, and the ribosome from Escherichia coli. Hemocyanins are large respiratory proteins in arthropods and molluscs. Most molluscan hemocyanins exist as two distinct isoforms composed of related polypeptides. In most species the two isoforms differ in terms of their oligomeric st...

  3. Asymmetric coherent transmission for single particle diode and gyroscope

    OpenAIRE

    S. Yang; Song, Z; Sun, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    We study the single particle scattering process in a coherent multi-site system consisting of a tight-binding ring threaded by an Aharonov-Bohm flux and several attaching leads. The asymmetric behavior of scattering matrix is discovered analytically in the framework of both Bethe Ansatz and Green's function formalism. It is found that, under certain conditions, a three-site electronic system can behave analogous to a perfect semiconductor diode where current flows only in one direction. The g...

  4. Single particle structure and shapes of exotic Sr isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Steffen; S1389 Team

    2016-09-01

    States within a nucleus that have different shapes that are close in energy are referred to as shape coexisting. A dramatic occurrence of shape coexisting states is observed in nuclei in the vicinity of Z=40, N=60, which is the subject of substantial current experimental and theoretical effort. An important aspect in this context is the evolution of single particle structure for N Engineering Research Council of Canada and the National Science Foundation, USA.

  5. Emissions from Ethanol-Gasoline Blends: A Single Particle Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H. McMurry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to its agricultural origin and function as a fuel oxygenate, ethanol is being promoted as an alternative biomass-based fuel for use in spark ignition engines, with mandates for its use at state and regional levels. While it has been established that the addition of ethanol to a fuel reduces the particulate mass concentration in the exhaust, little attention has been paid to changes in the physicochemical properties of the emitted particles. In this work, a dynamometer-mounted GM Quad-4 spark ignition engine run without aftertreatment at 1,500 RPM and 100% load was used with four different fuel blends, containing 0, 20, 40 and 85 percent ethanol in gasoline. This allowed the effects of the fuel composition to be isolated from other effects. Instrumentation employed included two Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometers covering different size ranges for analysis of single particle composition, an Aethalometer for black carbon, a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer for particle size distributions, a Photoelectric Aerosol Sensor for particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH species and gravimetric filter measurements for particulate mass concentrations. It was found that, under the conditions investigated here, additional ethanol content in the fuel changes the particle size distribution, especially in the accumulation mode, and decreases the black carbon and total particulate mass concentrations. The molecular weight distribution of the PAHs was found to decrease with added ethanol. However, PAHs produced from higher ethanol-content fuels are associated with NO2− (m/z—46 in the single-particle mass spectra, indicating the presence of nitro-PAHs. Compounds associated with the gasoline (e.g., sulfur-containing species are diminished due to dilution as ethanol is added to the fuel relative to those associated with the lubricating oil (e.g., calcium, zinc, phosphate in the single particle spectra. These changes have potential

  6. New apparatus of single particle trap system for aerosol visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hidenori; Fujioka, Tomomi; Endo, Tetsuo; Kitayama, Chiho; Seto, Takafumi; Otani, Yoshio

    2014-08-01

    Control of transport and deposition of charged aerosol particles is important in various manufacturing processes. Aerosol visualization is an effective method to directly observe light scattering signal from laser-irradiated single aerosol particle trapped in a visualization cell. New single particle trap system triggered by light scattering pulse signal was developed in this study. The performance of the device was evaluated experimentally. Experimental setup consisted of an aerosol generator, a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), an optical particle counter (OPC) and the single particle trap system. Polystylene latex standard (PSL) particles (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 μm) were generated and classified according to the charge by the DMA. Singly charged 0.5 and 1.0 μm particles and doubly charged 2.0 μm particles were used as test particles. The single particle trap system was composed of a light scattering signal detector and a visualization cell. When the particle passed through the detector, trigger signal with a given delay time sent to the solenoid valves upstream and downstream of the visualization cell for trapping the particle in the visualization cell. The motion of particle in the visualization cell was monitored by CCD camera and the gravitational settling velocity and the electrostatic migration velocity were measured from the video image. The aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was in good agreement with Stokes diameter calculated from the electrostatic migration velocity for individual particles. It was also found that the aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was a one-to-one function of the scattered light intensity of individual particles. The applicability of this system will be discussed.

  7. Nature of single-particle states in disordered graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Sabyasachi; Garg, Arti; Ramakrishnan, T. V.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the nature of the single-particle states, away from the Dirac point in the presence of long-range charge impurities in a tight-binding model for electrons on a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice which is of direct relevance for graphene. For a disorder potential V (r ⃗) =V0exp(-| r ⃗-r⃗imp|2/ξ2) , we demonstrate that not only the Dirac state but all the single-particle states remain extended for weak-enough disorder. Based on our numerical calculations of inverse participation ratio, dc conductivity, diffusion coefficient, and the localization length from time evolution dynamics of the wave packet, we show that the threshold Vth required to localize a single-particle state of energy E (k ⃗) is minimum for the states near the band edge and is maximum for states near the band center, implying a mobility edge starting from the band edge for weak disorder and moving towards the band center as the disorder strength increases. This can be explained in terms of the low-energy Hamiltonian at any point k ⃗ which has the same nature as that at the Dirac point. From the nature of the eigenfunctions, it follows that a weak long-range impurity will cause weak antilocalization effects, which can be suppressed, giving localization if the strength of impurities is sufficiently large to cause intervalley scattering. The intervalley spacing 2 | k ⃗| increases as one moves in from the band edge towards the band center, which is reflected in the behavior of Vth and the mobility edge.

  8. Single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bräuchle, Christoph; Michaelis, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Closing a gap in the literature, this handbook gathers all the information on single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer. It covers all aspects of this hot and modern topic, from detecting virus entry to membrane diffusion, and from protein folding using spFRET to coupled dye systems, as well recent achievements in the field. Throughout, the first-class editors and top international authors present content of the highest quality, making this a must-have for physical chemists, spectroscopists, molecular physicists and biochemists.

  9. Single-particle hydrodynamics in DPD: A new formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, W.; Pivkin, I. V.; Karniadakis, G. E.

    2008-10-01

    We present a new formulation of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) that leads to correct hydrodynamics in flows around bluff bodies represented by a single particle. In particular, we introduce a shear drag coefficient and a corresponding term in the dissipative force, which along with the angular momentum incorporate non-central shear forces between particles and preserve angular momentum. We consider several prototype flows to verify the performance of the proposed formulation with comparisons against theoretical and continuum-based simulation results. Our method is similar to the Fluid Particle Method (FPM) of Espanol (Phys. Rev. E, 57 (1998) 2930) and it has the computational and implementation simplicity of the standard DPD approach.

  10. Cryogenic electron microscopy and single-particle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmlund, Dominika; Elmlund, Hans

    2015-01-01

    About 20 years ago, the first three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions at subnanometer (single-particle analysis. Since then, thousands of structures have been determined to resolutions ranging from 30 Å to near atomic (analysis software have advanced the technology considerably. Near-atomic-resolution reconstructions can now be obtained, not only for megadalton macromolecular complexes or highly symmetrical assemblies but also for proteins of only a few hundred kilodaltons. We discuss the developments that led to this breakthrough in high-resolution structure determination by cryo-EM and point to challenges that lie ahead.

  11. Dosimetric Analyses of Single Particle Microbeam in Cell Irradiation Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU YongJian; JIANG Jiang; CHEN Lianyun; ZHAN Furu; YU Zengliang

    2008-01-01

    Single particle microbeam (SPM) is uniquely capable of delivering precisely the predefined number of charged particles to determined individual cells or sub-cellular targets in situ. It has been recognized as a powerful technique for unveiling ionization irradiation mechanisms of organism. This article describes some investigations on the irradiation quality of SPM of major world laboratories by means of Monte Carlo method based on dosimetry and microdosimetry. Those parameters are helpful not only to improve SPM irradiating cell experiments but also to study the biological effects of cells irradiated by SPM.

  12. Microswimmers - From Single Particle Motion to Collective Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompper, Gerhard; Bechinger, Clemens; Herminghaus, Stephan; Isele-Holder, Rolf; Kaupp, U. Benjamin; Löwen, Hartmut; Stark, Holger; Winkler, Roland G.

    2016-11-01

    Locomotion of autonomous microswimmers is a fascinating field at the cutting edge of science. It combines the biophysics of self-propulsion via motor proteins, artificial propulsion mechanisms, swimming strategies at low Reynolds numbers, the hydrodynamic interaction of swimmers, and the collective motion and synchronisation of large numbers of agents. The articles of this Special Issue are based on the lecture notes of an international summer school, which was organized by the DFG Priority Programme 1726 "Microswimmers - From Single Particle Motion to Collective Behaviour" in the fall of 2015. The minireviews provide a broad overview of the field, covering both elementary and advanced material, as well as selected areas from current research.

  13. Computational modeling of single particle scattering over large distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Rebecca; Plumley, Rajan; McCracken, Michael

    2016-09-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation of the propagation of a single particle through a large three-dimensional volume under the influence of individual scattering events. In such systems, short paths can be quickly and accurately simulated using random walks defined by individual scattering parameters, but the simulation time greatly increases as the size of the space grows. We present a method for reducing the overall simulation time by restricting the simulation to a cube of unit length; each `cell' is characterized by a set of parameters which dictate the distributions of allowable step lengths and polar scattering angles. We model propagation over large distances by constructing a lattice of cells with physical parameters that depend on position, such that the full set would represent a space within the entire volume available to the particle. With these, we propose the use of Markov chains to determine a probable path for the particle, thereby removing the need to simulate every step in the particle's path. For a single particle with constant velocity, we can use the step statistics to determine the travel time of the particle. We investigate the effect of scattering parameters such as average step distance and possible scattering angles on the probabilities of a cell.

  14. Single-particle excitations in disordered Weyl fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pixley, J. H.; Chou, Yang-Zhi; Goswami, Pallab; Huse, David A.; Nandkishore, Rahul; Radzihovsky, Leo; Das Sarma, S.

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically study the single-particle Green function of a three-dimensional disordered Weyl semimetal using a combination of techniques. These include analytic T -matrix and renormalization group methods with complementary regimes of validity and an exact numerical approach based on the kernel polynomial technique. We show that at any nonzero disorder, Weyl excitations are not ballistic: They instead have a nonzero linewidth that for weak short-range disorder arises from nonperturbative resonant impurity scattering. Perturbative approaches find a quantum critical point between a semimetal and a metal at a finite disorder strength, but this transition is avoided due to nonperturbative effects. At moderate disorder strength and intermediate energies the avoided quantum critical point renormalizes the scaling of single-particle properties. In this regime we compute numerically the anomalous dimension of the fermion field and find η =0.13 ±0.04 , which agrees well with a renormalization group analysis (η =0.125 ). Our predictions can be directly tested by ARPES and STM measurements in samples dominated by neutral impurities.

  15. Fluorescence calibration method for single-particle aerosol fluorescence instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley Robinson, Ellis; Gao, Ru-Shan; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Fahey, David W.; Perring, Anne E.

    2017-05-01

    Real-time, single-particle fluorescence instruments used to detect atmospheric bioaerosol particles are increasingly common, yet no standard fluorescence calibration method exists for this technique. This gap limits the utility of these instruments as quantitative tools and complicates comparisons between different measurement campaigns. To address this need, we have developed a method to produce size-selected particles with a known mass of fluorophore, which we use to calibrate the fluorescence detection of a Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4A). We use mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles to calibrate one detector (FL1; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 310-400 nm) and pure quinine particles to calibrate the other (FL2; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 420-650 nm). The relationship between fluorescence and mass for the mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles is linear, while that for the pure quinine particles is nonlinear, likely indicating that not all of the quinine mass contributes to the observed fluorescence. Nonetheless, both materials produce a repeatable response between observed fluorescence and particle mass. This procedure allows users to set the detector gains to achieve a known absolute response, calculate the limits of detection for a given instrument, improve the repeatability of the instrumental setup, and facilitate intercomparisons between different instruments. We recommend calibration of single-particle fluorescence instruments using these methods.

  16. A theorem on the single particle energy in a Fermi gas with interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, N.M.; Hove, Léon van

    1958-01-01

    This paper investigates single particle properties in a Fermi gas with interaction at the absolute zero of temperature. In such a system a single particle energy has only a meaning for particles of momentum k close to the Fermi momentum kF. These single particle states are metastable with a life-tim

  17. A theorem on the single particle energy in a Fermi gas with interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, N.M.; Hove, Léon van

    1958-01-01

    This paper investigates single particle properties in a Fermi gas with interaction at the absolute zero of temperature. In such a system a single particle energy has only a meaning for particles of momentum k close to the Fermi momentum kF. These single particle states are metastable with a

  18. Regional source identification using Lagrangian stochastic particle dispersion and HYSPLIT backward-trajectory models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koracin, Darko; Vellore, Ramesh; Lowenthal, Douglas H; Watson, John G; Koracin, Julide; McCord, Travis; DuBois, David W; Chen, L W Antony; Kumar, Naresh; Knipping, Eladio M; Wheeler, Neil J M; Craig, Kenneth; Reid, Stephen

    2011-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the capabilities of the receptor-oriented inverse mode Lagrangian Stochastic Particle Dispersion Model (LSPDM) with the 12-km resolution Mesoscale Model 5 (MM5) wind field input for the assessment of source identification from seven regions impacting two receptors located in the eastern United States. The LSPDM analysis was compared with a standard version of the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) single-particle backward-trajectory analysis using inputs from MM5 and the Eta Data Assimilation System (EDAS) with horizontal grid resolutions of 12 and 80 km, respectively. The analysis included four 7-day summertime events in 2002; residence times in the modeling domain were computed from the inverse LSPDM runs and HYPSLIT-simulated backward trajectories started from receptor-source heights of 100, 500, 1000, 1500, and 3000 m. Statistics were derived using normalized values of LSPDM- and HYSPLIT-predicted residence times versus Community Multiscale Air Quality model-predicted sulfate concentrations used as baseline information. From 40 cases considered, the LSPDM identified first- and second-ranked emission region influences in 37 cases, whereas HYSPLIT-MM5 (HYSPLIT-EDAS) identified the sources in 21 (16) cases. The LSPDM produced a higher overall correlation coefficient (0.89) compared with HYSPLIT (0.55-0.62). The improvement of using the LSPDM is also seen in the overall normalized root mean square error values of 0.17 for LSPDM compared with 0.30-0.32 for HYSPLIT. The HYSPLIT backward trajectories generally tend to underestimate near-receptor sources because of a lack of stochastic dispersion of the backward trajectories and to overestimate distant sources because of a lack of treatment of dispersion. Additionally, the HYSPLIT backward trajectories showed a lack of consistency in the results obtained from different single vertical levels for starting the backward trajectories. To

  19. Quantification of aerosol chemical composition using continuous single particle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, C.-H.; McGuire, M. L.; Godri, K. J.; Slowik, J. G.; Rehbein, P. J. G.; Evans, G. J.

    2011-07-01

    Mass concentrations of sulphate, nitrate, ammonium, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) were determined from real time single particle data in the size range 0.1-3.0 μm measured by an Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) at urban and rural sites in Canada. To quantify chemical species within individual particles measured by an ATOFMS, ion peak intensity of m/z -97 for sulphate, -62 for nitrate, +18 for ammonium, +43 for OC, and +36 for EC were scaled using the number and size distribution data by an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) and a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). Hourly quantified chemical species from ATOFMS single-particle analysis were compared with collocated fine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter PM2.5) chemical composition measurements by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) at a rural site, a Gas-Particle Ion Chromatograph (GPIC) at an urban site, and a Sunset Lab field OCEC analyzer at both sites. The highest correlation was found for nitrate, with correlation coefficients (Pearson r) of 0.89 (ATOFMS vs. GPIC) and 0.85 (ATOFMS vs. AMS). ATOFMS mass calibration factors, determined for the urban site, were used to calculate mass concentrations of the major PM2.5 chemical components at the rural site near the US border in southern Ontario. Mass reconstruction using the ATOFMS mass calibration factors agreed very well with the PM2.5 mass concentrations measured by a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM, r = 0.86) at the urban site and a light scattering monitor (DustTrak, r = 0.87) at the rural site. In the urban area nitrate was the largest contributor to PM2.5 mass in the winter, while organics and sulphate contributed ~64 % of the summer PM2.5 in the rural area, suggesting a strong influence of regional/trans-boundary pollution. The mass concentrations of five major species in ten size-resolved particle-types and aerosol acidity of each particle-type were determined for the rural site. On a mass basis sulphate

  20. Universal Lagrangian bundles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sepe, D.

    2013-01-01

    The obstruction to construct a Lagrangian bundle over a fixed integral affine manifold was constructed by Dazord and Delzant (J Differ Geom 26:223–251, 1987) and shown to be given by ‘twisted’ cup products in Sepe (Differ GeomAppl 29(6): 787–800, 2011). This paper uses the topology of universal Lagr

  1. Nonlinear Gravitational Lagrangians revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Magnano, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The Legendre transformation method, applied in 1987 to deal with purely metric gravitational Lagrangians with nonlinear dependence on the Ricci tensor, is extended to metric-affine models and is shown to provide a concise and insightful comparison of the dynamical content of the two variational frameworks.

  2. Symmetries in Lagrangian Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Búa, Lucia; Bucataru, Ioan; León, Manuel de; Salgado, Modesto; Vilariño, Silvia

    2015-06-01

    By generalising the cosymplectic setting for time-dependent Lagrangian mechanics, we propose a geometric framework for the Lagrangian formulation of classical field theories with a Lagrangian depending on the independent variables. For that purpose we consider the first-order jet bundles J1π of a fiber bundle π : E → ℝk where ℝk is the space of independent variables. Generalized symmetries of the Lagrangian are introduced and the corresponding Noether theorem is proved.

  3. Reconstructing an icosahedral virus from single-particle diffraction experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldin, D K; Poon, H-C; Schwander, P; Uddin, M; Schmidt, M

    2011-08-29

    The first experimental data from single-particle scattering experiments from free electron lasers (FELs) are now becoming available. The first such experiments are being performed on relatively large objects such as viruses, which produce relatively low-resolution, low-noise diffraction patterns in so-called "diffract-and-destroy" experiments. We describe a very simple test on the angular correlations of measured diffraction data to determine if the scattering is from an icosahedral particle. If this is confirmed, the efficient algorithm proposed can then combine diffraction data from multiple shots of particles in random unknown orientations to generate a full 3D image of the icosahedral particle. We demonstrate this with a simulation for the satellite tobacco necrosis virus (STNV), the atomic coordinates of whose asymmetric unit is given in Protein Data Bank entry 2BUK.

  4. Asymmetric coherent transmission for single particle diode and gyroscope

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, S; Sun, C P

    2009-01-01

    We study the single particle scattering process in a coherent multi-site system consisting of a tight-binding ring threaded by an Aharonov-Bohm flux and several attaching leads. The asymmetric behavior of scattering matrix is discovered analytically in the framework of both Bethe Ansatz and Green's function formalism. It is found that, under certain conditions, a three-site electronic system can behave analogous to a perfect semiconductor diode where current flows only in one direction. The general result is also valid for a neutral particle system since the effective magnetic flux may be implemented by a globe rotation. This observation means that the three-site system can serve as an orientation measuring gyroscope due to the approximate linear dependence of the current difference of two output leads on the rotational angular velocity.

  5. A single particle effective potential for interacting positron and positronium

    CERN Document Server

    Zubiaga, A; Puska, M

    2013-01-01

    We have studied small systems composed by an atom and a positron or a positronium atom. We have used many-body quantum mechanical calculations to describe the correlation effects of light particles. Explicitly correlated gaussian for the basis functions and a stochastical variational optimization method has allowed to obtain accurate wavefunctions and energies. We have discussed the chemistry of positrons in those systems by means of analyzing the densities of the light particles (electrons and positrons). During the discussion, we propose an effective potential that describes the properties of the positron in those systems, valid also when it forms a Ps cluster. The effective potential is a mean field description of the interaction of the positron that can be used to calculate the distribution of the positron and its interaction energy. This potential can be a step forward for an accurate single particle description of the positron in cases when it forms positronium, specially molecular soft matter.

  6. Approaching the Heisenberg Limit without Single-Particle Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Emily; Bentsen, Gregory; Schleier-Smith, Monika

    2016-02-05

    We propose an approach to quantum phase estimation that can attain precision near the Heisenberg limit without requiring single-particle-resolved state detection. We show that the "one-axis twisting" interaction, well known for generating spin squeezing in atomic ensembles, can also amplify the output signal of an entanglement-enhanced interferometer to facilitate readout. Applying this interaction-based readout to oversqueezed, non-Gaussian states yields a Heisenberg scaling in phase sensitivity, which persists in the presence of detection noise as large as the quantum projection noise of an unentangled ensemble. Even in dissipative implementations-e.g., employing light-mediated interactions in an optical cavity or Rydberg dressing-the method significantly relaxes the detection resolution required for spectroscopy beyond the standard quantum limit.

  7. A transient single particle model under FCI conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Yan; SHANG Zhi; XU Ji-Jun

    2005-01-01

    The paper is focused on the coupling effect between film boiling heat transfer and evaporation drag around a hot-particle in cold liquid. Based on the continuity, momentum and energy equations of the vapor film, a transient two-dimensional single particle model has been established. This paper contains a detailed description of HPMC (High-temperature Particle Moving in Coolant) model for studying some aspects of the premixing stage of fuel-coolant interactions (FCIs). The transient process of high-temperature particles moving in coolant can be simulated. Comparisons between the experiment results and the calculations using HPMC model demonstrate that HPMC model achieves a good agreement in predicting the time-varying characteristic of high-temperature spheres moving in coolant.

  8. Classification using diffraction patterns for single-particle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongli; Zhang, Kaiming; Meng, Xing

    2016-05-01

    An alternative method has been assessed; diffraction patterns derived from the single particle data set were used to perform the first round of classification in creating the initial averages for proteins data with symmetrical morphology. The test protein set was a collection of Caenorhabditis elegans small heat shock protein 17 obtained by Cryo EM, which has a tetrahedral (12-fold) symmetry. It is demonstrated that the initial classification on diffraction patterns is workable as well as the real-space classification that is based on the phase contrast. The test results show that the information from diffraction patterns has the enough details to make the initial model faithful. The potential advantage using the alternative method is twofold, the ability to handle the sets with poor signal/noise or/and that break the symmetry properties.

  9. Towards single particle imaging of human chromosomes at SACLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ian; Schwenke, Joerg; Yusuf, Mohammed; Estandarte, Ana; Zhang, Fucai; Chen, Bo; Clark, Jesse; Song, Changyong; Nam, Daewoong; Joti, Yasumasa; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Ratnasari, Gina; Kaneyoshi, Kohei; Takata, Hideaki; Fukui, Kiichi

    2015-12-01

    Single particle imaging (SPI) is one of the front-page opportunities which were used to motivate the construction of the first x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). SPI’s big advantage is that it avoids radiation damage to biological samples because the diffraction takes place in femtosecond single shots before any atomic motion can take place in the sample, hence before the onset of radiation damage. This is the ‘diffract before destruction’ theme, destruction being assured from the high x-ray doses used. This article reports our collaboration’s first attempt at SPI using the SACLA XFEL facility in June 2015. The report is limited to experience with the instrumentation and examples of data because we have not yet had time to invert them to images.

  10. Hierarchical Ag mesostructures for single particle SERS substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Minwei; Zhang, Yin

    2017-01-01

    Hierarchical Ag mesostructures with highly rough surface morphology have been synthesized at room temperature through a simple seed-mediated approach. Electron microscopy characterizations indicate that the obtained Ag mesostructures exhibit a textured surface morphology with the flower-like architecture. Moreover, the particle size can be tailored easily in the range of 250-500 nm. For the growth process of the hierarchical Ag mesostructures, it is believed that the self-assembly mechanism is more reasonable rather than the epitaxial overgrowth of Ag seed. The oriented attachment of nanoparticles is revealed during the formation of Ag mesostructures. Single particle surface enhanced Raman spectra (sp-SERS) of crystal violet adsorbed on the hierarchical Ag mesostructures were measured. Results reveal that the hierarchical Ag mesostructures can be highly sensitive sp-SERS substrates with good reproducibility. The average enhancement factors for individual Ag mesostructures are estimated to be about 106.

  11. Single-particle mapping of nonequilibrium nanocrystal transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xingchen; Jones, Matthew R.; Frechette, Layne B.; Chen, Qian; Powers, Alexander S.; Ercius, Peter; Dunn, Gabriel; Rotskoff, Grant M.; Nguyen, Son C.; Adiga, Vivekananda P.; Zettl, Alex; Rabani, Eran; Geissler, Phillip L.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2016-11-01

    Chemists have developed mechanistic insight into numerous chemical reactions by thoroughly characterizing nonequilibrium species. Although methods to probe these processes are well established for molecules, analogous techniques for understanding intermediate structures in nanomaterials have been lacking. We monitor the shape evolution of individual anisotropic gold nanostructures as they are oxidatively etched in a graphene liquid cell with a controlled redox environment. Short-lived, nonequilibrium nanocrystals are observed, structurally analyzed, and rationalized through Monte Carlo simulations. Understanding these reaction trajectories provides important fundamental insight connecting high-energy nanocrystal morphologies to the development of kinetically stabilized surface features and demonstrates the importance of developing tools capable of probing short-lived nanoscale species at the single-particle level.

  12. Entanglement polytopes: multiparticle entanglement from single-particle information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Michael; Doran, Brent; Gross, David; Christandl, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    Entangled many-body states are an essential resource for quantum computing and interferometry. Determining the type of entanglement present in a system usually requires access to an exponential number of parameters. We show that in the case of pure, multiparticle quantum states, features of the global entanglement can already be extracted from local information alone. This is achieved by associating any given class of entanglement with an entanglement polytope-a geometric object that characterizes the single-particle states compatible with that class. Our results, applicable to systems of arbitrary size and statistics, give rise to local witnesses for global pure-state entanglement and can be generalized to states affected by low levels of noise.

  13. Classification using diffraction patterns for single-particle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hongli; Zhang, Kaiming [Department of Biophysics, the Health Science Centre, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Meng, Xing, E-mail: xmeng101@gmail.com [Wadsworth Centre, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York 12201 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    An alternative method has been assessed; diffraction patterns derived from the single particle data set were used to perform the first round of classification in creating the initial averages for proteins data with symmetrical morphology. The test protein set was a collection of Caenorhabditis elegans small heat shock protein 17 obtained by Cryo EM, which has a tetrahedral (12-fold) symmetry. It is demonstrated that the initial classification on diffraction patterns is workable as well as the real-space classification that is based on the phase contrast. The test results show that the information from diffraction patterns has the enough details to make the initial model faithful. The potential advantage using the alternative method is twofold, the ability to handle the sets with poor signal/noise or/and that break the symmetry properties. - Highlights: • New classification method. • Create the accurate initial model. • Better in handling noisy data.

  14. Organic aerosol mixing observed by single-particle mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ellis Shipley; Saleh, Rawad; Donahue, Neil M

    2013-12-27

    We present direct measurements of mixing between separately prepared organic aerosol populations in a smog chamber using single-particle mass spectra from the high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). Docosane and docosane-d46 (22 carbon linear solid alkane) did not show any signs of mixing, but squalane and squalane-d62 (30 carbon branched liquid alkane) mixed on the time scale expected from a condensational-mixing model. Docosane and docosane-d46 were driven to mix when the chamber temperature was elevated above the melting point for docosane. Docosane vapors were shown to mix into squalane-d62, but not the other way around. These results are consistent with low diffusivity in the solid phase of docosane particles. We performed mixing experiments on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) surrogate systems finding that SOA derived from toluene-d8 (a surrogate for anthropogenic SOA (aSOA)) does not mix into squalane (a surrogate for hydrophobic primary organic aerosol (POA)) but does mix into SOA derived from α-pinene (biogenic SOA (bSOA) surrogate). For the aSOA/POA, the volatility of either aerosol does not limit gas-phase diffusion, indicating that the two particle populations do not mix simply because they are immiscible. In the aSOA/bSOA system, the presence of toluene-d8-derived SOA molecules in the α-pinene-derived SOA provides evidence that the diffusion coefficient in α-pinene-derived SOA is high enough for mixing on the time scale of 1 min. The observations from all of these mixing experiments are generally invisible to bulk aerosol composition measurements but are made possible with single-particle composition data.

  15. Symplectic Applicability of Lagrangian Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Nicolodi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We develop an approach to affine symplectic invariant geometry of Lagrangian surfaces by the method of moving frames. The fundamental invariants of elliptic Lagrangian immersions in affine symplectic four-space are derived together with their integrability equations. The invariant setup is applied to discuss the question of symplectic applicability for elliptic Lagrangian immersions. Explicit examples are considered.

  16. Renormalization and effective lagrangians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polchinski, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    There is a strong intuitive understanding of renormalization, due to Wilson, in terms of the scaling of effective lagrangians. We show that this can be made the basis for a proof of perturbative renormalization. We first study renormalizability in the language of renormalization group flows for a toy renormalization group equation. We then derive an exact renormalization group equation for a four-dimensional λø 4 theory with a momentum cutoff. We organize the cutoff dependence of the effective lagrangian into relevant and irrelevant parts, and derive a linear equation for the irrelevant part. A lengthy but straightforward argument establishes that the piece identified as irrelevant actually is so in perturbation theory. This implies renormalizability. The method extends immediately to any system in which a momentum-space cutoff can be used, but the principle is more general and should apply for any physical cutoff. Neither Weinberg's theorem nor arguments based on the topology of graphs are needed.

  17. Gravity, Time, and Lagrangians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2010-01-01

    Feynman mentioned to us that he understood a topic in physics if he could explain it to a college freshman, a high school student, or a dinner guest. Here we will discuss two topics that took us a while to get to that level. One is the relationship between gravity and time. The other is the minus sign that appears in the Lagrangian. (Why would one…

  18. Gravity, Time, and Lagrangians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2010-01-01

    Feynman mentioned to us that he understood a topic in physics if he could explain it to a college freshman, a high school student, or a dinner guest. Here we will discuss two topics that took us a while to get to that level. One is the relationship between gravity and time. The other is the minus sign that appears in the Lagrangian. (Why would one…

  19. NOGAPS Semi-Lagrangian

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    the vertical interpolation adjustment given by Equation 8 (SL OMT ), NOGAPS SL/SI with non-interpolation in the vertical (SL NIV), and the non semi...interpolation scheme (SL OMT ), the non-interpolating scheme in the vertical (SL NIV) and the non semi-Lagrangian NOGAPS (EULER). Figures 4 and...2009 comparing the control NOGAPS SL/SI with the adjusted vertical interpolation scheme (SL OMT ), the non-interpolating scheme in the vertical (SL NIV

  20. Single-particle characterization of the High Arctic summertime aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sierau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-particle mass spectrometric measurements were carried out in the High Arctic north of 80° during summer 2008. The campaign took place onboard the icebreaker \\textit{Oden} and was part of the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS. The instrument deployed was an Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS that provides information on the chemical composition of individual particles and their mixing state in real-time. Aerosols were sampled in the marine boundary layer at stations in the open ocean, in the marginal ice zone, and in the pack ice region. The largest fraction of particles detected for subsequent analysis in the size range of the ATOFMS between approximately 200 nm to 3000 nm in diameter showed mass spectrometric patterns indicating an internal mixing state and a biomass burning and/or biofuel source. The majority of these particles were connected to an air mass layer of elevated particle concentration mixed into the surface mixed layer from the upper part of the marine boundary layer. The second largest fraction was represented by sea salt particles. The chemical analysis of the over-ice sea salt aerosol revealed tracer compounds that reflect chemical aging of the particles during their long-range advection from the marginal ice zone, or open waters south thereof prior to detection at the ship. From our findings we conclude that long-range transport of particles is one source of aerosols in the High Arctic. To assess the importance of long-range particle sources for aerosol–cloud interactions over the inner Arctic in comparison to local and regional biogenic primary aerosol sources, the chemical composition of the detected particles was analyzed for indicators of marine biological origin. Only a~minor fraction showed chemical signatures of potentially ocean-derived primary particles of that kind. However, a chemical bias in the ATOFMS's detection capabilities observed during ASCOS might suggest a presence of a

  1. Single particle fluorescence burst analysis of epsin induced membrane fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Arielle; Shoup, Daniel; Kustigian, Lauren; Puchalla, Jason; Carr, Chavela M; Rye, Hays S

    2015-01-01

    Vital cellular processes, from cell growth to synaptic transmission, rely on membrane-bounded carriers and vesicles to transport molecular cargo to and from specific intracellular compartments throughout the cell. Compartment-specific proteins are required for the final step, membrane fission, which releases the transport carrier from the intracellular compartment. The role of fission proteins, especially at intracellular locations and in non-neuronal cells, while informed by the dynamin-1 paradigm, remains to be resolved. In this study, we introduce a highly sensitive approach for the identification and analysis of membrane fission machinery, called burst analysis spectroscopy (BAS). BAS is a single particle, free-solution approach, well suited for quantitative measurements of membrane dynamics. Here, we use BAS to analyze membrane fission induced by the potent, fission-active ENTH domain of epsin. Using this method, we obtained temperature-dependent, time-resolved measurements of liposome size and concentration changes, even at sub-micromolar concentration of the epsin ENTH domain. We also uncovered, at 37°C, fission activity for the full-length epsin protein, supporting the argument that the membrane-fission activity observed with the ENTH domain represents a native function of the full-length epsin protein.

  2. Automated single particle detection and tracking for large microscopy datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rhodri S; Yang, Lei; Dun, Alison; Smyth, Annya M; Duncan, Rory R; Rickman, Colin; Lu, Weiping

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in optical microscopy have enabled the acquisition of very large datasets from living cells with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Our ability to process these datasets now plays an essential role in order to understand many biological processes. In this paper, we present an automated particle detection algorithm capable of operating in low signal-to-noise fluorescence microscopy environments and handling large datasets. When combined with our particle linking framework, it can provide hitherto intractable quantitative measurements describing the dynamics of large cohorts of cellular components from organelles to single molecules. We begin with validating the performance of our method on synthetic image data, and then extend the validation to include experiment images with ground truth. Finally, we apply the algorithm to two single-particle-tracking photo-activated localization microscopy biological datasets, acquired from living primary cells with very high temporal rates. Our analysis of the dynamics of very large cohorts of 10 000 s of membrane-associated protein molecules show that they behave as if caged in nanodomains. We show that the robustness and efficiency of our method provides a tool for the examination of single-molecule behaviour with unprecedented spatial detail and high acquisition rates.

  3. Cluster analysis of WIBS single particle bioaerosol data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Robinson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis was performed on single-particle multi-spatial datasets comprising optical diameter, asymmetry and three different fluorescence measurements, gathered using two dual Waveband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS. The technique is demonstrated on measurements of various fluorescent and non-fluorescent polystyrene latex spheres (PSL before being applied to two separate contemporaneous ambient WIBS datasets recorded in a forest site in Colorado, USA as part of the BEACHON-RoMBAS project. Cluster analysis results between both datasets are consistent. Clusters are tentatively interpreted by comparison of concentration time series and cluster average measurement values to the published literature (of which there is a paucity to represent: non-fluorescent accumulation mode aerosol; bacterial agglomerates; and fungal spores. To our knowledge, this is the first time cluster analysis has been applied to long term online PBAP measurements. The novel application of this clustering technique provides a means for routinely reducing WIBS data to discrete concentration time series which are more easily interpretable, without the need for any a priori assumptions concerning the expected aerosol types. It can reduce the level of subjectivity compared to the more standard analysis approaches, which are typically performed by simple inspection of various ensemble data products. It also has the advantage of potentially resolving less populous or subtly different particle types. This technique is likely to become more robust in the future as fluorescence-based aerosol instrumentation measurement precision, dynamic range and the number of available metrics is improved.

  4. Cluster analysis of WIBS single particle bioaerosol data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, N. H.; Allan, J. D.; Huffman, J. A.; Kaye, P. H.; Foot, V. E.; Gallagher, M.

    2012-09-01

    Hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis was performed on single-particle multi-spatial datasets comprising optical diameter, asymmetry and three different fluorescence measurements, gathered using two dual Waveband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS). The technique is demonstrated on measurements of various fluorescent and non-fluorescent polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) before being applied to two separate contemporaneous ambient WIBS datasets recorded in a forest site in Colorado, USA as part of the BEACHON-RoMBAS project. Cluster analysis results between both datasets are consistent. Clusters are tentatively interpreted by comparison of concentration time series and cluster average measurement values to the published literature (of which there is a paucity) to represent: non-fluorescent accumulation mode aerosol; bacterial agglomerates; and fungal spores. To our knowledge, this is the first time cluster analysis has been applied to long term online PBAP measurements. The novel application of this clustering technique provides a means for routinely reducing WIBS data to discrete concentration time series which are more easily interpretable, without the need for any a priori assumptions concerning the expected aerosol types. It can reduce the level of subjectivity compared to the more standard analysis approaches, which are typically performed by simple inspection of various ensemble data products. It also has the advantage of potentially resolving less populous or subtly different particle types. This technique is likely to become more robust in the future as fluorescence-based aerosol instrumentation measurement precision, dynamic range and the number of available metrics is improved.

  5. Analysis of single particle photodegradation using photothermal infrared microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Jonathan G; Eddleston, Mark D; Belton, Peter S; Jones, William; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2013-04-21

    The increasing use of high throughput methods, coupled with the need to develop approaches to anticipate long term stability issues, has necessitated the introduction of testing approaches whereby extremely small samples may be rapidly analysed. A novel method is described whereby the UV light-induced degradation of single particles of a model drug, nifedipine, may be rapidly and simply monitored using photothermal infrared microspectroscopy (PTMS). The technique involves the contact attachment of individual particles to a heated probe tip composed of a modified Wollaston wire which enables temperature fluctuations to be measured. Application of a focused IR beam to excite the sample allows measurement and subsequent Fourier transformation of the resultant interferogram to produce an IR spectrum which is in good agreement with that obtained from conventional IR methods. By application of a UV source to the assembly for specified time periods, we demonstrate that it is possible to monitor the appearance of peaks associated with degradation products as a function of time. The technique is critically evaluated in terms of practical issues associated with volatilization, particle size effects and orientation to the light source as well as more general issues associated with the sensitivity, resolution and quantitative interpretation of data from the PTMS technique. Overall the method has been shown to be capable of rapid measurement of photo-instability on individual particles, with important implications for development of the approach as a rapid screening or high throughput technique, although there are practical and theoretical limitations to reliable quantitative analysis at the present time.

  6. The single-particle microbeam facility at CEA-Saclay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodja, H. [DSM/IRAMIS/SIS2M, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); CNRS, UMR9956, Laboratoire Pierre Suee, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)], E-mail: hicham.khodja@cea.fr; Hanot, M.; Carriere, M.; Hoarau, J. [DSM/IRAMIS/SIS2M, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); CNRS, UMR9956, Laboratoire Pierre Suee, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Angulo, J.F. [DSV, IRCM, SRO, Laboratoire de Genetique de la Radiosensibilite, F-92265 Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2009-06-15

    Low dose and non-targeted effect studies continue to attract the attention of a growing number of radiobiologists. Experimental setups based on light ion microbeams constitute a tool of choice for this kind of investigations. However, a careful attention must be given to experimental conditions, as setup-induced stress levels should be well below those induced by the irradiation itself. Here, we present the current status of the single-particle microbeam facility that has been developed these last years at the nuclear microprobe of Saclay. The driving idea was to build a facility in which local irradiation studies are performed in an environment close to cellular biology standards. This facility includes unique features, such as (i) a compact setup that allows easy access and vertical irradiation mode, (ii) a collimated beam that can be mechanically positioned under the desired cells at a very fast speed, avoiding the requirement of a focusing element and (iii) a controlled environment (temperature, CO{sub 2}, humidity) that allows performing of very long term experiments on cultured cells. Fluorescent techniques are implemented and permit in situ monitoring of cellular responses to irradiations. Several radiobiological studies are already underway and this will be illustrated with recent results regarding DNA damage and reactive oxygen species signaling time courses following targeted irradiations.

  7. Detection of Bioaerosols Using Single Particle Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (First-year Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Detection of Bioaerosols using Single Particle Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (First-year Report) by Dr. Kristan P. Gurton, Melvin Felton, and...Research Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-5934 February 2012 Detection of Bioaerosols using Single Particle Thermal Emission...October 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Detection of Bioaerosols using Single Particle Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (First-year Report) 5a. CONTRACT

  8. Generalized Superfield Lagrangian Quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, P M; Moshin, P Y

    2002-01-01

    We consider an extension of the gauge-fixing procedure in the framework of the Lagrangian superfield BRST and BRST-antiBRST quantization schemes for arbitrary gauge theories, taking into account the possible ambiguity in the choice of the superfield antibracket. We show that this ambiguity is fixed by the algebraic properties of the antibracket and the form of the BRST and antiBRST transformations, realized in terms of superspace translations. The Ward identities related to the generalized gauge-fixing procedure are obtained.

  9. Drift correction of the dissolved signal in single particle ICPMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Geert; Rauch, Sebastien

    2016-07-01

    A method is presented where drift, the random fluctuation of the signal intensity, is compensated for based on the estimation of the drift function by a moving average. It was shown using single particle ICPMS (spICPMS) measurements of 10 and 60 nm Au NPs that drift reduces accuracy of spICPMS analysis at the calibration stage and during calculations of the particle size distribution (PSD), but that the present method can again correct the average signal intensity as well as the signal distribution of particle-containing samples skewed by drift. Moreover, deconvolution, a method that models signal distributions of dissolved signals, fails in some cases when using standards and samples affected by drift, but the present method was shown to improve accuracy again. Relatively high particle signals have to be removed prior to drift correction in this procedure, which was done using a 3 × sigma method, and the signals are treated separately and added again. The method can also correct for flicker noise that increases when signal intensity is increased because of drift. The accuracy was improved in many cases when flicker correction was used, but when accurate results were obtained despite drift, the correction procedures did not reduce accuracy. The procedure may be useful to extract results from experimental runs that would otherwise have to be run again. Graphical Abstract A method is presented where a spICP-MS signal affected by drift (left) is corrected (right) by adjusting the local (moving) averages (green) and standard deviations (purple) to the respective values at a reference time (red). In combination with removing particle events (blue) in the case of calibration standards, this method is shown to obtain particle size distributions where that would otherwise be impossible, even when the deconvolution method is used to discriminate dissolved and particle signals.

  10. Cluster analysis of WIBS single-particle bioaerosol data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, N. H.; Allan, J. D.; Huffman, J. A.; Kaye, P. H.; Foot, V. E.; Gallagher, M.

    2013-02-01

    Hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis was performed on single-particle multi-spatial data sets comprising optical diameter, asymmetry and three different fluorescence measurements, gathered using two dual Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensors (WIBSs). The technique is demonstrated on measurements of various fluorescent and non-fluorescent polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) before being applied to two separate contemporaneous ambient WIBS data sets recorded in a forest site in Colorado, USA, as part of the BEACHON-RoMBAS project. Cluster analysis results between both data sets are consistent. Clusters are tentatively interpreted by comparison of concentration time series and cluster average measurement values to the published literature (of which there is a paucity) to represent the following: non-fluorescent accumulation mode aerosol; bacterial agglomerates; and fungal spores. To our knowledge, this is the first time cluster analysis has been applied to long-term online primary biological aerosol particle (PBAP) measurements. The novel application of this clustering technique provides a means for routinely reducing WIBS data to discrete concentration time series which are more easily interpretable, without the need for any a priori assumptions concerning the expected aerosol types. It can reduce the level of subjectivity compared to the more standard analysis approaches, which are typically performed by simple inspection of various ensemble data products. It also has the advantage of potentially resolving less populous or subtly different particle types. This technique is likely to become more robust in the future as fluorescence-based aerosol instrumentation measurement precision, dynamic range and the number of available metrics are improved.

  11. Cluster analysis of WIBS single-particle bioaerosol data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Robinson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis was performed on single-particle multi-spatial data sets comprising optical diameter, asymmetry and three different fluorescence measurements, gathered using two dual Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensors (WIBSs. The technique is demonstrated on measurements of various fluorescent and non-fluorescent polystyrene latex spheres (PSL before being applied to two separate contemporaneous ambient WIBS data sets recorded in a forest site in Colorado, USA, as part of the BEACHON-RoMBAS project. Cluster analysis results between both data sets are consistent. Clusters are tentatively interpreted by comparison of concentration time series and cluster average measurement values to the published literature (of which there is a paucity to represent the following: non-fluorescent accumulation mode aerosol; bacterial agglomerates; and fungal spores. To our knowledge, this is the first time cluster analysis has been applied to long-term online primary biological aerosol particle (PBAP measurements. The novel application of this clustering technique provides a means for routinely reducing WIBS data to discrete concentration time series which are more easily interpretable, without the need for any a priori assumptions concerning the expected aerosol types. It can reduce the level of subjectivity compared to the more standard analysis approaches, which are typically performed by simple inspection of various ensemble data products. It also has the advantage of potentially resolving less populous or subtly different particle types. This technique is likely to become more robust in the future as fluorescence-based aerosol instrumentation measurement precision, dynamic range and the number of available metrics are improved.

  12. Lagrangian vector field and Lagrangian formulation of partial differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Chen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider the Lagrangian formulation of a system of second order quasilinear partial differential equations. Specifically we construct a Lagrangian vector field such that the flows of the vector field satisfy the original system of partial differential equations.

  13. Report of the working group on single-particle nonlinear dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazzani, A.; Bongini, L.; Corbett, J.; Dome, G.; Fedorova, A.; Freguglia, P.; Ng, K.; Ohmi, K.; Owen, H.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Robin, D.; Safranek, J.; Scandale, W.; Terebilo, A.; Turchetti, G.; Todesco, E.; Warnock, R.; Zeitlin, M. (Office of Energy Research, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences Division, U.S. Department of Energy (United States))

    1999-04-01

    The Working Group on single-particle nonlinear dynamics has developed a set of tools to study nonlinear dynamics in a particle accelerator. The design of rings with large dynamic apertures is still far from automatic. The Working Group has concluded that nonlinear single-particle dynamics limits the performance of acclerators. (AIP) [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital American Institute of Physics

  14. Report of the working group on single-particle nonlinear dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzani, A.; Bongini, L.; Corbett, J.; Dome, G.; Fedorova, A.; Freguglia, P.; Ng, K.; Ohmi, K.; Owen, H.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Robin, D.; Safranek, J.; Scandale, W.; Terebilo, A.; Turchetti, G.; Todesco, E.; Warnock, R.; Zeitlin, M.

    1999-04-01

    The Working Group on single-particle nonlinear dynamics has developed a set of tools to study nonlinear dynamics in a particle accelerator. The design of rings with large dynamic apertures is still far from automatic. The Working Group has concluded that nonlinear single-particle dynamics limits the performance of acclerators. (AIP)

  15. Topological Classification of Lagrangian Fibrations

    CERN Document Server

    Sepe, D

    2009-01-01

    We define topological invariants of regular Lagrangian fibrations using the integral affine structure on the base space and we show that these coincide with the classes known in the literature. We also classify all symplectic types of Lagrangian fibrations with base $\\rpr$ and fixed monodromy representation, generalising a construction due to Bates.

  16. Single Particle Soot Photometer intercomparison at the AIDA chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Laborde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Soot particles, consisting of black carbon (BC, organic carbon (OC, inorganic salts, and trace elements, are emitted into the atmosphere during incomplete combustion. Accurate measurements of atmospheric BC are important as BC particles cause adverse health effects and impact the climate.

    Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the properties and mass concentrations of BC particles remains difficult. The Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2 can contribute to improving this situation by measuring the mass of refractory BC in individual particles as well as its mixing state.

    Here, the results of the first detailed SP2 intercomparison, involving 6 SP2s from 6 different research groups, are presented, including the most evolved data products that can presently be calculated from SP2 measurements.

    It was shown that a detection efficiency of almost 100% down to 1 fg BC per particle can readily be achieved, and that this limit can be pushed down to ∼0.2 fg BC with optimal SP2 setup. Number and mass size distributions of BC cores agreed within ±5% and ±10%, respectively, in between the SP2s, with larger deviations in the range below 1 fg BC.

    The accuracy of the SP2's mass concentration measurement depends on the calibration material chosen. The SP2 has previously been shown to be equally sensitive to fullerene soot and ambient BC from sources where fossil fuel was dominant and less sensitive to fullerene soot than to Aquadag. Fullerene soot was therefore chosen as the standard calibration material by the SP2 user community; however, many data sets rely solely on Aquadag calibration measurements. The difference in SP2 sensitivity was found to be almost equal (fullerene soot to Aquadag response ratio of ∼0.75 at 8.9 fg BC for all SP2s. This allows the calculation of a fullerene soot equivalent calibration curve from a measured Aquadag calibration, when no fullerene soot calibration is available. It could be

  17. Single Particle Soot Photometer intercomparison at the AIDA chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Laborde

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Soot particles, consisting of black carbon (BC, organic carbon (OC, inorganic salts, and trace elements, are emitted into the atmosphere during incomplete combustion. Accurate measurements of atmospheric BC are important as BC particles cause adverse health effects and impact the climate.

    Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the properties and mass concentrations of BC particles remains difficult. The Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2 can contribute to improving this situation by measuring the mass of refractory BC in individual particles as well as its mixing state.

    Here, the results of the first detailed SP2 intercomparison, involving 6 SP2s from 6 different research groups, are presented, including the most evolved data products that can presently be calculated from SP2 measurements.

    It was shown that a detection efficiency of almost 100% down to 1 fg BC per particle can readily be achieved, and that this limit can be pushed down to ~0.3 fg BC with optimal SP2 setup. Number and mass size distributions of BC cores agreed within ±5% and ±10%, respectively, in between the SP2s, with larger deviations in the range below 1 fg BC.

    The accuracy of the SP2's mass concentration measurement depends on the calibration material chosen. The SP2 has previously been shown to be equally sensitive to fullerene soot and ambient BC from sources where fossil fuel were dominant and less sensitive to fullerene soot than to Aquadag. Fullerene soot was therefore chosen as the standard calibration material by the SP2 user community, however many datasets rely solely on Aquadag calibration measurements. The difference in SP2 sensitivity was found to be almost equal (fullerene soot to Aquadag response ratio of ~0.75 at 8.9 fg BC for all SP2s. This allows the calculation of a fullerene soot equivalent calibration curve from a measured Aquadag calibration, when no fullerene soot calibration is available. It could be shown

  18. Lagrangian-Only Quantum Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Wharton, K B

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of the path integral, there have been relatively few attempts to look to the Lagrangian for a more realistic framework that might underlie quantum theory. While such realism is not available for the standard path integral or quantum field theory, a promising alternative is to only consider field histories for which the Lagrangian density is always zero. With this change, it appears possible to replace amplitudes with equally-weighted probabilities. This paper demonstrates a proof-of-principle for this approach, using a toy Lagrangian that corresponds to an arbitrary spin state. In this restricted framework one can derive both the Born rule and its limits of applicability. The fact that the Lagrangian obeys future boundary constraints also results in the first continuous, spacetime-based, hidden-variable description of a Bell-inequality-violating system.

  19. Lagrangian Modeling of the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-08-01

    Like watching a balloon borne by the breeze, a Lagrangian model tracks a parcel of air as it flows through the atmosphere. Whether running forward or backward in time, Lagrangian models offer a powerful tool for tracking and understanding the fates, or origins, of atmospheric flows. In the AGU monograph Lagrangian Modeling of the Atmosphere, editors John Lin, Dominik Brunner, Christoph Gerbig, Andreas Stohl, Ashok Luhar, and Peter Webley explore the nuances of the modeling technique. In this interview Eos talks to Lin about the growing importance of Lagrangian modeling as the world settles on climate change mitigation strategies, the societal value of operational modeling, and how recent advances are making it possible to run these complex calculations at home.

  20. The Lagrangian in Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirac, P. A. M.

    Quantum mechanics was built up on a foundation of analogy with the Hamiltonian theory of classical mechanics. This is because the classical notion of canonical coordinates and momenta was found to be one with a very simple quantum analogue, as a result of which the whole of the classical Hamiltonian theory, which is just a structure built up on this notion, could be taken over in all its details into quantum mechanics. Now there is an alternative formulation for classical dynamics, provided by the Lagrangian. This requires one to work in terms of coordinates and velocities instead of coordinates and momenta. The two formulations are, of course, closely related, but there are reasons for believing that the Lagrangian one is the more fundamental. In the first place the Lagrangian method allows one to collect together all the equations of motion and express them as the stationary property of a certain action function. (This action function is just the time-integral of the Lagrangian.) There is no corresponding action principle in terms of the coordinates and momenta of the Hamiltonian theory. Secondly the Lagrangian method can easily be expressed relativistically, on account of the action function being a relativistic invariant; while the Hamiltonian method is essentially non-relativistic in form, since it marks out a particular time variable as the canonical conjugate of the Hamiltonian function. For these reasons it would seem desirable to take up the question of what corresponds in the quantum theory to the Lagrangian method of the classical theory. A little consideration shows, however, that one cannot expect to be able to take over the classical Lagrangian equations in any very direct way. These equations involve partial derivatives of the Lagrangian with respect to the coordinates and velocities and no meaning can be given to such derivatives in quantum mechanics. The only differentiation process that can be carried out with respect to the dynamical variables of

  1. Lagrangian description of nonlinear chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Heng; LIU Xiaolong

    2004-01-01

    Under the framework of non-equilibrium thermodynamic separation theory (NTST), Local Lagrangian approach (LLA) was proposed to deal with the essential issues of the convection and diffusion (shock waves) phenomena in nonlinear chromatography with recursion equations based on the three basic theorems, Lagrangian description, continuity axiom and local equilibrium assumption (LEA). This approach remarkably distinguished from the system of contemporary chromatographic theories (Eulerian description-partial differential equations), and can felicitously match modern cybernetics.

  2. Presymplectic structures and intrinsic Lagrangians

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoriev, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that a Lagrangian induces a compatible presymplectic form on the equation manifold (stationary surface, understood as a submanifold of the respective jet-space). Given an equation manifold and a compatible presymplectic form therein, we define the first-order Lagrangian system which is formulated in terms of the intrinsic geometry of the equation manifold. It has a structure of a presymplectic AKSZ sigma model for which the equation manifold, equipped with the presymplectic form and the horizontal differential, serves as the target space. For a wide class of systems (but not all) we show that if the presymplectic structure originates from a given Lagrangian, the proposed first-order Lagrangian is equivalent to the initial one and hence the Lagrangian per se can be entirely encoded in terms of the intrinsic geometry of its stationary surface. If the compatible presymplectic structure is generic, the proposed Lagrangian is only a partial one in the sense that its stationary surface contains the...

  3. Nuclear single-particle states: dynamical shell model and energy density functional methods

    CERN Document Server

    Bortignon, P F; Sagawa, H

    2010-01-01

    We discuss different approaches to the problem of reproducing the observed features of nuclear single-particle (s.p.) spectra. In particular, we analyze the dominant energy peaks, and the single-particle strength fragmentation, using the example of neutron states in 208Pb. Our main emphasis is the interpretation of that fragmentation as due to particle-vibration coupling (PVC). We compare with recent Energy Density Functional (EDF) approaches, and try to present a critical perspective.

  4. Relativistic description of single-particle resonances via phase shift analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zi-Zhen

    2009-01-01

    Single-particle resonant states in spherical nuclei are studied by the real stabilization method in coordinate space within the framework of self-consistent relativistic mean field theory. Taking 122Zr as an example, the resonant parameters, including the energies and widths are extracted by fitting energy and phase shift. Good agreement with the previous calculations has been found. The details of single-particle resonant states are analysed.

  5. Electron Cryomicroscopy of Membrane Proteins: Specimen Preparation for Two-Dimensional Crystals and Single Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt-Krey, Ingeborg; Rubinstein, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Membrane protein structure and function can be studied by two powerful and highly complementary electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) methods: electron crystallography of two-dimensional (2D) crystals and single particle analysis of detergent-solubilized protein complexes. To obtain the highest-possible resolution data from membrane proteins, whether prepared as 2D crystals or single particles, cryo-EM samples must be vitrified with great care. Grid preparation for cryo-EM of 2D crystals is possi...

  6. Single particle mass spectral signatures from vehicle exhaust particles and the source apportionment of on-line PM2.5 by single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Ma, Shexia; Gao, Bo; Li, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yanjun; Cai, Jing; Li, Mei; Yao, Ling'ai; Huang, Bo; Zheng, Mei

    2017-09-01

    In order to accurately apportion the many distinct types of individual particles observed, it is necessary to characterize fingerprints of individual particles emitted directly from known sources. In this study, single particle mass spectral signatures from vehicle exhaust particles in a tunnel were performed. These data were used to evaluate particle signatures in a real-world PM2.5 apportionment study. The dominant chemical type originating from average positive and negative mass spectra for vehicle exhaust particles are EC species. Four distinct particle types describe the majority of particles emitted by vehicle exhaust particles in this tunnel. Each particle class is labeled according to the most significant chemical features in both average positive and negative mass spectral signatures, including ECOC, NaK, Metal and PAHs species. A single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was also employed during the winter of 2013 in Guangzhou to determine both the size and chemical composition of individual atmospheric particles, with vacuum aerodynamic diameter (dva) in the size range of 0.2-2μm. A total of 487,570 particles were chemically analyzed with positive and negative ion mass spectra and a large set of single particle mass spectra was collected and analyzed in order to identify the speciation. According to the typical tracer ions from different source types and classification by the ART-2a algorithm which uses source fingerprints for apportioning ambient particles, the major sources of single particles were simulated. Coal combustion, vehicle exhaust, and secondary ion were the most abundant particle sources, contributing 28.5%, 17.8%, and 18.2%, respectively. The fraction with vehicle exhaust species particles decreased slightly with particle size in the condensation mode particles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Full control of heat transfer in single-particle structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S.; Xu, L. J.; Wang, R. Z.; Huang, J. P.

    2017-09-01

    Thermal metamaterials have been applied to implement thermal phenomena, such as invisibility, illusion, and refraction. However, during the fabrication, they probably have complicated issues which are on account of the complicated structures. To get around this, here we put forward a single-particle structure. The theory helps to simplify the existing methods, which will undoubtedly contribute to the efficiency of fabrication. For clarity, we show the simulation and experimental results of thermal invisibility and illusion based on our proposed single-particle structural materials. Moreover, by tailoring the shape factor of the single particle appropriately, we can simultaneously realize thermal invisibility and illusion with only one device. The adjustable area fraction also indicates that these types of structural materials are highly adaptable. Such a single-particle device may have broad applications in misleading infrared detection. This work not only opens an avenue to design thermal materials based on single-particle structures but also holds for other physical fields like electrostatics, magnetostatics, and particle dynamics.

  8. Role of single-particle and pair condensates in Bose systems with arbitrary intensity of interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Peletminskii

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We study a superfluid Bose system with single-particle and pair condensates on the basis of a half-phenomenological theory of a Bose liquid not involving the weakness of interparticle interaction. The coupled equations describing the equilibrium state of such system are derived from the variational principle for entropy. These equations are analyzed at zero temperature both analytically and numerically. It is shown that the fraction of particles in the single-particle and pair condensates essentially depends on the total density of the system. At densities attainable in condensates of alkali-metal atoms, almost all particles are in the single-particle condensate. The pair condensate fraction grows with increasing total density and becomes dominant. It is shown that at density of liquid helium, the single-particle condensate fraction is less than 10% that agrees with experimental data on inelastic neutron scattering, Monte Carlo calculations and other theoretical predictions. The ground state energy, pressure, and compressibility are found for the system under consideration. The spectrum of single-particle excitations is also analyzed.

  9. About non standard Lagrangians in cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrijevic, Dragoljub D.; Milosevic, Milan [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, University of Nis, Visegradska 33, P.O. Box 224, 18000 Nis (Serbia)

    2012-08-17

    A review of non standard Lagrangians present in modern cosmological models will be considered. Well known example of non standard Lagrangian is Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) type Lagrangian for tachyon field. Another type of non standard Lagrangian under consideration contains scalar field which describes open p-adic string tachyon and is called p-adic string theory Lagrangian. We will investigate homogenous cases of both DBI and p-adic fields and obtain Lagrangians of the standard type which have the same equations of motions as aforementioned non standard one.

  10. Lagrangian continuum dynamics in ALEGRA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Michael K. W.; Love, Edward

    2007-12-01

    Alegra is an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) multi-material finite element code that emphasizes large deformations and strong shock physics. The Lagrangian continuum dynamics package in Alegra uses a Galerkin finite element spatial discretization and an explicit central-difference stepping method in time. The goal of this report is to describe in detail the characteristics of this algorithm, including the conservation and stability properties. The details provided should help both researchers and analysts understand the underlying theory and numerical implementation of the Alegra continuum hydrodynamics algorithm.

  11. Analysis of proton single-particle properties of zinc and germanium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bespalova, O. V., E-mail: besp@sinp.msu.ru; Ermakova, T. A.; Klimochkina, A. A.; Romanovsky, E. A.; Spasskaya, T. I. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    Experimental proton single-particle energies in the vicinity of the Fermi energy for stable zinc and germanium isotopes are analyzed on the basis the dispersive optical model. The values found for the parameters of the dispersive optical potential are corrected with the aim of matching the total number of protons that is calculated with the aid of the function of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory for the occupation probability for single-particle orbits with the charge number Z of the nucleus. The parameters of the dispersive optical potential are extrapolated on the basis of physically motivated arguments to the region of unstable isotopes in which the number N ranges between 34 and 50, and single-particle spectra are predicted by means of calculations with these parameters.

  12. Analysis of proton single-particle properties of zinc and germanium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalova, O. V.; Ermakova, T. A.; Klimochkina, A. A.; Romanovsky, E. A.; Spasskaya, T. I.

    2014-12-01

    Experimental proton single-particle energies in the vicinity of the Fermi energy for stable zinc and germanium isotopes are analyzed on the basis the dispersive optical model. The values found for the parameters of the dispersive optical potential are corrected with the aim of matching the total number of protons that is calculated with the aid of the function of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory for the occupation probability for single-particle orbits with the charge number Z of the nucleus. The parameters of the dispersive optical potential are extrapolated on the basis of physically motivated arguments to the region of unstable isotopes in which the number N ranges between 34 and 50, and single-particle spectra are predicted by means of calculations with these parameters.

  13. Forces acting on a single particle in an evaporating sessile droplet on a hydrophilic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jung-yeul; Kim, Young Won; Yoo, Jung Yul; Koo, Junemo; Kang, Yong Tae

    2010-02-01

    The evaporating sessile droplet of a mono/didisperse colloid on a plate is a very useful and handy technique in micro/nano/bioapplications to separate, pattern, and control the particles. Although the fundamental nature of the evaporation phenomena and its applications have been extensively proposed, the crucial forces affecting a single particle motion in an evaporating droplet are not reported yet. To elucidate the impact of various forces including the drag, electrostatic, van der Waals, and surface tension forces on the particle motion in suspension, the magnitudes of them are compared using the scale analysis. In the early stage of the evaporation, in which the contact line is fixed, the motion of a single particle suspended in liquid are mostly affected by drag force. Later, with the incidence of the contact line recession, the surface tension force takes over the control of the single particle motion.

  14. Damping of high-lying single-particle modes in heavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gales, S.; Stoyanov, C.; Vdovin, A.I.

    1988-08-01

    The recent experimental and theoretical results on the damping of high-lying single-particle modes in heavy nuclei are reviewed. In one-nucleon transfer reactions these states manifest themselves as broad 'resonance'-like structures superimposed on a large continuum. The advantages and the limitations of the transfer reaction approach will be presented using the results from neutron and proton pick-up and stripping reactions. The problem raised by the subtraction of the underlying background, the assumptions made to describe the reaction process and the method used to extract the strength distributions are presented. The existing empirical systematics is summarized for nuclei ranging from /sup 90/Zr to /sup 208/Pb. The theoretical approaches used to explain the damping of the high-lying single-particle modes are based on the coupling between collective and single-particle degrees of freedom. In a first step the bare single-particle mode is spread over several doorway collective states due to the interaction with surface vibrations. In a second step the doorway states spread their strengths over many other degrees of freedom. These two steps of the damping mechanism are discussed in detail within the framework of the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model. A large-scale comparison between the measured and calculated average energies, spreading widths and spectroscopic strengths of the high-lying single-particle (hole) states in heavy nuclei is presented. The systematic features of the damping (energy, angular momentum and isotopic dependence) are discussed. Recent advances of the experimental approaches, such as the ..gamma..-decay of the high-lying states or the use of heavy-ion transfer reactions at intermediate energies, are outlined. The detailed study of the damping mechanism of high-lying single-particle modes reveals new features and leads us to a new field in nuclear structure: 'The spectroscopy of inner and outer subshells'.

  15. Hyperon-nucleon single-particle potentials with low-momentum interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Djapo, Haris; Wambach, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    Single-particle potentials in Hartree-Fock approximation for different hyperon-nucleon (YN) channels are calculated in the framework of the effective low-momentum YN interaction V_lowk. In contrast to the nucleon-nucleon interaction, the available experimental data for the YN interaction are scarce. As a consequence no unique YN low-momentum potential V_lowk can be predicted from the various bare potentials. The resulting momentum- and density-dependent single-particle potentials for several different bare OBE models and for chiral effective field theory are compared to each other.

  16. A deep learning approach to single-particle recognition in cryo-electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yanan; Mao, Youdong

    2016-01-01

    Particle extraction represents a major practical bottleneck in the structure determination of biological macromolecular complexes by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). We developed a deep learning-based algorithmic framework, DeepEM, for single-particle recognition from noisy cryo-EM micrographs, enabling automated particle picking, selection and verification in an integrated fashion. Our approach exhibits improved performance and high accuracy when tested on the standard KLH dataset as well as several challenging experimental cryo-EM datasets.

  17. Evolution of Single-Particle Energies for N=9 Nuclei at Large N/Z

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuosmaa A. H.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the nucleus 14B using the 13B(d,p14B and 15C(d,3He14B reactions. The two reactions provide complementary information about the negative-parity 1s1/2 and 0d5/2 neutron single-particle states in 14B. The data from the (d,p reaction give neutron-spectroscopic strengths for these levels, and the (d,3He results confirm the existence of a broad 2- excited state suggested in the literature. Together these results provide estimates of the sd-shell neutron effective single-particle energies in 14B.

  18. Collective ion diffusion and localized single particle dynamics in pyridinium-based ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burankova, Tatsiana; Hempelmann, Rolf; Wildes, Andrew; Embs, Jan P

    2014-12-11

    Quasielastic neutron scattering with polarized neutrons allows for an experimental separation of single-particle and collective processes, as contained in the incoherent and coherent scattering contributions. This technique was used to investigate the dynamical processes in the pyridinium-based ionic liquid 1-butylpyridinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide. We observed two diffusion processes with different time scales. The slower diffusional process was present in both the coherent and the incoherent contribution, meaning that this process has at least a partial collective nature. The second faster localized process is only present in the incoherent scattering contribution. We conclude that it is a true single-particle process on a shorter time scale.

  19. A Student's Guide to Lagrangians and Hamiltonians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Part I. Lagrangian Mechanics: 1. Fundamental concepts; 2. The calculus of variations; 3. Lagrangian dynamics; Part II. Hamiltonian Mechanics: 4. Hamilton's equations; 5. Canonical transformations: Poisson brackets; 6. Hamilton-Jacobi theory; 7. Continuous systems; Further reading; Index.

  20. Lagrangian multi-particle statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüthi, Beat; Berg, Jacob; Ott, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Combined measurements of the Lagrangian evolution of particle constellations and the coarse-grained velocity derivative tensor. partial derivative(u) over tilde (i) /partial derivative x(j) are presented. The data are obtained from three-dimensional particle tracking measurements in a quasi isotr...

  1. Galilean invariance in Lagrangian mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohallem, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    The troublesome topic of Galilean invariance in Lagrangian mechanics is discussed in two situations: (i) A particular case involving a rheonomic constraint in uniform motion and (ii) the general translation of an entire system and the constants of motion involved. A widespread impropriety in most textbooks is corrected, concerning a condition for the equality h = E to hold.

  2. Data Assimilation With Regional Lagrangian Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-30

    Journal of Marine Systems . RESULTS We are able to fit the inviscid Lagrangian model with synthetic Lagrangian data for short periods of time (1-2 days...Mead and A.F. Bennett, 1999. Towards regional assimilation of data: The Lagrangian form of the reduced gravity model and its inverse, (submitted), Journal of Marine Systems .

  3. Deformed single-particle levels in the boson-fermion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A.; Shao, B. (Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (US) Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (US))

    1989-11-13

    Deformed single-particle levels are derived from a boson-fermion Hamiltonian in which the odd fermion occupies several {ital j} orbits. The geometric-oriented approach applied to {sup 169}Tm clarified the role of algebraic interactions and provides an intuitive interpretation and guidance to numerical calculations in deformed nuclei.

  4. Simple and accurate quantification of quantum dots via single-particle counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-yang; Johnson, Lawrence W

    2008-03-26

    Quantification of quantum dots (QDs) is essential to the quality control of QD synthesis, development of QD-based LEDs and lasers, functionalizing of QDs with biomolecules, and engineering of QDs for biological applications. However, simple and accurate quantification of QD concentration in a variety of buffer solutions and in complex mixtures still remains a critical technological challenge. Here, we introduce a new methodology for quantification of QDs via single-particle counting, which is conceptually different from established UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectrum techniques where large amounts of purified QDs are needed and specific absorption coefficient or quantum yield values are necessary for measurements. We demonstrate that single-particle counting allows us to nondiscriminately quantify different kinds of QDs by their distinct fluorescence burst counts in a variety of buffer solutions regardless of their composition, structure, and surface modifications, and without the necessity of absorption coefficient and quantum yield values. This single-particle counting can also unambiguously quantify individual QDs in a complex mixture, which is practically impossible for both UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectrum measurements. Importantly, the application of this single-particle counting is not just limited to QDs but also can be extended to fluorescent microspheres, quantum dot-based microbeads, and fluorescent nano rods, some of which currently lack efficient quantification methods.

  5. Report of the working group on single-particle nonlinear dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axinescu, S.; Bartolini, R.; Bazzani, A.; Biagini, M.; Chao, A.; Dragt, A.; Ellison, J.; Faus-Golfe, A.; Freguglia, P.; Hirata, K.; Ng, K.; Oide, K.; Ritson, D.; Schmidt, F.; Scandale, W.; Tazzari, S.; Todesco, E.; Turchetti, G.; Verolino, L.; Wan, W.; Warnock, R.; Yan, Y.

    1997-02-01

    This is a summary of the topics covered on the single particle nonlinear dynamics of particle accelerators. In particular, discussions of calculation tools for analysis of beams in accelerators, current status of understanding the dynamics aperture, and the problem of ripple, effects have been given. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. SINGLE-PARTICLE SELF-ENERGY AND OPTICAL CONDUCTIVITY OF THE SIMPLIFIED HUBBARD-MODEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Pedro; Michielsen, Kristel; Raedt, Hans De

    1994-01-01

    It is shown that the single-particle self-energy of the one and two-dimensional simplified Hubbard model exhibits different behavior characterized by Fermi-liquid, non-Fermi-liquid quasiparticle, or non-quasiparticle excitations, as a function of the strength of the on-site Coulomb repulsion U, temp

  7. Single-particle properties in an exactly solvable A-body system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanNeck, D; Dieperink, AEL; Waroquier, M

    1996-01-01

    A recent theorem states that for quantum many-body systems with short-range interactions the following property holds: the single-particle overlap functions, spectroscopic factors and separation energies of bound eigenstates of the (A - 1)-particle system are fully determined by the one-body density

  8. Single particle electron microscopy in combination with mass spectrometry to investigate novel complexes of membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arteni, Ana A.; Nowaczyk, Marc; Lax, Julia; Kouřil, Roman; Rögner, Matthias; Boekema, Egbert J.; Kouril, R.; Rogner, M.

    2005-01-01

    Large data sets of molecular projections of the membrane proteins Photosystem I and Photosystem II from cyanobacteria were analyzed by single particle electron microscopy (EM). Analysis resulted in the averaging of 2D projections from the purified complexes but also in the simultaneous detection and

  9. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Targeted and Single Particle Subcellular Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-03-12

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube.

  10. Homogeneous vs heterogeneous polymerization catalysis revealed by single-particle fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiari, N Melody; Blum, Suzanne A

    2011-11-16

    A high-sensitivity and high-resolution single-particle fluorescence microscopy technique differentiated between homogeneous and heterogeneous metathesis polymerization catalysis by imaging the location of the early stages of polymerization. By imaging single polymers and single crystals of Grubbs II, polymerization catalysis was revealed to be solely homogeneous rather than heterogeneous or both.

  11. Anchored Lagrangian submanifolds and their Floer theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fukaya, Kenji; Ohta, Hiroshi; Ono, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the notion of (graded) anchored Lagrangian submanifolds and use it to study the filtration of Floer' s chain complex. We then obtain an anchored version of Lagrangian Floer homology and its (higher) product structures. They are somewhat different from the more standard non-anchored version. The anchored version discussed in this paper is more naturally related to the variational picture of Lagrangian Floer theory and so to the likes of spectral invariants. We also discuss rationality of Lagrangian submanifold and reduction of the coefficient ring of Lagrangian Floer cohomology of thereof.

  12. Effective Lagrangian for Nonrelativistic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruki Watanabe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effective Lagrangian for Nambu-Goldstone bosons (NGBs in systems without Lorentz invariance has a novel feature that some of the NGBs are canonically conjugate to each other, hence describing 1 dynamical degree of freedom by two NGB fields. We develop explicit forms of their effective Lagrangian up to the quadratic order in derivatives. We clarify the counting rules of NGB degrees of freedom and completely classify possibilities of such canonically conjugate pairs based on the topology of the coset spaces. Its consequence on the dispersion relations of the NGBs is clarified. We also present simple scaling arguments to see whether interactions among NGBs are marginal or irrelevant, which justifies a lore in the literature about the possibility of symmetry breaking in 1+1 dimensions.

  13. Complex Lagrangians and phantom cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Andrianov, A A; Kamenshchik, A Yu

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by the generalization of quantum theory for the case of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians with PT symmetry, we show how a classical cosmological model describes a smooth transition from ordinary dark energy to the phantom one. The model is based on a classical complex Lagrangian of a scalar field. Specific symmetry properties analogous to PT in non-Hermitian quantum mechanics lead to purely real equation of motion.

  14. Lagrangian Description for Particle Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics: Entangled Many-Particle Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Roderick I.

    2016-11-01

    A Lagrangian formulation is constructed for particle interpretations of quantum mechanics, a well-known example of such an interpretation being the Bohm model. The advantages of such a description are that the equations for particle motion, field evolution and conservation laws can all be deduced from a single Lagrangian density expression. The formalism presented is Lorentz invariant. This paper follows on from a previous one which was limited to the single-particle case. The present paper treats the more general case of many particles in an entangled state. It is found that describing more than one particle while maintaining a relativistic description requires the specification of final boundary conditions as well as the usual initial ones, with the experimenter's controllable choice of the final conditions thereby exerting a backwards-in-time influence. This retrocausality then allows an important theoretical step forward to be made, namely that it becomes possible to dispense with the usual, many-dimensional description in configuration space and instead revert to a description in space-time using separate, single-particle wavefunctions.

  15. Hybrid quantum systems of atoms and ions

    CERN Document Server

    Zipkes, Christoph; Palzer, Stefan; Sias, Carlo; Köhl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, ultracold atoms have emerged as an exceptionally controllable experimental system to investigate fundamental physics, ranging from quantum information science to simulations of condensed matter models. Here we go one step further and explore how cold atoms can be combined with other quantum systems to create new quantum hybrids with tailored properties. Coupling atomic quantum many-body states to an independently controllable single-particle gives access to a wealth of novel physics and to completely new detection and manipulation techniques. We report on recent experiments in which we have for the first time deterministically placed a single ion into an atomic Bose Einstein condensate. A trapped ion, which currently constitutes the most pristine single particle quantum system, can be observed and manipulated at the single particle level. In this single-particle/many-body composite quantum system we show sympathetic cooling of the ion and observe chemical reactions of single particles in situ...

  16. Hybrid quantum systems of atoms and ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zipkes, Christoph; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Palzer, Stefan; Sias, Carlo; Koehl, Michael [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-10

    In recent years, ultracold atoms have emerged as an exceptionally controllable experimental system to investigate fundamental physics, ranging from quantum information science to simulations of condensed matter models. Here we go one step further and explore how cold atoms can be combined with other quantum systems to create new quantum hybrids with tailored properties. Coupling atomic quantum many-body states to an independently controllable single-particle gives access to a wealth of novel physics and to completely new detection and manipulation techniques. We report on recent experiments in which we have for the first time deterministically placed a single ion into an atomic Bose Einstein condensate. A trapped ion, which currently constitutes the most pristine single particle quantum system, can be observed and manipulated at the single particle level. In this single-particle/many-body composite quantum system we show sympathetic cooling of the ion and observe chemical reactions of single particles in situ.

  17. Guidelines for the fitting of anomalous diffusion mean square displacement graphs from single particle tracking experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldad Kepten

    Full Text Available Single particle tracking is an essential tool in the study of complex systems and biophysics and it is commonly analyzed by the time-averaged mean square displacement (MSD of the diffusive trajectories. However, past work has shown that MSDs are susceptible to significant errors and biases, preventing the comparison and assessment of experimental studies. Here, we attempt to extract practical guidelines for the estimation of anomalous time averaged MSDs through the simulation of multiple scenarios with fractional Brownian motion as a representative of a large class of fractional ergodic processes. We extract the precision and accuracy of the fitted MSD for various anomalous exponents and measurement errors with respect to measurement length and maximum time lags. Based on the calculated precision maps, we present guidelines to improve accuracy in single particle studies. Importantly, we find that in some experimental conditions, the time averaged MSD should not be used as an estimator.

  18. An alternative quantum theory for single particles and a proposed experimental test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Quan-hui

    2007-01-01

    An alternative quantum theory for single particles bounded in the external field proposed in 1986(Huang X.Y.,Phys.Lett.A.,1986,115:310)is further developed from which the energy of the state for the single particle takes one of the eigenvalues of the quantum Hamiltonian,and the usual quantum mechanics for the particle in a stationary state holds only in the statistical sense.In light of the theory,the particle of definite energy,ground-state-energy for instance,can exhibit a novel periodic behavior.This result for the ground-state-energy state neutron in the Earth's gravitational field is experimentally testable using ultracold neutron beam passing through the same apparatus that was devised in 2002 to identify the energy quantization of neutron in the field(Nesvizhevsky V.V.,et al.,Nature,2002,415:297).

  19. Gold nanoparticle translocation dynamics and electrical detection of single particle diffusion using solid-state nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Gaurav; Freedman, Kevin J; Kim, Min Jun

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes the use of gold nanoparticles to study particle translocation dynamics through silicon nitride solid-state nanopores. Gold nanoparticles were dispersed in 20 mM KCl solution containing nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 and their translocation was studied at different applied voltages. The use of low electrolyte concentration resulted in current enhancement upon particle translocation. The counterion cloud around the nanoparticles is proposed to be the reason for current enhancement phenomena because associated counterion cloud is believed to increase the ion density inside the pore during particle translocation. Further, single particle diffusion events were also recorded at 0 mV voltage bias and 0 pA background ionic current with high signal-to-noise ratio as the particles moved down their concentration gradient. The ability of nanopore sensors to detect single particle diffusion can be extended to field-free analysis of biomolecules in their native state and at or near physiological salt concentrations.

  20. Entangling a polariton with one photon: effect of interactions at the single-particle level

    CERN Document Server

    Cuevas, Álvaro; Carreño, Juan Camilo López; de Giorgi, Milena; Muñoz, Carlos Sánchez; Fieramosca, Antonio; Forero, Daniel Gustavo Suárez; Cardano, Filippo; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Tasco, Vittorianna; Biasiol, Giorgio; del Valle, Elena; Dominici, Lorenzo; Ballarini, Dario; Gigli, Giuseppe; Mataloni, Paolo; Laussy, Fabrice P; Sciarrino, Fabio; Sanvitto, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Polaritons are quasi-particles originating from the coupling of light with matter and that demonstrated quantum phenomena at the many-particle mesoscopic level, such as BEC and superuidity. A highly sought and long-time missing feature of polaritons is a genuine quantum manifestation of their dynamics at the single-particle level. Although they are conceptually perceived as entangled states and theoretical proposals abound for an explicit manifestation of their single-particle properties, so far their behaviour remained fully accountable for by classical and mean-field theories. In this Article, we report the first experimental demonstration of a genuinely-quantum manifestation of microcavity polaritons, by swapping the entanglement between a polariton and an external photon from a photon pair generated by parametric down-conversion. Moreover we demonstrate how interactions manifest at a single polariton level by perturbing the entangled state with a rarefied polariton condensate. Our results open the page of...

  1. Inequivalence of single-particle and population lifetimes in a cuprate superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuolong [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Sobota, J. A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Leuenberger, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); He, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Hashimoto, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lu, D. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Eisaki, H. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki (Japan); Kirchmann, P. S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Shen, Z. -X. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We study optimally doped Bi-2212 (Tc=96 K) using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Energy-resolved population lifetimes are extracted and compared with single-particle lifetimes measured by equilibrium photoemission. The population lifetimes deviate from the single-particle lifetimes in the low excitation limit by 1–2 orders of magnitude. Fundamental considerations of electron scattering unveil that these two lifetimes are in general distinct, yet for systems with only electron-phonon scattering they should converge in the low-temperature, low-fluence limit. As a result, the qualitative disparity in our data, even in this limit, suggests that scattering channels beyond electron-phonon interactions play a significant role in the electron dynamics of cuprate superconductors.

  2. Elaborate calibration procedure for cell irradiation at the CAS-LIBB single-particle microbeam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Zhi-Wen; Ding Ke-Jian; Yu Liang-Deng; Zhang Jun; Wu Li-Jun; Yu Zeng-Liang

    2006-01-01

    Single-particle microbeam is uniquely capable of precisely delivering a preset number of charged particles to individual cells or sub-cellular targets to be determined in vitro.It is crucial to find a reference point that relates the microbeam's location to the microscope's plane,and align individual targets at this reference point for cell irradiation.To choose an appropriate reference point,an approach based on analysing the intensity distribution of fluorescence in a thin scintillator excited by traversing particles is newly developed using the CAS-LIBB single-particle microbeam,which features decisive physical signification and sufficient resolution.As its bonus,this on-line analysis provides precise and fast response to the determination of beam profile and potentially optimizes the microbeam quality by further adjusting hardware setup.

  3. Cryo-EM single particle analysis with the Volta phase plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danev, Radostin; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    We present a method for in-focus data acquisition with a phase plate that enables near-atomic resolution single particle reconstructions. Accurate focusing is the determining factor for obtaining high quality data. A double-area focusing strategy was implemented in order to achieve the required precision. With this approach we obtained a 3.2 Å resolution reconstruction of the Thermoplasma acidophilum 20S proteasome. The phase plate matches or slightly exceeds the performance of the conventional defocus approach. Spherical aberration becomes a limiting factor for achieving resolutions below 3 Å with in-focus phase plate images. The phase plate could enable single particle analysis of challenging samples in terms of small size, heterogeneity and flexibility that are difficult to solve by the conventional defocus approach.

  4. Recovering a stochastic process from super-resolution noisy ensembles of single-particle trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoze, N; Holcman, D

    2015-11-01

    Recovering a stochastic process from noisy ensembles of single-particle trajectories is resolved here using the coarse-grained Langevin equation as a model. The massive redundancy contained in single-particle tracking data allows recovering local parameters of the underlying physical model. We use several parametric and nonparametric estimators to compute the first and second moments of the process, to recover the local drift, its derivative, and the diffusion tensor, and to deconvolve the instrumental from the physical noise. We use numerical simulations to also explore the range of validity for these estimators. The present analysis allows defining what can exactly be recovered from statistics of super-resolution microscopy trajectories used for characterizing molecular trafficking underlying cellular functions.

  5. Improved estimation of anomalous diffusion exponents in single particle tracking experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bronshtein, Eldad Kepten Irena

    2013-01-01

    The Mean Square Displacement is a central tool in the analysis of Single Particle Tracking experiments, shedding light on various biophysical phenomena. Frequently, parameters are extracted by performing time-averages on single particle trajectories followed by ensemble averaging. This procedure however, suffers from two systematic errors when applied to particles that perform anomalous diffusion. The first is significant at short time lags and is induced by measurement errors. The second arises from the natural heterogeneity in biophysical systems. We show how to estimate and correct these two errors and improve the estimation of the anomalous parameters for the whole particle distribution. As a consequence we manage to characterize ensembles of heterogeneous particles even for rather short and noisy measurements where regular time averaged mean square displacement analysis fails. We apply this method to both simulations and in vivo measurements of telomere diffusion in 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. ...

  6. A virtual experiment showing single particle motion on a linearly vibrating screen-deck

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A virtual sieving experimental simulation system was built using physical simulation principles.The effects of vibration frequency and amplitude,the inclination angle of the screen-deck and the vibration direction angle of screen on single particle kinematics were predicted.Properties such as the average velocity and the average throw height were studied.The results show that the amplitude and the angle of vibration have a great effect on particle average velocity and average height.The vibration frequency ...

  7. Protein Secondary Structure Determination by Constrained Single-Particle Cryo-Electron Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Bartesaghi, Alberto; Lecumberry, Federico; Sapiro, Guillermo; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a powerful technique for 3D structure determination of protein complexes by averaging information from individual molecular images. The resolutions that can be achieved with single-particle cryo-EM are frequently limited by inaccuracies in assigning molecular orientations based solely on 2D projection images. Tomographic data collection schemes, however, provide powerful constraints that can be used to more accurately determine molecular orientations nece...

  8. Expectation values of single-particle operators in the random phase approximation ground state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosov, D S

    2017-02-07

    We developed a method for computing matrix elements of single-particle operators in the correlated random phase approximation ground state. Working with the explicit random phase approximation ground state wavefunction, we derived a practically useful and simple expression for a molecular property in terms of random phase approximation amplitudes. The theory is illustrated by the calculation of molecular dipole moments for a set of representative molecules.

  9. Improved identification of primary biological aerosol particles using single particle mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Zawadowicz, Maria A.; Froyd, Karl D.; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of primary biological aerosol particles, especially at altitudes relevant to cloud formation, are scarce. Single particle mass spectrometry (SPMS) has been used to probe aerosol chemical composition from ground and aircraft for over 20 years. Here we develop a method for identifying bioaerosols using SPMS. We show that identification of bioaerosol using SPMS is complicated because phosphorus-bearing mineral dust and phosphorus-rich combustion by-products such as fly ash produce m...

  10. Troika of single particle tracking programing: SNR enhancement, particle identification, and mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuang, Bo; Chen, Jixin; Kisley, Lydia; Landes, Christy F

    2014-01-14

    Single particle tracking (SPT) techniques provide a microscopic approach to probe in vivo and in vitro structure and reactions. Automatic analysis of SPT data with high efficiency and accuracy spurs the development of SPT algorithms. In this perspective, we review a range of available techniques used in SPT analysis programs. In addition, we present an example SPT program step-by-step to provide a guide so that researchers can use, modify, and/or write a SPT program for their own purposes.

  11. Single-particle isomeric states in 121Pd and 117Ru

    CERN Document Server

    Lalkovski, S; Bacelar, A M Denis; Gorska, M; Pietri, S; Podolyak, Zs; Bednarczyk, P; Caceres, L; Casarejos, E; Cullen, I J; Doornenbal, P; Farrelly, G F; Garnsworthy, A B; Geissel, H; Gelletly, W; Gerl, J; Grcebosz, J; Hinke, C; Ilie, G; Jaworski, G; Kisyov, S; Kojouharov, I; Kurz, N; Myalski, S; Palacz, M; Prokopowicz, W; Regan, P H; Schaffner, H; Steer, S; Tashenov, S; Walker, P M; Wollersheim, H J; Zhekova, M

    2011-01-01

    Neutron-rich nuclei were populated in a relativistic fission of 238U. Gamma-rays with energies of 135 keV and 184 keV were associated with two isomeric states in 121Pd and 117Ru. Half-lives of 0.63(5) microseconds and 2.0(3) micrisecondss were deduced and the isomeric states were interpreted in terms of deformed single-particle states.

  12. Topological invariants for interacting topological insulators. II. Breakdown of single-particle Green's function formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan-Yao; Wu, Han-Qing; Meng, Zi Yang; Lu, Zhong-Yi

    2016-05-01

    Topological phase transitions in free fermion systems can be characterized by the closing of single-particle gap and the change in topological invariants. However, in the presence of electronic interactions, topological phase transitions can be more complicated. In paper I of this series [Phys. Rev. B 93, 195163 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.195163], we have proposed an efficient scheme to evaluate the topological invariants based on the single-particle Green's function formalism. Here, in paper II, we demonstrate several interaction-driven topological phase transitions (TPTs) in two-dimensional (2D) interacting topological insulators (TIs) via large-scale quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations, based on the scheme of evaluating topological invariants presented in paper I. Across these transitions, the defining symmetries of the TIs have been neither explicitly nor spontaneously broken. In the first two models, the topological invariants calculated from the Green's function formalism succeed in characterizing the topologically distinct phases and identifying interaction-driven TPTs. However, in the other two models, we find that the single-particle gap does not close and the topological invariants constructed from the single-particle Green's function acquire no change across the TPTs. Unexpected breakdown of the Green's function formalism in constructing the topological invariants is thus discovered. We thence classify the topological phase transitions in interacting TIs into two categories in practical computation: Those that have noninteracting correspondence can be characterized successfully by the topological invariants constructed from the Green's functions, while for the others that do not have noninteracting correspondence, the Green's function formalism experiences a breakdown, but more interesting and exciting phenomena, such as emergent collective critical modes at the transition, arise. Discussion on the success and breakdown of topological invariants

  13. Effect of single-particle magnetostriction on the shear modulus of compliant magnetoactive elastomers

    OpenAIRE

    Kalita, Viktor; Snarskii, Andrew; Shamonin, Mikhail; Zorinets, Denys

    2017-01-01

    The influence of an external magnetic field on the static shear strain and the effective shear modulus of a magnetoactive elastomer (MAE) is studied theoretically in the framework of a recently introduced approach to the single-particle magnetostriction mechanism [V. M. Kalita et al, Phys. Rev. E 93, 062503 (2016)]. The planar problem of magnetostriction in an MAE with soft magnetic inclusions in the form of a thin disk (platelet) having the magnetic anisotropy in the plane of this disk is so...

  14. Expectation values of single-particle operators in the random phase approximation ground state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosov, D. S.

    2017-02-01

    We developed a method for computing matrix elements of single-particle operators in the correlated random phase approximation ground state. Working with the explicit random phase approximation ground state wavefunction, we derived a practically useful and simple expression for a molecular property in terms of random phase approximation amplitudes. The theory is illustrated by the calculation of molecular dipole moments for a set of representative molecules.

  15. Introduction to 3D reconstruction of macromolecules using single particle electron microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oscar LLORCA

    2005-01-01

    Single-particle electron microscopy has now reached maturity, becoming a commonly used method in the examination ofmacromolecular structure. Using a small amount of purified protein, isolated molecules are observed under the electron microscope and the data collected can be averaged into a 3D reconstruction.Single-particle electron microscopy is an appropriate tool for the analysis of proteins that can only be obtained in modest quantities, like many of the large complexes currently of interest in biomedicine. Whilst the use of electron microscopy expands, new methods are being developed and improved to deal with further challenges, such as reaching higher resolutions and the combination of information at different levels of structural detail. More importantly, present methodology is still not robust enough when studying certain "tricky" proteins like those displaying extensive conformational flexibility and a great deal of user expertise is required, posing a threat to the consistency of the final structure. This mini review describes a brief outline of the methods currently used in the 3D analysis of macromolecules using single-particle electron microscopy, intended for those first approaching this field. A summary of methods, techniques, software, and some recent work is presented. The spectacular improvements to the technique in recent years, its advantages and limitations compared to other structural methods,and its future developments are discussed.

  16. Phonon-particle coupling effects in the single-particle energies of semi-magic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saperstein, E. E.; Baldo, M.; Pankratov, S. S.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    A method is presented to evaluate the particle-phonon coupling (PC) corrections to the single-particle energies in semi-magic nuclei. In such nuclei, always there is a collective low-lying 2+ phonon, and a strong mixture of single-particle and particle-phonon states often occurs. As in magic nuclei the so-called g L 2 approximation, where g L is the vertex of the L-phonon creation, can be used for finding the PC correction δΣPC(ɛ) to the initial mass operator Σ0. In addition to the usual pole diagram, the phonon "tadpole" diagram is also taken into account. In semi-magic nuclei, the perturbation theory in δΣPC(ɛ) with respect to Σ0 is often invalid for finding the PC-corrected single-particle energies. Instead, the Dyson equation with the mass operator Σ(ɛ) = Σ0 + δΣPC(ɛ) is solved directly, without any use of the perturbation theory. Results for a chain of semi-magic Pb isotopes are presented.

  17. Single Particle ICP-MS: Advances toward routine analysis of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaño, Manuel D; Olesik, John W; Barber, Angela G; Challis, Katie; Ranville, James F

    2016-07-01

    From its early beginnings in characterizing aerosol particles to its recent applications for investigating natural waters and waste streams, single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) has proven to be a powerful technique for the detection and characterization of aqueous dispersions of metal-containing nanomaterials. Combining the high-throughput of an ensemble technique with the specificity of a single particle counting technique and the elemental specificity of ICP-MS, spICP-MS is capable of rapidly providing researchers with information pertaining to size, size distribution, particle number concentration, and major elemental composition with minimal sample perturbation. Recently, advances in data acquisition, signal processing, and the implementation of alternative mass analyzers (e.g., time-of-flight) has resulted in a wider breadth of particle analyses and made significant progress toward overcoming many of the challenges in the quantitative analysis of nanoparticles. This review provides an overview of spICP-MS development from a niche technique to application for routine analysis, a discussion of the key issues for quantitative analysis, and examples of its further advancement for analysis of increasingly complex environmental and biological samples. Graphical Abstract Single particle ICP-MS workflow for the analysis of suspended nanoparticles.

  18. The magic nature of 132Sn explored through the single-particle states of 133Sn

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, K L; Bardayan, D W; Blackmon, J C; Chae, K Y; Chipps, K A; Cizewski, J A; Erikson, L; Harlin, C; Hatarik, R; Kapler, R; Kozub, R L; Liang, J F; Livesay, R; Ma, Z; Moazen, B H; Nesaraja, C D; Nunes, F M; Pain, S D; Patterson, N P; Shapira, D; Shriner, J F; Smith, M S; Swan, T P; Thomas, J S; 10.1038/nature09048

    2010-01-01

    Atomic nuclei have a shell structure where nuclei with 'magic numbers' of neutrons and protons are analogous to the noble gases in atomic physics. Only ten nuclei with the standard magic numbers of both neutrons and protons have so far been observed. The nuclear shell model is founded on the precept that neutrons and protons can move as independent particles in orbitals with discrete quantum numbers, subject to a mean field generated by all the other nucleons. Knowledge of the properties of single-particle states outside nuclear shell closures in exotic nuclei is important for a fundamental understanding of nuclear structure and nucleosynthesis (for example the r-process, which is responsible for the production of about half of the heavy elements). However, as a result of their short lifetimes, there is a paucity of knowledge about the nature of single-particle states outside exotic doubly magic nuclei. Here we measure the single-particle character of the levels in 133Sn that lie outside the double shell clos...

  19. Web server for tilt-pair validation of single particle maps from electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Sebastian; Rosenthal, Peter B

    2014-04-01

    Three-dimensional structures of biological assemblies may be calculated from images of single particles obtained by electron cryomicroscopy. A key step is the correct determination of the orientation of the particle in individual image projections. A useful tool for validation of the quality of a 3D map and its consistency with images is tilt-pair analysis. In a successful tilt-pair test, the relative angle between orientations assigned to each image of a tilt-pair agrees with the known relative rotation angle of the microscope specimen holder during the experiment. To make the procedure easy to apply to the increasing number of single particle maps, we have developed software and a web server for tilt-pair analysis. The tilt-pair analysis program reports the overall agreement of the assigned orientations with the known tilt angle and axis of the experiment and the distribution of tilt transformations for individual particles recorded in a single image field. We illustrate application of the validation tool to several single particle specimens and describe how to interpret the scores.

  20. Alternative expression for the electromagnetic Lagrangian

    CERN Document Server

    Saldanha, Pablo L

    2015-01-01

    We propose an alternative expression for the Lagrangian density that governs the interaction of a charged particle with external electromagnetic fields. The proposed Lagrangian is written in terms of the local superposition of the particle fields with the applied electromagnetic fields, not in terms of the particle charge and of the electromagnetic potentials as is usual. The total Lagrangian for a set of charged particles assumes a simple elegant form with the alternative formulation, giving an aesthetic support for it. The proposed Lagrangian is equivalent to the traditional one in their domain of validity and provides an interesting description of the Aharonov-Bohm effect.

  1. An example of special Lagrangian fibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jixiang

    2005-01-01

    On the total space of the line bundle π: π*1T*P1(◎)π2*T*P1 → P1× P1, acomplete Ricci-flat Kaehler metric and a smooth special Lagrangian fibration are given.This special Lagrangian fibration is smoothly built up of 4 Harvey-Lawson's models in 4directions.

  2. Electroweak Chiral Lagrangian for Neutral Higgs Boson

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shun-Zhi; WANG Qing

    2008-01-01

    A neutral Higgs boson is added into the traditional electroweak chiral Lagrangian by writing down all possible high dimension operators. The matter part of the Lagrangian is investigated in detail. We find that if Higgs field dependence of Yukawa couplings can be factorized out, there will be no flavour changing neutral couplings; neutral Higgs can induce coupling between light and heavy neutrinos.

  3. A functional LMO invariant for Lagrangian cobordisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheptea, Dorin; Habiro, Kazuo; Massuyeau, Gwénaël

    2008-01-01

    Lagrangian cobordisms are three-dimensional compact oriented cobordisms between once-punctured surfaces, subject to some homological conditions. We extend the Le–Murakami–Ohtsuki invariant of homology three-spheres to a functor from the category of Lagrangian cobordisms to a certain category...

  4. Anomalous effective lagrangians and vector resonance models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pallante, E.; Petronzio, R.

    1993-01-01

    Chiral lagrangians including vector resonances have been shown to saturate the finite part of some of the counterterms needed to regularize ordinary one-loop effective lagrangians of pseudoscalar interactions with external currents. The equivalence between different models has been discussed in the

  5. Development and characterization of a single particle laser ablation mass spectrometer (SPLAM for organic aerosol studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gaie-Levrel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A single particle instrument has been developed for real-time analysis of organic aerosols. This instrument, named Single Particle Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry (SPLAM, samples particles using an aerodynamic lens system for which the theoretical performances were calculated. At the outlet of this system, particle detection and sizing are realized using two continuous diode lasers operating at λ = 403 nm. Polystyrene Latex (PSL, sodium chloride (NaCl and dioctylphtalate (DOP particles were used to characterize and calibrate optical detection of SPLAM. The optical detection limit (DL and detection efficiency (DE were determined using size-selected DOP particles. The DE is ranging from 0.1 to 90 % for 100 and 350 nm DOP particles respectively and the SPLAM instrument is able to detect and size-resolve particles as small as 110–120 nm. Scattered light is detected by two photomultipliers and the detected signals are used to trigger a UV excimer laser (λ = 248 nm used for laser desorption ionization (LDI of individual aerosol particles. The formed ions are analyzed by a 1 m linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer in order to access to the chemical composition of individual particles. The TOF-MS detection limit for gaseous aromatic compounds was determined to be 0.85 attograms. DOP particles were also used to test the overall functioning of the instrument. The analysis of a secondary organic aerosol, formed in a smog chamber by the ozonolysis of indene, is presented as a first scientific application of the instrument. Single particle mass spectra are obtained with a global hit rate of 10 %. They are found to be very different from one particle to another, reflecting chemical differences of the analyzed particles, and most of the detected mass peaks are attributed to oxidized products of indene.

  6. In-cloud sulfate addition to single particles resolved with sulfur isotope analysis during HCCT-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Harris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In-cloud production of sulfate modifies the aerosol size distribution, with important implications for the magnitude of indirect and direct aerosol cooling and the impact of SO2 emissions on the environment. We investigate which sulfate sources dominate the in-cloud addition of sulfate to different particle classes as an air parcel passes through an orographic cloud. Sulfate aerosol, SO2 and H2SO4 were collected upwind, in-cloud and downwind of an orographic cloud for three cloud measurement events during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia campaign in Autumn, 2010 (HCCT-2010. Combined SEM and NanoSIMS analysis of single particles allowed the δ34S of particulate sulfate to be resolved for particle size and type. The most important in-cloud SO2 oxidation pathway at HCCT-2010 was aqueous oxidation catalysed by transition metal ions (TMI catalysis, which was shown with single particle isotope analyses to occur primarily in cloud droplets nucleated on coarse mineral dust. In contrast, direct uptake of H2SO4(g and ultrafine particulate were the most important sources modifying fine mineral dust, increasing its hygroscopicity and facilitating activation. Sulfate addition to "mixed" particles (secondary organic and inorganic aerosol and coated soot was dominated by in-cloud aqueous SO2 oxidation by H2O2 and direct uptake of H2SO4(g and ultrafine particle sulfate, depending on particle size mode and time of day. These results provide new insight into in-cloud sulfate production mechanisms, and show the importance of single particle measurements and models to accurately assess the environmental effects of cloud processing.

  7. SIMPLE: Software for ab initio reconstruction of heterogeneous single-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmlund, Dominika; Elmlund, Hans

    2012-12-01

    The open source software suite SIMPLE: Single-particle IMage Processing Linux Engine provides data analysis methods for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). SIMPLE addresses the problem of obtaining 3D reconstructions from 2D projections only, without using an input reference volume for approximating orientations. The SIMPLE reconstruction algorithm is tailored to asymmetrical and structurally heterogeneous single-particles. Its basis is global optimization with the use of Fourier common lines. The advance that enables ab initio reconstruction and heterogeneity analysis is the separation of the tasks of in-plane alignment and projection direction determination via bijective orientation search - a new concept in common lines-based strategies. Bijective orientation search divides the configuration space into two groups of paired parameters that are optimized separately. The first group consists of the rotations and shifts in the plane of the projection; the second group consists of the projection directions and state assignments. In SIMPLE, ab initio reconstruction is feasible because the 3D in-plane alignment is approximated using reference-free 2D rotational alignment. The subsequent common lines-based search hence searches projection directions and states only. Thousands of class averages are analyzed simultaneously in a matter of hours. Novice SIMPLE users get a head start via the well documented front-end. The structured, object-oriented back-end invites advanced users to develop new alignment and reconstruction algorithms. An overview of the package is presented together with benchmarks on simulated data. Executable binaries, source code, and documentation are available at http://simple.stanford.edu. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Lagrangian approach to classical thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, A.

    2017-02-01

    The specification of microstates of interacting dynamical systems is different in Lagrangian and Hamiltonian approaches whenever the interaction Lagrangian depends on generalised velocities. In almost all cases of physical interest however, velocity-dependent interaction Lagrangians do not couple velocities belonging to different subsystems. For these cases we define reduced system and bath Lagrangian macrostates, which like the underlying microstates differ from their Hamiltonian counterparts. We then derive exact first and second laws of thermodynamics without any modification of the original system and bath quantities. This approach yields manifestly gauge-invariant definitions of work and free energy, and a gauge-invariant Jarzynski equality is derived. The formalism is applied in deriving the thermodynamic laws for a material system within the radiation reservoir. The Lagrangian partition of the total energy is manifestly gauge-invariant and is in accordance with Poynting's theorem.

  9. Effect of Single Particle Hopping and Out of Plane Magnetic Impurity on Coupled Planar Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Manas; Sa, Debanand

    It is shown that the single particle band motion along the c axis is harmful for superconductivity in anisotropic systems. Variation of Tc with c axis hopping parameter is shown for both the conventional Josephson coupled, planar superconductors and for interlayer pair tunneling mechanism of Wheatley, Hsu, and Anderson (WHA). Effect of out-of-plane magnetic impurity substitution is shown to suppress Tc more for conventional superconductors whereas there is a very sharp decrease of Tc in the WHA mechanism at larger concentrations.

  10. Effect of single particle hopping and out of plane magnetic impurity on coupled planar superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Sardar, M; Manas Sardar; Debanand Sa

    1994-01-01

    It is shown that the single particle band motion along the c axis is harmful for superconductivity. Variation of T_c with c axis hopping parameter is shown for both the conventional planar superconductors and for interlayer pair tunneling mechanism of Wheatley Hsu and Anderson(WHA).Effect of out of plane magnetic impurity substitution is shown to suppres T_c more for conventional superconductors whereas there is very sharp decrease of T_c in the WHA mechanism at larger concentrations.

  11. Review of amorphous silicon based particle detectors: the quest for single particle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrsch, N.; Ballif, C.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is attractive for radiation detectors because of its radiation resistance and processability over large areas with mature Si microfabrication techniques. While the use of a-Si:H for medical imaging has been very successful, the development of detectors for particle tracking and minimum-ionizing-particle detection has lagged, with almost no practical implementation. This paper reviews the development of various types of a-Si:H-based detectors and discusses their respective achievements and limitations. It also presents more recent developments of detectors that could potentially achieve single particle detection and be integrated in a monolithic fashion into a variety of applications.

  12. Development and characterization of a single particle laser ablation mass spectrometer (SPLAM for organic aerosol studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gaie-Levrel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A single particle instrument was developed for real-time analysis of organic aerosol. This instrument, named Single Particle Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry (SPLAM, samples particles using an aerodynamic lens system for which the theoretical performances were calculated. At the outlet of this system, particle detection and sizing are realized by using two continuous diode lasers operating at λ = 403 nm. Polystyrene Latex (PSL, sodium chloride (NaCl and dioctylphtalate (DOP particles were used to characterize and calibrate optical detection of SPLAM. The optical detection limit (DL and detection efficiency (DE were determined using size-selected DOP particles. The DE ranges from 0.1 to 90% for 100 and 350 nm DOP particles respectively and the SPLAM instrument is able to detect and size-resolve particles as small as 110–120 nm. During optical detection, particle scattered light from the two diode lasers, is detected by two photomultipliers and the detected signals are used to trigger UV excimer laser (λ = 248 nm used for one-step laser desorption ionization (LDI of individual aerosol particles. The formed ions are analyzed by a 1 m linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer in order to access to the chemical composition of individual particles. The TOF-MS detection limit for gaseous aromatic compounds was determined to be 0.85 × 10−15 kg (∼4 × 103 molecules. DOP particles were also used to test the overall operation of the instrument. The analysis of a secondary organic aerosol, formed in a smog chamber by the ozonolysis of indene, is presented as a first application of the instrument. Single particle mass spectra were obtained with an effective hit rate of 8%. Some of these mass spectra were found to be very different from one particle to another possibly reflecting chemical differences within the investigated indene SOA particles. Our study shows that an exhaustive statistical analysis, over hundreds of particles

  13. Sugar nanowires based on cyclodextrin prepared by single particle nanofabrication technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Shogo; Asano, Atsushi [Division of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Seki, Shu [Division of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: seki@chem.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Sugimoto, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Masahito [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Seiichi, Tagawa [The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1, Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Tsukuda, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shun-Ichiro [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    The direct formation of nanowires consisting of cyclodextrins by single particle nanofabrication technique (SPNT) is investigated in the present paper. Substittuted cyclodextrin (CD) derivatives and their composite with poly(4-bromostyrene) caused efficient cross-linking reaction upon irradiation, and gave nanostructures by SPNT. Successful visualization of the nanostructures by atomic force microscopy suggested drastic increase in the surface area of the materials based on CDs, leading to considerable increase in the selective adsorption efficiency of the molecules fit to the size of the hydrophobic holes of CDs.

  14. Sugar nanowires based on cyclodextrin prepared by single particle nanofabrication technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shogo; Asano, Atsushi; Seki, Shu; Sugimoto, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Masahito; Seiichi, Tagawa; Tsukuda, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shun-Ichiro

    2009-12-01

    The direct formation of nanowires consisting of cyclodextrins by single particle nanofabrication technique (SPNT) is investigated in the present paper. Substittuted cyclodextrin (CD) derivatives and their composite with poly(4-bromostyrene) caused efficient cross-linking reaction upon irradiation, and gave nanostructures by SPNT. Successful visualization of the nanostructures by atomic force microscopy suggested drastic increase in the surface area of the materials based on CDs, leading to considerable increase in the selective adsorption efficiency of the molecules fit to the size of the hydrophobic holes of CDs.

  15. The Density Matrix Renormalization Group applied to single-particle Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    A simplified version of White's Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) algorithm has been used to find the ground state of the free particle on a tight-binding lattice. We generalize this algorithm to treat the tight-binding particle in an arbitrary potential and to find excited states. We thereby solve a discretized version of the single-particle Schr\\"odinger equation, which we can then take to the continuum limit. This allows us to obtain very accurate results for the lowest energy le...

  16. Expectation values of single-particle operators in the random phase approximation ground state

    CERN Document Server

    Kosov, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    We developed a method for computing matrix elements of single-particle operators in the correlated random phase approximation ground state. Working with the explicit random phase approximation ground state wavefunction, we derived practically useful and simple expression for a molecular property in terms of random phase approximation amplitudes. The theory is illustrated by the calculation of molecular dipole moments. It is shown that Hartree-Fock based random phase approximation provides a systematic improvement of molecular dipole moment values in comparison to M{\\o}ller-Plesset second order perturbation theory and coupled cluster method for a considered set of molecules.

  17. Scheme for Implementation of Optimal Cloning of Arbitrary Single Particle Atomic State into Two Photonic States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.K. Kushwaha; SONG Wei; QIN Tao

    2008-01-01

    We present a feasible scheme to implement the 1 → 2 optimal cloning of arbitrary single particle atomic state into two photonic states, which is important for applications in long distance quantum communication. Our scheme also realizes the tele-NOT gate of one atom to the distant atom trapped in another cavity. The scheme is based on the adiabatic passage and the polarization measurement. It is robust against a number of practical noises such as the violation of the Lamb-Dicke condition, spontaneous emission, and detection inefficiency.

  18. Single-Particle Momentum Distributions of Efimov States in Mixed-Species Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Yamashita, M.; F. Bellotti, F.; Frederico, T.

    2013-01-01

    We solve the three-body bound state problem in three dimensions for mass imbalanced systems of two identical bosons and a third particle in the universal limit where the interactions are assumed to be of zero-range. The system displays the Efimov effect and we use the momentum-space wave equation...... to derive formulas for the scaling factor of the Efimov spectrum for any mass ratio assuming either that two or three of the two-body subsystems have a bound state at zero energy. We consider the single-particle momentum distribution analytically and numerically and analyse the tail of the momentum...

  19. Collective and Single-particle Motion in Beyond Mean Field Approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Egido, J Luis; Rodríguez, Tomás R

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel nuclear energy density functional method to calculate spectroscopic properties of atomic nuclei. Intrinsic nuclear quadrupole deformations and rotational frequencies are considered simultaneously as the degrees of freedom within a symmetry conserving configuration mixing framework. The present method allows the study of nuclear states with collective and single-particle character. We calculate the fascinating structure of the semi-magic 44S nucleus as a first application of the method, obtaining an excellent quantitative agreement both with the available experimental data and with state-of-the-art shell model calculations.

  20. Advances in the field of single-particle cryo-electron microscopy over the last decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    In single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), molecules suspended in a thin aqueous layer are rapidly frozen and imaged at cryogenic temperature in the transmission electron microscope. From the random projection views, a three-dimensional image is reconstructed, enabling the structure of the molecule to be obtained. In this article I discuss technological progress over the past decade, which has, in my own field of study, culminated in the determination of ribosome structure at 2.5-Å resolution. I also discuss likely future improvements in methodology.

  1. A single particle plasmon resonance study of 3D conical nanoantennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Christian; Gollmer, Dominik A; Horrer, Andreas; Fulmes, Julia; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Cabrini, Stefano; Schuck, P James; Kern, Dieter P; Fleischer, Monika

    2013-09-07

    Metallic nanocones are well-suited optical antennas for near-field microscopy and spectroscopy, exhibiting a number of different plasmonic modes. A major challenge in using nanocones for many applications is maximizing the signal at the tip while minimizing the background from the base. It is shown that nanocone plasmon resonance properties can be shifted over a wide range of wavelengths by variation of the substrate, material, size and shape, enabling potential control over specific modes and field distributions. The individual resonances are identified and studied by correlated single particle dark field scattering and scanning electron microscopy in combination with numerical simulations.

  2. On Attracting Lagrangian Coherent Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Karrasch, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In this note, we show that in the autonomous, two-dimensional incompressible saddle flow, contrary to common intuition, also attracting Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) can show up as ridges of the forward finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field. This raises the issue of characterization of attracting LCSs from forward time FTLE analysis. First, we extend recent results of Haller & Sapsis (2011) [11] on the relation between forward and backward maximal and minimal stretching rates to the whole finite-time Lyapunov spectrum and to stretching directions by considering the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the deformation gradient. We show two significant advantages of the SVD compared to the usual eigendecomposition of the Cauchy-Green strain tensor: (1) one gains theoretical insight into local deformation under a finite-time dynamical system, and (2) one obtains both complete forward and backward strain information from a single grid advection. Furthermore, we give a short and direct proof of t...

  3. Time-Dependent Lagrangian Biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Ivancevic, Tijana T

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present the time-dependent generalization of an 'ordinary' autonomous human musculo-skeletal biomechanics. We start with the configuration manifold of human body, given as a set of its all active degrees of freedom (DOF). This is a Riemannian manifold with a material metric tensor given by the total mass-inertia matrix of the human body segments. This is the base manifold for standard autonomous biomechanics. To make its time-dependent generalization, we need to extend it with a real time axis. On this extended configuration space we develop time-dependent biomechanical Lagrangian dynamics, using derived jet spaces of velocities and accelerations, as well as the underlying geometric evolution of the mass-inertia matrix. Keywords: Human time-dependent biomechanics, configuration manifold, jet spaces, geometric evolution

  4. Single particle tracking reveals spatial and dynamic organization of the E. coli biofilm matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birjiniuk, Alona; Billings, Nicole; Nance, Elizabeth; Hanes, Justin; Ribbeck, Katharina; Doyle, Patrick S

    2014-08-27

    Biofilms are communities of surface-adherent bacteria surrounded by secreted polymers known as the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). Biofilms are harmful in many industries, and thus it is of great interest to understand their mechanical properties and structure to determine ways to destabilize them. By performing single particle tracking with beads of varying surface functionalization it was found that charge interactions play a key role in mediating mobility within biofilms. With a combination of single particle tracking and microrheological concepts, it was found that Escherichia coli biofilms display height dependent charge density that evolves over time. Statistical analyses of bead trajectories and confocal microscopy showed inter-connecting micron scale channels that penetrate throughout the biofilm, which may be important for nutrient transfer through the system. This methodology provides significant insight into a particular biofilm system and can be applied to many others to provide comparisons of biofilm structure. The elucidation of structure provides evidence for the permeability of biofilms to microscale objects, and the ability of a biofilm to mature and change properties over time.

  5. Protein secondary structure determination by constrained single-particle cryo-electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartesaghi, Alberto; Lecumberry, Federico; Sapiro, Guillermo; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2012-12-05

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a powerful technique for 3D structure determination of protein complexes by averaging information from individual molecular images. The resolutions that can be achieved with single-particle cryo-EM are frequently limited by inaccuracies in assigning molecular orientations based solely on 2D projection images. Tomographic data collection schemes, however, provide powerful constraints that can be used to more accurately determine molecular orientations necessary for 3D reconstruction. Here, we propose "constrained single-particle tomography" as a general strategy for 3D structure determination in cryo-EM. A key component of our approach is the effective use of images recorded in tilt series to extract high-resolution information and correct for the contrast transfer function. By incorporating geometric constraints into the refinement to improve orientational accuracy of images, we reduce model bias and overrefinement artifacts and demonstrate that protein structures can be determined at resolutions of ∼8 Å starting from low-dose tomographic tilt series.

  6. Single-particle characterization of summertime arctic aerosols collected at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hong; Ryu, Jiyeon; Jung, Hae-Jin; Chung, Hyeok; Ahn, Kang-Ho; Ro, Chul-Un

    2010-04-01

    Single-particle characterization of summertime Arctic aerosols is useful to understand the impact of air pollutants on the polar atmosphere. In the present study, a quantitative single particle analytical technique, low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis, was used to characterize 8100 individual particles overall in 16 sets of aerosol samples collected at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway on 25-31 July, 2007. Based on their X-ray spectral and secondary electron image data of individual particles, 13 particle types were identified, in which particles of marine origin were the most abundant, followed by carbonaceous and mineral dust particles. A number of aged (reacted) sea salt (and mixture) particles produced by the atmospheric reaction of genuine sea-salts, especially with NO(x) or HNO(3), were significantly encountered in almost all the aerosol samples. They greatly outnumbered genuine sea salt particles, implying that the summertime Arctic atmosphere, generally regarded as a clean background environment, is disturbed by anthropogenic air pollutants. The main sources of airborne NO(x) (or HNO(3)) are probably ship emissions around the Arctic Ocean, industry emission from northern Europe and northwestern Siberia, and renoxification of NO(3)(-) within or on the melting snow/ice surface.

  7. Phonon-particle coupling effects in single-particle energies of semi-magic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Saperstein, E E; Pankratov, S S; Tolokonnikov, S V

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented to evaluate the particle-phonon coupling (PC) corrections to the single-particle energies (SPEs) in semi-magic nuclei. In such nuclei always there is a collective low-lying $2^+$ phonon, and a strong mixture of single-particle and particle-phonon states often occurs. As in magic nuclei, the so-called $g^2_L$ approximation, where $g_L$ is the vertex of the $L$-phonon creation, can be used for finding the PC correction $\\delta \\Sigma^{\\rm PC}(\\varepsilon)$ to the initial mass operator $\\Sigma_0$. In addition to the usual pole diagram, the phonon "tadpole" diagram is also taken into account. In semi-magic nuclei, the perturbation theory in $\\delta \\Sigma^{\\rm PC}(\\varepsilon)$ with respect to $\\Sigma_0$ is often invalid for finding the PC corrected SPEs. Instead, the Dyson equation with the mass operator $\\Sigma(\\varepsilon){=}\\Sigma_0{+}\\delta \\Sigma^{\\rm PC}(\\varepsilon)$ is solved directly, without any use of the perturbation theory. Results for a chain of semi-magic Pb isotopes are pres...

  8. Evolution of Single Particle and Collective properties in the Neutron-Rich Mg Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Reiter, P; Wiens, A; Fitting, J; Lauer, M; Van duppen, P L E; Finke, F

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study the single particle and collective properties of the neutron-rich Mg isotopes in transfer reactions and Coulomb excitation using REX-ISOLDE and MINIBALL. From the Coulomb excitation measurement precise and largely model independent B( E2 ; 0$^{+}_{g.s.}\\rightarrow$ 2$^{+}_{1}$ ) will be determined for the even-even isotopes. For the odd isotopes the distribution of the E2 strength over a few low-lying states will be measured. The sign of the M1/E2 mixing ratio, extracted from angular distributions, is characteristic of the sign of the deformation, as is the resulting level scheme. The neutron-pickup channel in the transfer reactions will allow for a determination of the single particle properties (spin, parity, spectroscopic factors) of these nuclei. This information will give new insights in changes of nuclear structure in the vicinity of the island of deformation around $^{32}$Mg. A total of 24 shifts of REX beam time is requested.

  9. Revealing nonergodic dynamics in living cells from a single particle trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanoiselée, Yann; Grebenkov, Denis S

    2016-05-01

    We propose the improved ergodicity and mixing estimators to identify nonergodic dynamics from a single particle trajectory. The estimators are based on the time-averaged characteristic function of the increments and can thus capture additional information on the process as compared to the conventional time-averaged mean-square displacement. The estimators are first investigated and validated for several models of anomalous diffusion, such as ergodic fractional Brownian motion and diffusion on percolating clusters, and nonergodic continuous-time random walks and scaled Brownian motion. The estimators are then applied to two sets of earlier published trajectories of mRNA molecules inside live Escherichia coli cells and of Kv2.1 potassium channels in the plasma membrane. These statistical tests did not reveal nonergodic features in the former set, while some trajectories of the latter set could be classified as nonergodic. Time averages along such trajectories are thus not representative and may be strongly misleading. Since the estimators do not rely on ensemble averages, the nonergodic features can be revealed separately for each trajectory, providing a more flexible and reliable analysis of single-particle tracking experiments in microbiology.

  10. Particle migration analysis in iterative classification of cryo-EM single-particle data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Shen, Bingxin; Frank, Joachim

    2014-12-01

    Recently developed classification methods have enabled resolving multiple biological structures from cryo-EM data collected on heterogeneous biological samples. However, there remains the problem of how to base the decisions in the classification on the statistics of the cryo-EM data, to reduce the subjectivity in the process. Here, we propose a quantitative analysis to determine the iteration of convergence and the number of distinguishable classes, based on the statistics of the single particles in an iterative classification scheme. We start the classification with more number of classes than anticipated based on prior knowledge, and then combine the classes that yield similar reconstructions. The classes yielding similar reconstructions can be identified from the migrating particles (jumpers) during consecutive iterations after the iteration of convergence. We therefore termed the method "jumper analysis", and applied it to the output of RELION 3D classification of a benchmark experimental dataset. This work is a step forward toward fully automated single-particle reconstruction and classification of cryo-EM data.

  11. Pairing in the BCS and LN approximations using continuum single particle level density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Id Betan, R. M.; Repetto, C. E.

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the properties of drip line nuclei requires to take into account the correlations with the continuum spectrum of energy of the system. This paper has the purpose to show that the continuum single particle level density is a convenient way to consider the pairing correlation in the continuum. Isospin mean-field and isospin pairing strength are used to find the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and Lipkin-Nogami (LN) approximate solutions of the pairing Hamiltonian. Several physical properties of the whole chain of the Tin isotope, as gap parameter, Fermi level, binding energy, and one- and two-neutron separation energies, were calculated and compared with other methods and with experimental data when they exist. It is shown that the use of the continuum single particle level density is an economical way to include explicitly the correlations with the continuum spectrum of energy in large scale mass calculation. It is also shown that the computed properties are in good agreement with experimental data and with more sophisticated treatment of the pairing interaction.

  12. Improved estimation of anomalous diffusion exponents in single-particle tracking experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepten, Eldad; Bronshtein, Irena; Garini, Yuval

    2013-05-01

    The mean square displacement is a central tool in the analysis of single-particle tracking experiments, shedding light on various biophysical phenomena. Frequently, parameters are extracted by performing time averages on single-particle trajectories followed by ensemble averaging. This procedure, however, suffers from two systematic errors when applied to particles that perform anomalous diffusion. The first is significant at short-time lags and is induced by measurement errors. The second arises from the natural heterogeneity in biophysical systems. We show how to estimate and correct these two errors and improve the estimation of the anomalous parameters for the whole particle distribution. As a consequence, we manage to characterize ensembles of heterogeneous particles even for rather short and noisy measurements where regular time-averaged mean square displacement analysis fails. We apply this method to both simulations and in vivo measurements of telomere diffusion in 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. The motion of telomeres is found to be subdiffusive with an average exponent constant in time. Individual telomere exponents are normally distributed around the average exponent. The proposed methodology has the potential to improve experimental accuracy while maintaining lower experimental costs and complexity.

  13. Single-Particle Composition Measured in an Alpine Valley: Wood Smoke, EC and BC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepmann, C.; Gross, D. S.; Benzaid, S.; Christensen, J.; Turetsky, E.; Musicant, D.; Sandradewi, J.; Prevot, A.; Baltensperger, U.

    2007-12-01

    Particulate pollution is an issue of concern in today's society. Current regulations focus on the mass of particulate matter (PM) per volume of air, and not the source or chemical composition of the PM. Here we will present results from the AEROWOOD campaign in Roveredo, Switzerland where we investigated the PM composition measured using a single-particle mass spectrometer (TSI 3800 ATOFMS) to identify the sources of ambient particles. The goal was to differentiate wood smoke particles from diesel emissions. Roveredo is located in a deep alpine valley with strong wintertime thermal inversions, trapping the emissions. Local homes are predominantly heated by wood fires, and the village is located along a motorway that crosses the Swiss alps, providing two distinct particle sources. The particles sampled with the ATOFMS have been analyzed in a variety of ways with a focus on the temporal trends of the different particle types identified. Of particular interest is the distinction made between elemental carbon (EC) and black carbon (BC). During AEROWOOD, EC was measured chemically using real- time thermo/optical methods. BC was recorded directly by absorption, using an aethalometer. Regression models have been constructed to predict the EC and BC values using the single-particle mass spectra, providing chemical insight into the differences in these quantities. Additionally, comparing the timeline plots of EC, BC and the particle types found from the ATOFMS data should provide an idea as to the sources of EC and BC in this location.

  14. Pairing in the BCS and LN approximations using continuum single particle level density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Id Betan, R.M., E-mail: idbetan@ifir-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Física Rosario (CONICET-UNR), Bv. 27 de Febrero 210 bis, S2000EZP Rosario (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingeniería y Agrimensura (UNR), Av. Pellegrini 250, S2000BTP Rosario (Argentina); Instituto de Estudios Nucleares y Radiaciones Ionizantes (UNR), Riobamba y Berutti, S2000EKA Rosario (Argentina); Repetto, C.E. [Instituto de Física Rosario (CONICET-UNR), Bv. 27 de Febrero 210 bis, S2000EZP Rosario (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingeniería y Agrimensura (UNR), Av. Pellegrini 250, S2000BTP Rosario (Argentina)

    2017-04-15

    Understanding the properties of drip line nuclei requires to take into account the correlations with the continuum spectrum of energy of the system. This paper has the purpose to show that the continuum single particle level density is a convenient way to consider the pairing correlation in the continuum. Isospin mean-field and isospin pairing strength are used to find the Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer (BCS) and Lipkin–Nogami (LN) approximate solutions of the pairing Hamiltonian. Several physical properties of the whole chain of the Tin isotope, as gap parameter, Fermi level, binding energy, and one- and two-neutron separation energies, were calculated and compared with other methods and with experimental data when they exist. It is shown that the use of the continuum single particle level density is an economical way to include explicitly the correlations with the continuum spectrum of energy in large scale mass calculation. It is also shown that the computed properties are in good agreement with experimental data and with more sophisticated treatment of the pairing interaction.

  15. Thorium colloid analysis by single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degueldre, C; Favarger, P-Y

    2004-04-19

    Thorium colloid analysis in water has been carried out by a single particle mode using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The flash of ions due to the ionisation of a thorium colloidal particle in the plasma torch can be detected and measured in a time scan for (232)Th (+ ) or (248)[ThO] (+ ) according to the sensitivity required by the mass spectrometer. The peaks of the recorded intensity of the MS signal can be analysed as a function of the particle size or fraction of the studied element in the colloid phase. The frequency of the flashes is directly proportional to the concentration of particles in the colloidal suspension. After discussing Th colloid detection, on the basis of the intensity of the ion flashes generated in the plasma torch, tests were performed on thorium dioxide colloidal particles. This feasibility study also describes the experimental conditions and the limitation of the plasma design to detect thorium colloids in a single particle analysis mode down to about 10fg.

  16. [Analysis of Single Particle Aging and Mixing State at an Agriculture Site (Quzhou) in the North China Plain in Summer Using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zi-long; Zeng, Li-mm; Dong, I-Iua-Bin; Li, Mei; Zhu, Tong

    2016-04-15

    To characterize the size distribution and chemical ompsitins f abiet prtices t a agicuturesit intheNorh o Chinese Plain, a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was deployed from June 30 to July 8, 2013. A total of 230,152 particles in the size range of 0.2-2.0 pm were chemically analyzed with both positive and negative ion spectra. The results revealed that aerosol could he classified into eight dominant groups, including elemental carbon (EC, 55.5%), organic carbon (OC, 10.7%), alkalis (Na-K, 17.4%), other metals (1.7%), Fe-rich (6.3%), Pb-rich (3.1%), dust (4.8%), and other (0.8%). The observed eight types of particles contained secondary components such as 46NO2-, 62NO3-, 96SO3-, 96SO4-, 97HSO4-, showing that they probably went through different aging processes. The analysis of particle size distribution showed that 700-800 nm was the peak value of all particles, and that dust and Fe particles were mainly in the coarse size range. EC particles subtype group research revealed EC particles tended to be aging with the above mentioned secondary ions and eventually led to a particle type conversion from EC to the less aging ECN and the more serious aging ECS, the diurnal variation of which was obviously negatively correlated, and there was a possibility of forming OC/EC mixture with the adsorption of secondary organic matter on EC surface.

  17. Critical Point Theory for Lagrangian Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzucchelli, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Lagrangian systems constitute a very important and old class in dynamics. Their origin dates back to the end of the eighteenth century, with Joseph-Louis Lagrange's reformulation of classical mechanics. The main feature of Lagrangian dynamics is its variational flavor: orbits are extremal points of an action functional. The development of critical point theory in the twentieth century provided a powerful machinery to investigate existence and multiplicity questions for orbits of Lagrangian systems. This monograph gives a modern account of the application of critical point theory, and more spec

  18. Lagrangian Space Nonlinear $E$-mode clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hao-Ran; Zhu, Hong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    We study the nonlinear $E$-mode clustering in Lagrangian space by using large scale structure (LSS) $N$-body simulations and use the displacement field information in Lagrangian space to recover the primordial linear density field. We find that, compared to Eulerian nonlinear density fields, the $E$-mode displacement fields in Lagrangian space improves the cross-correlation scale $k$ with initial density field by factor of 6 $\\sim$ 7, containing 2 orders of magnitude more primordial information. This illustrates ability of potential density reconstruction algorithms, to improve the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements from current and future large scale structure surveys.

  19. An Augmented Lagrangian Approach for Scheduling Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Tatsushi; Konishi, Masami

    The paper describes an augmented Lagrangian decomposition and coordination approach for solving single machine scheduling problems to minimize the total weighted tardiness. The problem belongs to the class of NP-hard combinatorial optimization problem. We propose an augmented Lagrangian decomposition and coordination approach, which is commonly used for continuous optimization problems, for solving scheduling problems despite the fact that the problem is nonconvex and non-differentiable. The proposed method shows a good convergence to a feasible solution without heuristically constructing a feasible solution. The performance of the proposed method is compared with that of an ordinary Lagrangian relaxation.

  20. Regional differences in organic composition of submicron and single particles during INTEX-B 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Day

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic functional group and elemental concentrations were measured with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence (XRF from an aircraft platform as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment – Phase B (INTEX-B conducted over the Eastern Pacific and Western North America. Single particle spectra were obtained using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy-near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectrometry (STXM-NEXAFS. Organic mass (OM concentrations ranged from 1 to 7 μg m−3 and averaged 2.4–4.1 μg m−3. Alkane functional groups were the largest fraction of OM, averaging 1.9–2.1 μg m−3 or 50–76% of OM. Alcohol functional groups comprised the second largest fraction of OM (0.35–0.39 μg m−3, 9–14%. Organic and elemental concentrations are compared within and among geographical air mass regions: "Pacific" free troposphere, "Continental" free troposphere, "Seattle" metropolitan region, and the California "Central Valley". OM concentrations were highest and most variable in the Central Valley (3.5±2 μg m−3. Alcohol functional group concentrations were highest in the Continental and Central Valley and lowest in the Pacific and Seattle air masses. Oxygen-to-carbon ratios were relatively constant in the Central Valley but variable for the Continental air masses. Most elemental concentrations did not show large variations among or within air mass categories. Overall, the OM concentrations showed greater variability within air mass categories as compared to averages among them, suggesting sampled air mass regions included a variety of sources, processing, and losses of organic aerosol. Single particle spectra obtained by STXM-NEXAFS were classified into metaclasses associated with different sources and atmospheric processing. Particles with spectra indicative of secondary organic aerosol production and combustion sources were

  1. Measuring And Explaining The Supersymmetric Lagrangian

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, L

    2002-01-01

    The issues of measuring the supersymmetric Lagrangian once data is available, and making the connections between the low energy effective Lagrangian and fundamental theory, are considered. After a brief introduction to the fundamentals of supersymmetry and overview of Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), case studies in ways of measuring different parameters in the low energy MSSM Lagrangian are presented. They include: measuring CP violation phases and LSP masses in gluino decay; Higgs production and detection; flavor and CP violation in b → sγ processes; signature of cold dark matter in the cosmic rays. Potential ambiguities in the process of recovering the high energy effective Lagrangian from low energy data are discussed. A new basis, which is explicitly independent of unphysical parameters, is proposed to write the renormalization group equations. After a brief survey of some basic issues of string theory phenomenology, a string theory motivated Pati-Salam like model is const...

  2. Multi-Lagrangians for Integrable Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nutku, Y

    2001-01-01

    We propose a general scheme to construct multiple Lagrangians for completely integrable non-linear evolution equations that admit multi-Hamiltonian structure. The recursion operator plays a fundamental role in this construction. We use a conserved quantity higher/lower than the Hamiltonian in the potential part of the new Lagrangian and determine the corresponding kinetic terms by generating the appropriate momentum map. This leads to some remarkable new developments. We show that nonlinear evolutionary systems that admit $N$-fold first order local Hamiltonian structure can be cast into variational form with $2N-1$ Lagrangians which will be local functionals of Clebsch potentials. Furthermore we construct a new Lagrangian for polytropic gas dynamics in 1+1 dimensions which is a {\\it local} functional of the physical field variables, namely density and velocity.

  3. Effective Lagrangians and Light Gravitino Phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Luty, M A; Luty, Markus A.; Ponton, Eduardo

    1998-01-01

    We construct the low-energy effective lagrangian for supersymmetry breaking models with a light gravitino. Our effective lagrangian is written in terms of the spin-1/2 Goldstino (the longitudinal component of the gravitino) transforming under a non-linear realization of supersymmetry. The Goldstino is derivatively coupled. We use this lagrangian to place bounds on the supersymmetry breaking scale \\sqrt{F} from Goldstino phenomenology. The most stringent bounds come from the coupling of a single photon to Goldstino pairs. For gauge-mediated models, this coupling arises at one loop in the effective lagrangian, and supernova cooling allows \\sqrt{F} > 610 GeV or \\sqrt{F} 140 GeV for tan\\beta = 2.

  4. Detecting Lagrangian fronts with favourable fishery conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Prants, S V; Uleysky, M Yu

    2012-01-01

    Lagrangian fronts in the ocean delineate boundaries between surface waters with different Lagrangian properties. They can be accurately detected in a given velocity field by computing synoptic maps of the drift of synthetic tracers, their Lyapunov exponents, and other Lagrangian indicators. Using Russian ship's catch and location data for a number of commercial fishing seasons in the region of the northwest Pacific with one of the richest fishery in the world, it is shown that the saury fishing grounds with maximal catches are located mainly along those Lagrangian fronts where productive cold waters of the Oyashio Current, warmer waters of the southern branch of the Soya Current, and waters of warm-core Kuroshio rings converge. Computation of those fronts with the altimetric geostrophic velocity fields both in the years with the First and Second Oyashio Intrusions shows that in spite of different oceanographic conditions in both the cases the front locations may serve good indicators of potential fishing grou...

  5. Lagrangian filtered density function for LES-based stochastic modelling of turbulent dispersed flows

    CERN Document Server

    Innocenti, A; Chibbaro, S

    2016-01-01

    The Eulerian-Lagrangian approach based on Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) is one of the most promising and viable numerical tools to study turbulent dispersed flows when the computational cost of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) becomes too expensive. The applicability of this approach is however limited if the effects of the Sub-Grid Scales (SGS) of the flow on particle dynamics are neglected. In this paper, we propose to take these effects into account by means of a Lagrangian stochastic SGS model for the equations of particle motion. The model extends to particle-laden flows the velocity-filtered density function method originally developed for reactive flows. The underlying filtered density function is simulated through a Lagrangian Monte Carlo procedure that solves for a set of Stochastic Differential Equations (SDEs) along individual particle trajectories. The resulting model is tested for the reference case of turbulent channel flow, using a hybrid algorithm in which the fluid velocity field is provided b...

  6. Burnout of pulverized biomass particles in large scale boiler - Single particle model approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saastamoinen, Jaakko; Aho, Martti; Moilanen, Antero [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Box 1603, 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Soerensen, Lasse Holst [ReaTech/ReAddit, Frederiksborgsveij 399, Niels Bohr, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Clausen, Soennik [Risoe National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Berg, Mogens [ENERGI E2 A/S, A.C. Meyers Vaenge 9, DK-2450 Copenhagen SV (Denmark)

    2010-05-15

    Burning of coal and biomass particles are studied and compared by measurements in an entrained flow reactor and by modelling. The results are applied to study the burning of pulverized biomass in a large scale utility boiler originally planned for coal. A simplified single particle approach, where the particle combustion model is coupled with one-dimensional equation of motion of the particle, is applied for the calculation of the burnout in the boiler. The particle size of biomass can be much larger than that of coal to reach complete burnout due to lower density and greater reactivity. The burner location and the trajectories of the particles might be optimised to maximise the residence time and burnout. (author)

  7. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-06-01

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images.

  8. Sorting algorithms for single-particle imaging experiments at X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkov, S A; Teslyuk, A B; Kurta, R P; Gorobtsov, O Yu; Yefanov, O M; Ilyin, V A; Senin, R A; Vartanyants, I A

    2015-11-01

    Modern X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) operating at high repetition rates produce a tremendous amount of data. It is a great challenge to classify this information and reduce the initial data set to a manageable size for further analysis. Here an approach for classification of diffraction patterns measured in prototypical diffract-and-destroy single-particle imaging experiments at XFELs is presented. It is proposed that the data are classified on the basis of a set of parameters that take into account the underlying diffraction physics and specific relations between the real-space structure of a particle and its reciprocal-space intensity distribution. The approach is demonstrated by applying principal component analysis and support vector machine algorithms to the simulated and measured X-ray data sets.

  9. Hyperon Single-Particle Potentials Calculated from SU6 Quark-Model Baryon-Baryon Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kohno, M; Fujita, T; Nakamoto, C; Suzuki, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interaction recently developed by the Kyoto-Niigata group, we calculate NN, Lambda N and Sigma N G-matrices in ordinary nuclear matter. This is the first attempt to discuss the Lambda and Sigma single-particle potentials in nuclear medium, based on the realistic quark-model potential. The Lambda potential has the depth of more than 40 MeV, which is more attractive than the value expected from the experimental data of Lambda-hypernuclei. The Sigma potential turns out to be repulsive, the origin of which is traced back to the strong Pauli repulsion in the Sigma N (I=3/2) ^3S_1 state.

  10. A spherical harmonic approach to single particle imaging with X-ray lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Flamant, Julien; Martin, Andrew V; Manton, Jonathan H

    2016-01-01

    In 3D single particle imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers, particle orientation is not recorded during measurement but is instead recovered as a necessary step in the reconstruction of a 3D image from the diffraction data. Here we use harmonic analysis on the sphere to cleanly separate the angu- lar and radial degrees of freedom of this problem, providing new opportunities to efficiently use data and computational resources. We develop the Expansion-Maximization-Compression algorithm into a shell-by-shell approach and implement an angular bandwidth limit that can be gradually raised during the reconstruction. We study the minimum number of patterns and minimum rotation sampling required for a desired angular and radial resolution. These extensions provide new av- enues to improve computational efficiency and speed of convergence, which are critically important considering the very large datasets expected from experiment.

  11. Impact of ultrafast electronic damage in single particle x-ray imaging experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenz, U; Weckert, E; Vartanyants, I A

    2012-01-01

    In single particle coherent x-ray diffraction imaging experiments, performed at x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), samples are exposed to intense x-ray pulses to obtain single-shot diffraction patterns. The high intensity induces electronic dynamics on the femtosecond time scale in the system, which can reduce the contrast of the obtained diffraction patterns and adds an isotropic background. We quantify the degradation of the diffraction pattern from ultrafast electronic damage by performing simulations on a biological sample exposed to x-ray pulses with different parameters. We find that the contrast is substantially reduced and the background is considerably strong only if almost all electrons are removed from their parent atoms. This happens at fluences of at least one order of magnitude larger than provided at currently available XFEL sources.

  12. Orientation Determination in Single Particle X-ray Coherent Diffraction Imaging Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Yefanov, O M

    2013-01-01

    Single particle diffraction imaging experiments at free-electron lasers (FEL) have a great potential for structure determination of reproducible biological specimens that can not be crystallized. One of the challenges in processing the data from such an experiment is to determine correct orientation of each diffraction pattern from samples randomly injected in the FEL beam. We propose an algorithm (see also O. Yefanov et al., Photon Science - HASYLAB Annual Report 2010) that can solve this problem and can be applied to samples from tens of nanometers to microns in size, measured with sub-nanometer resolution in the presence of noise. This is achieved by the simultaneous analysis of a large number of diffraction patterns corresponding to different orientations of the particles. The algorithms efficiency is demonstrated for two biological samples, an artificial protein structure without any symmetry and a virus with icosahedral symmetry. Both structures are few tens of nanometers in size and consist of more tha...

  13. Impact of ultrafast electronic damage in single-particle x-ray imaging experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, U.; Kabachnik, N. M.; Weckert, E.; Vartanyants, I. A.

    2012-11-01

    In single-particle coherent x-ray diffraction imaging experiments, performed at x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), samples are exposed to intense x-ray pulses to obtain single-shot diffraction patterns. The high intensity induces electronic dynamics on the femtosecond time scale in the system, which can reduce the contrast of the obtained diffraction patterns and adds an isotropic background. We quantify the degradation of the diffraction pattern from ultrafast electronic damage by performing simulations on a biological sample exposed to x-ray pulses with different parameters. We find that the contrast is substantially reduced and the background is considerably strong only if almost all electrons are removed from their parent atoms. This happens at fluences of at least one order of magnitude larger than provided at currently available XFEL sources.

  14. Applications of differential algebra to single-particle dynamics in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Y.

    1991-09-01

    Recent developments in the use of differential algebra to study single-particle beam dynamics in charged-particle storage rings are the subject of this paper. Chapter 2 gives a brief review of storage rings. The concepts of betatron motion and synchrotron motion, and their associated resonances, are introduced. Also introduced are the concepts of imperfections, such as off-momentum, misalignment, and random and systematic errors, and their associated corrections. The chapter concludes with a discussion of numerical simulation principles and the concept of one-turn periodic maps. In Chapter 3, the discussion becomes more focused with the introduction of differential algebras. The most critical test for differential algebraic mapping techniques -- their application to long-term stability studies -- is discussed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 presents a discussion of differential algebraic treatment of dispersed betatron motion. The paper concludes in Chapter 6 with a discussion of parameterization of high-order maps.

  15. Effects of hydrogen-bond environment on single particle and pair dynamics in liquid water

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amalendu Chandra; Snehasis Chowdhuri

    2001-10-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water at 298 and 258 K to investigate the effects of hydrogen-bond environment on various single-particle and pair dynamical properties of water molecules at ambient and supercooled conditions. The water molecules are modelled by the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) model. We first calculate the distribution of hydrogen-bond environment in liquid water at both temperatures and then investigate how the selfdiffusion and orientational relaxation of a single water molecule and also the relative diffusion and relaxation of the hydrogen-bond of a water pair depend on the nature of the hydrogen-bond environment of the tagged molecules. We find that the various dynamical quantities depend significantly on the hydrogen-bond environment, especially at the supercooled temperature. The present study provides a molecular-level insight into the dynamics of liquid water under ambient and supercooled conditions.

  16. Proton resonance elastic scattering of $^{30}$Mg for single particle structure of $^{31}$Mg

    CERN Multimedia

    The single particle structure of $^{31}$Mg, which is located in the so-called “island of inversion”, will be studied through measuring Isobaric Analog Resonances (IARs) of bound states of $^{31}$Mg. They are located in the high excitation energy of $^{31}$Al. We are going to determine the spectroscopic factors and angular momenta of the parent states by measuring the excitation function of the proton resonance elastic scattering around 0 degrees in the laboratory frame with around 3 MeV/nucleon $^{30}$Mg beam. The present study will reveal the shell evolution around $^{32}$Mg. In addition, the spectroscopic factor of the (7/2)$^{−}$ state which was not yet determined experimentally, may allow one to study the shape coexistence in this nucleus.

  17. 3D structure determination of protein using TEM single particle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Chikara; Mio, Kazuhiro; Kawata, Masaaki; Ogura, Toshihiko

    2014-11-01

    Proteins play important roles in cell functions such as enzymes, cell trafficking, neurotransmission, muscle contraction and hormone secretion. However, some proteins are very difficult to be crystallized and their structures are undetermined. Several techniques have been developed to elucidate the structure of macromolecules; X-ray or electron crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and high-resolution electron microscopy. Among them, electron microscopy based single particle reconstruction (SPA) technique is a computer-aided structure determination method. This method reconstructs the 3D structure from projection images of dispersed protein. A large number of two-dimensional particle images are picked up from EM films, aligned and classified to generate 2D averages, and used to reconstruct the 3D structure by assigning the Euler angle of each 2D average. Due to the necessity of elaborate collaboration between the classical biology and the innovative information technology including parallel computing, scientists needed to break unseen barriers to get a start of this analysis. However, recent progresses in electron microscopes, mathematical algorithms, and computational abilities greatly reduced the height of barriers and expanded targets that are considered to be primarily addressable using single particle analysis. Membrane proteins are one of these targets to which the single particle analysis is successfully applied for the understanding of their 3D structures. For this purpose, we have developed various SPA methods [1-5] and applied them to different proteins [6-8].Here, we introduce reconstructed proteins, and discuss the availability of this technique. The intramembrane-cleaving proteases (I-CLiPs) that sever the transmembrane domains of their substrates have been identified in a range of organisms and play a variety of roles in biological conditions. I-CLiPs have been classified into three groups: serine-, aspartyl- and metalloprotease

  18. Single-Particle Refinement and Variability Analysis in EMAN2.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludtke, S J

    2016-01-01

    CryoEM single-particle reconstruction has been growing rapidly over the last 3 years largely due to the development of direct electron detectors, which have provided data with dramatic improvements in image quality. It is now possible in many cases to produce near-atomic resolution structures, and yet 2/3 of published structures remain at substantially lower resolutions. One important cause for this is compositional and conformational heterogeneity, which is both a resolution-limiting factor and presenting a unique opportunity to better relate structure to function. This manuscript discusses the canonical methods for high-resolution refinement in EMAN2.12, and then considers the wide range of available methods within this package for resolving structural variability, targeting both improved resolution and additional knowledge about particle dynamics.

  19. The on-line analysis of aerosol-delivered pharmaceuticals via single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrical, Bradley D; Balaxi, Maria; Fergenson, David

    2015-07-15

    The use of single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was evaluated for the analysis of inhaled pharmaceuticals to determine the mass distribution of the individual active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in both single ingredient and combination drug products. SPAMS is an analytical technique where the individual aerodynamic diameters and chemical compositions of many aerosol particles are determined in real-time. The analysis was performed using a Livermore Instruments SPAMS 3.0, which allowed the efficient analysis of aerosol particles with broad size distributions and can acquire data even under a very large particle load. Data similar to what would normally require roughly three days of experimentation and analysis was collected in a five minute period and analyzed automatically. The results were computed to be comparable to those returned by a typical Next Generation Impactor (NGI) particle size distribution experiment.

  20. Nanoplasmonic Photoluminescence Spectroscopy at Single-Particle Level: Sensing for Ethanol Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhaoke; Majima, Tetsuro

    2016-02-18

    Surface plasmon resonances of metal nanoparticles have shown significant promise for the use of solar energy to drive catalytic chemical reactions. More importantly, understanding and monitoring such catalytic reactions at single-nanoparticle level is crucial for the study of local reaction processes. Herein, using plasmonic photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, we describe a novel sensing method for catalytic ethanol oxidation reactions at the single-nanoparticle level. The Au nanorod monitors the interfacial interaction with ethanol during the catalytic reaction through the PL intensity changes in the single-particle PL spectra. The analysis of energy relaxation of excited electron-hole pairs indicates the relationship between the PL quenching and ethanol oxidation reaction on the single Au nanorod.

  1. Neutron single-particle strength in silicon isotopes: Constraining the driving forces of shell evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Stroberg, S R; Tostevin, J A; Bader, V M; Baugher, T; Bazin, D; Berryman, J S; Brown, B A; Campbell, C M; Kemper, K W; Langer, C; Lunderberg, E; Lemasson, A; Noji, S; Otsuka, T; Recchia, F; Walz, C; Weisshaar, D; Williams, S

    2015-01-01

    Shell evolution is studied in the neutron-rich silicon isotopes 36,38,40 Si using neutron single-particle strengths deduced from one-neutron knockout reactions. Configurations involving neutron excita- tions across the N = 20 and N = 28 shell gaps are quantified experimentally in these rare isotopes. Comparisons with shell model calculations show that the tensor force, understood to drive the col- lective behavior in 42 Si with N = 28, is already important in determining the structure of 40 Si with N = 26. New data relating to cross-shell excitations provide the first quantitative support for repulsive contributions to the cross-shell T = 1 interaction arising from three-nucleon forces.

  2. Single-particle And Collective Effects Of Cubic Nonlinearity In The Beam Dynamics Of Proton Synchrotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Tran Hy, J

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes some new studies of the effects of cubic nonlinearities arising from image-charge forces and octupole magnets on the transverse beam dynamics of proton synchrotrons and storage rings, and also a study of the damping of coherent oscillations using a feed-back damper. In the latter case, various corrective algorithms were modeled using linear one-turn maps. Kicks of fixed amplitude but appropriate sign were shown to provide linear damping and no coherent tune shift, though the rate predicted analytically was somewhat higher than that observed in simulations. This algorithm gave much faster damping (for equal power) than conventional proportional kicks, which damp exponentially. Two single-particle effects of the image-change force were investigated: distortion of the momentum dispersion function and amplitude dependence of the betatron tunes (resulting in tune spread). The former is calculated using transfer maps and the method of undetermined coefficients, the latter by solving the cubic ...

  3. 4D scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy: Single-particle imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortalan, Volkan; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2011-07-20

    We report the development of 4D scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy (ST-UEM). The method was demonstrated in the imaging of silver nanowires and gold nanoparticles. For the wire, the mechanical motion and shape morphological dynamics were imaged, and from the images we obtained the resonance frequency and the dephasing time of the motion. Moreover, we demonstrate here the simultaneous acquisition of dark-field images and electron energy loss spectra from a single gold nanoparticle, which is not possible with conventional methods. The local probing capabilities of ST-UEM open new avenues for probing dynamic processes, from single isolated to embedded nanostructures, without being affected by the heterogeneous processes of ensemble-averaged dynamics. Such methodology promises to have wide-ranging applications in materials science and in single-particle biological imaging.

  4. Operational characteristics of single-particle heat engines and refrigerators with time-asymmetric protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, P. S.; Saha, Arnab; Jayannavar, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the single-particle heat engine and refrigerator driven by time-asymmetric protocol of finite duration. Our system consists of a particle in a harmonic trap with time-periodic strength that drives the particle cyclically between two baths. Each cycle consists of two isothermal steps at different temperatures and two adiabatic steps connecting them. The system works in irreversible mode of operation even in the quasistatic regime. This is indicated by finite entropy production even in the large cycle time limit. Consequently, Carnot efficiency for heat engine or Carnot coefficient of performance (COP) for refrigerators is not achievable. We further analyzed the phase diagram of heat engines and refrigerators. They are sensitive to time-asymmetry of the protocol. Phase diagram shows several interesting features, often counterintuitive. The distribution of stochastic efficiency and COP is broad and exhibits power-law tails.

  5. Multiplex DNA assay based on nanoparticle probes by single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shixi; Han, Guojun; Xing, Zhi; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2014-04-01

    A multiplex DNA assay based on nanoparticle (NP) tags detection utilizing single particle mode inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SP-ICP-MS) as ultrasensitive readout has been demonstrated in the article. Three DNA targets associated with clinical diseases (HIV, HAV, and HBV) down to 1 pM were detected by DNA probes labeled with AuNPs, AgNPs, and PtNPs via DNA sandwich assay. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes can also be effectively discriminated. Since our method is unaffected by the sample matrix, it is well-suited for diagnostic applications. Moreover, with the high sensitivity of SP-ICP-MS and the variety of NPs detectable by SP-ICP-MS, high-throughput DNA assay could be achieved without signal amplification or chain reaction amplification.

  6. Robust estimation for class averaging in cryo-EM Single Particle Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chenxi; Tagare, Hemant D

    2014-01-01

    Single Particle Reconstruction (SPR) for Cryogenic Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) aligns and averages the images extracted from micrographs to improve the Signal-to-Noise ratio (SNR). Outliers compromise the fidelity of the averaging. We propose a robust cross-correlation-like w-estimator for combating the effect of outliers on the average images in cryo-EM. The estimator accounts for the natural variation of signal contrast among the images and eliminates the need for a threshold for outlier rejection. We show that the influence function of our estimator is asymptotically bounded. Evaluations of the estimator on simulated and real cryo-EM images show good performance in the presence of outliers.

  7. Development of the CAS-LIBB single-particle microbeam for localized irradiation of living cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xufei; XU Mingliang; WU Lijun; WANG Shaohu; FENG Huiyun; ZHAN Furu; PENG Shixiang; HU Chundong; ZHANG Shuqing; CHENG Jianjun; SHI Zhongtao; WANG Xiaohua; YUAN Hang; YUAN Haitao; YU Zengliang; CHEN Lianyun; HU Zhiwen; LI Jun; WU Yu; CHEN Bin; HU Suhua; ZHANG Jun

    2004-01-01

    A single-particle microbeam facility has been constructed at the Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering (LIBB), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). The system was designed to deliver a defined numbers of hydrogen ions, produced by a van de Graaff accelerator, in an energy range of 2.0-3.0 MeV, into an area smaller than that of the nucleus of an individual living cell. The beam is collimated by a borosilicate glass capillary that forms the beam-line exit. An integrated computer program recognizes the cells and locates them one by one over the microbeam exit for irradiation. We present technical details of the CAS-LIBB microbeam facility, particularly on the collimator, hardware, control program, as well as cell irradiation protocols available. Various factors contributing to the targeting and positioning precision are discussed along with accuracy measurement results.

  8. Dragonfly: an implementation of the expand–maximize–compress algorithm for single-particle imaging1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyer, Kartik; Lan, Ti-Yen; Elser, Veit; Loh, N. Duane

    2016-01-01

    Single-particle imaging (SPI) with X-ray free-electron lasers has the potential to change fundamentally how biomacromolecules are imaged. The structure would be derived from millions of diffraction patterns, each from a different copy of the macromolecule before it is torn apart by radiation damage. The challenges posed by the resultant data stream are staggering: millions of incomplete, noisy and un-oriented patterns have to be computationally assembled into a three-dimensional intensity map and then phase reconstructed. In this paper, the Dragonfly software package is described, based on a parallel implementation of the expand–maximize–compress reconstruction algorithm that is well suited for this task. Auxiliary modules to simulate SPI data streams are also included to assess the feasibility of proposed SPI experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford, California, USA. PMID:27504078

  9. Dragonfly: an implementation of the expand-maximize-compress algorithm for single-particle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyer, Kartik; Lan, Ti-Yen; Elser, Veit; Loh, N Duane

    2016-08-01

    Single-particle imaging (SPI) with X-ray free-electron lasers has the potential to change fundamentally how biomacromolecules are imaged. The structure would be derived from millions of diffraction patterns, each from a different copy of the macromolecule before it is torn apart by radiation damage. The challenges posed by the resultant data stream are staggering: millions of incomplete, noisy and un-oriented patterns have to be computationally assembled into a three-dimensional intensity map and then phase reconstructed. In this paper, the Dragonfly software package is described, based on a parallel implementation of the expand-maximize-compress reconstruction algorithm that is well suited for this task. Auxiliary modules to simulate SPI data streams are also included to assess the feasibility of proposed SPI experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford, California, USA.

  10. Structure, single-particle and many-particle coefficients of Lennard–Jones liquid Al

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G A Adebayo; O akinlade; O A Malomo; L A Hussain

    2005-08-01

    We investigate the effects of temperature and density on the single-particle and many-particle coefficients as well as on the structures of homogenous systems in which the particles are assumed to interact via a continuous soft sphere potential in the microcanonical ensemble. The pair distribution function and therefore the structures of the systems studied are affected by temperature close to and above the melting point through migrations of atoms from the first shell in the pair distribution function. The dynamics of atomic pairs in the short-time regime in liquid aluminium may be said to be governed by the potential of mean force, which depends on the static structure of liquid Al at all investigated temperatures. A polynomial dependence of on density and temperature was observed in contradiction to Arrhenius law. The shear viscosities of the systems studied are largely nonlinear. It was observed that the soft sphere potential used in our calculations overestimates the Stoke–Einstein relation.

  11. Irreproducibility of Diffusion Coefficients in Single-Particle-Tracking Measurements in Heterogeneous Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Akimoto, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    Local diffusion coefficients in living cells are highly heterogeneous and may change over time. Such a time-dependent and spatially heterogeneous environment results in irreproducibility of single-particle-tracking measurements. Here, we provide rigorous descriptions of equilibrium and non-equilibrium diffusion processes for a heterogeneous diffusion model in living cells. We give exact solutions for the mean square displacement (MSD) and the relative standard deviation of the time-averaged MSD for equilibrium and non-equilibrium situations. We find that the time-averaged MSD grows linearly with time and that the diffusion coefficients are intrinsically random in non-equilibrium situations. Our findings pave the way for a theoretical understanding of irreproducible diffusion coefficients in cell biology.

  12. An Efficient, Movable Single-Particle Detector for Use in Cryogenic Ultra-High Vacuum Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Spruck, Kaija; Fellenberger, Florian; Grieser, Manfred; von Hahn, Robert; Klinkhamer, Vincent; Novotný, Oldřich; Schippers, Stefan; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas; Krantz, Claude

    2014-01-01

    A compact, highly efficient single-particle counting detector for ions of keV/u kinetic energy, movable by a long-stroke mechanical translation stage, has been developed at the Max-Planck-Institut f\\"ur Kernphysik (Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, MPIK). Both, detector and translation mechanics, can operate at ambient temperatures down to $\\sim$ 10 K and consist fully of ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible, high-temperature bakeable and non-magnetic materials. The set-up is designed to meet the technical demands of MPIK's Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR). We present a series of functional tests that demonstrate full suitability for this application and characterise the set-up with regard to its particle detection efficiency.

  13. Experimental proof of nonlocal wavefunction collapse for a single particle using homodyne measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuwa, Maria; Takeda, Shuntaro; Zwierz, Marcin; Wiseman, Howard M; Furusawa, Akira

    2015-03-24

    A single quantum particle can be described by a wavefunction that spreads over arbitrarily large distances; however, it is never detected in two (or more) places. This strange phenomenon is explained in the quantum theory by what Einstein repudiated as 'spooky action at a distance': the instantaneous nonlocal collapse of the wavefunction to wherever the particle is detected. Here we demonstrate this single-particle spooky action, with no efficiency loophole, by splitting a single photon between two laboratories and experimentally testing whether the choice of measurement in one laboratory really causes a change in the local quantum state in the other laboratory. To this end, we use homodyne measurements with six different measurement settings and quantitatively verify Einstein's spooky action by violating an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-steering inequality by 0.042±0.006. Our experiment also verifies the entanglement of the split single photon even when one side is untrusted.

  14. On invariant sets in Lagrangian graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this exposition, we show that the Hamiltonian is always constant on a compact invariant connected subset which lies in a Lagrangian graph provided that the Hamiltonian and the graph are sufficiently smooth. We also provide some counterexamples to show that if the Hamiltonian function is not smooth enough, then it may be non-constant on a compact invariant connected subset which lies in a Lagrangian graph.

  15. Lagrangian Formulation of Todorov-Komar Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomis, J.; Kamimura, K.; Pons, J. M.

    1984-05-01

    The multi-temporal Hamiltonian model of relativistic particle interaction (Todorov-Komar model) is studied from the viewpoint of the Lagrangian formalism. The action is constructed and the gauge structure is clarified.The mathematical coordinates used to describe the Lagrangian are not gauge invariant and are disqualified as the physical coordinates of the interacting particles. The position of the particles is defined as the function of the canonical variables so that the world lines are invariant under the gauge transformations.

  16. Communication: A simplified coupled-cluster Lagrangian for polarizable embedding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Katharina; Klopper, Wim, E-mail: klopper@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Physical Chemistry, Theoretical Chemistry Group, KIT Campus South, P.O. Box 6980, 76049 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-01-28

    A simplified coupled-cluster Lagrangian, which is linear in the Lagrangian multipliers, is proposed for the coupled-cluster treatment of a quantum mechanical system in a polarizable environment. In the simplified approach, the amplitude equations are decoupled from the Lagrangian multipliers and the energy obtained from the projected coupled-cluster equation corresponds to a stationary point of the Lagrangian.

  17. Fabrication of bright and small size semiconducting polymer nanoparticles for cellular labelling and single particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lin; Zhou, Peng; Yang, Qingxiu; Yang, Qiaoyu; Ma, Ming; Chen, Bo; Xiao, Lehui

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a convenient and robust strategy for efficient fabrication of high fluorescence quantum yield (QY, 49.8 +/- 3%) semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (SPNs), with size comparable with semiconductor quantum dots (Qdots). The SPNs were synthesized by co-precipitation of hydrophobic semiconducting polymer together with amphiphilic multidentate polymer. Comprehensive spectroscopic and microscopic characterizations showed that the SPNs possess superior photophysical performance, with excellent fluorescence brightness and reduced photoblinking in contrast with Qdots, as well as good photostability compared to a fluorescent protein of a similar size, phycoerythrin. More importantly, by conjugating membrane biomarkers onto the surface of SPNs, it was found that they were not only suitable for specific cellular labelling but also for single particle tracking because of the improved optical performance.In this work, we demonstrate a convenient and robust strategy for efficient fabrication of high fluorescence quantum yield (QY, 49.8 +/- 3%) semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (SPNs), with size comparable with semiconductor quantum dots (Qdots). The SPNs were synthesized by co-precipitation of hydrophobic semiconducting polymer together with amphiphilic multidentate polymer. Comprehensive spectroscopic and microscopic characterizations showed that the SPNs possess superior photophysical performance, with excellent fluorescence brightness and reduced photoblinking in contrast with Qdots, as well as good photostability compared to a fluorescent protein of a similar size, phycoerythrin. More importantly, by conjugating membrane biomarkers onto the surface of SPNs, it was found that they were not only suitable for specific cellular labelling but also for single particle tracking because of the improved optical performance. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section and additional supporting results as noted in the text

  18. DEMONIC programming: a computational language for single-particle equilibrium thermodynamics, and its formal semantics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samson Abramsky

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Maxwell's Demon, 'a being whose faculties are so sharpened that he can follow every molecule in its course', has been the centre of much debate about its abilities to violate the second law of thermodynamics. Landauer's hypothesis, that the Demon must erase its memory and incur a thermodynamic cost, has become the standard response to Maxwell's dilemma, and its implications for the thermodynamics of computation reach into many areas of quantum and classical computing. It remains, however, still a hypothesis. Debate has often centred around simple toy models of a single particle in a box. Despite their simplicity, the ability of these systems to accurately represent thermodynamics (specifically to satisfy the second law and whether or not they display Landauer Erasure, has been a matter of ongoing argument. The recent Norton-Ladyman controversy is one such example. In this paper we introduce a programming language to describe these simple thermodynamic processes, and give a formal operational semantics and program logic as a basis for formal reasoning about thermodynamic systems. We formalise the basic single-particle operations as statements in the language, and then show that the second law must be satisfied by any composition of these basic operations. This is done by finding a computational invariant of the system. We show, furthermore, that this invariant requires an erasure cost to exist within the system, equal to kTln2 for a bit of information: Landauer Erasure becomes a theorem of the formal system. The Norton-Ladyman controversy can therefore be resolved in a rigorous fashion, and moreover the formalism we introduce gives a set of reasoning tools for further analysis of Landauer erasure, which are provably consistent with the second law of thermodynamics.

  19. Evaluation strategies for isotope ratio measurements of single particles by LA-MC-ICPMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, S; Boulyga, S F; Dorta, L; Günther, D; Hattendorf, B; Koffler, D; Laaha, G; Leisch, F; Prohaska, T

    2013-03-01

    Data evaluation is a crucial step when it comes to the determination of accurate and precise isotope ratios computed from transient signals measured by multi-collector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) coupled to, for example, laser ablation (LA). In the present study, the applicability of different data evaluation strategies (i.e. 'point-by-point', 'integration' and 'linear regression slope' method) for the computation of (235)U/(238)U isotope ratios measured in single particles by LA-MC-ICPMS was investigated. The analyzed uranium oxide particles (i.e. 9073-01-B, CRM U010 and NUSIMEP-7 test samples), having sizes down to the sub-micrometre range, are certified with respect to their (235)U/(238)U isotopic signature, which enabled evaluation of the applied strategies with respect to precision and accuracy. The different strategies were also compared with respect to their expanded uncertainties. Even though the 'point-by-point' method proved to be superior, the other methods are advantageous, as they take weighted signal intensities into account. For the first time, the use of a 'finite mixture model' is presented for the determination of an unknown number of different U isotopic compositions of single particles present on the same planchet. The model uses an algorithm that determines the number of isotopic signatures by attributing individual data points to computed clusters. The (235)U/(238)U isotope ratios are then determined by means of the slopes of linear regressions estimated for each cluster. The model was successfully applied for the accurate determination of different (235)U/(238)U isotope ratios of particles deposited on the NUSIMEP-7 test samples.

  20. Chikungunya virus fusion properties elucidated by single-particle and bulk approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Blijleven, Jelle S; van Oijen, Antoine M; Smit, Jolanda M

    2015-08-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly spreading, enveloped alphavirus causing fever, rash and debilitating polyarthritis. No specific treatment or vaccines are available to treat or prevent infection. For the rational design of vaccines and antiviral drugs, it is imperative to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in CHIKV infection. A critical step in the life cycle of CHIKV is fusion of the viral membrane with a host cell membrane. Here, we elucidate this process using ensemble-averaging liposome-virus fusion studies, in which the fusion behaviour of a large virus population is measured, and a newly developed microscopy-based single-particle assay, in which the fusion kinetics of an individual particle can be visualised. The combination of these approaches allowed us to obtain detailed insight into the kinetics, lipid dependency and pH dependency of hemifusion. We found that CHIKV fusion is strictly dependent on low pH, with a threshold of pH 6.2 and optimal fusion efficiency below pH 5.6. At this pH, CHIKV fuses rapidly with target membranes, with typically half of the fusion occurring within 2 s after acidification. Cholesterol and sphingomyelin in the target membrane were found to strongly enhance the fusion process. By analysing our single-particle data using kinetic models, we were able to deduce that the number of rate-limiting steps occurring before hemifusion equals about three. To explain these data, we propose a mechanistic model in which multiple E1 fusion trimers are involved in initiating the fusion process.

  1. Single-particle dynamics near the glass transition of a metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Y. J.; Wang, W. H.

    2016-12-01

    The single-particle dynamics of the glass-forming C u50Z r50 alloy, from the supercooled liquid well above the glass-transition temperature, Tg to the glassy state, is studied by using the molecular dynamics simulations. When the liquid is cooled below 1.2 Tg , the dynamics heterogeneity characterized by the cage-jump motion becomes increasingly pronounced. The analyses based on the continuous time random walk method indicate that the liquid falls out of equilibrium in the present simulation time scale when it is cooled into the regime below 1.02 Tg . However, we find that the jump length and the jump rate do not display the non-equilibrium behaviors even in the glassy state below Tg, which allows us to study the intrinsic dynamic characteristics through Tg. The mean waiting time between two successive jumps has a rapid growth following the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law as the non-equilibrium regime is approached, in analogy with the temperature behaviors of transport properties for fragile supercooled liquids. In contrast, the jump rate maintains the Arrhenius decay and the jump length has even a weaker temperature dependence when the liquid is cooled into glassy state. We find that a pronounced enhancement of the spatial correlation of jumps occurs accompanied by the glass transition: the string-like cooperative jumps dominate the fast motion instead of the uncorrelated and individual jumps. Our work offers an insight into the equilibrium effect of the single-particle dynamics in glass transition.

  2. Characteristics of tyre dust in polluted air: Studies by single particle mass spectrometry (ATOFMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Beddows, David C. S.; Gietl, Johanna K.; Olatunbosun, Oluremi A.; Yang, Xiaoguang; Harrison, Roy M.

    2014-09-01

    There is a paucity of quantitative knowledge on the contributions of non-exhaust (abrasion and re-suspension) sources to traffic emissions. Abrasive emissions can be broadly categorised as tyre wear, brake wear and road dust/road surface wear. Current research often considers road dust and tyre dust as externally mixed particles, the former mainly composed of mineral matter and the latter solely composed of mainly organic matter and some trace elements. The aim of this work was to characterise tyre wear from both laboratory and field studies by using Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS). Real-time single particle chemical composition was obtained from a set of rubber tyres rotating on a metal surface. Bimodal particle number size distributions peaking at 35 nm and 85 nm were obtained from SMPS/APS measurements over the range 6-20,000 nm. ATOFMS mass spectra of tyre wear in the particle size range 200-3000 nm diameter show peaks due to exo-sulphur compounds, nitrate, Zn and ions of high molecular weight (m/z > 100) attributed to organic polymers. Two large ATOFMS datasets collected from a number of outdoor studies were examined. The former was constituted of 48 road dust samples collected on the roads of London. The latter consisted of ATOFMS ambient air field studies from Europe, overall composed of more than 2,000,000 single particle mass spectra. The majority (95%) of tyre wear particles present in the road dust samples and atmospheric samples are internally mixed with metals (Li, Na, Ca, Fe, Ti), as well as phosphate. It is concluded that the interaction of tyres with the road surface creates particles internally mixed from two sources: tyre rubber and road surface materials. Measurements of the tyre rubber component alone may underestimate the contribution of tyre wear to concentrations of airborne particulate matter. The results presented are especially relevant for urban aerosol source apportionment and PM2.5 exposure assessment.

  3. Chemical characterization of freshly emitted particulate matter from aircraft exhaust using single particle mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abegglen, Manuel; Brem, B. T.; Ellenrieder, M.; Durdina, L.; Rindlisbacher, T.; Wang, J.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.

    2016-06-01

    Non-volatile aircraft engine emissions are an important anthropogenic source of soot particles in the upper troposphere and in the vicinity of airports. They influence climate and contribute to global warming. In addition, they impact air quality and thus human health and the environment. The chemical composition of non-volatile particulate matter emission from aircraft engines was investigated using single particle time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The exhaust from three different aircraft engines was sampled and analyzed. The soot particulate matter was sampled directly behind the turbine in a test cell at Zurich Airport. Single particle analyses will focus on metallic compounds. The particles analyzed herein represent a subset of the emissions composed of the largest particles with a mobility diameter >100 nm due to instrumental restrictions. A vast majority of the analyzed particles was shown to contain elemental carbon, and depending on the engine and the applied thrust the elemental carbon to total carbon ratio ranged from 83% to 99%. The detected metallic compounds were all internally mixed with the soot particles. The most abundant metals in the exhaust were Cr, Fe, Mo, Na, Ca and Al; V, Ba, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, Mg, Mn, Si, Ti and Zr were also detected. We further investigated potential sources of the ATOFMS-detected metallic compounds using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. The potential sources considered were kerosene, engine lubrication oil and abrasion from engine wearing components. An unambiguous source apportionment was not possible because most metallic compounds were detected in several of the analyzed sources.

  4. Phase-coexistence simulations of fluid mixtures by the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method using single-particle models

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jun

    2013-09-01

    We present a single-particle Lennard-Jones (L-J) model for CO2 and N2. Simplified L-J models for other small polyatomic molecules can be obtained following the methodology described herein. The phase-coexistence diagrams of single-component systems computed using the proposed single-particle models for CO2 and N2 agree well with experimental data over a wide range of temperatures. These diagrams are computed using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method based on the Gibbs-NVT ensemble. This good agreement validates the proposed simplified models. That is, with properly selected parameters, the single-particle models have similar accuracy in predicting gas-phase properties as more complex, state-of-the-art molecular models. To further test these single-particle models, three binary mixtures of CH4, CO2 and N2 are studied using a Gibbs-NPT ensemble. These results are compared against experimental data over a wide range of pressures. The single-particle model has similar accuracy in the gas phase as traditional models although its deviation in the liquid phase is greater. Since the single-particle model reduces the particle number and avoids the time-consuming Ewald summation used to evaluate Coulomb interactions, the proposed model improves the computational efficiency significantly, particularly in the case of high liquid density where the acceptance rate of the particle-swap trial move increases. We compare, at constant temperature and pressure, the Gibbs-NPT and Gibbs-NVT ensembles to analyze their performance differences and results consistency. As theoretically predicted, the agreement between the simulations implies that Gibbs-NVT can be used to validate Gibbs-NPT predictions when experimental data is not available. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  5. Lagrangian transported MDF methods for compressible high speed flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlinger, Peter

    2017-06-01

    This paper deals with the application of thermochemical Lagrangian MDF (mass density function) methods for compressible sub- and supersonic RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) simulations. A new approach to treat molecular transport is presented. This technique on the one hand ensures numerical stability of the particle solver in laminar regions of the flow field (e.g. in the viscous sublayer) and on the other hand takes differential diffusion into account. It is shown in a detailed analysis, that the new method correctly predicts first and second-order moments on the basis of conventional modeling approaches. Moreover, a number of challenges for MDF particle methods in high speed flows is discussed, e.g. high cell aspect ratio grids close to solid walls, wall heat transfer, shock resolution, and problems from statistical noise which may cause artificial shock systems in supersonic flows. A Mach 2 supersonic mixing channel with multiple shock reflection and a model rocket combustor simulation demonstrate the eligibility of this technique to practical applications. Both test cases are simulated successfully for the first time with a hybrid finite-volume (FV)/Lagrangian particle solver (PS).

  6. Hamiltonian and Lagrangian Dynamical Matrix Approaches Applied to Magnetic Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Zivieri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two micromagnetic tools to study the spin dynamics are reviewed. Both approaches are based upon the so-called dynamical matrix method, a hybrid micromagnetic framework used to investigate the spin-wave normal modes of confined magnetic systems. The approach which was formulated first is the Hamiltonian-based dynamical matrix method. This method, used to investigate dynamic magnetic properties of conservative systems, was originally developed for studying spin excitations in isolated magnetic nanoparticles and it has been recently generalized to study the dynamics of periodic magnetic nanoparticles. The other one, the Lagrangian-based dynamical matrix method, was formulated as an extension of the previous one in order to include also dissipative effects. Such dissipative phenomena are associated not only to intrinsic but also to extrinsic damping caused by injection of a spin current in the form of spin-transfer torque. This method is very accurate in identifying spin modes that become unstable under the action of a spin current. The analytical development of the system of the linearized equations of motion leads to a complex generalized Hermitian eigenvalue problem in the Hamiltonian dynamical matrix method and to a non-Hermitian one in the Lagrangian approach. In both cases, such systems have to be solved numerically.

  7. Analysis of the characteristics of single atmospheric particles in Chengdu using single particle mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junke; Luo, Bin; Zhang, Jianqiang; Ouyang, Feng; Song, Hongyi; Liu, Peichuan; Cao, Pan; Schäfer, Klaus; Wang, Shigong; Huang, Xiaojuan; Lin, Yongfu

    2017-05-01

    Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan Province and the main city in Sichuan basin, is one of the heavily polluted cities in China. The characteristics of single particles in the atmosphere over Chengdu are critical for the in-depth understanding of their sources, formation mechanisms, and effects. In this study, a continuous ambient aerosol measurement was performed in summer in Chengdu with a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) and other monitoring instruments. The particulate matter (PM) mass concentrations were low during our study period: PM2.5 and PM10 (aerosol particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 or 10 μm) were 40.5 ± 23.6 μg m-3 and 67.0 ± 38.1 μg m-3, respectively. This was mainly caused by the favorable meteorological conditions during the summer season. Twelve particle types were identified and classified as dust particles (Dust), four types of carbonaceous particles, organic nitrogen and potassium containing particles (KCN), four types of secondary particles, Na-K-containing particles (NaK), and metal-containing particles (Metal). The highest contribution of particles was from potassium with elemental carbon (KEC; 23.0%), and the lowest from elemental carbon (EC; 0.2%). All types of particles showed different diurnal variations and size distributions, which were closely related to their sources and reactions in the atmosphere. The eastern and southern air masses corresponded with high PM2.5 mass concentrations. The contributions of KEC and K-sulfate (KSO4) particles to PM2.5 were clearly higher than those in air masses from the southeast. During polluted days, the contributions of KEC and KSO4 particles increased, while the contributions of organic carbon (OC), combined OC and EC particles (OCEC), and K-nitrate (KNO3) particles decreased. This shows the importance of biomass burning and industrial emissions for the PM2.5 pollution in Chengdu. These results will be useful for the in-depth understanding of the PM2

  8. Single Particle Analysis by Combined Chemical Imaging to Study Episodic Air Pollution Events in Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofner, Johannes; Eitenberger, Elisabeth; Friedbacher, Gernot; Brenner, Florian; Hutter, Herbert; Schauer, Gerhard; Kistler, Magdalena; Greilinger, Marion; Lohninger, Hans; Lendl, Bernhard; Kasper-Giebl, Anne

    2017-04-01

    The aerosol composition of a city like Vienna is characterized by a complex interaction of local emissions and atmospheric input on a regional and continental scale. The identification of major aerosol constituents for basic source appointment and air quality issues needs a high analytical effort. Exceptional episodic air pollution events strongly change the typical aerosol composition of a city like Vienna on a time-scale of few hours to several days. Analyzing the chemistry of particulate matter from these events is often hampered by the sampling time and related sample amount necessary to apply the full range of bulk analytical methods needed for chemical characterization. Additionally, morphological and single particle features are hardly accessible. Chemical Imaging evolved to a powerful tool for image-based chemical analysis of complex samples. As a complementary technique to bulk analytical methods, chemical imaging can address a new access to study air pollution events by obtaining major aerosol constituents with single particle features at high temporal resolutions and small sample volumes. The analysis of the chemical imaging datasets is assisted by multivariate statistics with the benefit of image-based chemical structure determination for direct aerosol source appointment. A novel approach in chemical imaging is combined chemical imaging or so-called multisensor hyperspectral imaging, involving elemental imaging (electron microscopy-based energy dispersive X-ray imaging), vibrational imaging (Raman micro-spectroscopy) and mass spectrometric imaging (Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) with subsequent combined multivariate analytics. Combined chemical imaging of precipitated aerosol particles will be demonstrated by the following examples of air pollution events in Vienna: Exceptional episodic events like the transformation of Saharan dust by the impact of the city of Vienna will be discussed and compared to samples obtained at a high alpine

  9. Online single particle measurements of black carbon coatings, structure and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, James; Liu, Dantong; Taylor, Jonathan; Flynn, Michael; Williams, Paul; Morgan, William; Whitehead, James; Alfarra, Rami; McFiggans, Gordon; Coe, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    The impacts of black carbon on meteorology and climate remain a major source of uncertainty, owing in part to the complex relationship between the bulk composition of the particulates and their optical properties. A particular complication stems from how light interacts with particles in response to the microphysical configuration and any 'coatings', i.e. non-black carbon material that is either co-emitted or subsequently obtained through atmospheric processing. This may cause the particle to more efficiently absorb or scatter light and may even change the sign of its radiative forcing potential. While much insight has been gained through measurements of bulk aerosol properties, either while suspended or after collection on a filter or impactor substrate, this does not provide a complete picture and thus may not adequately constrain the system. Here we present an overview of recent work to better constrain the properties of black carbon using online, in situ measurements of single particles, primarily using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). We have developed novel methods of inverting the data produced and combining the different metrics derived so as to give the most effective insights into black carbon sources, processes and properties. We have also used this measurement in conjunction with other instruments (sometimes in series) and used the data to challenge many commonly used models of optical properties such as core-shell Mie, Rayleigh-Debeye-Gans and effective medium. This work has been carried out in a variety of atmospheric environments and with laboratory-produced soots, e.g. from a diesel engine rig. Highlights include the finding that with real-world atmospheric aerosols, bulk optical measurements may be insufficient to derive brown carbon parameters without detailed morphological data. We also show that the enhancement of absorption for both ambient and laboratory generated particles only occurs after the coating mass fraction reaches a certain

  10. Measurement of ambient aerosols in northern Mexico City by single particle mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Moffet

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous ambient measurements with aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS were made in an industrial/residential section in the northern part of Mexico City as part of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area-2006 campaign (MCMA-2006. Results are presented for the period of 15–27 March 2006. The submicron size mode contained both fresh and aged biomass burning, aged organic carbon (OC mixed with nitrate and sulfate, elemental carbon (EC, nitrogen-organic carbon, industrial metal, and inorganic NaK inorganic particles. Overall, biomass burning and aged OC particle types comprised 40% and 31%, respectively, of the submicron mode. In contrast, the supermicron mode was dominated by inorganic NaK particle types (42% which represented a mixture of dry lake bed dust and industrial NaK emissions mixed with soot. Additionally, aluminosilicate dust, transition metals, OC, and biomass burning contributed to the supermicron particles. Early morning periods (2–6 a.m. showed high fractions of inorganic particles from industrial sources in the northeast, composed of internal mixtures of Pb, Zn, EC and Cl, representing up to 73% of the particles in the 0.2–3μm size range. A unique nitrogen-containing organic carbon (NOC particle type, peaking in the early morning hours, was hypothesized to be amines from local industrial emissions based on the time series profile and back trajectory analysis. A strong dependence on wind speed and direction was observed in the single particle types that were present during different times of the day. The early morning (3:30–10 a.m. showed the greatest contributions from industrial emissions. During mid to late mornings (7–11 a.m., weak northerly winds were observed along with the most highly aged particles. Stronger winds from the south picked up in the late morning (after 11 a.m., resulting in a decrease in the concentrations of the major aged particle types and an increase in the number fraction of fresh

  11. Technical Note: The single particle soot photometer fails to detect PALAS soot nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gysel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The single particle soot photometer (SP2 uses laser-induced incandescence (LII for the measurement of atmospheric black carbon (BC particles. The BC mass concentration is obtained by combining quantitative detection of BC mass in single particles with a counting efficiency of 100% above its lower detection limit (LDL. It is commonly accepted that a particle must contain at least several tenths of femtograms BC in order to be detected by the SP2.

    Here we show the unexpected result that BC particles from a PALAS spark discharge soot generator remain undetected by the SP2, even if their BC mass, as independently determined with an aerosol particle mass analyser (APM, is clearly above the typical LDL of the SP2. Comparison of counting efficiency and effective density data of PALAS soot with flame generated soot (combustion aerosol standard burner, CAST, fullerene soot and carbon black particles (Cabot Regal 400R reveals that particle morphology can affect the SP2's LDL. PALAS soot particles are fractal-like agglomerates of very small primary particles with a low fractal dimension, resulting in a very low effective density. Such loosely-packed particles behave like "the sum of individual primary particles" in the SP2's laser. Accordingly, the PALAS soot particles remain undetected as the SP2's laser intensity is insufficient to heat the primary particles to vaporisation because of their small size (primary particle diameter ~5–10 nm. It is not surprising that particle morphology can have an effect on the SP2's LDL, however, such a dramatic effect as reported here for PALAS soot was not expected. In conclusion, the SP2's LDL at a certain laser power depends on total BC mass per particle for compact particles with sufficiently high effective density. However, for fractal-like agglomerates of very small primary particles and low fractal dimension, the BC mass per primary particle determines the limit of detection, independent of the total

  12. Single-particle characterization of the high-Arctic summertime aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sierau

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Single-particle mass-spectrometric measurements were carried out in the high Arctic north of 80° during summer 2008. The campaign took place onboard the icebreaker Oden and was part of the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS. The instrument deployed was an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS that provides information on the chemical composition of individual particles and their mixing state in real time. Aerosols were sampled in the marine boundary layer at stations in the open ocean, in the marginal ice zone, and in the pack ice region. The largest fraction of particles detected for subsequent analysis in the size range of the ATOFMS between approximately 200 and 3000 nm in diameter showed mass-spectrometric patterns, indicating an internal mixing state and a biomass burning and/or biofuel source. The majority of these particles were connected to an air mass layer of elevated particle concentration mixed into the surface mixed layer from the upper part of the marine boundary layer. The second largest fraction was represented by sea salt particles. The chemical analysis of the over-ice sea salt aerosol revealed tracer compounds that reflect chemical aging of the particles during their long-range advection from the marginal ice zone, or open waters south thereof prior to detection at the ship. From our findings we conclude that long-range transport of particles is one source of aerosols in the high Arctic. To assess the importance of long-range particle sources for aerosol–cloud interactions over the inner Arctic in comparison to local and regional biogenic primary aerosol sources, the chemical composition of the detected particles was analyzed for indicators of marine biological origin. Only a minor fraction showed chemical signatures of potentially ocean-derived primary particles of that kind. However, a chemical bias in the ATOFMS's detection capabilities observed during ASCOS might suggest the presence of a particle type of

  13. Technical Note: The single particle soot photometer fails to reliably detect PALAS soot nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gysel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The single particle soot photometer (SP2 uses laser-induced incandescence (LII for the measurement of atmospheric black carbon (BC particles. The BC mass concentration is obtained by combining quantitative detection of BC mass in single particles with a counting efficiency of 100% above its lower detection limit. It is commonly accepted that a particle must contain at least several tenths of a femtogram BC in order to be detected by the SP2.

    Here we show the result that most BC particles from a PALAS spark discharge soot generator remain undetected by the SP2, even if their BC mass, as independently determined with an aerosol particle mass analyser (APM, is clearly above the typical lower detection limit of the SP2. Comparison of counting efficiency and effective density data of PALAS soot with flame generated soot (combustion aerosol standard burner, CAST, fullerene soot and carbon black particles (Cabot Regal 400R reveals that particle morphology can affect the SP2's lower detection limit. PALAS soot particles are fractal-like agglomerates of very small primary particles with a low fractal dimension, resulting in a very low effective density. Such loosely packed particles behave like "the sum of individual primary particles" in the SP2's laser. Accordingly, most PALAS soot particles remain undetected as the SP2's laser intensity is insufficient to heat the primary particles to their vaporisation temperature because of their small size (Dpp ≈ 5–10 nm. Previous knowledge from pulsed laser-induced incandescence indicated that particle morphology might have an effect on the SP2's lower detection limit, however, an increase of the lower detection limit by a factor of ∼5–10, as reported here for PALAS soot, was not expected.

    In conclusion, the SP2's lower detection limit at a certain laser power depends primarily on the total BC mass per particle for compact particles with sufficiently high effective

  14. Lagrangian averages, averaged Lagrangians, and the mean effects of fluctuations in fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Darryl D.

    2002-06-01

    We begin by placing the generalized Lagrangian mean (GLM) equations for a compressible adiabatic fluid into the Euler-Poincare (EP) variational framework of fluid dynamics, for an averaged Lagrangian. This is the Lagrangian averaged Euler-Poincare (LAEP) theorem. Next, we derive a set of approximate small amplitude GLM equations (glm equations) at second order in the fluctuating displacement of a Lagrangian trajectory from its mean position. These equations express the linear and nonlinear back-reaction effects on the Eulerian mean fluid quantities by the fluctuating displacements of the Lagrangian trajectories in terms of their Eulerian second moments. The derivation of the glm equations uses the linearized relations between Eulerian and Lagrangian fluctuations, in the tradition of Lagrangian stability analysis for fluids. The glm derivation also uses the method of averaged Lagrangians, in the tradition of wave, mean flow interaction. Next, the new glm EP motion equations for incompressible ideal fluids are compared with the Euler-alpha turbulence closure equations. An alpha model is a GLM (or glm) fluid theory with a Taylor hypothesis closure. Such closures are based on the linearized fluctuation relations that determine the dynamics of the Lagrangian statistical quantities in the Euler-alpha equations. Thus, by using the LAEP theorem, we bridge between the GLM equations and the Euler-alpha closure equations, through the small-amplitude glm approximation in the EP variational framework. We conclude by highlighting a new application of the GLM, glm, and alpha-model results for Lagrangian averaged ideal magnetohydrodynamics. (c) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Fundamental Rheology of Disperse Systems Based on Single-Particle Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajinder Pal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive review of the fundamental rheology of dilute disperse systems is presented. The exact rheological constitutive equations based on rigorous single-particle mechanics are discussed for a variety of disperse systems. The different types of inclusions (disperse phase considered are: rigid-solid spherical particles with and without electric charge, rigid-porous spherical particles, non-rigid (soft solid particles, liquid droplets with and without surfactant, bubbles with and without surfactant, capsules, core-shell particles, non-spherical solid particles, and ferromagnetic spherical and non-spherical particles. In general, the state of the art is good in terms of the theoretical development. However, more experimental work is needed to verify the theoretical models and to determine their range of validity. This is especially true for dispersions of porous particles, capsules, core-shell particles, and magnetic particles. The main limitation of the existing theoretical developments on the rheology of disperse systems is that the matrix fluid is generally assumed to be Newtonian in nature. Rigorous theoretical models for the rheology of disperse systems consisting of non-Newtonian fluid as the matrix phase are generally lacking, especially at arbitrary flow strengths.

  16. Experimental study of single-particle inclusive hadron scattering and associated multiplicities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, A.E.; Carey, D.C.; Elias, J.E.; Garbincius, P.H.; Mikenberg, G.; Polychronakos, V.A.; Aitkenhead, W.; Barton, D.S.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Busza, W.; Dobrowolski, T.; Friedman, J.I.; Kendall, H.W.; Lyons, T.; Nelson, B.; Rosenson, L.; Toy, W.; Verdier, R.; Votta, L.; Chiaradia, M.T.; DeMarzo, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Germinario, G.; Guerriero, L.; LaVopa, P.; Maggi, G.; Posa, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Spinelli, P.; Waldner, F.; Meunier, R.; Cutts, D.; Dulude, R.S.; Lanou, R.E. Jr.; Massimo, J.T.

    1982-10-01

    An experiment using the Fermilab single arm spectrometer (SAS) facility and an associated nonmagnetic vertex detector studied the reactions a+p..-->..c+X where a and c were ..pi../sup + -/, K/sup + -/, p, or p-bar. Extensive measurements were made at 100 and 175 GeV/c beam momenta with the outgoing hadrons detected in the SAS covering a kinematic range 0.12single-particle inclusive data for charged-particle production in low-p/sub T/ hadronic fragmentation are presented. The average associated charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions are also given.

  17. Measurement of ambient aerosols in northern Mexico City by single particle mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Moffet

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuous ambient measurements with aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS were carried out in an industrial/residential section in the northern part of Mexico City as part of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area – 2006 campaign (MCMA-2006 between 7–27 March, 2006. Biomass and organic carbon (OC particle types were found to dominate the accumulation mode both day and night. The concentrations of both organic carbon and biomass particles were roughly equal early in the morning, but biomass became the largest contributor to the accumulation mode mass from the late morning until early evening. The diurnal pattern can be attributed to aging and/or a change in meteorology. Fresh elemental carbon (EC particles were observed during rush hour. The majority of the EC particles were mixed with nitrate, sulfate, organic carbon and potassium. Submicron particles from industrial sources in the northeast were composed of an internal mixture of Pb, Zn, EC and Cl and peaked early in the morning. A unique nitrogen-containing organic (NOC particle type was observed, and is hypothesized to be from industrial emissions based on the temporal profile and back trajectory analysis. This study provides unique insights into the real-time changes in single particle mixing state as a function of size and time for aerosols in Mexico City. These new findings indicate that biomass burning and industrial operations make significant contributions to particles in Mexico City. These sources have received relatively little attention in previous intensive field campaigns.

  18. Coarse-grained single-particle dynamics in two-dimensional solids and liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbermann, Jörg R; Schoen, Martin; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2008-07-01

    We consider the dynamics of a single tagged particle in a two-dimensional system governed by Lennard-Jones interactions. Previous work based on the Mori-Zwanzig projection operator formalism has shown that the single-particles dynamics can be described via a generalized Langevin equation (GLE) which is exact within the harmonic approximation, that is, for a low-temperature solid [J. M. Deutch and R. Silbey, Phys. Rev. A 3, 2049 (1971)]. In the present work we explore to what an extent the GLE reproduces the effective dynamics under thermodynamic conditions where the harmonic approximation is no longer justified. To this end we compute characteristic time autocorrelation functions for the tagged particle in molecular dynamics simulations of the full system and compare these functions with those obtained from solving the GLE. At low temperatures we find excellent agreement between both data sets. Deviations emerge at higher temperatures which are, however, surprisingly small even in the high-temperature liquid phase.

  19. A single particle detector for electron-ion collision experiments in the Cryogenic Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruck, Kaija; Mueller, Alfred; Schippers, Stefan [Institut fuer Atom- und Molekuelphysik, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Krantz, Claude; Becker, Arno; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Novotny, Oldrich [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, New York (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The study of ion chemistry in the interstellar medium requires, among others, knowledge about cross sections for the recombination of atomic and molecular ions with low temperature (∝10 K) electrons. Especially the database on singly charged atomic ions relevant to the chemistry of molecular clouds is incomplete in this respect. The electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR), currently being commissioned at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, will allow experiments with atomic, molecular and cluster ions at beam energies up to 300 keV per unit charge in a cryogenic extremely high vacuum (XHV) environment. Collisions of stored atomic ions with electrons provided by an electron cooler will lead to reaction products with charge states that differ from those of the parent particles. The detection of these products will be carried out behind a bending deflector of the storage ring by a high-efficiency movable single-particle detector, based on a secondary electron converter backed by heatable microchannel plates. The designs of the mechanical actuator and the detector are compatible with the cryogenic operating conditions at 10 K and a bakeout temperature of up to 530 K.

  20. Quantum dot-loaded monofunctionalized DNA icosahedra for single-particle tracking of endocytic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Dhiraj; Arumugam, Senthil; Nasilowski, Michel; Joshi, Himanshu; Wunder, Christian; Chambon, Valérie; Prakash, Ved; Grazon, Chloé; Nadal, Brice; Maiti, Prabal K.; Johannes, Ludger; Dubertret, Benoit; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2016-12-01

    Functionalization of quantum dots (QDs) with a single biomolecular tag using traditional approaches in bulk solution has met with limited success. DNA polyhedra consist of an internal void bounded by a well-defined three-dimensional structured surface. The void can house cargo and the surface can be functionalized with stoichiometric and spatial precision. Here, we show that monofunctionalized QDs can be realized by encapsulating QDs inside DNA icosahedra and functionalizing the DNA shell with an endocytic ligand. We deployed the DNA-encapsulated QDs for real-time imaging of three different endocytic ligands—folic acid, galectin-3 (Gal3) and the Shiga toxin B-subunit (STxB). Single-particle tracking of Gal3- or STxB-functionalized QD-loaded DNA icosahedra allows us to monitor compartmental dynamics along endocytic pathways. These DNA-encapsulated QDs, which bear a unique stoichiometry of endocytic ligands, represent a new class of molecular probes for quantitative imaging of endocytic receptor dynamics.

  1. Longitudinal, transverse, and single-particle dynamics in liquid Zn: Ab initio study and theoretical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rio, B. G.; González, L. E.

    2017-06-01

    We perform ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of liquid Zn near the melting point in order to study the longitudinal and transverse dynamic properties of the system. We find two propagating excitations in both of them in a wide range of wave vectors. This is in agreement with some experimental observations of the dynamic structure factor in the region around half the position of the main peak. Moreover, the two-mode structure in the transverse and longitudinal current correlation functions had also been previously observed in high pressure liquid metallic systems. We perform a theoretical analysis in order to investigate the possible origin of such two components by resorting to mode-coupling theories. They are found to describe qualitatively the appearance of two modes in the dynamics, but their relative intensities are not quantitatively reproduced. We suggest some possible improvements of the theory through the analysis of the structure of the memory functions. We also analyze the single-particle dynamics embedded in the velocity autocorrelation function, and explain its characteristics through mode-coupling concepts.

  2. Evolution of single-particle strength in neutron-rich 71Cu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Morfouace

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The strength functions of the πf5/2, πp3/2 and πf7/2 orbitals in neutron-rich 71Cu were obtained in a 72Zn(d,3He71Cu proton pick-up reaction in inverse kinematics using a radioactive beam of 72Zn at 38 MeV/u. A dedicated set-up was developed to overcome the experimental challenges posed by the low cross section of the reaction and the low energy of the outgoing 3He particles. The excitation-energy spectrum was reconstructed and spectroscopic factors were obtained after analysis of the angular distributions with the finite-range Distorted-Wave Born Approximation (DWBA. The results show that unlike for the πf5/2 orbital and contrary to earlier interpretation, the πf7/2 single-particle strength distribution is not appreciably affected by the addition of neutrons beyond N=40.

  3. Detection of Engineered Copper Nanoparticles in Soil Using Single Particle ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navratilova, Jana; Praetorius, Antonia; Gondikas, Andreas; Fabienke, Willi; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-12-10

    Regulatory efforts rely on nanometrology for the development and implementation of laws regarding the incorporation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) into industrial and consumer products. Copper is currently one of the most common metals used in the constantly developing and expanding sector of nanotechnology. The use of copper nanoparticles in products, such as agricultural biocides, cosmetics and paints, is increasing. Copper based ENMs will eventually be released to the environment through the use and disposal of nano-enabled products, however, the detection of copper ENMs in environmental samples is a challenging task. Single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (spICP-MS) has been suggested as a powerful tool for routine nanometrology efforts. In this work, we apply a spICP-MS method for the detection of engineered copper nanomaterials in colloidal extracts from natural soil samples. Overall, copper nanoparticles were successfully detected in the soil colloidal extracts and the importance of dwell time, background removal, and sample dilution for method optimization and recovery maximization is highlighted.

  4. Detection of Engineered Copper Nanoparticles in Soil Using Single Particle ICP-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Navratilova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory efforts rely on nanometrology for the development and implementation of laws regarding the incorporation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs into industrial and consumer products. Copper is currently one of the most common metals used in the constantly developing and expanding sector of nanotechnology. The use of copper nanoparticles in products, such as agricultural biocides, cosmetics and paints, is increasing. Copper based ENMs will eventually be released to the environment through the use and disposal of nano-enabled products, however, the detection of copper ENMs in environmental samples is a challenging task. Single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (spICP-MS has been suggested as a powerful tool for routine nanometrology efforts. In this work, we apply a spICP-MS method for the detection of engineered copper nanomaterials in colloidal extracts from natural soil samples. Overall, copper nanoparticles were successfully detected in the soil colloidal extracts and the importance of dwell time, background removal, and sample dilution for method optimization and recovery maximization is highlighted.

  5. Exponential Orthogonality Catastrophe in Single-Particle and Many-Body Localized Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong-Ling; Pixley, J. H.; Li, Xiaopeng

    We investigate the statistical orthogonality catastrophe (StOC) in single-particle and many-body localized systems by studying the response of the many-body ground state to a local quench. Using scaling arguments and exact numerical calculations, we establish that the StOC gives rise to a wave function overlap between the pre- and post-quench ground states that has an exponential decay with the system size, in sharp contrast to the well-known power law Anderson orthogonality catastrophe in metallic systems. This exponential decay arises from a statistical charge transfer process where a particle can be effectively ``transported'' to an arbitrary lattice site. We show that in a many-body localized phase, this non-local transport and the associated exponential StOC phenomenon persist in the presence of interactions. We study the possible experimental consequences of the exponential StOC on the Loschmidt echo and spectral function, establishing that this phenomenon might be observable in cold atomic experiments through Ramsey interference and radio-frequency spectroscopy. We thank S.-T. Wang, Z.-X. Gong, Y.-L. Wu, J. D. Sau, and Z. Ovadyahu for discussions. This work is supported by LPS-MPO-CMTC, JQI-NSF-PFC, and ARO-Atomtronics-MURI. The authors acknowledge the University of Maryland supercomputing resources.

  6. Ab-initio take on effective single-particle energies in doubly closed shell nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Duguet, T

    2011-01-01

    The present work discusses, from an ab-initio standpoint, the definition, the meaning, and the usefulness of effective single-particle energies (ESPEs) in doubly closed shell nuclei. We perform coupled-cluster calculations to quantify to what extent selected closed-shell nuclei in the oxygen and calcium isotopic chains can effectively be mapped onto an effective independent-particle picture. To do so, we revisit in detail the notion of ESPEs in the context of strongly correlated many-nucleon systems and illustrate the necessity to extract ESPEs through the diagonalization of the centroid {\\it matrix}, as originally argued by Baranger. For the purpose of illustration, we analyse the impact of correlations on observable one-nucleon separation energies and non-observable ESPEs in selected closed-shell oxygen and calcium isotopes. To further qualify the meaning and usefulness of ESPEs, we quantify the resolution-scale dependence of ESPEs and establish to what extent the first $2^+_1$ excitation energy is correlat...

  7. Single Particle Extinction and Scattering allows novel optical characterization of aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Federico; Bernardoni, Vera; Riccobono, Francesco; Vecchi, Roberta; Valli, Gianluigi; Sanvito, Tiziano; Paroli, Bruno; Pullia, Alberto; Potenza, Marco A. C.

    2017-08-01

    We apply to aerosols the optical method of Single Particle Extinction and Scattering recently proposed for characterizing liquid suspensions and specifically adapted to the aim. It provides simultaneous measurements of the real and imaginary parts of the field scattered in the forward direction by single airborne particles passing through a tightly focused laser beam. The intensity of transmitted light is collected in the forward direction, thus realizing a self-reference interferometric scheme relying on the fundamentals of the optical theorem. A high frequency (20 MS/s), extended dynamics (12 bits) sampling is performed by a cheap segmented photodiode, and a specific pulse shape analysis is exploited to validate the signals against a precise mathematical model. We show that accessing two independent physical quantities allows to exploit physical models to recover the aerosol size distribution from the measurement of the refractive index, either real or even complex. Laboratory measurements have been performed with polydisperse aerosols made of water droplets and NaCl in the submicron range, and the system has been accurately characterized. Examples of measurements of graphite nanoparticles and Pyrethrum smoke are shown. Limitations are discussed.

  8. Imaging whole Escherichia coli bacteria by using single-particle x-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jianwei; Hodgson, Keith O; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Larabell, Carolyn A; LeGros, Mark A; Nishino, Yoshinori

    2003-01-07

    We report the first experimental recording, to our knowledge, of the diffraction pattern from intact Escherichia coli bacteria using coherent x-rays with a wavelength of 2 A. By using the oversampling phasing method, a real space image at a resolution of 30 nm was directly reconstructed from the diffraction pattern. An R factor used for characterizing the quality of the reconstruction was in the range of 5%, which demonstrated the reliability of the reconstruction process. The distribution of proteins inside the bacteria labeled with manganese oxide has been identified and this distribution confirmed by fluorescence microscopy images. Compared with lens-based microscopy, this diffraction-based imaging approach can examine thicker samples, such as whole cultured cells, in three dimensions with resolution limited only by radiation damage. Looking forward, the successful recording and reconstruction of diffraction patterns from biological samples reported here represent an important step toward the potential of imaging single biomolecules at near-atomic resolution by combining single-particle diffraction with x-ray free electron lasers.

  9. Imaging Whole Escherichia Coli Bacteria by Using Single-Particle X-Ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, J.

    2004-06-04

    We report the first experimental recording, to our knowledge, of the diffraction pattern from intact Escherichia coli bacteria using coherent x-rays with a wavelength of 2 {angstrom}. By using the over-sampling phasing method, a real space image at a resolution of 30 nm was directly reconstructed from the diffraction pattern. An R factor used for characterizing the quality of the reconstruction was in the range of 5%, which demonstrated the reliability of the reconstruction process. The distribution of proteins inside the bacteria labeled with manganese oxide has been identified and this distribution confirmed by fluorescence microscopy images. Compared with lens-based microscopy, this diffraction-based imaging approach can examine thicker samples, such as whole cultured cells, in three dimensions with resolution limited only by radiation damage. Looking forward, the successful recording and reconstruction of diffraction patterns from biological samples reported here represent an important step toward the potential of imaging single biomolecules at near-atomic resolution by combining single-particle diffraction with x-ray free electron lasers.

  10. Single-particle and collective motion in unbound deformed $ ^{39}\\text{Mg} $

    CERN Document Server

    Fossez, K; Michel, N; Liu, Quan; Nazarewicz, W

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deformed neutron-rich magnesium isotopes constitute a fascinating territory where the interplay between collective rotation and single-particle motion is strongly affected by the neutron continuum. The unbound $fp$-shell nucleus $ ^{39}\\text{Mg} $ is an ideal candidate to study this interplay. Purpose: In this work, we predict the properties of low-lying resonant states of $ ^{39}\\text{Mg} $, using a suite of realistic theoretical approaches rooted in the open quantum system framework. Method: To describe the spectrum and decay modes of $ ^{39}\\text{Mg} $ we use the conventional Shell Model, Gamow Shell Model, Resonating Group Method, Density Matrix Renormalization Group method, and the non-adiabatic Particle-Plus-Rotor model formulated in the Berggren basis. Results: The unbound ground state of $ ^{39}\\text{Mg} $ is predicted to be either a $ J^{\\pi} = {7/2}^- $ state or a $ {3/2}^- $ state. A narrow $ J^{\\pi} = {7/2}^- $ ground-state candidate exhibits a resonant structure reminiscent of that of...

  11. Determination of gold nanoparticles in natural water using single particle-ICP-MS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙晨璐; 杨兆光; 杨远; 李海普; 王强

    2016-01-01

    A reliable method for detecting nanoparticles is necessary for the wide application of nanomaterials. Single particle-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SP-ICP-MS) was investigated to detect the size of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in this work. Discrimination of particle signal and iterative algorithm were used to calculate the baseline of particle signal. Influence of dwell time was discussed and 3 ms was selected as dwell time for size detection. Different AuNPs standards (30, 60, 80 and 100 nm) and mixed samples (60 and 100 nm) were determined by SP-ICP-MS and the accuracy was confirmed with reference values. The particle size detection limit was 19 nm in ultrapure water (UP water) and 31 nm in 0.1μg/L Au3+ solution. Stability of AuNPs in ultrapure water and natural water samples was investigated by detecting size variation of AuNPs. The result shows that AuNPs are stable in aqueous environment for 6 d but degraded after 30 d.

  12. Uncoating Mechanism of Carnation Mottle Virus Revealed by Cryo-EM Single Particle Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Qin-Fen; Gao, Yuan-Zhu; Xie, Li; Li, Hong-Mei; Hong, Jian; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Genome uncoating is a prerequisite for the successful infection of plant viruses in host plants. Thus far, little is known about the genome uncoating of the Carnation mottle virus (CarMV). Here, we obtained two reconstructions of CarMV at pH7 in the presence (Ca-pH7) and absence (EDTA-pH7) of calcium ions by Cryo-EM single particle analysis, which achieved 6.4 Å and 8 Å resolutions respectively. Our results showed that chelation of the calcium ions under EDTA-pH7 resulted in reduced interaction between the subunits near the center of the asymmetric unit but not overall size change of the viral particles, which indicated that the role of the calcium ions in CarMV was not predominantly for the structural preservation. Part of the genomic RNA closest to the capsid was found to be located near the center of the asymmetric unit, which might result from the interaction between genomic RNA and Lys194 residues. Together with the electrostatic potential analysis on the inner surface of the asymmetric unit, the reduced interaction near the center of the asymmetric unit under EDTA-pH7 suggested that the genome release of CarMV might be realized through the center of the asymmetric unit.

  13. A review of progress in single particle tracking: from methods to biophysical insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Carlo; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2015-12-01

    Optical microscopy has for centuries been a key tool to study living cells with minimum invasiveness. The advent of single molecule techniques over the past two decades has revolutionized the field of cell biology by providing a more quantitative picture of the complex and highly dynamic organization of living systems. Amongst these techniques, single particle tracking (SPT) has emerged as a powerful approach to study a variety of dynamic processes in life sciences. SPT provides access to single molecule behavior in the natural context of living cells, thereby allowing a complete statistical characterization of the system under study. In this review we describe the foundations of SPT together with novel optical implementations that nowadays allow the investigation of single molecule dynamic events with increasingly high spatiotemporal resolution using molecular densities closer to physiological expression levels. We outline some of the algorithms for the faithful reconstruction of SPT trajectories as well as data analysis, and highlight biological examples where the technique has provided novel insights into the role of diffusion regulating cellular function. The last part of the review concentrates on different theoretical models that describe anomalous transport behavior and ergodicity breaking observed from SPT studies in living cells.

  14. A statistical approach to the initial volume problem in Single Particle Analysis by Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorzano, C O S; Vargas, J; de la Rosa-Trevín, J M; Otón, J; Álvarez-Cabrera, A L; Abrishami, V; Sesmero, E; Marabini, R; Carazo, J M

    2015-03-01

    Cryo Electron Microscopy is a powerful Structural Biology technique, allowing the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of biological macromolecules. In particular, the structural study of purified macromolecules -often referred as Single Particle Analysis(SPA)- is normally performed through an iterative process that needs a first estimation of the three-dimensional structure that is progressively refined using experimental data. It is well-known the local optimisation nature of this refinement, so that the initial choice of this first structure may substantially change the final result. Computational algorithms aiming to providing this first structure already exist. However, the question is far from settled and more robust algorithms are still needed so that the refinement process can be performed with sufficient guarantees. In this article we present a new algorithm that addresses the initial volume problem in SPA by setting it in a Weighted Least Squares framework and calculating the weights through a statistical approach based on the cumulative density function of different image similarity measures. We show that the new algorithm is significantly more robust than other state-of-the-art algorithms currently in use in the field. The algorithm is available as part of the software suite Xmipp (http://xmipp.cnb.csic.es) and Scipion (http://scipion.cnb.csic.es) under the name "Significant".

  15. Three-dimensional reconstruction methods in Single Particle Analysis from transmission electron microscopy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carazo, J M; Sorzano, C O S; Otón, J; Marabini, R; Vargas, J

    2015-09-01

    The Transmission Electron Microscope provides two-dimensional (2D) images of the specimens under study. However, the architecture of these specimens is defined in a three-dimensional (3D) coordinate space, in volumetric terms, making the direct microscope output somehow "short" in terms of dimensionality. This situation has prompted the development of methods to quantitatively estimate 3D volumes from sets of 2D images, which are usually referred to as "three-dimensional reconstruction methods". These 3D reconstruction methods build on four considerations: (1) The relationship between the 2D images and the 3D volume must be of a particularly simple type, (2) many 2D images are needed to gain 3D volumetric information, (3) the 2D images and the 3D volume have to be in the same coordinate reference frame and (4), in practical terms, the reconstructed 3D volume will only be an approximation to the original 3D volume which gave raise to the 2D projections. In this work we will adopt a quite general view, trying to address a large community of interested readers, although some sections will be particularly devoted to the 3D analysis of isolated macromolecular complexes in the application area normally referred to as Single Particle Analysis (SPA).

  16. The single-particle density matrix of a quantum bright soliton from the coordinate Bethe ansatz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayet, Alex; Brand, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    We present a novel approach for computing reduced density matrices for superpositions of eigenstates of a Bethe-ansatz solvable model by direct integration of the wave function in coordinate representation. A diagrammatic approach is developed to keep track of relevant terms and identify symmetries, which helps to reduce the number of terms that have to be evaluated numerically. As a first application we compute with modest numerical resources the single-particle density matrix and its eigenvalues including the condensate fraction for a quantum bright soliton with up to N  =  10 bosons. The latter are constructed as superpositions of string-type Bethe-ansatz eigenstates of nonrelativistic bosons in one spatial dimension with attractive contact interaction. Upon delocalising the superposition in momentum space we find that the condensate fraction reaches maximum values larger than 97% with weak particle-number dependence in the range of particles studied. The presented approach is suitable for studying time-dependent problems and generalises to higher-order correlation functions.

  17. Improved identification of primary biological aerosol particles using single-particle mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadowicz, Maria A.; Froyd, Karl D.; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2017-06-01

    Measurements of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP), especially at altitudes relevant to cloud formation, are scarce. Single-particle mass spectrometry (SPMS) has been used to probe aerosol chemical composition from ground and aircraft for over 20 years. Here we develop a method for identifying bioaerosols (PBAP and particles containing fragments of PBAP as part of an internal mixture) using SPMS. We show that identification of bioaerosol using SPMS is complicated because phosphorus-bearing mineral dust and phosphorus-rich combustion by-products such as fly ash produce mass spectra with peaks similar to those typically used as markers for bioaerosol. We have developed a methodology to differentiate and identify bioaerosol using machine learning statistical techniques applied to mass spectra of known particle types. This improved method provides far fewer false positives compared to approaches reported in the literature. The new method was then applied to two sets of ambient data collected at Storm Peak Laboratory and a forested site in Central Valley, California to show that 0.04-2 % of particles in the 200-3000 nm aerodynamic diameter range were identified as bioaerosol. In addition, 36-56 % of particles identified as biological also contained spectral features consistent with mineral dust, suggesting internal dust-biological mixtures.

  18. Differentiation of primary biological aerosol from mineral dust using single particle mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadowicz, M. A.; Froyd, K. D.; Perring, A. E.; Murphy, D. M.; Moehler, O.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    The role of primary biological aerosol in cloud formation is uncertain. Measurements of biological aerosol abundance, especially at altitudes relevant to cirrus clouds, are scarce. Evidence of biological ice nucleation comes primarily from laboratory ice chamber studies using a limited number of highly-active species. Previous airborne single particle mass spectrometry studies have identified biological particles in ice cloud residuals. However, the methods from those studies have not been shown capable of differentiating biological aerosol from mineral dust. We have developed a robust method of differentiation using aerosol chemistry data collected by the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument by forming a database of atmospherically-relevant PALMS spectra from these aerosol types. We show that mineral dust is often confused with biological material and offer insights as to the reason for confusion. We further use PALMS flight deployments to estimate concentrations of biological aerosol both close to the surface and in the upper troposphere. This method is compared to established techniques of bioaerosol identification, such as Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS) and electron microscopy. The results of this study support mineral dust to be the primary source of ice nucleating particles in the free troposphere.

  19. Single particle dynamics of water confined in a hydrophobically modified MCM-41-S nanoporous matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraone, Antonio; Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2009-04-01

    The single particle dynamics of water confined in a hydrophobically modified MCM-41-S sample has been studied using three high resolution quasielastic neutron scattering spectrometers in the temperature range from 300 to 210 K. A careful modeling of the dynamics allowed us to obtain good agreement among the results obtained with the three instruments, which have very different energy resolutions. The picture arising from the data is that, because of the heterogenous environment experienced by the water molecules, the dynamics show a broad distribution of relaxation times. However, the Fickian diffusive behavior is retained. In the investigated temperature range we found no evidence of the dynamic crossover, from a non-Arrhenius to an Arrhenius behavior, which was detected for water confined in hydrophilic MCM-41-S. This finding is in agreement with what was reported by Chu et al. [Phys. Rev. E 76, 021505 (2007)] for water confined in other hydrophobic confining media that the dynamic crossover takes place at a much lower temperature. The results reported in the paper help clarify the role that the chemical interaction between the water molecules and the walls of the confining host plays in determining the characteristics of the water dynamics, as compared to purely geometric constraints such as the size and shape of the pores.

  20. Single particle tracking through highly scattering media with multiplexed two-photon excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perillo, Evan; Liu, Yen-Liang; Liu, Cong; Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2015-03-01

    3D single-particle tracking (SPT) has been a pivotal tool to furthering our understanding of dynamic cellular processes in complex biological systems, with a molecular localization accuracy (10-100 nm) often better than the diffraction limit of light. However, current SPT techniques utilize either CCDs or a confocal detection scheme which not only suffer from poor temporal resolution but also limit tracking to a depth less than one scattering mean free path in the sample (typically validated our microscope by tracking (1) fluorescent nanoparticles in a prescribed motion inside gelatin gel (with 1% intralipid) and (2) labeled single EGFR complexes inside skin cancer spheroids (at least 8 layers of cells thick) for ~10 minutes. Furthermore we discuss future capabilities of our multiplexed two-photon microscope design, specifically to the extension of (1) simultaneous multicolor tracking (i.e. spatiotemporal co-localization analysis) and (2) FRET studies (i.e. lifetime analysis). The high resolution, high depth penetration, and multicolor features of this microscope make it well poised to study a variety of molecular scale dynamics in the cell, especially related to cellular trafficking studies with in vitro tumor models and in vivo.

  1. Three-dimensional single-particle tracking in live cells: news from the third dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, A.; Gorelashvili, M.; Schüller, V.; Wehnekamp, F.; Arcizet, D.; Katayama, Y.; Lamb, D. C.; Heinrich, D.

    2013-07-01

    Single-particle tracking (SPT) is of growing importance in the biophysical community. It is used to investigate processes such as drug and gene delivery, viral uptake, intracellular trafficking or membrane-bound protein mobility. Traditionally, SPT is performed in two dimensions (2D) because of its technical simplicity. However, life occurs in three dimensions (3D) and many methods have been recently developed to track particles in 3D. Now, is the third dimension worth the effort? Here we investigate the differences between the 2D and 3D analyses of intracellular transport with the 3D development of a time-resolved mean square displacement (MSD) analysis introduced previously. The 3D trajectories, and the 2D projections, of fluorescent nanoparticles were obtained with an orbital tracking microscope in two different cell types: in Dictyostelium discoideum ameba and in adherent, more flattened HuH-7 human cells. As expected from the different 3D organization of both cells’ cytoskeletons, a third of the active transport was lost upon projection in the ameba whereas the identification of the active phases was barely affected in the HuH-7 cells. In both cell types, we found intracellular diffusion to be anisotropic and the diffusion coefficient values derived from the 2D analysis were therefore biased.

  2. Optimized method for black carbon analysis in ice and snow using the Single Particle Soot Photometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Wendl

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we attempt to optimize the method for measuring black carbon (BC in snow and ice using a single particle soot photometer (SP2. Beside the previously applied ultrasonic (CETAC and Collison-type nebulizers we introduce a jet (APEX-Q nebulizer to aerosolize the aqueous sample for SP2 analysis. Both CETAC and APEX-Q require small sample volumes (few milliliters which makes them suitable for ice core analysis. The APEX-Q shows the least size-dependent nebulizing efficiency in the BC particle diameter range of 100–1000 nm. The CETAC has the advantage that air and liquid flows can be monitored continuously. All nebulizer-types require a calibration with BC standards for the determination of the BC mass concentration in unknown aqueous samples. We found Aquadag to be a suitable material for preparing calibration standards. Further, we studied the influence of different treatments for fresh discrete snow and ice samples as well as the effect of storage. The results show that samples are best kept frozen until analysis. Once melted, they should be sonicated for 25 min, immediately analyzed while being stirred and not be refrozen.

  3. Single particle tracking with sterol modulation reveals the cholesterol-mediated diffusion properties of integrin receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Neha; Syed, Aleem; Sander, Suzanne; Smith, Emily A.

    2014-12-01

    A combination of sterol modulation with cyclodextrins plus fluorescence microscopy revealed a biophysical mechanism behind cholesterol’s influence on the diffusion of a ubiquitous class of receptors called integrins. The heterogeneous diffusion of integrins bound to ligand-coated quantum dots was measured using single particle tracking (SPT), and the ensemble changes in integrin diffusion were measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). A 25 ± 1% reduction of membrane cholesterol resulted in three significant changes to the diffusion of ligand-bound αPS2CβPS integrins as measured by SPT. There was a 23% increase in ligand-bound mobile integrins; there was a statistically significant increase in the average diffusion coefficient inside zones of confined diffusion, and histograms of confined integrin trajectories showed an increased frequency in the range of 0.1-1 μm2 s-1 and a decreased frequency in the 0.001-0.1 μm2 s-1 range. No statistical change was measured in the duration of confinement nor the size of confined zones. Restoring the cholesterol-depleted cells with exogenous cholesterol or exogenous epicholesterol resulted in similar diffusion properties. Epicholesterol differs from cholesterol in the orientation of a single hydroxyl group. The ability of epicholesterol to substitute for cholesterol suggests a biophysical mechanism for cholesterol’s effect on integrin diffusion. Influences of bilayer thickness, viscosity and organization are discussed as possible explanations for the measured changes in integrin diffusion when the membrane cholesterol concentration is reduced.

  4. Uncovering homo-and hetero-interactions on the cell membrane using single particle tracking approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Manzo, Carlo; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.

    2016-03-01

    The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is responsible for a myriad of functions that regulate cell physiology and plays a crucial role in a multitude of processes that include adhesion, migration, signaling recognition and cell-cell communication. This is accomplished by specific interactions between different membrane components such as lipids and proteins on the lipid bilayer but also through interactions with the underlying cortical actin cytoskeleton on the intracellular side and the glycocalyx matrix in close proximity to the extracellular side. Advanced biophysical techniques, including single particle tracking (SPT) have revealed that the lateral diffusion of molecular components on the plasma membrane represents a landmark manifestation of such interactions. Indeed, by studying changes in the diffusivity of individual membrane molecules, including sub-diffusion, confined diffusion and/or transient arrest of molecules in membrane compartments, it has been possible to gain insight on the nature of molecular interactions and to infer on its functional role for cell response. In this review, we will revise some exciting results where SPT has been crucial to reveal homo- and hetero-interactions on the cell membrane.

  5. Plasmon resonances in semiconductor materials for detecting photocatalysis at the single-particle level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiahao; Lin, Zhaoyong; Ma, Churong; Zheng, Zhaoqiang; Liu, Pu; Yang, Guowei

    2016-08-11

    Hot carriers, generated via the non-radiative decay of localized surface plasmon, can be utilized in photovoltaic and photocatalytic devices. In recent years, most studies have focused on conventional plasmon materials like Au and Ag. However, they suffer from several drawbacks like low energy of the generated hot carriers and a high charge-carrier recombination rate. To resolve these problems, here, we propose the plasmon resonances in heavily self-doped titanium oxide (TiO1.67) to realize effective hot carrier generation. Since the plasmon resonant energy of TiO1.67 nanoparticles (2.56 eV) is larger than the bandgap (2.15 eV), plasmon resonances through interband transition can realize both the generation and separation of hot carriers and bring a new strategy for visible-light photodegradation. The photodegradation rate for methyl orange was about 0.034 min(-1). More importantly, the combination of plasmonic and catalytic properties makes it feasible to investigate the degradation process of different materials and different structures at the single particle level in situ. By detecting the scattering shift, we demonstrated that the TiO1.67 dimer (Δλ/ΔλRIU = 0.16) possesses a higher photodegradation rate than an individual nanoparticle (Δλ/ΔλRIU = 0.09). We hope this finding may be a beginning, paving the way toward the development of semiconductor plasmonic materials for new applications beyond noble metals.

  6. Single-particle spectral function of the Λ hyperon in finite nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidaña, Isaac

    2017-02-01

    The spectral function of the Λ hyperon in finite nuclei is calculated from the corresponding Λ self-energy, which is constructed within a perturbative many-body approach using some of the hyperon-nucleon interactions of the Jülich and Nijmegen groups. Binding energies, wave functions and disoccupation numbers of different single-particle states are obtained for various hypernuclei from He5Λ to Pb209Λ. The agreement between the calculated binding energies and experimental data is qualitatively good. The small spin-orbit splitting of the p- , d- , f- and g-wave states is confirmed. The discrete and the continuum contributions of the single-Λ spectral function are computed. Their appearance is qualitatively similar to that of the nucleons. The Z-factor, that measures the importance of correlations, is also calculated. Our results show that its value is relatively large, indicating that the Λ hyperon is less correlated than nucleons. This is in agreement with the results obtained by other authors for the correlations of the Λ in infinite nuclear matter. The disoccupation numbers are obtained by integrating the spectral function over the energy. Our results show that the discrete contribution to the disoccupation number decreases when increasing the momentum of the Λ. This indicates that, in the production reactions of hypernuclei, the Λ hyperon is mostly formed in a quasi-free state.

  7. Image processing for electron microscopy single-particle analysis using XMIPP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheres, Sjors H W; Núñez-Ramírez, Rafael; Sorzano, Carlos O S; Carazo, José María; Marabini, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    We describe a collection of standardized image processing protocols for electron microscopy single-particle analysis using the XMIPP software package. These protocols allow performing the entire processing workflow starting from digitized micrographs up to the final refinement and evaluation of 3D models. A particular emphasis has been placed on the treatment of structurally heterogeneous data through maximum-likelihood refinements and self-organizing maps as well as the generation of initial 3D models for such data sets through random conical tilt reconstruction methods. All protocols presented have been implemented as stand-alone, executable python scripts, for which a dedicated graphical user interface has been developed. Thereby, they may provide novice users with a convenient tool to quickly obtain useful results with minimum efforts in learning about the details of this comprehensive package. Examples of applications are presented for a negative stain random conical tilt data set on the hexameric helicase G40P and for a structurally heterogeneous data set on 70S Escherichia coli ribosomes embedded in vitrified ice.

  8. Lagrangian Methods Of Cosmic Web Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, J D; Johnson, M S T

    2015-01-01

    The cosmic web defines the large scale distribution of matter we see in the Universe today. Classifying the cosmic web into voids, sheets, filaments and nodes allows one to explore structure formation and the role environmental factors have on halo and galaxy properties. While existing studies of cosmic web classification concentrate on grid based methods, this work explores a Lagrangian approach where the V-web algorithm proposed by Hoffman et al. (2012) is implemented with techniques borrowed from smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The Lagrangian approach allows one to classify individual objects (e.g. particles or halos) based on properties of their nearest neighbours in an adaptive manner. It can be applied directly to a halo sample which dramatically reduces computational cost and potentially allows an application of this classification scheme to observed galaxy samples. Finally, the Lagrangian nature admits a straight forward inclusion of the Hubble flow negating the necessity of a visually defined thresh...

  9. Do Assimilated Drifter Velocities Improve Lagrangian Predictability in an Operational Ocean Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    mass field, thus influencing only the baro - tropic component of the flow, their impact on trajectory forecast skill is unclear. In addition, SSH...the U.S. Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM), a free- surface primitive equation model that uses hybrid gen- eralized vertical coordinates ( Martin 2000...method for assimilation of Lagrangian data.Mon.Wea. Rev., 131, 2247–2260, doi:10.1175/1520-0493(2003)131,2247:AMFAOL.2.0.CO;2. Martin , P. J., 2000

  10. Forecasting for a Lagrangian aircraft campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A forecast system has been developed in preparation for an upcoming aircraft measurement campaign, where the same air parcels polluted by emissions over North America shall be sampled repeatedly as they leave the continent, during transport over the Atlantic, and upon their arrival over Europe. This paper describes the model system in advance of the campaign, in order to make the flight planners familiar with the novel model output. The aim of a Lagrangian strategy is to infer changes in the chemical composition and aerosol distribution occurring en route by measured upwind/downwind differences. However, guiding aircraft repeatedly into the same polluted air parcels requires careful forecasting, for which no suitable model system exists to date. This paper describes a procedure using both Eulerian-type (i.e. concentration fields and Lagrangian-type (i.e. trajectories model output from the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART to predict the best opportunities for a Lagrangian experiment. The best opportunities are defined as being highly polluted air parcels which receive little or no emission input after the first measurement, which experience relatively little mixing, and which are reachable by as many aircraft as possible. For validation the system was applied to the period of the NARE 97 campaign where approximately the same air masses were sampled on different flights. Measured upwind/downwind differences in carbon monoxide (CO and ozone (O3 decreased significantly as the threshold values used for accepting cases as Lagrangian were tightened. This proves that the model system can successfully identify Lagrangian opportunities.

  11. Forecasting for a Lagrangian aircraft campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available A forecast system has been developed in preparation for an upcoming aircraft measurement campaign, where the same air parcels polluted by emissions over North America shall be sampled repeatedly as they leave the continent, during transport over the Atlantic, and upon their arrival over Europe. This paper describes the model system in advance of the campaign, in order to make the flight planners familiar with the novel model output. The aim of a Lagrangian strategy is to infer changes in the chemical composition and aerosol distribution occurring en route by measured upwind/downwind differences. However, guiding aircraft repeatedly into the same polluted air parcels requires careful forecasting, for which no suitable model system exists to date. This paper describes a procedure using both Eulerian-type (i.e. concentration fields and Lagrangian-type (i.e. trajectories model output from the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART to predict the best opportunities for a Lagrangian experiment. The best opportunities are defined as being highly polluted air parcels which receive little or no emission input after the first measurement, which experience relatively little mixing, and which are reachable by as many aircraft as possible. For validation the system was applied to the period of the NARE 97 campaign where approximately the same air masses were sampled on different flights. Measured upwind/downwind differences in carbon monoxide (CO and ozone (O3 decreased significantly as the threshold values used for accepting cases as Lagrangian were tightened. This proves that the model system can successfully identify Lagrangian opportunities.

  12. Structure of a Single Particle From Scattering by Many Particles Randomly Oriented About an Axis: Toward Structure Solution Without Crystallization?

    OpenAIRE

    Saldin, D. K.; Shneerson, V. L.; Spence, J. C. H.; Howells, M. R.; Marchesini, S.; Chapman, H. N.; Bogan, M.; Shapiro, D.; Kirian, Richard; Weierstall, U.; Schmidt, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper is demonstrated a complete algorithm for determining the electron density of an individual particle from diffraction patterns of many particles, randomly oriented about a single axis. The algorithm operates on angular correlations among the measured intensity distributions. We also demonstrate the ability to recover the angular correlation functions of a single particle from measured diffraction patterns.

  13. Inert gases in a terra sample - Measurements in six grain-size fractions and two single particles from Lunar 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, D.; Lakatos, S.; Walton, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the results of inert gas measurements performed on six grain-size fractions and two single particles from four samples of Luna 20 material. Presented and discussed data include the inert gas contents, element and isotope systematics, radiation ages, and Ar-36/Ar-40 systematics.

  14. Inert gases in a terra sample - Measurements in six grain-size fractions and two single particles from Lunar 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, D.; Lakatos, S.; Walton, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the results of inert gas measurements performed on six grain-size fractions and two single particles from four samples of Luna 20 material. Presented and discussed data include the inert gas contents, element and isotope systematics, radiation ages, and Ar-36/Ar-40 systematics.

  15. International interlaboratory study for sizing and quatification of Ag nanoparticles in food simulants by single-particle ICPMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linsinger, T.P.J.; Peters, R.J.B.; Weigel, S.

    2014-01-01

    This publication describes the first international intercomparison of particle-size determination by single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (sp-ICPMS). Concentrated monodisperse silver nanoparticle suspensions with particle diameters of 20, 40 and 100 nm and a blank solution we

  16. Single Particle Strengths and Mirror States in $^{15}$N$-^{15}$O below 12.0 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Mertin, C E; Crisp, A M; Keeley, N; Kemper, K W; Momtyuk, O; Roeder, B T; Volya, A

    2014-01-01

    New $^{14}$N(d,p) angular distribution data were taken at a deuteron bombarding energy of 16 MeV to locate all narrow single particle neutron states up to 15 MeV in excitation. A new shell model calculation is able to reproduce all levels in $^{15}$N up to 11.5 MeV and is used to characterize a narrow single particle level at 11.236 MeV and to provide a map of the single particle strengths. The known levels in $^{15}$N are then used to determine their mirrors in the lesser known nucleus $^{15}$O. The 2s$_{1/2}$ and 1d$_{5/2}$ single particle centroid energies are determined for the $^{15}$N$-^{15}$O mirror pair as: $^{15}$N $(\\text{2s}_{1/2}) = 8.08$ MeV, $^{15}$O $(\\text{2s}_{1/2}) = 7.43$ MeV, $^{15}$N $(\\text{1d}_{5/2}) = 7.97$ MeV, and $^{15}$O $(\\text{1d}_{5/2}) = 7.47$ MeV. These results confirm the degeneracy of these orbits and that the $^{15}$N$-^{15}$O nuclei are where the transition between the $\\text{2s}_{1/2}$ lying below the $\\text{1d}_{5/2}$ to lying above it, takes place. The $\\text{1d}_{3/2}$...

  17. Euler-Lagrangian computation for estuarine hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ralph T.

    1983-01-01

    The transport of conservative and suspended matter in fluid flows is a phenomenon of Lagrangian nature because the process is usually convection dominant. Nearly all numerical investigations of such problems use an Eulerian formulation for the convenience that the computational grids are fixed in space and because the vast majority of field data are collected in an Eulerian reference frame. Several examples are given in this paper to illustrate a modeling approach which combines the advantages of both the Eulerian and Lagrangian computational techniques.

  18. Lagrangians for the W-Algebra Models

    CERN Document Server

    Gaite, J C

    1994-01-01

    The field algebra of the minimal models of W-algebras is amenable to a very simple description as a polynomial algebra generated by few elementary fields, corresponding to order parameters. Using this description, the complete Landau-Ginzburg lagrangians for these models are obtained. Perturbing these lagrangians we can explore their phase diagrams, which correspond to multicritical points with $D_n$ symmetry. In particular, it is shown that there is a perturbation for which the phase structure coincides with that of the IRF models of Jimbo et al.

  19. Effective Lagrangian in de Sitter Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Kitamoto, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Scale invariant fluctuations of metric are universal feature of quantum gravity in de Sitter spacetime. We construct an effective Lagrangian which summarizes their implications on local physics by integrating super-horizon metric fluctuations. It shows infrared quantum effects are local and render fundamental couplings time dependent. We impose Lorenz invariance on the effective Lagrangian as it is required by the principle of general covariance. We show that such a requirement leads to unique physical predictions by fixing the quantization ambiguities. We explain how the gauge parameter dependence of observables is canceled. In particular the relative evolution speed of the couplings are shown to be gauge invariant.

  20. The Mather problem for lower semicontinuous Lagrangians

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we develop the Aubry-Mather theory for Lagrangians in which the potential energy can be discontinuous. Namely we assume that the Lagrangian is lower semicontinuous in the state variable, piecewise smooth with a (smooth) discontinuity surface, as well as coercive and convex in the velocity. We establish existence of Mather measures, various approximation results, partial regularity of viscosity solutions away from the singularity, invariance by the Euler-Lagrange flow away from the singular set, and further jump conditions that correspond to conservation of energy and tangential momentum across the discontinuity. © 2013 Springer Basel.

  1. Learn the Lagrangian: A Vector-Valued RKHS Approach to Identifying Lagrangian Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-An; Huang, Han-Pang

    2016-12-01

    We study the modeling of Lagrangian systems with multiple degrees of freedom. Based on system dynamics, canonical parametric models require ad hoc derivations and sometimes simplification for a computable solution; on the other hand, due to the lack of prior knowledge in the system's structure, modern nonparametric models in machine learning face the curse of dimensionality, especially in learning large systems. In this paper, we bridge this gap by unifying the theories of Lagrangian systems and vector-valued reproducing kernel Hilbert space. We reformulate Lagrangian systems with kernels that embed the governing Euler-Lagrange equation-the Lagrangian kernels-and show that these kernels span a subspace capturing the Lagrangian's projection as inverse dynamics. By such property, our model uses only inputs and outputs as in machine learning and inherits the structured form as in system dynamics, thereby removing the need for the mundane derivations for new systems as well as the generalization problem in learning from scratches. In effect, it learns the system's Lagrangian, a simpler task than directly learning the dynamics. To demonstrate, we applied the proposed kernel to identify the robot inverse dynamics in simulations and experiments. Our results present a competitive novel approach to identifying Lagrangian systems, despite using only inputs and outputs.

  2. Single particle characterization using a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Cross

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the first single particle results obtained using an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer coupled with a light scattering module (LS-ToF-AMS. The instrument was deployed at the T1 ground site approximately 40 km northeast of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA as part of the MILAGRO field study in March of 2006. The instrument was operated as a standard AMS from 12–30 March, acquiring average chemical composition and size distributions for the ambient aerosol, and in single particle mode from 27–30 March. Over a 75-h sampling period, 12 853 single particle mass spectra were optically triggered, saved, and analyzed. The correlated optical and chemical detection allowed detailed examination of single particle collection and quantification within the LS-ToF-AMS. The single particle data enabled the mixing states of the ambient aerosol to be characterized within the context of the size-resolved ensemble chemical information.

    The particulate mixing states were examined as a function of sampling time and most of the particles were found to be internal mixtures containing many of the organic and inorganic species identified in the ensemble analysis. The single particle mass spectra were deconvolved, using techniques developed for ensemble AMS data analysis, into HOA, OOA, NH4NO3, (NH42SO4, and NH4Cl fractions. Average single particle mass and chemistry measurements are shown to be in agreement with ensemble MS and PTOF measurements. While a significant fraction of ambient particles were internal mixtures of varying degrees, single particle measurements of chemical composition allowed the identification of time periods during which the ambient ensemble was externally mixed. In some cases the chemical composition of the particles suggested a likely source. Throughout the full sampling period, the ambient ensemble was an external mixture of combustion

  3. Principles and biophysical applications of single particle super-localization and rotational tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Yan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    While conventional Single Particle Tracking (SPT) techniques acquire 2D or 3D trajectories of particle probes, we have developed Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) techniques to extract orientation and rotational information. Combined with DIC microscopy, the SPORT technique has been applied in biophysical studies, including membrane diffusion and intracellular transport. The rotational dynamics of nanoparticle vectors on live cell membranes was recorded and its influence on the fate of these nanoparticle vectors was elucidated. The rotational motions of gold nanorods with various surface modifiers were tracked continuously at a temporal resolution of 5 ms under a DIC microscope. We found that the rotational behaviors of gold nanorod vectors are strongly related to their surface charge, specific surface functional groups, and the availability of receptors on cell membranes. The study of rotational Brownian motion of nanoparticles on cell membranes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of drug delivery and provide guidance in designing surface modification strategies for drug delivery vectors under various circumstances. To characterize the rotation mode of surface functionalized gold nanorods on cell membranes, the SPORT technique is combined with the correlation analysis of the bright and dark DIC intensities. The unique capabilities of visualizing and understanding rotational motions of functionalized nanoparticles on live cell membranes allow us to correlate rotational and translational dynamics in unprecedented detail and provide new insights for complex membrane processes, including electrostatic interactions, ligand-receptor binding, and lateral (confined and hopping) diffusion of membrane receptors. Surface-functionalized nanoparticles interact with the membrane in fundamentally different ways and exhibit distinct rotational modes. The early events of particle-membrane approach and attachment are directly visualized

  4. Principles and biophysical applications of single particle super-localization and rotational tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan

    While conventional Single Particle Tracking (SPT) techniques acquire 2D or 3D trajectories of particle probes, we have developed Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) techniques to extract orientation and rotational information. Combined with DIC microscopy, the SPORT technique has been applied in biophysical studies, including membrane diffusion and intracellular transport. The rotational dynamics of nanoparticle vectors on live cell membranes was recorded and its influence on the fate of these nanoparticle vectors was elucidated. The rotational motions of gold nanorods with various surface modifiers were tracked continuously at a temporal resolution of 5 ms under a DIC microscope. We found that the rotational behaviors of gold nanorod vectors are strongly related to their surface charge, specific surface functional groups, and the availability of receptors on cell membranes. The study of rotational Brownian motion of nanoparticles on cell membranes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of drug delivery and provide guidance in designing surface modification strategies for drug delivery vectors under various circumstances. To characterize the rotation mode of surface functionalized gold nanorods on cell membranes, the SPORT technique is combined with the correlation analysis of the bright and dark DIC intensities. The unique capabilities of visualizing and understanding rotational motions of functionalized nanoparticles on live cell membranes allow us to correlate rotational and translational dynamics in unprecedented detail and provide new insights for complex membrane processes, including electrostatic interactions, ligand-receptor binding, and lateral (confined and hopping) diffusion of membrane receptors. Surface-functionalized nanoparticles interact with the membrane in fundamentally different ways and exhibit distinct rotational modes. The early events of particle-membrane approach and attachment are directly visualized

  5. Principles and biophysical applications of single particle super-localization and rotational tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Yan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    While conventional Single Particle Tracking (SPT) techniques acquire 2D or 3D trajectories of particle probes, we have developed Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) techniques to extract orientation and rotational information. Combined with DIC microscopy, the SPORT technique has been applied in biophysical studies, including membrane diffusion and intracellular transport. The rotational dynamics of nanoparticle vectors on live cell membranes was recorded and its influence on the fate of these nanoparticle vectors was elucidated. The rotational motions of gold nanorods with various surface modifiers were tracked continuously at a temporal resolution of 5 ms under a DIC microscope. We found that the rotational behaviors of gold nanorod vectors are strongly related to their surface charge, specific surface functional groups, and the availability of receptors on cell membranes. The study of rotational Brownian motion of nanoparticles on cell membranes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of drug delivery and provide guidance in designing surface modification strategies for drug delivery vectors under various circumstances. To characterize the rotation mode of surface functionalized gold nanorods on cell membranes, the SPORT technique is combined with the correlation analysis of the bright and dark DIC intensities. The unique capabilities of visualizing and understanding rotational motions of functionalized nanoparticles on live cell membranes allow us to correlate rotational and translational dynamics in unprecedented detail and provide new insights for complex membrane processes, including electrostatic interactions, ligand-receptor binding, and lateral (confined and hopping) diffusion of membrane receptors. Surface-functionalized nanoparticles interact with the membrane in fundamentally different ways and exhibit distinct rotational modes. The early events of particle-membrane approach and attachment are directly visualized

  6. Characterization of silver nanoparticles internalized by Arabidopsis plants using single particle ICP-MS analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongping eBao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the continual improvement of quality of life with nanotechnological applications, nanoparticles (NPs will inevitably reach our living environment and various ecosystems. Plants act as a crucial interface between humans and their environment. The wide use of NPs has raised great concerns about the risk of potential toxicity in crop health and food safety, leading to an emerging research theme about the interaction between plants and NPs. However, even the basic issue concerning the eventual fate and characteristics of NPs after internalization is not clearly delineated due to lack of a well-established technique for NP analysis in plant tissues. With the aid of enzymatic digestion, single particle-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SP-ICP-MS is employed to determine the size distribution of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs in tissues of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana after exposure to 10 nm Ag NPs. Our results show that Macerozyme R-10 is an appropriate enzyme to release Ag NPs from Arabidopsis plants without changing the properties of nanomaterials. The characteristics of Ag NPs obtained by SP-ICP-MS in both roots and shoots are in agreement with our transmission electron micrographs, demonstrating that SP-ICP-MS coupled with enzymatic digestion procedure is a powerful technique for quantitative determination of NPs in plant tissues. Our data reveal that Ag NPs tend to accumulate predominantly at root tissues whereby a minor portion is transported to shoot tissues. Furthermore, the measured size distribution of Ag NPs in plant tissue is centred at around 20.70 nm, larger than the average 12.84 nm in diameter, strongly implying that many internalized Ag NPs do not exist as intact individual particles but are aggregated and/or biotransformed by plant cells.

  7. Silver speciation and characterization of nanoparticles released from plastic food containers by single particle ICPMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, K; Gómez-Gómez, M M; Cámara, C; Ramos, L

    2016-05-01

    Silver migration from a commercial baby feeding bottle and a food box containing AgNPs, as confirmed by SEM-EDX analysis, was evaluated using food simulant solutions [i.e., water, 3% (v/v) acetic acid, and 10% and 90% (v/v) ethanol]. Silver release was investigated at temperatures in the 20-70°C range using contact times of up to 10 days. Migration of silver from the food box was in all cases 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that observed for the baby bottle, although the total silver content in the original box material was half of that found in the baby bottle. As expected, for both food containers, silver migration depended on both the nature of the tested solution and the applied conditions. The highest release was observed for 3% acetic acid at 70°C for 2h, corresponding to 62ngdm(2) and 1887ngdm(-2) of silver for the baby bottle and the food box, respectively. Single particle-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SP-ICPMS) was used to characterise and quantify AgNPs in the food simulants extracts. Sample preparation was optimized to preserve AgNPs integrity. The experimental parameters affecting AgNPs detection, sizing and quantification by SP-ICPMS were also optimised. Analyses of water and acidic extracts revealed the presence of both dissolved silver and AgNPs. Small AgNPs (in the 18-30nm range) and particle number concentrations within the 4-1510 10(6)L(-1) range were detected, corresponding to only 0.1-8.6% of the total silver released from these materials. The only exception was AgNPs migrated into water at 40°C and 70°C from the food box, which accounted for as much as 34% and 69% of the total silver content, respectively.

  8. Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles Internalized by Arabidopsis Plants Using Single Particle ICP-MS Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Dongping; Oh, Zhen Guo; Chen, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Plants act as a crucial interface between humans and their environment. The wide use of nanoparticles (NPs) has raised great concerns about their potential impacts on crop health and food safety, leading to an emerging research theme about the interaction between plants and NPs. However, up to this day even the basic issues concerning the eventual fate and characteristics of NPs after internalization are not clearly delineated due to the lack of a well-established technique for the quantitative analysis of NPs in plant tissues. We endeavored to combine a quantitative approach for NP analysis in plant tissues with TEM to localize the NPs. After using an enzymatic digestion to release the NPs from plant matrices, single particle-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SP-ICP-MS) is employed to determine the size distribution of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) in tissues of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana after exposure to 10 nm Ag NPs. Our results show that Macerozyme R-10 treatment can release Ag NPs from Arabidopsis plants without changing the size of Ag NPs. The characteristics of Ag NPs obtained by SP-ICP-MS in both roots and shoots are in agreement with our transmission electron micrographs, demonstrating that the combination of an enzymatic digestion procedure with SP-ICP-MS is a powerful technique for quantitative determination of NPs in plant tissues. Our data reveal that Ag NPs tend to accumulate predominantly in the apoplast of root tissues whereby a minor portion is transported to shoot tissues. Furthermore, the fact that the measured size distribution of Ag NPs in plant tissue is centered at around 20.70 nm, which is larger than the initial 12.84 nm NP diameter, strongly implies that many internalized Ag NPs do not exist as intact individual particles anymore but are aggregated and/or biotransformed in the plant instead.

  9. Single particle analysis integrated with microscopy: a high-throughput approach for reconstructing icosahedral particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaodong; Cardone, Giovanni; Zhang, Xing; Zhou, Z Hong; Baker, Timothy S

    2014-04-01

    In cryo-electron microscopy and single particle analysis, data acquisition and image processing are generally carried out in sequential steps and computation of a three-dimensional reconstruction only begins once all the micrographs have been acquired. We are developing an integrated system for processing images of icosahedral particles during microscopy to provide reconstructed density maps in real-time at the highest possible resolution. The system is designed as a combination of pipelines to run in parallel on a computer cluster and analyzes micrographs as they are acquired, handling automatically all the processing steps from defocus estimation and particle picking to origin/orientation determination. An ab initio model is determined independently from the first micrographs collected, and new models are generated as more particles become available. As a proof of concept, we simulated data acquisition sessions using three sets of micrographs of good to excellent quality that were previously recorded from different icosahedral viruses. Results show that the processing of single micrographs can keep pace with an acquisition rate of about two images per minute. The reconstructed density map improves steadily during the image acquisition phase and its quality at the end of data collection is only moderately inferior to that obtained by expert users who processed semi-automatically all the micrographs after the acquisition. The current prototype demonstrates the advantages of integrating three-dimensional image processing with microscopy, which include an ability to monitor acquisition in terms of the final structure and to predict how much data and microscope resources are needed to achieve a desired resolution.

  10. Single-particle and collective motion in unbound deformed 39Mg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossez, K.; Rotureau, J.; Michel, N.; Liu, Quan; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-11-01

    Background: Deformed neutron-rich magnesium isotopes constitute a fascinating territory where the interplay between collective rotation and single-particle motion is strongly affected by the neutron continuum. The unbound f p -shell nucleus 39Mg is an ideal candidate to study this interplay. Purpose: In this work, we predict the properties of low-lying resonant states of 39Mg, using a suite of realistic theoretical approaches rooted in the open quantum system framework. Method: To describe the spectrum and decay modes of 39Mg we use the conventional shell model, Gamow shell model, resonating group method, density matrix renormalization group method, and the nonadiabatic particle-plus-rotor model formulated in the Berggren basis. Results: The unbound ground state of 39Mg is predicted to be either a Jπ=7/2 - state or a 3/2 - state. A narrow Jπ=7/2 - ground-state candidate exhibits a resonant structure reminiscent of that of its one-neutron halo neighbor 37Mg, which is dominated by the f7 /2 partial wave at short distances and a p3 /2 component at large distances. A Jπ=3/2 - ground-state candidate is favored by the large deformation of the system. It can be associated with the 1/2 -[321 ] Nilsson orbital dominated by the ℓ =1 wave; hence its predicted width is large. The excited Jπ=1/2 - and 5 /2- states are expected to be broad resonances, while the Jπ=9/2 - and 11/2 - members of the ground-state rotational band are predicted to have very small neutron decay widths. Conclusion: We demonstrate that the subtle interplay between deformation, shell structure, and continuum coupling can result in a variety of excitations in an unbound nucleus just outside the neutron drip line.

  11. Single Particle Characterization of Free Tropospheric Aerosols at the Pico Mountain Observatory over the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, C.; China, S.; Scarnato, B. V.; Moffet, R.; OBrien, R. E.; Gilles, M. K.; Fialho, P. J.; Ampadu, M.; Kumar, S.; Dzepina, K.; Wright, K.; Sharma, N.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Perlinger, J. A.; Jacques, H.; Helmig, D.; Dziobak, M.; Kramer, L. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    Free tropospheric aerosols are being studied at the Pico Mountain Observatory, located near the top of the Pico volcano in the Azores, Portugal (38.47°N, 28.40°W, 2225m asl). Typically above the marine boundary layer in the summer, this is an ideal site to study aerosol transported over long distances across the Atlantic Ocean. Aerosols reaching the Observatory often originate from North America and sometimes from Africa and Europe. Aerosols instrumentation deployed at the site include: a) an optical particle counter, b) a 7-wavelength aethalometer to measure black carbon equivalent mass concentration, c) a 3-wavelength nephelometer to measure total and backward light scattering, d) four high volume samplers for aerosol chemical characterization, and e) a sequential aerosol sampler and a 4-stage impactor to collect particles on different substrates for microscopy analysis. The origin and transport pathways of the air masses sampled at the site are determined using FLEXible PARTicle (FLEXPART) dispersion modeling retroplume analysis. Single particle morphology and mixing states were determined using electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy. This study provides an overview of different types of aerosol collected at Pico Mountain Observatory. We investigated morphology and mixing of various types of particles, including dust, soot, salt and organic particles transported to the Observatory. Soot particles were often mixed/coated with other material and exhibited very compact shape. Dust particles were often mixed with sulfur containing species. We also observed dust particles that were mixed with coated soot particles. During some events, we observed soot and sulfate aerosol trapped within organic matter. The results of this study have implications on how aerosol particles and their internal mixing can be represented in numerical models for remote regions of the free troposphere.

  12. RNA interference and single particle tracking analysis of hepatitis C virus endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coller, Kelly E; Berger, Kristi L; Heaton, Nicholas S; Cooper, Jacob D; Yoon, Rosa; Randall, Glenn

    2009-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters hepatocytes following a complex set of receptor interactions, culminating in internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. However, aside from receptors, little is known about the cellular molecular requirements for infectious HCV entry. Therefore, we analyzed a siRNA library that targets 140 cellular membrane trafficking genes to identify host genes required for infectious HCV production and HCV pseudoparticle entry. This approach identified 16 host cofactors of HCV entry that function primarily in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, including components of the clathrin endocytosis machinery, actin polymerization, receptor internalization and sorting, and endosomal acidification. We next developed single particle tracking analysis of highly infectious fluorescent HCV particles to examine the co-trafficking of HCV virions with cellular cofactors of endocytosis. We observe multiple, sequential interactions of HCV virions with the actin cytoskeleton, including retraction along filopodia, actin nucleation during internalization, and migration of internalized particles along actin stress fibers. HCV co-localizes with clathrin and the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl prior to internalization. Entering HCV particles are associated with the receptor molecules CD81 and the tight junction protein, claudin-1; however, HCV-claudin-1 interactions were not restricted to Huh-7.5 cell-cell junctions. Surprisingly, HCV internalization generally occurred outside of Huh-7.5 cell-cell junctions, which may reflect the poorly polarized nature of current HCV cell culture models. Following internalization, HCV particles transport with GFP-Rab5a positive endosomes, which is consistent with trafficking to the early endosome. This study presents technical advances for imaging HCV entry, in addition to identifying new host cofactors of HCV infection, some of which may be antiviral targets.

  13. RNA interference and single particle tracking analysis of hepatitis C virus endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly E Coller

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters hepatocytes following a complex set of receptor interactions, culminating in internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. However, aside from receptors, little is known about the cellular molecular requirements for infectious HCV entry. Therefore, we analyzed a siRNA library that targets 140 cellular membrane trafficking genes to identify host genes required for infectious HCV production and HCV pseudoparticle entry. This approach identified 16 host cofactors of HCV entry that function primarily in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, including components of the clathrin endocytosis machinery, actin polymerization, receptor internalization and sorting, and endosomal acidification. We next developed single particle tracking analysis of highly infectious fluorescent HCV particles to examine the co-trafficking of HCV virions with cellular cofactors of endocytosis. We observe multiple, sequential interactions of HCV virions with the actin cytoskeleton, including retraction along filopodia, actin nucleation during internalization, and migration of internalized particles along actin stress fibers. HCV co-localizes with clathrin and the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl prior to internalization. Entering HCV particles are associated with the receptor molecules CD81 and the tight junction protein, claudin-1; however, HCV-claudin-1 interactions were not restricted to Huh-7.5 cell-cell junctions. Surprisingly, HCV internalization generally occurred outside of Huh-7.5 cell-cell junctions, which may reflect the poorly polarized nature of current HCV cell culture models. Following internalization, HCV particles transport with GFP-Rab5a positive endosomes, which is consistent with trafficking to the early endosome. This study presents technical advances for imaging HCV entry, in addition to identifying new host cofactors of HCV infection, some of which may be antiviral targets.

  14. Detecting nanoparticulate silver using single-particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrano, Denise M; Lesher, Emily K; Bednar, Anthony; Monserud, Jon; Higgins, Christopher P; Ranville, James F

    2012-01-01

    The environmental prevalence of engineered nanomaterials, particularly nanoparticulate silver (AgNP), is expected to increase substantially. The ubiquitous use of commercial products containing AgNP may result in their release to the environment, and the potential for ecological effects is unknown. Detecting engineered nanomaterials is one of the greatest challenges in quantifying their risks. Thus, it is imperative to develop techniques capable of measuring and characterizing exposures, while dealing with the innate difficulties of nanomaterial detection in environmental samples, such as low-engineered nanomaterial concentrations, aggregation, and complex matrices. Here the authors demonstrate the use of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, operated in a single-particle counting mode (SP-ICP-MS), to detect and quantify AgNP. In the present study, two AgNP products were measured by SP-ICP-MS, including one of precisely manufactured size and shape, as well as a commercial AgNP-containing health food product. Serial dilutions, filtration, and acidification were applied to confirm that the method detected particles. Differentiation of dissolved and particulate silver (Ag) is a feature of the technique. Analysis of two wastewater samples demonstrated the applicability of SP-ICP-MS at nanograms per liter Ag concentrations. In this pilot study, AgNP was found at 100 to 200 ng/L in the presence of 50 to 500 ng/L dissolved Ag. The method provides the analytical capability to monitor Ag and other metal and metal oxide nanoparticles in fate, transport, stability, and toxicity studies using a commonly available laboratory instrument. Rapid throughput and element specificity are additional benefits of SP-ICP-MS as a measurement tool for metal and metal oxide engineered nanoparticles. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  15. Probing Black Carbon-containing Particle Microphysics with the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, A. J.; Lewis, E. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Lambe, A. T.; Davidovits, P.; Kleinman, L. I.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of the structure and mixing state of black-carbon containing particles is important for calculating their radiative forcing and provides insight into their source and life cycle. Recently analysis of black carbon-containing particles has demonstrated that for a fraction of such particles, the black carbon may reside on or near the surface of the particle as opposed to the traditional core-shell configuration typically assumed in which the black carbon core is surrounded by a shell of non-refractory material. During the DOE-sponsored Aerosol Lifecycle field campaign held in summer, 2011 at Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, NY, episodes were encountered in which a high fraction of particles containing black carbon had such configurations, and these episodes corresponded to air masses that contained biomass burning plumes (Sedlacek et al., 2012). Subsequent analysis found other episodes in field campaigns in Colorado and California in which high fractions this configuration corresponded to biomass burning plumes. In an effort to evaluate this interpretation and explore formation mechanisms, a series of laboratory-based experiments examining the coagulation of regal black (surrogate for collapsed soot) with model non-refractory coatings [dioctyl sebacate (surrogate for organic aerosols with liquid-like character) and deliquesced ammonium sulfate (solid)] were carried out. The results of these experiments and their potential implications on black carbon radiative forcing will be discussed. Sedlacek, III, Arthur, E. R. Lewis, L. I. Kleinman, J. Xu and Q. Zhang (2012), Determination of and Evidence for Non-core-shell structure of particles containing black carbon using the single particle soot photometer (SP2). Geophys. Res. Lett., 39 L06802, doi:10.1029/2012GL050905

  16. TrackMate: An open and extensible platform for single-particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Perry, Nick; Schindelin, Johannes; Hoopes, Genevieve M; Reynolds, Gregory D; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Bednarek, Sebastian Y; Shorte, Spencer L; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2017-02-15

    We present TrackMate, an open source Fiji plugin for the automated, semi-automated, and manual tracking of single-particles. It offers a versatile and modular solution that works out of the box for end users, through a simple and intuitive user interface. It is also easily scriptable and adaptable, operating equally well on 1D over time, 2D over time, 3D over time, or other single and multi-channel image variants. TrackMate provides several visualization and analysis tools that aid in assessing the relevance of results. The utility of TrackMate is further enhanced through its ability to be readily customized to meet specific tracking problems. TrackMate is an extensible platform where developers can easily write their own detection, particle linking, visualization or analysis algorithms within the TrackMate environment. This evolving framework provides researchers with the opportunity to quickly develop and optimize new algorithms based on existing TrackMate modules without the need of having to write de novo user interfaces, including visualization, analysis and exporting tools. The current capabilities of TrackMate are presented in the context of three different biological problems. First, we perform Caenorhabditis-elegans lineage analysis to assess how light-induced damage during imaging impairs its early development. Our TrackMate-based lineage analysis indicates the lack of a cell-specific light-sensitive mechanism. Second, we investigate the recruitment of NEMO (NF-κB essential modulator) clusters in fibroblasts after stimulation by the cytokine IL-1 and show that photodamage can generate artifacts in the shape of TrackMate characterized movements that confuse motility analysis. Finally, we validate the use of TrackMate for quantitative lifetime analysis of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in plant cells.

  17. Understanding particle size and distance driven competition of interparticle interactions and effective single-particle anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacakova, B.; Mantlikova, A.; Niznansky, D.; Kubickova, S.; Vejpravova, J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic response of single-domain nanoparticles (NPs) in concentrated systems is strongly affected by mutual interparticle interactions. However, particle proximity significantly influences single-particle effective anisotropy. To solve which of these two phenomena plays a dominant role in the magnetic response of real NP systems, systematic study on samples with well-defined parameters is required. In our work, we prepared a series of nanocomposites constituted of highly-crystalline and well-isolated CoFe2O4 NPs embedded in an amorphous SiO2 matrix using a single-molecule precursor method. This preparation method enabled us to reach a wide interval of particle size and concentration. We observed that the characteristic parameters of the single-domain state (coercivity, blocking temperature) and dipole-dipole interaction energy ({{E}\\text{d-\\text{d}}} ) scaled with each other and increased with increasing {{≤ft({{d}\\text{XRD}}/r\\right)}3} , where d XRD was the NP diameter and r was the interparticle distance. Our results are in excellent agreement with Monte-Carlo simulations of the particle growth. Moreover, we demonstrated that the contribution of {{E}\\text{d-\\text{d}}} acting as an additional energetic barrier to the superspin reversal or as an average static field did not sufficiently explain how the concentrated NP systems responded to an external magnetic field. Alternations in the blocking temperature and coercivity of our NP systems accounted for reformed relaxations of the NP superspins and modified effective anisotropy energy of the interacting NPs. Therefore, the concept of modified NP effective anisotropy explains the magnetic response of our concentrated NP systems better than the concept of the energy barrier influenced by interparticle interactions.

  18. FIREX-Related Biomass Burning Research Using ARM Single-Particle Soot Photometer Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onasch, Timothy B [Aerodyne Research, Inc.; Sedlacek, Arthur J [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-03-15

    The scientific focus of this study was to investigate and quantify the mass loadings, chemical compositions, and optical properties of biomass burning particulate emissions generated in the laboratory from Western U.S. fuels using a similar instrument suite to the one deployed on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Gulfstream-1 (G-1) aircraft during the 2013 Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field study (Kleinman and Sedlacek, 2013). We deployed the single-particle soot photometer (SP2) to make measurements of biomass burning refractory black carbon (rBC) mass loadings and size distributions to correlate with non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM; i.e., HR-AMS) and rBC (SP-AMS) measurements as a function of photo-oxidation processes in an environmental chamber. With these measurements, we will address the following scientific questions: 1. What are the emission indices (g/kg fuel) of rBC from various wildland fuels from the Pacific Northwest (i.e., relevant to BBOP analysis) as a function of combustion conditions and simulated atmospheric processing in an environmental chamber? 2. What are the optical properties (e.g., mass-specific absorption cross-section [MAC], single-scattering albedo [SSA], and absorption Angstrom exponent [AAE)] of rBC emitted from various wildland fuels and how are they impacted by atmospheric processing? 3. How does the mixing state of rBC in biomass-burning plumes relate to the optical properties? 4. How does the emitted rBC affect radiative forcing?

  19. Lagrangian theoretical framework of dynamics of nonholonomic systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ By the generalized variational principle of two kinds of variables in general mechanics, it was demonstrated that two Lagrangian classical relationships can be applied to both holonomic systems and nonholonomic systems. And the restriction that two Lagrangian classical relationships cannot be applied to nonholonomic systems for a long time was overcome. Then, one important formula of similar Lagrangian classical relationship called the popularized Lagrangian classical relationship was derived. From Vakonomic model, by two Lagrangian classical relationships and the popularized Lagrangian classical relationship, the result is the same with Chetaev's model, and thus Chetaev's model and Vakonomic model were unified. Simultaneously, the Lagrangian theoretical framework of dynamics of nonholonomic system was established. By some representative examples, it was validated that the Lagrangian theoretical framework of dynamics of nonholonomic systems is right.

  20. Lagrangian theoretical framework of dynamics of nonholonomic systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG; LiFu

    2007-01-01

    By the generalized variational principle of two kinds of variables in general mechanics, it was demonstrated that two Lagrangian classical relationships can be applied to both holonomic systems and nonholonomic systems. And the restriction that two Lagrangian classical relationships cannot be applied to nonholonomic systems for a long time was overcome. Then, one important formula of similar Lagrangian classical relationship called the popularized Lagrangian classical relationship was derived. From Vakonomic model, by two Lagrangian classical relationships and the popularized Lagrangian classical relationship, the result is the same with Chetaev's model, and thus Chetaev's model and Vakonomic model were unified. Simultaneously, the Lagrangian theoretical framework of dynamics of nonholonomic system was established. By some representative examples, it was validated that the Lagrangian theoretical framework of dynamics of nonholonomic systems is right.  ……

  1. On Stability of the Mechanical Lagrangian Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valer Niminet

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available

    We consider MLS (mechanical Lagrangian systems with
    external forces. We give some conditions of stability and dissipativity and show that the energy of the system decreases on the integral curves.


    Key words: LMS, stability, dissipative system.

  2. Lagrangian tetragons and instabilities in Hamiltonian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entov, Michael; Polterovich, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    We present a new existence mechanism, based on symplectic topology, for orbits of Hamiltonian flows connecting a pair of disjoint subsets in the phase space. The method involves function theory on symplectic manifolds combined with rigidity of Lagrangian submanifolds. Applications include superconductivity channels in nearly integrable systems and dynamics near a perturbed unstable equilibrium.

  3. Experimental design for drifting buoy Lagrangian test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, P. M.

    1975-01-01

    A test of instrumentation fabricated to measure the performance of a free drifting buoy as a (Lagrangian) current meter is described. Specifically it is proposed to distinguish between the trajectory of a drogued buoy and the trajectory of the water at the level of the drogue by measuring the flow relative to the drogue.

  4. Towards effective Lagrangians for adelic strings

    CERN Document Server

    Dragovich, Branko

    2009-01-01

    p-Adic strings are important objects of string theory, as well as of p-adic mathematical physics and nonlocal cosmology. By a concept of adelic string one can unify and simultaneously study various aspects of ordinary and p-adic strings. By this way, one can consider adelic strings as a very useful instrument in the further investigation of modern string theory. It is remarkable that for some scalar p-adic strings exist effective Lagrangians, which are based on real instead of p-adic numbers and describe not only four-point scattering amplitudes but also all higher ones at the tree level. In this work, starting from p-adic Lagrangians, we consider some approaches to construction of effective field Lagrangians for p-adic sector of adelic strings. It yields Lagrangians for nonlinear and nonlocal scalar field theory, where spacetime nonlocality is determined by an infinite number of derivatives contained in the operator-valued Riemann zeta function. Owing to the Riemann zeta function in the dynamics of these sca...

  5. A new semi-Lagrangian difference scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季仲贞; 陈嘉滨

    2001-01-01

    A new completely energy-conserving semi-Lagrangian scheme is constructed. The numerical solution of shallow water equation shows that this conservative scheme preserves the total energy in twelve significant digits, while the traditional scheme does only in five significant digits.

  6. Lagrangian duality and cone convexlike functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.G. Frenk (Hans); G. Kassay

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we will show that the closely K-convexlike vector-valued functions with K Rm a nonempty convex cone and related classes of vector-valued functions discussed in the literature arise naturally within the theory of biconjugate functions applied to the Lagrangian perturbation s

  7. Lagrangian duality and cone convexlike functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.G. Frenk (Hans); G. Kassay

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we will show that the closely K-convexlike vector-valued functions with K Rm a nonempty convex cone and related classes of vector-valued functions discussed in the literature arise naturally within the theory of biconjugate functions applied to the Lagrangian perturbation

  8. Target Lagrangian kinematic simulation for particle-laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S.; Lightstone, M. F.; Tullis, S.

    2016-09-01

    The target Lagrangian kinematic simulation method was motivated as a stochastic Lagrangian particle model that better synthesizes turbulence structure, relative to stochastic separated flow models. By this method, the trajectories of particles are constructed according to synthetic turbulent-like fields, which conform to a target Lagrangian integral timescale. In addition to recovering the expected Lagrangian properties of fluid tracers, this method is shown to reproduce the crossing trajectories and continuity effects, in agreement with an experimental benchmark.

  9. Classification of Lagrangian Fibrations over a Klein Bottle

    CERN Document Server

    Sepe, D

    2009-01-01

    This paper completes the classification of regular Lagrangian fibratiopns over compact surfaces. \\cite{misha} classifies regular Lagrangian fibrations over $\\mathbb{T}^2$. The main theorem in \\cite{hirsch} is used in order to classify integral affine structures on the Klein bottle $K^2$ and, hence, regular Lagrangian fibrations over this space.

  10. Lagrangian multiplier and massive Yang-Mills fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z.P.

    1982-09-01

    If we give appropriate constraint to the gauge invariant Lagrangian, the variation principle of the action convert to the variational problems with subsidiary condition. The effective Lagrangian which contains Lagrangian multiplier may have the mass term of the mesons. In that case we obtain naturally the massive Yang-Mills fields which was discussed by Nakanishi.

  11. Lagrangian statistics in turbulent channel flow: implications for Lagrangian stochastic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzenmuller, Nickolas; Polanco, Juan Igancio; Vinkovic, Ivana; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Lagrangian acceleration and velocity correlations in statistically one-dimesional turbulence are presented in the context of the development of Lagrangian stochastic models of inhomogeneous turbulent flows. These correlations are measured experimentally by 3D PTV in a high aspect ratio water channel at Reτ = 1450 , and numerically from DNS performed at the same Reynolds number. Lagrangian timescales, key components of Lagrangian stochastic models, are extracted from acceleration and velocity autocorrelations. The evolution of these timescales as a function of distance to the wall is presented, and compared to similar quantities measured in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. A strong dependance of all Lagrangian timescales on wall distance is present across the width of the channel. Significant cross-correlations are observed between the streamwise and wall-normal components of both acceleration and velocity. Lagrangian stochastic models of this flow must therefore retain dependance on the wall-normal coordinate and the components of acceleration and velocity, resulting in significantly more complex models than those used for homogeneous isotropic turbulence. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the Agence Nationale de la Recherche, LabEx Tec 21, and CONICYT Becas Chile.

  12. Probing correlated quantum many-body systems at the single-particle level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endres, Manuel

    2013-02-27

    The detection of correlation and response functions plays a crucial role in the experimental characterization of quantum many-body systems. In this thesis, we present novel techniques for the measurement of such functions at the single-particle level. Specifically, we show the single-atom- and single-site-resolved detection of an ultracold quantum gas in an optical lattice. The quantum gas is described by the Bose-Hubbard model, which features a zero temperature phase transition from a superfluid to a Mott-insulating state, a paradigm example of a quantum phase transition. We used the aforementioned detection techniques to study correlation and response properties across the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition. The single-atom sensitivity of our method is achieved by fluorescence detection of individual atoms with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A high-resolution objective collects the fluorescence light and yields in situ 'snapshots' of the quantum gas that allow for a single-site-resolved reconstruction of the atomic distribution. This allowed us to measure two-site and non-local correlation-functions across the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition. Non-local correlation functions are based on the information of an extended region of the system and play an important role for the characterization of low-dimensional quantum phases. While non-local correlation functions were so far only theoretical tools, our results show that they are actually experimentally accessible. Furthermore, we used a new thermometry scheme, based on the counting of individual thermal excitations, to measure the response of the system to lattice modulation. Using this method, we studied the excitation spectrum of the system across the two-dimensional superfluid-Mott-insulator transition. In particular, we detected a 'Higgs' amplitude mode in the strongly-interacting superfluid close to the transition point where the system is described by an effectively Lorentz

  13. Separation Between d$_{5/2}$ and s$_{1/2}$ Neutron Single Particle Strength in $^{15}$N

    CERN Document Server

    Mertin, C E; Crisp, A M; Keeley, N; Kemper, K W; Momotyuk, O; Roeder, B T; Volya, A

    2014-01-01

    The separation between single particle levels in nuclei plays the dominant role in determining the location of the neutron drip line. The separation also provides a test of current crossed shell model interactions if the experimental data is such that multiple shells are involved. The present work uses the $^{14}$N(d, p)$^{15}$N reaction to extract the 2s$_{1/2}$, and 1d$_{5/2}$ total neutron single particle strengths and then compares these results with a shell model calculation using a p-sd crossed shell interaction to identify the J$^\\pi$ of all levels in $^{15}$N up to 12.8 MeV in excitation.

  14. Classification of Flat Lagrangian Surfaces in Complex Lorentzian Plane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bang-Yen CHEN; Johan FASTENAKELS

    2007-01-01

    One of the most fundamental problems in the study of Lagrangian submanifolds fromRiemannian geometric point of view is to classify Lagrangian immersions of real space forms intocomplex space forms. The main purpose of this paper is thus to classify flat Lagrangian surfaces inthe Lorentzian complex plane C12. Our main result states that there are thirty-eight families of flatLagrangian surfaces in C12. Conversely, every flat Lagrangian surface in C12 is locally congruent to oneof the thirty-eight families.

  15. Mass spectra features of biomass burning boiler and coal burning boiler emitted particles by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiao; Li, Mei; Shi, Guoliang; Wang, Haiting; Ma, Xian; Wu, Jianhui; Shi, Xurong; Feng, Yinchang

    2017-11-15

    In this study, single particle mass spectra signatures of both coal burning boiler and biomass burning boiler emitted particles were studied. Particle samples were suspended in clean Resuspension Chamber, and analyzed by ELPI and SPAMS simultaneously. The size distribution of BBB (biomass burning boiler sample) and CBB (coal burning boiler sample) are different, as BBB peaks at smaller size, and CBB peaks at larger size. Mass spectra signatures of two samples were studied by analyzing the average mass spectrum of each particle cluster extracted by ART-2a in different size ranges. In conclusion, BBB sample mostly consists of OC and EC containing particles, and a small fraction of K-rich particles in the size range of 0.2-0.5μm. In 0.5-1.0μm, BBB sample consists of EC, OC, K-rich and Al_Silicate containing particles; CBB sample consists of EC, ECOC containing particles, while Al_Silicate (including Al_Ca_Ti_Silicate, Al_Ti_Silicate, Al_Silicate) containing particles got higher fractions as size increase. The similarity of single particle mass spectrum signatures between two samples were studied by analyzing the dot product, results indicated that part of the single particle mass spectra of two samples in the same size range are similar, which bring challenge to the future source apportionment activity by using single particle aerosol mass spectrometer. Results of this study will provide physicochemical information of important sources which contribute to particle pollution, and will support source apportionment activities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Convergence of lateral dynamic measurements in the plasma membrane of live cells from single particle tracking and STED-FCS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Andrade, Débora M.; Clausen, Mathias P.

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with the super-resolution imaging method STED (STED-FCS), and single-particle tracking (SPT) are able to directly probe the lateral dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells at spatial scales much below the diff...... embryo fibroblasts results in an unhindered, intra-compartment, diffusion coefficient of ≈0.7-1.0 μm2 s-1, and a compartment size of about 100-150 nm....

  17. Inclusive single-particle production in two-photon collisions at LEP II with the DELPHI detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, U; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, P; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Buschbeck, B; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Munich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, F; Nawrocki, K; Némécek, S; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevski, A; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Radojicic, D; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Sekulin, R; Siebel, M; Sisakian, A; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W; Verdier, P; Vertogradova, Yu L; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2009-01-01

    A study of the inclusive charged hadron production in two-photon collisions is described. The data were collected with the DELPHI detector at LEP II. Results on the inclusive single-particle p_T distribution and the differential charged hadrons dsigma/dp_T cross-section are presented and compared to the predictions of perturbative NLO QCD calculations and to published results.

  18. Inclusive single-particle production in two-photon collisions at LEP II with the DELPHI detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallah, J. [LPNHE, IN2P3-CNRS, Univ. Paris VI et VII, Tour 33 (RdC), 4 place Jussieu, FR-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Abreu, P. [LIP, IST, FCUL - Av. Elias Garcia, 14-1o, PT-1000 Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Adam, W. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik, Osterr. Akad. d. Wissensch., Nikolsdorfergasse 18, AT-1050 Vienna (Austria); Adzic, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, P.O. Box 60228, GR-15310 Athens (Greece); Albrecht, T. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe, Postfach 6980, DE-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Alemany-Fernandez, R. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Allmendinger, T. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe, Postfach 6980, DE-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Allport, P.P. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Amaldi, U. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Univ. di Milano-Bicocca and INFN-MILANO, Piazza della Scienza 3, IT-20126 Milan (Italy); Amapane, N. [Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Universita di Torino and INFN, Via P. Giuria 1, IT-10125 Turin (Italy); Amato, S. [Univ. Federal do Rio de Janeiro, C.P. 68528 Cidade Univ., Ilha do Fundao BR-21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Anashkin, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova and INFN, Via Marzolo 8, IT-35131 Padua (Italy); Andreazza, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano and INFN-MILANO, Via Celoria 16, IT-20133 Milan (Italy); Andringa, S.; Anjos, N. [LIP, IST, FCUL - Av. Elias Garcia, 14-1o, PT-1000 Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Antilogus, P. [LPNHE, IN2P3-CNRS, Univ. Paris VI et VII, Tour 33 (RdC), 4 place Jussieu, FR-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Apel, W-D. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe, Postfach 6980, DE-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Arnoud, Y. [Institut des Sciences Nucleaires, IN2P3-CNRS, Universite de Grenoble 1, FR-38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Ask, S. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)] (and others)

    2009-08-03

    A study of the inclusive charged hadron production in two-photon collisions is described. The data were collected with the DELPHI detector at LEP II. Results on the inclusive single-particle p{sub T} distribution and the differential charged hadrons d{sigma}/dp{sub T} cross-section are presented and compared to the predictions of perturbative NLO QCD calculations and to published results.

  19. Mean Square Displacement Analysis of Single-Particle Trajectories with Localization Error: Brownian Motion in Isotropic Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Michalet, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    We examine the capability of mean square displacement analysis to extract reliable values of the diffusion coefficient D of single particle undergoing Brownian motion in an isotropic medium in the presence of localization uncertainty. The theoretical results, supported by simulations, show that a simple unweighted least square fit of the MSD curve can provide the best estimate of D provided an optimal number of MSD points is used for the fit. We discuss the practical implications of these res...

  20. Determining transport efficiency for the purpose of counting and sizing nanoparticles via single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Pace, Heather E.; Rogers, Nicola J.; Jarolimek, Chad; Coleman, Victoria A.; Higgins, Christopher P.; Ranville, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Currently there are few ideal methods for the characterization of nanoparticles in complex, environmental samples, leading to significant gaps in toxicity and exposure assessments of nanomaterials. Single particle-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) is an emerging technique that can both size and count metal-containing nanoparticles. A major benefit of the spICP-MS method is its ability to characterize nanoparticles at concentrations relevant to the environment. This paper...

  1. Real-time multi-parameter spectroscopy and localization in three-dimensional single-particle tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Hellriegel, C; Gratton, E

    2009-01-01

    Tracking of single particles in optical microscopy has been employed in studies ranging from material sciences to biophysics down to the level of single molecules. The technique intrinsically circumvents ensemble averaging and may therefore reveal directly mechanistic details of the involved dynamic processes. Such processes range from translational and rotational motion to spectral dynamics. We distinguish between conventional a posteriori tracking of objects (e.g. from the sequences of imag...

  2. Problems in obtaining perfect images by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy of biological structures in amorphous ice

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Richard; McMullan, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical considerations together with simulations of single-particle electron cryomicroscopy images of biological assemblies in ice demonstrate that atomic structures should be obtainable from images of a few thousand asymmetric units, provided the molecular weight of the whole assembly being studied is greater than the minimum needed for accurate position and orientation determination. However, with present methods of specimen preparation and current microscope and detector...

  3. Facilitating model reconstruction for single-particle scattering using small-angle X-ray scattering methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shufen; Liu, Haiguang

    2016-04-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers generate intense femtosecond X-ray pulses, so that high-resolution structure determination becomes feasible from noncrystalline samples, such as single particles or single molecules. At the moment, the orientation of sample particles cannot be precisely controlled, and consequently the unknown orientation needs to be recovered using computational algorithms. This delays the model reconstruction until all the scattering patterns have been re-oriented, which often entails a long elapse of time and until the completion of the experiment. The scattering patterns from single particles or multiple particles can be summed to form a virtual powder diffraction pattern, and the low-resolution region, corresponding to the small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) regime, can be analysed using existing SAXS methods. This work presents a pipeline that converts single-particle data sets into SAXS data, from which real-time model reconstruction is achieved using the model retrieval approach implemented in the software package SASTBX [Liu, Hexemer & Zwart (2012). J. Appl. Cryst.45, 587-593]. To illustrate the applications, two case studies are presented with real experimental data sets collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

  4. A local-optimization refinement algorithm in single particle analysis for macromolecular complex with multiple rigid modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Hong; Wang, Zihao; Zhang, Fa; Xiong, Yong; Yin, Chang-Cheng; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Single particle analysis, which can be regarded as an average of signals from thousands or even millions of particle projections, is an efficient method to study the three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules. An intrinsic assumption in single particle analysis is that all the analyzed particles must have identical composition and conformation. Thus specimen heterogeneity in either composition or conformation has raised great challenges for high-resolution analysis. For particles with multiple conformations, inaccurate alignments and orientation parameters will yield an averaged map with diminished resolution and smeared density. Besides extensive classification approaches, here based on the assumption that the macromolecular complex is made up of multiple rigid modules whose relative orientations and positions are in slight fluctuation around equilibriums, we propose a new method called as local optimization refinement to address this conformational heterogeneity for an improved resolution. The key idea is to optimize the orientation and shift parameters of each rigid module and then reconstruct their three-dimensional structures individually. Using simulated data of 80S/70S ribosomes with relative fluctuations between the large (60S/50S) and the small (40S/30S) subunits, we tested this algorithm and found that the resolutions of both subunits are significantly improved. Our method provides a proof-of-principle solution for high-resolution single particle analysis of macromolecular complexes with dynamic conformations.

  5. Synchronous Lagrangian variational principles in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Cremaschini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The problem of formulating synchronous variational principles in the context of General Relativity is discussed. Based on the analogy with classical relativistic particle dynamics, the existence of variational principles is pointed out in relativistic classical field theory which are either asynchronous or synchronous. The historical Einstein-Hilbert and Palatini variational formulations are found to belong to the first category. Nevertheless, it is shown that an alternative route exists which permits one to cast these principles in terms of equivalent synchronous Lagrangian variational formulations. The advantage is twofold. First, synchronous approaches allow one to overcome the lack of gauge symmetry of the asynchronous principles. Second, the property of manifest covariance of the theory is also restored at all levels, including the symbolic Euler-Lagrange equations, with the variational Lagrangian density being now identified with a $4-$scalar. As an application, a joint synchronous variational principle...

  6. A Lagrangian particle level set method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieber, Simone E.; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2005-11-01

    We present a novel particle level set method for capturing interfaces. The level set equation is solved in a Lagrangian frame using particles that carry the level set information. A key aspect of the method involves a consistent remeshing procedure for the regularization of the particle locations when the particle map gets distorted by the advection field. The Lagrangian description of the level set method is inherently adaptive and exact in the case of solid body motions. The efficiency and accuracy of the method is demonstrated in several benchmark problems in two and three dimensions involving pure advection and curvature induced motion of the interface. The simplicity of the particle description is shown to be well suited for real time simulations of surfaces involving cutting and reconnection as in virtual surgery environments.

  7. Multiloop Information from the QED Effective Lagrangian

    CERN Document Server

    Dunne, G V; Dunne, Gerald V.; Schubert, Christian

    2006-01-01

    We obtain information on the QED photon amplitudes at high orders in perturbation theory starting from known results on the QED effective Lagrangian in a constant electric field. A closed-form all-order result for the weak field limit of the imaginary part of this Lagrangian has been given years ago by Affleck, Alvarez and Manton (for scalar QED) and by Lebedev and Ritus (for spinor QED). We discuss the evidence for its correctness, and conjecture an analogous formula for the case of a self-dual field. From this extension we then obtain, using Borel analysis, the leading asymptotic growth for large N of the maximally helicity violating component of the L - loop N - photon amplitude in the low energy limit. The result leads us to conjecture that the perturbation series converges for the on-shell renormalized QED N - photon amplitudes in the quenched approximation.

  8. Lagrangian Vortices in Developing Tropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-25

    cyclones B. Rutherford,a* T. J. Dunkertona and M. T. Montgomeryb aNorthwest Research Associates, Redmond, WA, USA bNaval Postgraduate School, Monterey...article has been contributed to by a US Government employee and his work is in the public domain in the USA. Tracking pre-genesis tropical cyclones is...season. All of the Lagrangian coherent structures that can be identified by this field are shown for developing disturbances and mature cyclones . The

  9. Equivalent Lagrangians: Generalization, Transformation Maps, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Equivalent Lagrangians are used to find, via transformations, solutions and conservation laws of a given differential equation by exploiting the possible existence of an isomorphic algebra of Lie point symmetries and, more particularly, an isomorphic Noether point symmetry algebra. Applications include ordinary differential equations such as the Kummer equation and the combined gravity-inertial-Rossbywave equation and certain classes of partial differential equations related to multidimensional wave equations.

  10. Ocean Model Assessment with Lagrangian Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Ocean Model Assessment With Lagrangian Metrics” Pearn P. Niiler Scripps Institution of Oceanography 9500 Gilman Drive MC 0213 La Jolla, CA...project are to aid in the development of accurate modeling of upper ocean circulation by using data on circulation observations to test models . These tests...or metrics, will be statistical measures of model and data comparisons. It is believed that having accurate models of upper ocean currents will

  11. Introduction to Focus Issue: Lagrangian Coherent Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Thomas; Dabiri, John

    2010-03-01

    The topic of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) has been a rapidly growing area of research in nonlinear dynamics for almost a decade. It provides a means to rigorously define and detect transport barriers in dynamical systems with arbitrary time dependence and has a wealth of applications, particularly to fluid flow problems. Here, we give a short introduction to the topic of LCS and review the new work presented in this Focus Issue.

  12. Lagrangian Observations and Modeling of Marine Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Claire B.; Irisson, Jean-Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Just within the past two decades, studies on the early-life history stages of marine organisms have led to new paradigms in population dynamics. Unlike passive plant seeds that are transported by the wind or by animals, marine larvae have motor and sensory capabilities. As a result, marine larvae have a tremendous capacity to actively influence their dispersal. This is continuously revealed as we develop new techniques to observe larvae in their natural environment and begin to understand their ability to detect cues throughout ontogeny, process the information, and use it to ride ocean currents and navigate their way back home, or to a place like home. We present innovative in situ and numerical modeling approaches developed to understand the underlying mechanisms of larval transport in the ocean. We describe a novel concept of a Lagrangian platform, the Drifting In Situ Chamber (DISC), designed to observe and quantify complex larval behaviors and their interactions with the pelagic environment. We give a brief history of larval ecology research with the DISC, showing that swimming is directional in most species, guided by cues as diverse as the position of the sun or the underwater soundscape, and even that (unlike humans!) larvae orient better and swim faster when moving as a group. The observed Lagrangian behavior of individual larvae are directly implemented in the Connectivity Modeling System (CMS), an open source Lagrangian tracking application. Simulations help demonstrate the impact that larval behavior has compared to passive Lagrangian trajectories. These methodologies are already the base of exciting findings and are promising tools for documenting and simulating the behavior of other small pelagic organisms, forecasting their migration in a changing ocean.

  13. Lagrangian methods of cosmic web classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, J. D.; Faltenbacher, A.; Johnson, M. S. T.

    2016-05-01

    The cosmic web defines the large-scale distribution of matter we see in the Universe today. Classifying the cosmic web into voids, sheets, filaments and nodes allows one to explore structure formation and the role environmental factors have on halo and galaxy properties. While existing studies of cosmic web classification concentrate on grid-based methods, this work explores a Lagrangian approach where the V-web algorithm proposed by Hoffman et al. is implemented with techniques borrowed from smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The Lagrangian approach allows one to classify individual objects (e.g. particles or haloes) based on properties of their nearest neighbours in an adaptive manner. It can be applied directly to a halo sample which dramatically reduces computational cost and potentially allows an application of this classification scheme to observed galaxy samples. Finally, the Lagrangian nature admits a straightforward inclusion of the Hubble flow negating the necessity of a visually defined threshold value which is commonly employed by grid-based classification methods.

  14. Inverse Variational Problem for Nonstandard Lagrangians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, A.; Talukdar, B.

    2014-06-01

    In the mathematical physics literature the nonstandard Lagrangians (NSLs) were introduced in an ad hoc fashion rather than being derived from the solution of the inverse problem of variational calculus. We begin with the first integral of the equation of motion and solve the associated inverse problem to obtain some of the existing results for NSLs. In addition, we provide a number of alternative Lagrangian representations. The case studies envisaged by us include (i) the usual modified Emden-type equation, (ii) Emden-type equation with dissipative term quadratic in velocity, (iii) Lotka-Volterra model and (vi) a number of the generic equations for dissipative-like dynamical systems. Our method works for nonstandard Lagrangians corresponding to the usual action integral of mechanical systems but requires modification for those associated with the modified actions like S =∫abe L(x ,x˙ , t) dt and S =∫abL 1 - γ(x ,x˙ , t) dt because in the latter case one cannot construct expressions for the Jacobi integrals.

  15. Lagrangian approach and dissipative magnetic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.bose@physik.uni-halle.de [Martin-Luther-University, Physics Department, Von-Seckendorff-Platz 1, 06114 Halle (Germany); Trimper, Steffen, E-mail: steffen.trimper@physik.uni-halle.de [Martin-Luther-University, Physics Department, Von-Seckendorff-Platz 1, 06114 Halle (Germany)

    2011-06-13

    A Lagrangian is introduced which includes the coupling between magnetic moments m and the degrees of freedom σ of a reservoir. In case the system-reservoir coupling breaks the time reversal symmetry the magnetic moments perform a damped precession around an effective field which is self-organized by the mutual interaction of the moments. The resulting evolution equation has the form of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. In case the bath variables are constant vector fields the moments m fulfill the reversible Landau-Lifshitz equation. Applying Noether's theorem we find conserved quantities under rotation in space and within the configuration space of the moments. -- Highlights: → We propose a new approach for describing magnetic systems with dissipation on a mesoscopic scale. → The Lagrangian consists of an active magnetic system and a bath. → The coupling between both subsystems breaks the time reversal symmetry. → The suggested Lagrangian leads to the Landau-Lifshitz equation with damping. → We consider symmetry operations by means of Noether's theorem.

  16. Applications the Lagrangian description in aperiodic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Carolina; Mancho, Ana Maria

    2012-11-01

    We use several recently developed Lagrangian tools for describing transport in general aperiodic flows. In our approach the first step is based in a Lagrangian descriptor (the so called function M). It measures the length of particle trajectories on the ocean surface over a given interval of time. We describe its output over satellite altimetry data on the Kuroshio current. The technique is combined with the direct computation of manifolds of Distinguished Hyperbolic trajectories and a very detailed description of transport is achieved across an eddy and a jet on the Kuroshio current,. A second velocity data set is examined with the M function tool. These are obtained from the HYCOM project on the Gulf of Mexico during the time of the oil-spill. We have identified underlying Lagrangian structures and dynamics. We acknowledge to the hospitality of the university of Delaware and the assistance of Bruce Lipphardt and Helga Huntley in accessing the model data sets. We acknowledge to the grants: UPM-AL12-PAC-09, Becas de Movilidad de Caja Madrid 2011, MTM2011-26696 and ILINK-0145.

  17. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchuk, Kyle

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called "non-blinking" quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  18. Sensitivity of the Single Particle Soot Photometer to different black carbon types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Laborde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC is nowadays mainly of anthropogenic origin. It is the dominant light absorbing component of atmospheric aerosols, playing an important role in the earth's radiative balance and therefore relevant to climate change studies. In addition, BC is known to be harmful to humans making it relevant to policy makers. Nevertheless, the measurement of BC remains biased by the instrument-based definition of BC. The Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2, allows the measurement of the refractory BC (rBC mass of individual particle using laser-induced incandescence. However the SP2 needs an empirical calibration to retrieve the rBC mass from the incandescence signal and the sensitivity of the SP2 differs between different BC types. Ideally, for atmospheric studies, the SP2 should be calibrated using ambient particles containing a known mass of ambient rBC. However, such "ambient BC" calibration particles cannot easily be obtained and thus commercially available BC particles are commonly used for SP2 calibration instead. In this study we tested the sensitivity of the SP2 to different BC types in order to characterize the potential error introduced by using non-ambient BC for calibration. The sensitivity of the SP2 was determined for rBC from thermodenuded diesel exhaust, wood burning exhaust and ambient particles as well as for commercially available products: Aquadag® and fullerene soot.

    Thermodenuded, fresh diesel exhaust has been found to be ideal for SP2 calibration for two reasons. First, the small amount of non-BC matter upon emission reduces the risk of bias due to incomplete removal of non-BC matter and second, it is considered to represent atmospheric rBC as diesel exhaust is the main source of BC in most locations. The SP2 was found to be up to 16% less sensitive to rBC from thermodenuded ambient particles (≤15 fg than rBC from diesel exhaust, however, at least part of this difference can be explained by

  19. Developing new optical imaging techniques for single particle and molecule tracking in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a far-field as well as wide-field optical imaging technique. Since it is non-invasive and requires no sample staining, DIC microscopy is suitable for tracking the motion of target molecules in live cells without interfering their functions. In addition, high numerical aperture objectives and condensers can be used in DIC microscopy. The depth of focus of DIC is shallow, which gives DIC much better optical sectioning ability than those of phase contrast and dark field microscopies. In this work, DIC was utilized to study dynamic biological processes including endocytosis and intracellular transport in live cells. The suitability of DIC microscopy for single particle tracking in live cells was first demonstrated by using DIC to monitor the entire endocytosis process of one mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) into a live mammalian cell. By taking advantage of the optical sectioning ability of DIC, we recorded the depth profile of the MSN during the endocytosis process. The shape change around the nanoparticle due to the formation of a vesicle was also captured. DIC microscopy was further modified that the sample can be illuminated and imaged at two wavelengths simultaneously. By using the new technique, noble metal nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were selectively imaged. Among all the examined metal nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles in rod shapes were found to be especially useful. Due to their anisotropic optical properties, gold nanorods showed as diffraction-limited spots with disproportionate bright and dark parts that are strongly dependent on their orientation in the 3D space. Gold nanorods were developed as orientation nanoprobes and were successfully used to report the self-rotation of gliding microtubules on kinesin coated substrates. Gold nanorods were further used to study the rotational motions of cargoes during the endocytosis and intracellular transport processes in live mammalian

  20. Determination of single particle mass spectral signatures from light-duty vehicle emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodeman, David A; Toner, Stephen M; Prather, Kimberly A

    2005-06-15

    In this study, 28 light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDV) were operated on a chassis dynamometer at the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Smit Facility in El Monte, CA. The mass spectra of individual particles emitted from these vehicles were measured using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS). A primary goal of this study involves determining representative size-resolved single particle mass spectral signatures that can be used in future ambient particulate matter source apportionment studies. Different cycles were used to simulate urban driving conditions including the federal testing procedure (FTP), unified cycle (UC), and the correction cycle (CC). The vehicles were selected to span a range of catalytic converter (three-way, oxidation, and no catalysts) and engine technologies (vehicles models from 1953 to 2003). Exhaust particles were sampled directly from a dilution and residence chamber system using particle sizing instruments and an ATOFMS equipped with an aerodynamic lens (UF-ATOFMS) analyzing particles between 50 and 300 nm. On the basis of chemical composition, 10 unique chemical types describe the majority of the particles with distinct size and temporal characteristics. In the ultrafine size range (between 50 and 100 nm), three elemental carbon (EC) particle types dominated, all showing distinct EC signatures combined with Ca, phosphate, sulfate, and a lower abundance of organic carbon (OC). The relative fraction of EC particle types decreased as particle size increased with OC particles becoming more prevalent above 100 nm. Depending on the vehicle and cycle, several distinct OC particle types produced distinct ion patterns, including substituted aromatic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), coupled with other chemical species including ammonium, EC, nitrate, sulfate, phosphate, V, and Ca. The most likely source of the Ca and phosphate in the particles is attributed to the lubricating oil. Significant variability was

  1. Biomass Burning Research Using DOE ARM Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onasch, Timothy B [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Sedlacek, Arthur J [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lewis, Ernie [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The focus of this laboratory study was to investigate the chemical and optical properties, and the detection efficiencies, of tar balls generated in the laboratory using the same instruments deployed on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Gulfstream-1 (G-1) aircraft during the 2013 Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field study, during which tar balls were observed in wildland biomass burning particulate emissions. Key goals of this laboratory study were: (a) measuring the chemical composition of tar balls to provide insights into the atmospheric processes that form (evaporation/oxidation) and modify them in biomass burning plumes, (b) identifying whether tar balls contain refractory black carbon, (c) determining the collection efficiencies of tar balls impacting on the 600oC heated tungsten vaporizer in the Aerodyne Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) (i.e., given the observed low volatilities, AMS measurements might underestimate organic biomass burning plume loadings), and (d) measuring the wavelength-dependent, mass-specific absorption cross-sections of brown carbon components of tar balls. This project was funded primarily by the DOE Atmospheric System Research (ASR) program, and the ARM Facility made their single-particle soot photometer (SP2) available for September 1-September 31, 2016 in the Aerodyne laboratories. The ARM mentor (Dr. Sedlacek) requested no funds for mentorship or data reduction. All ARM SP2 data collected as part of this project are archived in the ARM Data Archive in accordance with established protocols. The main objectives of the ARM Biomass Burning Observation Period (BBOP, July-October, 2013) field campaign were to (1) assess the impact of wildland fires in the Pacific Northwest on climate, through near-field and regional intensive measurement campaigns, and (2) investigate agricultural burns to determine how those biomass burn plumes differ from

  2. Sensitivity of the Single Particle Soot Photometer to different black carbon types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Laborde

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC is now mainly of anthropogenic origin. It is the dominant light absorbing component of atmospheric aerosols, playing an important role in the earth's radiative balance and therefore relevant to climate change studies. In addition, BC is known to be harmful to human beings making it relevant to policy makers. Nevertheless, the measurement of BC remains biased by the instrument-based definition of BC. The Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2, allows the measurement of the refractory BC (rBC mass of individual particles using laser-induced incandescence. However, the SP2 needs an empirical calibration to retrieve the rBC mass from the incandescence signal and the sensitivity of the SP2 differs between different BC types. Ideally, for atmospheric studies, the SP2 should be calibrated using ambient particles containing a known mass of ambient rBC. However, such "ambient BC" calibration particles cannot easily be obtained and thus commercially available BC particles are commonly used for SP2 calibration instead. In this study we tested the sensitivity of the SP2 to different BC types in order to characterize the potential error introduced by using non-ambient BC for calibration. The sensitivity of the SP2 was determined, using an aerosol particle mass analyzer, for rBC from thermodenuded diesel exhaust, wood burning exhaust and ambient particles as well as for commercially available products: Aquadag® and fullerene soot.

    Thermodenuded, fresh diesel exhaust has been found to be ideal for SP2 calibration for two reasons. First, the small amount of non-BC matter upon emission reduces the risk of bias due to incomplete removal of non-BC matter and second, it is considered to represent atmospheric rBC in urban locations where diesel exhaust is the main source of BC. The SP2 was found to be up to 16% less sensitive to rBC from thermodenuded ambient particles (≤15 fg than rBC from diesel exhaust, however, at least part

  3. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchuk, Kyle [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called “non-blinking” quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  4. A Lagrangian-Lagrangian Model for Two-Phase Bubbly Flow around Circular Cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shademan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A Lagrangian-Lagrangian model is developed using an in-house code to simulate bubble trajectory in two-phase bubbly flow around circular cylinder. Random Vortex Method (RVM which is a Lagrangian approach is used for solving the liquid phase. The significance of RVM relative to other RANS/LES methods is its capability in directly modelling the turbulence. In RVM, turbulence is modeled by solving the vorticity transport equation and there is no need to use turbulence closure models. Another advantage of RVM relative to other CFD approaches is its independence from mesh generation. For the bubbles trajectory, equation of motion of bubbles which takes into account effect of different forces are coupled with the RVM. Comparison of the results obtained from current model with the experimental data confirms the validity of the model. Effect of different parameters including flow Reynolds number, bubble diameter and injection point on the bubbles' trajectory are investigated. Results show that increase in the Reynolds number reduces the rising velocity of the bubbles. Similar behavior is observed for the bubbles when their diameter was decreased. According to the analysis carried out, present Lagrangian-Lagrangian model solves the issues of mesh generation and turbulence modelling which exist in common two phase flow modelling schemes.

  5. Dynamics of Multibody Systems Near Lagrangian Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Brian

    This thesis examines the dynamics of a physically connected multi-spacecraft system in the vicinity of the Lagrangian points of a Circular Restricted Three-Body System. The spacecraft system is arranged in a wheel-spoke configuration with smaller and less massive satellites connected to a central hub using truss/beams or tether connectors. The kinematics of the system is first defined, and the kinetic, gravitational potential energy and elastic potential energy of the system are derived. The Assumed Modes Method is used to discretize the continuous variables of the system, and a general set of ordinary differential equations describing the dynamics of the connectors and the central hub are obtained using the Lagrangian method. The flexible body dynamics of the tethered and truss connected systems are examined using numerical simulations. The results show that these systems experienced only small elastic deflections when they are naturally librating or rotating at moderate angular velocities, and these deflections have relatively small effect on the attitude dynamics of the systems. Based on these results, it is determined that the connectors can be modeled as rigid when only the attitude dynamics of the system is of interest. The equations of motion of rigid satellites stationed at the Lagrangian points are linearized, and the stability conditions of the satellite are obtained from the linear equations. The required conditions are shown to be similar to those of geocentric satellites. Study of the linear equations also revealed the resonant conditions of rigid Lagrangian point satellites, when a librational natural frequency of the satellite matches the frequency of its station-keeping orbit leading to large attitude motions. For tethered satellites, the linear analysis shows that the tethers are in stable equilibrium when they lie along a line joining the two primary celestial bodies of the Three-Body System. Numerical simulations are used to study the long term

  6. A New Method Using Single-Particle Mass Spectrometry Data to Distinguish Mineral Dust and Biological Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mashat, H.; Kristensen, L.; Sultana, C. M.; Prather, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    The ability to distinguish types of particles present within a cloud is important for determining accurate inputs to climate models. The chemical composition of particles within cloud liquid droplets and ice crystals can have a significant impact on the timing, location, and amount of precipitation that falls. Precipitation efficiency is increased by the presence of ice crystals in clouds, and both mineral dust and biological aerosols have been shown to be effective ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the atmosphere. A current challenge in aerosol science is distinguishing mineral dust and biological material in the analysis of real-time, ambient, single-particle mass spectral data. Single-particle mass spectrometers are capable of measuring the size-resolved chemical composition of individual atmospheric particles. However, there is no consistent analytical method for distinguishing dust and biological aerosols. Sampling and characterization of control samples (i.e. of known identity) of mineral dust and bacteria were performed by the Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) as part of the Fifth Ice Nucleation (FIN01) Workshop at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) facility in Karlsruhe, Germany. Using data collected by the ATOFMS of control samples, a new metric has been developed to classify single particles as dust or biological independent of spectral cluster analysis. This method, involving the use of a ratio of mass spectral peak areas for organic nitrogen and silicates, is easily reproducible and does not rely on extensive knowledge of particle chemistry or the ionization characteristics of mass spectrometers. This represents a step toward rapidly distinguishing particle types responsible for ice nucleation activity during real-time sampling in clouds. The ability to distinguish types of particles present within a cloud is important for determining accurate inputs to climate models. The chemical composition of particles

  7. Evaluation of number concentration quantification by single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: microsecond vs. millisecond dwell times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad-Álvaro, Isabel; Peña-Vázquez, Elena; Bolea, Eduardo; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Castillo, Juan R; Laborda, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    The quality of the quantitative information in single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SP-ICP-MS) depends directly on the number concentration of the nanoparticles in the sample analyzed, which is proportional to the flux of nanoparticles through the plasma. Particle number concentrations must be selected in accordance with the data acquisition frequency, to control the precision from counting statistics and the bias, which is produced by the occurrence of multiple-particle events recorded as single-particle events. With quadrupole mass spectrometers, the frequency of data acquisition is directly controlled by the dwell time. The effect of dwell times from milli- to microseconds (10 ms, 5 ms, 100 μs, and 50 μs) on the quality of the quantitative data has been studied. Working with dwell times in the millisecond range, precision figures about 5 % were achieved, whereas using microsecond dwell times, the suitable fluxes of nanoparticles are higher and precision was reduced down to 1 %; this was independent of the dwell time selected. Moreover, due to the lower occurrence of multiple-nanoparticle events, linear ranges are wider when dwell times equal to or shorter than 100 μs are used. A calculation tool is provided to determine the optimal concentration for any instrument or experimental conditions selected. On the other hand, the use of dwell times in the microsecond range reduces significantly the contribution of the background and/or the presence of dissolved species, in comparison with the use of millisecond dwell times. Although the use of dwell times equal to or shorter than 100 μs offers improved performance working in single-particle mode, the use of conventional dwell times (3-10 ms) should not be discarded, once their limitations are known.

  8. Single-particle based helical reconstruction—how to make the most of real and Fourier space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Sachse

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The helical assembly is a fundamental organization principle of biomacromolecules. To determine the structures of helical filaments or tubes has been helped by the fact that many different views of the helical unit are present to reconstruct a three-dimensional image from a single helix. In this review, I present the current state of helical image reconstruction from electron cryo-micrographs by introducing Fourier-based processing alongside real-space approaches. Based on this foundation, I describe how they can be applied to determine the symmetry and high-resolution structure of helical assemblies. In the past, the main structure determination approach of helical assemblies from electron micrographs was the Fourier-Bessel method, which is based on a comprehensive theory and has generated many successful applications in the last 40 years. The emergence of the single-particle technique allowed segmented helical specimens to be treated as single particles, thus rendering new specimens amenable to 3D helical reconstruction and facilitating high-resolution structure analysis. However, helical symmetry determination remains the crucial step for a successful 3D reconstruction. Depending on the helical specimen, Fourier and real-space approaches or a combination of both provide important clues to establish the correct helical symmetry. I discuss recent developments in combining traditional Fourier-Bessel procedures with single-particle algorithms to provide a versatile and comprehensive approach to structure determination of helical specimens. Upon introduction of direct electron detectors, a series of near-atomic resolution structures from helical assemblies have become available. As helical organization is fundamental to many structural assemblies of the cell, these approaches to structure elucidation open up promising capabilities to study the underlying structures at atomistic resolution.

  9. Continuous Time Random Walks for the Evolution of Lagrangian Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Dentz, Marco; Comolli, Alessandro; Borgne, Tanguy Le; Lester, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    We develop a continuous time random walk (CTRW) approach for the evolution of Lagrangian velocities in steady heterogeneous flows based on a stochastic relaxation process for the streamwise particle velocities. This approach describes persistence of velocities over a characteristic spatial scale, unlike classical random walk methods, which model persistence over a characteristic time scale. We first establish the relation between Eulerian and Lagrangian velocities for both equidistant and isochrone sampling along streamlines, under transient and stationary conditions. Based on this, we develop a space continuous CTRW approach for the spatial and temporal dynamics of Lagrangian velocities. While classical CTRW formulations have non-stationary Lagrangian velocity statistics, the proposed approach quantifies the evolution of the Lagrangian velocity statistics under both stationary and non-stationary conditions. We provide explicit expressions for the Lagrangian velocity statistics, and determine the behaviors of...

  10. Lagrangian Coherent Structures in the Trieste Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besio, G.; Enrile, F.; Magaldi, M. G.; Mantovani, C.; Cosoli, S.; Gerin, R.; Poulain, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    One serious issue in Environmental Science and Engineering concerns the prediction of the fate of contaminants released in a water body. A possible way to tackle this problem consists in forecasting pollutant trajectories from velocity-field data sets obtained by measurements or numerical simulations. A shortcoming of such a traditional approach is the high sensitivity to initial conditions. Another way to understand transport in complex fluid flows comes from a new mathematical tool: Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS). The idea of using Lagrangian Structures rose as a meeting point between non-linear dynamics and fluid mechanics. It provides the means to identify material lines that shape trajectory patterns, dividing the flow field into regions with different dynamical behaviours. The objective of this study is the detection of Lagrangian Coherent Structures in the Gulf of Trieste. LCS are calculated from the 2D surface velocity field measured by the coastal radars of the TOSCA (Tracking Oil Spills & Coastal Awareness network) project. Blobs of simulated particles are subjected to chaotic stirring (transport and stretching) that is in agreement with the detected LCS. In the TOSCA project drifters were deployed, too. Therefore, a simple simulation of some of these drifters was carried out. The trajectory of the simulated drifters diverge from the real one: this result is due to the chaotic transport of passive tracers. However, the separation becomes more evident when velocity fields are less accurate because of lack of measurements, previously filled with nearest neighbourhood interpolation. In the light of such results, the use of LCS could be helpful in understanding the trajectory followed by drifters and passive tracers in general, because they can point out the directions along which transport is likely to develop.

  11. Single-Particle Properties of a Strongly Interacting Bose-Fermi Mixture Above the BEC Phase Transition Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharga, D.; Inotani, D.; Hanai, R.; Ohashi, Y.

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically investigate the normal state properties of a Bose-Fermi mixture with a strong attractive interaction between Fermi and Bose atoms. We extend the ordinary T-matrix approximation (TMA) with respect to Bose-Fermi pairing fluctuations, to include the Hugenholtz-Pines' relation for all Bose Green's functions appearing in TMA self-energy diagrams. This extension is shown to be essentially important to correctly describe the physical properties of the Bose-Fermi mixture, especially near the Bose-Einstein condensation instability. Using this improved TMA, we clarify how the formation of composite fermions affects Bose and Fermi single-particle excitation spectra, over the entire interaction strength.

  12. Investigation of the single Particle Structure of the neutron-rich Sodium Isotopes $^{27-31}\\!$Na

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study the single particle structure of the neutron-rich isotopes $^{27-31}\\!$Na. These isotopes will be investigated via neutron pickup reactions in inverse kinematics on a deuterium and a beryllium target. Scattered beam particles and transfer products are detected in a position sensitive detector located around 0$^\\circ$. De-excitation $\\gamma$-rays emitted after an excited state has been populated will be registered by the MINIBALL Germanium array. The results will shed new light on the structure of the neutron-rich sodium isotopes and especially on the region of strong deformation around the N=20 nucleus $^{31}\\!$Na.

  13. Impact of and correction for instrument sensitivity drift on nanoparticle size measurements by single-particle ICP-MS

    OpenAIRE

    El Hadri, Hind; Petersen, Elijah J.; Winchester, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of ICP-MS instrument sensitivity drift on the accuracy of NP size measurements using single particle (sp)ICP-MS is investigated. Theoretical modeling and experimental measurements of the impact of instrument sensitivity drift are in agreement and indicate that drift can impact the measured size of spherical NPs by up to 25 %. Given this substantial bias in the measured size, a method was developed using an internal standard to correct for the impact of drift and was shown to accura...

  14. Dynamic micro-organization of P2X7 receptors revealed by PALM based single particle tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Shrivastava, Amulya N.; Rodriguez, Pamela C.; Triller, Antoine; Renner, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-gated P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are members of the purinergic receptor family that are expressed in several cell types including neurons. A high concentration of ATP is required for the channel opening of P2X7Rs compared to other members of this receptor family. Recent work suggests that ATP binding to members of the P2X receptor family determines the diffusion and localization of these receptors on the plasma membrane of neurons. Here, we employed single particle t...

  15. Lagrangian form of Schrödinger equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenović, D.; Burić, N.; Davidović, D. M.; Prvanović, S.

    2014-07-01

    Lagrangian formulation of quantum mechanical Schrödinger equation is developed in general and illustrated in the eigenbasis of the Hamiltonian and in the coordinate representation. The Lagrangian formulation of physically plausible quantum system results in a well defined second order equation on a real vector space. The Klein-Gordon equation for a real field is shown to be the Lagrangian form of the corresponding Schrödinger equation.

  16. Webs of Lagrangian Tori in Projective Symplectic Manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Jun-Muk

    2012-01-01

    For a Lagrangian torus A in a simply-connected projective symplectic manifold M, we prove that M has a hypersurface disjoint from a deformation of A. This implies that a Lagrangian torus in a compact hyperk\\"ahler manifold is a fiber of an almost holomorphic Lagrangian fibration, giving an affirmative answer to a question of Beauville's. Our proof employs two different tools: the theory of action-angle variables for algebraically completely integrable Hamiltonian systems and Wielandt's theory of subnormal subgroups.

  17. New Terms for Compact Form of Electroweak Chiral Lagrangian

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Wei; ZHANG Hong-Hao; YANG Hong-Wei; YAN Wen-Bin; CHEN Na; J.K. Parry; LI Xue-Song

    2008-01-01

    The compact form of the electroweak chiral Lagrangian is a reformulation of its original form and is expressed in terms of chiral rotated electroweak gauge fields, which is crucial for relating the information of underlying theories to the coefficients of the low-energy effective Lagrangian. However the compact form obtained in previous works is not complete. In this letter we add several new chiral invariant terms to it and discuss the contributions of these terms to the original electroweak chiral Lagrangian.

  18. Towards Lagrangian approach to quantum computations

    CERN Document Server

    Vlasov, A Yu

    2003-01-01

    In this work is discussed possibility and actuality of Lagrangian approach to quantum computations. Finite-dimensional Hilbert spaces used in this area provide some challenge for such consideration. The model discussed here can be considered as an analogue of Weyl quantization of field theory via path integral in L. D. Faddeev's approach. Weyl quantization is possible to use also in finite-dimensional case, and some formulas may be simply rewritten with change of integrals to finite sums. On the other hand, there are specific difficulties relevant to finite case. This work has some allusions with phase space models of quantum computations developed last time by different authors.

  19. Hamiltonian and Lagrangian theory of viscoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanyga, A.; Seredyńska, M.

    2008-03-01

    The viscoelastic relaxation modulus is a positive-definite function of time. This property alone allows the definition of a conserved energy which is a positive-definite quadratic functional of the stress and strain fields. Using the conserved energy concept a Hamiltonian and a Lagrangian functional are constructed for dynamic viscoelasticity. The Hamiltonian represents an elastic medium interacting with a continuum of oscillators. By allowing for multiphase displacement and introducing memory effects in the kinetic terms of the equations of motion a Hamiltonian is constructed for the visco-poroelasticity.

  20. Trivial Lagrangians in the Causal Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Grigore, Dan-Radu

    2015-01-01

    We prove the non-uniqueness theorem for the chronological products of a gauge model. We use a cohomological language where the cochains are chronological products, gauge invariance means a cocycle restriction and coboundaries are expressions producing zero sandwiched between physical states. Suppose that we have gauge invariance up to order n of the perturbation theory and we modify the first-order chronological products by a coboundary (a trivial Lagrangian). Then the chronological products up to order n get modified by a coboundary also.

  1. Approximate Augmented Lagrangian Functions and Nonlinear Semidefinite Programs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X. X. HUANG; K. L. TEO; X. Q. YANG

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an approximate augmented Lagrangian function for nonlinear semidefinite programs is introduced. Some basic properties of the approximate augmented Lagrange function such as monotonicity and convexity are discussed. Necessary and sufficient conditions for approximate strong duality results are derived. Conditions for an approximate exact penalty representation in the framework of augmented Lagrangian are given. Under certain conditions, it is shown that any limit point of a sequence of stationary points of approximate augmented Lagrangian problems is a KKT point of the original semidefinite program and that a sequence of optimal solutions to augmented Lagrangian problems converges to a solution of the original semidefinite program.

  2. Relativistic Lagrangians for the Lorentz–Dirac equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deguchi, Shinichi, E-mail: deguchi@phys.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp [Institute of Quantum Science, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Nakano, Kunihiko [Institute of Quantum Science, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Suzuki, Takafumi [Junior College Funabashi Campus, Nihon University, Narashinodai, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8501 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    We present two types of relativistic Lagrangians for the Lorentz–Dirac equation written in terms of an arbitrary world-line parameter. One of the Lagrangians contains an exponential damping function of the proper time and explicitly depends on the world-line parameter. Another Lagrangian includes additional cross-terms consisting of auxiliary dynamical variables and does not depend explicitly on the world-line parameter. We demonstrate that both the Lagrangians actually yield the Lorentz–Dirac equation with a source-like term.

  3. Lagrangian Transport Through Surfaces in Volume-Preserving Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Karrasch, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Advective transport of scalar quantities through surfaces is of fundamental importance in many scientific applications. From the Eulerian perspective of the surface it can be quantified by the well-known integral of the flux density. The recent development of highly accurate semi-Lagrangian methods for solving scalar conservation laws and of Lagrangian approaches to coherent structures in turbulent (geophysical) fluid flows necessitate a new approach to transport from the (Lagrangian) material perspective. We present a Lagrangian framework for calculating transport of conserved quantities through a given surface in $n$-dimensional, fully aperiodic, volume-preserving flows. Our approach does not involve any dynamical assumptions on the surface or its boundary.

  4. The Dirac Conjecture and the Non-uniqueness of Lagrangian

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yong-Long; Jiang, Hua; Lu, Wei-Tao; Pan, Hong-Zhe

    2013-01-01

    We prove the validity of the Dirac conjecture generally by adding the total time derivatives of all constraints to the Lagrangian step by step. It is worthy to state that the total time derivatives added to the original Lagrangian can turn up some constraints, and discover the symmetries hidden in the original Lagrangian. For a constrained system, the extended Hamiltonian $H_E$ contains more constraints, and shows more symmetries. We discuss the Cawley's counterexample, and prove it not a real one to the Dirac conjecture. And we offer an example, its extended Hamiltonian is better that its total Hamiltonian for its Lagrangian.

  5. Single particle analysis of thylakoid proteins from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Synechocystis 6803 : Localization of the CupA subunit of NDH-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folea, I. Mihaela; Zhang, Pengpeng; Nowaczyk, Marc M.; Ogawa, Teruo; Aro, Eva-Marl; Boekema, Egbert J.; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2008-01-01

    The larger protein complexes of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic membrane of Thermosynechoccus elongatus and Synechocystis 6803 were studied by single particle electron microscopy after detergent solubilization, without any purification steps. Besides the "standard" L-shaped NDH-1L complex, related

  6. Single particle analysis of thylakoid proteins from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Synechocystis 6803 : Localization of the CupA subunit of NDH-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folea, I. Mihaela; Zhang, Pengpeng; Nowaczyk, Marc M.; Ogawa, Teruo; Aro, Eva-Marl; Boekema, Egbert J.; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2008-01-01

    The larger protein complexes of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic membrane of Thermosynechoccus elongatus and Synechocystis 6803 were studied by single particle electron microscopy after detergent solubilization, without any purification steps. Besides the "standard" L-shaped NDH-1L complex, related

  7. Excitation of the 4d shell in Sb, Te, and BaF/sub 2/ with inelastic electron scattering: Collective or single particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franck, C.; Schnatterly, S.E.

    1982-06-01

    Simple models suggest that the momentum-transfer (q) dependence of inelastic electron scattering is sensitive to the difference between collective and single-particle behavior in atomic dynamics. We measured the energy centroid of the 4d continuum peak for 0single-particle description is favored.

  8. Parallel algorithms for semi-lagrangian advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malevsky, A. V.; Thomas, S. J.

    1997-08-01

    Numerical time step limitations associated with the explicit treatment of advection-dominated problems in computational fluid dynamics are often relaxed by employing Eulerian-Lagrangian methods. These are also known as semi-Lagrangian methods in the atmospheric sciences. Such methods involve backward time integration of a characteristic equation to find the departure point of a fluid particle arriving at a Eulerian grid point. The value of the advected field at the departure point is obtained by interpolation. Both the trajectory integration and repeated interpolation influence accuracy. We compare the accuracy and performance of interpolation schemes based on piecewise cubic polynomials and cubic B-splines in the context of a distributed memory, parallel computing environment. The computational cost and interprocessor communication requirements for both methods are reported. Spline interpolation has better conservation properties but requires the solution of a global linear system, initially appearing to hinder a distributed memory implementation. The proposed parallel algorithm for multidimensional spline interpolation has almost the same communication overhead as local piecewise polynomial interpolation. We also compare various techniques for tracking trajectories given different values for the Courant number. Large Courant numbers require a high-order ODE solver involving multiple interpolations of the velocity field.

  9. Variational Contact Symmetries of Constraint Lagrangians

    CERN Document Server

    Terzis, Petros A; Christodoulakis, T; Paliathanasis, A; Tsamparlis, M

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of contact symmetries of re--parametrization invariant Lagrangians of finite degrees of freedom and quadratic in the velocities is presented. The main concern of the paper is those symmetry generators which depend linearly in the velocities. A natural extension of the symmetry generator along the lapse function $N(t)$, with the appropriate extension of the dependence in $\\dot{N}(t)$ of the gauge function, is assumed; this action yields new results. The central finding is that the integrals of motion are either linear or quadratic in velocities and are generated, respectively by the conformal Killing vector fields and the conformal Killing tensors of the configuration space metric deduced from the kinetic part of the Lagrangian (with appropriate conformal factors). The freedom of re--parametrization allows one to appropriately scale $N(t)$, so that the potential becomes constant; in this case the integrals of motion can be constructed from the Killing fields and Killing tensors of the scaled ...

  10. Sigma decomposition: the CP-odd Lagrangian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierro, I. M.; Merlo, L.; Rigolin, S.

    2016-04-01

    In Alonso et al., JHEP 12 (2014) 034, the CP-even sector of the effective chiral Lagrangian for a generic composite Higgs model with a symmetric coset has been constructed, up to four momenta. In this paper, the CP-odd couplings are studied within the same context. If only the Standard Model bosonic sources of custodial symmetry breaking are considered, then at most six independent operators form a basis. One of them is the weak- θ term linked to non-perturbative sources of CP violation, while the others describe CP-odd perturbative couplings between the Standard Model gauge bosons and an Higgs-like scalar belonging to the Goldstone boson sector. The procedure is then applied to three distinct exemplifying frameworks: the original SU(5)/SO(5) Georgi-Kaplan model, the minimal custodial-preserving SO(5)/SO(4) model and the minimal SU(3)/(SU(2) × U(1)) model, which intrinsically breaks custodial symmetry. Moreover, the projection of the high-energy electroweak effective theory to the low-energy chiral effective Lagrangian for a dynamical Higgs is performed, uncovering strong relations between the operator coefficients and pinpointing the differences with the elementary Higgs scenario.

  11. Generating functionals and Lagrangian partial differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vankerschaver, Joris; Liao, Cuicui; Leok, Melvin [Department of Mathematics, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, Dept. 0112, La Jolla, California 92093-0112 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    The main goal of this paper is to derive an alternative characterization of the multisymplectic form formula for classical field theories using the geometry of the space of boundary values. We review the concept of Type-I/II generating functionals defined on the space of boundary data of a Lagrangian field theory. On the Lagrangian side, we define an analogue of Jacobi's solution to the Hamilton–Jacobi equation for field theories, and we show that by taking variational derivatives of this functional, we obtain an isotropic submanifold of the space of Cauchy data, described by the so-called multisymplectic form formula. As an example of the latter, we show that Lorentz's reciprocity principle in electromagnetism is a particular instance of the multisymplectic form formula. We also define a Hamiltonian analogue of Jacobi's solution, and we show that this functional is a Type-II generating functional. We finish the paper by defining a similar framework of generating functions for discrete field theories, and we show that for the linear wave equation, we recover the multisymplectic conservation law of Bridges.

  12. The application of single particle aerosol mass spectrometry for the detection and identification of high explosives and chemical warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Audrey Noreen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) was evaluated as a real-time detection technique for single particles of high explosives. Dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectra were obtained for samples of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN); peaks indicative of each compound were identified. Composite explosives, Comp B, Semtex 1A, and Semtex 1H were also analyzed, and peaks due to the explosive components of each sample were present in each spectrum. Mass spectral variability with laser fluence is discussed. The ability of the SPAMS system to identify explosive components in a single complex explosive particle (~1 pg) without the need for consumables is demonstrated. SPAMS was also applied to the detection of Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA) simulants in the liquid and vapor phases. Liquid simulants for sarin, cyclosarin, tabun, and VX were analyzed; peaks indicative of each simulant were identified. Vapor phase CWA simulants were adsorbed onto alumina, silica, Zeolite, activated carbon, and metal powders which were directly analyzed using SPAMS. The use of metal powders as adsorbent materials was especially useful in the analysis of triethyl phosphate (TEP), a VX stimulant, which was undetectable using SPAMS in the liquid phase. The capability of SPAMS to detect high explosives and CWA simulants using one set of operational conditions is established.

  13. Single-Particle Spin-Orbit Strengths of the Nucleon and Hyperons by $SU_{6}$ Quark-Model

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Fujita, T; Nakamoto, C; Suzuki, Y

    2000-01-01

    The quark-model hyperon-nucleon interaction suggests an importantantisymmetric spin-orbit component. It is generated from a color analogue ofthe Fermi-Breit interaction dominating in the one-gluon exchange processbetween quarks. We discuss the strength S_B of the single-particle spin-orbitpotential, following the Scheerbaum's prescription. Using the SU6 quark-modelbaryon-baryon interaction which was recently developed by the Kyoto-Niigatagroup, we calculate NN, Lambda N and Sigma N G-matrices in symmetric nuclearmatter and apply them to estimate the strength S_B. The ratio of S_B to thenucleon strength S_N =~ -40 MeV*fm^5 is (S_Lambda)/(S_N) =~ 1/5 and(S_Sigma)/(S_N) =~ 1/2 in the Born approximation. The G-matrix calculation ofthe model FSS modifies S_Lambda to (S_Lambda)/(S_N) =~ 1/12. For S_N andS_Sigma, the effect of the short-range correlation is comparatively weakagainst meson-exchange potentials with a short-range repulsive core. Thesignificant reduction of the Lambda single-particle potential arises fr...

  14. Detection of lead nanoparticles in game meat by single particle ICP-MS following use of lead-containing bullets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollander, Barbro; Widemo, Fredrik; Ågren, Erik; Larsen, Erik H; Loeschner, Katrin

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated whether game meat may contain nanoparticles of lead from ammunition. Lead nanoparticles in the range 40 to 750 nm were detected by ICP-MS in single particle mode in game shot with lead-containing bullets. The median diameter of the detected nanoparticles was around 60 nm. The particle mass concentration ranged from 290 to 340 ng/g meat and the particle number concentrations from 27 to 50 million particles/g meat. The size limit of detection strongly depended on the level of dissolved lead and was in the range of 40 to 80 nm. In game meat sampled more than 10 cm away from the wound channel, no lead particles with a diameter larger than 40 nm were detected. In addition to dissolved lead in meat that originated from particulates, the presence of lead nano particles in game meat represents a hitherto unattended source of lead with a largely unknown toxicological impact to humans. Graphical Abstract Detection of lead nanoparticles in game meat by single particle ICP-MS following use of leadcontaining bullets.

  15. Massively parallel and highly quantitative single-particle analysis on interactions between nanoparticles on supported lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Kwang; Kim, Sungi; Oh, Jeong-Wook; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2014-03-12

    Observation of individual single-nanoparticle reactions provides direct information and insight for many complex chemical, physical, and biological processes, but this is utterly challenging with conventional high-resolution imaging techniques on conventional platforms. Here, we developed a photostable plasmonic nanoparticle-modified supported lipid bilayer (PNP-SLB) platform that allows for massively parallel in situ analysis of the interactions between nanoparticles with single-particle resolution on a two-dimensional (2D) fluidic surface. Each particle-by-particle PNP clustering process was monitored in real time and quantified via analysis of individual particle diffusion trajectories and single-particle-level plasmonic coupling. Importantly, the PNP-SLB-based nanoparticle cluster growth kinetics result was fitted well. As an application example, we performed a DNA detection assay, and the result suggests that our approach has very promising sensitivity and dynamic range (high attomolar to high femtomolar) without optimization, as well as remarkable single-base mismatch discrimination capability. The method shown herein can be readily applied for many different types of intermolecular and interparticle interactions and provide convenient tools and new insights for studying dynamic interactions on a highly controllable and analytical platform.

  16. Single-particle cryoEM analysis at near-atomic resolution from several thousand asymmetric subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Dario Oliveira; Lyumkis, Dmitry

    2015-11-01

    A single-particle cryoEM reconstruction of the large ribosomal subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was obtained from a dataset of ∼75,000 particles. The gold-standard and frequency-limited approaches to single-particle refinement were each independently used to determine orientation parameters for the final reconstruction. Both approaches showed similar resolution curves and nominal resolution values for the 60S dataset, estimated at 2.9 Å. The amount of over-fitting present during frequency-limited refinement was quantitatively analyzed using the high-resolution phase-randomization test, and the results showed no apparent over-fitting. The number of asymmetric subunits required to reach specific resolutions was subsequently analyzed by refining subsets of the data in an ab initio manner. With our data collection and processing strategies, sub-nanometer resolution was obtained with ∼200 asymmetric subunits (or, equivalently for the ribosomal subunit, particles). Resolutions of 5.6 Å, 4.5 Å, and 3.8 Å were reached with ∼1000, ∼1600, and ∼5000 asymmetric subunits, respectively. At these resolutions, one would expect to detect alpha-helical pitch, separation of beta-strands, and separation of Cα atoms, respectively. Using this map, together with strategies for ab initio model building and model refinement, we built a region of the ribosomal protein eL6, which was missing in previous models of the yeast ribosome. The relevance for more routine high-resolution structure determination is discussed.

  17. A comparison of single particle tracking and temporal image correlation spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of endosome motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, F. W.; Wustner, D.

    2013-01-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) is becoming a standard method to extract transport parameters from time-lapse image sequences of fluorescent vesicles in living cells. Another method to obtain these data is temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS), but this method is less often used for measu......Single particle tracking (SPT) is becoming a standard method to extract transport parameters from time-lapse image sequences of fluorescent vesicles in living cells. Another method to obtain these data is temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS), but this method is less often used...... for measurement of intracellular vesicle transport. Here, we present an extensive comparison of SPT and TICS. First we examine the effect of photobleaching, shading and noise on SPT and TICS analysis using simulated image sequences. To this end, we developed a simple photophysical model, which relates spatially...... varying illumination intensity to the bleaching propensity and fluorescence intensity of the moving particles. We found that neither SPT nor TICS are affected by photobleaching per se, but the transport parameters obtained by both methods are sensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the number...

  18. A comparison of single particle tracking and temporal image correlation spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of endosome motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, F. W.; Wustner, D.

    2013-01-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) is becoming a standard method to extract transport parameters from time-lapse image sequences of fluorescent vesicles in living cells. Another method to obtain these data is temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS), but this method is less often used for measu......Single particle tracking (SPT) is becoming a standard method to extract transport parameters from time-lapse image sequences of fluorescent vesicles in living cells. Another method to obtain these data is temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS), but this method is less often used...... for measurement of intracellular vesicle transport. Here, we present an extensive comparison of SPT and TICS. First we examine the effect of photobleaching, shading and noise on SPT and TICS analysis using simulated image sequences. To this end, we developed a simple photophysical model, which relates spatially...... varying illumination intensity to the bleaching propensity and fluorescence intensity of the moving particles. We found that neither SPT nor TICS are affected by photobleaching per se, but the transport parameters obtained by both methods are sensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the number...

  19. Continuous quantum mechanics of single particles in closed and quasi-closed systems: Pt. 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brieger, M. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Physik

    2004-07-01

    The established statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics never envisioned our today's ability to handle and investigate single particles in trap devices. After scrutinizing the development of quantum mechanics, we point out that Schroedinger's equation establishes an energy representation, which obtains the energy eigenvalues as extrema of the energy curve or on the energy hypersurface, respectively. We also strongly emphasize its never exhausted capability of accounting in classical terms and full detail for the dynamics of single particles in closed systems. This is demonstrated for several familiar examples. They show that the eigensolutions to Schroedinger's equation must not blindly be identified with physically stationary states. The gained insight into the true dynamics allows to describe, without involving QED, the time evolution of a complete spontaneous transition as being driven by unbalanced internal dynamics. This mechanism relies on the fact that perfect balances are only possible in the exact extrema of the total energy and that any deviation, which is characterized by nonstationary states, makes multipole moments oscillate and emit electromagnetic radiation. (orig.)

  20. Interplay between Single-Particle and Collective Effects in the Odd-A Cu Isotopes beyond N=40

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanescu, I; Balabanski, D L; Blasi, N; Blazhev, A; Bree, N; Cederkäll, J; Cocolios, T E; Davinson, T; Diriken, J; Eberth, J; Ekström, A; Fedorov, D; Fedosseev, V; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Gladnishki, K; Huyse, M; Ivanov, O; Ivanov, I; Iwanicki, J; Jolie, J; Konstantinopoulos, T; Kröll, Th; Krücken, R; Köster, U; Lagoyannis, A; Lo Bianco, G; Maierbeck, P; Marsh, B A; Napiorkowski, P; Patronis, N; Pauwels, D; Rainovski, G; Reiter, P; Riisager, K; Seliverstov, M; Sletten, G; Van de Walle, J; Van Duppen, P; Voulot, D; Warr, N; Wenander, F; Wrzosek, K

    2008-01-01

    Collective properties of the low-lying levels in the odd-A 67–73Cu were investigated by Coulomb excitation with radioactive beams. The beams were produced at ISOLDE and postaccelerated by REX-ISOLDE up to 2.99  MeV/u. In 67,69Cu, low-lying 1/2-, 5/2-, and 7/2- states were populated. In 71,73Cu, besides the known transitions deexciting the single-particle-like 5/2- and core-coupled 7/2- levels, γ rays of 454 and 135 keV, respectively, were observed for the first time. Based on a reanalysis of β-decay work and comparison with the systematics, a spin 1/2- is suggested for these excited states. Three B(E2) values were determined in each of the four isotopes. The results indicate a significant change in the structure of the odd-A Cu isotopes beyond N=40 where single-particle-like and collective levels are suggested to coexist at very low excitation energies.

  1. A Computational Realization of a Semi-Lagrangian Method for Solving the Advection Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Efremov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A parallel implementation of a method of the semi-Lagrangian type for the advection equation on a hybrid architecture computation system is discussed. The difference scheme with variable stencil is constructed on the base of an integral equality between the neighboring time levels. The proposed approach allows one to avoid the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy restriction on the relation between time step and mesh size. The theoretical results are confirmed by numerical experiments. Performance of a sequential algorithm and several parallel implementations with the OpenMP and CUDA technologies in the C language has been studied.

  2. ALE3D: An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Multi-Physics Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Charles R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Anderson, Andrew T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barton, Nathan R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bramwell, Jamie A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Capps, Arlie [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chang, Michael H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chou, Jin J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dawson, David M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Diana, Emily R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunn, Timothy A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Faux, Douglas R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fisher, Aaron C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Greene, Patrick T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Heinz, Ines [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kanarska, Yuliya [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Khairallah, Saad A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Liu, Benjamin T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Margraf, Jon D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nichols, Albert L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nourgaliev, Robert N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Puso, Michael A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reus, James F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Robinson, Peter B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shestakov, Alek I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Solberg, Jerome M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Taller, Daniel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tsuji, Paul H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); White, Christopher A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); White, Jeremy L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-23

    ALE3D is a multi-physics numerical simulation software tool utilizing arbitrary-Lagrangian- Eulerian (ALE) techniques. The code is written to address both two-dimensional (2D plane and axisymmetric) and three-dimensional (3D) physics and engineering problems using a hybrid finite element and finite volume formulation to model fluid and elastic-plastic response of materials on an unstructured grid. As shown in Figure 1, ALE3D is a single code that integrates many physical phenomena.

  3. High performance computing aspects of a dimension independent semi-Lagrangian discontinuous Galerkin code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einkemmer, Lukas

    2016-05-01

    The recently developed semi-Lagrangian discontinuous Galerkin approach is used to discretize hyperbolic partial differential equations (usually first order equations). Since these methods are conservative, local in space, and able to limit numerical diffusion, they are considered a promising alternative to more traditional semi-Lagrangian schemes (which are usually based on polynomial or spline interpolation). In this paper, we consider a parallel implementation of a semi-Lagrangian discontinuous Galerkin method for distributed memory systems (so-called clusters). Both strong and weak scaling studies are performed on the Vienna Scientific Cluster 2 (VSC-2). In the case of weak scaling we observe a parallel efficiency above 0.8 for both two and four dimensional problems and up to 8192 cores. Strong scaling results show good scalability to at least 512 cores (we consider problems that can be run on a single processor in reasonable time). In addition, we study the scaling of a two dimensional Vlasov-Poisson solver that is implemented using the framework provided. All of the simulations are conducted in the context of worst case communication overhead; i.e., in a setting where the CFL (Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy) number increases linearly with the problem size. The framework introduced in this paper facilitates a dimension independent implementation of scientific codes (based on C++ templates) using both an MPI and a hybrid approach to parallelization. We describe the essential ingredients of our implementation.

  4. Evaluation of the Lagrangian Marker Method in CTH: Taylor Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    ARL-TR-7235•MAR 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Evaluation of the Lagrangian Marker Method in CTH: Taylor Impact by Stephen Schraml Approved for...Research Laboratory Evaluation of the Lagrangian Marker Method in CTH: Taylor Impact by Stephen Schraml Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL...

  5. Deformations of log-Lagrangian submanifolds of Poisson manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We consider Lagrangian-like submanifolds in certain even-dimensional 'symplectic-like' Poisson manifolds. We show, under suitable transversality hypotheses, that the pair consisting of the ambient Poisson manifold and the submanifold has unobstructed deformations and that the deformations automatically preserve the Lagrangian-like property.

  6. Parallel Lagrangian models for turbulent transport and chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crone, Gilia Cornelia

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis we give an overview of recent stochastic Lagrangian models and present a new particle model for turbulent dispersion and chemical reactions. Our purpose is to investigate and assess the feasibility of the Lagrangian approach for modelling the turbulent dispersion and chemistry

  7. Flux form Semi-Lagrangian methods for parabolic problems

    CERN Document Server

    Bonaventura, Luca

    2015-01-01

    A semi-Lagrangian method for parabolic problems is proposed, that extends previous work by the authors to achieve a fully conservative, flux-form discretization of linear and nonlinear diffusion equations. A basic consistency and convergence analysis are proposed. Numerical examples validate the proposed method and display its potential for consistent semi-Lagrangian discretization of advection--diffusion and nonlinear parabolic problems.

  8. Lagrangian supersymmetries depending on derivatives. Global analysis and cohomology

    CERN Document Server

    Giachetta, G; Sardanashvily, G

    2004-01-01

    Lagrangian contact supersymmetries (depending on derivatives of arbitrary order) are treated in very general setting. The cohomology of the variational bicomplex on an arbitrary graded manifold and the iterated cohomology of a generic nilpotent contact supersymmetry are computed. In particular, the first variational formula and conservation laws for Lagrangian systems on graded manifolds using contact supersymmetries are obtained.

  9. Geometric Lagrangians for massive higher-spin fields

    CERN Document Server

    Francia, D

    2007-01-01

    Lagrangians for massive, unconstrained, higher-spin bosons and fermions are proposed. The idea is to modify the geometric, gauge invariant Lagrangians describing the corresponding massless theories by the addition of suitable quadratic polynomials. These polynomials provide generalisations of the Fierz-Pauli mass term containing all possible traces of the basic field. No auxiliary fields are needed.

  10. Lagrangian filtered density function for LES-based stochastic modelling of turbulent particle-laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Alessio; Marchioli, Cristian; Chibbaro, Sergio

    2016-11-01

    The Eulerian-Lagrangian approach based on Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) is one of the most promising and viable numerical tools to study particle-laden turbulent flows, when the computational cost of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) becomes too expensive. The applicability of this approach is however limited if the effects of the Sub-Grid Scales (SGSs) of the flow on particle dynamics are neglected. In this paper, we propose to take these effects into account by means of a Lagrangian stochastic SGS model for the equations of particle motion. The model extends to particle-laden flows the velocity-filtered density function method originally developed for reactive flows. The underlying filtered density function is simulated through a Lagrangian Monte Carlo procedure that solves a set of Stochastic Differential Equations (SDEs) along individual particle trajectories. The resulting model is tested for the reference case of turbulent channel flow, using a hybrid algorithm in which the fluid velocity field is provided by LES and then used to advance the SDEs in time. The model consistency is assessed in the limit of particles with zero inertia, when "duplicate fields" are available from both the Eulerian LES and the Lagrangian tracking. Tests with inertial particles were performed to examine the capability of the model to capture the particle preferential concentration and near-wall segregation. Upon comparison with DNS-based statistics, our results show improved accuracy and considerably reduced errors with respect to the case in which no SGS model is used in the equations of particle motion.

  11. Numerical methods for Eulerian and Lagrangian conservation laws

    CERN Document Server

    Després, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the interplay between Eulerian and Lagrangian conservation laws for systems that admit physical motivation and originate from continuum mechanics. Ultimately, it highlights what is specific to and beneficial in the Lagrangian approach and its numerical methods. The two first chapters present a selection of well-known features of conservation laws and prepare readers for the subsequent chapters, which are dedicated to the analysis and discretization of Lagrangian systems. The text is at the frontier of applied mathematics and scientific computing and appeals to students and researchers interested in Lagrangian-based computational fluid dynamics. It also serves as an introduction to the recent corner-based Lagrangian finite volume techniques.

  12. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Geometries. Applications to Analytical Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Miron, Radu

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present text is twofold: to provide a compendium of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian geometries and to introduce and investigate new analytical Mechanics: Finslerian, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian. The fundamental equations (or evolution equations) of these Mechanics are derived from the variational calculus applied to the integral of action and these can be studied by using the methods of Lagrangian or Hamiltonian geometries. More general, the notions of higher order Lagrange or Hamilton spaces have been introduced and developed by the present author. The applications led to the notions of Lagrangian or Hamiltonian Analytical Mechanics of higher order. For short, in this text we aim to solve some difficult problems: The problem of geometrization of classical non conservative mechanical systems; The foundations of geometrical theory of new mechanics: Finslerian, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian;To determine the evolution equations of the classical mechanical systems for whose external forces depend on the hig...

  13. Multi-Scale Analysis of Lagrangian Properties of Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, Michael; Lalescu, Cristian

    2016-11-01

    Turbulence is a multi-scale problem in space and time with a broad range of strongly interacting degrees of freedom. Lagrangian tracer particles advected with the flow sample this spatio-temporal complexity. This naturally leads to the question of how Lagrangian properties are affected by the scales of turbulence. We attempt to answer this question numerically and theoretically adopting a coarse-graining approach. In an extensive DNS (direct numerical simulation) study, we track tracer particles advected by spatially coarse-grained velocity fields. This allows to distinguish the impact of large-scale sweeping effects and small-scale intermittency on Lagrangian aspects of turbulence. In this presentation we will present results on Lagrangian particle dispersion and velocity fluctuations for various coarse-graining scales. The results will furthermore be discussed in the context of Eulerian-Lagrangian bridging relations.

  14. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian two-scale reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Giannoulis, Johannes; Mielke, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Studying high-dimensional Hamiltonian systems with microstructure, it is an important and challenging problem to identify reduced macroscopic models that describe some effective dynamics on large spatial and temporal scales. This paper concerns the question how reasonable macroscopic Lagrangian and Hamiltonian structures can by derived from the microscopic system. In the first part we develop a general approach to this problem by considering non-canonical Hamiltonian structures on the tangent bundle. This approach can be applied to all Hamiltonian lattices (or Hamiltonian PDEs) and involves three building blocks: (i) the embedding of the microscopic system, (ii) an invertible two-scale transformation that encodes the underlying scaling of space and time, (iii) an elementary model reduction that is based on a Principle of Consistent Expansions. In the second part we exemplify the reduction approach and derive various reduced PDE models for the atomic chain. The reduced equations are either related to long wave...

  15. Lagrangian coherent structures and plasma transport processes

    CERN Document Server

    Falessi, M V; Schep, T J

    2015-01-01

    A dynamical system framework is used to describe transport processes in plasmas embedded in a magnetic field. For periodic systems with one degree of freedom the Poincar\\'e map provides a splitting of the phase space into regions where particles have different kinds of motion: periodic, quasi-periodic or chaotic. The boundaries of these regions are transport barriers; i.e., a trajectory cannot cross such boundaries during the whole evolution of the system. Lagrangian Coherent Structure (LCS) generalize this method to systems with the most general time dependence, splitting the phase space into regions with different qualitative behaviours. This leads to the definition of finite-time transport barriers, i.e. trajectories cannot cross the barrier for a finite amount of time. This methodology can be used to identify fast recirculating regions in the dynamical system and to characterize the transport between them.

  16. Instantons in a Lagrangian model of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Grigorio, Leonardo S; Pereira, Rodrigo M; Chevillard, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The role of instantons is investigated in the Lagrangian model for the velocity gradient evolution known as the Recent Fluid Deformation approximation. After recasting the model into the path-integral formalism, the probability distribution function is computed along with the most probable path in the weak noise limit through the saddle-point approximation. Evaluation of the instanton solution is implemented numerically by means of the iteratively Chernykh-Stepanov method. In the case of the longitudinal velocity gradient statistics, due to symmetry reasons, the number of degrees of freedom can be reduced to one, allowing the pdf to be evaluated analytically as well, thereby enabling a prediction of the scaling of the moments as a function of Reynolds number. It is also shown that the instanton solution lies on the Vieillefosse line concerning the RQ-plane. We illustrate how instantons can be unveiled in the stochastic dynamics performing a conditional statistics.

  17. Holography, chiral Lagrangian and form factor relations

    CERN Document Server

    Zuo, Fen

    2013-01-01

    We perform a detailed study of mesonic properties in a class of holographic models of QCD, which is described by the Yang-Mills plus Chern-Simons action. By decomposing the 5 dimensional gauge field into resonances and integrating out the massive ones, we reproduce the Chiral Perturbative Theory Lagrangian up to ${\\cal O}(p^6)$ and obtain all the relevant low energy constants (LECs). The numerical predictions of the LECs show minor model dependence, and agree reasonably with the determinations from other approaches. Interestingly, various model-independent relations appear among them. Some of these relations are found to be the large-distance limits of universal relations between form factors of the anomalous and even-parity sectors of QCD.

  18. Non-Lagrangian theories from brane junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Ling [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Mitev, Vladimir [Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Mathematik und Inst. fuer Physik; Pomoni, Elli [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Taki, Masato [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan). Mathematical Physics Lab.; Yagi, Futoshi [International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA), Trieste (Italy); INFN, Trieste (Italy); Korea Institute for Advanced Study (KIAS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this article we use 5-brane junctions to study the 5D T{sub N} SCFTs corresponding to the 5D N=1 uplift of the 4D N=2 strongly coupled gauge theories, which are obtained by compactifying N M5 branes on a sphere with three full punctures. Even though these theories have no Lagrangian description, by using the 5-brane junctions proposed by Benini, Benvenuti and Tachikawa, we are able to derive their Seiberg-Witten curves and Nekrasov partition functions. We cross-check our results with the 5D superconformal index proposed by Kim, Kim and Lee. Through the AGTW correspondence, we discuss the relations between 5D superconformal indices and n-point functions of the q-deformed W{sub N} Toda theories.

  19. A perturbative approach to Lagrangian flow networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Naoya; Donges, Jonathan F; Donner, Reik V

    2016-01-01

    Complex network approaches have been successfully applied for studying transport processes in complex systems ranging from road, railway or airline infrastructure over industrial manufacturing to fluid dynamics. Here, we utilize a generic framework for describing the dynamics of geophysical flows such as ocean currents or atmospheric wind fields in terms of Lagrangian flow networks. In this approach, information on the passive advection of particles is transformed into a Markov chain based on transition probabilities of particles between the volume elements of a given partition of space for a fixed time step. We employ perturbation-theoretic methods to investigate the effects of modifications of transport processes in the underlying flow for three different problem classes: efficient absorption (corresponding to particle trapping or leaking), constant input of particles (with additional source terms modeling, e.g., localized contamination), and shifts of the steady state under probability mass conservation (a...

  20. Lagrangian Coherent Structures: Introduction and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, George

    2008-11-01

    Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) are distinguished material surfaces that organize the global mixing and transport of fluid particles. While these surfaces define a skeleton that governs all mixing events even in turbulent flows, LCS remain hidden to traditional coherent structure detecting methods based on vorticity, pressure, streamlines, or other frame-dependent quantities. Here we review the mathematical foundations of LCS and discuss how they can be located in an objective (frame-independent) way in complex flows. We also highlight applications to experimental and numerical flow data analysis. Examples include two-dimensional rotating turbulence, hairpin vortices in three-dimensional numerical simulations, passive ocean pollution control and atmospheric clear-air turbulence detection. Some of these examples will be discussed in more detail in later talks within this minisymposium.

  1. Lagrangian mixing in an axisymmetric hurricane model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Rutherford

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the extension of established Lagrangian mixing measures to make them applicable to data extracted from a 2-D axisymmetric hurricane simulation. Because of the non-steady and unbounded characteristics of the simulation, the previous measures are extended to a moving frame approach to create time-dependent mixing rates that are dependent upon the initial time of particle integration, and are computed for nonlocal regions. The global measures of mixing derived from finite-time Lyapunov exponents, relative dispersion, and a measured mixing rate are applied to distinct regions representing different characteristic feautures within the model. It is shown that these time-dependent mixing rates exhibit correlations with maximal tangential winds during a quasi-steady state, establishing a connection between mixing and hurricane intensity.

  2. On Active Current Selection for Lagrangian Profilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jouffroy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous Lagrangian profilers are now widely used as measurement and monitoring platforms, notably in observation programs as Argo. In a typical mode of operation, the profilers drift passively at their parking depthbefore making a vertical profile to go back to the surface. This paperpresents simple and computationally-efficient control strategies to activelyselect and use ocean currents so that a profiler can autonomously reach adesired destination. After briefly presenting a typical profiler andpossible mechanical modifications for a coastal environment, we introducesimple mathematical models for the profiler and the currents it will use. Wethen present simple feedback controllers that, using the direction of thecurrents and taking into account the configuration of the environment(coastal or deep-sea, is able to steer the profiler to any desiredhorizontal location. To illustrate the approach, a few results are presentedusing both simulated currents and real current velocity profiles from theNorth Sea.

  3. ORBXYZ: A 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. V.; Cohen, R. H.; Ferguson, J. R.; Johnston, B. M.; Sharp, C. B.; Willmann, P. A.

    1981-06-01

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, was modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications.

  4. Graphene oxide-encoded Ag nanoshells with single-particle detection sensitivity towards cancer cell imaging based on SERRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, DaBin; Kang, Homan; Jeon, Su-Ji; Kim, Hye-In; Yang, Jin-Kyoung; Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Sangyeop; Choo, Jaebum; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Kim, Jin Woong; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2015-05-21

    Developing ultrasensitive Raman nanoprobes is one of the emerging interests in the field of biosensing and bioimaging. Herein, we constructed a new type of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering nanoprobe composed of an Ag nanoshell as a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active nanostructure, which was encapsulated with 4,7,10-trioxa-1,13-tridecanediamine-functionalized graphene oxide as an ultrasensitive Raman reporter exhibiting strong resonance Raman scattering including distinct D and G modes. The designed nanoprobe was able to produce much more intense and simpler Raman signals even at a single particle level than the Ag nanoshell bearing a well-known Raman reporter, which is beneficial for the sensitive detection of a target in a complex biological system. Finally, this ultrasensitive nanoprobe successfully demonstrated its potential for bioimaging of cancer cells using Raman spectroscopy.

  5. Single-particle detection of products from atomic and molecular reactions in a cryogenic ion storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, C.; Novotný, O.; Becker, A.; George, S.; Grieser, M.; Hahn, R. von; Meyer, C.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.; Vogel, S.; Wolf, A.

    2017-04-01

    We have used a single-particle detector system, based on secondary electron emission, for counting low-energetic (∼keV/u) massive products originating from atomic and molecular ion reactions in the electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR). The detector is movable within the cryogenic vacuum chamber of CSR, and was used to measure production rates of a variety of charged and neutral daughter particles. In operation at a temperature of ∼ 6 K , the detector is characterised by a high dynamic range, combining a low dark event rate with good high-rate particle counting capability. On-line measurement of the pulse height distributions proved to be an important monitor of the detector response at low temperature. Statistical pulse-height analysis allows to infer the particle detection efficiency of the detector, which has been found to be close to unity also in cryogenic operation at 6 K.

  6. Neutron single-particle strengths at N =40 , 42: Neutron knockout from Ni,7068 ground and isomeric states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, F.; Weisshaar, D.; Gade, A.; Tostevin, J. A.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Albers, M.; Bader, V. M.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J. S.; Brown, B. A.; Campbell, C. M.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chen, J.; Chiara, C. J.; Crawford, H. L.; Hoffman, C. R.; Kondev, F. G.; Korichi, A.; Langer, C.; Lauritsen, T.; Liddick, S. N.; Lunderberg, E.; Noji, S.; Prokop, C.; Stroberg, S. R.; Suchyta, S.; Wimmer, K.; Zhu, S.

    2016-11-01

    The distribution of single-particle strength in Ni,6967 was characterized with one-neutron knockout reactions from intermediate-energy Ni,7068 secondary beams, selectively populating neutron-hole configurations at N =39 and 41, respectively. The spectroscopic strengths deduced from the measured partial cross sections to the individual final states, as tagged by their γ -ray decays, are used to identify and quantify neutron configurations in the wave functions. While 69Ni compares well with shell-model predictions, the results for 67Ni challenge the validity of current effective shell-model Hamiltonians by revealing discrepancies that cannot be explained so far. These results suggest that our understanding of the low-lying states in the neutron-rich, semimagic Ni isotopes may be incomplete and requires further investigation on both the experimental and theoretical sides.

  7. Opportunities and challenges in single-molecule and single-particle fluorescence microscopy for mechanistic studies of chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Thorben; Blum, Suzanne A.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, single-molecule and single-particle fluorescence microscopy has emerged as a tool to investigate chemical systems. After an initial lag of over a decade with respect to biophysical studies, this powerful imaging technique is now revealing mechanisms of 'classical' organic reactions, spatial distribution of chemical reactivity on surfaces and the phase of active catalysts. The recent advance into commercial imaging systems obviates the need for home-built laser systems and thus opens this technique to traditionally trained synthetic chemists. We discuss the requisite photophysical and chemical properties of fluorescent reporters and highlight the main challenges in applying single-molecule techniques to chemical questions. The goal of this Perspective is to provide a snapshot of an emerging multidisciplinary field and to encourage broader use of this young experimental approach that aids the observation of chemical reactions as depicted in many textbooks: molecule by molecule.

  8. Stereoscopy of dust density waves under microgravity: Velocity distributions and phase-resolved single-particle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himpel, Michael, E-mail: himpel@physik.uni-greifswald.de; Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André [Institute of Physics, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Bockwoldt, Tim; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Ole Menzel, Kristoffer [ABB Switzerland Ltd, Corporate Research Center, 5405 Dättwil (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on dust-density waves have been performed in dusty plasmas under the microgravity conditions of parabolic flights. Three-dimensional measurements of a dust density wave on a single particle level are presented. The dust particles have been tracked for many oscillation periods. A Hilbert analysis is applied to obtain trajectory parameters such as oscillation amplitude and three-dimensional velocity amplitude. While the transverse motion is found to be thermal, the velocity distribution in wave propagation direction can be explained by harmonic oscillations with added Gaussian (thermal) noise. Additionally, it is shown that the wave properties can be reconstructed by means of a pseudo-stroboscopic approach. Finally, the energy dissipation mechanism from the kinetic oscillation energy to thermal motion is discussed and presented using phase-resolved analysis.

  9. Planck scale physics of the single-particle Schrödinger equation with gravitational self-interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vikram Soni

    2002-08-01

    We consider the modification of a single-particle Schrödinger equation by the inclusion of an additional gravitational self-potential term which follows from the prescription that the ‘mass-density’ that enters this term is given by $m|\\Psi(\\overrightarrow{r}; t)|^{2}$, where $\\Psi(\\overrightarrow{r}; t)$ is the wave function and is the mass of the particle. This leads to a nonlinear equation, the ‘Newton–Schrödinger’ equation, which has been found to possess stationary self-bound solutions, whose energy can be determined using an asymptotic method. We find that such a particle strongly violates the superposition principle and becomes a black hole as its mass approaches the Planck mass.

  10. Intra-Nuclear Single-Particle Tracking (I-SPT) to Reveal the Functional Architecture of Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Récamier, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome architecture needs to be investigated in relation with the chemical function of DNA. The kinetics of gene expression, DNA replication, and repair are driven by the mechanisms by which a functional nuclear protein finds its substrate in the nucleus. Single-particle tracking (SPT) is a method to quantify fluorescent molecules dynamics from the tracks of the single molecules recorded by high-resolution microscopes. SPT offers direct observation of the movement and single-molecule resolution. Usually SPT is performed on membranes because of higher contrast. Here, we introduce a novel method to record the trajectories of weakly fluorescent molecules in the nucleus of living cells. I-SPT uses some specific detection and analysis tools to enable the computation of reliable statistics on nuclear particle movement.

  11. Single Particle Deformation and Analysis of Silica-Coated Gold Nanorods before and after Femtosecond Laser Pulse Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Wiebke; Deng, Tian-Song; Goris, Bart; van Huis, Marijn A; Bals, Sara; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2016-03-01

    We performed single particle deformation experiments on silica-coated gold nanorods under femtosecond (fs) illumination. Changes in the particle shape were analyzed by electron microscopy and associated changes in the plasmon resonance by electron energy loss spectroscopy. Silica-coated rods were found to be more stable compared to uncoated rods but could still be deformed via an intermediate bullet-like shape for silica shell thicknesses of 14 nm. Changes in the size ratio of the rods after fs-illumination resulted in blue-shifting of the longitudinal plasmon resonances. Two-dimensional spatial mapping of the plasmon resonances revealed that the flat side of the bullet-like particles showed a less pronounced longitudinal plasmonic electric field enhancement. These findings were confirmed by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. Furthermore, at higher laser fluences size reduction of the particles was found as well as for particles that were not completely deformed yet.

  12. Expansion-maximization-compression algorithm with spherical harmonics for single particle imaging with x-ray lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamant, Julien; Le Bihan, Nicolas; Martin, Andrew V; Manton, Jonathan H

    2016-05-01

    In three-dimensional (3D) single particle imaging with x-ray free-electron lasers, particle orientation is not recorded during measurement but is instead recovered as a necessary step in the reconstruction of a 3D image from the diffraction data. Here we use harmonic analysis on the sphere to cleanly separate the angular and radial degrees of freedom of this problem, providing new opportunities to efficiently use data and computational resources. We develop the expansion-maximization-compression algorithm into a shell-by-shell approach and implement an angular bandwidth limit that can be gradually raised during the reconstruction. We study the minimum number of patterns and minimum rotation sampling required for a desired angular and radial resolution. These extensions provide new avenues to improve computational efficiency and speed of convergence, which are critically important considering the very large datasets expected from experiment.

  13. Insight into the three-dimensional structure of maize chlorotic mottle virus revealed by Cryo-EM single particle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Qin-Fen; Gao, Yuan-Zhu; Zhou, Xue-Ping; Ji, Gang; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Hong, Jian; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2015-11-01

    Maize chlorotic mottle virus (MCMV) is the only member of the Machlomovirus genus in the family Tombusviridae. Here, we obtained the Cryo-EM structure of MCMV by single particle analysis with most local resolution at approximately 4 Å. The Cα backbone was built based on residues with bulky side chains. The resolved C-terminus of the capsid protein subunit and obvious openings at the 2-fold axis demonstrated the compactness of the asymmetric unit, which indicates an important role in the stability of MCMV. The Asp116 residue from each subunit around the 5-fold and 3-fold axes contributed to the negative charges in the centers of the pentamers and hexamers, which might serve as a solid barrier against the leakage of genomic RNA. Finally, the loops most exposed on the surface were analyzed and are proposed to be potential functional sites related to MCMV transmission.

  14. Validation of Gold and Silver Nanoparticle Analysis in Fruit Juices by Single-Particle ICP-MS without Sample Pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzler, Markus; Küllmer, Fabian; Hirtz, Annika; Günther, Klaus

    2016-05-25

    With the increasing use of nanoparticles in consumer products, the need for validated quantitation methods also rises. This becomes even more urgent because the risks of nanomaterials are still not conclusively assessed. Fast, accurate, and robust single-particle (sp) ICP-MS is a promising technique as it is capable of counting and sizing particles at very low concentrations at the same time. Another feature is the simultaneous distinction between dissolved and particulate analytes. The present study shows, for the first time to our knowledge, a method validation for the rapid analysis of silver and gold nanoparticles with sp-ICP-MS in fruit juices without sample preparation. The investigated matrices water, orange juice, and apple juice were spiked with particles and only diluted prior to measurement without using a digestion reagent. The validations regarding particle size are successful according to the German GTFCh's guideline with deviations of accuracy and precision below 15%.

  15. Fluidity evaluation of cell membrane model formed on graphene oxide with single particle tracking using quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Motegi, Toshinori; Iwasa, Seiji; Sandhu, Adarsh; Tero, Ryugo

    2015-04-01

    The lipid bilayer is the fundamental structure of plasma membranes, and artificial lipid bilayer membranes are used as model systems of cell membranes. Recently we reported the formation of a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) on graphene oxide (GO) by the vesicle fusion method. In this study, we conjugated a quantum dot (Qdot) on the SLB surface as a fluorescence probe brighter than dye-labeled lipid molecules, to qualitatively evaluate the fluidity of the SLB on GO by the single particle tracking method. We obtained the diffusion coefficient of the Qdot-conjugated lipids in the SLB on GO. We also performed the Qdot conjugation on the SLB containing a lipid conjugated with polyethylene glycol, to prevent the nonspecific adsorption of Qdots. The difference in the diffusion coefficients between the SLBs on the GO and the bare SiO2 regions was evaluated from the trajectory of single Qdot-conjugated lipid diffusing between the two regions.

  16. GPU-enabled FREALIGN: accelerating single particle 3D reconstruction and refinement in Fourier space on graphics processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueming; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Cheng, Yifan

    2010-12-01

    Among all the factors that determine the resolution of a 3D reconstruction by single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM), the number of particle images used in the dataset plays a major role. More images generally yield better resolution, assuming the imaged protein complex is conformationally and compositionally homogeneous. To facilitate processing of very large datasets, we modified the computer program, FREALIGN, to execute the computationally most intensive procedures on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). Using the modified program, the execution speed increased between 10 and 240-fold depending on the task performed by FREALIGN. Here we report the steps necessary to parallelize critical FREALIGN subroutines and evaluate its performance on computers with multiple GPUs.

  17. Opportunities and challenges in single-molecule and single-particle fluorescence microscopy for mechanistic studies of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Thorben; Blum, Suzanne A

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, single-molecule and single-particle fluorescence microscopy has emerged as a tool to investigate chemical systems. After an initial lag of over a decade with respect to biophysical studies, this powerful imaging technique is now revealing mechanisms of 'classical' organic reactions, spatial distribution of chemical reactivity on surfaces and the phase of active catalysts. The recent advance into commercial imaging systems obviates the need for home-built laser systems and thus opens this technique to traditionally trained synthetic chemists. We discuss the requisite photophysical and chemical properties of fluorescent reporters and highlight the main challenges in applying single-molecule techniques to chemical questions. The goal of this Perspective is to provide a snapshot of an emerging multidisciplinary field and to encourage broader use of this young experimental approach that aids the observation of chemical reactions as depicted in many textbooks: molecule by molecule.

  18. Single-particle tracking of immunoglobulin E receptors (FcεRI) in micron-sized clusters and receptor patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spendier, Kathrin; Lidke, Keith A; Lidke, Diane S; Thomas, James L

    2012-02-17

    When mast cells contact a monovalent antigen-bearing fluid lipid bilayer, IgE-loaded FcεRI receptors aggregate at contact points and trigger degranulation and the release of immune activators. We used two-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and single-particle tracking to show that most fluorescently labeled receptor complexes diffuse freely within these micron-size clusters, with a diffusion coefficient comparable to free receptors in resting cells. At later times, when the small clusters coalesce to form larger patches, receptors diffuse even more rapidly. In all cases, Monte Carlo diffusion simulations ensured that the tracking results were free of bias, and distinguished biological from statistical variation. These results show the diversity in receptor mobility in mast cells, demonstrating at least three distinct states of receptor diffusivity.

  19. Single Particle and PET-based Platform for Identifying Optimal Plasmonic Nano-Heaters for Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Norregaard, Kamilla; Tian, Pengfei;

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticle-based photothermal cancer therapy is a promising new tool to inflict localized and irreversible damage to tumor tissue by hyperthermia, without harming surrounding healthy tissue. We developed a single particle and positron emission tomography (PET)-based platform...... that PET imaging could be reliably used to monitor early treatment response of photothermal treatment. This multidisciplinary approach provides a much needed platform to benchmark the emerging plethora of novel plasmonic nanoparticles for their potential for photothermal cancer therapy....... predicted photo-absorption. In vivo, the heat generation of irradiated nanoparticles was evaluated in human tumor xenografts in mice using 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET imaging. To validate the use of this platform, we quantified the photothermal efficiency of near infrared resonant...

  20. Impact of and correction for instrument sensitivity drift on nanoparticle size measurements by single-particle ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hadri, Hind; Petersen, Elijah J; Winchester, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    The effect of ICP-MS instrument sensitivity drift on the accuracy of nanoparticle (NP) size measurements using single particle (sp)ICP-MS is investigated. Theoretical modeling and experimental measurements of the impact of instrument sensitivity drift are in agreement and indicate that drift can impact the measured size of spherical NPs by up to 25 %. Given this substantial bias in the measured size, a method was developed using an internal standard to correct for the impact of drift and was shown to accurately correct for a decrease in instrument sensitivity of up to 50 % for 30 and 60 nm gold nanoparticles. Graphical Abstract Correction of nanoparticle size measurement by spICP-MS using an internal standard.

  1. GPU-enabled FREALIGN: Accelerating single particle 3D reconstruction and refinement in Fourier space on graphics processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueming; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Cheng, Yifan

    2010-01-01

    Among all the factors that determine the resolution of a three-dimensional reconstruction by single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM), the number of particle images used in the dataset plays a major role. More images generally yield better resolution, assuming the imaged protein complex is conformationally and compositionally homogeneous. To facilitate processing of very large datasets, we modified the computer program, FREALIGN, to execute the computationally most intensive procedures on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). Using the modified program, the execution speed increased between 10 and 240-fold depending on the task performed by FREALIGN. Here we report the steps necessary to parallelize critical FREALIGN subroutines and evaluate its performance on computers with multiple GPUs. PMID:20558298

  2. Cell Locating with the Image Analysis System of the CAS-LIBB Single-Particle Microbeam Facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiaohua; Wang Shaohu; Yu Zengliang

    2005-01-01

    A single-particle microbeam facility has been constructed at the Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering (LIBB), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). At the CAS-LIBB microbeam facility, we have developed protocols to place exact numbers of charged particles through nuclear centroids of cells, at defined positions in the cytoplasm relative to the nucleus, and through defined fractions of cells in a population. In this paper, we address the methods for nucleus, cytoplasm and bystander (either a single or an exact number of ions is delivered to a certain percentage of cells in a population to study the bystander effects of radiation) irradiation in detail from the precision of target finding and cell locating in the image analysis system. Moreover, for cells touching slightly in an image, a watershed method is used to separate these touching objects;after that, the number of objects in an image is counted accurately and the irradiation points are located precisely.

  3. Structural biology at the single particle level: imaging tobacco mosaic virus by low-energy electron holography

    CERN Document Server

    Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2014-01-01

    Modern structural biology relies on NMR, X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy for gaining information on biomolecules at nanometer, sub-nanometer or atomic resolution. All these methods, however, require averaging over a vast ensemble of entities and hence knowledge on the conformational landscape of an individual particle is lost. Unfortunately, there are now strong indications that even X-ray free electron lasers will not be able to image individual molecules but will require nanocrystal samples. Here, we show that non-destructive structural biology of single particles has now become possible by means of low-energy electron holography. Individual tobacco mosaic viruses deposited on ultraclean freestanding graphene are imaged at one nanometer resolution revealing structural details arising from the helical arrangement of the outer protein shell of the virus. Since low-energy electron holography is a lens-less technique and since electrons with a deBroglie wavelength of approximately 1 Angstrom ...

  4. Detection of zinc oxide and cerium dioxide nanoparticles during drinking water treatment by rapid single particle ICP-MS methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Ariel R; Adams, Craig D; Ma, Yinfa; Stephan, Chady; Eichholz, Todd; Shi, Honglan

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) entering water systems are an emerging concern as NPs are more frequently manufactured and used. Single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SP-ICP-MS) methods were validated to detect Zn- and Ce-containing NPs in surface and drinking water using a short dwell time of 0.1 ms or lower, ensuring precision in single particle detection while eliminating the need for sample preparation. Using this technique, information regarding NP size, size distribution, particle concentration, and dissolved ion concentrations was obtained simultaneously. The fates of Zn- and Ce-NPs, including those found in river water and added engineered NPs, were evaluated by simulating a typical drinking water treatment process. Lime softening, alum coagulation, powdered activated carbon sorption, and disinfection by free chlorine were simulated sequentially using river water. Lime softening removed 38-53 % of Zn-containing and ZnO NPs and >99 % of Ce-containing and CeO2 NPs. Zn-containing and ZnO NP removal increased to 61-74 % and 77-79 % after alum coagulation and disinfection, respectively. Source and drinking water samples were collected from three large drinking water treatment facilities and analyzed for Zn- and Ce-containing NPs. Each facility had these types of NPs present. In all cases, particle concentrations were reduced by a minimum of 60 % and most were reduced by >95 % from source water to finished drinking water. This study concludes that uncoated ZnO and CeO2 NPs may be effectively removed by conventional drinking water treatments including lime softening and alum coagulation.

  5. Particle-fluorescence spectrometer for real-time single-particle measurements of atmospheric organic carbon and biological aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Pinnick, Ronald G; Hill, Steven C; Chang, Richard K

    2009-01-15

    A particle-fluorescence spectrometer (PFS) for real-time measurements of single-particle UV-laser-induced fluorescence (UV-LIF) excited with a pulsed (263-nm) laser is reported. The dispersed UV-LIF spectra are measured by a 32-anode PMT detector with spectral coverage from 280-600 nm. The PFS represents a significant improvement over our previous apparatus [Pinnick et al., Atmos. Environ. 2004, 38, 1657] and can (1) measure fluorescence spectra of bacterial particles having light-scattering sizes as small as 1 microm (previously limited to about 3 microm) and so can measure particles with size in the range of 1-10 microm, (2) measure each particle's elastic scattering which can be used to estimate particle size (not available previously), (3) measure single-particle fluorescence spectra with a laser and detector that can record spectra as fast as 90,000/s, although the highest rates we have found experimentally in atmospheric measurements is only several hundred per second (previously limited by detectors to only 25/s), and (4) provide a time stamp for a data block of spectra with time resolution from 10 ms to 10 min. In addition, the PFS has been modified to be more robust, transportable, and smaller. The use of an aerodynamic-focusing sheath inlet nozzle assembly has improved the sample rate. The PFS has been employed to measure UV-LIF spectra from individual atmospheric particles during October-December 2006 and January-May 2008 in New Haven, CT, and during January-May 2007 in Las Cruces, NM.

  6. Single-particle analysis reveals shutoff control of the Arabidopsis ammonium transporter AMT1;3 by clustering and internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinli; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Luo, Wangxi; Li, Ruili; He, Qihua; Fang, Xiaohong; Michele, Roberto De; Ast, Cindy; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Lin, Jinxing

    2013-08-01

    Ammonium is a preferred source of nitrogen for plants but is toxic at high levels. Plant ammonium transporters (AMTs) play an essential role in NH4(+) uptake, but the mechanism by which AMTs are regulated remains unclear. To study how AMTs are regulated in the presence of ammonium, we used variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy for single-particle fluorescence imaging of EGFP-tagged AMT1;3 on the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis root cells at various ammonium levels. We demonstrated that AMT1;3-EGFP dynamically appeared and disappeared on the plasma membrane as moving fluorescent spots in low oligomeric states under N-deprived and N-sufficient conditions. Under external high-ammonium stress, however, AMT1;3-EGFPs were found to amass into clusters, which were then internalized into the cytoplasm. A similar phenomenon also occurred in the glutamine synthetase mutant gln1;2 background. Single-particle analysis of AMT1;3-EGFPs in the clathrin heavy chain 2 mutant (chc2 mutant) and Flotllin1 artificial microRNA (Flot1 amiRNA) backgrounds, together with chemical inhibitor treatments, demonstrated that the endocytosis of AMT1;3 clusters induced by high-ammonium stress could occur mainly through clathrin-mediated endocytic pathways, but the contribution of microdomain-associated endocytic pathway cannot be excluded in the internalization. Our results revealed that the clustering and endocytosis of AMT1;3 provides an effective mechanism by which plant cells can avoid accumulation of toxic levels of ammonium by eliminating active AMT1;3 from the plasma membrane.

  7. Single particle aerosol mass spectrometry of coal combustion particles associated with high lung cancer rates in Xuanwei and Fuyuan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Senlin; Tan, Zhengying; Liu, Pinwei; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Dingyu; Yu, Shang; Cheng, Ping; Win, Myat Sandar; Hu, Jiwen; Tian, Linwei; Wu, Minghong; Yonemochi, Shinich; Wang, Qingyue

    2017-11-01

    Coal combustion particles (CCPs) are linked to the high incidence of lung cancer in Xuanwei and in Fuyuan, China, but studies on the chemical composition of the CCPs are still limited. Single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was recently developed to measure the chemical composition and size of single particles in real-time. In this study, SPAMS was used to measure individual combustion particles emitted from Xuanwei and Fuyuan coal samples and the results were compared with those by ICP-MS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The total of 38,372 particles mass-analyzed by SPAMS can be divided into 9 groups based on their chemical composition and their number percentages: carbonaceous, Na-rich, K-rich, Al-rich, Fe-rich, Si-rich, Ca-rich, heavy metal-bearing, and PAH-bearing particles. The carbonaceous and PAH-bearing particles are enriched in the size range below 0.56 μm, Fe-bearing particles range from 0.56 to 1.0 μm in size, and heavy metals such as Ti, V, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Pb have diameters below 1 μm. The TEM results show that the particles from Xuanwei and Fuyuan coal combustion can be classified into soot aggregates, Fe-rich particles, heavy metal containing particles, and mineral particles. Non-volatile particles detected by SPAMS could also be observed with TEM. The number percentages by SPAMS also correlate with the mass concentrations measured by ICP-MS. Our results could provide valuable insight for understanding high lung cancer incidence in the area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A reduction of order two for infinite-order Lagrangians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaén, X.; Llosa, J.; Molina, A.

    1986-10-01

    Given a Lagrangian system depending on the position derivatives of any order, and assuming that certain conditions are satisfied, a second-order differential system is obtained such that its solutions also satisfy the Euler equations derived from the original Lagrangian. A generalization of the singular Lagrangian formalism permits a reduction of order keeping the canonical formalism in sight. Finally, the general results obtained in the first part of the paper are applied to Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics for two charged point particles up to order 1/c4.

  9. In defence of naivete The conceptual status of Lagrangian QFT

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, D

    2001-01-01

    I analyse the conceptual and mathematical foundations of Lagrangian quantum field theory (that is, the "naive" quantum field theory used in mainstream physics, as opposed to algebraic quantum field theory). The objective is to see whether Lagrangian quantum field theory has a sufficiently firm conceptual and mathematical basis to be a legitimate object of foundational study, or whether it is too ill-defined. The analysis covers renormalisation and infinities, inequivalent representations, and the concept of localised states; the conclusion is that Lagrangian QFT (at least as described here) is a perfectly respectable physical theory, albeit somewhat different in certain respects from most of those studied in foundational work.

  10. Influence of Gold Coating and Interplate Voltage on the Performance of Chevron Micro-Channel Plates for the Time and Space Resolved Single Particle Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Hoendervanger, Lynn; Aspect, Alain; Westbrook, Christoph I; Dowek, Danielle; PICARD, Yan; Boiron, Denis

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of two sets of Micro-Channel Plates used for time and space resolved single particle detection. We investigate the effects of the gold layer and that of introducing an interplate voltage between the two chevron plates for the detection of single particles. We find that the gold layer increases the count rate of the detector and the pulse amplitude as previously reported for non-spatially resolved setups. The interplate voltage also increases count rates. In addition, we find that the interplate voltage leads to better spatial accuracy in determining the arrival position of incoming single particles (by 20%) while the gold layer has a negative effect (by 30%).

  11. Lagrangian Volume Deformations around Simulated Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Robles, S; Oñorbe, J; Martínez-Serrano, F J

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the local evolution of 206 Lagrangian Volumes (LVs) selected at high redshift around galaxy seeds, identified in a large-volume $\\Lambda$CDM hydrodynamical simulation. The LVs have a mass range of $1 - 1500 \\times 10^{10} M_\\odot$. We follow the dynamical evolution of the density field inside these initially spherical LVs from $z=10$ up to $z_{\\rm low}= 0.05$, witnessing highly non-linear, anisotropic mass rearrangements within them, leading to the emergence of the local cosmic web (CW). These mass arrangements have been analysed in terms of the reduced inertia tensor $I_{ij}^r$, focusing on the evolution of the principal axes of inertia and their corresponding eigen directions, and paying particular attention to the times when the evolution of these two structural elements declines. In addition, mass and component effects along this process have also been investigated. We have found that deformations are led by DM dynamics and they transform most of the initially spherical L...

  12. One-loop effective lagrangians after matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguila, F. del; Santiago, J. [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos and CAFPE, Granada (Spain); Kunszt, Z. [ETH Zuerich, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2016-05-15

    We discuss the limitations of the covariant derivative expansion prescription advocated to compute the one-loop Standard Model (SM) effective lagrangian when the heavy fields couple linearly to the SM. In particular, one-loop contributions resulting from the exchange of both heavy and light fields must be explicitly taken into account through matching because the proposed functional approach alone does not account for them. We review a simple case with a heavy scalar singlet of charge -1 to illustrate the argument. As two other examples where this matching is needed and this functional method gives a vanishing result, up to renormalization of the heavy sector parameters, we re-evaluate the one-loop corrections to the T-parameter due to a heavy scalar triplet with vanishing hypercharge coupling to the Brout-Englert-Higgs boson and to a heavy vector-like quark singlet of charged 2/3 mixing with the top quark, respectively. In all cases we make use of a new code for matching fundamental and effective theories in models with arbitrary heavy field additions. (orig.)

  13. Lagrangian based methods for coherent structure detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allshouse, Michael R., E-mail: mallshouse@chaos.utexas.edu [Center for Nonlinear Dynamics and Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Peacock, Thomas, E-mail: tomp@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    There has been a proliferation in the development of Lagrangian analytical methods for detecting coherent structures in fluid flow transport, yielding a variety of qualitatively different approaches. We present a review of four approaches and demonstrate the utility of these methods via their application to the same sample analytic model, the canonical double-gyre flow, highlighting the pros and cons of each approach. Two of the methods, the geometric and probabilistic approaches, are well established and require velocity field data over the time interval of interest to identify particularly important material lines and surfaces, and influential regions, respectively. The other two approaches, implementing tools from cluster and braid theory, seek coherent structures based on limited trajectory data, attempting to partition the flow transport into distinct regions. All four of these approaches share the common trait that they are objective methods, meaning that their results do not depend on the frame of reference used. For each method, we also present a number of example applications ranging from blood flow and chemical reactions to ocean and atmospheric flows.

  14. Sigma Decomposition: The CP-Odd Lagrangian

    CERN Document Server

    Hierro, I M; Rigolin, and S

    2015-01-01

    In Alonso et al., JHEP 12 (2014) 034, the CP-even sector of the effective chiral Lagrangian for a generic composite Higgs model with a symmetric coset has been constructed, up to four momenta. In this paper, the CP-odd couplings are studied within the same context. If only the Standard Model bosonic sources of custodial symmetry breaking are considered, then at most six independent operators form a basis. One of them is the weak-$\\theta$ term linked to non-perturbative sources of CP viola- tion, while the others describe CP-odd perturbative couplings between the Standard Model gauge bosons and an Higgs-like scalar belonging to the Goldstone boson sector. The procedure is then applied to three distinct exemplifying frameworks: the original $SU(5)/SO(5)$ Georgi-Kaplan model, the minimal custodial-preserving $SO(5)/SO(4)$ model and the minimal $SU(3)/(SU(2)\\times U(1))$ model, which intrinsically breaks cus- todial symmetry. Moreover, the projection of the high-energy electroweak effective theory to the low-ener...

  15. High Order Semi-Lagrangian Advection Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaga, Carlos; Mandujano, Francisco; Becerra, Julian

    2014-11-01

    In most fluid phenomena, advection plays an important roll. A numerical scheme capable of making quantitative predictions and simulations must compute correctly the advection terms appearing in the equations governing fluid flow. Here we present a high order forward semi-Lagrangian numerical scheme specifically tailored to compute material derivatives. The scheme relies on the geometrical interpretation of material derivatives to compute the time evolution of fields on grids that deform with the material fluid domain, an interpolating procedure of arbitrary order that preserves the moments of the interpolated distributions, and a nonlinear mapping strategy to perform interpolations between undeformed and deformed grids. Additionally, a discontinuity criterion was implemented to deal with discontinuous fields and shocks. Tests of pure advection, shock formation and nonlinear phenomena are presented to show performance and convergence of the scheme. The high computational cost is considerably reduced when implemented on massively parallel architectures found in graphic cards. The authors acknowledge funding from Fondo Sectorial CONACYT-SENER Grant Number 42536 (DGAJ-SPI-34-170412-217).

  16. Sea Fog Forecasting with Lagrangian Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    In 1913, G. I. Taylor introduced us to a Lagrangian view of sea fog formation. He conducted his study off the coast of Newfoundland in the aftermath of the Titanic disaster. We briefly review Taylor's classic work and then apply these same principles to a case of sea fog formation and dissipation off the coast of California. The resources used in this study consist of: 1) land-based surface and upper-air observations, 2) NDBC (National Data Buoy Center) observations from moored buoys equipped to measure dew point temperature as well as the standard surface observations at sea (wind, sea surface temperature, pressure, and air temperature), 3) satellite observations of cloud, and 4) a one-dimensional (vertically directed) boundary layer model that tracks with the surface air motion and makes use of sophisticated turbulence-radiation parameterizations. Results of the investigation indicate that delicate interplay and interaction between the radiation and turbulence processes makes accurate forecasts of sea fog onset unlikely in the near future. This pessimistic attitude stems from inadequacy of the existing network of observations and uncertainties in modeling dynamical processes within the boundary layer.

  17. Lagrangian Hydrocode Simulations of Tsunamigenic, Subaerial Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaiger, H. F.; Parsons, J.; Higman, B.

    2006-12-01

    The interaction of debris flows, both subaqueous and subaerial, with bodies of water can produce tsunamis with a locally devastating impact. When debris flows begin above the water surface, the impact can produce a large air cavity, significantly increasing the effective volume of water displaced and complicating efforts to model the resulting tsunami. Because grid-based, Eulerian numerical methods have an inherent difficulty tracking material boundaries, we have implemented a particle-based, Lagrangian model (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics). The use of a particle model removes the common numerical difficulties associated with large deformation, multi-phase flows such as the numerical diffusion of material boundaries. We treat the debris flow as an incompressible, viscous fluid and the body of water as inviscid. Other rheologies of the debris flow (Mohr-Coulomb or Bingham plastic) can be included through the use of a non-linear viscosity. We apply this model to study the 1958 Lituya Bay landslide and resulting tsunami. Our simulation results compare favorably with field observations as well as a scaled laboratory experiment and a numerical study using an AMR Eulerian compressible fluid model.

  18. Disentangling the Cosmic Web with Lagrangian Submanifold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandarin, Sergei F.; Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2016-10-01

    The Cosmic Web is a complicated highly-entangled geometrical object. Remarkably it has formed from practically Gaussian initial conditions, which may be regarded as the simplest departure from exactly uniform universe in purely deterministic mapping. The full complexity of the web is revealed neither in configuration no velocity spaces considered separately. It can be fully appreciated only in six-dimensional (6D) phase space. However, studies of the phase space is complicated by the fact that every projection of it on a three-dimensional (3D) space is multivalued and contained caustics. In addition phase space is not a metric space that complicates studies of geometry. We suggest to use Lagrangian submanifold i.e., x = x(q), where both x and q are 3D vectors instead of the phase space for studies the complexity of cosmic web in cosmological N-body dark matter simulations. Being fully equivalent in dynamical sense to the phase space it has an advantage of being a single valued and also metric space.

  19. Top marine predators track Lagrangian coherent structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew Kai, Emilie; Rossi, Vincent; Sudre, Joel; Weimerskirch, Henri; Lopez, Cristobal; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Marsac, Francis; Garçon, Veronique

    2009-05-19

    Meso- and submesoscales (fronts, eddies, filaments) in surface ocean flow have a crucial influence on marine ecosystems. Their dynamics partly control the foraging behavior and the displacement of marine top predators (tuna, birds, turtles, and cetaceans). In this work we focus on the role of submesoscale structures in the Mozambique Channel in the distribution of a marine predator, the Great Frigatebird. Using a newly developed dynamic concept, the finite-size Lyapunov exponent (FSLE), we identified Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) present in the surface flow in the channel over a 2-month observation period (August and September 2003). By comparing seabird satellite positions with LCS locations, we demonstrate that frigatebirds track precisely these structures in the Mozambique Channel, providing the first evidence that a top predator is able to track these FSLE ridges to locate food patches. After comparing bird positions during long and short trips and different parts of these trips, we propose several hypotheses to understand how frigatebirds can follow these LCSs. The birds might use visual and/or olfactory cues and/or atmospheric current changes over the structures to move along these biologic corridors. The birds being often associated with tuna schools around foraging areas, a thorough comprehension of their foraging behavior and movement during the breeding season is crucial not only to seabird ecology but also to an appropriate ecosystemic approach to fisheries in the channel.

  20. Single-particle and collective excitations in quantum wires made up of vertically stacked quantum dots: zero magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S

    2011-09-28

    We report on the theoretical investigation of the elementary electronic excitations in a quantum wire made up of vertically stacked self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots. The length scales (of a few nanometers) involved in the experimental setups prompt us to consider an infinitely periodic system of two-dimensionally confined (InAs) quantum dot layers separated by GaAs spacers. The resultant quantum wire is characterized by a two-dimensional harmonic confining potential in the x-y plane and a periodic (Kronig-Penney) potential along the z (or the growth) direction within the tight-binding approximation. Since the wells and barriers are formed from two different materials, we employ the Bastard's boundary conditions in order to determine the eigenfunctions along the z direction. These wave functions are then used to generate the Wannier functions, which, in turn, constitute the legitimate Bloch functions that govern the electron dynamics along the direction of periodicity. Thus, the Bloch functions and the Hermite functions together characterize the whole system. We then make use of the Bohm-Pines' (full) random-phase approximation in order to derive a general nonlocal, dynamic dielectric function. Thus, developed theoretical framework is then specified to work within a (lowest miniband and) two-subband model that enables us to scrutinize the single-particle as well as collective responses of the system. We compute and discuss the behavior of the eigenfunctions, band-widths, density of states, Fermi energy, single-particle and collective excitations, and finally size up the importance of studying the inverse dielectric function in relation with the quantum transport phenomena. It is remarkable to notice how the variation in the barrier- and well-widths can allow us to tailor the excitation spectrum in the desired energy range. Given the advantage of the vertically stacked quantum dots over the planar ones and the foreseen applications in the single-electron devices

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of the structure and single-particle dynamics of mixtures of divalent salts and ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-González, Víctor; Docampo-Álvarez, Borja; Gallego, Luis J.; Varela, Luis M., E-mail: luismiguel.varela@usc.es [Grupo de Nanomateriais e Materia Branda, Departamento de Física da Materia Condensada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Vida s/n, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Cabeza, Oscar [Facultade de Ciencias, Universidade da Coruña, Campus A Zapateira s/n, E-15008 A Coruña (Spain); Fedorov, Maxim [Department of Physics, Scottish University Physics Alliance (SUPA), University of Strathclyde, John Anderson Bldg., 107 Rottenrow East, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Lynden-Bell, Ruth M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-28

    We report a molecular dynamics study of the structure and single-particle dynamics of mixtures of a protic (ethylammonium nitrate) and an aprotic (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexaflurophosphate [BMIM][PF{sub 6}]) room-temperature ionic liquids doped with magnesium and calcium salts with a common anion at 298.15 K and 1 atm. The solvation of these divalent cations in dense ionic environments is analyzed by means of apparent molar volumes of the mixtures, radial distribution functions, and coordination numbers. For the protic mixtures, the effect of salt concentration on the network of hydrogen bonds is also considered. Moreover, single-particle dynamics of the salt cations is studied by means of their velocity autocorrelation functions and vibrational densities of states, explicitly analyzing the influence of salt concentration, and cation charge and mass on these magnitudes. The effect of the valency of the salt cation on these properties is considered comparing the results with those for the corresponding mixtures with lithium salts. We found that the main structural and dynamic features of the local solvation of divalent cations in ionic liquids are similar to those of monovalent salts, with cations being localized in the polar nanoregions of the bulk mixture coordinated in monodentate and bidentate coordination modes by the [NO{sub 3}]{sup −} and [PF{sub 6}]{sup −} anions. However, stronger electrostatic correlations of these polar nanoregions than in mixtures with salts with monovalent cations are found. The vibrational modes of the ionic liquid (IL) are seen to be scarcely affected by the addition of the salt, and the effect of mass and charge on the vibrational densities of states of the dissolved cations is reported. Cation mass is seen to exert a deeper influence than charge on the low-frequency vibrational spectra, giving a red shift of the vibrational modes and a virtual suppression of the higher energy vibrational modes for the heavier Ca{sup 2

  2. A constraint algorithm for singular Lagrangians subjected to nonholonomic constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Leon, M. [Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); de Diego, D.M. [Departamento de Economia Aplicada Cuantitativa, Facultad de Ciencias Economicas y Empresariales, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    1997-06-01

    We construct a constraint algorithm for singular Lagrangian systems subjected to nonholonomic constraints which generalizes that of Dirac for constrained Hamiltonian systems. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. A Dynamic Job Shop Scheduling Method Based on Lagrangian Relaxation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Due to the complexity of dynamic job shop scheduling in flexible manufacturing s ystem(FMS), many heuristic rules are still used today. A dynamic scheduling appr oach based on Lagrangian relaxation is proposed to improve the quality and guara ntee the real-time capability of dynamic scheduling. The proposed method makes use of the dynamic predictive optimal theory combined with Lagrangian relaxation to obtain a good solution that can be evaluated quantitatively. The Lagrangian multipliers introduced here are capable of describing machine predictive states and system capacity constraints. This approach can evaluate the suboptimality of the scheduling systems. It can also quickly obtain high quality feasible schedu les, thus enabling Lagrangian relaxation to be better used in the dynamic schedu ling of manufacturing system. The efficiency and effectiveness of this method ar e verified by numerical experiments.

  4. Remarks on the Lagrangian representation of bi-Hamiltonian equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, M. V.; Vitolo, R. F.

    2017-03-01

    The Lagrangian representation of multi-Hamiltonian PDEs has been introduced by Y. Nutku and one of us (MVP). In this paper we focus on systems which are (at least) bi-Hamiltonian by a pair A1, A2, where A1 is a hydrodynamic-type Hamiltonian operator. We prove that finding the Lagrangian representation is equivalent to finding a generalized vector field τ such that A2 =LτA1. We use this result in order to find the Lagrangian representation when A2 is a homogeneous third-order Hamiltonian operator, although the method that we use can be applied to any other homogeneous Hamiltonian operator. As an example we provide the Lagrangian representation of a WDVV hydrodynamic-type system in 3 components.

  5. Second post-Newtonian Lagrangian dynamics of spinning compact binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li; Wu, Xin [Nanchang University, Department of Physics and Institute of Astronomy, Nanchang (China); Ma, DaZhu [Hubei University for Nationalities, School of Science, Enshi (China)

    2016-09-15

    The leading-order spin-orbit coupling is included in a post-Newtonian Lagrangian formulation of spinning compact binaries, which consists of the Newtonian term, first post-Newtonian (1PN) and 2PN non-spin terms and 2PN spin-spin coupling. This leads to a 3PN spin-spin coupling occurring in the derived Hamiltonian. The spin-spin couplings are mainly responsible for chaos in the Hamiltonians. However, the 3PN spin-spin Hamiltonian is small and has different signs, compared with the 2PN spin-spin Hamiltonian equivalent to the 2PN spin-spin Lagrangian. As a result, the probability of the occurrence of chaos in the Lagrangian formulation without the spin-orbit coupling is larger than that in the Lagrangian formulation with the spin-orbit coupling. Numerical evidences support this claim. (orig.)

  6. Construction of Lagrangians and Hamiltonians from the Equation of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, C. C.

    1978-01-01

    Demonstrates that infinitely many Lagrangians and Hamiltonians can be constructed from a given equation of motion. Points out the lack of an established criterion for making a proper selection. (Author/GA)

  7. A discrete Lagrangian based direct approach to macroscopic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Saikat; Nowruzpour, Mohsen; Reddy, J. N.; Srinivasa, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    A direct discrete Lagrangian based approach, designed at a length scale of interest, to characterize the response of a body is proposed. The main idea is to understand the dynamics of a deformable body via a Lagrangian corresponding to a coupled interaction of rigid particles in the reduced dimension. We argue that the usual practice of describing the laws of a deformable body in the continuum limit is redundant, because for most of the practical problems, analytical solutions are not available. Since continuum limit is not taken, the framework automatically relaxes the requirement of differentiability of field variables. The discrete Lagrangian based approach is illustrated by deriving an equivalent of the Euler-Bernoulli beam model. A few test examples are solved, which demonstrate that the derived non-local model predicts lower deflections in comparison to classical Euler-Bernoulli beam solutions. We have also included crack propagation in thin structures for isotropic and anisotropic cases using the Lagrangian based approach.

  8. Don't worry. Lagrangian drift kinetics is OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burby, Joshua

    2015-11-01

    I show that standard Lagrangian (i.e. variational) drift kinetics with uE × B ~vth and Hgc =Ho + ɛH1 +ɛ2H2 has an unphysically-large phase space; where a valid initial condition ought to consist of (F , E , B) specified at t = 0 , Lagrangian drift kinetics requires initial time derivatives of the electromagnetic field to be specified as well. This phenomenon occurs because the guiding center coordinate transformation depends on time derivatives of the electromagnetic field, and this leads to the appearance of a time derivative of E in H2. I also show how to ``renormalize'' the Lagrangian approach to drift kinetics in a way that manifestly preserves the correct structure of the initial value problem. Starting from this modified Lagrangian procedure, I derive the drift kinetic system's Poisson bracket. Work supported by DOE contract # DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  9. Geometry of Lagrangian First-order Classical Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Echeverría-Enríquez, A; Román-Roy, N; Echeverr\\'ia-Enr\\'iquez, Arturo; Muñoz-Lecanda, Miguel C.; Román-Roy, Narciso

    1996-01-01

    We construct a lagrangian geometric formulation for first-order field theories using the canonical structures of first-order jet bundles, which are taken as the phase spaces of the systems in consideration. First of all, we construct all the geometric structures associated with a first-order jet bundle and, using them, we develop the lagrangian formalism, defining the canonical forms associated with a lagrangian density and the density of lagrangian energy, obtaining the {\\sl Euler-Lagrange equations} in two equivalent ways: as the result of a variational problem and developing the {\\sl jet field formalism} (which is a formulation more similar to the case of mechanical systems). A statement and proof of Noether's theorem is also given, using the latter formalism. Finally, some classical examples are briefly studied.

  10. The complete HEFT Lagrangian after the LHC Run I

    CERN Document Server

    Brivio, I; Gonzalez-Garcia, M C; Merlo, L

    2016-01-01

    The complete effective chiral Lagrangian for a dynamical Higgs is presented and constrained by means of a global analysis including electroweak precision data together with Higgs and triple gauge boson coupling data from the LHC Run~I. The operators' basis up to next-to-leading order in the expansion consists of 148 (188 considering right-handed neutrinos) flavour universal terms and it is presented here making explicit the custodial nature of the operators. This effective Lagrangian provides the most general description of the physical Higgs couplings once the electroweak symmetry is assumed, and it allows for deviations from the $SU(2)_L$ doublet nature of the Standard Model Higgs. The comparison with the effective linear Lagrangian constructed with an exact $SU(2)_L$ doublet Higgs and considering operators with at most canonical dimension six is presented. A promising strategy to disentangle the two descriptions consists in analysing i) anomalous signals present only in the chiral Lagrangian and not expect...

  11. Classical Nonminimal Lagrangians and Kinematic Tests of Special Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Schreck, M

    2016-01-01

    This article gives a brief summary on recently obtained classical lagrangians for the nonminimal fermion sector of the Standard-Model Extension (SME). Such lagrangians are adequate descriptions of classical particles that are subject to a Lorentz-violating background field based on the SME. Explicitly, lagrangians were obtained for the leading nonminimal contributions of the m, a, c, e, and f coefficients. These results were then used to interpret classical, kinematic tests of Special Relativity in the framework of the nonminimal SME. This led to new constraints on certain nonminimal controlling coefficients. Although the experiments were very sophisticated in the era when they were carried out, their sensitivities for detecting Lorentz violation were still far away from the Planck scale. Obtaining the novel constraints can be considered as a proof-of-principle demonstrating the applicability of the classical lagrangians computed.

  12. Simultaneous temperature and velocity Lagrangian measurements in turbulent thermal convection

    CERN Document Server

    Liot, O; Zonta, F; Chibbaro, S; Coudarchet, T; Gasteuil, Y; Pinton, J -F; Salort, J; Chillà, F

    2015-01-01

    We report joint Lagrangian velocity and temperature measurements in turbulent thermal convection. Measurements are performed using an improved version (extended autonomy) of the neutrally-buoyant instrumented particle that was used by to performed experiments in a parallelepipedic Rayleigh-Benard cell. The temperature signal is obtained from a RFtransmitter. Simultaneously, we determine particle's position and velocity with one camera, which grants access to the Lagrangian heat flux. Due to the extended autonomy of the present particle, we obtain well converged temperature and velocity statistics, as well as pseudo-eulerian maps of velocity and heat flux. Present experimental results have also been compared with the results obtained by a corresponding campaign of Direct Numerical Simulations and Lagrangian Tracking of massless tracers. The comparison between experimental and numerical results show the accuracy and reliability of our experimental measurements. Finally, the analysis of lagrangian velocity and t...

  13. Single particle electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Folea, Mihaela; Kouril, Roman; Kouřil, Roman

    2009-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) in combination with image analysis is a powerful technique to study protein structures at low, medium, and high resolution. Since electron micrographs of biological objects are very noisy, improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio by image processing is an integral part of EM

  14. Photothermal Single Particle Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Selmke, Markus; Cichos, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Photothermal microscopy has recently complemented single molecule fluorescence microscopy by the detection of individual nano-objects in absorption. Photothermal techniques gain their superior sensitivity by exploiting a heat induced refractive index change around the absorbing nano-object. Numerous new applications to nanoparticles, nanorods and even single molecules have been reported all refering to the fact that photothermal microscopy is an extinction measurement on a heat induced refractive index profile. Here, we show that the actual physical mechanism generating a photothermal signal from a single molecule/particle is fundamentally different from the assumed extinction measurement. Combining photothermal microscopy, light scattering microscopy as well as accurate Mie scattering calculations to single gold nanoparticles, we reveal that the detection mechanism is quantitatively explained by a nanolensing effect of the long range refractive index profile. Our results lay the foundation for future develop...

  15. Photothermal Single Particle Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Selmke, Markus; Braun, Marco; Cichos, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Photothermal microscopy has recently complemented single molecule fluorescence microscopy by the detection of individual nano-objects in absorption. Photothermal techniques gain their superior sensitivity by exploiting a heat induced refractive index change around the absorbing nano-object. Numerous new applications to nanoparticles, nanorods and even single molecules have been reported all refering to the fact that photothermal microscopy is an extinction measurement on a heat induced refrac...

  16. Flux form Semi-Lagrangian methods for parabolic problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonaventura Luca

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A semi-Lagrangian method for parabolic problems is proposed, that extends previous work by the authors to achieve a fully conservative, flux-form discretization of linear and nonlinear diffusion equations. A basic consistency and stability analysis is proposed. Numerical examples validate the proposed method and display its potential for consistent semi-Lagrangian discretization of advection diffusion and nonlinear parabolic problems.

  17. Integration over families of Lagrangian submanifolds in BV formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhailov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Gauge fixing is interpreted in BV formalims as a choice of Lagrangian submanifold in an odd symplectic manifold. A natural construction defines an integration procedure on families of Lagrangian submanifolds. In string perturbation theory, the moduli space integrals of higher genus amplitudes can be interpreted this way. We discuss the role of symmetries in this construction. We also discuss its applications to string worldsheet sigma-model, in particular to the construction of vertex operators.

  18. Addendum to "Coherent Lagrangian vortices: The black holes of turbulence"

    OpenAIRE

    Haller, G.; Beron-Vera, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    In Haller and Beron-Vera (2013) we developed a variational principle for the detection of coherent Lagrangian vortex boundaries. The solutions of this variational principle turn out to be closed null-geodesics of the Lorentzian metric associated with a generalized Green-Lagrange strain tensor family. This metric interpretation implies a mathematical analogy between coherent Lagrangian vortex boundaries and photon spheres in general relativity. Here we give an improved discussion on this analogy.

  19. Merging matter and geometry in the same Lagrangian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Ludwig

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We show that a Lagrangian density proportional to −gLm2/R reduces to a pressuron theory of gravity that is indistinguishable from General Relativity in the dust limit. The combination of matter and geometry in the same Lagrangian density intrinsically satisfies Mach's Principle — since matter cannot exist without curvature and vice versa — while it may have the correct phenomenology in order to describe actual gravity.

  20. Lagrangian formulation of continuum with internal long-range interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Based on a new definition of nonlocal variable,this paper establishes the Lagrangian formulation for continuum with internal long-range interactions.Distinguished from the existing theories,the nonlocal term in the Lagrangian formulation automatically satisfies the zero mean condition determined by the action and reaction law.By this formulation,elastic wave in a rod with the internal long-range interactions is investigated.The dispersion of the elastic wave is predicted.