WorldWideScience

Sample records for hybrid nano-imprinting lithography

  1. 3D Simulation of Nano-Imprint Lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Román Marín, José Manuel; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2010-01-01

    A proof of concept study of the feasibility of fully three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent simulation of nano-imprint lithography of polymer melt, where the polymer is treated as a structured liquid, has been presented. Considering the flow physics of the polymer as a structured liquid, we have...... followed the line initiated by de Gennes, using a Molecular Stress Function model of the Doi and Edwards type. We have used a 3D Lagrangian Galerkin finite element methods implemented on a parallel computer architecture. In a Lagrangian techniques, the node point follows the particle movement, allowing...... for the movement of free surfaces or interfaces. We have extended the method to handle the dynamic movement of the contact line between the polymer melt and stamp during mold filling....

  2. Fabrication of superconducting NbN meander nanowires by nano-imprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yang; Li-Hua, Liu; Lu-Hui, Ning; Yi-Rong, Jin; Hui, Deng; Jie, Li; Yang, Li; Dong-Ning, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detector (SNSPD), as a new type of superconducting single photon detector (SPD), has a broad application prospect in quantum communication and other fields. In order to prepare SNSPD with high performance, it is necessary to fabricate a large area of uniform meander nanowires, which is the core of the SNSPD. In this paper, we demonstrate a process of patterning ultra-thin NbN films into meander-type nanowires by using the nano-imprint technology. In this process, a combination of hot embossing nano-imprint lithography (HE-NIL) and ultraviolet nano-imprint lithography (UV-NIL) is used to transfer the meander nanowire structure from the NIL Si hard mold to the NbN film. We have successfully obtained a NbN nanowire device with uniform line width. The critical temperature (Tc) of the superconducting NbN meander nanowires is about 5 K and the critical current (Ic) is about 3.5 μA at 2.5 K. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CBA00106 and 2009CB929102) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11104333 and 10974243).

  3. Nano-imprint lithography using poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Yung-Chiang; Shy, Shyi-Long

    2016-04-01

    Nano-imprinting lithography (NIL) technology, as one of the most promising fabrication technologies, has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for large-area replication up to wafer-level, with features down to nanometer scale. The cost of resists used for NIL is important for wafer-level large-area replication. This study aims to develop capabilities in patterning larger area structure using thermal NIL. The commercial available Poly (Methyl Methacrylate) (PMMA) and Polystyrene (PS) polymers possess a variety of characteristics desirable for NIL, such as low material cost, low bulkvolumetric shrinkage, high spin coating thickness uniformity, high process stability, and acceptable dry-etch resistance. PMMA materials have been utilized for positive electron beam lithography for many years, offering high resolution capability and wide process latitude. In addition, it is preferable to have a negative resist like PMMA, which is a simple polymer with low cost and practically unlimited shelf life, and can be dissolved easily using commercial available Propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (PGMEA) safer solvent to give the preferred film thickness. PS is such a resist, as it undergoes crosslinking when exposed to deep UV light or an electron beam and can be used for NIL. The result is a cost effective patterning larger area structure using thermal nano-imprint lithography (NIL) by using commercial available PMMA and PS ploymers as NIL resists.

  4. Superior light trapping in thin film silicon solar cells through nano imprint lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soppe, W.J.; Dorenkamper, M.S.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Pex, P.P.A.C.

    2013-10-15

    ECN and partners have developed a fabrication process based on nanoimprint lithography (NIL) of textures for light trapping in thin film solar cells such as thin-film silicon, OPV, CIGS and CdTe. The process can be applied in roll-to-roll mode when using a foil substrate or in roll-to-plate mode when using a glass substrate. The lacquer also serves as an electrically insulating layer for cells if steel foil is used as substrate, to enable monolithic series interconnection. In this paper we will show the superior light trapping in thin film silicon solar cells made on steel foil with nanotextured back contacts. We have made single junction a-Si and {mu}c-Si and a-Si/{mu}c-Si tandem cells, where we applied several types of nano-imprints with random and periodic structures. We will show that the nano-imprinted back contact enables more than 30% increase of current in comparison with non-textured back contacts and that optimized periodic textures outperform state-of-the-art random textures. For a-Si cells we obtained Jsc of 18 mA/cm{sup 2} and for {mu}c-Si cells more than 24 mA/cm{sup 2}. Tandem cells with a total Si absorber layer thickness of only 1350 nm have an initial efficiency of 11%.

  5. Improvement of silicon nanowire solar cells made by metal catalyzed electroless etching and nano imprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junyi; Subramani, Thiyagu; Jevasuwan, Wipakorn; Fukata, Naoki

    2017-04-01

    Silicon nanowires were fabricated by metal catalyzed electroless etching (MCEE) and nano imprint lithography (NIL), then a shell p-type layer was grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. To reduce back surface recombination and also to activate the dopant, we used two techniques, back surface field (BSF) treatment and rapid thermal annealing (RTA), to improve device performance. In this study, we investigated BSF and RTA treatments in silicon nanowire solar cells, and improved the device performance and efficiency from 4.1 to 7.4% (MCEE device) and from 1.1 to 6.6% (NIL device) after introducing BSF and RTA treatments. Moreover, to achieve better metal contact without sacrificing the reflectance after the shell formation, the selective-area etching method was investigated. Finally, after combining all processes, silicon nanowire solar cells fabricated via the MCEE process exhibited 8.7% efficiency.

  6. Single Layer Broadband Anti-Reflective Coatings for Plastic Substrates Produced by Full Wafer and Roll-to-Roll Step-and-Flash Nano-Imprint Lithography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marieke Burghoorn; Dorrit Roosen-Melsen; Joris de Riet; Sami Sabik; Zeger Vroon; Iryna Yakimets; Pascal Buskens

    2013-01-01

    ...) and polycarbonate using wafer-by-wafer step-and-flash nano-imprint lithography (NIL). The reduction in reflection in the visible field achieved with these coatings was 3.5% and 4.0%, respectively...

  7. Enhanced efficiency of organic light-emitting devices with corrugated nanostructures based on soft nano-imprinting lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue-Feng; An, Ming-Hui; Zhang, Xu-Lin; Bi, Yan-Gang; Yin, Da; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Feng, Jing; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2016-11-01

    An enhanced efficiency organic light-emitting device (OLED) with corrugated nanostructures on a small-molecule organic film has been demonstrated. By patterning the hole transport layer via soft nano-imprinting lithography and coating with Ag, a nanostructured cathode is introduced to enhance the light extraction of the OLED without affecting the flatness and conductivity of the indium-tin-oxide film. Both luminance and current efficiency are improved compared with those of conventional planar devices. The observable improvement in luminance and current efficiency can be ascribed to the surface plasmonic and scattering effects caused by the Ag nanostructures. Moreover, theoretical simulations also demonstrate that the power loss to surface plasmon-polariton modes has been recovered.

  8. Emission-enhanced plasmonic substrates fabricated by nano-imprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bongseok; Iwanaga, Masanobu; Miyazaki, Hideki T.; Sakoda, Kazuaki; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa

    2014-03-01

    We fabricated large-area stacked complementary plasmonic crystals (SC PlCs) by employing ultra-violet (UV) nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The SC PlCs was made on silicon on insulator (SOI) substrates, consisting of three layers: the top layer contacting air was perforated Au film, the bottom layer contacting buried oxide (BOX) layer included Au disk array corresponding to the holes in the top layer, and the middle layer was Si photonic crystal slab. The SC PlCs have prominent resonances in the optical wavelengths. It is shown that the fabricated PlCs were precisely made in structure and well uniform in the optical properties. We have examined photoluminescence (PL) enhancement of dye molecules on the SC PlC substrates in the visible range and found large enhancement up to 100-fold in comparison with the dye molecules on non-processed Si wafers.

  9. Study of nano imprinting using soft lithography on Krafty glue and PVDF polymer thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankar, M. S. Ravi, E-mail: rameshg.phy@pondiuni.edu; Gangineni, Ramesh Babu, E-mail: rameshg.phy@pondiuni.edu [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, R. V. Nagar, Kalapet, Puducherry - 605014 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The present work reveals soft lithography strategy based on self assembly and replica molding for carrying out micro and nanofabrication. It provides a convenient, effective and very low cost method for the formation and manufacturing of micro and nano structures. Al-layer of compact disc (sony CD-R) used as a stamp with patterned relief structures to generate patterns and structures with pattern size of 100nm height, 1.7 μm wide. In literature, PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) solution is widely used to get negative copy of the Al-layer. In this work, we have used inexpensive white glue (Polyvinylacetate + water), 15gm (□5) and PVDF (Polyvinylidene difluoride) spin coated films and successfully transferred the nano patterns of Al layer on to white glue and PVDF films.

  10. Single Layer Broadband Anti-Reflective Coatings for Plastic Substrates Produced by Full Wafer and Roll-to-Roll Step-and-Flash Nano-Imprint Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Buskens

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Anti-reflective coatings (ARCs are used to lower the reflection of light on the surface of a substrate. Here, we demonstrate that the two main drawbacks of moth eye-structured ARCs—i.e., the lack of suitable coating materials and a process for large area, high volume applications—can be largely eliminated, paving the way for cost-efficient and large-scale production of durable moth eye-structured ARCs on polymer substrates. We prepared moth eye coatings on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA and polycarbonate using wafer-by-wafer step-and-flash nano-imprint lithography (NIL. The reduction in reflection in the visible field achieved with these coatings was 3.5% and 4.0%, respectively. The adhesion of the coating to both substrates was good. The moth eye coating on PMMA demonstrated good performance in three prototypical accelerated ageing tests. The pencil hardness of the moth eye coatings on both substrates was <4B, which is less than required for most applications and needs further optimization. Additionally, we developed a roll-to-roll UV NIL pilot scale process and produced moth eye coatings on polyethylene terephthalate (PET at line speeds up to two meters per minute. The resulting coatings showed a good replication of the moth eye structures and, consequently, a lowering in reflection of the coated PET of 3.0%.

  11. Single Layer Broadband Anti-Reflective Coatings for Plastic Substrates Produced by Full Wafer and Roll-to-Roll Step-and-Flash Nano-Imprint Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghoorn, Marieke; Roosen-Melsen, Dorrit; de Riet, Joris; Sabik, Sami; Vroon, Zeger; Yakimets, Iryna; Buskens, Pascal

    2013-08-27

    Anti-reflective coatings (ARCs) are used to lower the reflection of light on the surface of a substrate. Here, we demonstrate that the two main drawbacks of moth eye-structured ARCs-i.e., the lack of suitable coating materials and a process for large area, high volume applications-can be largely eliminated, paving the way for cost-efficient and large-scale production of durable moth eye-structured ARCs on polymer substrates. We prepared moth eye coatings on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polycarbonate using wafer-by-wafer step-and-flash nano-imprint lithography (NIL). The reduction in reflection in the visible field achieved with these coatings was 3.5% and 4.0%, respectively. The adhesion of the coating to both substrates was good. The moth eye coating on PMMA demonstrated good performance in three prototypical accelerated ageing tests. The pencil hardness of the moth eye coatings on both substrates was polyethylene terephthalate (PET) at line speeds up to two meters per minute. The resulting coatings showed a good replication of the moth eye structures and, consequently, a lowering in reflection of the coated PET of 3.0%.

  12. Nano-Imprint Lithography: Nanonex NX-2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description:CORAL Name: NanoimprinterThis tool creates a pattern in a thin resist by embossing from a mold. The pattern is later transferred to the wafer by reactive...

  13. Generic nano-imprint process for fabrication of nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierret, Aurelie; Hocevar, Moira; Algra, Rienk E; Timmering, Eugene C; Verschuuren, Marc A; Immink, George W G; Verheijen, Marcel A; Bakkers, Erik P A M [Philips Research Laboratories Eindhoven, High Tech Campus 11, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Diedenhofen, Silke L [FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics c/o Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Vlieg, E, E-mail: e.p.a.m.bakkers@tue.nl [IMM, Solid State Chemistry, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-02-10

    A generic process has been developed to grow nearly defect-free arrays of (heterostructured) InP and GaP nanowires. Soft nano-imprint lithography has been used to pattern gold particle arrays on full 2 inch substrates. After lift-off organic residues remain on the surface, which induce the growth of additional undesired nanowires. We show that cleaning of the samples before growth with piranha solution in combination with a thermal anneal at 550 deg. C for InP and 700 deg. C for GaP results in uniform nanowire arrays with 1% variation in nanowire length, and without undesired extra nanowires. Our chemical cleaning procedure is applicable to other lithographic techniques such as e-beam lithography, and therefore represents a generic process.

  14. Three dimensional polymer waveguide using hybrid lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanran; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Minghui; Chen, Changming; Wang, Xibin; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Daming; Yi, Yunji

    2015-10-01

    A three dimensional polymer waveguide with taper structure was demonstrated and fabricated by a reliable and effective hybrid lithography. The hybrid lithography consists of lithography to fabricate a polymer waveguide and gray scale lithography to fabricate a polymer taper structure. Laser ablation and shadow aluminum evaporation were designed for gray scale lithography. The length of the gray scale region ranging from 20 to 400 μm could be controlled by the laser power, the ablation speed, and the aluminum thickness. The slope angle was determined by the length of the gray scale region and the thickness of the photoresist. The waveguide taper structure could be transferred to the lower layer by the etching method. The taper structure can be used for integration of the waveguide with different dimensions.

  15. Design, fabrication and characterisation of nano-imprinted single mode waveguide structures for intra-chip optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, John; Khan, Umar; Korhonen, Tia; Boersma, Arjen; Wiegersma, Sjoukje; Karppinen, Mikko; Corbett, Brian

    2015-03-01

    In the Information and Communications Technology (ICT) sector, the demands on bandwidth continually grow due to increased microprocessor performance and the need to access ever increasing amounts of stored data. The introduction of optical data transmission (e.g. glass fiber) to replace electronic transmission (e.g. copper wire) has alleviated the bandwidth issue for communications over distances greater than 10 meters, however, the need has arisen for optical data transfer over shorter distances such as those found inside computers. A possible solution for this is the use of low-cost single mode polymer based optical waveguides fabricated by direct patterning Nanoimprint Lithography (NIL). NIL has emerged as a scalable manufacturing technology capable of producing features down to the hundred nanometer scale with the potential for large scale (roll-to-roll) manufacturing. In this paper, we present results on the modeling, fabrication and characterization of single mode waveguides and optical components in low-loss ORMOCER™ materials. Single mode waveguides with a mode field diameter of 7 μm and passive structures such as bends, directional couplers and multi-mode interferometers (MMIs) suitable for use in 1550 nm optical interconnects were fabricated using wafer scale NIL processes. Process issues arising from the nano-imprint technique such as residual layers and angled sidewalls are modeled and investigated for excess loss and higher order mode excitation. Conclusions are drawn on the applicability of nano-imprinting to the fabrication of circuits for intrachip/ board-level optical interconnect.

  16. Lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Landis, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Lithography is now a complex tool at the heart of a technological process for manufacturing micro and nanocomponents. A multidisciplinary technology, lithography continues to push the limits of optics, chemistry, mechanics, micro and nano-fluids, etc. This book deals with essential technologies and processes, primarily used in industrial manufacturing of microprocessors and other electronic components.

  17. Hybrid UV Lithography for 3D High-Aspect-Ratio Microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sungmin; Nam, Gyungmok; Kim, Jonghun; Yoon, Sang-Hee [Inha Univ, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) high-aspect-ratio (HAR) microstructures for biomedical applications (e.g., microneedle, microadhesive, etc.) are microfabricated using the hybrid ultraviolet (UV) lithography in which inclined, rotational, and reverse-side UV exposure processes are combined together. The inclined and rotational UV exposure processes are intended to fabricate tapered axisymmetric HAR microstructures; the reverse-side UV exposure process is designed to sharpen the end tip of the microstructures by suppressing the UV reflection on a bottom substrate which is inevitable in conventional UV lithography. Hybrid UV lithography involves fabricating 3D HAR microstructures with an epoxy-based negative photoresist, SU-8, using our customized UV exposure system. The effects of hybrid UV lithography parameters on the geometry of the 3D HAR microstructures (aspect ratio, radius of curvature of the end tip, etc.) are measured. The dependence of the end-tip shape on SU-8 soft-baking condition is also discussed.

  18. Negative index fishnet with nanopillars formed by direct nano-imprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Graham J.; Khan, Saima I.; Khokhar, Ali Z.; De La Rue, Richard M.; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the ability to fabricate fishnets by nanoimprinting directly into a pre-deposited three layer metal-dielectric-metal stack, enabling us to pattern large areas in two minutes. We have designed and fabricated two different fishnet structures of varying dimensions using this method and measured their resonant wavelengths in the near-infrared at 1.45 μm and 1.88 μm. An important by-product of directly imprinting into the metal-dielectric stack, without separation from the substrate, is the formation of rectangular nanopillars that sit within the rectangular apertures between the fishnet slabs. Simulations complement our measurements and suggest a negative refractive index real part with a magnitude of 1.6. Further simulations suggest that if the fishnet were to be detached from the supporting substrate a refractive index real part of 5 and FOM of 2.74 could be obtained.

  19. Nano-imprint gold grating as refractive index sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sudha; Mohapatra, Saswat; Moirangthem, Rakesh S.

    2016-05-01

    Large scale of fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures has been a challenging task due to time consuming process and requirement of expensive nanofabrication tools such as electron beam lithography system, focused ion beam system, and extreme UV photolithography system. Here, we present a cost-effective fabrication technique so called soft nanoimprinting to fabricate nanostructures on the larger sample area. In our fabrication process, a commercially available optical DVD disc was used as a template which was imprinted on a polymer glass substrate to prepare 1D polymer nano-grating. A homemade nanoimprinting setup was used in this fabrication process. Further, a label-free refractive index sensor was developed by utilizing the properties of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a gold coated 1D polymer nano-grating. Refractive index sensing was tested by exposing different solutions of glycerol-water mixture on the surface of gold nano-grating. The calculated bulk refractive index sensitivity was found to be 751nm/RIU. We believed that our proposed SPR sensor could be a promising candidate for developing low-cost refractive index sensor with high sensitivity on a large scale.

  20. Fabrication of Nanopillar Micropatterns by Hybrid Mask Lithography for Surface-Directed Liquid Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihito Arai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method for fabricating nanopillar micropatterns for surface-directed liquid flows. It employs hybrid mask lithography, which uses a mask consisting of a combination of a photoresist and nanoparticles in the photolithography process. The nanopillar density is controlled by varying the weight ratio of nanoparticles in the composite mask. Hybrid mask lithography was used to fabricate a surface-directed liquid flow. The effect of the surface-directed liquid flow, which was formed by the air-liquid interface due to nanopillar micropatterns, was evaluated, and the results show that the oscillation of microparticles, when the micro-tool was actuated, was dramatically reduced by using a surface-directed liquid flow. Moreover, the target particle was manipulated individually without non-oscillating ambient particles.

  1. Hybrid inverse lithography techniques for advanced hierarchical memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guangming; Hooker, Kevin; Irby, Dave; Zhang, Yunqiang; Ward, Brian; Cecil, Tom; Hall, Brett; Lee, Mindy; Kim, Dave; Lucas, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Traditional segment-based model-based OPC methods have been the mainstream mask layout optimization techniques in volume production for memory and embedded memory devices for many device generations. These techniques have been continually optimized over time to meet the ever increasing difficulties of memory and memory periphery patterning. There are a range of difficult issues for patterning embedded memories successfully. These difficulties include the need for a very high level of symmetry and consistency (both within memory cells themselves and between cells) due to circuit effects such as noise margin requirements in SRAMs. Memory cells and access structures consume a large percentage of area in embedded devices so there is a very high return from shrinking the cell area as much as possible. This aggressive scaling leads to very difficult resolution, 2D CD control and process window requirements. Additionally, the range of interactions between mask synthesis corrections of neighboring areas can extend well beyond the size of the memory cell, making it difficult to fully take advantage of the inherent designed cell hierarchy in mask pattern optimization. This is especially true for non-traditional (i.e., less dependent on geometric rule) OPC/RET methods such as inverse lithography techniques (ILT) which inherently have more model-based decisions in their optimizations. New inverse methods such as model-based SRAF placement and ILT are, however, well known to have considerable benefits in finding flexible mask pattern solutions to improve process window, improve 2D CD control, and improve resolution in ultra-dense memory patterns. They also are known to reduce recipe complexity and provide native MRC compliant mask pattern solutions. Unfortunately, ILT is also known to be several times slower than traditional OPC methods due to the increased computational lithographic optimizations it performs. In this paper, we describe and present results for a methodology to

  2. Lithography, metrology and nanomanufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, J Alexander; Gallatin, Gregg M

    2011-07-01

    Semiconductor chip manufacturing is by far the predominant nanomanufacturing technology in the world today. Top-down lithography techniques are used for fabrication of logic and memory chips since, in order to function, these chips must essentially be perfect. Assuring perfection requires expensive metrology. Top of the line logic sells for several hundred thousand dollars per square metre and, even though the required metrology is expensive, it is a small percentage of the overall manufacturing cost. The level of stability and control afforded by current lithography tools means that much of this metrology can be online and statistical. In contrast, many of the novel types of nanomanufacturing currently being developed will produce products worth only a few dollars per square metre. To be cost effective, the required metrology must cost proportionately less. Fortunately many of these nanofabrication techniques, such as block copolymer self-assembly, colloidal self-assembly, DNA origami, roll-2-roll nano-imprint, etc., will not require the same level of perfection to meet specification. Given the variability of these self-assembly processes, in order to maintain process control, these techniques will require some level of real time online metrology. Hence we are led to the conclusion that future nanomanufacturing may well necessitate "cheap" nanometre scale metrology which functions real time and on-line, e.g. at GHz rates, in the production stream. In this paper we review top-down and bottom-up nanofabrication techniques and compare and contrast the various metrology requirements.

  3. Position Analysis of a Hybrid Serial-Parallel Manipulator in Immersion Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-jie Shao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel hybrid serial-parallel mechanism with 6 degrees of freedom. The new mechanism combines two different parallel modules in a serial form. 3-P̲(PH parallel module is architecture of 3 degrees of freedom based on higher joints and specializes in describing two planes’ relative pose. 3-P̲SP parallel module is typical architecture which has been widely investigated in recent researches. In this paper, the direct-inverse position problems of the 3-P̲SP parallel module in the couple mixed-type mode are analyzed in detail, and the solutions are obtained in an analytical form. Furthermore, the solutions for the direct and inverse position problems of the novel hybrid serial-parallel mechanism are also derived and obtained in the analytical form. The proposed hybrid serial-parallel mechanism is applied to regulate the immersion hood’s pose in an immersion lithography system. Through measuring and regulating the pose of the immersion hood with respect to the wafer surface simultaneously, the immersion hood can track the wafer surface’s pose in real-time and the gap status is stabilized. This is another exploration to hybrid serial-parallel mechanism’s application.

  4. Hybrid soft-lithography/laser machined microchips for the parallel generation of droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muluneh, M; Issadore, D

    2013-12-21

    Microfluidic chips have been developed to generate droplets and microparticles with control over size, shape, and composition not possible using conventional methods. However, it has remained a challenge to scale-up production for practical applications due to the inherently limited throughput of micro-scale devices. To address this problem, we have developed a self-contained microchip that integrates many (N = 512) micro-scale droplet makers. This 3 × 3 cm(2) PDMS microchip consists of a two-dimensional array of 32 × 16 flow-focusing droplet makers, a network of flow channels that connect them, and only two inputs and one output. The key innovation of this technology is the hybrid use of both soft-lithography and direct laser-micromachining. The microscale resolution of soft lithography is used to fabricate flow-focusing droplet makers that can produce small and precisely defined droplets. Deeply engraved (h ≈ 500 μm) laser-machined channels are utilized to supply each of the droplet makers with its oil phase, aqueous phase, and access to an output channel. The engraved channels' low hydrodynamic resistance ensures that each droplet maker is driven with the same flow rates for highly uniform droplet formation. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, water droplets (d ≈ 80 μm) were generated in hexadecane on both 8 × 1 and 32 × 16 geometries.

  5. Near-zero-residual layer nanoimprint based on hybrid nanoimprint soft lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yushuang; Lu, Jingjun; Fu, XinXin; Bian, Jie; Yuan, Changsheng; Ge, Haixiong; Chen, Yanfeng

    2015-11-01

    A thin and uniform residual layer, especially zero-residual layer, is highly desired in the nanoimprint lithography, because it is critical to the succeeding pattern transfer process. In this study, a partial cavity filling method was applied on UV-curable resins instead of thermal plastic polymer to realize zero-residual layer based on a hybrid nanoimprint technique. The initial thickness of the UV-curable resin on the substrate was precisely quantified less than the cavity volume of the imprint mold by adjusting the resin concentration and spin coating speed. A near-zero-residual layer was successfully achieved under an extremely low imprint pressure by the control of the viscosity, surface tension and thickness of the UV-curable resist.

  6. Fabrication of a Ni nano-imprint stamp for an anti-reflective layer using an anodic aluminum oxide template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Mi; Lim, Seung-Kyu; Ra, Senug-Hyun; Suh, Su-Jung

    2013-11-01

    Aluminum anodizing can alter pore diameter, density distribution, periodicity and layer thickness in a controlled way. Because of this property, porous type anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) was used as a template for nano-structure fabrication. The alumina layer generated at a constant voltage increased the pore size from 120 nm to 205 nm according to an increasing process time from 60 min to 150 min. The resulting fabricated AAO templates had pore diameters at or less than 200 nm. Ni was sputtered as a conductive layer onto this AAO template and electroplated using DC and pulse power. Comparing these Ni stamps, those generated from electroplating using on/reverse/off pulsing had an ordered pillar array and maintained the AAO template morphology. This stamp was used for nano-imprinting on UV curable resin coated glass wafer. Surface observations via electron microscopy showed that the nano-imprinted patterned had the same shape as the AAO template. A soft mold was subsequently fabricated and nano-imprinted to form a moth-eye structure on the glass wafer. An analysis of the substrate transmittance using UV-VIS/NIR spectroscopy showed that the transmittance of the substrate with the moth-eye structure was 5% greater that the non-patterned substrate.

  7. Nanoimprint, DSA, and multi-beam lithography: patterning technologies with new integration challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, S.; Teyssedre, H.; Claveau, G.; Servin, I.; Delachat, F.; Pourteau, M. L.; Gharbi, A.; Pimenta Barros, P.; Tiron, R.; Nouri, L.; Possemé, N.; May, M.; Brianceau, P.; Barnola, S.; Blancquaert, Y.; Pradelles, J.; Essomba, P.; Bernadac, A.; Dal'zotto, B.; Bos, S.; Argoud, M.; Chamiot-Maitral, G.; Sarrazin, A.; Tallaron, C.; Lapeyre, C.; Pain, L.

    2017-04-01

    In the lithography landscape, EUV technology recovered some credibility recently. However, its large adoption remains uncertain. Meanwhile, 193nm immersion lithography, with multiple-patterning strategies, supports the industry preference for advanced-node developments. In this landscape, lithography alternatives maintain promise for continued R&D. Massively parallel electron-beam and nano-imprint lithography techniques remain highly attractive, as they can provide noteworthy cost-of-ownership benefits. Directed self-assembly lithography shows promising resolution capabilities and appears to be an option to reduce multi-patterning strategies. Even if large amount of efforts are dedicated to overcome the lithography side issues, these solutions introduce also new challenges and opportunities for the integration schemes.

  8. Hyper-Uniform Site-Controlled Quantum Dot Arrays Prepared by Soft Nano-Imprint Lithography Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-24

    and thus, avoiding potential damage to the substrate. The (100) semi-insulating GaAs substrate is coated with 50 nm silicon dioxide followed by a UV ... curable PR of 120 nm thick . Next, the soft NIL technique is used to replicate the designed pattern in the silicon dioxide and PR layers. The pattern

  9. A method for manufacturing a tool part for an injection molding process, a hot embossing process, a nano-imprint process, or an extrusion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for manufacturing a tool part for an injection molding process, a hot embossing process, nano-imprint process or an extrusion process. First, there is provided a master structure (10) with a surface area comprising nanometre-sized protrusions (11) with a ......The present invention relates to a method for manufacturing a tool part for an injection molding process, a hot embossing process, nano-imprint process or an extrusion process. First, there is provided a master structure (10) with a surface area comprising nanometre-sized protrusions (11...

  10. Micro-macro hybrid soft-lithography master (MMHSM) fabrication for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaewon; Li, Jianrong; Han, Arum

    2010-04-01

    We present a novel micro-macro hybrid soft-lithography master (MMHSM) fabrication technique where microdevices having both microscale and macroscale features can be replicated with a single soft-lithography step. A poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) master having macroscale structures was first created by a bench-top milling machine. An imprinting master mold having microscale structures was then imprinted on the PMMA surface through a hot-embossing process to obtain a PMMA master mold. A poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) master was then replicated from this PMMA master through a standard soft-lithography process. This process allowed both microscale (height: 3-20 microm, width: 20-500 microm) and macroscale (height: 3.5 mm, width: 1.2-7 mm) structures to co-exist on the PDMS master mold, from which final PDMS devices could be easily stamped out in large quantities. Microfluidic structures requiring macroscale dimensions in height, such as reservoirs or fluidic tubing interconnects, could be directly built into PDMS microfluidic devices without the typically used manual punching process. This significantly reduced alignment errors and time required for such manual fabrication steps. In this paper, we successfully demonstrated the utility of this novel hybrid fabrication method by fabricating a PDMS microfluidic device with 40 built-in fluidic interfaces and a PDMS multi-compartment neuron co-culture platform, where millimeter-scale compartments are connected via arrays of 20 microm wide and 200 microm long microfluidic channels. The resulting structures were characterized for the integrity of the transferred pattern sizes and the surface roughness using scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry.

  11. Lithography alternatives meet design style reality: How do they "line" up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smayling, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Optical lithography resolution scaling has stalled, giving innovative alternatives a window of opportunity. One important factor that impacts these lithographic approaches is the transition in design style from 2D to 1D for advanced CMOS logic. Just as the transition from 3D circuits to 2D fabrication 50 years ago created an opportunity for a new breed of electronics companies, the transition today presents exciting and challenging time for lithographers. Today, we are looking at a range of non-optical lithography processes. Those considered here can be broadly categorized: self-aligned lithography, self-assembled lithography, deposition lithography, nano-imprint lithography, pixelated e-beam lithography, shot-based e-beam lithography .Do any of these alternatives benefit from or take advantage of 1D layout? Yes, for example SAPD + CL (Self Aligned Pitch Division combined with Complementary Lithography). This is a widely adopted process for CMOS nodes at 22nm and below. Can there be additional design / process co-optimization? In spite of the simple-looking nature of 1D layout, the placement of "cut" in the lines and "holes" for interlayer connections can be tuned for a given process capability. Examples of such optimization have been presented at this conference, typically showing a reduction of at least one in the number of cut or hole patterns needed.[1,2] Can any of the alternatives complement each other or optical lithography? Yes.[3] For example, DSA (Directed Self Assembly) combines optical lithography with self-assembly. CEBL (Complementary e-Beam Lithography) combines optical lithography with SAPD for lines with shot-based e-beam lithography for cuts and holes. Does one (shrinking) size fit all? No, that's why we have many alternatives. For example NIL (Nano-imprint Lithography) has been introduced for NAND Flash patterning where the (trending lower) defectivity is acceptable for the product. Deposition lithography has been introduced in 3D NAND Flash to

  12. Combined nano-imprint and photolithography (CNP) of integrated polymer optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Schøler, Mikkel; Kristensen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    and substrate are separated, and the un-exposed resist is dissolved. Polymer waveguides are added to the system by an additional UV lithography step in a film of un-doped SU-8, which is spincoated on top of the lasers and substrate. When optically pumped at 532 nm, lasing is obtained in the wavelength range 559...... nm - 600 nm, determined by the grating period. Our results, where 20 laser devices are defined across a 10 cm diameter wafer substrate, demonstrate the feasibility of CNP for wafer-scale fabrication of advanced nano-structured active and passive polymer optical components....

  13. Fabricating omnidirectional low-reflection films by nano-imprinting method for boosting solar power generation of silicon-based solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mengyu; Zhan, Xinghua; Chen, Fei; Si, Yang; Tie, Shengnian; Gao, Wei

    2017-07-01

    Low-reflection polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films are fabricated with nano-imprinting method. The films are then used to cover polycrystalline silicon solar cells. The morphological and optical properties of films are investigated. The films have periodic cylinder-like nanostructures and relatively low reflectivity in light incident angle ranging from 30∘ to 60∘. The nanostructures are with a period of 600 nm and height of 90 nm. Besides, the polycrystalline Si solar cells covered with the films exhibit 12% more power generation than the cells covered with glass. Nano-imprinting method offers a cost-effective approach to fabricate omnidirectional anti-reflection films, which could boost the power generation of Si solar cells. Additionally, the films also have potential applications in different types of solar cells due to its facile fabricating process.

  14. Evaluation of hybrid polymers for high-precision manufacturing of 3D optical interconnects by two-photon absorption lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleunitz, A.; Klein, J. J.; Krupp, A.; Stender, B.; Houbertz, R.; Gruetzner, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fabrication of optical interconnects has been widely investigated for the generation of optical circuit boards. Twophoton absorption (TPA) lithography (or high-precision 3D printing) as an innovative production method for direct manufacture of individual 3D photonic structures gains more and more attention when optical polymers are employed. In this regard, we have evaluated novel ORMOCER-based hybrid polymers tailored for the manufacture of optical waveguides by means of high-precision 3D printing. In order to facilitate future industrial implementation, the processability was evaluated and the optical performance of embedded waveguides was assessed. The results illustrate that hybrid polymers are not only viable consumables for industrial manufacture of polymeric micro-optics using generic processes such as UV molding. They also are potential candidates to fabricate optical waveguide systems down to the chip level where TPA-based emerging manufacturing techniques are engaged. Hence, it is shown that hybrid polymers continue to meet the increasing expectations of dynamically growing markets of micro-optics and optical interconnects due to the flexibility of the employed polymer material concept.

  15. Extreme ultraviolet Talbot interference lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Marconi, Mario C

    2015-10-05

    Periodic nanopatterns can be generated using lithography based on the Talbot effect or optical interference. However, these techniques have restrictions that limit their performance. High resolution Talbot lithography is limited by the very small depth of focus and the demanding requirements in the fabrication of the master mask. Interference lithography, with large DOF and high resolution, is limited to simple periodic patterns. This paper describes a hybrid extreme ultraviolet lithography approach that combines Talbot lithography and interference lithography to render an interference pattern with a lattice determined by a Talbot image. As a result, the method enables filling the arbitrary shaped cells produced by the Talbot image with interference patterns. Detailed modeling, system design and experimental results using a tabletop EUV laser are presented.

  16. Single layer broadband anti-reflective coatings for plastic substrates produced by full wafer and roll-to-roll step-and-flash nano-imprint lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burghoorn, M.M.A.; Roosen-Melsen, D.A.; Riet, J.F.J. de; Sabik, S.; Vroon, Z.A.E.P.; Yakimets, I.; Buskens, P.J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Anti-reflective coatings (ARCs) are used to lower the reflection of light on the surface of a substrate. Here, we demonstrate that the two main drawbacks of moth eye-structured ARCs-i.e., the lack of suitable coating materials and a process for large area, high volume applications-can be largely

  17. Negative index fishnet structures with nanopillars formed by nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Graham J.; Khan, Saima I.; Khokhar, Ali Z.; De La Rue, Richard M.; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2014-05-01

    Since their inception, metamaterial fishnet structures have frequently been used to exhibit a negative refractive index. Their shape and structure make it possible to independently produce both a negative permeability (μ) and a negative permittivity (ɛ). Fishnets that display this characteristic can be referred to as a double negative metamaterial. Although other techniques have been demonstrated, fishnets are commonly fabricated using electron-beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion-beam (FIB) milling. In this paper we demonstrate the fabrication of fishnets using nano-imprint lithography (NIL). Advantages associated with NIL include a shorter fabrication time, a larger feasible pattern area and reduced costs. In addition to these advantages, the quality of the fabricated structures is excellent. We imprint a stamp directly into a metal-dielectric-metal stack which creates the fishnet and, as an artifact of the technique, a periodic array of nanopillars. Two different designs of the fishnet and nanopillar structure have been fabricated and optical measurements have been taken from both. In addition to the experimental measurements the structures have also been extensively simulated, suggesting a negative refractive index with a real part as large in magnitude as five can be achieved.

  18. UV-nanoimprint lithography as a tool to develop flexible microfluidic devices for electrochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juhong; Zhou, Yiliang; Wang, Danhui; He, Fei; Rotello, Vincent M; Carter, Kenneth R; Watkins, James J; Nugen, Sam R

    2015-07-21

    Research in microfluidic biosensors has led to dramatic improvements in sensitivities. Very few examples of these devices have been commercially successful, keeping this methodology out of the hands of potential users. In this study, we developed a method to fabricate a flexible microfluidic device containing electrowetting valves and electrochemical transduction. The device was designed to be amenable to a roll-to-roll manufacturing system, allowing a low manufacturing cost. Microchannels with high fidelity were structured on a PET film using UV-NanoImprint Lithography (UV-NIL). The electrodes were inkjet-printed and photonically sintered on second flexible PET film. The film containing electrodes was bonded directly to the channel-containing layer to form sealed fluidic device. Actuation of the multivalve system with food dye in PBS buffer was performed to demonstrate automated fluid delivery. The device was then used to detect Salmonella in a liquid sample.

  19. High resolution defect inspection of step and flash imprint lithography for 32 nm half-pitch patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMackin, I.; Perez, J.; Selinidis, K.; Maltabes, J.; Resnick, D.; Sreenivassan, S. V.

    2008-03-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective method for the replication of nanometer-scale structures from an imprint mask (template) or mold. Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL®) is unique in its ability to address both resolution and alignment. Recently overlay across a 200 mm wafer of less than 20nm, 3σ has been demonstrated. Current S-FIL resolution and alignment performance motivates the consideration of nano-imprint lithography as a Next Generation Lithography (NGL) solution for IC production. During the S-FIL process, a transferable image, an imprint, is produced by mechanically molding a liquid UV-curable resist on a wafer. Acceptance of imprint lithography for CMOS manufacturing will require demonstration that it can attain defect levels commensurate with the requirements of cost-effective device production. This report summarizes the result of defect inspections of wafers patterned using S-FIL. Wafer inspections were performed with KLA Tencor- 2132 (KT-2132) and KLA Tencor eS23 (KT-eS32) automated patterned wafer inspection tools. Imprint specific defectivity was shown to be <=3 cm -2 with some wafers having defectivity of less than 1 cm -2 and many fields having 0 imprint specific defects, as measured with the KT-2132. KT eS32 inspection of 32 nm half pitch features indicated that the random defectivity resulting from the imprint process was low.

  20. Metal-mesh lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhao; Wei, Qingshan; Wei, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Metal-mesh lithography (MML) is a practical hybrid of microcontact printing and capillary force lithography that can be applied over millimeter-sized areas with a high level of uniformity. MML can be achieved by blotting various inks onto substrates through thin copper grids, relying on preferential wetting and capillary interactions between template and substrate for pattern replication. The resulting mesh patterns, which are inverted relative to those produced by stenciling or serigraphy, can be reproduced with low micrometer resolution. MML can be combined with other surface chemistry and lift-off methods to create functional microarrays for diverse applications, such as periodic islands of gold nanorods and patterned corrals for fibroblast cell cultures.

  1. Flexible, Transparent, Thickness-Controllable SWCNT/PEDOT:PSS Hybrid Films Based on Coffee-Ring Lithography for Functional Noncontact Sensing Device

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong

    2015-12-08

    Flexible transparent conductive films (FTCFs) as the essential components of the next generation of functional circuits and devices are presently attracting more attention. Here, a new strategy has been demonstrated to fabricate thickness-controllable FTCFs through coffee ring lithography (CRL) of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) hybrid ink. The influence of ink concentration and volume on the thickness and size of hybrid film has been investigated systematically. Results show that the final FTCFs present a high performance, including a homogeneous thickness of 60-65 nm, a sheet resistance of 1.8 kohm/sq, a visible/infrared-range transmittance (79%, PET = 90%), and a dynamic mechanical property (>1000 cycle, much better than ITO film), respectively, when SWCNT concentration is 0.2 mg/mL, ink volume is 0.4 μL, drying at room temperature. Moreover, the benefits of these kinds of FTCFs have been verified through a full transparent, flexible noncontact sensing panel (3 × 4 sensing pixels) and a flexible battery-free wireless sensor based on a humidity sensing mechanism, showing excellent human/machine interaction with high sensitivity, good stability, and fast response/recovery ability. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  2. Coaxial Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Tuncay

    The optical and electrical properties of heterogeneous nanowires are profoundly related to their composition and nanoscale architecture. However, the intrinsic constraints of conventional synthetic and lithographic techniques have limited the types of multi-compositional nanowires that can be realized and studied in the laboratory. This thesis focuses on bridging templated electrochemical synthesis and lithography for expanding current synthetic capabilities with respect to materials generality and the ability to tailor two-dimensional growth in the formation of core-shell structures for the rational design and preparation of nanowires with very complex architectures that cannot be made by any other techniques. Chapter 1 introduces plasmonics, templated electrochemical synthesis, and on-wire lithography concepts and their significances within chemistry and materials science. Chapter 2 details a powerful technique for the deposition of metals and semiconductors with nanometer resolution in segment and gap lengths using on-wire lithography, which serves as a new platform to explore plasmon-exciton interactions in the form of long-range optical nanoscale rulers. Chapter 3 highlights an approach for the electrochemical synthesis of solution dispersible core-shell polymeric and inorganic semiconductor nanowires with metallic leads. A photodetector based on a single core-shell semiconductor nanowire is presented to demonstrate the functionality of the nanowires produced using this approach. Chapter 4 describes a new materials general technique, termed coaxial lithography (COAL), bridging templated electrochemical synthesis and lithography for generating coaxial nanowires in a parallel fashion with sub-10 nanometer resolution in both axial and radial dimensions. Combinations of coaxial nanowires composed of metals, metal oxides, metal chalcogenides, conjugated polymers, and a core/shell semiconductor nanowire with an embedded plasmonic nanoring are presented to

  3. Fabrication of three-dimensional MIS nano-capacitor based on nano-imprinted single crystal silicon nanowire arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Zhai, Yujia

    2012-11-26

    We report fabrication of single crystalline silicon nanowire based-three-dimensional MIS nano-capacitors for potential analog and mixed signal applications. The array of nanowires is patterned by Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL). Deep silicon etching (DSE) is used to form the nanowires with high aspect ratio, increase the electrode area and thus significantly enhance the capacitance. High-! dielectric is deposited by highly conformal atomic layer deposition (ALD) Al2O3 over the Si nanowires, and sputtered metal TaN serves as the electrode. Electrical measurements of fabricated capacitors show the expected increase of capacitance with greater nanowire height and decreasing dielectric thickness, consistent with calculations. Leakage current and time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) are also measured and compared with planar MIS capacitors. In view of greater interest in 3D transistor architectures, such as FinFETs, 3D high density MIS capacitors offer an attractive device technology for analog and mixed signal applications. - See more at: http://www.eurekaselect.com/105099/article#sthash.EzeJxk6j.dpuf

  4. Fabrication of Photonic Crystal Structures on Flexible Organic Light-Emitting Diodes by Using Nano-Imprint and PDMS Mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Ting-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, nanoimprint lithography was used to create a photonic crystals structure film in organic light-emitting diode (OLED component, and then compare the efficiency of components whether with nanostructure or not. By using two different kinds of mold, such as silicon mold and PDMS mold, the nano structures in PMMA (molecular weight of 350K were fabricated. Nanostructures in period of 403.53nm with silicon mold and nano structures in period of 385.64nm with PDMS mold as photonic crystal films were fabricated and were integrated into OLED. In experimental results, the OLED without photonic crystal films (with packing behaves 193.3cd/m2 for luminous intensity, 3.481cd/A for lightening efficiency (ηL and 0.781 lm/W for lightening power (ηP where V is 14V and I is 5.5537mA; the OLED with photonic crystal films (with packing behaves 241.6cd/m2 for luminous intensity, 4.173cd/A for lightening efficiency (ηL and 0.936 lm/W for lightening power (ηP where voltage of 14V and current (I of 5.7891mA, which shows that the latter perform is well.

  5. High resolution hole patterning with EB lithography for NIL template production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Mana; Yagawa, Keisuke; Motokawa, Takeharu; Hagihara, Kazuki; Suenaga, Machiko; Saito, Masato; Kanamitsu, Shingo; Itoh, Masamitsu

    2016-05-01

    Nano imprint lithography (NIL) is one to one lithography and contact transfer technique using template. Therefore, the lithography performance depends greatly on the quality of the template pattern. In this study, we investigated the resolution and the defect level for hole patterning using chemical amplified resists (CAR) and VSB type EB writer, EBM9000. To form smaller pattern with high quality, high resolution resist process and high sensitivity etching process are needed. After these elements were optimized, we succeeded to form 24 nm dense hole pattern on template. In general, it is difficult to suppress the defect density in a large area because of fogging effect and process loading and so forth. However, from the view point of defect quality, 26 nm hole pattern is achieved to form with practical level in a large area. Therefore, we indicate the capability of forming 26 nm hole master template which will be required in 2019 from ITRS2013. These results show that this process is possible to obtain less than 30 nm hole pattern without enormous writing time. As future work, we will imprint master to replica template and check the printability.

  6. Nano lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Landis, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Lithography is an extremely complex tool - based on the concept of "imprinting" an original template version onto mass output - originally using relatively simple optical exposure, masking, and etching techniques, and now extended to include exposure to X-rays, high energy UV light, and electron beams - in processes developed to manufacture everyday products including those in the realms of consumer electronics, telecommunications, entertainment, and transportation, to name but a few. In the last few years, researchers and engineers have pushed the envelope of fields including optics, physics,

  7. Fabrication of nano-structures on glass substrate by modified nano-imprint patterning with a plasma-induced surface-oxidized Cr mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So Hee; Lee, Su Yeon; Lee, Seong Eui; Lee, Heon; Lee, Hee Chul

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we introduce a process for fabrication of nano-sized structural arrays on glass using modified nano-imprint patterning. A PVC (polyvinyl chloride) stamp was prepared by hot embossing, and a Cr-oxide-pattern etch-mask was used. The etch-mask was formed by oxidizing the surface of exposed Cr region by oxygen plasma treatment at room temperature. The fabrication of the etch-mask was conducted by immersing the locally oxidized Cr pattern in resin remover and Cr-etchant. The residual UV resin and un-oxidized Cr pattern were selectively removed, resulting in the obvious array of Cr-oxide etch-mask-pattern. The array of glass nano-structures was formed by reactive ion etching (RIE) using CF4 and Ar gas discharge. After removing the Cr-oxide mask, the final nano-structure had a height of 40 nm and a diameter of 170 nm, which was slightly less than the diameter of the original master-mold. The plasma treatment gave rise to a rough glass surface with root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of 29.25 nm, while that of bare glass was 0.66 nm. A high optical transmittance due to reduction in reflectance was observed at the plasma-treated rough surface, as well as for the array of nano-structures. The highest measured optical transmittance was 97.2% at a wavelength of 550 nm; an increase of about 7.2% compared to bare glass.

  8. Lithography for VLSI

    CERN Document Server

    Einspruch, Norman G

    1987-01-01

    VLSI Electronics Microstructure Science, Volume 16: Lithography for VLSI treats special topics from each branch of lithography, and also contains general discussion of some lithographic methods.This volume contains 8 chapters that discuss the various aspects of lithography. Chapters 1 and 2 are devoted to optical lithography. Chapter 3 covers electron lithography in general, and Chapter 4 discusses electron resist exposure modeling. Chapter 5 presents the fundamentals of ion-beam lithography. Mask/wafer alignment for x-ray proximity printing and for optical lithography is tackled in Chapter 6.

  9. Coaxial lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Tuncay; Bourret, Gilles R; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-04-01

    The optical and electrical properties of heterogeneous nanowires are profoundly related to their composition and nanoscale architecture. However, the intrinsic constraints of conventional synthetic and lithographic techniques have limited the types of multi-compositional nanowire that can be created and studied in the laboratory. Here, we report a high-throughput technique that can be used to prepare coaxial nanowires with sub-10 nm control over the architectural parameters in both axial and radial dimensions. The method, termed coaxial lithography (COAL), relies on templated electrochemical synthesis and can create coaxial nanowires composed of combinations of metals, metal oxides, metal chalcogenides and conjugated polymers. To illustrate the possibilities of the technique, a core/shell semiconductor nanowire with an embedded plasmonic nanoring was synthesized--a structure that cannot be prepared by any previously known method--and its plasmon-excitation-dependent optoelectronic properties were characterized.

  10. Maskless lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweatt, William C.; Stulen, Richard H.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides.

  11. VUV lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Edward V.; Oster, Yale; Mundinger, David C.

    1990-01-01

    Deep UV projection lithography can be performed using an e-beam pumped solid excimer UV source, a mask, and a UV reduction camera. The UV source produces deep UV radiation in the range 1700-1300A using xenon, krypton or argon; shorter wavelengths of 850-650A can be obtained using neon or helium. A thin solid layer of the gas is formed on a cryogenically cooled plate and bombarded with an e-beam to cause fluorescence. The UV reduction camera utilizes multilayer mirrors having high reflectivity at the UV wavelength and images the mask onto a resist coated substrate at a preselected demagnification. The mask can be formed integrally with the source as an emitting mask.

  12. Chemistry and lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma

    2011-01-01

    This is a unique book, combining chemistry and physics with technology and history in a way that is both enlightening and lively. No other book in the field of lithography has as much breadth. Highly recommended for anyone interested in the broad application of chemistry to lithography. --Chris Mack, Gentleman Scientist. This book provides a comprehensive treatment of the chemical phenomena in lithography in a manner that is accessible to a wide readership. The book presents topics on the optical and charged particle physics practiced in lithography, with a broader view of how the marriage bet

  13. On-Wire Lithography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lidong Qin; Sungho Park; Ling Huang; Chad A. Mirkin

    2005-01-01

    .... This procedure, termed on-wire lithography, combines advances in template-directed synthesis of nanowires with electrochemical deposition and wet-chemical etching and allows routine fabrication...

  14. Optical simulations for fractional fluorine terminated coatings on nanoimprint lithography masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Thomas E.; Goldberg, Alexander; Halls, Mathew D.

    2015-10-01

    Simulations of the optical intensity within Nano Imprint Lithography (NIL) mask features have been made for patterned quartz masks having ultrathin film coatings with different indices of refraction. Fractionally fluorine terminated surfaces, previously proposed for improving the yield of NIL processes, are briefly reviewed. Optical intensity solutions within the feature were obtained using Panoramictech Maxwell solver software for variances in the optical constants of the coating films, aspect ratio, feature size, and wavelength.. The coated masks have conformal surface, higher index of refraction under-layer coating and a fractional terminated fluorine hydrocarbon (FHC) monomolecular layer. The values of optical constants for the FHC layers are unknown, so a range of ad-hoc values were simulated. Optical constants for quartz mask and Al2O3, TiO2 and Si under-layer films are taken from the literature. Wavelengths were varied from 193nm to 365nm. The question of photo-dissociation of the FHC layer for higher energy photons is addressed from first principles, with the result that the F-terminated layers are stable at higher wavelengths. Preliminary simulations for features filled with resist over various substrates are dependent on the antireflection character of the underlying film system. The optical intensity is generally increased within the simulated mask feature when coated with a higher index/FHC films relative to the uncoated reference quartz mask for ~5nm physical feature sizes.

  15. Laser Interference Lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wolferen, Hendricus A.G.M.; Abelmann, Leon; Hennessy, Theodore C.

    In this chapter we explain how submicron gratings can be prepared by Laser Interference Lithography (LIL). In this maskless lithography technique, the standing wave pattern that exists at the intersection of two coherent laser beams is used to expose a photosensitive layer. We show how to build the

  16. Study of Carbon Nano-Tube Photo-electronic Devices by Nano-Imprint Lithography%微压印制备的碳纳米管的光电性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红忠; 丁玉成; 尹磊; 卢秉恒; 范多旺

    2007-01-01

    @@ Introduction With the remarkable properties in mechanical, electronic and magnetic, fabrication of carbon nanotube(CNT) arrays has drawn ever-increasing worldwide attention in application of field emission display (FED)and sensor devices.

  17. Lithography-based nanoelectrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassaei, Liza; Singh, Pradyumna S; Lemay, Serge G

    2011-06-01

    Lithographically fabricated nanostructures appear in an increasingly wide range of scientific fields, and electroanalytical chemistry is no exception. This article introduces lithography methods and provides an overview of the new capabilities and electrochemical phenomena that can emerge in nanostructures.

  18. Polymer Pen Lithography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fengwei Huo; Zijian Zheng; Gengfeng Zheng; Louise R. Giam; Hua Zhang; Chad A. Mirkin

    2008-01-01

    We report a low-cost, high-throughput scanning probe lithography method that uses a soft elastomeric tip array, rather than tips mounted on individual cantilevers, to deliver inks to a surface in a “direct write” manner...

  19. FEL Applications in EUV Lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Goldstein, M; Shroff, Y A; Silverman, P J; Williams, D

    2005-01-01

    Semiconductor industry growth has largely been made possible by regular improvements in lithography. State of the art lithographic tools cost upwards of twenty five million dollars and use 0.93 numerical aperture projection optics with 193nm wavelengths to pattern features for 45 nm node development. Scaling beyond the 32 nm feature size node is expected to require extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength light. EUV source requirements and equipment industry plasma source development efforts are reviewed. Exploratory research on a novel hybrid klystron and high gain harmonic generation FEL with oblique laser seeding will be disclosed. The opportunity and challenges for FELs to serve as a second generation (year 2011-2013) source technology in the semiconductor industry are presented.

  20. Principles of lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Levinson, Harry J

    2011-01-01

    The publication of Principles of Lithography, Third Edition just five years after the previous edition is evidence of the quickly changing and exciting nature of lithography as applied to the production of integrated circuits and other micro- and nanoscale devices. This text is intended to serve as an introduction to the science of microlithography, but also covers several subjects in depth, making it useful to the experienced lithographer as well. Topics directly related to manufacturing tools are addressed, including overlay, the stages of exposure, tools, and light sources. This updated edi

  1. Electron caustic lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Kennedy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A maskless method of electron beam lithography is described which uses the reflection of an electron beam from an electrostatic mirror to produce caustics in the demagnified image projected onto a resist–coated wafer. By varying the electron optics, e.g. via objective lens defocus, both the morphology and dimensions of the caustic features may be controlled, producing a range of bright and tightly focused projected features. The method is illustrated for line and fold caustics and is complementary to other methods of reflective electron beam lithography.

  2. Nanobiotechnology: soft lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Elisa; Pisignano, Dario

    2009-01-01

    An entirely new scientific and technological area has been born from the combination of nanotechnology and biology: nanobiotechnology. Such a field is primed especially by the strong potential synergy enabled by the integration of technologies, protocols, and investigation methods, since, while biomolecules represent functional nanosystems interesting for nanotechnology, micro- and nano-devices can be very useful instruments for studying biological materials. In particular, the research of new approaches for manipulating matter and fabricating structures with micrometre- and sub-micrometre resolution has determined the development of soft lithography, a new set of non-photolithographic patterning techniques applied to the realization of selective proteins and cells attachment, microfluidic circuits for protein and DNA chips, and 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering. Today, soft lithographies have become an asset of nanobiotechnology. This Chapter examines the biological applications of various soft lithographic techniques, with particular attention to the main general features of soft lithography and of materials commonly employed with these methods. We present approaches particularly suitable for biological materials, such as microcontact printing (muCP) and microfluidic lithography, and some key micro- and nanobiotechnology applications, such as the patterning of protein and DNA microarrays and the realization of microfluidic-based analytical devices.

  3. An ice lithography instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

  4. Ice Lithography for Nanodevices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Anpan; Kuan, A.; Wang, J.

    Water vapor is condensed onto a cold sample, coating it with a thin-film of ice. The ice is sensitive to electron beam lithography exposure. 10 nm ice patterns are transferred into metals by “melt-off”. Non-planar samples are coated with ice, and we pattern on cantilevers, AFM tips, and suspended...

  5. Neutral particle lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Barry Paul

    Neutral particle lithography (NPL) is a high resolution, proximity exposure technique where a broad beam of energetic neutral particles floods a stencil mask and transmitted beamlets transfer the mask pattern to resist on a substrate, such that each feature is printed in parallel, rather than in the serial manner of electron beam lithography. It preserves the advantages of ion beam lithography (IBL), including extremely large depth-of-field, sub-5 nm resist scattering, and the near absence of diffraction, yet is intrinsically immune to charge-related artifacts including line-edge roughness and pattern placement errors due to charge accumulation on the mask and substrate. In our experiments, a neutral particle beam is formed by passing an ion beam (e.g., 30 keV He+) through a high pressure helium gas cell (e.g., 100 mTorr) to convert the ions to energetic neutrals through charge transfer scattering. The resolution of NPL is generally superior to that of IBL for applications involving insulating substrates, large proximity gaps, and ultra-small features. High accuracy stepped exposures with energetic neutral particles, where magnetic or electrostatic deflection is impossible, have been obtained by clamping the mask to the wafer, setting the proximity gap with a suitable spacer, and mechanically inclining the mask/wafer stack relative to the beam. This approach is remarkably insensitive to vibration and thermal drift; nanometer scale image offsets have been obtained with +/-2 nm placement accuracy for experiments lasting over one hour. Using this nanostepping technique, linewidth versus dose curves were obtained, from which the NPL lithographic blur was determined as 4.4+/-1.4 nm (1sigma), which is 2-3 times smaller than the blur of electron beam lithography. Neutral particle lithography has the potential to form high density, periodic patterns with sub-10 nm resolution.

  6. Influence of mold and substrate material combinations on nanoimprint lithography process: MD simulation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seunghwa; Yu, Suyoung; Cho, Maenghyo

    2014-05-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) study was performed to examine the effect of mold-substrate material composition on the pattern transferring and defects of the resist polymer in a thermal Nano Imprint Lithography (NIL) process. As candidate materials, single crystalline nickel (Ni), silicon (Si) and silica (SiO2, α-quartz) for the rigid mold substrate, and amorphous poly-(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) thin film for the resist were considered for common applications in NIL processes. Three different material compositions of Si mold-Ni substrate, Ni mold-Si substrate, and quartz mold-Ni substrate were considered. In accordance with a real NIL process, a sequence of indentation-relaxation-release processes was quasi-statically simulated using isothermal ensemble simulation on tri-layer molecular structures consisting of a mold, resist, and substrate. To correlate the deformed shape and delamination of PMMA resist from the substrate in indentation and release processes, non-bond interaction energy between a rigid mold and resist was calculated for each combination of mold and substrate materials. The Si mold-Ni substrate combination shows successful pattern transfer to the resist polymer even without an anti-sticking layer as a result of the desirable balance of surface free energy for mold and substrate materials. However, Ni mold-Si substrate combination shows a critical delamination of the resist in the release process due to strong van der Waals adhesion between the resist and Ni mold. Similarly, the quartz mold-Ni substrate combination shows the same delamination in pattern transfer, but the adhesion of the resist to the quartz mold is attributed to electrostatic interaction. In order to provide guidelines for material selection in imprint-like processes where surface adsorption and wetting characteristics are critical design parameters, a simple PMMA-rigid plate model is proposed, with which consistent surface interaction characteristics in the full model NIL process

  7. Step & flash imprint lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas J. Resnick

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The escalating cost of next generation lithography (NGL is driven in part by the need for complex sources and optics. The cost for a single NGL tool could soon exceed $50 million, a prohibitive amount for many companies. As a result, several research groups are looking at alternative, low-cost methods for printing sub-100 nm features. Many of these methods are limited in their ability to do precise overlay. In 1999, Willson and Sreenivasan developed step and flash imprint lithography (S-FIL™. The use of a quartz template opens up the potential for optical alignment of the wafer and template. This paper reviews several key aspects of the S-FIL process, including template, tool, ultraviolet (UV-curable monomer, and pattern transfer. Two applications are also presented: contact holes and surface acoustic wave (SAW filters.

  8. Self-Collapse Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuanzhen; Xu, Xiaobin; Yang, Qing; Man, Tianxing; Jonas, Steven J; Schwartz, Jeffrey J; Andrews, Anne M; Weiss, Paul S

    2017-08-09

    We report a facile, high-throughput soft lithography process that utilizes nanoscale channels formed naturally at the edges of microscale relief features on soft, elastomeric stamps. Upon contact with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) functionalized substrates, the roof of the stamp collapses, resulting in the selective removal of SAM molecules via a chemical lift-off process. With this technique, which we call self-collapse lithography (SCL), sub-30 nm patterns were achieved readily using masters with microscale features prepared by conventional photolithography. The feature sizes of the chemical patterns can be varied continuously from ∼2 μm to below 30 nm by decreasing stamp relief heights from 1 μm to 50 nm. Likewise, for fixed relief heights, reducing the stamp Young's modulus from ∼2.0 to ∼0.8 MPa resulted in shrinking the features of resulting patterns from ∼400 to ∼100 nm. The self-collapse mechanism was studied using finite element simulation methods to model the competition between adhesion and restoring stresses during patterning. These results correlate well with the experimental data and reveal the relationship between the line widths, channel heights, and Young's moduli of the stamps. In addition, SCL was applied to pattern two-dimensional arrays of circles and squares. These chemical patterns served as resists during etching processes to transfer patterns to the underlying materials (e.g., gold nanostructures). This work provides new insights into the natural propensity of elastomeric stamps to self-collapse and demonstrates a means of exploiting this behavior to achieve patterning via nanoscale chemical lift-off lithography.

  9. Mapper: high troughput maskless lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, E.; Wieland, M.J.; de Boer, G.; Kruit, P.; Ten Berge, G.F.; Houkes, A.M.C.; Jager, R.; Van de Peut, T.; Peijster, J.J.M.; Steenbrink, S.W.H.K.

    2008-01-01

    MAPPER Lithography is developing a maskless lithography technology. The technology combines massively-parallel electron-beam writing with high speed optical data transport used in the telecommunication industry. The electron optics generates 13,000 electron beams that are focused on the wafer by

  10. Colloidal pen lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mianqi; Cai, Xiaojing; Chen, Ghenfu

    2015-02-04

    Colloidal pen lithography, a low-cost, high-throughput scanning probe contact printing method, has been developed, which is based on self-assembled colloidal arrays embedded in a soft elastomeric stamp. Patterned protein arrays are demonstrated using this method, with a feature size ranging from 100 nm to several micrometers. A brief study into the specificity reorganization of protein gives evidence for the feasibility of this method for writing protein chips. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Hyper-lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Jingbo; Litchinitser, Natalia M

    2016-01-01

    The future success of integrated circuits (IC) technology relies on the continuing miniaturization of the feature size, allowing more components per chip and higher speed. Extreme anisotropy opens new opportunities for spatial pattern compression from the micro- to nano-scale. Such compression, enabling visible light-based lithographic patterning not restricted by the fundamental diffraction limit,if realized,may address the ever-increasing demand of IC industry for inexpensive, all-optical nanoscale lithography. By exploiting strongly anisotropic optical properties of engineered nanostructures, we realize the first experimental demonstration of hyperlens-based photolithography, facilitating optical patterning below the diffraction limit using a diffraction-limited mask. We demonstrate that the diffraction-limited features on a mask can be de-magnified to form the subwavelength patterns on the photoresist using visible light. This unique functionality,enabled by the hyperbolic dispersive properties of the med...

  12. Method for maskless lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweatt, William C.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides.

  13. Advances in Nanoimprint Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traub, Matthew C; Longsine, Whitney; Truskett, Van N

    2016-06-07

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL), a molding process, can replicate features <10 nm over large areas with long-range order. We describe the early development and fundamental principles underlying the two most commonly used types of NIL, thermal and UV, and contrast them with conventional photolithography methods used in the semiconductor industry. We then describe current advances toward full commercial industrialization of UV-curable NIL (UV-NIL) technology for integrated circuit production. We conclude with brief overviews of some emerging areas of research, from photonics to biotechnology, in which the ability of NIL to fabricate structures of arbitrary geometry is providing new paths for development. As with previous innovations, the increasing availability of tools and techniques from the semiconductor industry is poised to provide a path to bring these innovations from the lab to everyday life.

  14. Surface enhanced thermo lithography

    KAUST Repository

    Coluccio, Maria Laura

    2017-01-13

    We used electroless deposition to fabricate clusters of silver nanoparticles (NPs) on a silicon substrate. These clusters are plasmonics devices that induce giant electromagnetic (EM) field increments. When those EM field are absorbed by the metal NPs clusters generate, in turn, severe temperature increases. Here, we used the laser radiation of a conventional Raman set-up to transfer geometrical patterns from a template of metal NPs clusters into a layer of thermo sensitive Polyphthalaldehyde (PPA) polymer. Temperature profile on the devices depends on specific arrangements of silver nanoparticles. In plane temperature variations may be controlled with (i) high nano-meter spatial precision and (ii) single Kelvin temperature resolution on varying the shape, size and spacing of metal nanostructures. This scheme can be used to generate strongly localized heat amplifications for applications in nanotechnology, surface enhanced thermo-lithography (SETL), biology and medicine (for space resolved cell ablation and treatment), nano-chemistry.

  15. Nanoimprint lithography for nanodevice fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelo, Steven; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-09-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a compelling technique for low cost nanoscale device fabrication. The precise and repeatable replication of nanoscale patterns from a single high resolution patterning step makes the NIL technique much more versatile than other expensive techniques such as e-beam or even helium ion beam lithography. Furthermore, the use of mechanical deformation during the NIL process enables grayscale lithography with only a single patterning step, not achievable with any other conventional lithography techniques. These strengths enable the fabrication of unique nanoscale devices by NIL for a variety of applications including optics, plasmonics and even biotechnology. Recent advances in throughput and yield in NIL processes demonstrate the potential of being adopted for mainstream semiconductor device fabrication as well.

  16. Nanoimprint lithography for nanodevice fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelo, Steven; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a compelling technique for low cost nanoscale device fabrication. The precise and repeatable replication of nanoscale patterns from a single high resolution patterning step makes the NIL technique much more versatile than other expensive techniques such as e-beam or even helium ion beam lithography. Furthermore, the use of mechanical deformation during the NIL process enables grayscale lithography with only a single patterning step, not achievable with any other conventional lithography techniques. These strengths enable the fabrication of unique nanoscale devices by NIL for a variety of applications including optics, plasmonics and even biotechnology. Recent advances in throughput and yield in NIL processes demonstrate the potential of being adopted for mainstream semiconductor device fabrication as well.

  17. Nanoimprint Lithography -A Next Generation High Volume Lithography Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Pelzer; P.Lindner; T.Glinsner; B.Vratzov; C.Gourgon; S.Landis; P.Kettner; C.Schaefer

    2004-01-01

    Nanoimprint Lithography has been demonstrated to be one of the most promising next generation techniques for large-area structure replication in the nanometer scale.This fast and low cost method becomes an increasingly important instrument for fabrication of biochemistry,μ-fluidic,μ-TAS and telecommunication devices,as well as for a wide variety of fields in the nm range,like biomedical,nano-fluidics,nano-optical applications,data storage,etc.Due to the restrictions on wavelength and the enormous development works,linked to high process and equipment costs on standard lithography systems,nanoimprint lithography might become a real competitive method in mainstream IC industry.There are no physical limitations encountered with imprinting techniques for much smaller replicated structures,down to the sub-10nm range [1].Among several Nanoimprint lithography techniques results of two promising methods,hot embossing lithography(HEL)and UV-nanoimprinting(UV-NIL)will be presented.Both techniques allow rapid prototyping as well as high volume production of fully patterned substrates for a wide range of materials.This paper will present results on HE and UVNIL,among them full wafer imprints up to 200mm with high-resolution patterns down to nm range.

  18. Physical Limitations in Lithography for Microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, P. G.

    1981-01-01

    Describes techniques being used in the production of microelectronics kits which have replaced traditional optical lithography, including contact and optical projection printing, and X-ray and electron beam lithography. Also includes limitations of each technique described. (SK)

  19. Porphyrin-Based Photocatalytic Lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J; Stone, G; Christian, A; Dugan, L; Hiddessen, A; Wu, K J; Wu, L; Hamilton, J; Stockton, C; Hubbell, J

    2007-10-15

    Photocatalytic lithography is an emerging technique that couples light with coated mask materials in order to pattern surface chemistry. We excite porphyrins to create radical species that photocatalytically oxidize, and thereby pattern, chemistries in the local vicinity. The technique advantageously does not necessitate mass transport or specified substrates, it is fast and robust and the wavelength of light does not limit the resolution of patterned features. We have patterned proteins and cells in order to demonstrate the utility of photocatalytic lithography in life science applications.

  20. Advanced oxidation scanning probe lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Yu K.; Garcia, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    Force microscopy enables a variety of approaches to manipulate and/or modify surfaces. Few of those methods have evolved into advanced probe-based lithographies. Oxidation scanning probe lithography (o-SPL) is the only lithography that enables the direct and resist-less nanoscale patterning of a large variety of materials, from metals to semiconductors; from self-assembled monolayers to biomolecules. Oxidation SPL has also been applied to develop sophisticated electronic and nanomechanical devices such as quantum dots, quantum point contacts, nanowire transistors or mechanical resonators. Here, we review the principles, instrumentation aspects and some device applications of o-SPL. Our focus is to provide a balanced view of the method that introduces the key steps in its evolution, provides some detailed explanations on its fundamentals and presents current trends and applications. To illustrate the capabilities and potential of o-SPL as an alternative lithography we have favored the most recent and updated contributions in nanopatterning and device fabrication.

  1. Advanced oxidation scanning probe lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Yu K; Garcia, Ricardo

    2017-04-07

    Force microscopy enables a variety of approaches to manipulate and/or modify surfaces. Few of those methods have evolved into advanced probe-based lithographies. Oxidation scanning probe lithography (o-SPL) is the only lithography that enables the direct and resist-less nanoscale patterning of a large variety of materials, from metals to semiconductors; from self-assembled monolayers to biomolecules. Oxidation SPL has also been applied to develop sophisticated electronic and nanomechanical devices such as quantum dots, quantum point contacts, nanowire transistors or mechanical resonators. Here, we review the principles, instrumentation aspects and some device applications of o-SPL. Our focus is to provide a balanced view of the method that introduces the key steps in its evolution, provides some detailed explanations on its fundamentals and presents current trends and applications. To illustrate the capabilities and potential of o-SPL as an alternative lithography we have favored the most recent and updated contributions in nanopatterning and device fabrication.

  2. Graphic Arts/Offset Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoisington, James; Metcalf, Joseph

    This revised curriculum for graphic arts is designed to provide secondary and postsecondary students with entry-level skills and an understanding of current printing technology. It contains lesson plans based on entry-level competencies for offset lithography as identified by educators and industry representatives. The guide is divided into 15…

  3. Maskless, reticle-free, lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Markle, David A.

    1997-11-25

    A lithography system in which the mask or reticle, which usually carries the pattern to be printed onto a substrate, is replaced by a programmable array of binary (i.e. on/off) light valves or switches which can be programmed to replicate a portion of the pattern each time an illuminating light source is flashed. The pattern of light produced by the programmable array is imaged onto a lithographic substrate which is mounted on a scanning stage as is common in optical lithography. The stage motion and the pattern of light displayed by the programmable array are precisely synchronized with the flashing illumination system so that each flash accurately positions the image of the pattern on the substrate. This is achieved by advancing the pattern held in the programmable array by an amount which corresponds to the travel of the substrate stage each time the light source flashes. In this manner the image is built up of multiple flashes and an isolated defect in the array will only have a small effect on the printed pattern. The method includes projection lithographies using radiation other than optical or ultraviolet light. The programmable array of binary switches would be used to control extreme ultraviolet (EUV), x-ray, or electron, illumination systems, obviating the need for stable, defect free masks for projection EUV, x-ray, or electron, lithographies.

  4. Plasmonic films based on colloidal lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bin; Yu, Ye; Möhwald, Helmuth; Zhang, Gang; Yang, Bai

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the field of plasmonic films fabricated by colloidal lithography. Compared with conventional lithography techniques such as electron beam lithography and focused ion beam lithography, the unconventional colloidal lithography technique with advantages of low-cost and high-throughput has made the fabrication process more efficient, and moreover brought out novel films that show remarkable surface plasmon features. These plasmonic films include those with nanohole arrays, nanovoid arrays and nanoshell arrays with precisely controlled shapes, sizes, and spacing. Based on these novel nanostructures, optical and sensing performances can be greatly enhanced. The introduction of colloidal lithography provides not only efficient fabrication processes but also plasmonic films with unique nanostructures, which are difficult to be fabricated by conventional lithography techniques.

  5. Latex particle template lift-up guided gold wire-networks via evaporation lithography

    KAUST Repository

    Lone, Saifullah

    2014-01-01

    We describe a hybrid methodology that combines a two dimensional (2D) monolayer of latex particles (with a pitch size down to 1 μm) prepared by horizontal dry deposition, lift-up of a 2D template onto flat surfaces and evaporation lithography to fabricate metal micro- and nano wire-networks. This journal is

  6. Ultrafast nanoimprint lithography (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qiangfei; Chou, Stephen Y.

    2005-04-01

    Both ultrafast thermal and photocurable nanoimprint lithography (NIL) are studied and high fidelity transfers of nanopatterns from molds to resists have been achieved. In ultrafast thermal NIL, we use a single excimer laser pulse to melt a NIL resist polymer and imprint it using a fused silica mold. The entire imprint process, from melting the polymer to completion of the imprint, takes less than 200 ns. This technique, termed laser assisted nanoimprint lithography (LAN), has patterned nanostructures in various polymer films with high fidelity over the entire mold area. In LAN, the short laser pulse is absorbed primarily by the resist and the laser energy is minute, hence substrate heating and distortion are negligible. In ultrafast photocurable NIL, a flash lamp (pulse width 94 μs) is used to crosslink photo curable resists over a 4 in. wafer with high uniformity by a single pulse. The significant reduction of the heating of the substrate and mold will greatly benefit overlay alignment.

  7. Process Control for Nanoimprint Lithography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To tackle the demoulding and conglutinating problem with the resist and hard mold in the nanoimprint lithography process, a soft mould can be used to demould and reduce the macro or micro mismatch between mould bottom surface and wafer top surface. In nanoimprint lithography process, a mathematical equation is formulated to demonstrate the relation between the residual resist thickness and the pressing force during pressing the mould toward the resist-coated wafer.Based on these analytical studies, a new imprint process, which includes a pre-cure release of the pressing force, was proposed for the high-conformity transfer of nano-patterns from the mould to the wafer. The results of a series of imprint experiments showed that the proposed loading process could meet the requirements for the imprint of different patterns and feature sizes while maintaining a uniform residual resist and non-distorted transfer of nano-patterns from the mould to the resistcoated wafer.

  8. X-ray lithography source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  9. Pixelated source and mask optimization for immersion lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xu; Han, Chunying; Li, Yanqiu; Dong, Lisong; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2013-01-01

    Immersion lithography systems with hyper-numerical aperture (hyper-NA) (NA>1) have become indispensable in nanolithography for technology nodes of 45 nm and beyond. Source and mask optimization (SMO) has emerged as a key technique used to further improve the imaging performance of immersion lithography. Recently, a set of pixelated gradient-based SMO approaches were proposed under the scalar imaging models, which are inaccurate for hyper-NA settings. This paper focuses on developing pixelated gradient-based SMO algorithms based on a vector imaging model that is accurate for current immersion lithography. To achieve this goal, an integrative and analytic vector imaging model is first used to formulate the simultaneous SMO (SISMO) and sequential SMO (SESMO) frameworks. A gradient-based algorithm is then exploited to jointly optimize the source and mask. Subsequently, this paper studies and compares the performance of individual source optimization (SO), individual mask optimization (MO), SISMO, and SESMO. Finally, a hybrid SMO (HSMO) approach is proposed to take full advantage of SO, SISMO, and MO, consequently achieving superior performance.

  10. Fabrication of a silicon oxide stamp by edge lithography reinforced with silicon nitride for nanoimprint lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yiping; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, M.; de Boer, Meint J.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Huskens, Jurriaan; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    The fabrication of a stamp reinforced with silicon nitride is presented for its use in nanoimprint lithography. The fabrication process is based on edge lithography using conventional optical lithography and wet anisotropic etching of 110 silicon wafers. SiO2 nano-ridges of 20 nm in width were

  11. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Qing [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O2+, BF2+, P+ etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF2+, over 90% of O2+ and P+ have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He+ beam is as high as 440 A/cm2 • Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O2+ ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O2+ ions with the dose of 1015 cm-2. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The

  12. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Qing

    2003-03-10

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O{sub 2}{sup +}, BF{sub 2}{sup +}, P{sup +} etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF{sub 2}{sup +}, over 90% of O{sub 2}{sup +} and P{sup +} have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He{sup +} beam is as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O{sub 2}{sup +} ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O{sub 2}{sup +} ions with the dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features

  13. Multicusp sources for ion beam lithography applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, K.N.; Herz, P.; Kunkel, W.B.; Lee, Y.; Perkins, L.; Pickard, D.; Sarstedt, M.; Weber, M.; Williams, M.D.

    1995-05-01

    Application of the multicusp source for Ion Projection Lithography is described. It is shown that the longitudinal energy spread of the positive ions at the extraction aperture can be reduced by employing a magnetic filter. The advantages of using volume-produced H{sup {minus}} ions for ion beam lithography is also discussed.

  14. Multicusp sources for ion beam lithography applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, K.N.; Herz, P.; Kunkel, W.B.; Lee, Y.; Perkins, L.; Pickard, D.; Sarstedt, M.; Weber, M.; Williams, M.D. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Application of the multicusp source for ion projection lithography is described. It is shown that the longitudinal energy spread of the positive ions at the extraction aperture can be reduced by employing a magnetic filter. The advantages of using volume-produced H{sup {minus}} ions for ion beam lithography are also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Vacuum} {ital Society}

  15. 3D-Nanomachining using corner lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berenschot, Johan W.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Jansen, Henricus V.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    We present a fabrication method to create 3D nano structures without the need for nano lithography. The method, named "corner lithography" is based on conformal deposition and subsequent isotropic thinning of a thin film. The material that remains in sharp concave corners is either used as a mask or

  16. Alternative lithography strategies for flexible electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Main aim of the research has been the development of alternative lithography strategies for the fabrication of complex, flexible electronic devices. Flexible bottom-contact, bottom-gate thin-film transistors were solely patterned with UV nanoimprint lithography on poly(ethylene naphthalate) foil. Pa

  17. High-Throughput Contact Flow Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goff, Gaelle C; Lee, Jiseok; Gupta, Ankur; Hill, William Adam; Doyle, Patrick S

    2015-10-01

    High-throughput fabrication of graphically encoded hydrogel microparticles is achieved by combining flow contact lithography in a multichannel microfluidic device and a high capacity 25 mm LED UV source. Production rates of chemically homogeneous particles are improved by two orders of magnitude. Additionally, the custom-built contact lithography instrument provides an affordable solution for patterning complex microstructures on surfaces.

  18. Flexible Stamp for Nanoimprint Lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Theodor; Pedersen, Rasmus H.; Hansen, Ole

    2005-01-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of a flexible silicon stamp for homogenous large area nanoimprint lithography (NIL) are presented. The flexible stamp is fabricated by bulk semiconductor micro machining of a 4-inch silicon wafer and consists of thick anchor like imprint areas connected...... by membranes. The bending stiffness difference between the imprint areas and the membranes ensures that the deformation of the stamp during the imprint process mainly takes place in the membranes, leaving the imprint structures unaffected. By this design the strong demand to the parallelism between stamp...

  19. Design for manufacturability with advanced lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Bei

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces readers to the most advanced research results on Design for Manufacturability (DFM) with multiple patterning lithography (MPL) and electron beam lithography (EBL).  The authors describe in detail a set of algorithms/methodologies to resolve issues in modern design for manufacturability problems with advanced lithography.  Unlike books that discuss DFM from the product level, or physical manufacturing level, this book describes DFM solutions from a circuit design level, such that most of the critical problems can be formulated and solved through combinatorial algorithms. Enables readers to tackle the challenge of layout decompositions for different patterning techniques; Presents a coherent framework, including standard cell compliance and detailed placement, to enable Triple Patterning Lithography (TPL) friendly design; Includes coverage of the design for manufacturability with E-Beam lithography.

  20. Hybrid 3D-2D printing for bone scaffolds fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleznev, V. A.; Prinz, V. Ya

    2017-02-01

    It is a well-known fact that bone scaffold topography on micro- and nanometer scale influences the cellular behavior. Nano-scale surface modification of scaffolds allows the modulation of biological activity for enhanced cell differentiation. To date, there has been only a limited success in printing scaffolds with micro- and nano-scale features exposed on the surface. To improve on the currently available imperfect technologies, in our paper we introduce new hybrid technologies based on a combination of 2D (nano imprint) and 3D printing methods. The first method is based on using light projection 3D printing and simultaneous 2D nanostructuring of each of the layers during the formation of the 3D structure. The second method is based on the sequential integration of preliminarily created 2D nanostructured films into a 3D printed structure. The capabilities of the developed hybrid technologies are demonstrated with the example of forming 3D bone scaffolds. The proposed technologies can be used to fabricate complex 3D micro- and nanostructured products for various fields.

  1. Scanning Probe Photonic Nanojet Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacassi, Andrea; Tantussi, Francesco; Dipalo, Michele; Biagini, Claudio; Maccaferri, Nicolò; Bozzola, Angelo; De Angelis, Francesco

    2017-09-08

    The use of nano/microspheres or beads for optical nanolithography is a consolidated technique for achieving subwavelength structures using a cost-effective approach; this method exploits the capability of the beads to focus electromagnetic waves into subwavelength beams called photonic nanojets, which are used to expose the photoresist on which the beads are placed. However, this technique has only been used to produce regular patterns based on the spatial arrangement of the beads on the substrate, thus considerably limiting the pool of applications. Here, we present a novel microsphere-based optical lithography technique that offers high subwavelength resolution and the possibility of generating any arbitrary pattern. The presented method consists of a single microsphere embedded in an AFM cantilever, which can be controlled using the AFM motors to write arbitrary patterns with subwavelength resolution (down to 290 nm with a 405 nm laser). The performance of the proposed technique can compete with those of commercial high-resolution standard instruments, with the advantage of a one-order-of-magnitude reduction in costs. This approach paves the way for direct integration of cost-effective, high-resolution optical lithography capabilities into several existing AFM systems.

  2. Moiré Nanosphere Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Rajeeva, Bharath Bangalore; Wu, Zilong; Rukavina, Michael; Dao, Thang Duy; Ishii, Satoshi; Aono, Masakazu; Nagao, Tadaaki; Zheng, Yuebing

    2015-06-23

    We have developed moiré nanosphere lithography (M-NSL), which incorporates in-plane rotation between neighboring monolayers, to extend the patterning capability of conventional nanosphere lithography (NSL). NSL, which uses self-assembled layers of monodisperse micro/nanospheres as masks, is a low-cost, scalable nanofabrication technique and has been widely employed to fabricate various nanoparticle arrays. Combination with dry etching and/or angled deposition has greatly enriched the family of nanoparticles NSL can yield. In this work, we introduce a variant of this technique, which uses sequential stacking of polystyrene nanosphere monolayers to form a bilayer crystal instead of conventional spontaneous self-assembly. Sequential stacking leads to the formation of moiré patterns other than the usually observed thermodynamically stable configurations. Subsequent O2 plasma etching results in a variety of complex nanostructures. Using the etched moiré patterns as masks, we have fabricated complementary gold nanostructures and studied their optical properties. We believe this facile technique provides a strategy to fabricate complex nanostructures or metasurfaces.

  3. Hybrid 3D-2D printing of bone scaffolds Hybrid 3D-2D printing methods for bone scaffolds fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, V Ya; Seleznev, Vladimir

    2016-12-13

    It is a well-known fact that bone scaffold topography on micro- and nanometer scale influences the cellular behavior. Nano-scale surface modification of scaffolds allows the modulation of biological activity for enhanced cell differentiation. To date, there has been only a limited success in printing scaffolds with micro- and nano-scale features exposed on the surface. To improve on the currently available imperfect technologies, in our paper we introduce new hybrid technologies based on a combination of 2D (nano imprint) and 3D printing methods. The first method is based on using light projection 3D printing and simultaneous 2D nanostructuring of each of the layers during the formation of the 3D structure. The second method is based on the sequential integration of preliminarily created 2D nanostructured films into a 3D printed structure. The capabilities of the developed hybrid technologies are demonstrated with the example of forming 3D bone scaffolds. The proposed technologies can be used to fabricate complex 3D micro- and nanostructured products for various fields. Copyright 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  4. Multi-shaped beam proof of lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slodowski, Matthias; Doering, Hans-Joachim; Dorl, Wolfgang; Stolberg, Ines A.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper a full package high throughput multi electron-beam approach, called Multi Shaped Beam (MSB), for applications in mask making as well as direct write will be presented including complex proof-of-lithography results. The basic concept enables a significant exposure shot count reduction for advanced patterns compared to standard Variable Shaped Beam (VSB) systems and allows full pattern flexibility by concurrently using MSB, VSB and Cell Projection (CP). Proof of lithography results will be presented, which have been performed using a fully operational electron-beam lithography system including data path and substrate scanning by x/y-stage movement.

  5. Particle Lithography Enables Fabrication of Multicomponent Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-feng; Swartz, Logan A.; Li, Jie-Ren; Liu, Yang; Liu, Gang-yu

    2014-01-01

    Multicomponent nanostructures with individual geometries have attracted much attention because of their potential to carry out multiple functions synergistically. The current work reports a simple method using particle lithography to fabricate multicomponent nanostructures of metals, proteins, and organosiloxane molecules, each with its own geometry. Particle lithography is well-known for its capability to produce arrays of triangular-shaped nanostructures with novel optical properties. This paper extends the capability of particle lithography by combining a particle template in conjunction with surface chemistry to produce multicomponent nanostructures. The advantages and limitations of this approach will also be addressed. PMID:24707328

  6. Soft lithography contacts to organics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia W.P. Hsu

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic materials play an increasingly important role in (optoelectronics, particularly in low-cost or flexible devices. A major challenge is the contact between the electrodes and the organic material. Processes developed for inorganic semiconductors are inapplicable because of the sensitivity of organic materials to heat, radiation, and chemicals. Deposition of metal(s through shadow masks onto organic materials is commonly used, despite problems with ill-controlled interfaces and material damage. In addition, conventional approaches restrict device size to >1 μm. Clearly, a better technique is needed. In this article, two soft lithography methods for making contacts to organic materials are reviewed: nanotransfer printing (nTP and soft-contact lamination (ScL. These new approaches produce devices that outperform those made by conventional methods. The link between better device performance and better interfacial control is explained, and nanoscale devices are described.

  7. Resistless Fabrication of Nanoimprint Lithography (NIL Stamps Using Nano-Stencil Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen Brugger

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to keep up with the advances in nano-fabrication, alternative, cost-efficient lithography techniques need to be implemented. Two of the most promising are nanoimprint lithography (NIL and stencil lithography. We explore here the possibility of fabricating the stamp using stencil lithography, which has the potential for a cost reduction in some fabrication facilities. We show that the stamps reproduce the membrane aperture patterns within ±10 nm and we validate such stamps by using them to fabricate metallic nanowires down to 100 nm in size.

  8. Imprint lithography advances in LED manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Robert; Doyle, Gary; Jones, Chris; LaBrake, Dwayne; Miller, Mike [Molecular Imprints Inc., 1807 West Braker Lane, Building C-11, Austin, TX 78758 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Imprint lithography is a promising cost effect alternative to e-beam and optical lithography for producing photonic crystals and other nano-scale light extraction and beam directing elements for LEDs; however, there are several challenges that must be overcome before imprint lithography can be applied to typical LED substrates. This paper reviews progress made at Molecular Imprints Inc. (MII) in imprinting representative 3{sup ''} GaN on Sapphire substrates including methods for dealing with substrate non-flatness, multi-die imprint, and imprinting on warped and bowed substrates. The results of imprinting over typical GaN on Sapphire topography and common defects such as fall-on particles and EPI defects is presented along with results on GaN wafers optimized for imprint lithography. Whole wafer thin template replication techniques are also discussed. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Gradient-based inverse extreme ultraviolet lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xu; Wang, Jie; Chen, Xuanbo; Li, Yanqiu; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2015-08-20

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is the most promising successor of current deep ultraviolet (DUV) lithography. The very short wavelength, reflective optics, and nontelecentric structure of EUV lithography systems bring in different imaging phenomena into the lithographic image synthesis problem. This paper develops a gradient-based inverse algorithm for EUV lithography systems to effectively improve the image fidelity by comprehensively compensating the optical proximity effect, flare, photoresist, and mask shadowing effects. A block-based method is applied to iteratively optimize the main features and subresolution assist features (SRAFs) of mask patterns, while simultaneously preserving the mask manufacturability. The mask shadowing effect may be compensated by a retargeting method based on a calibrated shadowing model. Illustrative simulations at 22 and 16 nm technology nodes are presented to validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  10. DNA-Origami-Driven Lithography for Patterning on Gold Surfaces with Sub-10 nm Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gállego, Isaac; Manning, Brendan; Prades, Joan Daniel; Mir, Mònica; Samitier, Josep; Eritja, Ramon

    2017-03-01

    Sub-10 nm lithography of DNA patterns is achieved using the DNA-origami stamping method. This new strategy utilizes DNA origami to bind a preprogrammed DNA ink pattern composed of thiol-modified oligonucleotides on gold surfaces. Upon denaturation of the DNA origami, the DNA ink pattern is exposed. The pattern can then be developed by hybridization with complementary strands carrying gold nanoparticles. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Semiconductor foundry, lithography, and partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Burn J.

    2002-07-01

    The semiconductor foundry took off in 1990 with an annual capacity of less than 0.1M 8-inch-equivalent wafers at the 2-mm node. In 2000, the annual capacity rose to more than 10M. Initially, the technology practiced at foundries was 1 to 2 generations behind that at integrated device manufacturers (IDMs). Presently, the progress in 0.13-mm manufacturing goes hand-in-hand with any of the IDMs. There is a two-order of magnitude rise in output and the progress of technology development outpaces IDMs. What are the reasons of the success? Is it possible to sustain the pace? This paper shows the quick rise of foundries in capacity, sales, and market share. It discusses the their uniqueness which gives rise to advantages in conjunction with challenges. It also shows the role foundries take with their customer partners and supplier partners, their mutual dependencies, as well as expectations. What role then does lithography play in the foundries? What are the lithographic challenges to sustain the pace of technology? The experience of technology development and transfer, at one of the major foundries, is used to illustrate the difficulties and progresses made. Looking into the future, as semiconductor manufacturing will become even more expensive and capital investment more prohibitive, we will make an attempt to suggest possible solutions.

  12. Negative printing by soft lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jason Kee Yang; Moore, David; Kane, Jennifer; Saraf, Ravi F

    2014-08-27

    In inkless microcontact printing (IμCP) by soft lithography, the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamp transfers uncured polymer to a substrate corresponding to its pattern. The spontaneous diffusion of PDMS oligomers to the surface of the stamp that gives rise to this deleterious side effect has been leveraged to fabricate a variety of devices, such as organic thin film transistors, single-electron devices, and biomolecular chips. Here we report an anomalous observation on a partially cured PDMS stamp where the transfer of oligomers onto Au occurred on regions that were not in contact with the stamp, while the surface in contact with the stamp was pristine with no polymer. On the SiO2 surface of the same chip, as expected, the transfer of PDMS occurred exclusively on regions in contact with the stamp. The printing on Au was quantified by a novel method where the submonolayer of PDMS transfer was measured by probing the local electrochemical passivation of the Au. The local transfer of polymer on SiO2 (and also Au) was measured by selective deposition of Au nanoparticle necklaces that exclusively deposited on PDMS at submonolayer sensitivity. It was discovered that the selectivity and sharpness of PDMS deposition on Au for inkless printing (i.e., negative) is significantly better than the traditional (positive) microcontact printing where the stamp is "inked" with low molecular weight PDMS.

  13. Multi-focal multiphoton lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschdorff, Eric T; Nielson, Rex; Shear, Jason B

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton lithography (MPL) provides unparalleled capabilities for creating high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) materials from a broad spectrum of building blocks and with few limitations on geometry, qualities that have been key to the design of chemically, mechanically, and biologically functional microforms. Unfortunately, the reliance of MPL on laser scanning limits the speed at which fabrication can be performed, making it impractical in many instances to produce large-scale, high-resolution objects such as complex micromachines, 3D microfluidics, etc. Previously, others have demonstrated the possibility of using multiple laser foci to simultaneously perform MPL at numerous sites in parallel, but use of a stage-scanning system to specify fabrication coordinates resulted in the production of identical features at each focal position. As a more general solution to the bottleneck problem, we demonstrate here the feasibility for performing multi-focal MPL using a dynamic mask to differentially modulate foci, an approach that enables each fabrication site to create independent (uncorrelated) features within a larger, integrated microform. In this proof-of-concept study, two simultaneously scanned foci produced the expected two-fold decrease in fabrication time, and this approach could be readily extended to many scanning foci by using a more powerful laser. Finally, we show that use of multiple foci in MPL can be exploited to assign heterogeneous properties (such as differential swelling) to micromaterials at distinct positions within a fabrication zone.

  14. Array imaging system for lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirner, Raoul; Mueller, Kevin; Malaurie, Pauline; Vogler, Uwe; Noell, Wilfried; Scharf, Toralf; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2016-09-01

    We present an integrated array imaging system based on a stack of microlens arrays. The microlens arrays are manufactured by melting resist and reactive ion etching (RIE) technology on 8'' wafers (fused silica) and mounted by wafer-level packaging (WLP)1. The array imaging system is configured for 1X projection (magnification m = +1) of a mask pattern onto a planar wafer. The optical system is based on two symmetric telescopes, thus anti-symmetric wavefront aberrations like coma, distortion, lateral color are minimal. Spherical aberrations are reduced by using microlenses with aspherical lens profiles. In our system design approach, sub-images of individual imaging channels do not overlap to avoid interference. Image superposition is achieved by moving the array imaging system during the exposure time. A tandem Koehler integrator illumination system (MO Exposure Optics) is used for illumination. The angular spectrum of the illumination light underfills the pupils of the imaging channels to avoid crosstalk. We present and discuss results from simulation, mounting and testing of a first prototype of the investigated array imaging system for lithography.

  15. Polymer-Pen Chemical Lift-Off Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Yang, Qing; Cheung, Kevin M; Zhao, Chuanzhen; Wattanatorn, Natcha; Belling, Jason N; Abendroth, John M; Slaughter, Liane S; Mirkin, Chad A; Andrews, Anne M; Weiss, Paul S

    2017-05-10

    We designed and fabricated large arrays of polymer pens having sub-20 nm tips to perform chemical lift-off lithography (CLL). As such, we developed a hybrid patterning strategy called polymer-pen chemical lift-off lithography (PPCLL). We demonstrated PPCLL patterning using pyramidal and v-shaped polymer-pen arrays. Associated simulations revealed a nanometer-scale quadratic relationship between contact line widths of the polymer pens and two other variables: polymer-pen base line widths and vertical compression distances. We devised a stamp support system consisting of interspersed arrays of flat-tipped polymer pens that are taller than all other sharp-tipped polymer pens. These supports partially or fully offset stamp weights thereby also serving as a leveling system. We investigated a series of v-shaped polymer pens with known height differences to control relative vertical positions of each polymer pen precisely at the sub-20 nm scale mimicking a high-precision scanning stage. In doing so, we obtained linear-array patterns of alkanethiols with sub-50 nm to sub-500 nm line widths and minimum sub-20 nm line width tunable increments. The CLL pattern line widths were in agreement with those predicted by simulations. Our results suggest that through informed design of a stamp support system and tuning of polymer-pen base widths, throughput can be increased by eliminating the need for a scanning stage system in PPCLL without sacrificing precision. To demonstrate functional microarrays patterned by PPCLL, we inserted probe DNA into PPCLL patterns and observed hybridization by complementary target sequences.

  16. Cost of ownership for future lithography technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelton, Andrew J.; Wüest, Andrea; Hughes, Greg; Litt, Lloyd C.; Goodwin, Frank

    2008-11-01

    The cost of ownership (COO) of candidate technologies for 32 nm and 22 nm half-pitch lithography is calculated. To more accurately compare technologies with different numbers of process steps, a model that includes deposition, etching, metrology, and other costs is created. Results show lithography COO for leading edge layers will increase by roughly 50% from the 45 nm to the 32 nm half-pitch nodes. Double patterning and extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) technologies have roughly the same COO under certain conditions. For 22 nm half-pitch nodes, EUVL has a significant cost advantage over other technologies under certain mask cost assumptions. Double patterning, however, may be competitive under worst case EUVL mask cost assumptions. Sensitivity studies of EUVL COO to throughput and uptime show EUVL may be cost-competitive at lower uptime and throughput conditions. In spite of these higher costs, total lithography costs for 32 nm and 22 nm half-pitches remain within reach of the Moore's Law trend. Finally, the COO of 450 mm lithography is calculated and shows the expected cost reduction is between 0% and 15%.

  17. Optical lithography at a 126-nm wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hoyoung; Bourov, Anatoly; Smith, Bruce W.

    2001-08-01

    There is a window of opportunity for optical lithography between wavelengths of 100 nm and 157 nm that warrants exploration as a next generation technology. We will present activities underway to explore the feasibility of VUV optical lithography in this region with respect to source, optical design, materials, processes, masks, resolution enhancement, and compatibility with existing technologies. We have constructed a small field prototype lithography system using the second continuum 126nm emission wavelength of the Argon excimer. This has been accomplished using a small dielectric barrier discharge lamp with output on the order of 10mW/cm2 and small field catoptric imaging systems based on a modified Cassegrain system. Capacitance focus gauge and piezo electric stage has been installed for fine focusing. In order to achieve sub-half wavelength resolution that would be required to compete with 157nm lithography and others, we have started exploring the feasibility of using liquefied noble gas immersion fluids to increase effective value of lens numerical aperture by factors approaching 1.4x. Conventional silylation process works well with 126nm with high sensitivity. Chemically amplified DUV negative resist looks very good material for 126 nm. Initial contact printing image shows good selectivity and process control. An effort is also underway to explore the use of inorganic resist materials, as silver halide material for instance, to replace the conventional polymeric imaging systems that are currently employed at longer wavelengths, but may be problematic at these VUV wavelengths. Early accomplishments are encouraging. Prototype optical research tools can be used to reveal issues involved with 126nm lithography and solve initial problems. Though many challenges do exist at this short wavelength, it is quite feasible that lithography at this wavelength could meet the part of the needs of future device generations.

  18. Data sharing system for lithography APC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Eiichi; Teranishi, Yoshiharu; Shimabara, Masanori

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a simple and cost-effective data sharing system between fabs for lithography advanced process control (APC). Lithography APC requires process flow, inter-layer information, history information, mask information and so on. So, inter-APC data sharing system has become necessary when lots are to be processed in multiple fabs (usually two fabs). The development cost and maintenance cost also have to be taken into account. The system handles minimum information necessary to make trend prediction for the lots. Three types of data have to be shared for precise trend prediction. First one is device information of the lots, e.g., process flow of the device and inter-layer information. Second one is mask information from mask suppliers, e.g., pattern characteristics and pattern widths. Last one is history data of the lots. Device information is electronic file and easy to handle. The electronic file is common between APCs and uploaded into the database. As for mask information sharing, mask information described in common format is obtained via Wide Area Network (WAN) from mask-vender will be stored in the mask-information data server. This information is periodically transferred to one specific lithography-APC server and compiled into the database. This lithography-APC server periodically delivers the mask-information to every other lithography-APC server. Process-history data sharing system mainly consists of function of delivering process-history data. In shipping production lots to another fab, the product-related process-history data is delivered by the lithography-APC server from the shipping site. We have confirmed the function and effectiveness of data sharing systems.

  19. Nanoimprint lithography an enabling process for nanofabrication

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Weimin

    2013-01-01

    Nanoimprint Lithography: An enabling process for nanofabrication presents a comprehensive description of nanotechnology that is one of the most promising low-cost, high-throughput technologies for manufacturing nanostructures, and an emerging lithography candidates for 22, 16 and 11 nm nodes. It provides the exciting, multidisciplinary field, offering a wide range of topics covering: principles, process, material and application. This book would be of specific interest for researchers and graduate students in the field of nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanofabrication, material, physical, chemical, electric engineering and biology. Dr. Weimin Zhou is an associate professor at Shanghai Nanotechnology Promotion Center, China.

  20. NANOIMPRINT LITHOGRAPHY TECHNOLOGY WITH AUTOMATIC ALIGNMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xiqiu; ZHANG Honghai; WANG Xuefang; HU Xiaofeng; JIA Ke; LIU Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is recognized as one of the most promising candidates for the next generation lithography (NGL) to obtain sub-100 nm patterns because of its simplicity,high-throughput and low-cost. While substantial effort has been expending on NIL for producing smaller and smaller feature sizes, considerably less effort has been devoted to the equally important issue-alignment between template and substrate. A homemade prototype nanoimprint lithography enable the substrate to move towards the desired position automatically. Linear motors with 300 mm travel range and 1 μm step resolution are used as macro actuators, and piezoelectric translators with 50 μm travel range and 1 nm step resolution are used as micro actuators. In addition, the prototype provides one translation (z displacement) and two tilting motion(α and β) to automatically bring uniform intact contact between the template and substrate surfaces by using a flexure stage. As a result, 10 μm coarse alignment accuracy and 20 nm fine alignment accuracy can be achieved. Finally,some results of nanostructures and micro devices such as nanoscale trenches and holes, gratings and microlens array fabricated using the prototype tool are presented, and hot embossing lithography, one typical NIL technology, are depicted by taking nanoscale gratings fabrication as an example.

  1. Solvent-vapor-assisted imprint lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voicu, Nicoleta E.; Ludwigs, Sabine; Crossland, Edward J. W.; Andrew, Piers; Steiner, Ullrich

    2007-01-01

    Sub-micrometer features are replicated into high-molecular-weight polymer resists by using solvent-assisted nanoimprint lithography (see figure). By swelling the polymer in a controlled solvent-vapor atmosphere, millibar pressures and ambient temperatures are sufficient to achieve high-fidelity

  2. Thermoplastic microcantilevers fabricated by nanoimprint lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders; Keller, Stephan Urs; Vig, Asger Laurberg

    2010-01-01

    Nanoimprint lithography has been exploited to fabricate micrometre-sized cantilevers in thermoplastic. This technique allows for very well defined microcantilevers and gives the possibility of embedding structures into the cantilever surface. The microcantilevers are fabricated in TOPAS and are up...

  3. Athermal Azobenzene-Based Nanoimprint Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Christian; Meichner, Christoph; Kreger, Klaus; Kador, Lothar; Neuber, Christian; Schmidt, Hans-Werner

    2016-04-06

    A novel nanoimprint lithography technique based on the photofluidization effect of azobenzene materials is presented. The tunable process allows for imprinting under ambient conditions without crosslinking reactions, so that shrinkage of the resist is avoided. Patterning of surfaces in the regime from micrometers down to 100 nm is demonstrated. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Fabrication of biopolymer cantilevers using nanoimprint lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Fisker-Bødker, Nis

    2011-01-01

    The biodegradable polymer poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) was introduced for the fabrication of micromechanical devices. For this purpose, thin biopolymer films with thickness around 10 μm were spin-coated on silicon substrates. Patterning of microcantilevers is achieved by nanoimprint lithography. A major...

  5. Wiring up pre-characterized single-photon emitters by laser lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Q.; Sontheimer, B.; Nikolay, N.; Schell, A. W.; Fischer, J.; Naber, A.; Benson, O.; Wegener, M.

    2016-08-01

    Future quantum optical chips will likely be hybrid in nature and include many single-photon emitters, waveguides, filters, as well as single-photon detectors. Here, we introduce a scalable optical localization-selection-lithography procedure for wiring up a large number of single-photon emitters via polymeric photonic wire bonds in three dimensions. First, we localize and characterize nitrogen vacancies in nanodiamonds inside a solid photoresist exhibiting low background fluorescence. Next, without intermediate steps and using the same optical instrument, we perform aligned three-dimensional laser lithography. As a proof of concept, we design, fabricate, and characterize three-dimensional functional waveguide elements on an optical chip. Each element consists of one single-photon emitter centered in a crossed-arc waveguide configuration, allowing for integrated optical excitation and efficient background suppression at the same time.

  6. Soft lithography for micro- and nanoscale patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Dong; Xia, Younan; Whitesides, George M

    2010-03-01

    This protocol provides an introduction to soft lithography--a collection of techniques based on printing, molding and embossing with an elastomeric stamp. Soft lithography provides access to three-dimensional and curved structures, tolerates a wide variety of materials, generates well-defined and controllable surface chemistries, and is generally compatible with biological applications. It is also low in cost, experimentally convenient and has emerged as a technology useful for a number of applications that include cell biology, microfluidics, lab-on-a-chip, microelectromechanical systems and flexible electronics/photonics. As examples, here we focus on three of the commonly used soft lithographic techniques: (i) microcontact printing of alkanethiols and proteins on gold-coated and glass substrates; (ii) replica molding for fabrication of microfluidic devices in poly(dimethyl siloxane), and of nanostructures in polyurethane or epoxy; and (iii) solvent-assisted micromolding of nanostructures in poly(methyl methacrylate).

  7. Photoresists in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Danilo; Vesters, Yannick; Vandenberghe, Geert

    2017-06-01

    The evolutionary advances in photosensitive material technology, together with the shortening of the exposure wavelength in the photolithography process, have enabled and driven the transistor scaling dictated by Moore's law for the last 50 years. Today, the shortening wavelength trend continues to improve the chips' performance over time by feature size miniaturization. The next-generation lithography technology for high-volume manufacturing (HVM) is extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), using a light source with a wavelength of 13.5 nm. Here, we provide a brief introduction to EUVL and patterning requirements for sub-0-nm feature sizes from a photomaterial standpoint, discussing traditional and novel photoresists. Emphasis will be put on the novel class of metal-containing resists (MCRs) as well as their challenges from a manufacturing prospective.

  8. Resolution enhancement techniques in optical lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Alfred K

    2001-01-01

    Ever-smaller IC devices are pushing the optical lithography envelope, increasing the importance of resolution enhancement techniques. This tutorial encompasses two decades of research. It discusses theoretical and practical aspects of commonly used techniques, including optical imaging and resolution, modified illumination, optical proximity correction, alternating and attenuating phase-shifting masks, selecting RETs, and second-generation RETs. Useful for students and practicing lithographers.

  9. Liquid-Phase Beam Pen Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shu; Xie, Zhuang; Park, Daniel J; Liao, Xing; Brown, Keith A; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Zhou, Yu; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-02-24

    Beam pen lithography (BPL) in the liquid phase is evaluated. The effect of tip-substrate gap and aperture size on patterning performance is systematically investigated. As a proof-of-concept experiment, nanoarrays of nucleotides are synthesized using BPL in an organic medium, pointing toward the potential of using liquid phase BPL to perform localized photochemical reactions that require a liquid medium. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Formation of Magnetic Anisotropy by Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si Nyeon; Nam, Yoon Jae; Kim, Yang Doo; Choi, Jun Woo; Lee, Heon; Lim, Sang Ho

    2016-05-24

    Artificial interface anisotropy is demonstrated in alternating Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns, providing a means of forming magnetic anisotropy using lithography. In-plane hysteresis loops measured along two principal directions are explained in depth by two competing shape and interface anisotropies, thus confirming the formation of interface anisotropy at the Co/Pt and Co/Pd interfaces of the stripe patterns. The measured interface anisotropy energies, which are in the range of 0.2-0.3 erg/cm(2) for both stripes, are smaller than those observed in conventional multilayers, indicating a decrease in smoothness of the interfaces when formed by lithography. The demonstration of interface anisotropy in the Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns is of significant practical importance, because this setup makes it possible to form anisotropy using lithography and to modulate its strength by controlling the pattern width. Furthermore, this makes it possible to form more complex interface anisotropy by fabricating two-dimensional patterns. These artificial anisotropies are expected to open up new device applications such as multilevel bits using in-plane magnetoresistive thin-film structures.

  11. Electron Beam Lithography for nano-patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greibe, Tine; Anhøj, Thomas Aarøe; Khomtchenko, Elena;

    2014-01-01

    Electron beam lithography is a versatile tool for fabrication of nano-sized patterns. The patterns are generated by scanning a focused beam of high-energy electrons onto a substrate coated with a thin layer of electron-sensitive polymer (resist), i.e. by directly writing custom-made patterns...... in a polymer. Electron beam lithography is a suitable method for nano-sized production, research, or development of semiconductor components on a low-volume level. Here, we present electron beam lithography available at DTU Danchip. We expertize a JEOL 9500FZ with electrons accelerated to an energy of 100ke......V and focused to a beam spot size down to ~5nm. The electron beam can scan across the substrate with a speed of 100MHz and can write areas of 1mm x 1mm without stitching. In order to ensure high-precision patterning, the beam position on the substrate is controlled by a two-stage deflector system and substrates...

  12. Metallic resist for phase-change lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bi Jian; Huang, Jun Zhu; Ni, Ri Wen; Yu, Nian Nian; Wei, Wei; Hu, Yang Zhi; Li, Zhen; Miao, Xiang Shui

    2014-06-01

    Currently, the most widely used photoresists in optical lithography are organic-based resists. The major limitations of such resists include the photon accumulation severely affects the quality of photolithography patterns and the size of the pattern is constrained by the diffraction limit. Phase-change lithography, which uses semiconductor-based resists such as chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 films, was developed to overcome these limitations. Here, instead of chalcogenide, we propose a metallic resist composed of Mg58Cu29Y13 alloy films, which exhibits a considerable difference in etching rate between amorphous and crystalline states. Furthermore, the heat distribution in Mg58Cu29Y13 thin film is better and can be more easily controlled than that in Ge2Sb2Te5 during exposure. We succeeded in fabricating both continuous and discrete patterns on Mg58Cu29Y13 thin films via laser irradiation and wet etching. Our results demonstrate that a metallic resist of Mg58Cu29Y13 is suitable for phase change lithography, and this type of resist has potential due to its outstanding characteristics.

  13. Stereomask lithography for multi-protein patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Siwei; Chen, Arnold; Revzin, Alexander; Pan, Tingrui

    2014-01-01

    The advances of biologically-friendly micropatterning technologies have benefited many areas of biological and medical research, including quantitative biochemical assay, point-of-care devices, biosensing and regenerative medicine. Conventional micropatterning techniques, for example, photolithography and soft lithography, have seen encouraging adaptation to creating biological micropatterns in the last decades. However, they still have not completely addressed the major needs of constructing multi-object biological microarrays with single-cell resolution without requiring cleanroom access. In this chapter, we present a novel versatile biological lithography technique to achieve integrated multi-object patterning with high feature resolution and high adaptability to various biomaterials, referred to as stereomask lithography (SML). A novel three-dimensional stereomask has been developed for successive patterning of multiple objects. The stereomask consists of both patterned through holes, which layout new micropatterns and non-through recesses, which protect pre-existing features on the substrate. Furthermore, high-precision reversible alignment among multiple bio-objects is achieved by adopting a peg-in-hole design between the substrate and stereomasks. As demonstration, we have successfully used the SML technique to construct complex biological microenvironment with various bio-functional components at single-cell resolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Metallic resist for phase-change lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bi Jian; Huang, Jun Zhu; Ni, Ri Wen; Yu, Nian Nian; Wei, Wei; Hu, Yang Zhi; Li, Zhen; Miao, Xiang Shui

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the most widely used photoresists in optical lithography are organic-based resists. The major limitations of such resists include the photon accumulation severely affects the quality of photolithography patterns and the size of the pattern is constrained by the diffraction limit. Phase-change lithography, which uses semiconductor-based resists such as chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 films, was developed to overcome these limitations. Here, instead of chalcogenide, we propose a metallic resist composed of Mg58Cu29Y13 alloy films, which exhibits a considerable difference in etching rate between amorphous and crystalline states. Furthermore, the heat distribution in Mg58Cu29Y13 thin film is better and can be more easily controlled than that in Ge2Sb2Te5 during exposure. We succeeded in fabricating both continuous and discrete patterns on Mg58Cu29Y13 thin films via laser irradiation and wet etching. Our results demonstrate that a metallic resist of Mg58Cu29Y13 is suitable for phase change lithography, and this type of resist has potential due to its outstanding characteristics. PMID:24931505

  15. Polymeric waveguide Bragg grating filter using soft lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Askin; Aydinli, Atilla

    2006-10-01

    We use the soft lithography technique to fabricate a polymeric waveguide Bragg grating filter. Master grating structure is patterned by e-beam lithography. Using an elastomeric stamp and capillary action, uniform grating structures with very thin residual layers are transferred to the UV curable polymer without the use of an imprint machine. The waveguide layer based on BCB optical polymer is fabricated by conventional optical lithography. This approach provides processing simplicity to fabricate Bragg grating filters.

  16. Design and simulation of large field plate lithography lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chao; Xing, Tingwen; Lin, Wumei; Zhu, Xianchang

    2016-10-01

    Because industry demand for LED,LCD panel continues to increase, the high yield of micron-scale resolution lithography is increasingly prominent for manufacturers, which requires the field of lithography objective lens becomes larger. This paper designed a lithography lens with large field, whose effective image side field will reach to 132 × 132mm.Subsequently, the tolerance was analysed by simulation for the optical system. Finally, it is proved that the design meets the requirements of micron-scale resolution.

  17. Synchrotron Radiation Lithography and MEMS Technique at NSRL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Two beamlines and stations for soft X-ray lithography and hard X-ray lithography at NSRL are presented. Synchrotron radiation lithography (SRL) and mask techniques are developed, and the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) techniques are also investigated at NSRL. In this paper, some results based on SRL and MEMS techniques are reported, and sub-micron and high aspect ratio microstructures are given. Some micro-devices, such as microreactors are fabricated at NSRL.

  18. 75 FR 44015 - Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing... importation of certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques and products containing... certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques or products containing same...

  19. Submicron three-dimensional structures fabricated by reverse contact UV nanoimprint lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehagias, N.; Reboud, Vincent; Chansin, G.

    2006-01-01

    The fabrication of a three-dimensional multilayered nanostructure is demonstrated with a newly developed nanofabrication technique, namely, reverse contact ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography. This technique is a combination of reverse nanoimprint lithography and contact ultraviolet lithography...

  20. High-resolution imprint and soft lithography for patterning self-assembling systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duan, X.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis contributes to the continuous development of patterning strategies in several different areas of unconventional nanofabrication. A series of soft lithography approaches (microcontact printing, nanomolding in capillaries), nanoimprint lithography (NIL), and capillary force lithography

  1. Expected innovations of optical lithography in the next 10 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owa, Soichi; Hirayanagi, Noriyuki

    2016-03-01

    In the past 10 years, immersion lithography has been the most effective high volume manufacturing method for the critical layers of semiconductor devices. Thinking of the next 10 years, we can expect continuous improvement on existing 300 mm wafer scanners with better accuracy and throughput to enhance the total output value per input cost. This value productivity, however, can be upgraded also by larger innovations which might happen in optical lithography. In this paper, we will discuss the possibilities and the impossibilities of potential innovation ideas of optical lithography, which are 450 mm wafer, optical maskless, multicolor lithography, and metamaterial.

  2. Lithography - Green and Getting Greener

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Harry J.

    2011-06-01

    Today, many energy-saving technologies and practices are enabled or made more effective through the use of nano-electronics. Such technologies include hybrid and all-electric cars, as well as controllers to increase the efficiency of photovoltaic panels. Telecommuting, which enables people to work without traveling from their homes, has been made possible by personal computers and the internet. Reducing the costs of nano-electronics will make possible increased opportunities for the use of products that reduce energy consumption. The most effective way to reduce costs is to improve efficiency. Increased efficiency also provides the benefit of reducing energy and material consumption in the manufacturing of nano-electronics. For example, reducing photochemical usage decreases costs but also reduces material consumption and the need for disposal. Reduction of scrap and rework are direct improvements in efficiency. Cycle time reduction enables greater responsiveness to demand, reducing the amount of material started in processing but never completed. Good process control reduces scrap and rework during manufacturing and results in circuits that have high performance, yet lower power consumption, when used. There are ready opportunities for making the most of the natural tendencies of businesses to innovate and improve efficiency. The semiconductor industry has historically adopted process improvements that have increased worker safety and reduced the consumption of hazardous materials. An early example was the transition from solvent to aqueous photoresist developers. Today, all types of development can be conducted in safer equipment that minimizes the release of hazardous chemicals to the air and water. Non-toxic solvents, such as ethyl lactate, have been widely adopted. There are many opportunities for further improvement. For example, over 90% of resist goes down the drain using conventional spin-coating process, so there is an opportunity for greatly improved

  3. Plasmon–Phonon Coupling in Large-Area Graphene Dot and Antidot Arrays Fabricated by Nanosphere Lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Wang, Weihua; Yan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured graphene on SiO2 substrates paves the way for enhanced light–matter interactions and explorations of strong plasmon–phonon hybridization in the mid-infrared regime. Unprecedented large-area graphene nanodot and antidot optical arrays are fabricated by nanosphere lithography......, with structural control down to the sub-100 nm regime. The interaction between graphene plasmon modes and the substrate phonons is experimentally demonstrated, and structural control is used to map out the hybridization of plasmons and phonons, showing coupling energies of the order 20 meV. Our findings...

  4. EUV lithography imaging using novel pellicle membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollentier, Ivan; Vanpaemel, Johannes; Lee, Jae Uk; Adelmann, Christoph; Zahedmanesh, Houman; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Gallagher, Emily E.

    2016-03-01

    EUV mask protection against defects during use remains a challenge for EUV lithography. A stand-off protective membrane - a pellicle - is targeted to prevent yield losses in high volume manufacturing during handling and exposure, just as it is for 193nm lithography. The pellicle is thin enough to transmit EUV exposure light, yet strong enough to remain intact and hold any particles out of focus during exposure. The development of pellicles for EUV is much more challenging than for 193nm lithography for multiple reasons including: high absorption of most materials at EUV wavelength, pump-down sequences in the EUV vacuum system, and exposure to high intensity EUV light. To solve the problems of transmission and film durability, various options have been explored. In most cases a thin core film is considered, since the deposition process for this is well established and because it is the simplest option. The transmission specification typically dictates that membranes are very thin (~50nm or less), which makes both fabrication and film mechanical integrity difficult. As an alternative, low density films (e.g. including porosity) will allow thicker membranes for a given transmission specification, which is likely to improve film durability. The risk is that the porosity could influence the imaging. At imec, two cases of pellicle concepts based on reducing density have been assessed : (1) 3D-patterned SiN by directed self-assembly (DSA), and (2) carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanosheets (CNS). The first case is based on SiN membranes that are 3D-patterned by Directed Self Assembly (DSA). The materials are tested relative to the primary specifications: EUV transmission and film durability. A risk assessment of printing performance is provided based on simulations of scattered energy. General conclusions on the efficacy of various approaches will provided.

  5. Manipulation of heat-diffusion channel in laser thermal lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jingsong; Wang, Yang; Wu, Yiqun

    2014-12-29

    Laser thermal lithography is a good alternative method for forming small pattern feature size by taking advantage of the structural-change threshold effect of thermal lithography materials. In this work, the heat-diffusion channels of laser thermal lithography are first analyzed, and then we propose to manipulate the heat-diffusion channels by inserting thermal conduction layers in between channels. Heat-flow direction can be changed from the in-plane to the out-of-plane of the thermal lithography layer, which causes the size of the structural-change threshold region to become much smaller than the focused laser spot itself; thus, nanoscale marks can be obtained. Samples designated as "glass substrate/thermal conduction layer/thermal lithography layer (100 nm)/thermal conduction layer" are designed and prepared. Chalcogenide phase-change materials are used as thermal lithography layer, and Si is used as thermal conduction layer to manipulate heat-diffusion channels. Laser thermal lithography experiments are conducted on a home-made high-speed rotation direct laser writing setup with 488 nm laser wavelength and 0.90 numerical aperture of converging lens. The writing marks with 50-60 nm size are successfully obtained. The mark size is only about 1/13 of the focused laser spot, which is far smaller than that of the light diffraction limit spot of the direct laser writing setup. This work is useful for nanoscale fabrication and lithography by exploiting the far-field focusing light system.

  6. Roll-to-roll UV imprint lithography for flexible electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maury, P.; Turkenburg, D.H.; Stroeks, N.; Giesen, P.; Barbu, I.; Meinders, E.R.; Bremen, A. van; Iosad, N.; Werf, R. van der; Onvlee, H.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a roll-to-roll UV imprint lithography tool as a way to pattern flexible PET foil with µm-resolution. As a way to overcome dimensional instability of the foil and its effect on overlay, a self-align approach was investigated, that permits to make several layers in a single lithography step

  7. Thermoplastic microcantilevers fabricated by nanoimprint lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders; Keller, Stephan Urs; Vig, Asger Laurberg;

    2010-01-01

    Nanoimprint lithography has been exploited to fabricate micrometre-sized cantilevers in thermoplastic. This technique allows for very well defined microcantilevers and gives the possibility of embedding structures into the cantilever surface. The microcantilevers are fabricated in TOPAS and are up...... to 500 μm long, 100 μm wide, and 4.5 μm thick. Some of the cantilevers have built-in ripple surface structures with heights of 800 nm and pitches of 4 μm. The yield for the cantilever fabrication is 95% and the initial out-of-plane bending is below 10 μm. The stiffness of the cantilevers is measured...

  8. Wave and particle in molecular interference lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juffmann, Thomas; Truppe, Stefan; Geyer, Philipp; Major, András G; Deachapunya, Sarayut; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Arndt, Markus

    2009-12-31

    The wave-particle duality of massive objects is a cornerstone of quantum physics and a key property of many modern tools such as electron microscopy, neutron diffraction or atom interferometry. Here we report on the first experimental demonstration of quantum interference lithography with complex molecules. Molecular matter-wave interference patterns are deposited onto a reconstructed Si(111) 7x7 surface and imaged using scanning tunneling microscopy. Thereby both the particle and the quantum wave character of the molecules can be visualized in one and the same image. This new approach to nanolithography therefore also represents a sensitive new detection scheme for quantum interference experiments.

  9. Wave and Particle in Molecular Interference Lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Juffmann, Thomas; Geyer, Philipp; Major, Andras G; Deachapunya, Sarayut; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Arndt, Markus; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.263601

    2010-01-01

    The wave-particle duality of massive objects is a cornerstone of quantum physics and a key property of many modern tools such as electron microscopy, neutron diffraction or atom interferometry. Here we report on the first experimental demonstration of quantum interference lithography with complex molecules. Molecular matter-wave interference patterns are deposited onto a reconstructed Si(111) 7x7 surface and imaged using scanning tunneling microscopy. Thereby both the particle and the quantum wave character of the molecules can be visualized in one and the same image. This new approach to nanolithography therefore also represents a sensitive new detection scheme for quantum interference experiments.

  10. Atom Lithography with a Chromium Atomic Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; LI Tong-Bao

    2006-01-01

    @@ Direct write atom lithography is a new technique in which resonant light is used to pattern an atomic beam and the nanostructures are formed when the atoms deposit on the substrate. We design an experiment setup to fabricate chromium nanolines by depositing an atomic beam of 52 Cr through an off-resonant laser standing wave with the wavelength of 425.55 nm onto a silicon substrate. The resulting nanolines exhibit a period of 215 ± 3 nm with height of 1 nm.

  11. Advanced processes for 193-nm immersion lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Yayi

    2009-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive guide to advanced processes and materials used in 193-nm immersion lithography (193i). It is an important text for those new to the field as well as for current practitioners who want to broaden their understanding of this latest technology. The book can be used as course material for graduate students of electrical engineering, material sciences, physics, chemistry, and microelectronics engineering and can also be used to train engineers involved in the manufacture of integrated circuits. It provides techniques for selecting critical materials (topcoats, photoresi

  12. EUV lithography: progress, challenges, and outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, S.

    2014-10-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) has been in the making for more than a quarter century. The first EUVL production tools have been delivered over the past year and chip manufacturers and suppliers are maturing the technology in pilot line mode to prepare for high volume manufacturing (HVM). While excellent progress has been made in many technical and business areas to prepare EUVL for HVM introduction, there are still critical technical and business challenges to be addressed before the industry will be able to use EUVL in HVM.

  13. A simple electron-beam lithography system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Bøggild, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A large number of applications of electron-beam lithography (EBL) systems in nanotechnology have been demonstrated in recent years. In this paper we present a simple and general-purpose EBL system constructed by insertion of an electrostatic deflector plate system at the electron-beam exit...... of the column of a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The system can easily be mounted on most standard SEM systems. The tested setup allows an area of up to about 50 x 50 pm to be scanned, if the upper limit for acceptable reduction of the SEM resolution is set to 10 run. We demonstrate how the EBL system can...

  14. A review of roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooy, Nazrin; Mohamed, Khairudin; Pin, Lee Tze; Guan, Ooi Su

    2014-01-01

    Since its introduction in 1995, nanoimprint lithography has been demonstrated in many researches as a simple, low-cost, and high-throughput process for replicating micro- and nanoscale patterns. Due to its advantages, the nanoimprint lithography method has been rapidly developed over the years as a promising alternative to conventional nanolithography processes to fulfill the demands generated from the recent developments in the semiconductor and flexible electronics industries, which results in variations of the process. Roll-to-roll (R2R) nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is the most demanded technique due to its high-throughput fulfilling industrial-scale application. In the present work, a general literature review on the various types of nanoimprint lithography processes especially R2R NIL and the methods commonly adapted to fabricate imprint molds are presented to provide a clear view and understanding on the nanoimprint lithography technique as well as its recent developments. 81.16.Nd.

  15. Inverse lithography source optimization via compressive sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhiyang; Ma, Xu; Gao, Jie; Wang, Jie; Li, Yanqiu; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2014-06-16

    Source optimization (SO) has emerged as a key technique for improving lithographic imaging over a range of process variations. Current SO approaches are pixel-based, where the source pattern is designed by solving a quadratic optimization problem using gradient-based algorithms or solving a linear programming problem. Most of these methods, however, are either computational intensive or result in a process window (PW) that may be further extended. This paper applies the rich theory of compressive sensing (CS) to develop an efficient and robust SO method. In order to accelerate the SO design, the source optimization is formulated as an underdetermined linear problem, where the number of equations can be much less than the source variables. Assuming the source pattern is a sparse pattern on a certain basis, the SO problem is transformed into a l1-norm image reconstruction problem based on CS theory. The linearized Bregman algorithm is applied to synthesize the sparse optimal source pattern on a representation basis, which effectively improves the source manufacturability. It is shown that the proposed linear SO formulation is more effective for improving the contrast of the aerial image than the traditional quadratic formulation. The proposed SO method shows that sparse-regularization in inverse lithography can indeed extend the PW of lithography systems. A set of simulations and analysis demonstrate the superiority of the proposed SO method over the traditional approaches.

  16. Hard Transparent Arrays for Polymer Pen Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, James L; Brown, Keith A; Kluender, Edward J; Cabezas, Maria D; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-03-22

    Patterning nanoscale features across macroscopic areas is challenging due to the vast range of length scales that must be addressed. With polymer pen lithography, arrays of thousands of elastomeric pyramidal pens can be used to write features across centimeter-scales, but deformation of the soft pens limits resolution and minimum feature pitch, especially with polymeric inks. Here, we show that by coating polymer pen arrays with a ∼175 nm silica layer, the resulting hard transparent arrays exhibit a force-independent contact area that improves their patterning capability by reducing the minimum feature size (∼40 nm), minimum feature pitch (<200 nm for polymers), and pen to pen variation. With these new arrays, patterns with as many as 5.9 billion features in a 14.5 cm(2) area were written using a four hundred thousand pyramid pen array. Furthermore, a new method is demonstrated for patterning macroscopic feature size gradients that vary in feature diameter by a factor of 4. Ultimately, this form of polymer pen lithography allows for patterning with the resolution of dip-pen nanolithography across centimeter scales using simple and inexpensive pen arrays. The high resolution and density afforded by this technique position it as a broad-based discovery tool for the field of nanocombinatorics.

  17. Photochromic silver nanoparticles fabricated by nanosphere lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meixner, Melanie; Sprafke, Alexander; Hallermann, Florian; Reismann, Maximilian; Wuttig, Matthias; Plessen, Gero von [Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Photochromic materials change their color under irradiation with light. In previous work, we have studied the photochromic transformation of silver nanoparticles embedded in transition-metal oxides prepared by dc-sputter deposition, such as TiO{sub x}, ZrO{sub x} and HfO{sub x}. The silver nanoparticles are highly inhomogeneous in shape, size and spatial distribution. The photochromic effect is based on spectral hole burning in the inhomogeneously broadened particle-plasmon band. This hole burning is probably caused by photoemission of electrons from the resonantly excited particles. In the present work, we show that TiO{sub x}-embedded silver nanoparticles with improved photochromic properties can be fabricated through a combination of electron-beam evaporation and nanosphere lithography. Nanosphere lithography is a method to produce hexagonal arranged and equally shaped particles. The good reproducibility of this approach allows us to analyze the photochromic transformation in a more quantitative way than was possible with samples prepared by sputter deposition.

  18. Optical design for EUV lithography source collector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuqing Zhang; Qi Wang; Dongyuan Zhu; Runshun Li; Chang Liu

    2011-01-01

    @@ Wolter I collector is the best collector for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, which has a series of nested mirrors.It has high collection efficiency and can obtain more uniform intensity distribution at the intermediate focus (IF).A new design with the calculation sequence from the outer mirror to the inner one on the premise of satisfying the requirements of the collector is introduced.Based on this concept, a computer program is established and the optical parameters of the collector using the program is calculated.The design results indicate that the collector satisfies all the requirements.%Wolter I collector is the best collector for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, which has a series of nested mirrors. It has high collection efficiency and can obtain more uniform intensity distribution at the intermediate focus (IF). A new design with the calculation sequence from the outer mirror to the inner one on the premise of satisfying the requirements of the collector is introduced. Based on this concept, acomputer program is established and the optical parameters of the collector using the program is calculated.The design results indicate that the collector satisfies all the requirements.

  19. Molecular self-assembly for biological investigations and nanoscale lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheunkar, Sarawut

    Small, diffusible molecules when recognized by their binding partners, such as proteins and antibodies, trigger enzymatic activity, cell communication, and immune response. Progress in analytical methods enabling detection, characterization, and visualization of biological dynamics at the molecular level will advance our exploration of complex biological systems. In this dissertation, analytical platforms were fabricated to capture membrane-associated receptors, which are essential proteins in cell signaling pathways. The neurotransmitter serotonin and its biological precursor were immobilized on gold substrates coated with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of oligo(ethylene glycol)alkanethiols and their reactive derivatives. The SAM-coated substrates present the biologically selective affinity of immobilized molecules to target native membrane-associated receptors. These substrates were also tested for biospecificity using antibodies. In addition, small-molecule-functionalized platforms, expressing neurotransmitter pharmacophores, were employed to examine kinetic interactions between G-protein-coupled receptors and their associated neurotransmitters. The binding interactions were monitored using a quartz crystal microbalance equipped with liquid-flow injection. The interaction kinetics of G-protein-coupled serotonin 1A receptor and 5-hydroxytyptophan-functionalized surfaces were studied in a real-time, label-free environment. Key binding parameters, such as equilibrium dissociation constants, binding rate constants, and dissociative half-life, were extracted. These parameters are critical for understanding and comparing biomolecular interactions in modern biomedical research. By integrating self-assembly, surface functionalization, and nanofabrication, small-molecule microarrays were created for high-throughput screening. A hybrid soft-lithography, called microcontact insertion printing, was used to pattern small molecules at the dilute scales necessary for highly

  20. Innovative SU-8 Lithography Techniques and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Bong Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available SU-8 has been widely used in a variety of applications for creating structures in micro-scale as well as sub-micron scales for more than 15 years. One of the most common structures made of SU-8 is tall (up to millimeters high-aspect-ratio (up to 100:1 3D microstructure, which is far better than that made of any other photoresists. There has been a great deal of efforts in developing innovative unconventional lithography techniques to fully utilize the thick high aspect ratio nature of the SU-8 photoresist. Those unconventional lithography techniques include inclined ultraviolet (UV exposure, back-side UV exposure, drawing lithography, and moving-mask UV lithography. In addition, since SU-8 is a negative-tone photoresist, it has been a popular choice of material for multiple-photon interference lithography for the periodic structure in scales down to deep sub-microns such as photonic crystals. These innovative lithography techniques for SU-8 have led to a lot of unprecedented capabilities for creating unique micro- and nano-structures. This paper reviews such innovative lithography techniques developed in the past 15 years or so.

  1. Resolution considerations in MeV ion microscopy and lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norarat, Rattanaporn, E-mail: rattanaporn@rmutl.ac.th [University of Applied Sciences (HES-SO), Haute Ecole Arc Ingénierie, Eplatures-Gris 17, CH-2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Faculty of Sciences and Agricultural Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Lanna, Chiang Rai, 57120 Chiang Rai (Thailand); Whitlow, Harry J. [University of Applied Sciences (HES-SO), Haute Ecole Arc Ingénierie, Eplatures-Gris 17, CH-2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland)

    2015-04-01

    There a disparity between the way the resolution is specified in microscopy and lithography using light compared to MeV ion microscopy and lithography. In this work we explore the implications of the way the resolution is defined with a view to answering the questions; how are the resolving powers in MeV ion microscopy and lithography relate to their optical counterparts? and how do different forms of point spread function affect the modulation transfer function and the sharpness of the edge profile?.

  2. Workshop on compact storage ring technology: applications to lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-30

    Project planning in the area of x-ray lithography is discussed. Three technologies that are emphasized are the light source, the lithographic technology, and masking technology. The needs of the semiconductor industry in the lithography area during the next decade are discussed, particularly as regards large scale production of high density dynamic random access memory devices. Storage ring parameters and an overall exposure tool for x-ray lithography are addressed. Competition in this area of technology from Germany and Japan is discussed briefly. The design of a storage ring is considered, including lattice design, magnets, and beam injection systems. (LEW)

  3. Femtolitre chemistry assisted by microfluidic pen lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Carlos; Stylianou, Kyriakos C; Hernando, Jordi; Evangelio, Emi; Barnett, Sarah A; Nettikadan, Saju; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Chemical reactions at ultrasmall volumes are becoming increasingly necessary to study biological processes, to synthesize homogenous nanostructures and to perform high-throughput assays and combinatorial screening. Here we show that a femtolitre reaction can be realized on a surface by handling and mixing femtolitre volumes of reagents using a microfluidic stylus. This method, named microfluidic pen lithography, allows mixing reagents in isolated femtolitre droplets that can be used as reactors to conduct independent reactions and crystallization processes. This strategy overcomes the high-throughput limitations of vesicles and micelles and obviates the usually costly step of fabricating microdevices and wells. We anticipate that this process enables performing distinct reactions (acid-base, enzymatic recognition and metal-organic framework synthesis), creating multiplexed nanoscale metal-organic framework arrays, and screening combinatorial reactions to evaluate the crystallization of novel peptide-based materials.

  4. Photonic integrated circuits: new challenges for lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolten, Jens; Wahlbrink, Thorsten; Prinzen, Andreas; Porschatis, Caroline; Lerch, Holger; Giesecke, Anna Lena

    2016-10-01

    In this work routes towards the fabrication of photonic integrated circuits (PICs) and the challenges their fabrication poses on lithography, such as large differences in feature dimension of adjacent device features, non-Manhattan-type features, high aspect ratios and significant topographic steps as well as tight lithographic requirements with respect to critical dimension control, line edge roughness and other key figures of merit not only for very small but also for relatively large features, are highlighted. Several ways those challenges are faced in today's low-volume fabrication of PICs, including the concept multi project wafer runs and mix and match approaches, are presented and possible paths towards a real market uptake of PICs are discussed.

  5. Femtolitre chemistry assisted by microfluidic pen lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Carlos; Stylianou, Kyriakos C.; Hernando, Jordi; Evangelio, Emi; Barnett, Sarah A.; Nettikadan, Saju; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Chemical reactions at ultrasmall volumes are becoming increasingly necessary to study biological processes, to synthesize homogenous nanostructures and to perform high-throughput assays and combinatorial screening. Here we show that a femtolitre reaction can be realized on a surface by handling and mixing femtolitre volumes of reagents using a microfluidic stylus. This method, named microfluidic pen lithography, allows mixing reagents in isolated femtolitre droplets that can be used as reactors to conduct independent reactions and crystallization processes. This strategy overcomes the high-throughput limitations of vesicles and micelles and obviates the usually costly step of fabricating microdevices and wells. We anticipate that this process enables performing distinct reactions (acid-base, enzymatic recognition and metal-organic framework synthesis), creating multiplexed nanoscale metal-organic framework arrays, and screening combinatorial reactions to evaluate the crystallization of novel peptide-based materials. PMID:23863998

  6. Microfluidic Lithography of Bioinspired Helical Micromotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yunru; Shang, Luoran; Gao, Wei; Zhao, Ze; Wang, Huan; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2017-07-29

    Considerable efforts have been devoted to developing artificial micro/nanomotors that can convert energy into movement. A flow lithography integrated microfluidic spinning and spiraling system is developed for the continuous generation of bioinspired helical micromotors. Because the generation processes could be precisely tuned by adjusting the flow rates and the illuminating frequency, the length, diameter, and pitch of the helical micromotors were highly controllable. Benefiting from the fast online gelation and polymerization, the resultant helical micromotors could be imparted with Janus, triplex, and core-shell cross-sectional structures that have never been achieved by other methods. Owing to the spatially controlled encapsulation of functional nanoparticles in the microstructures, the helical micromotors can perform locomotion not only by magnetically actuated rotation or corkscrew motion but also through chemically powered catalytic reaction. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Sequential infiltration synthesis for advanced lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Seth B.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Tseng, Yu-Chih; Peng, Qing

    2015-03-17

    A plasma etch resist material modified by an inorganic protective component via sequential infiltration synthesis (SIS) and methods of preparing the modified resist material. The modified resist material is characterized by an improved resistance to a plasma etching or related process relative to the unmodified resist material, thereby allowing formation of patterned features into a substrate material, which may be high-aspect ratio features. The SIS process forms the protective component within the bulk resist material through a plurality of alternating exposures to gas phase precursors which infiltrate the resist material. The plasma etch resist material may be initially patterned using photolithography, electron-beam lithography or a block copolymer self-assembly process.

  8. Direct optical lithography of functional inorganic nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Fedin, Igor; Zhang, Hao; Talapin, Dmitri V.

    2017-07-01

    Photolithography is an important manufacturing process that relies on using photoresists, typically polymer formulations, that change solubility when illuminated with ultraviolet light. Here, we introduce a general chemical approach for photoresist-free, direct optical lithography of functional inorganic nanomaterials. The patterned materials can be metals, semiconductors, oxides, magnetic, or rare earth compositions. No organic impurities are present in the patterned layers, which helps achieve good electronic and optical properties. The conductivity, carrier mobility, dielectric, and luminescence properties of optically patterned layers are on par with the properties of state-of-the-art solution-processed materials. The ability to directly pattern all-inorganic layers by using a light exposure dose comparable with that of organic photoresists provides an alternate route for thin-film device manufacturing.

  9. DNA Nanostructures-Mediated Molecular Imprinting Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Cheng; Kim, Hyojeong; Sun, Wei; Kim, Yunah; Yin, Peng; Liu, Haitao

    2017-01-24

    This paper describes the fabrication of polymer stamps using DNA nanostructure templates. This process creates stamps having diverse nanoscale features with dimensions ranging from several tens of nanometers to micrometers. DNA nanostructures including DNA nanotubes, stretched λ-DNA, two-dimensional (2D) DNA brick crystals with three-dimensional (3D) features, hexagonal DNA 2D arrays, and triangular DNA origami were used as master templates to transfer patterns to poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(l-lactic acid) with high fidelity. The resulting polymer stamps were used as molds to transfer the pattern to acryloxy perfluoropolyether polymer. This work establishes an approach to using self-assembled DNA templates for applications in soft lithography.

  10. Nanoscale plasmonic stamp lithography on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fenglin; Luber, Erik J; Huck, Lawrence A; Olsen, Brian C; Buriak, Jillian M

    2015-02-24

    Nanoscale lithography on silicon is of interest for applications ranging from computer chip design to tissue interfacing. Block copolymer-based self-assembly, also called directed self-assembly (DSA) within the semiconductor industry, can produce a variety of complex nanopatterns on silicon, but these polymeric films typically require transformation into functional materials. Here we demonstrate how gold nanopatterns, produced via block copolymer self-assembly, can be incorporated into an optically transparent flexible PDMS stamp, termed a plasmonic stamp, and used to directly functionalize silicon surfaces on a sub-100 nm scale. We propose that the high intensity electric fields that result from the localized surface plasmons of the gold nanoparticles in the plasmonic stamps upon illumination with low intensity green light, lead to generation of electron-hole pairs in the silicon that drive spatially localized hydrosilylation. This approach demonstrates how localized surface plasmons can be used to enable functionalization of technologically relevant surfaces with nanoscale control.

  11. Current status of HESYRL lithography beam line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shinan; Li, Guihe; Liu, Zewen; Chen, Qianhong; Jiang, Dikui; kan, Ya; Liu, Wanpo

    1990-06-01

    A lithography beam line, as the first of possibly six or more, has been installed in the Hefei Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (HESYRL). A scanning mirror is used to cut off shorter wavelengths and to expand exposure dimensions vertically. The scanning mirror is oscillated by a stepping motor while an in-situ Moirè fringe grating system measures motor speed uniformity. Some testing results are given. In the first part of the beam line, there is a beryllium window to block longer wavelength light, a laser alignment unit to align the beam line and a special exposure shutter, which is controlled by another stepping motor. An exposure chamber with vacuum of 5 × 10-7 torr is located 7 meters downstream from the source point. Because there is no window at the entrance of the chamber, a differential pumping system is needed. The chamber is equipped with a mask-wafer system, driven by a third stepping motor.

  12. Integrating nanosphere lithography in device fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurvick, Tod V.; Coutu, Ronald A.; Lake, Robert A.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the integration of nanosphere lithography (NSL) with other fabrication techniques, allowing for nano-scaled features to be realized within larger microelectromechanical system (MEMS) based devices. Nanosphere self-patterning methods have been researched for over three decades, but typically not for use as a lithography process. Only recently has progress been made towards integrating many of the best practices from these publications and determining a process that yields large areas of coverage, with repeatability and enabled a process for precise placement of nanospheres relative to other features. Discussed are two of the more common self-patterning methods used in NSL (i.e. spin-coating and dip coating) as well as a more recently conceived variation of dip coating. Recent work has suggested the repeatability of any method depends on a number of variables, so to better understand how these variables affect the process a series of test vessels were developed and fabricated. Commercially available 3-D printing technology was used to incrementally alter the test vessels allowing for each variable to be investigated individually. With these deposition vessels, NSL can now be used in conjunction with other fabrication steps to integrate features otherwise unattainable through current methods, within the overall fabrication process of larger MEMS devices. Patterned regions in 1800 series photoresist with a thickness of ~700nm are used to capture regions of self-assembled nanospheres. These regions are roughly 2-5 microns in width, and are able to control the placement of 500nm polystyrene spheres by controlling where monolayer self-assembly occurs. The resulting combination of photoresist and nanospheres can then be used with traditional deposition or etch methods to utilize these fine scale features in the overall design.

  13. Benchtop micromolding of polystyrene by soft lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuli; Balowski, Joseph; Phillips, Colleen; Phillips, Ryan; Sims, Christopher E; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2011-09-21

    Polystyrene (PS), a standard material for cell culture consumable labware, was molded into microstructures with high fidelity of replication by an elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold. The process was a simple, benchtop method based on soft lithography using readily available materials. The key to successful replica molding by this simple procedure relies on the use of a solvent, for example, gamma-butyrolactone, which dissolves PS without swelling the PDMS mold. PS solution was added to the PDMS mold, and evaporation of the solvent was accomplished by baking the mold on a hotplate. Microstructures with feature sizes as small as 3 μm and aspect ratios as large as 7 were readily molded. Prototypes of microfluidic chips made from PS were prepared by thermal bonding of a microchannel molded in PS with a flat PS substrate. The PS microfluidic chip displayed much lower adsorption and absorption of hydrophobic molecules (e.g. rhodamine B) compared to a comparable chip created from PDMS. The molded PS surface exhibited stable surface properties after plasma oxidation as assessed by contact angle measurement. The molded, oxidized PS surface remained an excellent surface for cell culture based on cell adhesion and proliferation. To demonstrate the application of this process for cell biology research, PS was micromolded into two different microarray formats, microwells and microposts, for segregation and tracking of non-adherent and adherent cells, respectively. The micromolded PS possessed properties that were ideal for biological and bioanalytical needs, thus making it an alternative material to PDMS and suitable for building lab-on-a-chip devices by soft lithography methods. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  14. Direct-write scanning probe lithography: towards a desktop fab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giam, Louise R.; Senesi, Andrew J.; Liao, Xing; Wong, Lu Shin; Chai, Jinan; Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Shim, Wooyoung; Rasin, Boris; He, Shu; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2011-06-01

    Massively parallel scanning-probe based methods have been used to address the challenges of nanometer to millimeter scale printing for a variety of materials and mark a step towards the realization of a "desktop fab." Such tools enable simple, flexible, high-throughput, and low-cost nano- and microscale patterning, which allow researchers to rapidly synthesize and study systems ranging from nanoparticle synthesis to biological processes. We have developed a novel scanning probe-based cantilever-free printing method termed polymer pen lithography (PPL), which uses an array of elastomeric tips to transfer materials (e.g. alkanethiols, proteins, polymers) in a direct-write manner onto a variety of surfaces. This technique takes the best attributes of dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) and eliminates many of the disadvantages of contact printing. Various related techniques such as beam pen lithography (BPL), scanning probe block copolymer lithography (SPBCL), and hard-tip, soft spring lithography (HSL) are also discussed.

  15. ANALYSIS OF LITHOGRAPHY BASED APPROACHES IN DEVELOPMENT OF SEMICONDUCTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatin Chopra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The end of the 19th century brought about a change in the dynamics of computing by the development of the microprocessor. Huge bedroom size computers began being replaced by portable, smaller sized desktops. Today the world is dominated by silicon, which has circumscribed chip development for computers through microprocessors. Majority of the integrated circuits that are manufactured at present are developed using the concept of Lithography. This paper presents a detailed analysis of multiple Lithography methodologies as a means for advanced integrated circuit development. The study paper primarily restricts to examples in the context of Lithography, surveying the various existing techniques of Lithography in literature, examining feasible and efficient methods, highlighting the various pros and cons of each of them.

  16. Nanoscale 2.5-dimensional surface patterning with plasmonic lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Howon; Park, Changhoon; Oh, Seonghyeon; Hahn, Jae W

    2017-08-29

    We report an extension of plasmonic lithography to nanoscale 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) surface patterning. To obtain the impulse response of a plasmonic lithography system, we described the field distribution of a point dipole source generated by a metallic ridge aperture with a theoretical model using the concepts of quasi-spherical waves and surface plasmon-polaritons. We performed deconvolution to construct an exposure map of a target shape for patterning. For practical applications, we fabricated several nanoscale and microscale structures, such as a cone, microlens array, nanoneedle, and a multiscale structure using the plasmonic lithography system. We verified the possibility of applying plasmonic lithography to multiscale structuring from a few tens of nanometres to a few micrometres in the lateral dimension. We obtained a root-mean-square error of 4.7 nm between the target shape and the patterned shape, and a surface roughness of 11.5 nm.

  17. Development of motorized plasma lithography for cell patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Shinji; Nagasawa, Yohei; Saito, Akira C; Matsui, Tsubasa S; Yokoyama, Sho; Sato, Masaaki

    2014-03-01

    The micropatterning of cells, which restricts the adhesive regions on the substrate and thus controls cell geometry, is used to study mechanobiology-related cell functions. Plasma lithography is a means of providing such patterns and uses a spatially-selective plasma treatment. Conventional plasma lithography employs a positionally-fixed mask with which the geometry of the patterns is determined and thus is not suited for producing on-demand geometries of patterns. To overcome this, we have manufactured a new device with a motorized mask mounted in a vacuum chamber of a plasma generator, which we designate motorized plasma lithography. Our pilot tests indicate that various pattern geometries can be obtained with the control of a shielding mask during plasma treatment. Our approach can thus omit the laborious process of preparing photolithographically microfabricated masks required for the conventional plasma lithography.

  18. Intel takes a stake in ultraviolet-lithography firm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Ned

    2012-08-01

    The world's biggest computer-chip maker, Intel Corporation, has signed a major agreement with Dutch lithography firm ASML Holding to collaborate on developing the next generation of technology for manufacturing semiconductor chips.

  19. Image-Reversal Soft Lithography: Fabrication of Ultrasensitive Biomolecular Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Tina Saberi; Das, Jagotamoy; Mahshid, Sahar Sadat; Aldridge, Peter M; Sargent, Edward H; Kelley, Shana O

    2016-04-20

    Image-reversal soft lithography enables the straightforward fabrication of high-performance biosensors without requiringhigh-resolution photolitography. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. In-situ resist colloidal lithography for affordable plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochenkov, Vladimir E.

    2017-09-01

    A recently developed extension of Sparse Colloidal Lithography, an In-situ Resist Colloidal Lithography method is presented. The technique is based on in-situ deposition of structured resist layer having low adhesion to target material to form nanoparticles of desired shape. A high potential of the method is demonstrated by the examples of fabricated plasmonic nanostructures with different shapes, including concentric and non-concentric rings, disks and chiral comma-like particles.

  1. Maskless Electron-Beam Lithography for Trusted Microchip Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    no resolution improvement in optical lithography equipment. To enable manufacture of advanced designs, Intel was first to adopt unidirectional (1D...designed for high-volume manufacturing and unsuited for production of small quantities of a wide mix of special devices for DoD. The Defense...below: Reduce mask/equipment costs for production: In high volume manufacturing , lithography now accounts for more than 50% of wafer cost. In low

  2. Displacement Talbot lithography: an alternative technique to fabricate nanostructured metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Boulbar, E. D.; Chausse, P. J. P.; Lis, S.; Shields, P. A.

    2017-06-01

    Nanostructured materials are essential for many recent electronic, magnetic and optical devices. Lithography is the most common step used to fabricate organized and well calibrated nanostructures. However, feature sizes less than 200 nm usually require access to deep ultraviolet photolithography, e-beam lithography or soft lithography (nanoimprinting), which are either expensive, have low-throughput or are sensitive to defects. Low-cost, high-throughput and low-defect-density techniques are therefore of interest for the fabrication of nanostructures. In this study, we investigate the potential of displacement Talbot lithography for the fabrication of specific structures of interest within plasmonic and metamaterial research fields. We demonstrate that nanodash arrays and `fishnet'-like structures can be fabricated by using a double exposure of two different linear grating phase masks. Feature sizes can be tuned by varying the exposure doses. Such lithography has been used to fabricate metallic `fishnet'-like structures using a lift-off technique. This proof of principle paves the way to a low-cost, high-throughput, defect-free and large-scale technique for the fabrication of structures that could be useful for metamaterial and plasmonic metasurfaces. With the development of deep ultraviolet displacement Talbot lithography, the feature dimensions could be pushed lower and used for the fabrication of optical metamaterials in the visible range.

  3. Negative UV-NIL (NUV-NIL) - A mix-and-match NIL and UV strategy for realisation of nano- and micrometre structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjolding, L. H. D.; Teixidor, G. T.; Emneus, J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel strategy for aligning patterns created with nano-imprint lithography (NIL) and UV lithography, similar to a mix-and-match process, which allows for the fabrication of large and small features in a single layer of resist. The resin used to demonstrate this new imprintin...

  4. Metal hierarchical patterning by direct nanoimprint lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, Boya; Lim, Su Hui; Saifullah, Mohammad S M; Kulkarni, Giridhar U

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional hierarchical patterning of metals is of paramount importance in diverse fields involving photonics, controlling surface wettability and wearable electronics. Conventionally, this type of structuring is tedious and usually involves layer-by-layer lithographic patterning. Here, we describe a simple process of direct nanoimprint lithography using palladium benzylthiolate, a versatile metal-organic ink, which not only leads to the formation of hierarchical patterns but also is amenable to layer-by-layer stacking of the metal over large areas. The key to achieving such multi-faceted patterning is hysteretic melting of ink, enabling its shaping. It undergoes transformation to metallic palladium under gentle thermal conditions without affecting the integrity of the hierarchical patterns on micro- as well as nanoscale. A metallic rice leaf structure showing anisotropic wetting behavior and woodpile-like structures were thus fabricated. Furthermore, this method is extendable for transferring imprinted structures to a flexible substrate to make them robust enough to sustain numerous bending cycles.

  5. Evaporative Lithography in Open Microfluidic Channel Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Lone, Saifullah

    2017-02-24

    We demonstrate a direct capillary-driven method based on wetting and evaporation of various suspensions to fabricate regular two-dimensional wires in an open microfluidic channel through continuous deposition of micro- or nanoparticles under evaporative lithography, akin to the coffee-ring effect. The suspension is gently placed in a loading reservoir connected to the main open microchannel groove on a PDMS substrate. Hydrophilic conditions ensure rapid spreading of the suspension from the loading reservoir to fill the entire channel length. Evaporation during the spreading and after the channel is full increases the particle concentration toward the end of the channel. This evaporation-induced convective transport brings particles from the loading reservoir toward the channel end where this flow deposits a continuous multilayered particle structure. The particle deposition front propagates backward over the entire channel length. The final dry deposit of the particles is thereby much thicker than the initial volume fraction of the suspension. The deposition depth is characterized using a 3D imaging profiler, whereas the deposition topography is revealed using a scanning electron microscope. The patterning technology described here is robust and passive and hence operates without an external field. This work may well become a launching pad to construct low-cost and large-scale thin optoelectronic films with variable thicknesses and interspacing distances.

  6. STRUCTURING OF DIAMOND FILMS USING MICROSPHERE LITHOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Domonkos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the structuring of micro- and nanocrystalline diamond thin films is demonstrated. The structuring of the diamond films is performed using the technique of microsphere lithography followed by reactive ion etching. Specifically, this paper presents a four-step fabrication process: diamond deposition (microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition, mask preparation (by the standard Langmuir-Blodgett method, mask modification and diamond etching. A self-assembled monolayer of monodisperse polystyrene (PS microspheres with close-packed ordering is used as the primary template. Then the PS microspheres and the diamond films are processed in capacitively coupled radiofrequency plasma  using different plasma chemistries. This fabrication method illustrates the preparation of large arrays of periodic and homogeneous hillock-like structures. The surface morphology of processed diamond films is characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. The potential applications of such diamond structures in various fields of nanotechnology are also briefly discussed.

  7. Evaporative Lithography in Open Microfluidic Channel Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Saifullah; Zhang, Jia Ming; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-03-13

    We demonstrate a direct capillary-driven method based on wetting and evaporation of various suspensions to fabricate regular two-dimensional wires in an open microfluidic channel through continuous deposition of micro- or nanoparticles under evaporative lithography, akin to the coffee-ring effect. The suspension is gently placed in a loading reservoir connected to the main open microchannel groove on a PDMS substrate. Hydrophilic conditions ensure rapid spreading of the suspension from the loading reservoir to fill the entire channel length. Evaporation during the spreading and after the channel is full increases the particle concentration toward the end of the channel. This evaporation-induced convective transport brings particles from the loading reservoir toward the channel end where this flow deposits a continuous multilayered particle structure. The particle deposition front propagates backward over the entire channel length. The final dry deposit of the particles is thereby much thicker than the initial volume fraction of the suspension. The deposition depth is characterized using a 3D imaging profiler, whereas the deposition topography is revealed using a scanning electron microscope. The patterning technology described here is robust and passive and hence operates without an external field. This work may well become a launching pad to construct low-cost and large-scale thin optoelectronic films with variable thicknesses and interspacing distances.

  8. Smartphone Sensors for Stone Lithography Authentication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirripa Spagnolo, Giuseppe; Cozzella, Lorenzo; Papalillo, Donato

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays mobile phones include quality photo and video cameras, access to wireless networks and the internet, GPS assistance and other innovative systems. These facilities open them to innovative uses, other than the classical telephonic communication one. Smartphones are a more sophisticated version of classic mobile phones, which have advanced computing power, memory and connectivity. Because fake lithographs are flooding the art market, in this work, we propose a smartphone as simple, robust and efficient sensor for lithograph authentication. When we buy an artwork object, the seller issues a certificate of authenticity, which contains specific details about the artwork itself. Unscrupulous sellers can duplicate the classic certificates of authenticity, and then use them to “authenticate” non-genuine works of art. In this way, the buyer will have a copy of an original certificate to attest that the “not original artwork” is an original one. A solution for this problem would be to insert a system that links together the certificate and the related specific artwork. To do this it is necessary, for a single artwork, to find unique, unrepeatable, and unchangeable characteristics. In this article we propose an innovative method for the authentication of stone lithographs. We use the color spots distribution captured by means of a smartphone camera as a non-cloneable texture of the specific artworks and an information management system for verifying it in mobility stone lithography. PMID:24811077

  9. Overlay considerations for 300-mm lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mono, Tobias; Schroeder, Uwe P.; Nees, Dieter; Palitzsch, Katrin; Koestler, Wolfram; Bruch, Jens; Kramp, Sirko; Veldkamp, Markus; Schuster, Ralf

    2003-05-01

    Generally, the potential impact of systematical overlay errors on 300mm wafers is much larger than on 200mm wafers. Process problems which are merely identified as minor edge yield detractors on 200mm wafers, can evolve as major roadblocks for 300mm lithography. Therefore, it is commonly believed that achieving product overlay specifications on 300mm wafers is much more difficult than on 200mm wafers. Based on recent results on high volume 300mm DRAM manufacturing, it is shown that in reality this assumption does not hold. By optimizing the process, overlay results can be achieved which are comparable to the 200mm reference process. However, the influence of non-lithographic processes on the overlay performance becomes much more critical. Based on examples for specific overlay signatures, the influence of several processes on the overlay characteristics of 300mm wafers is demonstrated. Thus, process setup and process changes need to be analyzed monitored much more carefully. Any process variations affecting wafer related overlay have to be observed carefully. Fast reaction times are critical to avoid major yield loss. As the semiconductor industry converts to 300mm technology, lithographers have to focus more than ever on process integration aspects.

  10. Lithography strategy for 65-nm node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodovsky, Yan A.; Schenker, Richard E.; Allen, Gary A.; Tejnil, Edita; Hwang, David H.; Lo, Fu-Chang; Singh, Vivek K.; Gleason, Robert E.; Brandenburg, Joseph E.; Bigwood, Robert M.

    2002-07-01

    Intel will start high volume manufacturing (HVM) of the 65nm node in 2005. Microprocessor density and performance trends will continue to follow Moore's law and cost-effective patterning solutions capable of supporting it have to be found, demonstrated and developed during 2002-2004. Given the uncertainty regarding the readiness and respective capabilities of 157nm and 193nm lithography to support 65nm technology requirements, Intel is developing both lithographic options and corresponding infrastructure with the intent to use both options in manufacturing. Development and use of dual lithographic options for a given technology node in manufacturing is not a new paradigm for Intel: whenever introduction of a new exposure wavelength presented excessive risk to the manufacturing schedule, Intel developed parallel patterning approaches in time for the manufacturing ramp. Both I-line and 248nm patterning solutions were developed and successfully used in manufacturing of the 350nm node at Intel. Similarly, 248nm and 193nm patterning solutions were fully developed for 130nm node high volume manufacturing.

  11. Tunable diffraction grating in flexible substrate by UV-nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, F.; Aassime, A.; Bertin, H.; Gogol, P.; Bartenlian, B.; Dagens, B.

    2017-02-01

    The fabrication of flexible advanced devices is a very important issue that requires the hybrid integration of different nanostructured materials. In this work, we report on a new molding technique based on an improved hard UV-nanoimprint lithography process (hard UV-NIL) using a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) film. The large-scale integration of a high-quality nanostructured gold pattern in PDMS is made possible with the use of an inorganic sacrificial layer soluble in hydrogen peroxide. A tunable diffraction gold stripe grating has been fabricated by transferring a 1 cm2 stripe grating from a rigid silicon substrate to a flexible PDMS substrate. As a result, we successfully demonstrate diffraction grating optical tunability when mechanical tension is applied.

  12. Magnetic Nanoparticles: Material Engineering and Emerging Applications in Lithography and Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuping; Wen, Tianlong; Samia, Anna Cristina S.; Khandhar, Amit; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    We present an interdisciplinary overview of material engineering and emerging applications of iron oxide nanoparticles. We discuss material engineering of nanoparticles in the broadest sense, emphasizing size and shape control, large-area self-assembly, composite/hybrid structures, and surface engineering. This is followed by a discussion of several non-traditional, emerging applications of iron oxide nanoparticles, including nanoparticle lithography, magnetic particle imaging, magnetic guided drug delivery, and positive contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. We conclude with a succinct discussion of the pharmacokinetics pathways of iron oxide nanoparticles in the human body –– an important and required practical consideration for any in vivo biomedical application, followed by a brief outlook of the field. PMID:26586919

  13. Plasmonic nanostructures fabricated using nanosphere-lithography, soft-lithography and plasma etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel R. Gonçalves

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present two routes for the fabrication of plasmonic structures based on nanosphere lithography templates. One route makes use of soft-lithography to obtain arrays of epoxy resin hemispheres, which, in a second step, can be coated by metal films. The second uses the hexagonal array of triangular structures, obtained by evaporation of a metal film on top of colloidal crystals, as a mask for reactive ion etching (RIE of the substrate. In this way, the triangular patterns of the mask are transferred to the substrate through etched triangular pillars. Making an epoxy resin cast of the pillars, coated with metal films, allows us to invert the structure and obtain arrays of triangular holes within the metal. Both fabrication methods illustrate the preparation of large arrays of nanocavities within metal films at low cost.Gold films of different thicknesses were evaporated on top of hemispherical structures of epoxy resin with different radii, and the reflectance and transmittance were measured for optical wavelengths. Experimental results show that the reflectivity of coated hemispheres is lower than that of coated polystyrene spheres of the same size, for certain wavelength bands. The spectral position of these bands correlates with the size of the hemispheres. In contrast, etched structures on quartz coated with gold films exhibit low reflectance and transmittance values for all wavelengths measured. Low transmittance and reflectance indicate high absorbance, which can be utilized in experiments requiring light confinement.

  14. Plasmonic nanostructures fabricated using nanosphere-lithography, soft-lithography and plasma etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Manuel R; Makaryan, Taron; Enderle, Fabian; Wiedemann, Stefan; Plettl, Alfred; Marti, Othmar; Ziemann, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We present two routes for the fabrication of plasmonic structures based on nanosphere lithography templates. One route makes use of soft-lithography to obtain arrays of epoxy resin hemispheres, which, in a second step, can be coated by metal films. The second uses the hexagonal array of triangular structures, obtained by evaporation of a metal film on top of colloidal crystals, as a mask for reactive ion etching (RIE) of the substrate. In this way, the triangular patterns of the mask are transferred to the substrate through etched triangular pillars. Making an epoxy resin cast of the pillars, coated with metal films, allows us to invert the structure and obtain arrays of triangular holes within the metal. Both fabrication methods illustrate the preparation of large arrays of nanocavities within metal films at low cost.Gold films of different thicknesses were evaporated on top of hemispherical structures of epoxy resin with different radii, and the reflectance and transmittance were measured for optical wavelengths. Experimental results show that the reflectivity of coated hemispheres is lower than that of coated polystyrene spheres of the same size, for certain wavelength bands. The spectral position of these bands correlates with the size of the hemispheres. In contrast, etched structures on quartz coated with gold films exhibit low reflectance and transmittance values for all wavelengths measured. Low transmittance and reflectance indicate high absorbance, which can be utilized in experiments requiring light confinement.

  15. Non-polydimethylsiloxane devices for oxygen-free flow lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Ki Wan; Xu, Jingjing; Kim, Jong-Ho; Chapin, Stephen C; Strano, Michael S; Gleason, Karen K; Doyle, Patrick S

    2012-05-01

    Flow lithography has become a powerful particle synthesis technique. Currently, flow lithography relies on the use of polydimethylsiloxane microchannels, because the process requires local inhibition of polymerization, near channel interfaces, via oxygen permeation. The dependence on polydimethylsiloxane devices greatly limits the range of precursor materials that can be processed in flow lithography. Here we present oxygen-free flow lithography via inert fluid-lubrication layers for the synthesis of new classes of complex microparticles. We use an initiated chemical vapour deposition nano-adhesive bonding technique to create non-polydimethylsiloxane-based devices. We successfully synthesize microparticles with a sub-second residence time and demonstrate on-the-fly alteration of particle height. This technique greatly expands the synthesis capabilities of flow lithography, enabling particle synthesis, using water-insoluble monomers, organic solvents, and hydrophobic functional entities such as quantum dots and single-walled carbon nanotubes. As one demonstrative application, we created near-infrared barcoded particles for real-time, label-free detection of target analytes.

  16. Non-polydimethylsiloxane devices for oxygen-free flow lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Ki Wan; Xu, Jingjing; Kim, Jong-Ho; Chapin, Stephen C.; Strano, Michael S.; Gleason, Karen K.; Doyle, Patrick S.

    2012-05-01

    Flow lithography has become a powerful particle synthesis technique. Currently, flow lithography relies on the use of polydimethylsiloxane microchannels, because the process requires local inhibition of polymerization, near channel interfaces, via oxygen permeation. The dependence on polydimethylsiloxane devices greatly limits the range of precursor materials that can be processed in flow lithography. Here we present oxygen-free flow lithography via inert fluid-lubrication layers for the synthesis of new classes of complex microparticles. We use an initiated chemical vapour deposition nano-adhesive bonding technique to create non-polydimethylsiloxane-based devices. We successfully synthesize microparticles with a sub-second residence time and demonstrate on-the-fly alteration of particle height. This technique greatly expands the synthesis capabilities of flow lithography, enabling particle synthesis, using water-insoluble monomers, organic solvents, and hydrophobic functional entities such as quantum dots and single-walled carbon nanotubes. As one demonstrative application, we created near-infrared barcoded particles for real-time, label-free detection of target analytes.

  17. Optical characterisation of photonic wire and photonic crystal waveguides fabricated using nanoimprint lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borel, Peter Ingo; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Lavrinenko, Andrei;

    2006-01-01

    We have characterised photonic-crystal and photonic-wire waveguides fabricated by thermal nanoimprint lithography. The structures, with feature sizes down below 20 nm, are benchmarked against similar structures defined by direct electron beam lithography....

  18. Extreme ultraviolet lithography: reflective mask technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Christopher C.; Kearney, Patrick A.; Mirkarimi, Paul B.; Bowers, Joel M.; Cerjan, Charles J.; Warrick, Abbie L.; Wilhelmsen, Karl C.; Fought, Eric R.; Moore, Craig E.; Larson, Cindy C.; Baker, Sherry L.; Burkhart, Scott C.; Hector, Scott D.

    2000-07-01

    EUVL mask blanks consist of a distributed Bragg reflector made of 6.7 nm-pitch bi-layers of Mo and Si deposited upon a precision Si or glass substrate. The layer deposition process has been optimized for low defects, by application of a vendor-supplied but highly modified ion-beam sputter deposition system. This system is fully automated using SMIF technology to obtain the lowest possible environmental- and handling-added defect levels. Originally designed to coat 150 mm substrates, it was upgraded in July 1999 to 200 mm and has coated runs of over 50 substrates at a time with median added defects > 100 nm below 0.05/cm2. These improvements have resulted from a number of ion-beam sputter deposition system modifications, upgrades, and operational changes, which will be discussed. Success in defect reduction is highly dependent upon defect detection, characterization, and cross- platform positional registration. We have made significant progress in adapting and extending commercial tools to this purpose, and have identified the surface scanner detection limits for different defect classes, and the signatures of false counts and non-printable scattering anomalies on the mask blank. We will present key results and how they have helped reduce added defects. The physics of defect reduction and mitigation is being investigated by a program on multilayer growth over deliberately placed perturbations (defects) of varying size. This program includes modeling of multilayer growth and modeling of defect printability. We developed a technique for depositing uniformly sized gold spheres on EUVL substrates, and have studied the suppression of the perturbations during multilayer growth under varying conditions. This work is key to determining the lower limit of critical defect size for EUV Lithography. We present key aspects of this work. We will summarize progress in all aspects of EUVL mask blank development, and present detailed results on defect reduction and mask blank

  19. Antireflective surface patterned by rolling mask lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Oliver; Geddes, Joseph B.; Aryal, Mukti; Perez, Joseph; Wassei, Jonathan; McMackin, Ian; Kobrin, Boris

    2014-03-01

    A growing number of commercial products such as displays, solar panels, light emitting diodes (LEDs and OLEDs), automotive and architectural glass are driving demand for glass with high performance surfaces that offer anti-reflective, self-cleaning, and other advanced functions. State-of-the-art coatings do not meet the desired performance characteristics or cannot be applied over large areas in a cost-effective manner. "Rolling Mask Lithography" (RML™) enables highresolution lithographic nano-patterning over large-areas at low-cost and high-throughput. RML is a photolithographic process performed using ultraviolet (UV) illumination transmitted through a soft cylindrical mask as it rolls across a substrate. Subsequent transfer of photoresist patterns into the substrate is achieved using an etching process, which creates a nanostructured surface. The current generation exposure tool is capable of patterning one-meter long substrates with a width of 300 mm. High-throughput and low-cost are achieved using continuous exposure of the resist by the cylindrical photomask. Here, we report on significant improvements in the application of RML™ to fabricate anti-reflective surfaces. Briefly, an optical surface can be made antireflective by "texturing" it with a nano-scale pattern to reduce the discontinuity in the index of refraction between the air and the bulk optical material. An array of cones, similar to the structure of a moth's eye, performs this way. Substrates are patterned using RML™ and etched to produce an array of cones with an aspect ratio of 3:1, which decreases the reflectivity below 0.1%.

  20. Metamaterial fishnet structure formed from nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Graham J.; Yuce, Murat; Hu, Xiaolon; Sinworapun, Mantana; Khokhar, Ali Z.; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2013-05-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterisation of fishnet structures of various dimensions on a polymer layer. The fabrication process causes metal-dielectric-metal rectangular pillars to be compressed to the bottom of fishnet structures. The metamaterial structures are fabricated using nanoimprint lithography, allowing large areas to be patterned quickly and good reproducibility through multiple use of the nanoimprint stamp. A tri-layer comprising of silver (Ag) and magnesium fluoride (MgF2) was deposited on a thick polymer layer, in this instance PMMA, before being directly imprinted by a stamp. When the metal-dielectric layered pillars are imprinted to a sufficient depth in the PMMA below the fishnet, distinct resonance peaks can be measured at both visible and near-infrared frequencies. The precise wavelength of the resonant peak at near-infrared and its Q-factor can be changed by altering the physical dimensions and number of metal and dielectric layers of the fishnet respectively. The response viewed at visible frequencies is due to the pillars that sit in the PMMA, below the fishnet. Silver and magnesium fluoride layers that comprise the suppressed pillars are crushed during the imprinting process but still allow for light to be transmitted. Despite imprinting directly into multiple metal and dielectric layers, high quality structures are observed with a minimum feature size as low as 200 nm. Resonance peaks are measured experimentally in reflectance using an FTIR spectrometer with a calcium fluoride (CaF2) beam-splitter and a visible wavelength range spectrometer with a silicon (Si) detector.

  1. Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography - Reflective Mask Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, C.C.; Kearney, P.A.; Mirkarimi, P.B.; Bowers, J.M.; Cerjan, C.; Warrick, A.L.; Wilhelmsen, K.; Fought, E.; Moore, C.; Larson, C.; Baker, S.; Burkhart, S.C.; Hector, S.D.

    2000-05-09

    EUVL mask blanks consist of a distributed Bragg reflector made of 6.7nm-pitch bi-layers of MO and Si deposited upon a precision Si or glass substrate. The layer deposition process has been optimized for low defects, by application of a vendor-supplied but highly modified ion-beam sputter deposition system. This system is fully automated using SMIF technology to obtain the lowest possible environmental- and handling-added defect levels. Originally designed to coat 150mm substrates, it was upgraded in July, 1999 to 200 mm and has coated runs of over 50 substrates at a time with median added defects >100nm below 0.05/cm{sup 2}. These improvements have resulted from a number of ion-beam sputter deposition system modifications, upgrades, and operational changes, which will be discussed. Success in defect reduction is highly dependent upon defect detection, characterization, and cross-platform positional registration. We have made significant progress in adapting and extending commercial tools to this purpose, and have identified the surface scanner detection limits for different defect classes, and the signatures of false counts and non-printable scattering anomalies on the mask blank. We will present key results and how they have helped reduce added defects. The physics of defect reduction and mitigation is being investigated by a program on multilayer growth over deliberately placed perturbations (defects) of varying size. This program includes modeling of multilayer growth and modeling of defect printability. We developed a technique for depositing uniformly sized gold spheres on EUVL substrates, and have studied the suppression of the perturbations during multilayer growth under varying conditions. This work is key to determining the lower limit of critical defect size for EUV Lithography. We present key aspects of this work. We will summarize progress in all aspects of EUVL mask blank development, and present detailed results on defect reduction and mask blank

  2. Graphene nanoribbon superlattices fabricated via He ion lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archanjo, Braulio S., E-mail: bsarchanjo@inmetro.gov.br [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Fragneaud, Benjamin [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-330 (Brazil); Gustavo Cançado, Luiz [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG 30123-970 (Brazil); Winston, Donald [Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, 1501 Page Mill Road, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Miao, Feng [Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, 1501 Page Mill Road, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Physics, National Center of Microstructures and Quantum Manipulation, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Alberto Achete, Carlos [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de janeiro, Rio de Janeiro RJ 21941-972 (Brazil); Medeiros-Ribeiro, Gilberto [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG 30123-970 (Brazil); Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, 1501 Page Mill Road, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

    2014-05-12

    Single-step nano-lithography was performed on graphene sheets using a helium ion microscope. Parallel “defect” lines of ∼1 μm length and ≈5 nm width were written to form nanoribbon gratings down to 20 nm pitch. Polarized Raman spectroscopy shows that crystallographic orientation of the nanoribbons was partially maintained at their lateral edges, indicating a high-fidelity lithography process. Furthermore, Raman analysis of large exposure areas with different ion doses reveals that He ions produce point defects with radii ∼ 2× smaller than do Ga ions, demonstrating that scanning-He{sup +}-beam lithography can texture graphene with less damage.

  3. Pattern-integrated interference lithography: prospects for nano- and microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibovici, Matthieu C R; Burrow, Guy M; Gaylord, Thomas K

    2012-10-08

    In recent years, limitations in optical lithography have challenged the cost-effective manufacture of nano- and microelectronic chips. Spatially regular designs have been introduced to improve manufacturability. However, regular designed layouts typically require an interference step followed by a trim step. These multiple steps increase cost and reduce yield. In the present work, Pattern-Integrated Interference Lithography (PIIL) is introduced to address this problem. PIIL is the integration of interference lithography and superposed pattern mask imaging, combining the interference and the trim into a single-exposure step. Example PIIL implementations and experimental demonstrations are presented. The degrees of freedom associated with the source, pattern mask, and Fourier filter designs are described.

  4. Designing large scale chiral metamaterials by nanosphere shadowing lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yizhuo; Zhao, Yiping

    2016-09-01

    A scalable nanofabrication technique for chiral metamaterials is presented, which combines the dynamic shadowing growth and self-assembled nanosphere monolayers, and is also known as nanosphere shadowing lithography. We have developed two strategies based on nanosphere shadowing lithography to prepare chiral nanostructures. The first strategy is to create a quasi-three-dimensional single-layer fan-shaped chiral nanostructure on nanospheres with one plasmonic material. The second strategy is to create three-dimensional multi-layers helical nanostructures with one plasmonic material and one dielectric material. Both strategies can produce large-area chiral nanostructures with strong chiral optical response, which makes nanosphere shadowing lithography suitable for producing chiral metamaterial based devices such as an ultrathin narrow-band circular polarizer.

  5. Recent developments of x-ray lithography in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaker, Mohamed; Boily, Stephane; Ginovker, A.; Jean, Alain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Mercier, P. P.; Pepin, Henri; Leung, Pak; Currie, John F.; Lafontaine, Hugues

    1991-08-01

    An overview of current activities in Canada is reported, including x-ray lithography studies based on laser plasma sources and x-ray mask development. In particular, the application of laser plasma sources for x-ray lithography is discussed, taking into account the industrial requirement and the present state of laser technology. The authors describe the development of silicon carbide membranes for x-ray lithography application. SiC films were prepared using either a 100 kHz plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system or a laser ablation technique. These membranes have a relatively large diameter (> 1 in.) and a high optical transparency (> 50%). Experimental studies on stresses in tungsten films deposited with triode sputtering are reported.

  6. Reducing DfM to practice: the lithography manufacturability assessor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebmann, Lars; Mansfield, Scott; Han, Geng; Culp, James; Hibbeler, Jason; Tsai, Roger

    2006-03-01

    The need for accurate quantification of all aspects of design for manufacturability using a mutually compatible set of quality-metrics and units-of-measure, is reiterated and experimentally verified. A methodology to quantify the lithography component of manufacturability is proposed and its feasibility demonstrated. Three stages of lithography manufacturability assessment are described: process window analysis on realistic integrated circuits following layout manipulations for resolution enhancement and the application of optical proximity correction, failure sensitivity analysis on simulated achievable dimensional bounds (a.k.a. variability bands), and yield risk analysis on iso-probability bands. The importance and feasibility of this technique is demonstrated by quantifying the lithography manufacturability impact of redundant contact insertion and Critical Area optimization in units that can be used to drive an overall layout optimization. The need for extensive experimental calibration and improved simulation accuracy is also highlighted.

  7. Scalable Fourier transform system for instantly structured illumination in lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yan; Xu, Fengchuan; Wei, Guojun; Xu, Yishen; Pu, Donglin; Chen, Linsen; Huang, Zhiwei

    2017-05-15

    We report the development of a unique scalable Fourier transform 4-f system for instantly structured illumination in lithography. In the 4-f system, coupled with a 1-D grating and a phase retarder, the ±1st order of diffracted light from the grating serve as coherent incident sources for creating interference patterns on the image plane. By adjusting the grating and the phase retarder, the interference fringes with consecutive frequencies, as well as their orientations and phase shifts, can be generated instantly within a constant interference area. We demonstrate that by adapting this scalable Fourier transform system into lithography, the pixelated nano-fringe arrays with arbitrary frequencies and orientations can be dynamically produced in the photoresist with high variation resolution, suggesting its promising application for large-area functional materials based on space-variant nanostructures in lithography.

  8. Thickness optimization for lithography process on silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaojing; Su, Yajuan; Liu, Yansong; Chen, Fong; Liu, Zhimin; Zhang, Wei; Li, Bifeng; Gao, Tao; Wei, Yayi

    2015-03-01

    With the development of the lithography, the demand for critical dimension (CD) and CD uniformity (CDU) has reached a new level, which is harder and harder to achieve. There exists reflection at the interface between photo-resist and substrate during lithography exposure. This reflection has negative impact on CD and CDU control. It is possible to optimize the litho stack and film stack thickness on different lithography conditions. With the optimized stack, the total reflectivity for all incident angles at the interface can be controlled less than 0.5%, ideally 0.1%, which enhances process window (PW) most of the time. The theoretical results are verified by the experiment results from foundry, which helps the foundry achieve the mass production finally.

  9. UV LED lithography with digitally tunable exposure dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapici, Murat Kaya; Farhat, Ilyas

    2014-10-01

    This paper reports the development of a low-cost, portable, light-emitting diode (LED)-based ultraviolet (UV) exposure system. The major system components include UV-LEDs, a microcontroller, a digital-to-analog converter, and LED control circuitry. Through its front panel with a liquid crystal display and keypad, the UV-LED lithography system is able to receive user-defined values for exposure time and power, which allows the exposure dose to be tunable on demand. Compared to standard mask aligners, the UV-LED lithography system is a fraction of the cost, is simpler to construct using off-the shelf components, and does not require a complex infrastructure to operate. Such a reduction in system cost and complexity renders UV-LED lithography a perfect candidate for microlithography with large process windows typically suitable for MEMS, microfluidics applications.

  10. Free-standing coating patterns fabricated by ultraviolet contact lithography using photosensitive sol-gel coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Youlai; Du, Ai; Li, Xiaoguang; Sun, Wei; Wu, Shuai; Li, Tiemin; Liu, Mingfang; Zhou, Bin

    2017-07-01

    Photosensitive ZrO2-SiO2 hybrid sol-gel coatings containing large contents of chelating rings were prepared by using the zirconium n-butoxide (TBOZ) and methyltriethoxysilane (MTES) as hybrid precursors, and benzoylacetone (BZAC) as chelating agent. The change of ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectra, chemical composition, and optical properties of ZrO2-SiO2 hybrid sol-gel coatings were analyzed before and after UV exposure and calcination. The refractive index of the ZrO2-SiO2 hybrid gel coatings decreased from 1.673 to 1.561 with the increase of the molar content of MTES in precursors. The sol-gel coating patterns with the periods of 20.24 μm, 10.11 μm and 3.99 μm on the PAMS substrates were firstly obtained by using the photosensitive ZrO2-SiO2 hybrid sol-gel films as fundamental materials through a process of UV contact lithography with photo masks and etching with ethanol. Finally, the free-standing gel coating patterns supported by copper grids, with the period of 12.70 μm and line width of 4.93 μm, and the period of 14.20 μm and line width of 3.82 μm, were obtained by removing the PAMS thermal degradation sacrifice layer after being calcined at 330 °C. Micrometer-periodic free-standing gel coating patterns with different structure have potential applications in the laser physical experiments.

  11. Hybrid nanoantennas for directional emission enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusak, Evgenia; Staude, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.staude@anu.edu.au; Decker, Manuel; Sautter, Jürgen; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Powell, David A.; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Kivshar, Yuri S. [Nonlinear Physics Centre and Centre for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia)

    2014-12-01

    Plasmonic and dielectric nanoparticles offer complementary strengths regarding their use as optical antenna elements. While plasmonic nanoparticles are well-known to provide strong decay rate enhancement for localized emitters, all-dielectric nanoparticles can enable high directivity combined with low losses. Here, we suggest a hybrid metal-dielectric nanoantenna consisting of a gold nanorod and a silicon nanodisk, which combines all these advantages. Our numerical analysis reveals a giant enhancement of directional emission together with simultaneously high radiation efficiency (exceeding 70%). The suggested hybrid nanoantenna has a subwavelength footprint, and all parameters and materials are chosen to be compatible with fabrication by two-step electron-beam lithography.

  12. Lithography for enabling advances in integrated circuits and devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, C Michael

    2012-08-28

    Because the transistor was fabricated in volume, lithography has enabled the increase in density of devices and integrated circuits. With the invention of the integrated circuit, lithography enabled the integration of higher densities of field-effect transistors through evolutionary applications of optical lithography. In 1994, the semiconductor industry determined that continuing the increase in density transistors was increasingly difficult and required coordinated development of lithography and process capabilities. It established the US National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors and this was expanded in 1999 to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors to align multiple industries to provide the complex capabilities to continue increasing the density of integrated circuits to nanometre scales. Since the 1960s, lithography has become increasingly complex with the evolution from contact printers, to steppers, pattern reduction technology at i-line, 248 nm and 193 nm wavelengths, which required dramatic improvements of mask-making technology, photolithography printing and alignment capabilities and photoresist capabilities. At the same time, pattern transfer has evolved from wet etching of features, to plasma etch and more complex etching capabilities to fabricate features that are currently 32 nm in high-volume production. To continue increasing the density of devices and interconnects, new pattern transfer technologies will be needed with options for the future including extreme ultraviolet lithography, imprint technology and directed self-assembly. While complementary metal oxide semiconductors will continue to be extended for many years, these advanced pattern transfer technologies may enable development of novel memory and logic technologies based on different physical phenomena in the future to enhance and extend information processing.

  13. Advanced low-complexity compression for maskless lithography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Vito; Zakhor, Avideh

    2004-05-01

    A direct-write maskless lithography system using 25nm for 50nm feature sizes requires data rates of about 10 Tb/s to maintain a throughput of one wafer per minute per layer achieved by today"s optical lithography systems. In a previous paper, we presented an architecture that achieves this data rate contingent on 25 to 1 compression of lithography data, and on implementation of a real-time decompressor fabricated on the same chip as a massively parallel array of lithography writers for 50 nm feature sizes. A number of compression techniques, including JBIG, ZIP, the novel 2D-LZ, and BZIP2 were demonstrated to achieve sufficiently high compression ratios on lithography data to make the architecture feasible, although no single technique could achieve this for all test layouts. In this paper we present a novel lossless compression algorithm called Context Copy Combinatorial Code (C4) specifically tailored for lithography data. It successfully combines the advantages of context-based modeling in JBIG and copying in ZIP to achieve higher compression ratios across all test layouts. As part of C4, we have developed a low-complexity binary entropy coding technique called combinatorial coding which is simultaneously as efficient as arithmetic coding and as fast as Huffman coding. Compression results show C4 outperforms JBIG, ZIP, BZIP2, and 2D-LZ, and achieves lossless compression ratios greater than 22 for binary layout image data, and greater than 14 for grey-pixel image data. The tradeoff between decoder buffer size, which directly affects implementation complexity and compression ratio is examined. For the same buffer size, C4 achieves higher compression than LZ77, ZIP, and BZIP2.

  14. The Introduction and Early Use of Lithography in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhill, Georgia B.

    This paper discusses the use of lithography in the United States in the early 1800s. Highlights include: the development of lithography in Germany between 1796 and 1798; early expectations for lithography; competition against the existing technology for the production of images--relief prints and copper-plate engravings; examples of 18th-century…

  15. V-groove plasmonic waveguides fabricated by nanoimprint lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Cuesta, I.; Nielsen, R.B.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Propagation of channel plasmon-polariton modes in the bottom of a metal V groove has been recently demonstrated. It provides a unique way of manipulating light at nanometer length scale. In this work, we present a method based on nanoimprint lithography that allows parallel fabrication of integra......Propagation of channel plasmon-polariton modes in the bottom of a metal V groove has been recently demonstrated. It provides a unique way of manipulating light at nanometer length scale. In this work, we present a method based on nanoimprint lithography that allows parallel fabrication...

  16. Large area mold fabrication for the nanoimprint lithography using electron beam lithography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The mold fabrication is a critical issue for the development of nanoimprint lithography as an effective low-cost and mass production process.This paper describes the fabrication process developed to fabricate the large area nanoimprint molds on the silicon wafers.The optimization of e-beam exposure dose and pattern design is presented.The overlayer process is developed to improve the field stitching accuracy of e-beam exposure,and around 10 nm field stitching accuracy is obtained.By means of the optimization of the e-beam exposure dose,pattern design and overlayer process,large area nanoimprint molds having dense line structures with around 10 nm field stitching accuracy have been fabricated.The fabricated mold was used to imprint commercial imprinting resist.

  17. Electrochemical nanoimprint lithography: when nanoimprint lithography meets metal assisted chemical etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Han, Lianhuan; Tian, Zhao-Wu; Tian, Zhong-Qun; Zhan, Dongping

    2017-06-08

    The functional three dimensional micro-nanostructures (3D-MNS) play crucial roles in integrated and miniaturized systems because of the excellent physical, mechanical, electric and optical properties. Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) has been versatile in the fabrication of 3D-MNS by pressing thermoplastic and photocuring resists into the imprint mold. However, direct nanoimprint on the semiconductor wafer still remains a great challenge. On the other hand, considered as a competitive fabrication method for erect high-aspect 3D-MNS, metal assisted chemical etching (MacEtch) can remove the semiconductor by spontaneous corrosion reaction at the metal/semiconductor/electrolyte 3-phase interface. Moreover, it was difficult for MacEtch to fabricate multilevel or continuously curved 3D-MNS. The question of the consequences of NIL meeting the MacEtch is yet to be answered. By employing a platinum (Pt) metalized imprint mode, we demonstrated that using electrochemical nanoimprint lithography (ECNL) it was possible to fabricate not only erect 3D-MNS, but also complex 3D-MNS with multilevel stages with continuously curved surface profiles on a gallium arsenide (GaAs) wafer. A concave microlens array with an average diameter of 58.4 μm and height of 1.5 μm was obtained on a ∼1 cm(2)-area GaAs wafer. An 8-phase microlens array was fabricated with a minimum stage of 57 nm and machining accuracy of 2 nm, presenting an excellent optical diffraction property. Inheriting all the advantages of both NIL and MacEtch, ECNL has prospective applications in the micro/nano-fabrications of semiconductors.

  18. New approaches to atomic force microscope lithography on silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Karen; Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Rasmussen, Jan Pihl

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated new approaches to the formation of conducting nanowires on crystalline silicon surfaces using atomic force microscope (AFM) lithography. To increase processing speed and reduce wear of the AFM tip, large-scale structures are formed with a direct laser write setup, while the AFM...

  19. Fast thermal nanoimprint lithography by a stamp with integrated heater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tormen, Massimo; Malureanu, Radu; Pedersen, Rasmus Haugstrup

    2008-01-01

    We propose fast nanoimprinting lithography (NIL) process based on the use of stamps with integrated heater. The latter consists of heavily ion implantation n-type doped silicon layer buried below the microstructured surface of the stamp. The stamp is heated by Joule effect, by 50 μs 25 Hz...

  20. Adaptive Optics for EUV Lithography: Phase Retrieval for Wavefront Metrology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polo, A.

    2014-01-01

    In the semiconductor industry, optical lithography is presently the most widespread technology used to print a geometrical pattern on a semiconductor wafer. Because of the plans imposed by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) for more powerful and smaller chips, new printin

  1. From 2D Lithography to 3D Patterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Zeijl, H.W.; Wei, J.; Shen, C.; Verhaar, T.M.; Sarro, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Lithography as developed for IC device fabrication is a high volume high accuracy patterning technology with strong 2 dimensional (2D) characteristics. This 2D nature makes it a challenge to integrate this technology in a 3 dimensional (3D) manufacturing environment. This article addresses the perfo

  2. From 2D Lithography to 3D Patterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Zeijl, H.W.; Wei, J.; Shen, C.; Verhaar, T.M.; Sarro, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Lithography as developed for IC device fabrication is a high volume high accuracy patterning technology with strong 2 dimensional (2D) characteristics. This 2D nature makes it a challenge to integrate this technology in a 3 dimensional (3D) manufacturing environment. This article addresses the

  3. Adaptive Optics for EUV Lithography: Phase Retrieval for Wavefront Metrology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polo, A.

    2014-01-01

    In the semiconductor industry, optical lithography is presently the most widespread technology used to print a geometrical pattern on a semiconductor wafer. Because of the plans imposed by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) for more powerful and smaller chips, new printin

  4. Predicting lithography costs: guidance for <= 32 nm patterning solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelton, Andrew J.; Wüest, Andrea; Hughes, Greg; Lercel, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Extending lithography to 32 nm and 22 nm half pitch requires the introduction of new lithography technologies, such as EUVL or high-index immersion, or new techniques, such as double patterning. All of these techniques introduce large changes into the single exposure immersion lithography process as used for the 45 nm half pitch node. Therefore, cost per wafer is a concern. In this paper, total patterning costs are estimated for the 32 nm and 22 nm half pitch nodes through the application of cost-of-ownership models based on the tool, mask, and process costs. For all cases, the cost of patterning at 32 nm half pitch for critical layers will be more expensive than in prior generations. Mask costs are observed to be a significant component of lithography costs even up to a mask usage of 10,000 wafers/mask in most cases. The more simple structure of EUVL masks reduces the mask cost component and results in EUVL being the most cost-effective patterning solution under the assumptions of high throughput and good mask blank defect density.

  5. Receding contact lines: From sliding drops to immersion lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, K.G.; Peters, I.R.; Evangelista, F.; Riepen, M.; Daerr, A.; Limat, L.; Snoeijer, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Instabilities of receding contact lines often occur through the formation of a corner with a very sharp tip. These dewetting structures also appear in the technology of Immersion Lithography, where water is put between the lens and the silicon wafer to increase the optical resolution. In this paper

  6. Beyond EUV lithography: a comparative study of efficient photoresists' performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojarad, Nassir; Gobrecht, Jens; Ekinci, Yasin

    2015-03-18

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography at 13.5 nm is the main candidate for patterning integrated circuits and reaching sub-10-nm resolution within the next decade. Should photon-based lithography still be used for patterning smaller feature sizes, beyond EUV (BEUV) lithography at 6.x nm wavelength is an option that could potentially meet the rigid demands of the semiconductor industry. We demonstrate simultaneous characterization of the resolution, line-edge roughness, and sensitivity of distinct photoresists at BEUV and compare their properties when exposed to EUV under the same conditions. By using interference lithography at these wavelengths, we show the possibility for patterning beyond 22 nm resolution and characterize the impact of using higher energy photons on the line-edge roughness and exposure latitude. We observe high sensitivity of the photoresist performance on its chemical content and compare their overall performance using the Z-parameter criterion. Interestingly, inorganic photoresists have much better performance at BEUV, while organic chemically-amplified photoresists would need serious adaptations for being used at such wavelength. Our results have immediate implications for deeper understanding of the radiation chemistry of novel photoresists at the EUV and soft X-ray spectra.

  7. Topology optimization for optical projection lithography with manufacturing uncertainties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Mingdong; Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Sigmund, Ole

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a topology optimization approach for micro-and nano-devices fabricated by optical projection lithography. Incorporating the photolithography process and the manufacturing uncertainties into the topology optimization process results in a binary mask that can be sent directly...

  8. Wafer scale coating of polymer cantilever fabricated by nanoimprint lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders; Dohn, Søren; Keller, Stephan Urs

    2010-01-01

    Microcantilevers can be fabricated in TOPAS by nanoimprint lithography, with the dimensions of 500 ¿m length 4.5 ¿m thickness and 100 ¿m width. By using a plasma polymerization technique it is possible to selectively functionalize individually cantilevers with a polymer coating, on wafer scale...

  9. Single etch grating couplers for mass fabrication with DUV lithography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Halir, R; Zavargo-Peche, L; Xu, Dan-Xia; Cheben, Pavel; Ma, Rubin; Schmid, Jens Holger; Janz, Siegfried; Densmore, Adam; Ortega-Moñux, A; Molina-Fernández, Í; Fournier, M; Fédeli, J.-M

    2012-01-01

    ... efficiencies with a single etch step, thereby significantly reducing fabrication complexity. Here we demonstrate that such couplers can be fabricated on a large scale with ultra-violet lithography, achieving a 5 dB coupling efficiency at 1,550 nm...

  10. Pattern Definition with DUV-Lithography at DTU Danchip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Matthias; Khomtchenko, Elena; Nyholt, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    or hole comprising patterns -, its symmetry and the separations between the different structures. The projection lithography tool FPA-3000EX4 from Canon (max. NA=0,6; 1:5 reduction) produces patterns on the wafer within a maximum chip area of 22x22mm2 that can be stitched together with an accuracy of 3σ......Deep ultra violet (DUV) illumination generated with the help of a KrF laser can be utilized to produce components having sizes of some hundreds of nanometers. This light source with its 248nm wavelength is exploited in the DUV-lithography equipment at DTU Danchip in order to fill the resolution gap...... between traditional UV-lithography and e-beam lithography. With the help of a DUV stepper, devices with pattern sizes of 250 nm (see in fig. 1) can be produced on a high volume scale, with a throughput of 30 to 90 wafers per hour on 6” or 8” wafers. For R&D purposes also smaller line widths can be printed...

  11. Mix-and-match lithography in a manufacturing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flack, Warren W.; Dameron, David H.; Alameda, Valerie J.; Malek, Ghassan C.

    1992-07-01

    Fabrication of integrated circuits at subhalf micron geometries is currently feasible only using advanced lithography technologies such as direct write e-beam and x-ray systems. These systems are extremely expensive and have low effective throughputs for a production environment. A mix-and-match approach using optical steppers for noncritical levels can dramatically increase productivity and control total lithography costs. A major impact for mix- and-match lithography is the total root mean squared alignment errors between systems. Implementation of a larger overlay budget to accommodate mix-and-match errors adversely impacts design rules for submicron technologies. However, a maskless lithography tool such as direct write e-beam offers the potential to compensate for systematic errors during wafer patterning and dramatically reduce the overlay budget for those layers. At TRW, a mix-and- match scheme has been developed between a Hitachi HL-700D e-beam direct write system and a Ultratech 1500 wide field 1X stepper. A previous analysis using only the linear distortion terms between these systems was found to be inadequate to fully explain the observed overlay. In this study, both linear and higher order distortion components are extracted using a large number of distributed measurement sites in the stepper field. These distortion terms are then analyzed to determine their source. Compensation techniques including both system hardware adjustments and e-beam software are investigated to enhance registration capabilities.

  12. Protein assay structured on paper by using lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, E.; Nargang, T. M.; Al Bitar, W.; Waterkotte, B.; Rapp, B. E.

    2015-03-01

    There are two main challenges in producing a robust, paper-based analytical device. The first one is to create a hydrophobic barrier which unlike the commonly used wax barriers does not break if the paper is bent. The second one is the creation of the (bio-)specific sensing layer. For this proteins have to be immobilized without diminishing their activity. We solve both problems using light-based fabrication methods that enable fast, efficient manufacturing of paper-based analytical devices. The first technique relies on silanization by which we create a flexible hydrophobic barrier made of dimethoxydimethylsilane. The second technique demonstrated within this paper uses photobleaching to immobilize proteins by means of maskless projection lithography. Both techniques have been tested on a classical lithography setup using printed toner masks and on a lithography system for maskless lithography. Using these setups we could demonstrate that the proposed manufacturing techniques can be carried out at low costs. The resolution of the paper-based analytical devices obtained with static masks was lower due to the lower mask resolution. Better results were obtained using advanced lithography equipment. By doing so we demonstrated, that our technique enables fabrication of effective hydrophobic boundary layers with a thickness of only 342 μm. Furthermore we showed that flourescine-5-biotin can be immobilized on the non-structured paper and be employed for the detection of streptavidinalkaline phosphatase. By carrying out this assay on a paper-based analytical device which had been structured using the silanization technique we proofed biological compatibility of the suggested patterning technique.

  13. Arrays of metallic micro-/nano-structures by means of colloidal lithography and laser dewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, C.; Deepak, K. L. N.; Delaporte, P.; Utéza, O.; Grojo, D.

    2016-06-01

    Long-range arrays of prismatoid metal nanostructures are fabricated by a hybrid methodology, i.e. using Langmuir microsphere films and laser-assisted dewetting. As the initial step, we use colloidal lithography. Monolayers of 1-5 μm polystyrene microspheres covered with a thermally evaporated Ag or Au thin film of controlled thickness (5-50 nm) are then used as masks to pattern the surface of quartz, BK7 glass or silicon substrates, typically in the order of cm2. When removing the spheres by physico-chemical means (ultrasound bath and solvent wash), the resulting surface shows an array of nm-size prismatoid structures (Fischer patterns), that can be further processed by laser. Thus, by using two different lasers (355-nm wavelength, 50-ps duration and 193-nm wavelength, 15-ns duration) for the metal dewetting, we control the shape of the deposited nanostructures. A detailed study is presented here on the reshaping of such metal structures through laser annealing. This new hybrid methodology expands the panel of microsphere-assisted technologies employed in preparing surface nanomaterials.

  14. Micro-optical elements functioning in non-visible spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Andy Z. Z.; Bergström, Andreas; Huo, Vicky Z. J.; Almqvist, Susanne; Kaplan, Wlodek; Andersson, Jan Y.

    2010-05-01

    Nowadays novel micro-fabrication and wafer-based manufacturing approach allows realizing micro-optics in a way scientists have dreamt for generations, in particular, utilizing nano-imprint lithography as fabrication tooling enables greatly accelerating the micro-optics technology to its frontier. In this report, we present wafer-scale fabrication of various types of micro-optical elements based on photoresist, benzocyclobutene, photocurable imprint resist, and semiconductor materials by using thermal reflow, reactive ion etching, and imprint techniques. Especially, several concave or convex 3-dimensional micro-optical structures shaped by imprint method are detailed. These micro-optical elements can be monolithically or hybrid integrated onto optoelectronics devices, such as photodetectors and emitters as optical beam focuser, collimator, filter, or anti-reflectance elements. As application examples, polymer microlenses were integrated directly on the top of UV dual functional devices and quantum dot long wavelength infrared photodetectors, respectively.

  15. Particulate templates and ordered liquid bridge networks in evaporative lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Kwek, Jin W; Tang, Xiaosong; O'Shea, Sean J; Chan, Derek Y C

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the properties of latex particle templates required to optimize the development of ordered liquid bridge networks in evaporative lithography. These networks are key precursors in the assembly of solutions of conducting nanoparticles into large, optically transparent, and conducting microwire networks on substrates (Vakarelski, I. U.; Chan, D. Y. C.; Nonoguchi, T.; Shinto, H.; Higashitani, K. Phys. Rev. Lett., 2009, 102, 058303). An appropriate combination of heat treatment and oxygen plasma etching of a close-packed latex particle monolayer is shown to create open-spaced particle templates which facilitates the formation of ordered fully connected liquid bridge networks that are critical to the formation of ordered microwire networks. Similar results can also be achieved if non-close-packed latex particle templates with square or honeycomb geometries are used. The present results have important implications for the development of the particulate templates to control the morphology of functional microwire networks by evaporative lithography.

  16. Functionalized SU-8 patterned with X-ray Lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Søren; Romanato, F.

    2005-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of x-ray lithography on SU-8 photoresist doped with the laser dye Rhodamine 6G, while retaining the photoactive properties of the embedded dye. Two kinds of structures are fabricated via soft x-ray lithography and characterized: a laser and in amplified...... spontaneous emission light source that couples out light normal to the chip plane. In addition we examine the influence of the x-ray irradiation on the fluorescence of thin films of dye doped SU-8. The dye embedded in the SU-8 is optically excited during, characterization by an external light source tuned...... to the absorption band of the dye. (c) 2005 American Iaviuon SocietY....

  17. Bioimprinting strategies: from soft lithography to biomimetic sensors and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujahid, Adnan; Iqbal, Naseer; Afzal, Adeel

    2013-12-01

    Imprinting is a straightforward, yet a reliable technique to develop dynamic artificial recognition materials-so called as synthetic antibodies. Surface imprinting strategies such as soft lithography allow biological stereotyping of polymers and sol-gel phases to prepare extremely selective receptor layers, which can be combined with suitable transducer systems to develop high performance biomimetic sensors. This article presents an overview of the remarkable technical advancements in the field of surface bioimprinting with particular emphasis on surface imprinted bioanalyte detection systems and their applications in rapid bioanalysis and biotechnology. Herein, we discuss a variety of surface imprinting strategies including soft lithography, template immobilization, grafting, emulsion polymerization, and others along with their biomimetic sensor applications, merits and demerits. The pioneering research works on surface patterned biosensors are described with selected examples of detecting biological agents ranging from small biomolecules and proteins to living cells and microorganisms. © 2013.

  18. DNA Origami Mask for Sub-Ten-Nanometer Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diagne, Cheikh Tidiane; Brun, Christophe; Gasparutto, Didier; Baillin, Xavier; Tiron, Raluca

    2016-07-26

    DNA nanotechnology is currently widely explored and especially shows promises for advanced lithography due to its ability to define nanometer scale features. We demonstrate a 9 × 14 nm(2) hole pattern transfer from DNA origami into an SiO2 layer with a sub-10-nm resolution using anhydrous HF vapor in a semiconductor etching machine. We show that the resulting SiO2 pattern inherits its shape from the DNA structure within a process time ranging from 30 to 60 s at an etching rate of 0.2 nm/s. At 600 s of etching, the SiO2 pattern meets corrosion and the overall etching reaction is blocked. These results, in addition to the entire surface coverage by magnesium occurring on the substrate at a density of 1.1 × 10(15) atom/cm(2), define a process window, fabrication rules, and limits for DNA-based lithography.

  19. Fabrication of Nonperiodic Metasurfaces by Microlens Projection Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonidec, Mathieu; Hamedi, Mahiar M; Nemiroski, Alex; Rubio, Luis M; Torres, Cesar; Whitesides, George M

    2016-07-13

    This paper describes a strategy that uses template-directed self-assembly of micrometer-scale microspheres to fabricate arrays of microlenses for projection photolithography of periodic, quasiperiodic, and aperiodic infrared metasurfaces. This method of "template-encoded microlens projection lithography" (TEMPL) enables rapid prototyping of planar, multiscale patterns of similarly shaped structures with critical dimensions down to ∼400 nm. Each of these structures is defined by local projection lithography with a single microsphere acting as a lens. This paper explores the use of TEMPL for the fabrication of a broad range of two-dimensional lattices with varying types of nonperiodic spatial distribution. The matching optical spectra of the fabricated and simulated metasurfaces confirm that TEMPL can produce structures that conform to expected optical behavior.

  20. 4-Nitrobenzene Grafted in Porous Silicon: Application to Optical Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiddia, Mariavitalia; Mula, Guido; Sechi, Elisa; Vacca, Annalisa; Cara, Eleonora; De Leo, Natascia; Fretto, Matteo; Boarino, Luca

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we report a method to process porous silicon to improve its chemical resistance to alkaline solution attacks based on the functionalization of the pore surface by the electrochemical reduction of 4-nitrobenzendiazonium salt. This method provides porous silicon with strong resistance to the etching solutions used in optical lithography and allows the fabrication of tailored metallic contacts on its surface. The samples were studied by chemical, electrochemical, and morphological methods. We demonstrate that the grafted samples show a resistance to harsh alkaline solution more than three orders of magnitude larger than that of pristine porous silicon, being mostly unmodified after about 40 min. The samples maintained open pores after the grafting, making them suitable for further treatments like filling by polymers. Optical lithography was performed on the functionalized samples, and electrochemical characterization results are shown.

  1. Challenges of anamorphic high-NA lithography and mask making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Stephen D.; Liu, Jingjing

    2017-06-01

    Chip makers are actively working on the adoption of 0.33 numerical aperture (NA) EUV scanners for the 7-nm and 5-nm nodes (B. Turko, S. L. Carson, A. Lio, T. Liang, M. Phillips, et al., in `Proc. SPIE9776, Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography VII', vol. 977602 (2016) doi: 10.1117/12.2225014; A. Lio, in `Proc. SPIE9776, Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography VII', vol. 97760V (2016) doi: 10.1117/12.2225017). In the meantime, leading foundries and integrated device manufacturers are starting to investigate patterning options beyond the 5-nm node (O. Wood, S. Raghunathan, P. Mangat, V. Philipsen, V. Luong, et al., in `Proc. SPIE. 9422, Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography VI', vol. 94220I (2015) doi: 10.1117/12.2085022). To minimize the cost and process complexity of multiple patterning beyond the 5-nm node, EUV high-NA single-exposure patterning is a preferred method over EUV double patterning (O. Wood, S. Raghunathan, P. Mangat, V. Philipsen, V. Luong, et al., in `Proc. SPIE. 9422, Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography VI', vol. 94220I (2015) doi: 10.1117/12.2085022; J. van Schoot, K. van Ingen Schenau, G. Bottiglieri, K. Troost, J. Zimmerman, et al., `Proc. SPIE. 9776, Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography VII', vol. 97761I (2016) doi: 10.1117/12.2220150). The EUV high-NA scanner equipped with a projection lens of 0.55 NA is designed to support resolutions below 10 nm. The high-NA system is beneficial for enhancing resolution, minimizing mask proximity correction bias, improving normalized image log slope (NILS), and controlling CD uniformity (CDU). However, increasing NA from 0.33 to 0.55 reduces the depth of focus (DOF) significantly. Therefore, the source mask optimization (SMO) with sub-resolution assist features (SRAFs) are needed to increase DOF to meet the demanding full chip process control requirements (S. Hsu, R. Howell, J. Jia, H.-Y. Liu, K. Gronlund, et al., EUV `Proc. SPIE9048, Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography VI', (2015) doi: 10

  2. Plastic masters-rigid templates for soft lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Salil P; Freeman, Dennis M; Voldman, Joel

    2009-06-07

    We demonstrate a simple process for the fabrication of rigid plastic master molds for soft lithography directly from (poly)dimethysiloxane devices. Plastics masters (PMs) provide a cost-effective alternative to silicon-based masters and can be easily replicated without the need for cleanroom facilities. We have successfully demonstrated the use of plastics micromolding to generate both single and dual-layer plastic structures, and have characterized the fidelity of the molding process. Using the PM fabrication technique, world-to-chip connections can be integrated directly into the master enabling devices with robust, well-aligned fluidic ports directly after molding. PMs provide an easy technique for the fabrication of microfluidic devices and a simple route for the scaling-up of fabrication of robust masters for soft lithography.

  3. XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newnam, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Lithography Assisted Fiber-Drawing Nanomanufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipour, Behrad; Bastock, Paul; Cui, Long; Craig, Christopher; Khan, Khouler; Hewak, Daniel W.; Soci, Cesare

    2016-10-01

    We present a high-throughput and scalable technique for the production of metal nanowires embedded in glass fibres by taking advantage of thin film properties and patterning techniques commonly used in planar microfabrication. This hybrid process enables the fabrication of single nanowires and nanowire arrays encased in a preform material within a single fibre draw, providing an alternative to costly and time-consuming iterative fibre drawing. This method allows the combination of materials with different thermal properties to create functional optoelectronic nanostructures. As a proof of principle of the potential of this technique, centimetre long gold nanowires (bulk Tm = 1064 °C) embedded in silicate glass fibres (Tg = 567 °C) were drawn in a single step with high aspect ratios (>104) such nanowires can be released from the glass matrix and show relatively high electrical conductivity. Overall, this fabrication method could enable mass manufacturing of metallic nanowires for plasmonics and nonlinear optics applications, as well as the integration of functional multimaterial structures for completely fiberised optoelectronic devices.

  5. Influence of Immersion Lithography on Wafer Edge Defectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Jami, K.; Pollentier, I.; Vedula, S; Blumenstock, G

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the impact of immersion lithography on wafer edge defectivity. In the past, such work has been limited to inspection of the flat top part of the wafer edge due to the inspection challenges at the curved wafer edge and lack of a comprehensive defect inspection solution. Our study used a new automated edge inspection system that provides full wafer edge imaging and automatic defect classification. The work revealed several key challenges to controlling wafer edge-...

  6. Tunable Nanopatterning of Conductive Polymers via Electrohydrodynamic Lithography

    OpenAIRE

    Rickard, Jonathan James Stanley; Farrer, Ian; Goldberg Oppenheimer, Pola

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of technologies require the fabrication of conductive structures on a broad range of scales and over large areas. Here, we introduce advanced yet simple electrohydrodynamic lithography (EHL) for patterning conductive polymers directly on a substrate with high fidelity. We illustrate the generality of this robust, low-cost method by structuring thin polypyrrole films via electric-field-induced instabilities, yielding well-defined conductive structures with feature sizes ra...

  7. 450mm wafer patterning with jet and flash imprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ecron; Hellebrekers, Paul; Hofemann, Paul; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    The next step in the evolution of wafer size is 450mm. Any transition in sizing is an enormous task that must account for fabrication space, environmental health and safety concerns, wafer standards, metrology capability, individual process module development and device integration. For 450mm, an aggressive goal of 2018 has been set, with pilot line operation as early as 2016. To address these goals, consortiums have been formed to establish the infrastructure necessary to the transition, with a focus on the development of both process and metrology tools. Central to any process module development, which includes deposition, etch and chemical mechanical polishing is the lithography tool. In order to address the need for early learning and advance process module development, Molecular Imprints Inc. has provided the industry with the first advanced lithography platform, the Imprio® 450, capable of patterning a full 450mm wafer. The Imprio 450 was accepted by Intel at the end of 2012 and is now being used to support the 450mm wafer process development demands as part of a multi-year wafer services contract to facilitate the semiconductor industry's transition to lower cost 450mm wafer production. The Imprio 450 uses a Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process that employs drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for markets including NAND Flash memory, patterned media for hard disk drives and displays. This paper reviews the recent performance of the J-FIL technology (including overlay, throughput and defectivity), mask development improvements provided by Dai Nippon Printing, and the application of the technology to a 450mm lithography platform.

  8. Mask-less lithography for fabrication of optical waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubov, M.; Natarajan, S. R.; Williams, J. A. R.; Bennion, I.

    2008-02-01

    A flexible method for fabricating shallow optical waveguides by using femtosecond laser writing of patterns on a metal coated glass substrate followed by ion-exchange is described. This overcomes the drawbacks of low index contrast and high induced stress in waveguides directly written using low-repetition rate ultrafast laser systems. When compared to conventional lithography, the technique is simpler and has advantages in terms of flexibility in the types of structures which can be fabricated.

  9. Stochastic simulation studies of line-edge roughness in block copolymer lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Kon

    2014-08-01

    Because photoresist has the uncertain triangle relation among the higher resolution, the lower line-edge-roughness (LER) (or line-with-roughness (LWR)), and the improved sensitivity, for below 20-nm pattern formation, this relation makes hard to use the optical lithography. Directed self-assembly (DSA) has been considered as a potential candidate to extend the resolution limit of the optical lithography. The effects of DSA processing and DSA molecular geometry on LER should be well understood in order to meet the ITRS lithographic specifications. In this paper, for the optical lithography and the block copolymer (BCP) lithography such as graphoepitaxy, LER behavior is modeled by the stochastic methods such as the Monte Carlo method and the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. Simulation results explain that the LER of the BCP lithography is smaller than that of the optical lithography because of a self-healing capability of block copolymers.

  10. Homogeneity of Residual Layer thickness in UV Nanoimprint Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroshima, Hiroshi; Atobe, Hidemasa

    2009-06-01

    In nanoimprint lithography, control of residual layer thickness is a very important issue. Pattern density variation is inconvenient for nanoimprint lithography but UV nanoimprint is considered more adaptive to pattern density variation thanks to the higher fluidity of UV-curable resin. Despite this consideration, methods to overcome pattern density problems have been developed and adopted in UV nanoimprint lithography. These methods work well; however, it is still remains there a question of whether residual layer thickness uniformity is improved without such methods. In this study, UV nanoimprint is carried out using a conformable contact mechanism, and the impact of pattern density variation and pressing time of nanoimprint on the residual layer profile is investigated for an initially thin UV-curable resin. After recess filling, UV-curable resin moves very locally so as to make the residual layer smoothly change, but does not move sufficiently for the residual layer to be modified across the entire imprint field. For a longer pressing time, the residual layer thickness is decreased only at the edges. A small amount of the UV-curable resin was expelled from the mold, but most was retained between the mold and wafer, and the UV-curable resin moved inward. For realization of a thin and uniform residual layer, the residual layer must be thin throughout the imprint field from the beginning of the pressing process; otherwise the resulting residual layer that is thick only at peripheral regions must be thinned by a long pressing time.

  11. Lithography development and research challenges for the pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    For the 32 and 22 nm half-pitch nodes of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, the industry will face the challenge of introducing new lithography technologies into manufacturing. Some can build on the extension of current optical lithography technologies. However, others require a tool, optics, mask, and resist infrastructure quite different from those supporting today's manufacturing. Developing new technology solutions for use in manufacturing takes a long time and the final stages of infrastructure development and commercialization are very costly. The readiness of lithography technologies needs to be assessed based on development progress, but it also needs to consider whether a technology receives the necessary support to intersect a given technology node. In addition to being technically challenging, enabling an infrastructure capable of supporting pilot line and then high volume manufacturing insertion on an aggressive timeline is also a significant business challenge. To share the risk and cost, the industry must consider new business models for efficient collaboration with tool and infrastructure suppliers on the one side and device manufacturers on the other.

  12. Fabrication of 70nm split ring resonators by nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Graham J.; Khokhar, Ali Z.; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the fabrication of 70 nm wide, high resolution rectangular U-shaped split ring resonators (SRRs) using nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The fabrication method for the nanoimprint stamp does not require dry etching. The stamp is used to pattern SRRs in a thin PMMA layer followed by metal deposition and lift-off. Nanoimprinting in this way allows high resolution patterns with a minimum feature size of 20 nm. This fabrication technique yields a much higher throughput than conventional e-beam lithography and each stamp can be used numerous times to imprint patterns. Reflectance measurements of fabricated aluminium SRRs on silicon substrates show a so-called an LC resonance peak in the visible spectrum under transverse electric polarisation. Fabricating the SRRs by NIL rather than electron beam lithography allows them to be scaled to smaller dimensions without any significant loss in resolution, partly because pattern expansion caused by backscattered electrons and the proximity effect are not present with NIL. This in turn helps to shift the magnetic response to short wavelengths while still retaining a distinct LC peak.

  13. PSM design for inverse lithography with partially coherent illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xu; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2008-11-24

    Phase-shifting masks (PSM) are resolution enhancement techniques (RET) used extensively in the semiconductor industry to improve the resolution and pattern fidelity of optical lithography. Recently, a set of gradient-based PSM optimization methods have been developed to solve for the inverse lithography problem under coherent illumination. Most practical lithography systems, however, use partially coherent illumination due to non-zero width and off-axis light sources, which introduce partial coherence factors that must be accounted for in the optimization of PSMs. This paper thus focuses on developing a framework for gradient-based PSM optimization methods which account for the inherent nonlinearities of partially coherent illumination. In particular, the singular value decomposition (SVD) is used to expand the partially coherent imaging equation by eigenfunctions into a sum of coherent systems (SOCS). The first order coherent approximation corresponding to the largest eigenvalue is used in the PSM optimization. In order to influence the solution patterns to have more desirable manufacturability properties and higher fidelity, a post-processing of the mask pattern based on the 2D discrete cosine transformation (DCT) is introduced. Furthermore, a photoresist tone reversing technique is exploited in the design of PSMs to project extremely sparse patterns.

  14. Oblique Colloidal Lithography for the Fabrication of Nonconcentric Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi; Cao, Yang; Cai, Yangjun; Yang, Jian; He, Ximin; Nordlander, Peter; Cremer, Paul S

    2017-07-25

    Herein, we describe the development of oblique colloidal lithography (OCL) and establish a systematic patterning strategy for creating libraries of nanosized nonconcentric plasmonic structures. This strategy combines OCL, capillary force lithography, and several wet and ion etching steps. Hexagonal arrays of nonconcentric gold features were created on glass substrates with highly controllable geometric parameters. The size, geometry, and eccentricity of the gold features could be independently tuned by controlling the experimental conditions. Gaps within surface elements could be shrunk to as small as 30 nm, while the total patterned area was about l cm(2). The goal was to devise a method that offers a high degree of control over the resolution and morphology of asymmetric structures without the need to resort to electron beam lithography. This technique also enabled the development of numerous surface patterns through the stepwise fabrication of separate elements. Complex features, including dots-surrounded nonconcentric targets, nonconcentric hexagram-disks, and nonconcentric annular aperture arrays, were demonstrated, and their optical properties were characterized. Indeed, spectroscopic studies and FDTD simulations demonstrated that Fano resonances could readily be generated by the nonconcentric gold features. Consequently, our patterning strategy should enable the high-throughput investigation of plasmonic coupling and Fano resonances as a function of the physical parameters of the elements within the nanopattern array.

  15. Low Cost Lithography Tool for High Brightness LED Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Hawryluk; Emily True

    2012-06-30

    The objective of this activity was to address the need for improved manufacturing tools for LEDs. Improvements include lower cost (both capital equipment cost reductions and cost-ofownership reductions), better automation and better yields. To meet the DOE objective of $1- 2/kilolumen, it will be necessary to develop these highly automated manufacturing tools. Lithography is used extensively in the fabrication of high-brightness LEDs, but the tools used to date are not scalable to high-volume manufacturing. This activity addressed the LED lithography process. During R&D and low volume manufacturing, most LED companies use contact-printers. However, several industries have shown that these printers are incompatible with high volume manufacturing and the LED industry needs to evolve to projection steppers. The need for projection lithography tools for LED manufacturing is identified in the Solid State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap Draft, June 2009. The Roadmap states that Projection tools are needed by 2011. This work will modify a stepper, originally designed for semiconductor manufacturing, for use in LED manufacturing. This work addresses improvements to yield, material handling, automation and throughput for LED manufacturing while reducing the capital equipment cost.

  16. Echelle grating for silicon photonics applications: integration of electron beam lithography in the process flow and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschel, Mathias; Letzkus, Florian; Butschke, Jörg; Skwierawski, Piotr; Schneider, Marc; Weber, Marc

    2016-05-01

    We present the technology steps to integrate an Echelle grating in the process flow of silicon-organic hybrid (SOH) modulators or related active devices. The CMOS-compatible process flow on SOI substrates uses a mix of optical i-line lithography and electron beam lithography (EBL). High speed optical data communication depends on wavelength divisions multiplexing and de-multiplexing devices like Echelle gratings. The minimum feature sizes vary from device to device and reach down to 60 nm inside a modulator, while the total area of a single Echelle grating is up to several mm2 of unprocessed silicon. Resist patterning using a variable shape beam electron beam pattern generator allows high resolution. An oxide hard mask is deposited, patterns are structured threefold by EBL and are later transferred to the silicon. We demonstrate a 9-channel multiplexer featuring a 2 dB on-chip loss and an adjacent channel crosstalk better than -22 dB. Additionally a 45-channel Echelle multiplexer is presented with 5 dB on chip loss and a channel crosstalk better than -12 dB. The devices cover an on-chip area of only 0.08 mm2 and 0.5 mm2 with a wavelength spacing of 10.5 nm and 2.0 nm, respectively.

  17. A combined electron beam/optical lithography process step for the fabrication of sub-half-micron-gate-length MMIC chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, James S.; Bozada, Christopher A.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced radar and communication systems rely heavily on state-of-the-art microelectronics. Systems such as the phased-array radar require many transmit/receive (T/R) modules which are made up of many millimeter wave - microwave integrated circuits (MMIC's). The heart of a MMIC chip is the Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) field-effect transistor (FET). The transistor gate length is the critical feature that determines the operating frequency of the radar system. A smaller gate length will typically result in a higher frequency. In order to make a phased array radar system economically feasible, manufacturers must be capable of producing very large quantities of small-gate-length MMIC chips at a relatively low cost per chip. This requires the processing of a large number of wafers with a large number of chips per wafer, minimum processing time, and a very high chip yield. One of the bottlenecks in the fabrication of MIMIC chips is the transistor gate definition. The definition of sub-half-micron gates for GaAs-based field-effect transistors is generally performed by direct-write electron beam lithography (EBL). Because of the throughput limitations of EBL, the gate-layer fabrication is conventionally divided into two lithographic processes where EBL is used to generate the gate fingers and optical lithography is used to generate the large-area gate pads and interconnects. As a result, two complete sequences of resist application, exposure, development, metallization and lift-off are required for the entire gate structure. We have baselined a hybrid process, referred to as EBOL (electron beam/optical lithography), in which a single application of a multi-level resist is used for both exposures. The entire gate structure, (gate fingers, interconnects and pads), is then formed with a single metallization and lift-off process. The EBOL process thus retains the advantages of the high-resolution E-beam lithography and the high throughput of optical lithography while essentially

  18. Laser Direct Writing of Thick Hybrid Polymers for Microfluidic Chips

    OpenAIRE

    Akanksha Singh; Gianmario Scotti; Tiina Sikanen; Ville Jokinen; Sami Franssila

    2014-01-01

    This work presents patterning of thick (10–50 µm) hybrid polymer structures of ORMOCER® by laser direct writing. ORMOCER® combine polymer-like fabrication processes with glass-like surface chemistry that is beneficial for many bio-microfluidic applications. ORMOCER® is liquid before exposure, so patterning is done by contact-free lithography, such as proximity exposure. With laser direct writing, we obtained higher resolution patterns, with smaller radius of curvature (~2–4 µm), compared to p...

  19. Step and flash imprint lithography: A low-pressure, room-temperature nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, Matthew Earl

    Lithography process has been proven to be a high-resolution technique capable of patterning a wide variety of substrate at room temperature under low applied pressure in a fashion consistent with high volume manufacturing requirements.

  20. Hybrid Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Page, P R

    2003-01-01

    We review the status of hybrid baryons. The only known way to study hybrids rigorously is via excited adiabatic potentials. Hybrids can be modelled by both the bag and flux-tube models. The low-lying hybrid baryon is N 1/2^+ with a mass of 1.5-1.8 GeV. Hybrid baryons can be produced in the glue-rich processes of diffractive gamma N and pi N production, Psi decays and p pbar annihilation.

  1. Nano devices and sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Liaw, Shien-Kuei; Chung, Yung-Hui

    2016-01-01

    This volume on semiconductor devices focuses on such topics as nano-imprinting, lithography, nanowire charge-trapping, thermo-stability in nanowires, nano-electrodes, and voltage and materials used for fabricating and improving electrical characteristics of nano-materials.

  2. Imprinted photonic crystal chemical sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, A.; Burghoorn, M.M.A.; Saalmink, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present the use of Photonic Crystals as chemical sensors. These 2D nanostructured sensors were prepared by nano-imprint lithography during which a nanostructure is transferred from a nickel template into a responsive polymer, that is be specifically tuned to interact with the chemic

  3. Fabrication and characterization of free-standing, high-line-density transmission gratings for the vacuum UV to soft X-ray range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goh, S.J.; Bastiaens, H.J.M.; Vratzov, B.; Huang, Q.; Bijkerk, F.; Boller, K-J.

    2015-01-01

    We present state-of-the-art high resolution transmission gratings, applicable for spectroscopy in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and the soft X-ray (SRX) wavelength range, fabricated with a novel process using ultraviolet based nano imprint lithography (UV-NIL). Free-standing, high-line-density gratin

  4. One-step sol-gel imprint lithography for guided-mode resonance structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yin; Liu, Longju; Johnson, Michael; C Hillier, Andrew; Lu, Meng

    2016-03-01

    Guided-mode resonance (GMR) structures consisting of sub-wavelength periodic gratings are capable of producing narrow-linewidth optical resonances. This paper describes a sol-gel-based imprint lithography method for the fabrication of submicron 1D and 2D GMR structures. This method utilizes a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold to fabricate the grating coupler and waveguide for a GMR device using a sol-gel thin film in a single step. An organic-inorganic hybrid sol-gel film was selected as the imprint material because of its relatively high refractive index. The optical responses of several sol-gel GMR devices were characterized, and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results of electromagnetic simulations. The influence of processing parameters was investigated in order to determine how finely the spectral response and resonant wavelength of the GMR devices could be tuned. As an example potential application, refractometric sensing experiments were performed using a 1D sol-gel device. The results demonstrated a refractive index sensitivity of 50 nm/refractive index unit. This one-step fabrication process offers a simple, rapid, and low-cost means of fabricating GMR structures. We anticipate that this method can be valuable in the development of various GMR-based devices as it can readily enable the fabrication of complex shapes and allow the doping of optically active materials into sol-gel thin film.

  5. Double-Sided Opportunities Using Chemical Lift-Off Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Anne M; Liao, Wei-Ssu; Weiss, Paul S

    2016-08-16

    We discuss the origins, motivation, invention, development, applications, and future of chemical lift-off lithography, in which a specified pattern of a self-assembled monolayer is removed, i.e., lifted off, using a reactive, patterned stamp that is brought into contact with the monolayer. For Au substrates, this process produces a supported, patterned monolayer of Au on the stamp in addition to the negative pattern in the original molecular monolayer. Both the patterned molecular monolayer on the original substrate and the patterned supported metal monolayer on the stamp are useful as materials and for further applications in sensing and other areas. Chemical lift-off lithography effectively lowers the barriers to and costs of high-resolution, large-area nanopatterning. On the patterned monolayer side, features in the single-nanometer range can be produced across large (square millimeter or larger) areas. Patterns smaller than the original stamp feature sizes can be produced by controlling the degree of contact between the stamp and the lifted-off monolayer. We note that this process is different than conventional lift-off processes in lithography in that chemical lift-off lithography removes material, whereas conventional lift-off is a positive-tone patterning method. Chemical lift-off lithography is in some ways similar to microtransfer printing. Chemical lift-off lithography has critical advantages in the preparation of biocapture surfaces because the molecules left behind are exploited to space and to orient functional(ized) molecules. On the supported metal monolayer side, a new two-dimensional material has been produced. The useful important chemical properties of Au (vis-à-vis functionalization with thiols) are retained, but the electronic and optical properties of bulk Au or even Au nanoparticles are not. These metal monolayers do not quench excitation and may be useful in optical measurements, particularly in combination with selective binding due to

  6. Free-electron laser emission architecture impact on EUV lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, Erik R.; Wood, Obert R.; Barletta, William A.

    2017-03-01

    Laser-produced plasma (LPP) EUV sources have demonstrated approximately 125 W at customer sites, establishing confidence in EUV lithography as a viable manufacturing technology. However, beyond the 7 nm technology node existing scanner/source technology must enable higher-NA imaging systems (requiring increased resist dose and providing half-field exposures) and/or EUV multi-patterning (requiring increased wafer throughput proportional to the number of exposure passes. Both development paths will require a substantial increase in EUV source power to maintain the economic viability of the technology, creating an opportunity for free-electron laser (FEL) EUV sources. FEL-based EUV sources offer an economic, high-power/single-source alternative to LPP EUV sources. Should free-electron lasers become the preferred next generation EUV source, the choice of FEL emission architecture will greatly affect its operational stability and overall capability. A near-term industrialized FEL is expected to utilize one of the following three existing emission architectures: (1) selfamplified spontaneous emission (SASE), (2) regenerative amplification (RAFEL), or (3) self-seeding (SS-FEL). Model accelerator parameters are put forward to evaluate the impact of emission architecture on FEL output. Then, variations in the parameter space are applied to assess the potential impact to lithography operations, thereby establishing component sensitivity. The operating range of various accelerator components is discussed based on current accelerator performance demonstrated at various scientific user facilities. Finally, comparison of the performance between the model accelerator parameters and the variation in parameter space provides a means to evaluate the potential emission architectures. A scorecard is presented to facilitate this evaluation and provide a framework for future FEL design and enablement for EUV lithography applications.

  7. Imbalance aware lithography hotspot detection: a deep learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haoyu; Luo, Luyang; Su, Jing; Lin, Chenxi; Yu, Bei

    2017-03-01

    With the advancement of VLSI technology nodes, light diffraction caused lithographic hotspots have become a serious problem affecting manufacture yield. Lithography hotspot detection at the post-OPC stage is imperative to check potential circuit failures when transferring designed patterns onto silicon wafers. Although conventional lithography hotspot detection methods, such as machine learning, have gained satisfactory performance, with extreme scaling of transistor feature size and more and more complicated layout patterns, conventional methodologies may suffer from performance degradation. For example, manual or ad hoc feature extraction in a machine learning framework may lose important information when predicting potential errors in ultra-large-scale integrated circuit masks. In this paper, we present a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) targeting representative feature learning in lithography hotspot detection. We carefully analyze impact and effectiveness of different CNN hyper-parameters, through which a hotspot-detection-oriented neural network model is established. Because hotspot patterns are always minorities in VLSI mask design, the training data set is highly imbalanced. In this situation, a neural network is no longer reliable, because a trained model with high classification accuracy may still suffer from high false negative results (missing hotspots), which is fatal in hotspot detection problems. To address the imbalance problem, we further apply minority upsampling and random-mirror flipping before training the network. Experimental results show that our proposed neural network model achieves highly comparable or better performance on the ICCAD 2012 contest benchmark compared to state-of-the-art hotspot detectors based on deep or representative machine leaning.

  8. Flow lithography in ultraviolet-curable polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junbeom; An, Heseong; Seo, Yoojin; Jung, Youngmee; Lee, Jong Suk; Choi, Nakwon; Bong, Ki Wan

    2017-03-01

    Flow Lithography (FL) is the technique used for the synthesis of hydrogel microparticles with various complex shapes and distinct chemical compositions by combining microfluidics with photolithography. Although polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has been used most widely as almost the sole material for FL, PDMS microfluidic chips have limitations: (1) undesired shrinkage due to the thermal expansion of masters used for replica molding and (2) interfacial delamination between two thermally cured PDMS layers. Here, we propose the utilization of ultraviolet (UV)-curable PDMS (X-34-4184) for FL as an excellent alternative material of the conventional PDMS. Our proposed utilization of the UV-curable PDMS offers three key advantages, observed in our study: (1) UV-curable PDMS exhibited almost the same oxygen permeability as the conventional PDMS. (2) The almost complete absence of shrinkage facilitated the fabrication of more precise reverse duplication of microstructures. (3) UV-cured PDMS microfluidic chips were capable of much stronger interfacial bonding so that the burst pressure increased to ∼0.9 MPa. Owing to these benefits, we demonstrated a substantial improvement of productivity in synthesizing polyethylene glycol diacrylate microparticles via stop flow lithography, by applying a flow time (40 ms) an order of magnitude shorter. Our results suggest that UV-cured PDMS chips can be used as a general platform for various types of flow lithography and also be employed readily in other applications where very precise replication of structures on micro- or sub-micrometer scales and/or strong interfacial bonding are desirable.

  9. SVM based layout retargeting for fast and regularized inverse lithography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai-sheng LUO; Zheng SHI; Xiao-lang YAN; Zhen GENG

    2014-01-01

    Inverse lithography technology (ILT), also known as pixel-based optical proximity correction (PB-OPC), has shown promising capability in pushing the current 193 nm lithography to its limit. By treating the mask optimization process as an inverse problem in lithography, ILT provides a more complete exploration of the solution space and better pattern fidelity than the tradi-tional edge-based OPC. However, the existing methods of ILT are extremely time-consuming due to the slow convergence of the optimization process. To address this issue, in this paper we propose a support vector machine (SVM) based layout retargeting method for ILT, which is designed to generate a good initial input mask for the optimization process and promote the convergence speed. Supervised by optimized masks of training layouts generated by conventional ILT, SVM models are learned and used to predict the initial pixel values in the‘undefined areas’ of the new layout. By this process, an initial input mask close to the final optimized mask of the new layout is generated, which reduces iterations needed in the following optimization process. Manu-facturability is another critical issue in ILT;however, the mask generated by our layout retargeting method is quite irregular due to the prediction inaccuracy of the SVM models. To compensate for this drawback, a spatial filter is employed to regularize the retargeted mask for complexity reduction. We implemented our layout retargeting method with a regularized level-set based ILT (LSB-ILT) algorithm under partially coherent illumination conditions. Experimental results show that with an initial input mask generated by our layout retargeting method, the number of iterations needed in the optimization process and runtime of the whole process in ILT are reduced by 70.8%and 69.0%, respectively.

  10. Wavelength tuning of photonic crystal waveguides fabricated using 248-nm deep UV lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Yanxin; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Harpøth, Anders

    2004-01-01

    Wavelength tuning of characteristic features of straight photonic crystal waveguides has been obtained by varying the exposure dose in deep UV lithography. The experimental results agree very well with numerical simulations.......Wavelength tuning of characteristic features of straight photonic crystal waveguides has been obtained by varying the exposure dose in deep UV lithography. The experimental results agree very well with numerical simulations....

  11. Nanoimprint lithography with a focused laser beam for the fabrication of nanopatterned microchannel molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyungjun; Ryu, Jihyeong; Kim, Geehong; Choi, Kee-Bong; Lee, Sunghwi; Lee, Jaejong

    2013-08-21

    We present a process based on nanoimprint lithography for the fabrication of a microchannel mold having nanopatterns formed at the bottoms of its microchannels. A focused laser beam selectively cures the resist in the micrometer scale during nanoimprint lithography. Nanopatterns within the microchannels may be used to control microfluidic behavior.

  12. Surface force measurement of ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Jun; Hasegawa, Masayuki; Amemiya, Hironao; Kobayashi, Hayato

    2016-02-01

    Ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) has advantages such as room-temperature operation, high through-put, and high resolution. In the UV-NIL process, the mold needs a release coating material to prevent adhesion of the transfer resin. Usually, fluorinated silane coupling agents are used as release coating materials. To evaluate the release property, surface force analyzer equipment was used. This equipment can measure the surface forces between release-coated or noncoated mold material surfaces and UV-cured resin surfaces in the solid state. Lower surface forces were measured when a release coating was used on the mold material surface.

  13. Combined electron beam and UV lithography in SU-8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Thamdrup, Lasse Højlund; Mironov, Andrej;

    2007-01-01

    We present combined electron beam and UV lithography (CEUL) in SU-8 as a fast and flexible lithographic technique for prototyping of functional polymer devices and pattern transfer applications. CEUL is a lithographic technique suitable for defining both micrometer and nanometer scale features...... in a single polymer film on the wafer scale. The height of the micrometer and nanometer scale features is matched within 30 nm. As a pattern transfer application, we demonstrate stamp fabrication and thermal nanoimprint of a 2-dimensional array of 100 nm wide lines with a pitch of 380 nm in connection...

  14. Optical laue diffraction on photonic structures designed by laser lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samusev, K. B.; Rybin, M. V.; Lukashenko, S. Yu.; Limonov, M. F.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional photonic crystals with square symmetry C 4v were obtained using the laser lithography method. The structure of these samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Optical Laue diffraction for monochromatic light was studied experimentally depending on the incidence angle of laser beam and lattice constant. Interpretation of the observed diffraction patterns is given in the framework of the Laue diffraction mechanism for an one-dimensional chain of scattering elements. Red thresholds for different diffraction orders were determined experimentally and theoretically. The results of calculations are in an excellent agreement with experiment.

  15. Large-area magnetic metamaterials via compact interference lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feth, Nils; Enkrich, Christian; Wegener, Martin; Linden, Stefan

    2007-01-22

    Magnetic metamaterials with magnetic-dipole resonances around 1.2-mum wavelength are fabricated using an extremely compact and robust version of two- or three-beam interference lithography for 1D and 2D structures, respectively. Our approach employs a single laser beam at 532- nm wavelength impinging onto a suitably shaped dielectric object (roof-top prism or pyramid) - bringing the complexity of fabricating magnetic metamaterials down to that of evaporating usual dielectric/metallic coatings.The measured optical spectra agree well with theory; the retrieval reveals a negative magnetic permeability. Importantly, the large-scale sample homogeneity is explicitly demonstrated by optical experiments.

  16. Combined electron beam and UV lithography in SU-8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Thamdrup, Lasse Højlund; Mironov, Andrej

    2007-01-01

    We present combined electron beam and UV lithography (CEUL) in SU-8 as a fast and flexible lithographic technique for prototyping of functional polymer devices and pattern transfer applications. CEUL is a lithographic technique suitable for defining both micrometer and nanometer scale features...... in a single polymer film on the wafer scale. The height of the micrometer and nanometer scale features is matched within 30 nm. As a pattern transfer application, we demonstrate stamp fabrication and thermal nanoimprint of a 2-dimensional array of 100 nm wide lines with a pitch of 380 nm in connection...... with micrometer scale features....

  17. A nano-scale alignment method for imprint lithography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; LU Bing-heng; DING Yu-cheng; QIU Zhi-hui; LIU Hong-zhong

    2006-01-01

    A novel nano-scale alignment technique based generated by two pairs of quadruple gratings on mold and wafer are optically projected onto two photo-detector arrays,alignment errors in the x and y directions.The experiment sensitive to relative displacement of the mold and wafer,and the alignment accuracy obtained in the x and y directions and in θare ±20 nm,±25 nm and ±1 μrad (3σ),respectively.They can meet the requirements of alignment accuracy for submicron imprint lithography.

  18. Solid state microcavity dye lasers fabricated by nanoimprint lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Daniel; Nielsen, Theodor; Kristensen, Anders

    2004-01-01

    We present a solid state polymer microcavity dye laser, fabricated by thermal nanoimprint lithography (NIL) in a dye-doped thermoplast. The thermoplast poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) is used due to its high transparency in the visible range and its robustness to laser radiation. The laser dye...... propagating TE–TM modes. The laser cavity has the lateral shape of a trapezoid, supporting lasing modes by reflection on the vertical cavity walls. The solid polymer dye lasers emit laterally through one of the vertical cavity walls, when pumped optically through the top surface by means of a frequency...

  19. Analysis of laser durability of CaF2 for optical lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabosch, Guenter; Parthier, Lutz; Natura, Ute; Poehl, Karin; Letz, Martin; Muehlig, Christian; Knapp, Konrad

    2005-02-01

    Photolithography is a key technolgoy for the production of semiconductor devices. It supports the continuing trend towards higher integration density of microelectronic devices. The material used in the optics of lithography tools has to be of extremely high quality to ensure the high demand of the imaging. Due to its properties CaF2 is a material of choice for the application in lithography systems. Because of the compexity of the lithography tools single lenses or lens system modules cannot be replaced. Therefore the lens material has to last the full lifetime of the tool without major degradation. According to the roadmap for next generation of optical lithography tools, like immersion lithography, the requirements of CaF2 for radiation hardness are increasing considerably. We will present a detailed analysis of the key factors influencing the laser hardness covering the complete production chain. Some aspects of the evaluation methods for testing CaF2 laser durability will be presented.

  20. Sparse nonlinear inverse imaging for shot count reduction in inverse lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaofei; Liu, Shiyuan; Lv, Wen; Lam, Edmund Y

    2015-10-19

    Inverse lithography technique (ILT) is significant to reduce the feature size of ArF optical lithography due to its strong ability to overcome the optical proximity effect. A critical issue for inverse lithography is the complex curvilinear patterns produced, which are very costly to write due to the large number of shots needed with the current variable shape beam (VSB) writers. In this paper, we devise an inverse lithography method to reduce the shot count by incorporating a model-based fracturing (MBF) in the optimization. The MBF is formulated as a sparse nonlinear inverse imaging problem based on representing the mask as a linear combination of shots followed by a threshold function. The problem is approached with a Gauss-Newton algorithm, which is adapted to promote sparsity of the solution, corresponding to the reduction of the shot count. Simulations of inverse lithography are performed on several test cases, and results demonstrate reduced shot count of the resulting mask.

  1. Large-area metallic photonic lattices for military applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luk, Ting Shan

    2007-11-01

    In this project we developed photonic crystal modeling capability and fabrication technology that is scaleable to large area. An intelligent optimization code was developed to find the optimal structure for the desired spectral response. In terms of fabrication, an exhaustive survey of fabrication techniques that would meet the large area requirement was reduced to Deep X-ray Lithography (DXRL) and nano-imprint. Using DXRL, we fabricated a gold logpile photonic crystal in the <100> plane. For the nano-imprint technique, we fabricated a cubic array of gold squares. These two examples also represent two classes of metallic photonic crystal topologies, the connected network and cermet arrangement.

  2. Computer numerical control (CNC) lithography: light-motion synchronized UV-LED lithography for 3D microfabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungkwun; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Allen, Mark G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a computer-numerical-controlled ultraviolet light-emitting diode (CNC UV-LED) lithography scheme for three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication. The CNC lithography scheme utilizes sequential multi-angled UV light exposures along with a synchronized switchable UV light source to create arbitrary 3D light traces, which are transferred into the photosensitive resist. The system comprises a switchable, movable UV-LED array as a light source, a motorized tilt-rotational sample holder, and a computer-control unit. System operation is such that the tilt-rotational sample holder moves in a pre-programmed routine, and the UV-LED is illuminated only at desired positions of the sample holder during the desired time period, enabling the formation of complex 3D microstructures. This facilitates easy fabrication of complex 3D structures, which otherwise would have required multiple manual exposure steps as in the previous multidirectional 3D UV lithography approach. Since it is batch processed, processing time is far less than that of the 3D printing approach at the expense of some reduction in the degree of achievable 3D structure complexity. In order to produce uniform light intensity from the arrayed LED light source, the UV-LED array stage has been kept rotating during exposure. UV-LED 3D fabrication capability was demonstrated through a plurality of complex structures such as V-shaped micropillars, micropanels, a micro-‘hi’ structure, a micro-‘cat’s claw,’ a micro-‘horn,’ a micro-‘calla lily,’ a micro-‘cowboy’s hat,’ and a micro-‘table napkin’ array.

  3. Chemical tailoring of hybrid sol-gel thick coatings as hosting matrix for functional patterned microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcaro, Paolo; Costacurta, Stefano; Malfatti, Luca; Buso, Dario; Patelli, Alessandro; Schiavuta, Piero; Piccinini, Massimo; Grenci, Gianluca; Marmiroli, Benedetta; Amenitsch, Heinz; Innocenzi, Plinio

    2011-02-01

    A phenyl-based hybrid organic - inorganic coating has been synthesized and processed by hard X-ray lithography. The overall lithography process is performed in a two-step process only (X-rays exposure and chemical etching). The patterns present high aspect ratio, sharp edges, and high homogeneity. The coating has been doped with a variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon functional molecules, such as anthracene, pentacene, and fullerene. For the first time, hard X-rays have been combined with thick hybrid functional coatings, using the sol-gel thick film directly as resist. A new technique based on a new material combined with hard X-rays is now available to fabricate optical devices. The effect due to the high-energy photon exposure has been investigated using FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, laser scanner, optical profilometer, and confocal and electron microscope. High-quality thick hybrid fullerene-doped microstructures have been fabricated.

  4. Tilted pillar array fabrication by the combination of proton beam writing and soft lithography for microfluidic cell capture Part 2: Image sequence analysis based evaluation and biological application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Járvás, Gábor; Varga, Tamás; Szigeti, Márton; Hajba, László; Fürjes, Péter; Rajta, István; Guttman, András

    2017-07-17

    As a continuation of our previously published work, this paper presents a detailed evaluation of a microfabricated cell capture device utilizing a doubly tilted micropillar array. The device was fabricated using a novel hybrid technology based on the combination of proton beam writing and conventional lithography techniques. Tilted pillars offer unique flow characteristics and support enhanced fluidic interaction for improved immunoaffinity based cell capture. The performance of the microdevice was evaluated by an image sequence analysis based in-house developed single-cell tracking system. Individual cell tracking allowed in-depth analysis of the cell-chip surface interaction mechanism from hydrodynamic point of view. Simulation results were validated by using the hybrid device and the optimized surface functionalization procedure. Finally, the cell capture capability of this new generation microdevice was demonstrated by efficiently arresting cells from a HT29 cell-line suspension. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Mighty high-T lithography for 65-nm generation contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Will; Montgomery, Patrick K.; Lucas, Kevin; Litt, Lloyd C.; Maltabes, John G.; Dieu, Laurent; Hughes, Gregory P.; Mellenthin, David L.; Socha, Robert J.; Fanucchi, Eric L.; Verhappen, Arjan; Wampler, Kurt E.; Yu, Linda; Schaefer, Erika; Cassel, Shawn; Kuijten, Jan P.; Pijnenburg, Wil; Wiaux, Vincent; Vandenberghe, Geert

    2003-06-01

    Contact patterning for the 65nm device generation will be an exceedingly difficult task. The 2001 SIA roadmap lists the targeted contact size as 90nm with +/-10% CD control requirements of +/-9nm. Defectivity levels must also be below one failure per billion contacts for acceptable device yield. Difficulties in contact patterning are driven by the low depth of focus of isolated contacts and/or the high mask error (MEF) for dense contact arrays (in combination with expected reticle CD errors). Traditional contact lithography methods are not able to mitigate both these difficulties simultaneously. Inlaid metal trench patterning for the 65nm generation has similar lithographic difficulties though not to the extreme degree as seen with contacts. This study included the use of multiple, high transmission, 193nm attenuated phase shifting mask varieties to meet the difficult challenges of 65nm contact and trench lithography. Numerous illumination schemes, mask biasing, optical proximity correction (OPC), mask manufacturing techniques, and mask blank substrate materials were investigated. The analysis criteria included depth of focus, exposure latitude and MEF through pitch, reticle inspection, reticle manufacturability, and cost of ownership. The investigation determined that certain high transmission reticle schemes are strong contenders for 65nm generation contact and trench patterning. However, a number of strong interactions between illumination, OPC, and reticle manufacturing issues need to be considered.

  6. High efficiency diffraction grating for EUV lithography beamline monochromator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronov, D. L.; Warwick, T.; Gullikson, E. M.; Salmassi, F.; Naulleau, P.; Artemiev, N. A.; Lum, P.; Padmore, H. A.

    2016-09-01

    A blazed diffraction grating for the EUV lithography Beamline 12.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source has been fabricated using optical direct write lithography and anisotropic wet etching technology. A variable line spacing pattern was recorded on a photoresist layer and transferred to a hard mask layer of the grating substrate by a plasma etch. Then anisotropic wet etching was applied to shape triangular grating grooves with precise control of the ultralow blaze angle. Variation of the groove density along the grating length was measured with a Long Trace Profiler (LTP). Fourier analysis of the LTP data confirmed high groove placement accuracy of the grating. The grating coated with a Ru coating demonstrated diffraction efficiency of 69.6% in the negative first diffraction order which is close to theoretical efficiency at the wavelength of 13.5 nm. This work demonstrates an alternative approach to fabrication of highly efficient and precise x-ray diffraction gratings with ultra-low blaze angles.

  7. Integrated lithography to prepare arrays of rounded nano-objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, Áron; Szalai, Anikó; Csete, Mária

    2012-03-01

    An integrated lithography method is presented to prepare rounded nano-objects with variable shape, in arrays with arbitrary symmetry and wavelength-scaled periodicity. Finite element method was applied to determine the near-field confinement under monolayers of silver and gold colloid spheres illuminated by circularly polarized beams possessing periodic intensity distribution, and to predict the shape of nano-objects, which can be fabricated on thin noble metal layers on glass substrates. It was shown that illumination by perpendicularly incident homogeneous beam results in hexagonal array of uniform nano-rings, while uniform nano-crescents appear due to single obliquely incident beam. Illumination of colloid sphere monolayers by interfering beams causes development of co-existent nano-rings and nanocrescents. It was demonstrated that the periodicity of complex patterns is determined by the wavelength and angle of incidence; the inter-object distance is controlled by the relative orientation of interference patterns with respect to colloid sphere monolayers; the nano-object size is determined by the wavelength, sphere diameter and material; while the nearfield distribution sensitively depends on the direction of illumination by circularly polarized light. We present complex patterns of various rounded nano-objects that can be uniquely fabricated via Circular Integrated Interference and Colloid sphere Lithography (CIICL), and applied as plasmonic and meta-materials.

  8. Integrated lithography to prepare periodic arrays of nano-objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, Áron; Szalai, Anikó; Csete, Mária

    2013-08-01

    We present an integrated lithography method to prepare versatile nano-objects with variable shape and nano-scaled substructure, in wavelength-scaled periodic arrays with arbitrary symmetry. The idea is to illuminate colloid sphere monolayers by polarized beams possessing periodic lateral intensity modulations. Finite element method was applied to determine the effects of the wavelength, polarization and angle of incidence of the incoming beam, and to predict the characteristics of nano-objects, which can be fabricated on thin metal layer covered substrates due to the near-field enhancement under silica colloid spheres. The inter-object distance is controlled by varying the relative orientation of the periodic intensity modulation with respect to the silica colloid sphere monolayer. It is shown that illuminating silica colloid sphere monolayers by two interfering beams, linear patterns made of elliptical holes appear in case of linear polarization, while circularly polarized beams result in co-existent rounded objects, as more circular nano-holes and nano-crescents. The size of the nano-objects and their sub-structure is determined by the spheres diameter and by the wavelength. We present various complex plasmonic patterns made of versatile nano-objects that can be uniquely fabricated applying the inherent symmetry breaking possibilities in the integrated lithography method.

  9. Candidate plasma-facing materials for EUV lithography source components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Ahmed; Burtseva, Tatiana; Brooks, Jeff N.; Konkashbaev, Isak K.; Rice, Bryan J.

    2003-06-01

    Material selection and lifetime issues for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography are of critical importance to the success of this technology for commercial applications. This paper reviews current trends in production and use of plasma-facing electrodes, insulators, and wall materials for EUV type sources. Ideal candidate materials should be able to: withstand high thermal shock from the short pulsed plasma; withstand high thermal loads without structural failure; reduce debris generation during discharge; and be machined accurately. We reviewed the literature on current and proposed fusion plasma-facing materials as well as current experience with plasma gun and other simulation devices. Both fusion and EUV source materials involve issues of surface erosion by particle sputtering and heat-induced evaporation/melting. These materials are either bare structural materials or surface coatings. EUV materials can be divided into four categories: wall, electrode, optical, and insulator materials. For electric discharge sources, all four types are required, whereas laser-produced plasma EUV sources do not require electrode and insulator materials. Several types of candidate alloy and other materials and methods of manufacture are recommended for each component of EUV lithography light sources.

  10. Microfluidic structures for LOC devices designed by laser lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figurova, M.; Pudis, D.; Gaso, P.

    2016-12-01

    Nowadays, lab on a chip (LOC) applications are very popular in the field of biomedicine. LOC device works with biological materials and enables to arrange conventional laboratory operations on a small chip. Philosophy of LOC applications stands on quick and precise diagnostics process and technology, which uses cheap materials with possibility of rapid prototyping. LOC, as a time saving application, works with small volume of samples and reagents and enables better control over the sample. We present fabrication method of functional LOC chip for different biomedical microfluidic applications based on direct laser writing (DLW) lithography. We present fabrication of few types of microfluidic and micro-optic structures with different capabilities created by DLW system. The combination of DLW lithography in photoresist layer deposited on glass substrate and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replica molding process were used for patterning of designed microstructures. Prepared microfluidic and micro-optic structures were observed by confocal microscope and microfluidic flow observations were investigated by conventional optical microscope and CCD camera.

  11. Scalable, high performance, enzymatic cathodes based on nanoimprint lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Pankratov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we detail high performance, enzymatic electrodes for oxygen bio-electroreduction, which can be easily and reproducibly fabricated with industry-scale throughput. Planar and nanostructured electrodes were built on biocompatible, flexible polymer sheets, while nanoimprint lithography was used for electrode nanostructuring. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first reports concerning the usage of nanoimprint lithography for amperometric bioelectronic devices. The enzyme (Myrothecium verrucaria bilirubin oxidase was immobilised on planar (control and artificially nanostructured, gold electrodes by direct physical adsorption. The detailed electrochemical investigation of bioelectrodes was performed and the following parameters were obtained: open circuit voltage of approximately 0.75 V, and maximum bio-electrocatalytic current densities of 18 µA/cm2 and 58 µA/cm2 in air-saturated buffers versus 48 µA/cm2 and 186 µA/cm2 in oxygen-saturated buffers for planar and nanostructured electrodes, respectively. The half-deactivation times of planar and nanostructured biocathodes were measured to be 2 h and 14 h, respectively. The comparison of standard heterogeneous and bio-electrocatalytic rate constants showed that the improved bio-electrocatalytic performance of the nanostructured biocathodes compared to planar biodevices is due to the increased surface area of the nanostructured electrodes, whereas their improved operational stability is attributed to stabilisation of the enzyme inside nanocavities.

  12. Thermal management of masks for deep x-ray lithography.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khounsary, A.; Chojnowski, D.; Mancini, D.C.; Lai, B.; Dejus, R.

    1997-11-18

    This paper addresses some options and techniques in the thermal management of masks used in deep x-ray lithography. The x-ray masks are thin plates made of low-atomic-number materials on which a patterned thin film of a high-atomic-number metal has been deposited. When they are exposed to an x-ray beam, part of the radiation is transmitted to replicate the pattern on a downstream photoresist, and the remainder is absorbed in the mask in the form of heat. This heat load can cause deformation of the mask and thus image distortion in the lithography process. The mask geometry considered in the present study is 100 mm x 100 mm in area, and about 0.1 to 2 mm thick. The incident radiation is a bending magnet x-ray beam having a footprint of 60 mm x 4 mm at the mask. The mask is scanned vertically about {+-} 30 mm so that a 60 mm x 60 mm area is exposed. the maximum absorbed heat load in the mask is 80 W, which is significantly greater than a few watts encountered in previous systems. In this paper, cooling techniques, substrate material selection, transient and steady state thermal and structural behavior, and other thermo-mechanical aspects of mask design are discussed. It is shown that, while diamond and graphite remain attractive candidates, at present beryllium is a more suitable material for this purpose and, when properly cooled, can provide the necessary dimensional tolerance.

  13. Mask image position correction for double patterning lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masato; Itoh, Masamitsu; Ikenaga, Osamu; Ishigo, Kazutaka

    2008-05-01

    Application of double patterning technique has been discussed for lithography of HP 3X nm device generation. In this case, overlay budget for lithography becomes so hard that it is difficult to achieve it with only improvement of photomask's position accuracy. One of the factors of overlay error will be induced by distortion of photomask after chucking on the mask stage of exposure tool, because photomasks are bended by the force of vacuum chucking. Recently, mask flatness prediction technique was developed. This technique is simulating the surface shape of mask when it is on the mask stage by using the flatness data of free-standing state blank and the information of mask chucking stage. To use this predicted flatness data, it is possible to predict a pattern position error after exposed and it is possible to correct it on the photomask. A blank supplier developed the flatness data transfer system to mask vender. Every blanks are distinguished individually by 2D barcode mark on blank which including serial number. The flatness data of each blank is linked with this serial number, and mask vender can use this serial number as a key code to mask flatness data. We developed mask image position correction system by using 2D barcode mark linked to predicted flatness data, and position accuracy assurance system for these masks. And with these systems, we made some masks actually.

  14. Mixed-signal data interface for maskless lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warlick, Benjamin; Nikolic, Borivoje

    2004-05-01

    A future maskless lithography system that replaces traditional masks with an array of electro-mechanical mirrors relies on a very high rate data interface to achieve the wafer throughputs comparable to today's optical lithography systems. In order to write one layer per minute in 45nm technology node, a throughput of 12Tb/s using 5-bit grayscale data is needed. With EUV light source flash rates limite to below 10kHz, 240 million 1μm x 1μm micromirrors have to be integrated on the writer chip, each driven with 32 possible voltage levels. This paper explores the system design for various wafer throughputs, with or without data compression. In particular, the design tradeoffs for the mirror interface datapath, implemented on the same silicon die with the writers are discussed. The design of the digita-to-analog converters (DACs) that compensate for the nonlinearity of the mirror transfer function and fit into the required datapath pitch is presented. Extrapolated data from the designs in 0.13μm CMOS technology indicate that DACs will likely limit the throughput to about 30 wafers per hour in 45nm node.

  15. Scalable, high performance, enzymatic cathodes based on nanoimprint lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratov, Dmitry; Sundberg, Richard; Sotres, Javier; Suyatin, Dmitry B; Maximov, Ivan; Shleev, Sergey; Montelius, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Here we detail high performance, enzymatic electrodes for oxygen bio-electroreduction, which can be easily and reproducibly fabricated with industry-scale throughput. Planar and nanostructured electrodes were built on biocompatible, flexible polymer sheets, while nanoimprint lithography was used for electrode nanostructuring. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first reports concerning the usage of nanoimprint lithography for amperometric bioelectronic devices. The enzyme (Myrothecium verrucaria bilirubin oxidase) was immobilised on planar (control) and artificially nanostructured, gold electrodes by direct physical adsorption. The detailed electrochemical investigation of bioelectrodes was performed and the following parameters were obtained: open circuit voltage of approximately 0.75 V, and maximum bio-electrocatalytic current densities of 18 µA/cm(2) and 58 µA/cm(2) in air-saturated buffers versus 48 µA/cm(2) and 186 µA/cm(2) in oxygen-saturated buffers for planar and nanostructured electrodes, respectively. The half-deactivation times of planar and nanostructured biocathodes were measured to be 2 h and 14 h, respectively. The comparison of standard heterogeneous and bio-electrocatalytic rate constants showed that the improved bio-electrocatalytic performance of the nanostructured biocathodes compared to planar biodevices is due to the increased surface area of the nanostructured electrodes, whereas their improved operational stability is attributed to stabilisation of the enzyme inside nanocavities.

  16. Stop flow lithography in perfluoropolyether (PFPE) microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Ki Wan; Lee, Jiseok; Doyle, Patrick S

    2014-12-21

    Stop Flow Lithography (SFL) is a microfluidic-based particle synthesis method for creating anisotropic multifunctional particles with applications that range from MEMS to biomedical engineering. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has been typically used to construct SFL devices as the material enables rapid prototyping of channels with complex geometries, optical transparency, and oxygen permeability. However, PDMS is not compatible with most organic solvents which limit the current range of materials that can be synthesized with SFL. Here, we demonstrate that a fluorinated elastomer, called perfluoropolyether (PFPE), can be an alternative oxygen permeable elastomer for SFL microfluidic flow channels. We fabricate PFPE microfluidic devices with soft lithography and synthesize anisotropic multifunctional particles in the devices via the SFL process--this is the first demonstration of SFL with oxygen lubrication layers in a non-PDMS channel. We benchmark the SFL performance of the PFPE devices by comparing them to PDMS devices. We synthesized particles in both PFPE and PDMS devices under the same SFL conditions and found the difference of particle dimensions was less than a micron. PFPE devices can greatly expand the range of precursor materials that can be processed in SFL because the fluorinated devices are chemically resistant to most organic solvents, an inaccessible class of reagents in PDMS-based devices due to swelling.

  17. Large area nanoimprint by substrate conformal imprint lithography (SCIL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuuren, Marc A.; Megens, Mischa; Ni, Yongfeng; van Sprang, Hans; Polman, Albert

    2017-06-01

    Releasing the potential of advanced material properties by controlled structuring materials on sub-100-nm length scales for applications such as integrated circuits, nano-photonics, (bio-)sensors, lasers, optical security, etc. requires new technology to fabricate nano-patterns on large areas (from cm2 to 200 mm up to display sizes) in a cost-effective manner. Conventional high-end optical lithography such as stepper/scanners is highly capital intensive and not flexible towards substrate types. Nanoimprint has had the potential for over 20 years to bring a cost-effective, flexible method for large area nano-patterning. Over the last 3-4 years, nanoimprint has made great progress towards volume production. The main accelerator has been the switch from rigid- to wafer-scale soft stamps and tool improvements for step and repeat patterning. In this paper, we discuss substrate conformal imprint lithography (SCIL), which combines nanometer resolution, low patterns distortion, and overlay alignment, traditionally reserved for rigid stamps, with the flexibility and robustness of soft stamps. This was made possible by a combination of a new soft stamp material, an inorganic resist, combined with an innovative imprint method. Finally, a volume production solution will be presented, which can pattern up to 60 wafers per hour.

  18. Rapid structuring of proteins on filter paper using lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nargang, Tobias M.; Kotz, Frederik; Keller, Nico; Helmer, Dorothea; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2017-02-01

    Microfluidic paper based analytical devices (μPADs) are simple and cost efficient and can be used everywhere without the need for a high standard laboratory for obtaining a readout. These devices are thus especially suited for the developing world or crisis regions. To fabricate a bioanalytical test, certain biomolecules like proteins or antibodies have to be attached to paper strips. Common immobilization methods often rely on non-covalent, unoriented attachment which leads to reduced bioactivity of the immobilized species. Specific Immobilization of biomolecules on surfaces still poses a great challenge to biochemical research and applications. We propose a method for the specific immobilization of biomolecules on functionalized filter paper using a maskless projection lithography setup. The paper was functionalized either by applying an adhesive protein coating or by covalent attachment of methacrylate groups. Fluorescently labelled biomolecules were attached by exploiting the formation of radical species upon bleaching of the fluorophore. A custom made maskless photo-lithography setup and a low cost approach were used to produce microscale biomolecule greyscale patterns. Protein patterns were visualized by fluorescence, enzyme patterns were tested for bioactivity by substrate conversion with colorimetric readout. This method enables the creation of complex, highly specific bioactive protein patterns and greatly facilitates the production of μPADs.

  19. Integration of plant viruses in electron beam lithography nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose M.; Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Bittner, Alexander M.

    2013-03-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is the textbook example of a virus, and also of a self-assembling nanoscale structure. This tubular RNA/protein architecture has also found applications as biotemplate for the synthesis of nanomaterials such as wires, as tubes, or as nanoparticle assemblies. Although TMV is, being a biological structure, quite resilient to environmental conditions (temperature, chemicals), it cannot be processed in electron beam lithography (eBL) fabrication, which is the most important and most versatile method of nanoscale structuring. Here we present adjusted eBL-compatible processes that allow the incorporation of TMV in nanostructures made of positive and negative tone eBL resists. The key steps are covering TMV by polymer resists, which are only heated to 50 °C, and development (selective dissolution) in carefully selected organic solvents. We demonstrate the post-lithography biochemical functionality of TMV by selective immunocoating of the viral particles, and the use of immobilized TMV as direct immunosensor. Our modified eBL process should be applicable to incorporate a wide range of sensitive materials in nanofabrication schemes.

  20. Lithography focus/exposure control and corrections to improve CDU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Ki; Yelverton, Mark; Lee, Joungchel; Cheng, Jerry; Wei, Hong; Kim, Jeong Soo; Gutjahr, Karsten; Gao, Jie; Karur-Shanmugam, Ram; Herrera, Pedro; Huang, Kevin; Volkovich, Roie; Pierson, Bill

    2013-04-01

    As leading edge lithography moves to advanced nodes which requires better critical dimension (CD) control ability within wafer. Current methods generally make exposure corrections by field via factory automation or by sub-recipe to improve CD uniformity. KLA-Tencor has developed a method to provide CD uniformity (CDU) control using a generated Focus/Exposure (F/E) model from a representative process. Exposure corrections by each field can be applied back to the scanner so as to improve CD uniformity through the factory automation. CDU improvement can be observed either at after lithography or after etch metrology steps. In addition to corrections, the graphic K-T Analyzer interface also facilitates the focus/exposure monitoring at the extreme wafer edge. This paper will explain the KT CDFE method and the application in production environment. Run to run focus/exposure monitoring will be carried out both on monitoring and production wafers to control the wafer process and/or scanner fleet. CDU improvement opportunities will be considered as well.

  1. Process window study with various illuminations for EUV lithography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hun; Zhang, Zhiyu

    2007-03-01

    EUV lithography has the ability to support 22 nm logic manufacturing and beyond. Similar to the DUV lithographic systems, partial coherence on EUV lithographic systems can have a big impact on process latitude for critical layers. Thus, it is important to understand the effect of partial coherence on EUV imaging systems. In this paper, process windows with various illumination settings are investigated. The experiments are conducted using the MET station at the Advance Light Source (ALS). In addition to the annular and dipole illuminations which reported in our last paper1, C-quad and Quad illuminations are used to explore the impact of the partial coherence on the process window. Even though the MET system has resolutions below 30nm dense lines, the exposures are targeted for 60nm, 50nm, and 45nm dense features due to the resist limitation. The experimental results are compared with simulation results using Intel's lithography modeling tool, I-Photo. Resist and aerial image threshold models are used for the comparison study. The experimental results correlate well with the resist based simulation results, but some discrepancies are observed for the aerial image threshold cases. We believe the discrepancies are due to the resist limitations. We found that the dipole shows the largest Depth of Focus for dense lines and spaces.

  2. Hybrid vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, J.G.W. [Electrical Machines (United Kingdom)

    1997-07-01

    The reasons for adopting hybrid vehicles result mainly from the lack of adequate range from electric vehicles at an acceptable cost. Hybrids can offer significant improvements in emissions and fuel economy. Series and parallel hybrids are compared. A combination of series and parallel operation would be the ideal. This can be obtained using a planetary gearbox as a power split device allowing a small generator to transfer power to the propulsion motor giving the effect of a CVT. It allows the engine to run at semi-constant speed giving better fuel economy and reduced emissions. Hybrid car developments are described that show the wide range of possible hybrid systems. (author)

  3. A novel optical lithography implement utilizing third harmonic generation via metallic tip enhanced near field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhu, Ning; Mei, Ting; He, Miao; Li, Hao; Chen, Zhenshi

    2017-01-01

    A novel scheme for near-field optical lithography utilizing a metallic tip illuminated by femtosecond laser pulses with proper polarization has been presented. The strongly enhanced near field at the metallic tip offers a localized excitation source for the third harmonic generation in the nonlinear material. The generated third harmonic via excitation of nonlinear photoresist provides good exposure contrast due to the cubic intensity dependence. The spatial resolution of this novel lithography scheme is shown to be better than that of the conventional lithography technique.

  4. Photomask displacement technology for continuous profile generation by mask aligner lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichelt, Tina; Kinder, Robert; Zeitner, Uwe D.

    2016-12-01

    Mask aligner lithography is one of the most widely used technologies for micro-optical elements fabrication. It offers a high throughput with high-yield processing. With different resolution enhancement technologies shadow printing is a mature alternative to the more expensive projection or electron-beam lithography. We are presenting a novel mask aligner tool that allows shifting the photomask with high accuracy between sequential exposure shots. It offers possibilities such as double patterning or gray tone lithography by applying different light doses at different locations. Within this publication, we show the first results for high resolution blazed grating structures generated in photoresist by multiple exposures using a conventional binary photomask.

  5. Direct laser writing defects in holographic lithography-created photonic lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-Bo; Nakamura, Atsushi; Kaneko, Koshiro; Shoji, Satoru; Kawata, Satoshi

    2005-04-15

    As a well-established laser fabrication approach, holographic lithography, or multibeam interference patterning, is known for its capability to create long-range ordered large-volume photonic crystals (PhCs) rapidly. Its broad use is, however, hampered by difficulty in inducing artificially designed defects for device functions. We use pinpoint femtosecond laser ablation to remove and two-photon photopolymerization to add desired defective features to obtain photonic acceptors and photonic donors, respectively, in an otherwise complete PhC matrix produced by holographic lithography. The combined use of the two direct laser writing technologies would immediately make holographic lithography a promising industrial tool for PhC manufacture.

  6. Imprint Lithography at Room Temperature with Novolak Resin and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Numai

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Imprint lithography[1] has attracted considerable attention from the viewpoint of low cost fabrication,because light exposure systems are not required. Up to now,polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) films and hard molds were often used in imprint lithography.In this paper,we report on the successful demonstration of imprint lithography using novolak resin (OFPR-800),which is more suitable than PMMA for dry etching,and a soft mold such as a soft polyester sheet,which has a two-dimensional (2D) square ...

  7. Coulomb blur advantage of a multi-shaped beam lithography approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slodowski, Matthias; Doering, Hans-Joachim; Elster, Thomas; Stolberg, Ines A.

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes a new multi beam approach in electron beam lithography called Multi Shaped Beam (MSB). Based on the well known Variable Shaped Beam (VSB) principle, the single shaped beam arrangement is extended and complemented by an array of individually controlled shaped beams. The positive effect of the MSB approach on resolution limiting stochastic beam blur due to Coulomb interactions will be highlighted applying detailed electron-optical Monte-Carlo simulations. To verify the feasibility of the above-mentioned new approach, there is also depicted a proof-of-lithography test stand based on a complete e-beam-lithography system containing MSB-specific hardware and software components.

  8. A physical resist shrinkage model for full-chip lithography simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Zheng, Leiwu; Ma, Maggie; Zhao, Qian; Fan, Yongfa; Zhang, Qiang; Feng, Mu; Guo, Xin; Wallow, Tom; Gronlund, Keith; Goossens, Ronald; Zhang, Gary; Lu, Yenwen

    2016-03-01

    Strong resist shrinkage effects have been widely observed in resist profiles after negative tone development (NTD) and therefore must be taken into account in computational lithography applications. However, existing lithography simulation tools, especially those designed for full-chip applications, lack resist shrinkage modeling capabilities because they are not needed until only recently when NTD processes begin to replace the conventional positive tone development (PTD) processes where resist shrinkage effects are negligible. In this work we describe the development of a physical resist shrinkage (PRS) model for full-chip lithography simulations and present its accuracy evaluation against experimental data.

  9. Design and fabrication of electrostatic microcolumn in multiple electron-beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhidong; Wen, Ye; Traverso, Luis; Datta, Anurup; Chen, Chen; Xu, Xianfan; Pan, Liang

    2016-03-01

    Microcolumns are widely used for parallel electron-beam lithography because of their compactness and the ability to achieve high spatial resolution. A design of an electrostatic microcolumn for our recent nanoscale photoemission sources is presented. We proposed a compact column structure (as short as several microns in length) for the ease of microcolumn fabrication and lithography operation. We numerically studied the influence of several design parameters on the optical performance such as microcolumn diameter, electrode thickness, beam current, working voltages, and working distance. We also examined the effect of fringing field between adjacent microcolumns during parallel lithography operations. The microcolumns were also fabricated to show the possibility.

  10. Hybrid foundry patterns of bevel gears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budzik G.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Possibilities of making hybrid foundry patterns of bevel gears for investment casting process are presented. Rapid prototyping of gears with complex tooth forms is possible with the use of modern methods. One of such methods is the stereo-lithography, where a pattern is obtained as a result of resin curing with laser beam. Patterns of that type are applicable in precision casting. Removing of stereo-lithographic pattern from foundry mould requires use of high temperatures. Resin burning would generate significant amounts of harmful gases. In case of a solid stereo-lithographic pattern, the pressure created during gas burning may cause the mould to crack. A gas volume reduction may be achieved by using patterns of honeycomb structure. However, this technique causes a significant worsening of accuracy of stereo-lithographic patterns in respect of their dimensions and shape. In cooperation with WSK PZL Rzeszów, the Machine Design Department of Rzeszow University of Technology carried out research on the design of hybrid stereo-lithographic patterns. Hybrid pattern consists of a section made by stereo-lithographic process and a section made of casting wax. The latter material is used for stereo-lithographic pattern filling and for mould gating system. The hybrid pattern process consists of two stages: wax melting and then the burn-out of stereolithographic pattern. Use of hybrid patterns reduces the costs of production of stereolithographic patterns. High dimensional accuracy remains preserved in this process.

  11. Modular Polymer Biosensors by Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Jayven S.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Grate, Jay W.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Gratton, Enrico; Vasdekis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography (SIIL), a rapid benchtop microsystem prototyping technique, including polymer functionalization, imprinting and bonding. Here, we focus on the realization of planar polymer sensors using SIIL through simple solvent immersion without imprinting. We describe SIIL’s impregnation characteristics, including an inherent mechanism that not only achieves practical doping concentrations, but their unexpected 4-fold enhancement compared to the immersion solution. Subsequently, we developed and characterized optical sensors for detecting molecular O2. To this end, a high dynamic range is reported, including its control through the immersion duration, a manifestation of SIIL’s modularity. Overall, SIIL exhibits the potential of improving the operating characteristics of polymer sensors, while significantly accelerating their prototyping, as it requires a few seconds of processing and no need for substrates or dedicated instrumentation. These are critical for O2 sensing as probed by way of example here, as well as any polymer permeable reactant.

  12. Interpreting cost of ownership for mix-and-match lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Alan L.; Bergendahl, Albert S.

    1994-05-01

    Cost of ownership modeling is a critical and emerging tool that provides significant insight into the ways to optimize device manufacturing costs. The development of a model to deal with a particular application, mix-and-match lithography, was performed in order to determine the level of cost savings and the optimum ways to create these savings. The use of sensitivity analysis with cost of ownership allows the user to make accurate trade-offs between technology and cost. The use and interpretation of the model results are described in this paper. Parameters analyzed include several manufacturing considerations -- depreciation, maintenance, engineering and operator labor, floorspace, resist, consumables and reticles. Inherent in this study is the ability to customize this analysis for a particular operating environment. Results demonstrate the clear advantages of a mix-and-match approach for three different operating environments. These case studies also demonstrate various methods to efficiently optimize cost savings strategies.

  13. Polystyrene negative resist for high-resolution electron beam lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Siqi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We studied the exposure behavior of low molecular weight polystyrene as a negative tone electron beam lithography (EBL resist, with the goal of finding the ultimate achievable resolution. It demonstrated fairly well-defined patterning of a 20-nm period line array and a 15-nm period dot array, which are the densest patterns ever achieved using organic EBL resists. Such dense patterns can be achieved both at 20 and 5 keV beam energies using different developers. In addition to its ultra-high resolution capability, polystyrene is a simple and low-cost resist with easy process control and practically unlimited shelf life. It is also considerably more resistant to dry etching than PMMA. With a low sensitivity, it would find applications where negative resist is desired and throughput is not a major concern.

  14. Critical illumination condenser for x-ray lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S.J.; Seppala, L.G.

    1998-04-07

    A critical illumination condenser system is disclosed, particularly adapted for use in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography based on a ring field imaging system and a laser produced plasma source. The system uses three spherical mirrors and is capable of illuminating the extent of the mask plane by scanning either the primary mirror or the laser plasma source. The angles of radiation incident upon each mirror of the critical illumination condenser vary by less than eight (8) degrees. For example, the imaging system in which the critical illumination condenser is utilized has a 200 {micro}m source and requires a magnification of 26. The three spherical mirror system constitutes a two mirror inverse Cassegrain, or Schwarzschild configuration, with a 25% area obstruction (50% linear obstruction). The third mirror provides the final pupil and image relay. The mirrors include a multilayer reflective coating which is reflective over a narrow bandwidth. 6 figs.

  15. Novel fluorinated compounds for releasing material in nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Tsuneo; Mitsuhashi, Hisashi; Morita, Masamichi

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, utilization and reduction of pattern size are following nanoimprint lithography (NIL) quickly. In nanoimprinting, since it is contact printing, a higher separation force might cause damages to the master and imprinting tool, degradation in pattern quality as well. There is a mold-release characteristic of a master and resin as one of the biggest subjects in utilization. Although Optool DSXTM (DAIKIN Ind. Ltd.) is an de facto standard as mold releasing reagent now, there is a problem in durability at UV-NIL. Then, we focused on the material which raises the mold-release characteristic of resist. The new fluorinated copolymers based on α-chloroacrylate and the low molecular weight perfluorocompounds, added to resist was developed. In this paper, we will report these synthesis method, specific properties such as static contact angle, releasing force and further fluorinated compounds were segregated resin surface.

  16. Optical design of a 1-to-1 lithography projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiun-Woei

    2016-08-01

    A 1:1 lithography projection has been designed and is fabricated for a 3D integrated circuit fabrication platform. Using a dual triplet as an initial type to form a one-to-one lens and applying a tele-centric structure, the optical common components of an optical system have been designed. The tolerance of the mechanical mounts is simulated by tilting the mounts to single and two aspheric surfaces of lens to show the degradation in the modulation transfer function; thus, the single aspheric-tilted mount in a system is suggested to reach the precision. Furthermore, Koehler illumination is used. By applying partial coherence analysis, the optimized relative numerical aperture was found. As the system is built, optimized performance should be expected.

  17. Integrated lithography to produce complex structures for spectral engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Csete, Maria; Szalai, Aniko; Szabo, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    An integrated interference and colloid sphere lithography (IICL) method is presented capable of producing complex plasmonic structures consisting of wavelength-scaled periodic arrays of nano-objects with arbitrary array symmetry and controllable nano-scaled sub-structures. The IICL method is based on illumination of colloid sphere monolayers by interference patterns synchronized with sphere arrays along arbitrary crystallographic directions. This nano-kaleidoscope method enables to tune four structure parameters independently: the symmetry and characteristic periodicity of the interference pattern might be varied by the wavelength, number and angle of incidence of the interfering beams; the colloid-spheres' diameter-scaled distance between the nano-objects is controllable by the relative orientation of the interference pattern with respect to the hexagonal lattice of colloid spheres; the size of the individual nano-objects is determined by the colloid-spheres diameter and by the illumination light wavelength ...

  18. Mold deformation in soft UV-nanoimprint lithography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    UV-nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) using a soft mold is a promising technique with low cost and high throughput for producing the submicron scale large-area patterns. However, the deformations of the soft mold during imprinting process which can cause serious consequences have to be understood for the practical application of the process. This paper investigated the deformation of the soft mold by theoretical analyses, numerical simulations, and experimental studies. We simulated the mold deformation using a simplified model and finite element method. The simulation and the related experimental results agree well with each other. Through the investigation, the mechanism and affected factors of the mold deformation are revealed, and some useful conclusions have been achieved. These results will be valuable in optimizing the imprinting process conditions and mold design for improving the quality of transferred patterns.

  19. Method for the protection of extreme ultraviolet lithography optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunow, Philip A.; Clift, Wayne M.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2010-06-22

    A coating for the protection of optical surfaces exposed to a high energy erosive plasma. A gas that can be decomposed by the high energy plasma, such as the xenon plasma used for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), is injected into the EUVL machine. The decomposition products coat the optical surfaces with a protective coating maintained at less than about 100 .ANG. thick by periodic injections of the gas. Gases that can be used include hydrocarbon gases, particularly methane, PH.sub.3 and H.sub.2S. The use of PH.sub.3 and H.sub.2S is particularly advantageous since films of the plasma-induced decomposition products S and P cannot grow to greater than 10 .ANG. thick in a vacuum atmosphere such as found in an EUVL machine.

  20. Vitreous carbon mask substrate for X-ray lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigeldinger, Georg [Livermore, CA; Skala, Dawn M [Fremont, CA; Griffiths, Stewart K [Livermore, CA; Talin, Albert Alec [Livermore, CA; Losey, Matthew W [Livermore, CA; Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter [Dublin, CA

    2009-10-27

    The present invention is directed to the use of vitreous carbon as a substrate material for providing masks for X-ray lithography. The new substrate also enables a small thickness of the mask absorber used to pattern the resist, and this enables improved mask accuracy. An alternative embodiment comprised the use of vitreous carbon as a LIGA substrate wherein the VC wafer blank is etched in a reactive ion plasma after which an X-ray resist is bonded. This surface treatment provides a surface enabling good adhesion of the X-ray photoresist and subsequent nucleation and adhesion of the electrodeposited metal for LIGA mold-making while the VC substrate practically eliminates secondary radiation effects that lead to delamination of the X-ray resist form the substrate, the loss of isolated resist features, and the formation of a resist layer adjacent to the substrate that is insoluble in the developer.

  1. Synthesis of colloidal microgels using oxygen-controlled flow lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Harry Z; Eral, H Burak; Chen, Lynna; Chen, Michelle B; Doyle, Patrick S

    2014-10-14

    We report a synthesis approach based on stop-flow lithography (SFL) for fabricating colloidal microparticles with any arbitrary 2D-extruded shape. By modulating the degree of oxygen inhibition during synthesis, we achieved previously unattainable particle sizes. Brownian diffusion of colloidal discs in bulk suggests the out-of-plane dimension can be as small as 0.8 μm, which agrees with confocal microscopy measurements. We measured the hindered diffusion of microdiscs near a solid surface and compared our results to theoretical predictions. These colloidal particles can also flow through physiological microvascular networks formed by endothelial cells undergoing vasculogensis under minimal hydrostatic pressure (∼5 mm H2O). This versatile platform creates future opportunities for on-chip parametric studies of particle geometry effects on particle passage properties, distribution and cellular interactions.

  2. Optical design of a 1-to-1 lithography projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiun-Woei

    2016-10-01

    A 1:1 lithography projection has been designed and is fabricated for a 3D integrated circuit fabrication platform. Using a dual triplet as an initial type to form a one-to-one lens and applying a tele-centric structure, the optical common components of an optical system have been designed. The tolerance of the mechanical mounts is simulated by tilting the mounts to single and two aspheric surfaces of lens to show the degradation in the modulation transfer function; thus, the single aspheric-tilted mount in a system is suggested to reach the precision. Furthermore, Koehler illumination is used. By applying partial coherence analysis, the optimized relative numerical aperture was found. As the system is built, optimized performance should be expected.

  3. Photoluminescence-enhanced plasmonic substrates fabricated by nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bongseok; Iwanaga, Masanobu; Miyazaki, Hideki T.; Sakoda, Kazuaki; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa

    2014-04-01

    We fabricated large-area stacked complementary plasmonic crystals (SC PlCs) by employing ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography. The SC PlCs were made on silicon-on-insulator substrates consisting of three layers: the top layer contacting air was a perforated Au film, the bottom layer contacting the buried oxide layer included an Au disk array corresponding to the holes in the top layer, and the middle layer was a Si photonic crystal slab. The SC PlCs have prominent resonances in optical wavelengths. It is shown that the fabricated PlCs were precise in structure and uniform in their optical properties. We examined the photoluminescence (PL) enhancement of monolayer dye molecules on the SC PlC substrates in the visible range and found large PL enhancements of up to a 100-fold in comparison with dye molecules on nonprocessed Si wafers.

  4. Lithography beamline design and exposure uniformity controlling and measuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shinan; Jiang, Dikui; Liu, Zewen; Chen, Qianhong; Kan, Ya; Liu, Wanpo

    1989-07-01

    The lithography beamline design of Hefei National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is presented. A scanning mirror is used to cut off short wavelength radiation and to expand the vertical exposure dimension to 50 mm. A thin beryllium window is installed before the scanning mirror to prevent the longer wavelength radiation from going through. An exposure chamber with a vacuum of 5×10E-7 Torr is located at 7 m downstream from the source point. Because there is no window at the entrance of the chamber, a differential pumping system is used. The scanning mirror is driven by a stepping motor which oscillates through a 1° angle. The required driving speed curve is determined by a computer in order to obtain a uniform exposure area. An in situ moiré fringe grating system is used to measure the uniformity of the motor speed.

  5. Solvent immersion nanoimprint lithography of fluorescent conjugated polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitworth, G. L.; Zhang, S.; Stevenson, J. R. Y.; Ebenhoch, B.; Samuel, I. D. W.; Turnbull, G. A. [Organic Semiconductor Centre, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-19

    Solvent immersion imprint lithography (SIIL) was used to directly nanostructure conjugated polymer films. The technique was used to create light-emitting diffractive optical elements and organic semiconductor lasers. Gratings with lateral features as small as 70 nm and depths of ∼25 nm were achieved in poly(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl). The angular emission from the patterned films was studied, comparing measurement to theoretical predictions. Organic distributed feedback lasers fabricated with SIIL exhibited thresholds for lasing of ∼40 kW/cm{sup 2}, similar to those made with established nanoimprint processes. The results show that SIIL is a quick, convenient and practical technique for nanopatterning of polymer photonic devices.

  6. Polymeric lithography editor: Editing lithographic errors with nanoporous polymeric probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Pradeep Ramiah; Zhou, Chuanhong; Dasari, Mallika; Voss, Kay-Obbe; Trautmann, Christina; Kohli, Punit

    2017-06-01

    A new lithographic editing system with an ability to erase and rectify errors in microscale with real-time optical feedback is demonstrated. The erasing probe is a conically shaped hydrogel (tip size, ca. 500 nm) template-synthesized from track-etched conical glass wafers. The "nanosponge" hydrogel probe "erases" patterns by hydrating and absorbing molecules into a porous hydrogel matrix via diffusion analogous to a wet sponge. The presence of an interfacial liquid water layer between the hydrogel tip and the substrate during erasing enables frictionless, uninterrupted translation of the eraser on the substrate. The erasing capacity of the hydrogel is extremely high because of the large free volume of the hydrogel matrix. The fast frictionless translocation and interfacial hydration resulted in an extremely high erasing rate (~785 μm(2)/s), which is two to three orders of magnitude higher in comparison with the atomic force microscopy-based erasing (~0.1 μm(2)/s) experiments. The high precision and accuracy of the polymeric lithography editor (PLE) system stemmed from coupling piezoelectric actuators to an inverted optical microscope. Subsequently after erasing the patterns using agarose erasers, a polydimethylsiloxane probe fabricated from the same conical track-etched template was used to precisely redeposit molecules of interest at the erased spots. PLE also provides a continuous optical feedback throughout the entire molecular editing process-writing, erasing, and rewriting. To demonstrate its potential in device fabrication, we used PLE to electrochemically erase metallic copper thin film, forming an interdigitated array of microelectrodes for the fabrication of a functional microphotodetector device. High-throughput dot and line erasing, writing with the conical "wet nanosponge," and continuous optical feedback make PLE complementary to the existing catalog of nanolithographic/microlithographic and three-dimensional printing techniques. This new PLE

  7. Lithography-induced limits to scaling of design quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahng, Andrew B.

    2014-03-01

    Quality and value of an IC product are functions of power, performance, area, cost and reliability. The forthcoming 2013 ITRS roadmap observes that while manufacturers continue to enable potential Moore's Law scaling of layout densities, the "realizable" scaling in competitive products has for some years been significantly less. In this paper, we consider aspects of the question, "To what extent should this scaling gap be blamed on lithography?" Non-ideal scaling of layout densities has been attributed to (i) layout restrictions associated with multi-patterning technologies (SADP, LELE, LELELE), as well as (ii) various ground rule and layout style choices that stem from misalignment, reliability, variability, device architecture, and electrical performance vs. power constraints. Certain impacts seem obvious, e.g., loss of 2D flexibility and new line-end placement constraints with SADP, or algorithmically intractable layout stitching and mask coloring formulations with LELELE. However, these impacts may well be outweighed by weaknesses in design methodology and tooling. Arguably, the industry has entered a new era in which many new factors - (i) standard-cell library architecture, and layout guardbanding for automated place-and-route: (ii) performance model guardbanding and signoff analyses: (iii) physical design and manufacturing handoff algorithms spanning detailed placement and routing, stitching and RET; and (iv) reliability guardbanding - all contribute, hand in hand with lithography, to a newly-identified "design capability gap". How specific aspects of process and design enablements limit the scaling of design quality is a fundamental question whose answer must guide future RandD investment at the design-manufacturing interface. terface.

  8. 75 FR 81643 - In the Matter of Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and... for ] importation, and sale within the United States after importation of certain semiconductor... respondents: Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing, Co., Ltd. (Taiwan) (``TSMC''); and Samsung Electronics...

  9. Mussel-inspired block copolymer lithography for low surface energy materials of teflon, graphene, and gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Hoon; Lee, Duck Hyun; Kim, Ju Young; Shin, Dong Ok; Jeong, Hu Young; Hong, Seonki; Yun, Je Moon; Koo, Chong Min; Lee, Haeshin; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2011-12-15

    Mussel-inspired interfacial engineering is synergistically integrated with block copolymer (BCP) lithography for the surface nanopatterning of low surface energy substrate materials, including, Teflon, graphene, and gold. The image shows the Teflon nanowires and their excellent superhydrophobicity.

  10. Fabrication of Partially Transparent Petaled Masks Using Gray Scale Lithography Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our main objective in this study is to design, fabricate, and analyze the partially transparent petaled (PTP) masks using gray scale lithography to suppress the...

  11. Fabrication of Partially Transparent Petaled Masks Using Gray Scale Lithography Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our main objective in this study is to design, fabricate, and analyze the partially transparent petaled(PTP) masks using gray scale lithography to suppress the...

  12. Report of the workshop on transferring X-ray Lithography Synchrotron (XLS) technology to industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcuse, W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on plans to develop an x-ray synchrotron for use in lithography. The primary concern of the present paper is technology transfer from national laboratories to private industry. (JDH)

  13. Ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography using cyclodextrin-based porous template for pattern failure reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Satoshi; Hanabata, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    An approach to ultraviolet (UV) nanoimprint lithography using a cyclodextrin-based porous template was investigated for the reduction of air trapping and template damage caused by gases such as nitrogen and oxygen generated from UV cross-linked materials. The accuracy of the printed pattern using UV nanoimprint lithography with the porous transparent template was improved because of enhanced material adsorption and increased permeability to gaseous species. The use of volatile solvents in the UV cross-linked materials for nanoimprint lithography has been limited because of high pattern failure rates. However, using the cyclodextrin-based porous template, the UV cross-linked materials with a 5 wt. % volatile solvent exhibited well-defined nanoscale patterns. Based on this study, acceptable chemistries for the UV cross-linked materials have been expanded, which will be beneficial for future device applications using UV nanoimprint lithography.

  14. High aspect ratio tungsten grating on ultrathin Si membranes for extreme UV lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xinsheng; Ying, Yulong

    2016-09-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography is one of the modern lithography tools for high-volume manufacturing with 22 nm resolution and beyond. But critical challenges exist to the design and fabrication of large-scale and highly efficient diffraction transmission gratings, significantly reducing the feature sizes down to 22 nm and beyond. To achieve such a grating, the surface flatness, the line edge roughness, the transmission efficiency and aspect ratio should be improved significantly. Delachat et al (2015 Nanotechnology 26 108262) develop a full process to fabricate a tungsten diffraction grating on an ultrathin silicon membrane with higher aspect ratio up to 8.75 that met all the aforementioned requirements for extreme ultraviolet lithography. This process is fully compatible with standard industrial extreme ultraviolet lithography.

  15. Achieving Low Contact Resistance by Engineering a Metal-Graphene Interface Simply with Optical Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qinghua; Wang, Xuanyun; Xia, Lishuang; Wu, Chenbo; Feng, Zhixin; Wang, Min; Zhao, Jing

    2017-06-28

    High-performance graphene-based transistors crucially depend on the creation of the high-quality graphene-metal contacts. Here we report an approach for achieving ultralow contact resistance simply with optical lithography by engineering a metal-graphene interface. Note that a significant improvement with optical lithography for the contact-treated graphene device leads to a contact resistance as low as 150 Ω·μm. The residue-free sacrificial film impedes the photoresist from further doping graphene, and all of the source and drain contact regions defined by optical lithography remain intact. This approach, being compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) fabrication processes regardless of the source of graphene, would hold promise for the large-scale production of graphene-based transistors with optical lithography.

  16. High aspect ratio tungsten grating on ultrathin Si membranes for extreme UV lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xinsheng; Ying, Yulong

    2016-09-02

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography is one of the modern lithography tools for high-volume manufacturing with 22 nm resolution and beyond. But critical challenges exist to the design and fabrication of large-scale and highly efficient diffraction transmission gratings, significantly reducing the feature sizes down to 22 nm and beyond. To achieve such a grating, the surface flatness, the line edge roughness, the transmission efficiency and aspect ratio should be improved significantly. Delachat et al (2015 Nanotechnology 26 108262) develop a full process to fabricate a tungsten diffraction grating on an ultrathin silicon membrane with higher aspect ratio up to 8.75 that met all the aforementioned requirements for extreme ultraviolet lithography. This process is fully compatible with standard industrial extreme ultraviolet lithography.

  17. Spatially selective surface platforms for binding fibrinogen prepared by particle lithography with organosilanes

    OpenAIRE

    Englade-Franklin, Lauren E.; Saner, ChaMarra K.; Garno, Jayne C.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an approach based on particle lithography to prepare spatially selective surface platforms of organosilanes that are suitable for nanoscale studies of protein binding. Particle lithography was applied for patterning fibrinogen, a plasma protein that has a major role in the clotting cascade for blood coagulation and wound healing. Surface nanopatterns of mercaptosilanes were designed as sites for the attachment of fibrinogen within a protein-resistant matrix of 2-[methoxy(polyethy...

  18. Architecture and Hardware Design of Lossless Compression Algorithms for Direct-Write Maskless Lithography Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    system using 22 nm pixels for 45 nm technology, a data rate of 12 Tb/s is required. A recently proposed datapath architecture for direct-write...for 45 nm technology, a data rate of 12 Tb/s is required. A recently pro- posed datapath architecture for direct-write lithography systems shows that...1 1.2 The Architecture of Maskless Lithography Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.3 Datapath Implementation of

  19. Hybrid strategies for nanolithography and chemical patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Charan

    Remarkable technological advances in photolithography have extended patterning to the sub-50-nm regime. However, because photolithography is a top-down approach, it faces substantial technological and economic challenges in maintaining the downward scaling trends of feature sizes below 30 nm. Concurrently, fundamental research on chemical self-assembly has enabled the path to access molecular length scales. The key to the success of photolithography is its inherent economies of scale, which justify the large capital investment for its implementation. In this thesis research, top-down and bottom-up approaches have been combined synergistically, and these hybrid strategies have been employed in applications that do not have the economies of scale found in semiconductor chip manufacturing. The specific instances of techniques developed here include molecular-ruler lithography and a series of nanoscale chemical patterning methods. Molecular-ruler lithography utilizes self-assembled multilayered films as a sidewall spacer on initial photolithographically patterned gold features (parent) to place a second-generation feature (daughter) in precise proximity to the parent. The parent-daughter separation, which is on the nanometer length scale, is defined by the thickness of the molecular-ruler resist. Analogous to protocols followed in industry to evaluate lithographic performance, electrical test-pad structures were designed to interrogate the nanostructures patterned by molecular-ruler nanolithography, failure modes creating electrical shorts were mapped to each lithographic step, and subsequent lithographic optimization was performed to pattern nanoscale devices with excellent electrical performance. The optimized lithographic processes were applied to generate nanoscale devices such as nanowires and thin-film transistors (TFTs). Metallic nanowires were patterned by depositing a tertiary generation material in the nanogap and surrounding micron-scale regions, and then

  20. The capability of lithography simulation based on MVM-SEM® system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Shingo; Fujii, Nobuaki; Kanno, Koichi; Imai, Hidemichi; Hayano, Katsuya; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Shida, Soichi; Murakawa, Tsutomu; Kuribara, Masayuki; Matsumoto, Jun; Nakamura, Takayuki; Matsushita, Shohei; Hara, Daisuke; Pang, Linyong

    2015-10-01

    The 1Xnm technology node lithography is using SMO-ILT, NTD or more complex pattern. Therefore in mask defect inspection, defect verification becomes more difficult because many nuisance defects are detected in aggressive mask feature. One key Technology of mask manufacture is defect verification to use aerial image simulator or other printability simulation. AIMS™ Technology is excellent correlation for the wafer and standards tool for defect verification however it is difficult for verification over hundred numbers or more. We reported capability of defect verification based on lithography simulation with a SEM system that architecture and software is excellent correlation for simple line and space.[1] In this paper, we use a SEM system for the next generation combined with a lithography simulation tool for SMO-ILT, NTD and other complex pattern lithography. Furthermore we will use three dimension (3D) lithography simulation based on Multi Vision Metrology SEM system. Finally, we will confirm the performance of the 2D and 3D lithography simulation based on SEM system for a photomask verification.

  1. Mask optimization approaches in optical lithography based on a vector imaging model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xu; Li, Yanqiu; Dong, Lisong

    2012-07-01

    Recently, a set of gradient-based optical proximity correction (OPC) and phase-shifting mask (PSM) optimization methods has been developed to solve for the inverse lithography problem under scalar imaging models, which are only accurate for numerical apertures (NAs) of less than approximately 0.4. However, as lithography technology enters the 45 nm realm, immersion lithography systems with hyper-NA (NA>1) are now extensively used in the semiconductor industry. For the hyper-NA lithography systems, the vector nature of the electromagnetic field must be taken into account, leading to the vector imaging models. Thus, the OPC and PSM optimization approaches developed under the scalar imaging models are inadequate to enhance the resolution in immersion lithography systems. This paper focuses on developing pixelated gradient-based OPC and PSM optimization algorithms under a vector imaging model. We first formulate the mask optimization framework, in which the imaging process of the optical lithography system is represented by an integrative and analytic vector imaging model. A gradient-based algorithm is then used to optimize the mask iteratively. Subsequently, a generalized wavelet penalty is proposed to keep a balance between the mask complexity and convergence errors. Finally, a set of methods is exploited to speed up the proposed algorithms.

  2. Nanofabrication at 1nm resolution by quantum optical lithography (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, Eugen

    2015-08-01

    A major problem in the optical lithography was the diffraction limit. Here, we report and demonstrate a lithography method, Quantum Optical Lithography [1,2], able to attain 1 nm resolution by optical means using new materials (fluorescent photosensitive glass-ceramics and QMC-5 resist). The performance is several times better than that described for any optical or Electron Beam Lithography (EBL) methods. In Fig. 1 we present TEM images of 1 nm lines recorded at 9.6 m/s. a) b) Fig. 1 TEM images of: a) multiple 1 nm lines written in a fluorescent photosensitive glass-ceramics sample; b) single 1 nm line written in QMC-5 resist. References [1] E. Pavel, S. Jinga, B.S. Vasile, A. Dinescu, V. Marinescu, R. Trusca and N. Tosa, "Quantum Optical Lithography from 1 nm resolution to pattern transfer on silicon wafer", Optics and Laser Technology, 60 (2014) 80-84. [2] E. Pavel, S. Jinga, E. Andronescu, B.S. Vasile, G. Kada, A. Sasahara, N. Tosa, A. Matei, M. Dinescu, A. Dinescu and O.R. Vasile, "2 nm Quantum Optical Lithography", Optics Communications,291 (2013) 259-263

  3. Quelle source pour la lithographie dans l'EUV ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccotti, T.

    2005-06-01

    L'impressionnante évolution des performances des circuits intégrés (CI) ces trente dernières années, répond à la désormais célèbre loi de Moore. Selon la prédiction faite en 1975 par le co-fondateur d'Intel Gordon Moore et qui n'a jamais été contredite, le nombre de transistors dans un CI allait doubler tous les 18mois. De simple intuition, la loi de Moore est devenue un impératif à respecter pour l'industrie des CI et des semi-conducteurs en général. La continuité dans les années à venir d'une telle progression technologique permettrait à ce secteur économique de garder, voire augmenter, toute son importance actuelle. Augmenter le nombre des transistors dans les CI signifie principalement réduire leur taille caractéristique de gravure et par conséquent la longueur d'onde utilisée. Depuis 2000, la lithographie dans l'extrême ultraviolet (EUVL) à 13.5 nm est considérée comme la plus prometteuse parmi les technologies appelées à remplacer la lithographie actuelle qui utilise du rayonnement laser à 193 nm comme source de lumière. La réalisation d'une machine lithographique industrielle utilisant du rayonnement EUV nécessite la résolution de nombreux problèmes technologiques qui font, depuis des années, l'objet de plusieurs programmes de recherche dans le monde. Une attention toute particulière est portée à la source de rayonnement EUVcar ses caractéristiques, notamment de puissance et de propreté, vont décider du succès ou pas de l'EUVL. Le cahier des charges d'une source EUV, les différents approches pour y répondre ainsi que leurs limites seront présentés ainsi qu'un état de l'art des performances des sources actuelles.

  4. Amine control for DUV lithography: identifying hidden sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishkovich, Oleg P.; Larson, Carl E.

    2000-06-01

    The impact of airborne basic molecular contamination (MB) on the performance of chemically amplified (CA) resist systems has been a long standing problem. Low ppb levels of MB may be sufficient for robust 0.25 micrometer lithography with today's advanced CA resist systems combined with adequate chemical air filtration. However, with minimum CD targets heading below 150 nm, the introduction of new resist chemistries for Next Generation Lithography, and the trend towards thinner resists, the impact of MB at low and sub-ppb levels again becomes a critical manufacturing issue. Maximizing process control at aggressive feature sizes requires that the level of MB be maintained below a certain limit, which depends on such parameters as the sensitivity of the CA resist, the type of production tools, product mix, and process characteristics. Three approaches have been identified to reduce the susceptibility of CA resists to MB: effective chemical air filtration, modifications to resist chemistry/processing and cleanroom protocols involving MB monitoring and removal of MB sources from the fab. The final MB concentration depends on the effectiveness of filtration resources and on the total pollution originating from different sources in and out of the cleanroom. There are many well-documented sources of MB. Among these are: ambient air; polluted exhaust from other manufacturing areas re-entering the cleanroom through make-up air handlers; manufacturing process chemicals containing volatile molecular bases; certain cleanroom construction materials, such as paint and ceiling tiles; and volatile, humidifier system boiler additives (corrosion inhibitors), such as morpholine, cyclohexylamine, and dimethylaminoethanol. However, there is also an indeterminate number of other 'hidden' pollution sources, which are neither obvious nor well-documented. None of these sources are new, but they had little impact on earlier semiconductor manufacturing processes because the contamination

  5. Mask characterization for CDU budget breakdown in advanced EUV lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2012-11-01

    As the ITRS Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and a high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. In this paper we will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for an advanced EUV lithography with 1D and 2D feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CD's and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples in this paper. Also mask stack reflectivity variations should be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We observed also MEEF-through-field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may also play a role for the total intrafield CDU and may be taken into account for EUV Lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, the results to be discussed in our paper, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to characterization of the mask part of EUV CDU characterization delivers an accurate and integral CDU Budget

  6. Polymeric lithography editor: Editing lithographic errors with nanoporous polymeric probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Pradeep Ramiah; Zhou, Chuanhong; Dasari, Mallika; Voss, Kay-Obbe; Trautmann, Christina; Kohli, Punit

    2017-01-01

    A new lithographic editing system with an ability to erase and rectify errors in microscale with real-time optical feedback is demonstrated. The erasing probe is a conically shaped hydrogel (tip size, ca. 500 nm) template-synthesized from track-etched conical glass wafers. The “nanosponge” hydrogel probe “erases” patterns by hydrating and absorbing molecules into a porous hydrogel matrix via diffusion analogous to a wet sponge. The presence of an interfacial liquid water layer between the hydrogel tip and the substrate during erasing enables frictionless, uninterrupted translation of the eraser on the substrate. The erasing capacity of the hydrogel is extremely high because of the large free volume of the hydrogel matrix. The fast frictionless translocation and interfacial hydration resulted in an extremely high erasing rate (~785 μm2/s), which is two to three orders of magnitude higher in comparison with the atomic force microscopy–based erasing (~0.1 μm2/s) experiments. The high precision and accuracy of the polymeric lithography editor (PLE) system stemmed from coupling piezoelectric actuators to an inverted optical microscope. Subsequently after erasing the patterns using agarose erasers, a polydimethylsiloxane probe fabricated from the same conical track-etched template was used to precisely redeposit molecules of interest at the erased spots. PLE also provides a continuous optical feedback throughout the entire molecular editing process—writing, erasing, and rewriting. To demonstrate its potential in device fabrication, we used PLE to electrochemically erase metallic copper thin film, forming an interdigitated array of microelectrodes for the fabrication of a functional microphotodetector device. High-throughput dot and line erasing, writing with the conical “wet nanosponge,” and continuous optical feedback make PLE complementary to the existing catalog of nanolithographic/microlithographic and three-dimensional printing techniques. This new

  7. Near-field investigation of a plasmonic-photonic hybrid nanolaser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Taiping; Callard, Ségolène; jamois, Cecile; Letartre, Xavier; Chevalier, Celine; Rojo-Romeo, Pedro; Devif, Brice; Viktorovitch, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We report an approach of realization and characterization of a novel plasmonic-photonic hybrid nanodevice. The device comprises a plasmonic nano-antenna (NA) and a defect mode based PC cavity, and were fabricated based on a multi-step electron-beam lithography. The laser emission of the devices was demonstrated and the coupling conditions between the NA and PC cavity were investigated in near-field level.

  8. Hybrid Metaheuristics

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this book is to provide a state of the art of hybrid metaheuristics. The book provides a complete background that enables readers to design and implement hybrid metaheuristics to solve complex optimization problems (continuous/discrete, mono-objective/multi-objective, optimization under uncertainty) in a diverse range of application domains. Readers learn to solve large scale problems quickly and efficiently combining metaheuristics with complementary metaheuristics, mathematical programming, constraint programming and machine learning. Numerous real-world examples of problems and solutions demonstrate how hybrid metaheuristics are applied in such fields as networks, logistics and transportation, bio-medical, engineering design, scheduling.

  9. Thermochemical scanning probe lithography of protein gradients at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisetti, E.; Carroll, K. M.; Lu, X.; Curtis, J. E.; Petti, D.; Bertacco, R.; Riedo, E.

    2016-08-01

    Patterning nanoscale protein gradients is crucial for studying a variety of cellular processes in vitro. Despite the recent development in nano-fabrication technology, combining nanometric resolution and fine control of protein concentrations is still an open challenge. Here, we demonstrate the use of thermochemical scanning probe lithography (tc-SPL) for defining micro- and nano-sized patterns with precisely controlled protein concentration. First, tc-SPL is performed by scanning a heatable atomic force microscopy tip on a polymeric substrate, for locally exposing reactive amino groups on the surface, then the substrate is functionalized with streptavidin and laminin proteins. We show, by fluorescence microscopy on the patterned gradients, that it is possible to precisely tune the concentration of the immobilized proteins by varying the patterning parameters during tc-SPL. This paves the way to the use of tc-SPL for defining protein gradients at the nanoscale, to be used as chemical cues e.g. for studying and regulating cellular processes in vitro.

  10. Fluid management in roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A.; Bonnecaze, R. T.

    2013-06-01

    The key process parameters of UV roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography are identified from an analysis of the fluid, curing, and peeling dynamics. The process includes merging of droplets of imprint material, curing of the imprint material from a viscous liquid to elastic solid resist, and pattern replication and detachment of the resist from template. The time and distances on the web or rigid substrate over which these processes occur are determined as function of the physical properties of the uncured liquid, the cured solid, and the roller configuration. The upper convected Maxwell equation is used to model the viscoelastic liquid and to calculate the force on the substrate and the torque on the roller. The available exposure time is found to be the rate limiting parameter and it is O(√Rho /uo), where R is the radius of the roller, ho is minimum gap between the roller and web, and uo is the velocity of the web. The residual layer thickness of the resist should be larger than the gap between the roller and the substrate to ensure complete feature filling and optimal pattern replication. For lower residual layer thickness, the droplets may not merge to form a continuous film for pattern transfer.

  11. Microintaglio Printing for Soft Lithography-Based in Situ Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Biyani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in lithographic approaches to fabricating bio-microarrays have been extensively explored over the last two decades. However, the need for pattern flexibility, a high density, a high resolution, affordability and on-demand fabrication is promoting the development of unconventional routes for microarray fabrication. This review highlights the development and uses of a new molecular lithography approach, called “microintaglio printing technology”, for large-scale bio-microarray fabrication using a microreactor array (µRA-based chip consisting of uniformly-arranged, femtoliter-size µRA molds. In this method, a single-molecule-amplified DNA microarray pattern is self-assembled onto a µRA mold and subsequently converted into a messenger RNA or protein microarray pattern by simultaneously producing and transferring (immobilizing a messenger RNA or a protein from a µRA mold to a glass surface. Microintaglio printing allows the self-assembly and patterning of in situ-synthesized biomolecules into high-density (kilo-giga-density, ordered arrays on a chip surface with µm-order precision. This holistic aim, which is difficult to achieve using conventional printing and microarray approaches, is expected to revolutionize and reshape proteomics. This review is not written comprehensively, but rather substantively, highlighting the versatility of microintaglio printing for developing a prerequisite platform for microarray technology for the postgenomic era.

  12. Four-mirror extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography projection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Simon J; Jeong, Hwan J; Shafer, David R

    2000-01-01

    The invention is directed to a four-mirror catoptric projection system for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography to transfer a pattern from a reflective reticle to a wafer substrate. In order along the light path followed by light from the reticle to the wafer substrate, the system includes a dominantly hyperbolic convex mirror, a dominantly elliptical concave mirror, spherical convex mirror, and spherical concave mirror. The reticle and wafer substrate are positioned along the system's optical axis on opposite sides of the mirrors. The hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors are positioned on the same side of the system's optical axis as the reticle, and are relatively large in diameter as they are positioned on the high magnification side of the system. The hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors are relatively far off the optical axis and hence they have significant aspherical components in their curvatures. The convex spherical mirror is positioned on the optical axis, and has a substantially or perfectly spherical shape. The spherical concave mirror is positioned substantially on the opposite side of the optical axis from the hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors. Because it is positioned off-axis to a degree, the spherical concave mirror has some asphericity to counter aberrations. The spherical concave mirror forms a relatively large, uniform field on the wafer substrate. The mirrors can be tilted or decentered slightly to achieve further increase in the field size.

  13. Line Search-Based Inverse Lithography Technique for Mask Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As feature size is much smaller than the wavelength of illumination source of lithography equipments, resolution enhancement technology (RET has been increasingly relied upon to minimize image distortions. In advanced process nodes, pixelated mask becomes essential for RET to achieve an acceptable resolution. In this paper, we investigate the problem of pixelated binary mask design in a partially coherent imaging system. Similar to previous approaches, the mask design problem is formulated as a nonlinear program and is solved by gradient-based search. Our contributions are four novel techniques to achieve significantly better image quality. First, to transform the original bound-constrained formulation to an unconstrained optimization problem, we propose a new noncyclic transformation of mask variables to replace the wellknown cyclic one. As our transformation is monotonic, it enables a better control in flipping pixels. Second, based on this new transformation, we propose a highly efficient line search-based heuristic technique to solve the resulting unconstrained optimization. Third, to simplify the optimization, instead of using discretization regularization penalty technique, we directly round the optimized gray mask into binary mask for pattern error evaluation. Forth, we introduce a jump technique in order to jump out of local minimum and continue the search.

  14. Print-to-pattern dry film photoresist lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Shaun P.; Murphy, Terrence M., Jr.; Pan, Tingrui

    2014-05-01

    Here we present facile microfabrication processes, referred to as print-to-pattern dry film photoresist (DFP) lithography, that utilize the combined advantages of wax printing and DFP to produce micropatterned substrates with high resolution over a large surface area in a non-cleanroom setting. The print-to-pattern methods can be performed in an out-of-cleanroom environment making microfabrication much more accessible to minimally equipped laboratories. Two different approaches employing either wax photomasks or wax etchmasks from a solid ink desktop printer have been demonstrated that allow the DFP to be processed in a negative tone or positive tone fashion, respectively, with resolutions of 100 µm. The effect of wax melting on resolution and as a bonding material was also characterized. In addition, solid ink printers have the capacity to pattern large areas with high resolution, which was demonstrated by stacking DFP layers in a 50 mm × 50 mm woven pattern with 1 mm features. By using an office printer to generate the masking patterns, the mask designs can be easily altered in a graphic user interface to enable rapid prototyping.

  15. High index fluoride materials for 193nm immersion lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawata, T.; Inui, Y.; Masada, I.; Nishijima, E.; Satoh, H.; Fukuda, T.

    2006-03-01

    We tried to investigate various kinds of metal fluoride materials which have higher gravity than CaF II and cubic crystal system, and we found out barium lithium fluoride (BaLiF 3) and potassium yttrium fluoride (KY 3F 10) as candidates for the last lens material. We have developed unique Czochralski (CZ) machines and techniques for the growth of large calcium fluoride single crystals. And we applied these technologies to the growth of fluoride high index materials. We have succeeded to grow the large BaLiF 3 single crystal with 120mm in diameter and a KY 3F 10 single crystal, and measured their basic properties such as refractive index, VUV transmittance, birefringence, and so on. As a result of our basic research, we found out that BaLiF 3 single crystal is transparent at VUV region, and the refractive index at 193nm is 1.64, and KY 3F 10 single crystal has the index of 1.59 at the wavelength of 193nm which is slightly higher than fused silica. We expect that these fluoride high index materials are useful for the last lens material of the next generation immersion lithography.

  16. Dots-on-the-fly electron beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isotalo, Tero J.; Niemi, Tapio

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for electron-beam lithography (EBL) of periodic nanostructures. This technique can rapidly produce arrays of various metallic and etched nanostructures with line and pitch dimensions approaching the beam spot size. Our approach is based on often neglected functionality which is inherent in most modern EBL systems. The raster/vector beam exposure system of the EBL software is exploited to produce arrays of pixel-like spots without the need to define coordinates for each spot in the array. Producing large arrays with traditional EBL techniques is cumbersome during pattern design, usually leads to large data files and easily results in system memory overload during patterning. In Dots-on-the-fly (DOTF) patterning, instead of specifying the locations of individual spots, a boundary for the array is given and the spacing between spots within the boundary is specified by the beam step size. A designed pattern element thus becomes a container object, with beam spacing acting as a parameterized location list for an array of spots confined by that container. With the DOTF method, a single pattern element, such as a square, rectangle or circle, can be used to produce a large array containing thousands of spots. In addition to simple arrays of nano-dots, we expand the technique to produce more complex, highly tunable arrays and structures on substrates of silicon, ITO/ FTO coated glass, as well as uncoated fused silica, quartz and sapphire.

  17. Modelling the deformation process of flexible stamps for nanoimprint lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Mads Rostgaard

    The present thesis is devoted to numerical modelling of the deformation process of flexible stamps for nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The purpose of those models is to be able to predict the deformation and stretch of the flexixble stamps in order to take that into account when designing the plan...... 2D silicon master used in the NIL process. Two different manufacturing processes are investigated; (i) Embossing of an electroplated nickel foil into a hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) polymer resist on a double-curved surface, (ii) NIL of a flexible polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) stamps...... into a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resist. Challenges comprise several non-linear phenomena. First of all geometrical non-linearities arising from the inherent large strains and deformations during the process are modelled. Then, the constitutive behaviors of the nickel foil and the PTFE polymer during...... deformation are addressed. This is achieved by a general elasto-plastic description for the nickel foil and a viscoelastic-viscoplastic model for the PTFE material, in which the material parameters are found. Last, the contact conditions between the deforming stamp and the injection moulding tool insert...

  18. Development of procedures for programmable proximity aperture lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitlow, H.J., E-mail: harry.whitlow@he-arc.ch [Institut des Microtechnologies Appliquées Arc, Haute Ecole Arc Ingénierie, Eplatures-Grise 17, CH-2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Gorelick, S. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, Tietotie 3, Espoo, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Puttaraksa, N. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Napari, M.; Hokkanen, M.J.; Norarat, R. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2013-07-01

    Programmable proximity aperture lithography (PPAL) with MeV ions has been used in Jyväskylä and Chiang Mai universities for a number of years. Here we describe a number of innovations and procedures that have been incorporated into the LabView-based software. The basic operation involves the coordination of the beam blanker and five motor-actuated translators with high accuracy, close to the minimum step size with proper anti-collision algorithms. By using special approaches, such writing calibration patterns, linearisation of position and careful backlash correction the absolute accuracy of the aperture size and position, can be improved beyond the standard afforded by the repeatability of the translator end-point switches. Another area of consideration has been the fluence control procedures. These involve control of the uniformity of the beam where different approaches for fluence measurement such as simultaneous aperture current and the ion current passing through the aperture using a Faraday cup are used. Microfluidic patterns may contain many elements that make-up mixing sections, reaction chambers, separation columns and fluid reservoirs. To facilitate conception and planning we have implemented a .svg file interpreter, that allows the use of scalable vector graphics files produced by standard drawing software for generation of patterns made up of rectangular elements.

  19. Fabrication of periodic gold nanocup arrays using colloidal lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vetter, Brent M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Alvine, Kyle J.

    2017-09-02

    Within recent years, the field of plasmonics has exploded as researchers have demonstrated exciting applications related to chemical and optical sensing in combination with new nanofabrication techniques. A plasmon is a quantum of charge density oscillation that lends nanoscale metals such as gold and silver unique optical properties. In particular, gold and silver nanoparticles exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances—collective charge density oscillations on the surface of the nanoparticle—in the visible spectrum. Here, we focus on the fabrication of periodic arrays of anisotropic plasmonic nanostructures. These half-shell (or nanocup) structures can exhibit additional unique light-bending and polarization dependent optical properties that simple isotropic nanostructures cannot. Researchers are interested in the fabrication of periodic arrays of nanocups for a wide variety of applications such as low-cost optical devices, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, and tamper indication. We present a scalable technique based on colloidal lithography in which it is possible to easily fabricate large periodic arrays of nanocups using spin-coating and self-assembled commercially available polymeric nanospheres. Electron microscopy and optical spectroscopy from the visible to near-IR was performed to confirm successful nanocup fabrication. We conclude with a demonstration of the transfer of nanocups to a flexible, conformal adhesive film.

  20. Fabrication of Pneumatic Microvalve for Tall Microchannel Using Inclined Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maho Kaminaga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We used inclined lithography to fabricate a pneumatic microvalve for tall microchannels such as those used to convey large cells. The pneumatic microvalve consists of three layers. The upper layer is the actual liquid microchannel, which has a parallelogram-shaped cross section of width 500 μm, height 100 μm, and an acute angle of 53.6°. The lower layer is a pneumatic microchannel that functions as an actuator, and the middle layer is a thin polydimethylsiloxane membrane between the upper and lower layers. The operation of the pneumatic microchannel actuator causes the thin membrane to bend, resulting in the bending of the liquid microchannel and its closure. It was confirmed that the closure of the liquid microchannel completely stopped the flow of the HeLa cell suspension that was used to demonstrate the operation of the microvalve. The HeLa cells that passed through the microchannel were also observed to retain their proliferation and morphological properties.

  1. Stat-LRC: statistical rules check for variational lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedhar, Aswin; Kundu, Sandip

    2010-03-01

    As interconnect densities increase with each technology generation, the lithographic processes required to print all features with acceptable irregularities have become more complex. Restricted design rules (RDR) and modelbased Design for Manufacturability (DFM) guidelines have been added to the existing Design Rule Check (DRC) software to prevent unprintable patterns to be drawn on the mask by predicting their imprint on the wafer. It is evident from analyses of predicted patterns that edge placement errors have a continuous distribution, hence a pass/fail cut-off is somewhat arbitrary. In this paper, we describe a methodology to perform Statistical Lithography Rules Check (Stat-LRC) involving design yield based on interconnect linewidth distribution for variation in lithographic input error sources. In this scheme, a list of error locations indicating polygons that have yield below a user specified threshold are listed. The overall design yield is recovered by trading-off slightly poorer EPE distributions for lines with short runs with excellent ones. The simulation/analysis environment is fully automated and yield recovery improvement has been demonstrated.

  2. Thermo-curable epoxy systems for nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Chang; Lien-Chung Hsu, Steve

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we have used solvent-free thermo-curable epoxy systems for low-pressure and moderate-temperature nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The curing kinetic parameters and conversion of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) resin with different ambient-cure 930 and 954 hardeners were studied by the isothermal DSC technique. They are useful for the study of epoxy resins in the imprinting application. The DGEBA/930 and DGEBA/954 epoxy resists can be imprinted to obtain high-density nano- and micro-scale patterns on a flexible indium tin oxide/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (ITO/PET) substrate. The DGEBA/930 epoxy resin is not only suitable for resist material, but also for plastic mold material. Highly dense nanometer patterns can be successfully imprinted using a UV-curable resist from the DGEBA/930 epoxy mold. Using the replicated DGEBA/930 epoxy mold instead of the expensive master can prevent brittle failure of the silicon molds in the NIL.

  3. Injection Compression Molding of Replica Molds for Nanoimprint Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Nagato

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As a breakthrough in the cost and durability of molds for nanoimprint lithography (NIL, replica molds are fabricated by injection compression molding (ICM. ICM is commonly used for optical disks such as DVDs or Blu-ray disks and is also a practical fabrication method for nanostructures. In this paper, I successfully demonstrated the fabrication of cycloolefin polymer replica molds with structures smaller than 60 nm by ICM. Furthermore, ultraviolet (UV-NIL using these replica molds was demonstrated. UV-cured resist was replicated over an area of 60 mm diameter. The degree of replication by UV-NIL in the first usage of each replica mold had good repeatability. Because ICM is a high-throughput, low-cost process, the replica mold can be disposed of after a certain time for UV-NIL. This method leads to a high-integrity UV-NIL process of patterned media because multiple large-area replica molds can be fabricated simultaneously.

  4. The effect of radial polarization in multiphoton lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Le; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Dong, Xian-Zi; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Considering the axially symmetric polarization and intensity distribution, radially polarized (RP) laser beam has comparatively higher axial component of electric field and smaller size of focal spot compared to linearly polarized (LP) laser. In this study, the effect of radial polarization on multiphoton fabrication has been studied, and polymer spots and lines are chosen as the study objects of 2D micro/nano structures of multiphoton lithography. These structures were fabricated with IP-L, a commercial negative photoresist, by RP fs-pulse laser beam which was tightly focused by an objective lens with high numerical aperture. Multiple experimental conditions, such as fabrication power, exposure time and scanning velocity, were verified in order to observe the structural variation of these polymer structures. On the basis of measurement from images of the scanning electron microscope, the transverse and longitudinal sizes of polymer spots and lines could be analyzed, and the relationship between the aspect ratio (AR) and the above experimental conditions could be acquired. The statistical results agree with our predictions that the RP laser beam can significantly reduce the AR, and the AR in RP laser fabrication has little correlation with conditions besides fabrication power, such as exposure time and scanning velocity.

  5. Controlling the Geometries of Si Nanowires through Tunable Nanosphere Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Luping; Fang, Yin; Xu, Cheng; Zhao, Yang; Wu, Kedi; Limburg, Connor; Jiang, Peng; Ziegler, Kirk J

    2017-02-14

    A tunable nanosphere lithography (NSL) technique is combined with metal-assisted etching of silicon (Si) to fabricate ordered, high-aspect-ratio Si nanowires. Non-close-packed structures are directly prepared via shear-induced ordering of the nanospheres. The spacing between the nanospheres is independent of their diameters and tuned by changing the loading of nanospheres. Nanowires with spacings between 110 and 850 nm are easily achieved with diameters between 100 and 550 nm. By eliminating plasma or heat treatment of the nanospheres, the diameter of the nanowires fabricated is nearly identical to the nanosphere diameter in the suspension. The elimination of this step helps avoid common drawbacks of traditional NSL approaches, leading to the high-fidelity, large-scale fabrication of highly crystalline, nonporous Si nanowires in ordered hexagonal patterns. The ability to simultaneously control the diameter and spacing makes the NSL technique more versatile and expands the range of geometries that can be fabricated by top-down approaches.

  6. Print-to-Pattern Dry Film Photoresist Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Shaun P; Murphy, Terrence M; Pan, Tingrui

    2014-05-01

    Here we present facile microfabrication processes, referred to as Print-to-Pattern dry film photoresist (DFP) lithography, that utilize the combined advantages of wax printing and DFP to produce micropatterned substrates with high resolution over a large surface area in a non-cleanroom setting. The Print-to-Pattern methods can be performed in an out-of-cleanroom environment making microfabrication much more accessible to minimally equipped laboratories. Two different approaches employing either wax photomasks or wax etchmasks from a solid ink desktop printer have been demonstrated that allow the DFP to be processed in a negative tone or positive tone fashion, respectively, with resolutions of 100 μm. The effect of wax melting on resolution and as a bonding material was also characterized. In addition, solid ink printers have the capacity to pattern large areas with high resolution which was demonstrated by stacking DFP layers in a 50 mm × 50 mm woven pattern with 1 mm features. By using an office printer to generate the masking patterns, the mask designs can be easily altered in a graphic user interface to enable rapid prototyping.

  7. Fast character projection electron beam lithography for diffractive optical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzendorf, Torsten; Fuchs, Frank; Banasch, Michael; Zeitner, Uwe D.

    2014-05-01

    Electron beam lithography becomes attractive also for the fabrication of large scale diffractive optical elements by the use of the character projection (CP) technique. Even in the comparable fast variable shaped beam (VSB) exposure approach for conventional electron beam writers optical nanostructures may require very long writing times exceeding 24 hours per wafer because of the high density of features, as required by e.g. sub-wavelength nanostructures. Using character projection, the writing time can be reduced by more than one order of magnitude, due to the simultaneous exposure of multiple features. The benefit of character projection increases with increasing complexity of the features and decreasing period. In this contribution we demonstrate the CP technique for a grating of hexagonal symmetry at 350nm period. The pattern is designed to provide antireflective (AR) properties, which can be adapted in their spectral and angular domain for applications from VIS to NIR by changing the feature size and the etching depth of the nanostructure. This AR nanostructure can be used on the backside of optical elements e.g. gratings, when an AR coating stack could not be applied for the reason of climatic conditions or wave front accuracy.

  8. Tunable Nanopatterning of Conductive Polymers via Electrohydrodynamic Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Jonathan James Stanley; Farrer, Ian; Oppenheimer, Pola Goldberg

    2016-03-22

    An increasing number of technologies require the fabrication of conductive structures on a broad range of scales and over large areas. Here, we introduce advanced yet simple electrohydrodynamic lithography (EHL) for patterning conductive polymers directly on a substrate with high fidelity. We illustrate the generality of this robust, low-cost method by structuring thin polypyrrole films via electric-field-induced instabilities, yielding well-defined conductive structures with feature sizes ranging from tens of micrometers to hundreds of nanometers. Exploitation of a conductive polymer induces free charge suppression of the field in the polymer film, paving the way for accessing scale sizes in the low submicron range. We show the feasibility of the polypyrrole-based structures for field-effect transistor devices. Controlled EHL pattering of conductive polymer structures at the micro and nano scale demonstrated in this study combined with the possibility of effectively tuning the dimensions of the tailor-made architectures might herald a route toward various submicron device applications in supercapacitors, photovoltaics, sensors, and electronic displays.

  9. Electron beam inspection methods for imprint lithography at 32 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Step and Flash Imprint Lithography redefines nanoimprinting. This novel technique involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned solid on the substrate. Compatibility with existing CMOS processes requires a mask infrastructure in which resolution, inspection and repair are all addressed. The purpose of this paper is to understand the limitations of inspection at half pitches of 32 nm and below. A 32 nm programmed defect mask was fabricated. Patterns included in the mask consisted of an SRAM Metal 1 cell, dense lines, and dense arrays of pillars. Programmed defect sizes started at 4 nm and increased to 48 nm in increments of 4 nm. Defects in both the mask and imprinted wafers were characterized scanning electron microscopy and the measured defect areas were calculated. These defects were then inspected using a KLA-T eS35 electron beam wafer inspection system. Defect sizes as small as 12 nm were detected, and detection limits were found to be a function of defect type.

  10. Lateral Magnetically Modulated Multilayers by Combining Ion Implantation and Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Enric; Modarresi, Hiwa; Petermann, Claire; Nogués, Josep; Domingo, Neus; Liu, Haoliang; Kirby, Brian J; Mohd, Amir Syed; Salhi, Zahir; Babcock, Earl; Mattauch, Stefan; Van Haesendonck, Chris; Vantomme, André; Temst, Kristiaan

    2017-03-01

    The combination of lithography and ion implantation is demonstrated to be a suitable method to prepare lateral multilayers. A laterally, compositionally, and magnetically modulated microscale pattern consisting of alternating Co (1.6 µm wide) and Co-CoO (2.4 µm wide) lines has been obtained by oxygen ion implantation into a lithographically masked Au-sandwiched Co thin film. Magnetoresistance along the lines (i.e., current and applied magnetic field are parallel to the lines) reveals an effective positive giant magnetoresistance (GMR) behavior at room temperature. Conversely, anisotropic magnetoresistance and GMR contributions are distinguished at low temperature (i.e., 10 K) since the O-implanted areas become exchange coupled. This planar GMR is principally ascribed to the spatial modulation of coercivity in a spring-magnet-type configuration, which results in 180° Néel extrinsic domain walls at the Co/Co-CoO interfaces. The versatility, in terms of pattern size, morphology, and composition adjustment, of this method offers a unique route to fabricate planar systems for, among others, spintronic research and applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Superhydrophobic hierarchical arrays fabricated by a scalable colloidal lithography approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothary, Pratik; Dou, Xuan; Fang, Yin; Gu, Zhuxiao; Leo, Sin-Yen; Jiang, Peng

    2017-02-01

    Here we report an unconventional colloidal lithography approach for fabricating a variety of periodic polymer nanostructures with tunable geometries and hydrophobic properties. Wafer-sized, double-layer, non-close-packed silica colloidal crystal embedded in a polymer matrix is first assembled by a scalable spin-coating technology. The unusual non-close-packed crystal structure combined with a thin polymer film separating the top and the bottom colloidal layers render great versatility in templating periodic nanostructures, including arrays of nanovoids, nanorings, and hierarchical nanovoids. These different geometries result in varied fractions of entrapped air in between the templated nanostructures, which in turn lead to different apparent water contact angles. Superhydrophobic surfaces with >150° water contact angles and <5° contact angle hysteresis are achieved on fluorosilane-modified polymer hierarchical nanovoid arrays with large fractions of entrapped air. The experimental contact angle measurements are complemented with theoretical predictions using the Cassie's model to gain insights into the fundamental microstructure-dewetting property relationships. The experimental and theoretical contact angles follow the same trends as determined by the unique hierarchical structures of the templated periodic arrays. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 3D Stretchable Arch Ribbon Array Fabricated via Grayscale Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yu; Shu, Yi; Shavezipur, Mohammad; Wang, Xuefeng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Haiming; Deng, Ningqin; Maboudian, Roya; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Microstructures with flexible and stretchable properties display tremendous potential applications including integrated systems, wearable devices and bio-sensor electronics. Hence, it is essential to develop an effective method for fabricating curvilinear and flexural microstructures. Despite significant advances in 2D stretchable inorganic structures, large scale fabrication of unique 3D microstructures at a low cost remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate that the 3D microstructures can be achieved by grayscale lithography to produce a curved photoresist (PR) template, where the PR acts as sacrificial layer to form wavelike arched structures. Using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at low temperature, the curved PR topography can be transferred to the silicon dioxide layer. Subsequently, plasma etching can be used to fabricate the arched stripe arrays. The wavelike silicon dioxide arch microstructure exhibits Young modulus and fracture strength of 52 GPa and 300 MPa, respectively. The model of stress distribution inside the microstructure was also established, which compares well with the experimental results. This approach of fabricating a wavelike arch structure may become a promising route to produce a variety of stretchable sensors, actuators and circuits, thus providing unique opportunities for emerging classes of robust 3D integrated systems. PMID:27345766

  13. Streptavidin functionalized polymer nanodots fabricated by visible light lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfesberger, Clemens; Wollhofen, Richard; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A

    2015-03-28

    Two-photon polymerization, optionally combined with stimulated emission depletion (STED) lithography, allows two and three dimensional polymer fabrication with structure sizes and resolution below the diffraction limit. Structuring of polymers with photons, whose wavelength is within the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum, gives new opportunities to a large field of applications e.g. in the field of biotechnology and tissue engineering. In order to create new biotechnological applications, versatile methods are needed to functionalize the polymeric structures. Here we report the creation of polymer-nanodots with high streptavidin (SA) affinity via two-photon polymerization (TPP). Controlling the size of the polymer dots allows for limiting the number of the SA molecules. TPP dots with a diameter of a few 100 nm show up to 100% streptavidin loading. We can show that most of the dots are loaded by one to two streptavidins on average. Attached streptavidin molecules remain functional and are capable to bind 0.7 biotin molecules on average. The presented functionalized nanostructures may be used as platforms for a multitude of biological experimental setups. Nanoscopic well defined structures, capable of selective binding of streptavin proteins, used as linkers for other biotinylated biomolecules, may also find application in in-vitro sensing, like for example lab on chip devices with limited surface area.

  14. Large-Area Semiconducting Graphene Nanomesh Tailored by Interferometric Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Alireza; He, Xiang; Alaie, Seyedhamidreza; Ghasemi, Javad; Dawson, Noel Mayur; Cavallo, Francesca; Habteyes, Terefe G; Brueck, Steven R J; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-07-01

    Graphene nanostructures are attracting a great deal of interest because of newly emerging properties originating from quantum confinement effects. We report on using interferometric lithography to fabricate uniform, chip-scale, semiconducting graphene nanomesh (GNM) with sub-10 nm neck widths (smallest edge-to-edge distance between two nanoholes). This approach is based on fast, low-cost, and high-yield lithographic technologies and demonstrates the feasibility of cost-effective development of large-scale semiconducting graphene sheets and devices. The GNM is estimated to have a room temperature energy bandgap of ~30 meV. Raman studies showed that the G band of the GNM experiences a blue shift and broadening compared to pristine graphene, a change which was attributed to quantum confinement and localization effects. A single-layer GNM field effect transistor exhibited promising drive current of ~3.9 μA/μm and ON/OFF current ratios of ~35 at room temperature. The ON/OFF current ratio of the GNM-device displayed distinct temperature dependence with about 24-fold enhancement at 77 K.

  15. Electrical biomolecule detection using nanopatterned silicon via block copolymer lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chang Kyu; Jin, Hyeong Min; Ahn, Jae-Hyuk; Park, Tae Jung; Yoo, Hyeon Gyun; Koo, Min; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Kim, Sang Ouk; Lee, Keon Jae

    2014-01-29

    An electrical biosensor exploiting a nanostructured semiconductor is a promising technology for the highly sensitive, label-free detection of biomolecules via a straightforward electronic signal. The facile and scalable production of a nanopatterned electrical silicon biosensor by block copolymer (BCP) nano-lithography is reported. A cost-effective and large-area nanofabrication, based on BCP self-assembly and single-step dry etching, is developed for the hexagonal nanohole patterning of thin silicon films. The resultant nanopatterned electrical channel modified with biotin molecules successfully detects the two proteins, streptavidin and avidin, down to nanoscale molarities (≈1 nm). The nanoscale pattern comparable to the Debye screening length and the large surface area of the three-dimensional silicon nanochannel enable excellent sensitivity and stability. A device simulation confirms that the nanopatterned structure used in this work is effective for biomolecule detection. This approach relying on the scalable self-assembly principle offers a high-throughput manufacturing process for clinical lab-on-a-chip diagnoses and relevant biomolecular studies. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Microintaglio Printing for Soft Lithography-Based in Situ Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyani, Manish; Ichiki, Takanori

    2015-07-14

    Advances in lithographic approaches to fabricating bio-microarrays have been extensively explored over the last two decades. However, the need for pattern flexibility, a high density, a high resolution, affordability and on-demand fabrication is promoting the development of unconventional routes for microarray fabrication. This review highlights the development and uses of a new molecular lithography approach, called "microintaglio printing technology", for large-scale bio-microarray fabrication using a microreactor array (µRA)-based chip consisting of uniformly-arranged, femtoliter-size µRA molds. In this method, a single-molecule-amplified DNA microarray pattern is self-assembled onto a µRA mold and subsequently converted into a messenger RNA or protein microarray pattern by simultaneously producing and transferring (immobilizing) a messenger RNA or a protein from a µRA mold to a glass surface. Microintaglio printing allows the self-assembly and patterning of in situ-synthesized biomolecules into high-density (kilo-giga-density), ordered arrays on a chip surface with µm-order precision. This holistic aim, which is difficult to achieve using conventional printing and microarray approaches, is expected to revolutionize and reshape proteomics. This review is not written comprehensively, but rather substantively, highlighting the versatility of microintaglio printing for developing a prerequisite platform for microarray technology for the postgenomic era.

  17. Highly hydrophobic materials for ArF immersion lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebe, Yoko; Shirota, Naoko; Sasaki, Takashi; Murata, Koichi; Yokokoji, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    In immersion lithography, the impact of water on resist performance and the possibility of damage to the lens by the components eluted from the resist material are seriously concern. And much work has shown that controlling the water-resist interface is critical to enabling high scan rates. Many topcoat materials have been developed to control the aforementioned interfacial properties. Developable topcoats have been particularly investigated as suitable candidates for its applicability to the resist developing process. Achieving the balance between the low surface energy required for higher receding contact angle and the base solubility for topcoat removal is challenging. We have already reported FUGU polymer which have partially fluorinated monocyclic structure and hexafluoroalcohol(HFA) group and showed that its developer solubility was excellent but hydrophobicity was insufficient for high scan rate. We have also reported that co-polymers of FUGU and highly fluorinated monomers which have perfluorinated cyclic structure had sufficient hydrophobicity but lower developer solubility. We have found that it was difficult to use these copolymers in themselves as topcoat. But by blending of moderate amount of these copolymers into FUGU polymer, we have finally obtained highly hydrophobic developer-soluble topcoat. Hydrophobicity can be controlled by blending ratio. Furthermore we have newly successfully synthesized a series of fluoropolymers, FIT polymer partially fluorinated monocyclic structure and having carboxylic acid group as developer-soluble unit. When FIT polymer as well as FUGU polymer, was blended to highly hydrophobic copolymer, the blended polymer also showed higher hydrophobicity keeping sufficient developer solubility.

  18. Interdigitated multicolored bioink micropatterns by multiplexed polymer pen lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Greiner, Alexandra M; Weschenfelder, Markus; Waterkotte, Björn; Bastmeyer, Martin; Fuchs, Harald

    2013-10-11

    Multiplexing, i.e., the application and integration of more than one ink in an interdigitated microscale pattern, is still a challenge for microcontact printing (μCP) and similar techniques. On the other hand there is a strong demand for interdigitated patterns of more than one protein on subcellular to cellular length scales in the lower micrometer range in biological experiments. Here, a new integrative approach is presented for the fabrication of bioactive microarrays and complex multi-ink patterns by polymer pen lithography (PPL). By taking advantage of the strength of microcontact printing (μCP) combined with the spatial control and capability of precise repetition of PPL in an innovative way, a new inking and writing strategy is introduced for PPL that enables true multiplexing within each repetitive subpattern. Furthermore, a specific ink/substrate platform is demonstrated that can be used to immobilize functional proteins and other bioactive compounds over a biotin-streptavidin approach. This patterning strategy aims specifically at application by cell biologists and biochemists addressing a wide range of relevant pattern sizes, easy pattern generation and adjustment, the use of only biofriendly, nontoxic chemicals, and mild processing conditions during the patterning steps. The retained bioactivity of the fabricated cm(2) area filling multiprotein patterns is demonstrated by showing the interaction of fibroblasts and neurons with multiplexed structures of fibronectin and laminin or laminin and ephrin, respectively.

  19. Master masks for big patterns by electron-beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlobin, Vladimir A.; Mamonov, V. I.; Vasiljeva, Olga G.

    1995-05-01

    Modern technologies for power semiconductor devices, laser and micro optics, micromechanics requires microlithography of patterns having a large are up to 100 cm2 with complicate precise drawing. The electron beam lithography (EBL) tools with variable shape beam have good prospects for this purpose, but their application has a few problems in case of the tasks pointed above. The main problems are a great volume of information and a large exposure time of such patterns. We propose the system for preparation of the exposure data having more than 100 MB volume that consists from set of personal computers, network adapters, and software. The preparation of graphic information and exposure strategy are presented. The optimum exposure conditions are determined by program modeling the exposure process in dependence on the statistic distribution of sizes of EBL figures. Our method permits to decrease the exposure time in several times under certain conditions and brings that nearer to theoretical limit Tmin equals SD/IBmax, where Tmin is minimum exposure time, S is exposure area, D is dose density, IBmax is maximum beam current. This approach is valid if the basic factor limiting the writing speed is IBmax. The developed computer system and writing strategy was applied us for mask making on modified ZBA-21 tool. These masks were meant for production of power semiconductor and laser optics devices.

  20. Synchrotron radiation lithography system in an atmospheric environment (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, K.; Kouno, E.; Nomura, E.; Suzuki, K.; Fujii, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Iwata, J.; Kawase, Y.

    1989-07-01

    The atmospheric environmental exposure system for synchrotron radiation (SR) lithography has been integrated using the Photon Factory storage ring (2.5 GeV). The system, composed of a highly reliable beamline, an SR extracting chamber and a prototype SR stepper, aims at attaining higher accuracy and throughput. Based on a fail-safe mechanism notion, a double-vacuum protection system, in which two sets of a fast closing valve and acoustic delay line are installed in the main beamline and branch beamline, respectively, has been organized. Vacuum breakdown tests indicated that any vacuum breakdown, a beryllium (Be) window rupture in the worst case, exerts little influence on the storage ring ultrahigh vacuum. The SR extracting chamber, equipped with a Be window and an extraction window, is filled with helium at atmospheric pressure. Particularly, the 50-μm-thick, 35-mm-diam Be window, vacuum-sealed by a Viton O-ring, was preliminarily employed and, so far, has operated successfully, giving a 25-mm square exposure area. In terms of practical availability and simplicity, the SR stepper in an atmospheric environment has been constructed. A novel differential mode linear Fresnel zone plate alignment method, which can detect an alignment error between a mask and a wafer during exposure, was developed.

  1. Maskless lithography and nanopatterning with electron and ion multibeam projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzgummer, Elmar

    2010-03-01

    Multi-beam writing becomes mandatory in order to stay within reasonable realization times for the fabrication of leading-edge complex masks and templates. IMS Nanofabrication has developed multi-beam projection techniques implementing a programmable aperture plate system (APS) and charged-particle projection optics with 200x reduction. Proof-of-concept of multi-beam writing was demonstrated in 2009 with 10 keV ion multi-beams and 50 keV electron multi-beams using 43-thousand and 2.5-thousand, respectively, programmable 12.5nm sized beams. In Q4 2009 the development of a 50 keV electron multi-beam Mask Exposure Tool (eMET) was started with the aim to realize 256-thousand programmable 20 nm and 10 nm sized beams. The eMET column realization will provide important synergies for the development of projection mask-less lithography (PML2) for direct write on wafers. In order to enhance throughput a Multi-Axis-PML2 scheme is put forward with potential throughput of 5 WPH for the 16 nm hp technology node and below. Clustering such maskless tools a throughput of 50-100 WPH within a scanner floor space is envisioned. Ion multi-beam techniques may be applied for 2.5D / 3D template fabrication and resistless nanopatterning.

  2. W-CMOS blanking device for projection multibeam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurisch, Michael; Irmscher, Mathias; Letzkus, Florian; Eder-Kapl, Stefan; Klein, Christof; Loeschner, Hans; Piller, Walter; Platzgummer, Elmar

    2010-05-01

    As the designs of future mask nodes become more and more complex the corresponding pattern writing times will rise significantly when using single beam writing tools. Projection multi-beam lithography [1] is one promising technology to enhance the throughput compared to state of the art VSB pattern generators. One key component of the projection multi-beam tool is an Aperture Plate System (APS) to form and switch thousands of individual beamlets. In our present setup a highly parallel beam is divided into 43,008 individual beamlets by a Siaperture- plate. These micrometer sized beams pass through larger openings in a blanking-plate and are individually switched on and off by applying a voltage to blanking-electrodes which are placed around the blanking-plate openings. A charged particle 200x reduction optics demagnifies the beamlet array to the substrate. The switched off beams are filtered out in the projection optics so that only the beams which are unaffected by the blanking-plate are projected to the substrate with 200x reduction. The blanking-plate is basically a CMOS device for handling the writing data. In our work the blanking-electrodes are fabricated using CMOS compatible add on processes like SiO2-etching or metal deposition and structuring. A new approach is the implementation of buried tungsten electrodes for beam blanking.

  3. Soft-X-Ray Projection Lithography Using a High-Repetition-Rate Laser-Induced X-Ray Source for Sub-100 Nanometer Lithography Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Louis,; F. Bijkerk,; Shmaenok, L.; Voorma, H. J.; van der Wiel, M. J.; Schlatmann, R.; Verhoeven, J.; van der Drift, E. W. J. M.; Romijn, J.; Rousseeuw, B. A. C.; Voss, F.; Desor, R.; Nikolaus, B.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we present the status of a joint development programme on soft x-ray projection lithography (SXPL) integrating work on high brightness laser plasma sources. fabrication of multilayer x-ray mirrors. and patterning of reflection masks. We are in the process of optimization of a laser-pla

  4. Hybrid intermediaries

    OpenAIRE

    Cetorelli, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    I introduce the concept of hybrid intermediaries: financial conglomerates that control a multiplicity of entity types active in the "assembly line" process of modern financial intermediation, a system that has become known as shadow banking. The complex bank holding companies of today are the best example of hybrid intermediaries, but I argue that financial firms from the "nonbank" space can just as easily evolve into conglomerates with similar organizational structure, thus acquiring the cap...

  5. Hybrid composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacob John, Maya

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available effect was observed for the elongation at break of the hybrid composites. The impact strength of the hybrid composites increased with the addition of glass fibres. The tensile and impact properties of thermoplastic natural rubber reinforced short... panels made from conventional structural materials. Figure 3 illustrates the performance of cellular biocomposite panels against conventional systems used for building and residential construction, namely a pre- cast pre-stressed hollow core concrete...

  6. Intregrating metallic wiring with three-dimensional polystyrene colloidal crystals using electron-beam lithography and three-dimensional laser lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yaolan; Isotalo, Tero J.; Konttinen, Mikko P.; Li, Jiawei; Heiskanen, Samuli; Geng, Zhuoran; Maasilta, Ilari J.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a method to fabricate narrow, down to a few micron wide metallic leads on top of a three-dimensional (3D) colloidal crystal self-assembled from polystyrene (PS) nanospheres of diameter 260 nm, using electron-beam lithography. This fabrication is not straightforward due to the fact that PS nanospheres cannot usually survive the harsh chemical treatments required in the development and lift-off steps of electron-beam lithography. We solve this problem by increasing the chemical resistance of the PS nanospheres using an additional electron-beam irradiation step, which allows the spheres to retain their shape and their self-assembled structure, even after baking to a temperature of 160 °C, the exposure to the resist developer and the exposure to acetone, all of which are required for the electron-beam lithography step. Moreover, we show that by depositing an aluminum oxide capping layer on top of the colloidal crystal after the e-beam irradiation, the surface is smooth enough so that continuous metal wiring can be deposited by the electron-beam lithography. Finally, we also demonstrate a way to self-assemble PS colloidal crystals into a microscale container, which was fabricated using direct-write 3D laser-lithography. Metallic wiring was also successfully integrated with the combination of a container structure and a PS colloidal crystal. Our goal is to make a device for studies of thermal transport in 3D phononic crystals, but other phononic or photonic crystal applications could also be envisioned.

  7. Advanced electric-field scanning probe lithography on molecular resist using active cantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Marcus; Aydogan, Cemal; Lipowicz, Hubert-Seweryn; Ivanov, Tzvetan; Lenk, Steve; Ahmad, Ahmad; Angelov, Tihomir; Reum, Alexander; Ishchuk, Valentyn; Atanasov, Ivaylo; Krivoshapkina, Yana; Hofer, Manuel; Holz, Mathias; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2015-03-01

    The routine "on demand" fabrication of features smaller than 10 nm opens up new possibilities for the realization of many novel nanoelectronic, NEMS, optical and bio-nanotechnology-based devices. Based on the thermally actuated, piezoresistive cantilever technology we have developed a first prototype of a scanning probe lithography (SPL) platform able to image, inspect, align and pattern features down to single digit nano regime. The direct, mask-less patterning of molecular resists using active scanning probes represents a promising path circumventing the problems in today's radiation-based lithography. Here, we present examples of practical applications of the previously published electric field based, current-controlled scanning probe lithography on molecular glass resist calixarene by using the developed tabletop SPL system. We demonstrate the application of a step-and-repeat scanning probe lithography scheme including optical as well as AFM based alignment and navigation. In addition, sequential read-write cycle patterning combining positive and negative tone lithography is shown. We are presenting patterning over larger areas (80 x 80 μm) and feature the practical applicability of the lithographic processes.

  8. Three-dimensional deep sub-diffraction optical beam lithography with 9 nm feature size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zongsong; Cao, Yaoyu; Evans, Richard A; Gu, Min

    2013-01-01

    The current nanofabrication techniques including electron beam lithography provide fabrication resolution in the nanometre range. The major limitation of these techniques is their incapability of arbitrary three-dimensional nanofabrication. This has stimulated the rapid development of far-field three-dimensional optical beam lithography where a laser beam is focused for maskless direct writing. However, the diffraction nature of light is a barrier for achieving nanometre feature and resolution in optical beam lithography. Here we report on three-dimensional optical beam lithography with 9 nm feature size and 52 nm two-line resolution in a newly developed two-photon absorption resin with high mechanical strength. The revealed dependence of the feature size and the two-line resolution confirms that they can reach deep sub-diffraction scale but are limited by the mechanical strength of the new resin. Our result has paved the way towards portable three-dimensional maskless laser direct writing with resolution fully comparable to electron beam lithography.

  9. Scanning near-field lithography with high precision flexure orientation stage control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jin; Zhang, Liang; Tan, Haosen; Wang, Liang

    2017-09-01

    A new design of an orientation stage for scanning near-field lithography is presented based on flexure hinges. Employing flexure mechanisms in place of rigid-body mechanisms is one of the most promising techniques to efficiently implement high precision motion and avoid problems caused by friction. For near-field scanning lithography with evanescent wave, best resolution can be achieved in contact mode. However, if the mask is fixed on a rigid stage, contact friction will deteriorate the lithography surface. To reduce friction while maintaining good contact between the mask and the substrate, the mask should be held with high lateral stiffness and low torsion stiffness. This design can hold the mask in place during the scanning process and achieve passive alignment. Circular flexure hinges, whose parameters are determined by motion requirements based on Schotborgh's equation, are used as the basic unit of the stage to achieve passive alignment by compensating motions from elastic deformation. A finite-element analysis is performed to verify this property of the stage. With the aid of this stage, 21 nm resolution is achieved in static near-field lithography and 18 nm line-width in scanning near-field lithography.

  10. Applications of nanoimprint lithography/hot embossing: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yifang

    2015-11-01

    This review concentrates on the applications of nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and hot embossing for the fabrications of nanolectronic devices, nanophotonic metamaterials and other nanostructures. Technical challenges and solutions in NIL such as nanofabrication of templates, removal of residual resist, pattern displacement in thermal NIL arising from thermal expansion are first discussed. In the nanofabrication of templates, dry etch in plasma for the formation of multi-step structures and ultra-sharp tip arrays in silicon, nanophotonic chiral structures with high aspect ratio in SiC are demonstrated. A bilayer technique for nondestructive removal of residual resist in thermal NIL is described. This process is successfully applied for the fabrication of T-shape gates and functional high electron mobility transistors. However, pattern displacement intrinsically existing in thermal NIL/hot embossing owing to different thermal expansions in the template and substrate, respectively, limits its further development and scale-up. Low temperature even room temperature NIL (RTNIL) was then proposed on HSQ, trying to eliminate the pattern distortion by avoiding a thermal loop in the imprint. But, considerable pressure needed in RTNIL turned the major attentions to the development of UV-curing NIL in UV-curable monomers at low temperature. A big variety of applications by low-temperature UV-curing NIL in SU-8 are described, including high-aspect-ratio phase gratings, tagging technology by nanobarcode for DNA sequencing, nanofluidic channels, nanophotonic metamaterials and biosensors. Hot embossing, as a parallel technique to NIL, was also developed, and its applications on ferroelectric polymers as well as metals are reviewed. Therefore, it is necessary to emphasize that this review is mainly attempted to review the applications of NIL/embossing instead of NIL technique advances.

  11. Fabrication of phosphor micro-grids using proton beam lithography.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Paolo (University of Padova and INFN, Padova, Italy); Antolak, Arlyn J.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Doyle, Barney Lee; Malmqvist, Klas (Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden); Hearne, Sean Joseph; Nilsson, Christer (Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden); Kristiansson, Per (Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden); Wegden, Marie (Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden); Elfman, Mikael (Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden); Pallon, Jan (Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden); Auzelyte, Vaida (Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    A new nuclear microscopy technique called ion photon emission microscopy or IPEM was recently invented. IPEM allows analysis involving single ions, such as ion beam induced charge (IBIC) or single event upset (SEU) imaging using a slightly modified optical microscope. The spatial resolution of IPEM is currently limited to more than 10 {micro}m by the scattering and reflection of ion-induced photons, i.e. light blooming or spreading, in the ionoluminescent phosphor layer. We are developing a 'Microscopic Gridded Phosphor' (also called Black Matrix) where the phosphor nanocrystals are confined within the gaps of a micrometer scale opaque grid, which limits the amount of detrimental light blooming. MeV-energy proton beam lithography is ideally suited to lithographically form masks for the grid because of high aspect ratio, pattern density and sub-micron resolution of this technique. In brief, the fabrication of the grids was made in the following manner: (1) a MeV proton beam focused to 1.5-2 {micro}m directly fabricated a matrix of pillars in a 15 {micro}m thick SU-8 lithographic resist; (2) 7:1 aspect ratio pillars were then formed by developing the proton exposed area; (3) Ni (Au) was electrochemically deposited onto Cu-coated Si from a sulfamate bath (or buffered CN bath); (4) the SU-8 pillars were removed by chemical etching; finally (5) the metal micro-grid was freed from its substrate by etching the underlying Cu layer. Our proposed metal micro-grids promise an order-of-magnitude improvement in the resolution of IPEM.

  12. Zero expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR® roadmap for advanced lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhoff, Thomas; Jedamzik, Ralf; Hartmann, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The zero expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR® is a well-established material in microlithography in critical components as wafer- and reticle-stages, mirrors and frames in the stepper positioning and alignment system. The very low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and its extremely high CTE homogeneity are key properties to achieve the tight overlay requirements of advanced lithography processes. SCHOTT is continuously improving critical material properties of ZERODUR® essential for microlithography applications according to a roadmap driven by the ever tighter material specifications broken down from the customer roadmaps. This paper will present the SCHOTT Roadmap for ZERODUR® material property development. In the recent years SCHOTT established a physical model based on structural relaxation to describe the coefficient of thermal expansion's temperature dependence. The model is successfully applied for the new expansion grade ZERODUR® TAILORED introduced to the market in 2012. ZERODUR® TAILORED delivers the lowest thermal expansion of ZERODUR® products at microlithography tool application temperature allowing for higher thermal stability for tighter overlay control in IC production. Data will be reported demonstrating the unique CTE homogeneity of ZERODUR® and its very high reproducibility, a necessary precondition for serial production for microlithography equipment components. New data on the bending strength of ZERODUR® proves its capability to withstand much higher mechanical loads than previously reported. Utilizing a three parameter Weibull distribution it is possible to derive minimum strength values for a given ZERODUR® surface treatment. Consequently the statistical uncertainties of the earlier approach based on a two parameter Weibull distribution have been eliminated. Mechanical fatigue due to stress corrosion was included in a straightforward way. The derived formulae allows calculating life time of ZERODUR® components for a given stress

  13. Stop Flow Lithography Synthesis and Characterization of Structured Microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Baah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the synthesis of nonspherical composite particles of poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEG-DA/SiO2 and PEG-DA/Al2O3 with single or multiple vias and the corresponding inorganic particles of SiO2 and Al2O3 synthesized using the Stop Flow Lithography (SFL method is reported. Precursor suspensions of PEG-DA, 2-hydroxy-2-methylpropiophenone, and SiO2 or Al2O3 nanoparticles were prepared. The precursor suspension flows through a microfluidic device mounted on an upright microscope and is polymerized in an automated process. A patterned photomask with transparent geometric features masks UV light to synthesize the particles. Composite particles with vias were synthesized and corresponding inorganic SiO2 and Al2O3 particles were obtained through polymer burn-off and sintering of the composites. The synthesis of porous inorganic particles of SiO2 and Al2O3 with vias and overall dimensions in the range of ~35–90 µm was achieved. BET specific surface area measurements for single via inorganic particles were 56–69 m2/g for SiO2 particles and 73–81 m2/g for Al2O3 particles. Surface areas as high as 114 m2/g were measured for multivia cubic SiO2 particles. The findings suggest that, with optimization, the particles should have applications in areas where high surface area is important such as catalysis and sieving.

  14. Clickable Antifouling Polymer Brushes for Polymer Pen Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bog, Uwe; de Los Santos Pereira, Andres; Mueller, Summer L; Havenridge, Shana; Parrillo, Viviana; Bruns, Michael; Holmes, Andrea E; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Fuchs, Harald; Hirtz, Michael

    2017-04-05

    Protein-repellent reactive surfaces that promote localized specific binding are highly desirable for applications in the biomedical field. Nonspecific adhesion will compromise the function of bioactive surfaces, leading to ambiguous results of binding assays and negating the binding specificity of patterned cell-adhesive motives. Localized specific binding is often achieved by attaching a linker to the surface, and the other side of the linker is used to bind specifically to a desired functional agent, as e.g. proteins, antibodies, and fluorophores, depending on the function required by the application. We present a protein-repellent polymer brush enabling highly specific covalent surface immobilization of biorecognition elements by strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition click chemistry for selective protein adhesion. The protein-repellent polymer brush is functionalized by highly localized molecular binding sites in the low micrometer range using polymer pen lithography (PPL). Because of the massive parallelization of writing pens, the tunable PPL printed patterns can span over square centimeter areas. The selective binding of the protein streptavidin to these surface sites is demonstrated while the remaining polymer brush surface is resisting nonspecific adsorption without any prior blocking by bovine serum albumin (BSA). In contrast to the widely used BSA blocking, the reactive polymer brushes are able to significantly reduce nonspecific protein adsorption, which is the cause of biofouling. This was achieved for solutions of single proteins as well as complex biological fluids. The remarkable fouling resistance of the polymer brushes has the potential to improve the multiplexing capabilities of protein probes and therefore impact biomedical research and applications.

  15. Development of fluoropolymer for 193nm immersion lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirota, Naoko; Takebe, Yoko; Sasaki, Takashi; Yokokoji, Osamu; Toriumi, Minoru; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2006-03-01

    We had already developed several series of fluoropolymers, FPRs and FUGUs, having a partially fluorinated monocyclic structure and having acidic hydroxyl group, which acts as dissolution unit into alkaline solution. Then we have optimized these polymers for top-coat as the developer-soluble type in the 193nm immersion lithography. However the hydrophobicity of these polymers were a little poor due to its hydroxyl group. So we thought that the introduction of water repellent moiety into the these polymers structure is effective to improve the their hydrophobicity though the increase of water repellent unit in the polymer leads to lower dissolution rate in developer. To introduce as much as possible of hydrophobicity unit, we selected FUGU as platform, which has larger dissolution rate in developer than that of FPRs, We copolymerized FUGU with higher water-repellent component and obtained three copolymers, FUGU-CoA, FUGU-CoB, and FUGU-CoC. In this paper, we described characteristics and evaluation of these polymers. Most of these polymer showed an improvement of hydrophobicity, in particular FUGU-CoB had excellent hydrophobicity due to introduction bulky containing-fluorine group. In this study, we also investigated the interaction between the water and various polymers by using QCM method. The difference between FUGU and water repellent polymers for swelling behavior to water became clear by analysis of diffusion coefficient. We found that our new co-polymers have excellent diffusion coefficient than FUGU which was confirmed by QCM method used to evaluate water permeability and water diffusion in the materials.

  16. Large-scale electrohydrodynamic organic nanowire printing, lithography, and electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Woo

    2014-03-01

    Although the many merits of organic nanowires (NWs), a reliable process for controllable and large-scale assembly of highly-aligned NW parallel arrays based on ``individual control (IC)'' of NWs must be developed since inorganic NWs are mainly grown vertically on substrates and thus have been transferred to the target substrates by any of several non-individually controlled (non-IC) methods such as contact-printing technologies with unidirectional massive alignment, and the random dispersion method with disordered alignment. Controlled alignment and patterning of individual semiconducting NWs at a desired position in a large area is a major requirement for practical electronic device applications. Large-area, high-speed printing of highly-aligned individual NWs that allows control of the exact numbers of wires, and dimensions and their orientations, and its use in high-speed large-area nanolithography is a significant challenge for practical applications. Here we use a high-speed electrohydrodynamic organic nanowire printer to print large-area organic semiconducting nanowire arrays directly on device substrates in an accurately individually-controlled manner; this method also enables sophisticated large-area nanowire lithography for nano-electronics. We achieve an unprecedented high maximum field-effect mobility up to 9.7 cm2 .V-1 .s-1 with extremely low contact resistance (<5.53 Ω . cm) even in nano-channel transistors based on single-stranded semiconducting NWs. We also demonstrate complementary inverter circuit arrays consist of well-aligned p-type and n-type organic semiconducting NWs. Extremely fast nanolithography using printed semiconducting nanowire arrays provide a very simple, reliable method of fabricating large-area and flexible nano-electronics.

  17. Inspection of advanced computational lithography logic reticles using a 193-nm inspection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ching-Fang; Lin, Mei-Chun; Lai, Mei-Tsu; Hsu, Luke T. H.; Chin, Angus; Lee, S. C.; Yen, Anthony; Wang, Jim; Chen, Ellison; Wu, David; Broadbent, William H.; Huang, William; Zhu, Zinggang

    2010-09-01

    We report inspection results of early 22-nm logic reticles designed with both conventional and computational lithography methods. Inspection is performed using a state-of-the-art 193-nm reticle inspection system in the reticleplane inspection mode (RPI) where both rule-based sensitivity control (RSC) and a newer modelbased sensitivity control (MSC) method are tested. The evaluation includes defect detection performance using several special test reticles designed with both conventional and computational lithography methods; the reticles contain a variety of programmed critical defects which are measured based on wafer print impact. Also included are inspection results from several full-field product reticles designed with both conventional and computational lithography methods to determine if low nuisance-defect counts can be achieved. These early reticles are largely single-die and all inspections are performed in the die-to-database inspection mode only.

  18. Planar self-aligned imprint lithography for coplanar plasmonic nanostructures fabrication

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Weiwei

    2014-03-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a cost-efficient nanopatterning technology because of its promising advantages of high throughput and high resolution. However, accurate multilevel overlay capability of NIL required for integrated circuit manufacturing remains a challenge due to the high cost of achieving mechanical alignment precision. Although self-aligned imprint lithography was developed to avoid the need of alignment for the vertical layered structures, it has limited usage in the manufacture of the coplanar structures, such as integrated plasmonic devices. In this paper, we develop a new process of planar self-alignment imprint lithography (P-SAIL) to fabricate the metallic and dielectric structures on the same plane. P-SAIL transfers the multilevel imprint processes to a single-imprint process which offers higher efficiency and less cost than existing manufacturing methods. Such concept is demonstrated in an example of fabricating planar plasmonic structures consisting of different materials. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  19. 16 nm-resolution lithography using ultra-small-gap bowtie apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Qin, Jin; Chen, Jianfeng; Zhang, Liang; Ma, Chengfu; Chu, Jiaru; Xu, Xianfan; Wang, Liang

    2017-02-01

    Photolithography has long been a critical technology for nanoscale manufacturing, especially in the semiconductor industry. However, the diffractive nature of light has limited the continuous advance of optical lithography resolution. To overcome this obstacle, near-field scanning optical lithography (NSOL) is an alternative low-cost technique, whose resolution is determined by the near-field localization that can be achieved. Here, we apply the newly-developed backside milling method to fabricate bowtie apertures with a sub-15 nm gap, which can substantially improve the resolution of NSOL. A highly confined electric near field is produced by localized surface plasmon excitation and nanofocusing of the closely-tapered gap. We show contact lithography results with a record 16 nm resolution (FWHM). This photolithography scheme promises potential applications in data storage, high-speed computation, energy harvesting, and other nanotechnology areas.

  20. Fabrication of metal oxide nanostructures based on Atomic Force Microscopy lithography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU XiaoYang; CHENG Gang; WANG ShuJie; DAI ShuXi; WAN ShaoMing; ZHANG XingTang; DU ZuLiang

    2008-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) mechanical lithography is a simple but significant method for nanofabrication. In this work, we used this method to construct nanos-tructures on Pt/Cu bilayer metal electrodes under ambient conditions in air. The influence of various scratch parameters, such as the applied force, scan velocity and circle times, on the lithography patterns was investigated. The Pt-Cu-CuxO-Cu-Pt nanostructure was constructed by choosing suitable scratch parameters and oxidation at room temperature. The properties of the scratched regions were also investigated by friction force microscopy and conductive AFM (C-AFM). The/-Vcurves show symmetric and linear properties, and Ohmic contacts were formed. These results indicate that AFM mechanical lithography is a powerful tool for fabricating novel metal-semiconductor nanoelectronic devices.

  1. Pr-based metallic glass films used as resist for phase-change lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Teng; Li, Zhen; He, Qiang; Miao, Xiangshui

    2016-03-21

    Metallic glass film of Pr60Al10Ni10Cu20 is proposed to be used as a resist of phase-change lithography (PCL). PCL is a mask-less lithography technology by using laser-direct-writing to create the intended nanopatterns. Thermal distribution in the PrAlNiCu film after exposure is calculated by finite element method (FEM). Thin films are exposed by continuous-wave laser and selective etched by nitric-acid solution, and the patterns are discerned by optical and atomic force microscope. The etching rate of as-deposited PrAlNiCu is thus nearly five times of the crystalline film. These results indicate that PrAlNiCu metallic glass film is a promising resist for phase-change lithography.

  2. 16 nm-resolution lithography using ultra-small-gap bowtie apertures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Qin, Jin; Chen, Jianfeng; Zhang, Liang; Ma, Chengfu; Chu, Jiaru; Xu, Xianfan; Wang, Liang

    2017-02-03

    Photolithography has long been a critical technology for nanoscale manufacturing, especially in the semiconductor industry. However, the diffractive nature of light has limited the continuous advance of optical lithography resolution. To overcome this obstacle, near-field scanning optical lithography (NSOL) is an alternative low-cost technique, whose resolution is determined by the near-field localization that can be achieved. Here, we apply the newly-developed backside milling method to fabricate bowtie apertures with a sub-15 nm gap, which can substantially improve the resolution of NSOL.  A highly confined electric near field is produced by localized surface plasmon excitation and nanofocusing of the closely-tapered gap. We show contact lithography results with a record 16 nm resolution (FWHM). This photolithography scheme promises potential applications in data storage, high-speed computation, energy harvesting, and other nanotechnology areas.

  3. "Multipoint Force Feedback" Leveling of Massively Parallel Tip Arrays in Scanning Probe Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hanaul; Jung, Goo-Eun; Kim, Sukhyun; Yun, Seong-Hun; Jo, Ahjin; Kahng, Se-Jong; Cho, Nam-Joon; Cho, Sang-Joon

    2015-09-16

    Nanoscale patterning with massively parallel 2D array tips is of significant interest in scanning probe lithography. A challenging task for tip-based large area nanolithography is maintaining parallel tip arrays at the same contact point with a sample substrate in order to pattern a uniform array. Here, polymer pen lithography is demonstrated with a novel leveling method to account for the magnitude and direction of the total applied force of tip arrays by a multipoint force sensing structure integrated into the tip holder. This high-precision approach results in a 0.001° slope of feature edge length variation over 1 cm wide tip arrays. The position sensitive leveling operates in a fully automated manner and is applicable to recently developed scanning probe lithography techniques of various kinds which can enable "desktop nanofabrication." © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Fabrication of metal oxide nanostructures based on Atomic Force Microscopy lithography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) mechanical lithography is a simple but significant method for nanofabrication. In this work, we used this method to construct nanos- tructures on Pt/Cu bilayer metal electrodes under ambient conditions in air. The influence of various scratch parameters, such as the applied force, scan velocity and circle times, on the lithography patterns was investigated. The Pt-Cu-CuxO-Cu-Pt nanostructure was constructed by choosing suitable scratch parameters and oxidation at room temperature. The properties of the scratched regions were also investigated by friction force microscopy and conductive AFM (C-AFM). The I-V curves show symmetric and linear properties, and Ohmic contacts were formed. These results indicate that AFM mechanical lithography is a powerful tool for fabricating novel metal-semiconductor nanoelectronic devices.

  5. Nanoimprint lithography for green water-repellent film derived from biomass with high-light transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Satoshi; Hanabata, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Newly eco-friendly high light transparency film with plant-based materials was investigated to future development of liquid crystal displays and optical devices with water repellency as a chemical design concept of nanoimprint lithography. This procedure is proven to be suitable for material design and the process conditions of ultraviolet curing nanoimprint lithography for green water-repellent film derived from biomass with high-light transparency. The developed formulation of advanced nanoimprinted materials design derived from lactulose and psicose, and the development of suitable UV nanoimprint conditions produced high resolutions of the conical shaped moth-eye regularly-nanostructure less than approximately 200 nm diameter, and acceptable patterning dimensional accuracy by the replication of 100 times of UV nanoimprint lithography cycles. The newly plant-based materials and the process conditions are expected as one of the defect less nanoimprint lithographic technologies in next generation electronic devices.

  6. Automatic layout feature extraction for lithography hotspot detection based on deep neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunawa, Tetsuaki; Nojima, Shigeki; Kotani, Toshiya

    2016-03-01

    Lithography hotspot detection in the physical verification phase is one of the most important techniques in today's optical lithography based manufacturing process. Although lithography simulation based hotspot detection is widely used, it is also known to be time-consuming. To detect hotspots in a short runtime, several machine learning based methods have been proposed. However, it is difficult to realize highly accurate detection without an increase in false alarms because an appropriate layout feature is undefined. This paper proposes a new method to automatically extract a proper layout feature from a given layout for improvement in detection performance of machine learning based methods. Experimental results show that using a deep neural network can achieve better performance than other frameworks using manually selected layout features and detection algorithms, such as conventional logistic regression or artificial neural network.

  7. Multi-shaped beam: development status and update on lithography results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slodowski, Matthias; Doering, Hans-Joachim; Dorl, Wolfgang; Stolberg, Ines A.

    2011-04-01

    According to the ITRS [1] photo mask is a significant challenge for the 22nm technology node requirements and beyond. Mask making capability and cost escalation continue to be critical for future lithography progress. On the technological side mask specifications and complexity have increased more quickly than the half-pitch requirements on the wafer designated by the roadmap due to advanced optical proximity correction and double patterning demands. From the economical perspective mask costs have significantly increased each generation, in which mask writing represents a major portion. The availability of a multi-electron-beam lithography system for mask write application is considered a potential solution to overcome these challenges [2, 3]. In this paper an update of the development status of a full-package high-throughput multi electron-beam writer, called Multi Shaped Beam (MSB), will be presented. Lithography performance results, which are most relevant for mask writing applications, will be disclosed. The MSB technology is an evolutionary development of the matured single Variable Shaped Beam (VSB) technology. An arrangement of Multi Deflection Arrays (MDA) allows operation with multiple shaped beams of variable size, which can be deflected and controlled individually [4]. This evolutionary MSB approach is associated with a lower level of risk and a relatively short time to implementation compared to the known revolutionary concepts [3, 5, 6]. Lithography performance is demonstrated through exposed pattern. Further details of the substrate positioning platform performance will be disclosed. It will become apparent that the MSB operational mode enables lithography on the same and higher performance level compared to single VSB and that there are no specific additional lithography challenges existing beside those which have already been addressed [1].

  8. Total lithography system based on a new application software platform enabling smart scanner management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Hirotaka; Masaki, Kazuo; Matsuyama, Tomoyuki; Wakamoto, Shinji; Park, Seemoon; Sugihara, Taro; Shibazaki, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    Along with device shrinkage, higher accuracy will continuously be required from photo-lithography tools in order to enhance on-product yield. In order to achieve higher yield, the advanced photo-lithography tools must be equipped with sophisticated tuning knobs on the tool and with software that is flexible enough to be applied per layer. This means photo-lithography tools must be capable of handling many types of sub-recipes and parameters simultaneously. To enable managing such a large amount of data easily and to setup lithography tools smoothly, we have developed a total lithography system called Litho Turnkey Solution based on a new software application platform, which we call Plug and Play Manager (PPM). PPM has its own graphical user interface, which enables total management of various data. Here various data means recipes, sub-recipes, tuning-parameters, measurement results, and so on. Through PPM, parameter making by intelligent applications such as CDU/Overlay tuning tools can easily be implemented. In addition, PPM is also linked to metrology tools and the customer's host computer, which enables data flow automation. Based on measurement data received from the metrology tools, PPM calculates correction parameters and sends them to the scanners automatically. This scheme can make calibration feedback loops possible. It should be noted that the abovementioned functions are running on the same platform through a user-friendly interface. This leads to smart scanner management and usability improvement. In this paper, we will demonstrate the latest development status of Nikon's total lithography solution based on PPM; describe details of each application; and provide supporting data for the accuracy and usability of the system. Keywords: exposure

  9. Nanorobotic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Dong

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Two strategies towards the realization of nanotechnology have been presented, i.e., top-down and bottom up. The former one is mainly based on nanofabrication and includes technologies such as nano-lithography, nano-imprint, and etching. Presently, they are still 2D fabrication processes with low resolution. The later one is an assembly-based technique. At present, it includes such items as self-assembly, dip-pen lithography, and directed self-assembly. These techniques can generate regular nano patterns in large scales. To fabricate 3D complex nano devices there are still no effective ways by so far. Here we show our effort on the development of a nano laboratory, a prototype nanomanufacturing system, based on nanorobotic manipulations. In which, we take a hybrid strategy as shown in Fig. 1. In this system, nano fabrication and nano assembly can be performed in an arbitrary order to construct nano building blocks and finally nano devices. The most important feature in this system is that the products can be fed back into the system to shrink the system part by part leading to nanorobots. Property characterization can be performed in each intermediate process. Due to the nanorobotic manipulation system, dynamic measurement can be performed rather than conventional static observations.

  10. Light sources for high-volume manufacturing EUV lithography: technology, performance, and power scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkov, Igor; Brandt, David; Ershov, Alex; Schafgans, Alexander; Tao, Yezheng; Vaschenko, Georgiy; Rokitski, Slava; Kats, Michael; Vargas, Michael; Purvis, Michael; Rafac, Rob; La Fontaine, Bruno; De Dea, Silvia; LaForge, Andrew; Stewart, Jayson; Chang, Steven; Graham, Matthew; Riggs, Daniel; Taylor, Ted; Abraham, Mathew; Brown, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is expected to succeed in 193-nm immersion multi-patterning technology for sub-10-nm critical layer patterning. In order to be successful, EUV lithography has to demonstrate that it can satisfy the industry requirements in the following critical areas: power, dose stability, etendue, spectral content, and lifetime. Currently, development of second-generation laser-produced plasma (LPP) light sources for the ASML's NXE:3300B EUV scanner is complete, and first units are installed and operational at chipmaker customers. We describe different aspects and performance characteristics of the sources, dose stability results, power scaling, and availability data for EUV sources and also report new development results.

  11. Fabrication of 2D and 3D photonic structures using laser lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaso, P.; Jandura, D.; Pudis, D.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we demonstrate possibilities of three-dimensional (3D) printing technology based on two photon polymerization. We used three-dimensional dip-in direct-laser-writing (DLW) optical lithography to fabricate 2D and 3D optical structures for optoelectronics and for optical sensing applications. DLW lithography allows us use a non conventional way how to couple light into the waveguide structure. We prepared ring resonator and we investigated its transmission spectral characteristic. We present 3D inverse opal structure from its design to printing and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging. Finally, SEM images of some prepared photonic crystal structures were performed.

  12. Electrochemical Hydrogel Lithography of Calcium-Alginate Hydrogels for Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumisato Ozawa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Here we propose a novel electrochemical lithography methodology for fabricating calcium-alginate hydrogels having controlled shapes. We separated the chambers for Ca2+ production and gel formation with alginate with a semipermeable membrane. Ca2+ formed in the production chamber permeated through the membrane to fabricate a gel structure on the membrane in the gel formation chamber. When the calcium-alginate hydrogels were modified with collagen, HepG2 cells proliferated on the hydrogels. These results show that electrochemical hydrogel lithography is useful for cell culture.

  13. Sub-Rayleigh lithography using high flux loss-resistant entangled states of light

    CERN Document Server

    Rosen, Shamir; Israel, Yonatan; Ambar, Oron; Silberberg, Yaron

    2012-01-01

    Quantum lithography achieves phase super-resolution using fragile, experimentally challenging entangled states of light. We propose a scalable scheme for creating features narrower than classically achievable, with reduced use of quantum resources and consequently enhanced resistance to loss. The scheme is an implementation of interferometric lithography using a mixture of an SPDC entangled state with intense classical coherent light. We measure coincidences of up to four photons mimicking multiphoton absorption. The results show a narrowing of the interference fringes of up to 30% with respect to the best analogous classical scheme using only 10% of the non-classical light required for creating NOON states.

  14. Hardware implementation of Corner2 lossless compression algorithm for maskless lithography systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jeehong; Li, Xiaohui; Savari, Serap A.

    2012-03-01

    The data delivery throughput of maskless lithography systems can be improved by applying a lossless image compression algorithm to the layout images and using a lithography writer that contains a decoding circuit packed in single silicon to decode the compressed image on-the-fly. In our past research we have introduced Corner2, a layout image compression algorithm which achieved significantly better performance in all aspects (compression ratio, encoding/decoding speed, decoder memory requirement) than Block C4. In this paper, we present the synthesis results of the Corner2 decoder for FPGA implementation.

  15. Chemical trimming overcoat: an enhancing composition and process for 193nm lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cong; Rowell, Kevin; Joesten, Lori; Baranowski, Paul; Kaur, Irvinder; Huang, Wanyi; Leonard, JoAnne; Jeong, Hae-Mi; Im, Kwang-Hwyi; Estelle, Tom; Cutler, Charlotte; Pohlers, Gerd; Yin, Wenyan; Fallon, Patricia; Li, Mingqi; Jeon, Hyun; Xu, Cheng Bai; Trefonas, Pete

    2016-03-01

    As the critical dimension of devices is approaching the resolution limit of 193nm photo lithography, multiple patterning processes have been developed to print smaller CD and pitch. Multiple patterning and other advanced lithographic processes often require the formation of isolated features such as lines or posts by direct lithographic printing. The formation of isolated features with an acceptable process window, however, can pose a challenge as a result of poor aerial image contrast at defocus. Herein we report a novel Chemical Trimming Overcoat (CTO) as an extra step after lithography that allows us to achieve smaller feature size and better process window.

  16. Simultaneous fabrication of line defects-embedded periodic lattice by topographically assisted holographic lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated simultaneous fabrication of designed defects within a periodic structure. For rapid fabrication of periodic structures incorporating nanoscale line-defects at large area, topographically assisted holographic lithography (TAHL) technique, combining the strength of hologram lithography and phase-shift interference, was proposed. Hot-embossing method generated the photoresist patterns with vertical side walls which enabled phase-shift mask effect at the edge of patterns. Embossing temperature and relief height were crucial parameters for the successful TAHL process. Periodic holes with a diameter of 600 nm at a 1 μm-pitch incorporating 250 nm wide line-defects were obtained simultaneously. PMID:21749704

  17. Simultaneous fabrication of line defects-embedded periodic lattice by topographically assisted holographic lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Ki Seok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have demonstrated simultaneous fabrication of designed defects within a periodic structure. For rapid fabrication of periodic structures incorporating nanoscale line-defects at large area, topographically assisted holographic lithography (TAHL technique, combining the strength of hologram lithography and phase-shift interference, was proposed. Hot-embossing method generated the photoresist patterns with vertical side walls which enabled phase-shift mask effect at the edge of patterns. Embossing temperature and relief height were crucial parameters for the successful TAHL process. Periodic holes with a diameter of 600 nm at a 1 μm-pitch incorporating 250 nm wide line-defects were obtained simultaneously.

  18. High-resolution nanopatterning of biodegradable polylactide by thermal nanoimprint lithography using gas permeable mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Takei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report high-resolution (150 nm nanopatterning of biodegradable polylactide by thermal nanoimprint lithography using dichloromethane as a volatile solvent for improving the liquidity and a porous cyclodextrin-based gas-permeable mold. This study demonstrates the high-resolution patterning of polylactic acid and other non-liquid functional materials with poor fluidity by thermal nanoimprinting. Such a patterning is expected to expand the utility of thermal nanoimprint lithography and fabricate non-liquid functional materials suitable for eco-friendly and biomedical applications.

  19. High-resolution nanopatterning of biodegradable polylactide by thermal nanoimprint lithography using gas permeable mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Satoshi; Hanabata, Makoto

    2017-03-01

    We report high-resolution (150 nm) nanopatterning of biodegradable polylactide by thermal nanoimprint lithography using dichloromethane as a volatile solvent for improving the liquidity and a porous cyclodextrin-based gas-permeable mold. This study demonstrates the high-resolution patterning of polylactic acid and other non-liquid functional materials with poor fluidity by thermal nanoimprinting. Such a patterning is expected to expand the utility of thermal nanoimprint lithography and fabricate non-liquid functional materials suitable for eco-friendly and biomedical applications.

  20. Design and fabrication of a diamond-turned hybrid diffractive/refractive singlet for visible applications at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernacki, B.E.; Miller, A.C.; Maxey, L.C.

    1995-02-01

    Hybrid diffractive/refractive optics can be fabricated using traditional lithographic methods involving masks or holographic techniques as well as direct-write approaches that include electron-beam lithography, single-point diamond turning, and laser beam lithography. Only the direct-write methods have proven to be practical in producing continuous-form diffractive surfaces, or kinoforms, and among these methods, only diamond turning can easily produce large kinoforms on curved base surfaces. In this paper, we describe design and fabrication issues for a hybrid singlet produced by single-point diamond turning that functions in the visible portion of the spectrum and takes advantage of all of the degrees of freedom available from diamond turning: aspheric front surface to control spherical aberration, curved rear surface for elimination of coma, and kinoform surface placed on either curved base surface for control of primary chromatic aberration.

  1. Extreme ultraviolet lithography: A few more pieces of the puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Christopher N. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-05-20

    The work described in this dissertation has improved three essential components of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography: exposure tools, photoresist, and metrology. Exposure tools. A field-averaging illumination stage is presented that enables nonuniform, high-coherence sources to be used in applications where highly uniform illumination is required. In an EUV implementation, it is shown that the illuminator achieves a 6.5% peak-to-valley intensity variation across the entire design field of view. In addition, a design for a stand-alone EUV printing tool capable of delivering 15 nm half-pitch sinusoidal fringes with available sources, gratings and nano-positioning stages is presented. It is shown that the proposed design delivers a near zero line-edge-rougness (LER) aerial image, something extremely attractive for the application of resist testing. Photoresist. Two new methods of quantifying the deprotection blur of EUV photoresists are described and experimentally demonstrated. The deprotection blur, LER, and sensitivity parameters of several EUV photoresists are quantified simultaneously as base weight percent, photoacid generator (PAG) weight percent, and post-exposure bake (PEB) temperature are varied. Two surprising results are found: (1) changing base weight percent does not significantly affect the deprotection blur of EUV photoresist, and (2) increasing PAG weight percent can simultaneously reduce LER and E-size in EUV photoresist. The latter result motivates the development of an EUV exposure statistics model that includes the effects of photon shot noise, the PAG spatial distribution, and the changing of the PAG distribution during the exposure. In addition, a shot noise + deprotection blur model is used to show that as deprotection blur becomes large relative to the size of the printed feature, LER reduction from improved counting statistics becomes dominated by an increase in LER due to reduced deprotection contrast. Metrology. Finally, this

  2. Extreme ultraviolet lithography mask etch study and overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Banqiu; Kumar, Ajay; Chandrachood, Madhavi; Sabharwal, Amitabh

    2013-04-01

    An overview of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask etch is presented and a EUVL mask etch study was carried out. Today, EUVL implementation has three critical challenges that hinder its adoption: extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source power, resist resolution-line width roughness-sensitivity, and a qualified EUVL mask. The EUVL mask defect challenges result from defects generated during blank preparation, absorber and multilayer deposition processes, as well as patterning, etching and wet clean processes. Stringent control on several performance criteria including critical dimension (CD) uniformity, etch bias, micro-loading, profile control, defect control, and high etch selectivity requirement to capping layer is required during the resist pattern duplication on the underlying absorber layer. EUVL mask absorbers comprise of mainly tantalum-based materials rather than chrome- or MoSi-based materials used in standard optical masks. Compared to the conventional chrome-based absorbers and phase shift materials, tantalum-based absorbers need high ion energy to obtain moderate etch rates. However, high ion energy may lower resist selectivity, and could introduce defects. Current EUVL mask consists of an anti-reflective layer on top of the bulk absorber. Recent studies indicate that a native oxide layer would suffice as an anti-reflective coating layer during the electron beam inspection. The absorber thickness and the material properties are optimized based on optical density targets for the mask as well as electromagnetic field effects and optics requirements of the patterning tools. EUVL mask etch processes are modified according to the structure of the absorber, its material, and thickness. However, etch product volatility is the fundamental requirement. Overlapping lithographic exposure near chip border may require etching through the multilayer, resulting in challenges in profile control and etch selectivity. Optical proximity correction is applied to further

  3. Nanostructured organic solar cells defined by nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Mukti Nath

    Energy harvesting from sunlight via organic solar cells (OSCs) based on polymers as an electron donors and fullerenes as electron acceptors has been subject of intensive research due to the potential for low cost and large area devices with attractive market perspectives. One of the biggest challenges for OSCs is their low efficiency of power conversion, which is limited by quality of active layer morphology of donor-acceptor materials and interfaces between the components. Key reasons for this low efficiency include severe electron-hole recombination, which prevents charge pair propagation toward the electrodes and poor light absorptions due to thin polymer layer (˜100 nm). These problems can be dramatically alleviated if the charge-transfer polymers can be arranged as periodic nanostructures for active layer of ˜300 nm so that enough light absorption takes place and no phase overlap exists in the charge propagation path. This work reports the formation of ordered bi-continuous interdigitized active layer morphology, well defined interfaces for charge pair formation and propagation without recombination toward the electrodes. Such nanostructure arrays of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) with well defined interfaces have been fabricated using nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The molds required for NIL are fabricated using innovative low cost and non-lithographic technique which is scalable to commercial use. Simultaneous control of nanostructured and 3-D chain alignment in P3HT nanostructures (nanowires and nanopillars) defined by NIL is revealed using out-of-plane and in-plane grazing incident X-ray diffraction measurements and enhancement in anisotropic charge carrier mobility favorable to solar cells and field effect transistors (FETs) is measured making FETs. Separate acceptor deposition is required for nanostructured solar cells which is challenging due to the limitation of solvent compatibility and self shadowing effect for thermal deposition. For this purpose

  4. 7nm logic optical lithography with OPC-Lite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smayling, Michael C.; Tsujita, Koichiro; Yaegashi, Hidetami; Axelrad, Valery; Nakayama, Ryo; Oyama, Kenichi; Yamauchi, Shohei; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Mikami, Koji

    2015-03-01

    The CMOS logic 22nm node was the last one done with single patterning. It used a highly regular layout style with Gridded Design Rules (GDR). Smaller nodes have required the same regular layout style but with multiple patterning for critical layers. A "line/cut" approach is being used to achieve good pattern fidelity and process margin.[1] As shown in Fig. 1, even with "line" patterns, pitch division will eventually be necessary. For the "cut" pattern, Design-Source-Mask Optimization (DSMO) has been demonstrated to be effective at the 20nm node and below.[2,3,4] Single patterning was found to be suitable down to 16nm, while double patterning extended optical lithography for cuts to the 10-12nm nodes. Design optimization avoided the need for triple patterning. Lines can be patterned with 193nm immersion with no complex OPC. The final line dimensions can be achieved by applying pitch division by two or four.[5] In this study, we extend the scaling using simplified OPC to the 7nm node for critical FEOL and BEOL layers. The test block is a reasonably complex logic function with ~100k gates of combinatorial logic and flip-flops, scaled from previous experiments. Simulation results show that for cuts at 7nm logic dimensions, the gate layer can be done with single patterning whose minimum pitch is 53nm, possibly some of the 1x metal layers can be done with double patterning whose minimum pitch is 53nm, and the contact layer will require triple patterning whose minimum pitch is 68nm. These pitches are less than the resolution limit of ArF NA=1.35 (72nm). However these patterns can be separated by a combination of innovative SMO for less than optical resolution limit and a process trick of hole-repair technique. An example of triple patterning coloring is shown in Fig 3. Fin and local interconnect are created by lines and trims. The number of trim patterns are 3 times (min. pitch=90nm) and twice (min. pitch=120nm), respectively. The small number of masks, large pitches, and

  5. Modeling and process design for laser interference lithography used in fabricating two-dimensional periodic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bostan, C.G.; Ridder, de R.M.; Dorssen, van I.; Wolferen, van H.A.G.M.; Kuipers, L.; Hulst, van N.F.

    2002-01-01

    Laser interference lithography (LIL) is a technique that can be successfully used for realization of 2D periodic structures, with excellent uniformity over large areas. However, detailed modeling is needed in order to extract the optimum design parameters. In this paper, we refer to a design procedu

  6. High-resolution laser lithography based on vortex laser and composite layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shichao; Liang, Yiyong; Li, Xiongfeng

    2016-11-01

    Traditional laser lithography systems cannot write sub-wavelength patterns due to the diffraction limit. In this paper, a novel super-resolution laser direct writing method is proposed to break through the diffraction limit. Compared with conventional lithography systems, the photoresist layer in this method is overlaid by an extra photochromic layer which is a mixture of metanil yellow and aqueous PVA solution. Then a vortex beam with a hollow energy distribution is used to expose the photochromic layer and make an annular region of the photochromic layer opaque to the writing beam. Thus, a virtual aperture is formed in the photochromic layer which can confine the diameter of the writing beam and reduce the linewidth exposed in the photoresist layer. Lithography process of this new method was modeled and a corresponding simulation was made. In this simulation, the intensity ratio of the two beams, relative absorption coefficients and other parameters were changed to study their influence to linewidth in the photoresist. An experimental setup was designed to validate the simulation, where the wavelengths of the writing beam and the vortex beam are 405 nm and 532 nm, respectively. These two beams are strictly coaxial when they are incident to the photochromic layer. The experimental results agree quite well with the model simulation, showing that the linewidth could be reduced by increasing the intensity ratio of the vortex beam to the writing beam. They also indicate that the vortex beam could effectively reduce the lithography linewidth to 300nm or even smaller.

  7. Direct Patterning of Covalent Organic Monolayers on Silicon Using Nanoimprint Lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorthuijzen, W. Pim; Yilmaz, M. Deniz; Gomez-Casado, Alberto; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Wiel, van der Wilfred G.; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2010-01-01

    Two fabrication schemes are reported for the direct patterning of organic monolayers on oxide-free silicon, combining top-down nanoimprint lithography and bottom-up monolayer formation. The first approach was designed to form monolayer patterns on the imprinted areas, while the second approach was d

  8. High resolution 100 kV electron beam lithography in SU-8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Jakobsen, S.; Schmidt, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    High resolution 100 kV electron beam lithography in thin layers of the negative resist SU-8 is demonstrated. Sub-30 nm lines with a pitch down to 300 nm are written in 100 nm thick SU-8. Two reactive ion etch processes are developed in order to transfer the SU-8 structures into a silicon substrat...

  9. High Excitation Efficiency of Channel Plasmon Polaritons in Tailored, UV-Lithography-Defined V-Grooves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Cameron; Thilsted, Anil Haraksingh; Garcia-Ortiz, Cesar E.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate >50% conversion of light to V-groove channel plasmon-polaritons (CPPs) via compact waveguide-termination mirrors. Devices are fabricated using UV-lithography and crystallographic silicon etching. The V-shape is tailored by thermal oxidation to support confined CPPs....

  10. Geometric-Phase Polarization Fan-out Grating Fabricated with Deep-UV Interference Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chenhao; Lombardo, David; Sarangan, Andrew; Zhan, Qiwen

    2017-06-01

    We report the design, fabrication and testing of a highly efficient polarization fan-out grating for coherent beam combining working at 1550 nm. The grating design exploits the geometric-phase effect. Deep-UV interference lithography is used to fabricate the designed grating. Such a polarization fan-out grating demonstrates several advantages that are ideal for laser beam combining.

  11. High-quality global hydrogen silsequioxane contact planarization for nanoimprint lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büyükköse, S.; Vratzov, B.; Wiel, van der W.G.

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a novel global contact planarization technique based on the spin-on-glass material hydrogen silsequioxane (HSQ) and demonstrate its excellent performance on patterns of 70 nm up to several microns generated by UV-based nanoimprint lithography. The HSQ layer (∼165 nm) is spin coa

  12. High-quality global hydrogen silsequioxane contact planarization for nanoimprint lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büyükköse, Serkan; Vratzov, Boris; Wiel, van der Wilfred G.

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a novel global contact planarization technique based on the spin-on-glass material hydrogen silsequioxane (HSQ) and demonstrate its excellent performance on patterns of 70 nm up to several microns generated by UV-based nanoimprint lithography. The HSQ layer (∼165 nm) is spin coat

  13. Fabrication and Characterization of Three Dimensional Photonic Crystals Generated by Multibeam Interference Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Chieh

    2009-01-01

    Multibeam interference lithography is investigated as a manufacturing technique for three-dimensional photonic crystal templates. In this research, optimization of the optical setup and the photoresist initiation system leads to a significant improvement of the optical quality of the crystal, as characterized by normal incidence optical…

  14. Focused helium and neon ion beam induced etching for advanced extreme ultraviolet lithography mask repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez, Carlos M.; Timilsina, Rajendra; Li, Guoliang; Duscher, Gerd; Rack, Philip D.; Slingenbergh, Winand; van Dorp, Willem F.; De Hosson, Jeff T. M.; Klein, Kate L.; Wu, Huimeng M.; Stern, Lewis A.

    2014-01-01

    The gas field ion microscope was used to investigate helium and neon ion beam induced etching of nickel as a candidate technique for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography mask editing. No discernable nickel etching was observed for room temperature helium exposures at 16 and 30 keV in the dose range

  15. Controlling bridging and pinching with pixel-based mask for inverse lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobelkov, Sergey; Tritchkov, Alexander; Han, JiWan

    2016-03-01

    Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) has become a viable computational lithography candidate in recent years as it can produce mask output that results in process latitude and CD control in the fab that is hard to match with conventional OPC/SRAF insertion approaches. An approach to solving the inverse lithography problem as a nonlinear, constrained minimization problem over a domain mask pixels was suggested in the paper by Y. Granik "Fast pixel-based mask optimization for inverse lithography" in 2006. The present paper extends this method to satisfy bridging and pinching constraints imposed on print contours. Namely, there are suggested objective functions expressing penalty for constraints violations, and their minimization with gradient descent methods is considered. This approach has been tested with an ILT-based Local Printability Enhancement (LPTM) tool in an automated flow to eliminate hotspots that can be present on the full chip after conventional SRAF placement/OPC and has been applied in 14nm, 10nm node production, single and multiple-patterning flows.

  16. Resist and Exposure Processes for Sub-10-nm Electron and Ion Beam Lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sidorkin, V.A.

    2010-01-01

    The research work described in this thesis deals with studying the ultimate resolution capabilities of electron and ion beam lithography (EBL and IBL respectively) with a focus on resist and exposure processes. The aim of this research was to enlarge knowledge and improve methods on the formation of

  17. High throughput, high resolution enzymatic lithography process: effect of crystallite size, moisture, and enzyme concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhantong; Ganesh, Manoj; Bucaro, Michael; Smolianski, Igor; Gross, Richard A; Lyons, Alan M

    2014-12-08

    By bringing enzymes into contact with predefined regions of a surface, a polymer film can be selectively degraded to form desired patterns that find a variety of applications in biotechnology and electronics. This so-called "enzymatic lithography" is an environmentally friendly process as it does not require actinic radiation or synthetic chemicals to develop the patterns. A significant challenge to using enzymatic lithography has been the need to restrict the mobility of the enzyme in order to maintain control of feature sizes. Previous approaches have resulted in low throughput and were limited to polymer films only a few nanometers thick. In this paper, we demonstrate an enzymatic lithography system based on Candida antartica lipase B (CALB) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) that can resolve fine-scale features, (Lithography (PPL) tool was developed to deposit an aqueous solution of CALB onto a spin-cast PCL film. Immobilization of the enzyme on the polymer surface was monitored using fluorescence microscopy by labeling CALB with FITC. The crystallite size in the PCL films was systematically varied; small crystallites resulted in significantly faster etch rates (20 nm/min) and the ability to resolve smaller features (as fine as 1 μm). The effect of printing conditions and relative humidity during incubation is also presented. Patterns formed in the PCL film were transferred to an underlying copper foil demonstrating a "Green" approach to the fabrication of printed circuit boards.

  18. Selective Etching via Soft Lithography of Conductive Multilayered Gold Films with Analysis of Electrolyte Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Ralph W.; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2008-01-01

    This experiment is designed to expose undergraduate students to the process of selective etching by using soft lithography and the resulting electrical properties of multilayered films fabricated via self-assembly of gold nanoparticles. Students fabricate a conductive film of gold on glass, apply a patterned resist using a polydimethylsiloxane…

  19. Combination photo and electron beam lithography with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbaugh, Daniel J; Pandya, Sneha G; Wright, Jason T; Kaya, Savas; Rahman, Faiz

    2017-09-12

    We describe techniques for performing photolithography and electron beam lithography in succession on the same resist-covered substrate. Larger openings are defined in the resist film through photolithography whereas smaller openings are defined through conventional electron beam lithography. The two processes are carried out one after the other and without an intermediate wet development step. At the conclusion of the two exposures, the resist film is developed once to reveal both large and small openings. Interestingly, these techniques are applicable to both positive and negative tone lithographies with both optical and electron beam exposure. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), by itself or mixed with a photocatalytic cross-linking agent, is used for this purpose. We demonstrate that such resists are sensitive to both ultraviolet (UV) and electron beam irradiation. All four possible combinations, consisting of optical and electron beam lithographies, carried out in positive and negative tone modes have been described. Demonstration grating structures have been shown and process conditions have been described for all four cases. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  20. A Low-Cost Hands-On Laboratory to Introduce Lithography Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, M.; Marti, J. J.; Kirchhoff, A. L.; Lawrenz, F.; Campbell, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    A lithography lab course has been developed that is applicable to students from the middle-school level up to college students. It can also be inserted into electronics technology or similar courses in two- and four-year colleges, or used to demonstrate applications of polymers in chemistry classes. Some of these techniques would enable research…

  1. Fabrication and Characterization of Three Dimensional Photonic Crystals Generated by Multibeam Interference Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Chieh

    2009-01-01

    Multibeam interference lithography is investigated as a manufacturing technique for three-dimensional photonic crystal templates. In this research, optimization of the optical setup and the photoresist initiation system leads to a significant improvement of the optical quality of the crystal, as characterized by normal incidence optical…

  2. Optical near-field lithography on hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Steen; Müllenborn, Matthias; Birkelund, Karen

    1996-01-01

    We report on a novel lithography technique for patterning of hydrogen-passivated amorphous silicon surfaces. A reflection mode scanning near-field optical microscope with uncoated fiber probes has been used to locally oxidize a thin amorphous silicon layer. Lines of 110 nm in width, induced...

  3. Evaluation of EUV resist performance below 20nm CD using helium ion lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, D.J.; Veldhoven, E. van; Langen-Suurling, A. van; Alkemade, P.F.A.; Wuister, S.; Hoefnagels, R.; Verspaget, C.; Meessen, J.; Fliervoet, T.

    2014-01-01

    For the introduction of EUV lithography, development of high performance EUV resists is of key importance. This development involves studies into resist sensitivity, resolving power and pattern uniformity. We have used a sub-nanometer-sized 30 keV helium ion beam to expose chemically amplified (CAR)

  4. Fabrication of anisotropically arrayed nano-slots metasurfaces using reflective plasmonic lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jun; Zeng, Bo; Wang, Changtao; Gao, Ping; Liu, Kaipeng; Pu, Mingbo; Jin, Jinjin; Zhao, Zeyu; Li, Xiong; Yu, Honglin; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-11-28

    Nanofabrication technology with high-resolution, high-throughput and low-cost is essential for the development of nanoplasmonic and nanophotonic devices. At present, most metasurfaces are fabricated in a point by point writing manner with electron beam lithography or a focused ion beam, which imposes a serious cost barrier with respect to practical applications. Near field optical lithography, seemingly providing a high-resolution and low-cost way, however, suffers from the ultra shallow depth and poor fidelity of obtained photoresist patterns due to the exponential decay feature of evanescent waves. Here, we propose a method of surface plasmonic imaging lithography by introducing a reflective plasmonic lens to amplify and compensate evanescent waves, resulting in the production of nano resist patterns with high fidelity, contrast and enhanced depth beyond that usually obtained by near field optical lithography. As examples, a discrete and anisotropically arrayed nano-slots mask pattern with different orientations and a size of 40 nm × 120 nm could be imaged in photoresist and transferred successfully onto a metal layer through an etching process. Evidence for the pattern quality is given by virtue of the fabricated metasurface lens devices showing good focusing performance in experiments. It is believed that this method provides a parallel, low-cost, high-throughput and large-area nanofabrication route for fabricating nanostructures of holograms, vortex phase plates, bio-sensors and solar cells etc.

  5. Thiol-Ene Based Polymer Waveguides Fabricated By Uv-Assisted Soft Lithography For Optofluidic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Guisheng; Jensen, Thomas Glasdam; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a thiol-ene based polymer waveguide, defined by UV-assisted soft lithography, is designed, fabricated and characterized. Waveguides are formed by filling microfluidic channels with a high refractive index liquid mixture of ‘thiol’ and ‘ene’ monomers (e.g., trimethylolpropane tris(3...

  6. Imprint lithography provides topographical nanocues to guide cell growth in primary cortical cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Sijia; Lüttge, Regina

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a technology platform to study the effect of nanocues on the cell growth direction in primary cortical cell culture. Topographical cues to cells are provided using nanoscale features created by Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography, coated with polyethylenimine. We

  7. Helium ion beam lithography (HIBL) using HafSOx as the resist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feixiang; Manichev, Viacheslav; Li, Mengjun; Mitchson, Gavin; Yakshinskiy, Boris; Gustafsson, Torgny; Johnson, David; Garfunkel, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Helium ion beam lithography (HIBL) is a novel alternative lithographic technique with the capacity of fabricating highresolution and high-density features. Only limited research has been performed exploring HIBL to date. HafSOx (Hf(OH)4-2x-2y(O2)x(SO4)y·qH2O) is a negative-tone inorganic resist that is one of several candidate resist materials for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) and e-beam lithography (EBL), and has been demonstrated to show high resolution, moderate sensitivity and low line-edge roughness (LER) in both EUVL and EBL. To date, no ion beam lithography work on HafSOx has been reported. In this study, we tested HafSOx as an HIBL resist and achieved a high sensitivity compared with EBL with a turn-on dose D100 ~ 2-4 μC/cm2. We obtained sub-10 nm line widths with low LER. A simple Monte Carlo simulation suggests that ionizing excitation accounts for most of the incident He ions' energy loss.

  8. Lithography focus/exposure control and corrections to improve CDU at post etch step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Ki; Yelverton, Mark; Tristan, John; Lee, Joungchel; Gutjahr, Karsten; Hsu, Ching-Hsiang; Wei, Hong; Wang, Lester; Li, Chen; Subramany, Lokesh; Chung, Woong Jae; Kim, Jeong Soo; Ramanathan, Vidya; Yap, LipKong; Gao, Jie; Karur-Shanmugam, Ram; Golotsvan, Anna; Herrera, Pedro; Huang, Kevin; Pierson, Bill

    2014-04-01

    As leading edge lithography moves to advanced nodes in high-mix, high-volume manufacturing environment, automated control of critical dimension (CD) within wafer has become a requirement. Current control methods to improve CD uniformity (CDU) generally rely upon the use of field by field exposure corrections via factory automation or through scanner sub-recipe. Such CDU control methods are limited to lithography step and cannot be extended to etch step. In this paper, a new method to improve CDU at post etch step by optimizing exposure at lithography step is introduced. This new solution utilizes GLOBALFOUNDRIES' factory automation system and KLA-Tencor's K-T Analyzer as the infrastructure to calculate and feed the necessary field by field level exposure corrections back to scanner, so as to achieve the optimal CDU at post etch step. CD at post lithography and post etch steps are measured by scatterometry metrology tools respectively and are used by K-T Analyzer as the input for correction calculations. This paper will explain in detail the philosophy as well as the methodology behind this novel CDU control solution. In addition, applications and use cases will be reviewed to demonstrate the capability and potential of this solution. The feasibility of adopting this solution in high-mix, high-volume manufacturing environment will be discussed as well.

  9. Positioning control system of three-dimensional wafer stage of lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Peng; Yan, Wei; Yang, Fan; Li, Fanxing; Hu, Song

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional wafer stage is an important component of lithography. It is required to high positioning precision and efficiency. The closed-loop positioning control system, that consists of five-phase step motor and grating scale, implements rapid and precision positioning control of the three-dimensional wafer stage. The MCU STC15W4K32S4, which is possession of six independent PWM output channels and the pulse width, period is adjustable, is used to control the three axes. The stepper motor driver and grating scale are subdivided according to the precision of lithography, and grating scale data is transmitted to the computer for display in real time via USB communication. According to the lithography material, mask parameter, incident light intensity, it's able to calculate the speed of Z axis, and then get the value of PWM period based on the mathematical formula of speed and pulse period, finally realize high precision control. Experiments show that the positioning control system of three-dimensional wafer stage can meet the requirement of lithography, the closed-loop system is high stability and precision, strong practicability.

  10. Resist and Exposure Processes for Sub-10-nm Electron and Ion Beam Lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sidorkin, V.A.

    2010-01-01

    The research work described in this thesis deals with studying the ultimate resolution capabilities of electron and ion beam lithography (EBL and IBL respectively) with a focus on resist and exposure processes. The aim of this research was to enlarge knowledge and improve methods on the formation of

  11. Integrating nanotubes into microsystems with electron beam lithography and in situ catalytically activated growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerde, Kjetil; Fornés-Mora, Marc; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    2006-01-01

    the possibility of waferscale fabrication of such devices. We combine conventional microfabrication techniques with state of the art electron beam lithography (EBL) to precisely position catalyst nanoparticles with sub 100 nm diameter into the microsystems. In particular, we have explored two main approaches...

  12. Hybrid microelectronic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, P.

    Various areas of hybrid microelectronic technology are discussed. The topics addressed include: basic thick film processing, thick film pastes and substrates, add-on components and attachment methods, thin film processing, and design of thick film hybrid circuits. Also considered are: packaging hybrid circuits, automating the production of hybrid circuits, application of hybrid techniques, customer's view of hybrid technology, and quality control and assurance in hybrid circuit production.

  13. Architecture for next-generation massively parallel maskless lithography system (MPML2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ming-Shing; Tsai, Kuen-Yu; Lu, Yi-Chang; Kuo, Yu-Hsuan; Pei, Ting-Hang; Yen, Jia-Yush

    2010-03-01

    Electron-beam lithography is promising for future manufacturing technology because it does not suffer from wavelength limits set by light sources. Since single electron-beam lithography systems have a common problem in throughput, a multi-electron-beam lithography (MEBL) system should be a feasible alternative using the concept of massive parallelism. In this paper, we evaluate the advantages and the disadvantages of different MEBL system architectures, and propose our novel Massively Parallel MaskLess Lithography System, MPML2. MPML2 system is targeting for cost-effective manufacturing at the 32nm node and beyond. The key structure of the proposed system is its beamlet array cells (BACs). Hundreds of BACs are uniformly arranged over the whole wafer area in the proposed system. Each BAC has a data processor and an array of beamlets, and each beamlet consists of an electron-beam source, a source controller, a set of electron lenses, a blanker, a deflector, and an electron detector. These essential parts of beamlets are integrated using MEMS technology, which increases the density of beamlets and reduces the system cost. The data processor in the BAC processes layout information coming off-chamber and dispatches them to the corresponding beamlet to control its ON/OFF status. High manufacturing cost of masks is saved in maskless lithography systems, however, immense mask data are needed to be handled and transmitted. Therefore, data compression technique is applied to reduce required transmission bandwidth. The compression algorithm is fast and efficient so that the real-time decoder can be implemented on-chip. Consequently, the proposed MPML2 can achieve 10 wafers per hour (WPH) throughput for 300mm-wafer systems.

  14. Single electron tunneling in large scale nanojunction arrays with bisferrocene-nanoparticle hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Shilpi; Kumar, Susmit; Marzo, Pasquale; Primiceri, Elisabetta; di Corato, Riccardo; Rinaldi, Ross; Cozzi, Pier Giorgio; Bramanti, Alessandro Paolo; Maruccio, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    We report on the fabrication and single electron tunneling behaviour of large scale arrays of nanogap electrodes bridged by bisferrocene-gold nanoparticle hybrids (BFc-AuNP). Coulomb staircase was observed in the low temperature current-voltage curves measured on the junctions with asymmetric tunnel barriers. On the other hand, junctions with symmetric tunneling barrier exhibited mere nonlinear current voltage characteristics without discrete staircase. The experimental results agreed well with simulations based on the orthodox theory. The junction resistance showed thermally activated conduction behaviour at higher temperature. The overall voltage and temperature dependent results show that the transport behaviour of the large arrays of single particle devices obtained by a facile optical lithography and chemical etching process corresponds with the behaviour of single particle devices fabricated by other techniques like e-beam lithography and mechanical breaking methods.We report on the fabrication and single electron tunneling behaviour of large scale arrays of nanogap electrodes bridged by bisferrocene-gold nanoparticle hybrids (BFc-AuNP). Coulomb staircase was observed in the low temperature current-voltage curves measured on the junctions with asymmetric tunnel barriers. On the other hand, junctions with symmetric tunneling barrier exhibited mere nonlinear current voltage characteristics without discrete staircase. The experimental results agreed well with simulations based on the orthodox theory. The junction resistance showed thermally activated conduction behaviour at higher temperature. The overall voltage and temperature dependent results show that the transport behaviour of the large arrays of single particle devices obtained by a facile optical lithography and chemical etching process corresponds with the behaviour of single particle devices fabricated by other techniques like e-beam lithography and mechanical breaking methods. Electronic supplementary

  15. Hybrid Gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Robert F. (Inventor); Roberts, Gary D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid gear consisting of metallic outer rim with gear teeth and metallic hub in combination with a composite lay up between the shaft interface (hub) and gear tooth rim is described. The composite lay-up lightens the gear member while having similar torque carrying capability and it attenuates the impact loading driven noise/vibration that is typical in gear systems. The gear has the same operational capability with respect to shaft speed, torque, and temperature as an all-metallic gear as used in aerospace gear design.

  16. Hybrid Qualifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    has turned out as a major focus of European education and training policies and certainly is a crucial principle underlying the European Qualifications Framework (EQF). In this context, «hybrid qualifications» (HQ) may be seen as an interesting approach to tackle these challenges as they serve «two...... masters», i.e. by producing skills for the labour market and enabling individuals to progress more or less directly to higher education. The specific focus of this book is placed on conditions, structures and processes which help to combine VET with qualifications leading into higher education...

  17. Ultra-low loss fully-etched grating couplers for perfectly vertical coupling compatible with DUV lithography tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabos, G.; Pleros, N.; Tsiokos, D.

    2016-03-01

    Hybrid integration of VCSELs onto silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates has emerged as an attractive approach for bridging the gap between cost-effective and energy-efficient directly modulated laser sources and silicon-based PICs by leveraging flip-chip (FC) bonding techniques and silicon grating couplers (GCs). In this context, silicon GCs, should comply with the process requirements imposed by the complimentary-metal-oxide-semiconductor manufacturing tools addressing in parallel the challenges originating from the perfectly vertical incidence. Firstly, fully etched GCs compatible with deep-ultraviolet lithography tools offering high coupling efficiencies are imperatively needed to maintain low fabrication cost. Secondly, GC's tolerance to VCSEL bonding misalignment errors is a prerequisite for practical deployment. Finally, a major challenge originating from the perfectly vertical coupling scheme is the minimization of the direct back-reflection to the VCSEL's outgoing facet which may destabilize its operation. Motivated from the above challenges, we used numerical simulation tools to design an ultra-low loss, bidirectional VCSEL-to-SOI optical coupling scheme for either TE or TM polarization, based on low-cost fully etched GCs with a Si-layer of 340 nm without employing bottom reflectors or optimizing the buried-oxide layer. Comprehensive 2D Finite-Difference-Time- Domain simulations have been performed. The reported GC layout remains fully compatible with the back-end-of-line (BEOL) stack associated with the 3D integration technology exploiting all the inter-metal-dielectric (IMD) layers of the CMOS fab. Simulation results predicted for the first time in fully etched structures a coupling efficiency of as low as -0.87 dB at 1548 nm and -1.47 dB at 1560 nm with a minimum direct back-reflection of -27.4 dB and -14.2 dB for TE and TM polarization, respectively.

  18. Alternative technological development for RF hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antônio Finardi, Célio; da Fontoura Ponchet, André; Battesini Adamo, Cristina; Flacker, Alexander; Cotrin Teixeira, Ricardo; Panepucci, Roberto Ricardo

    2017-03-01

    The paper presents a technological solution for high frequency packaging platform evaluated up to 40 GHz. The main purpose of this development was to define an alternative hybrid technology that is more flexible and faster to prototype compared with thin film or multi chip module (MCM-D). The alternative technology also shows adequate performance for high bit rate solutions integrating optical and electronics blocks. This approach consists of a soft substrate (laminate material), plating processes (electroless Ni-P/Au, electrolytic Au) and lithography patterning. Ground coplanar waveguide was used for microwave structures with excellent ground planes connections due to easy via holes implementation. We present results of high frequency packaging of important RF blocks, such as integrated broadband bias-T, transimpedance amplifier ICs and silicon photonics optical modulators. The paper demonstrates a solution for high frequency hybridization that can be implemented with standard substrates, designed with any shape and with large numbers of metalized via holes and compatible with usual assembling techniques.

  19. Enhancement of superconductivity in NbN nanowires by negative electron-beam lithography with positive resist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charaev, I.; Silbernagel, T.; Bachowsky, B.; Kuzmin, A.; Doerner, S.; Ilin, K.; Semenov, A.; Roditchev, D.; Vodolazov, D. Yu.; Siegel, M.

    2017-08-01

    We performed comparative experimental investigation of superconducting NbN nanowires which were prepared by means of positive- and negative electron-beam lithography with the same positive tone Poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) resist. We show that nanowires with a thickness 4.9 nm and widths less than 100 nm demonstrate at 4.2 K higher critical temperature and higher density of critical and retrapping currents when they are prepared by negative lithography. Also the ratio of the experimental critical current to the depairing critical current is larger for nanowires prepared by negative lithography. We associate the observed enhancement of superconducting properties with the difference in the degree of damage that nanowire edges sustain in the lithographic process. A whole range of advantages which is offered by the negative lithography with positive PMMA resist ensures high potential of this technology for improving the performance metrics of superconducting nanowire singe-photon detectors.

  20. Characterization of Bragg gratings in Al2O3 waveguides fabricated by focused ion beam milling and laser interference lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ay, F.; Bernhardi, Edward; Agazzi, L.; Bradley, J.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Pollnau, Markus; de Ridder, R.M.

    Optical grating cavities in Al2O3 channel waveguides were successfully defined by focused ion beam milling and laser interference lithography. Both methods are shown to be suitable for realizing resonant structures for on-chip waveguide lasers.

  1. Material Transport and Synthesis by Cantilever-free Scanning Probe Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xing

    Reliably synthesizing and transporting materials in nanoscale is the key question in many fields of nanotechnology. Cantilever-free scanning probe lithography, by replacing fragile and costly cantilevers with a robust and low cost elastomeric structure, fundamentally solved the low-throughput nature of scanning probe lithography, which has great potential to be a powerful and point-of-use tool for high throughput synthesis of various kinds of nanomaterials. Two nanolithographic methods, polymer pen lithography (PPL) and beam pen lithography (BPL), have been developed based on the cantilever-free architecture to directly deliver materials and transfer energy to substrates, respectively. The first portion of my thesis, including chapter two and chapter three, addresses major challenges remaining in the cantilever-free scanning probe lithographic techniques. Chapter two details the role of contact force in polymer pen lithography. A geometric model was developed to quantitatively explain the relationship between the z-piezo extension, the contact force and the resulted feature size. With such a model, force can be used as the in-situ feedback during the patterning and a new method for leveling the pen arrays was developed, which utilizes the total force between the pen arrays and the surface to achieve leveling with a tilt of less than 0.004°. In chapter three, massively multiplexed near-field photolithography has been demonstrated by combining BPL with a batch method to fabricate nanometer scale apertures in parallel fashion and a strategy to individually actuation of each pen in the pen array are discussed. This transformative combination enables one to writing arbitrary patterns composed of diffraction-unlimited features over square centimeter areas that are in registry with existing patterns and nanostructures, creating a unified tool for constructing and studying nanomaterials. The second portion of this thesis focuses on applications of cantilever-free scanning

  2. 铁电刻蚀的研究进展%Research Progress of the Ferroelectric Lithography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘黎明; 曾华荣; 杨培志; 李国荣; 殷庆瑞

    2011-01-01

    Ferroelectric lithography is a novel lithography technique and receives considerable attention in the research area of ferroelectrics. The research status of the ferroelectric lithography is reviewed. The effect of the domain polarization on surface properties of ferroelectric materials is described firstly. Then three ferroelectric domain patterning approaches for patterning surface domains, including micro-electrodes, scanning probe microscopy and electron beams,are introduced in detail. The mechanisms and characteristics of the three approaches are analyzed. The minimum size of ferroelectric domain patterns using micro-electrodes patterning approach is in the micrometer size range, but the size of domains by scanning probe patterning and electron beam patterning is less than 100 nm. The ferroelectric lithography in combination with the domain-specific surface reactivity provides a new approach for the nanostructure fabrication,and has wide application prospects in the field of nano-devices. The development of ferroelectric lithography research will focus on the improvement of the ferroelectric lithography technique and the enhancement of its application in nano-devices in the future.%铁电刻蚀是一种新颖的刻蚀技术,在铁电研究领域日益受到重视.对铁电刻蚀的研究现状进行了综述.首先介绍了铁电极化对铁电材料表面性能的影响,然后详细阐述了铁电畴图形化的三种方法,即微电极图形化、扫描探针图形化和电子束图形化,并分析了它们的图形化机制和特点.其中微电极方法的铁电畴图形的最小尺寸为微米量级,而扫描探针和电子束方法的铁电畴图形的最小尺寸可小于100 nm.与铁电畴定位的表面反应相结合,铁电刻蚀可为纳米结构的制造提供新的途径,因此在纳米器件领域具有广泛的应用前景.未来铁电刻蚀技术发展的方向是在改进铁电刻蚀技术的同时推进其在纳米器件制造中的应用.

  3. Beryllium window and acoustic delay line design for x-ray lithography beam lines at the University of Wisconsin Center for X-ray Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, E. L.; Hamilton, W.; Wells, G.; Cerrina, F.; Corradini, M.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray lithography systems require sample chambers that can perform exposures in helium gas at atmospheric pressure. The interface between the experimental chamber and the beamline is critical for x-ray lithography and the storage ring. It must allow a high x-ray flux throughput while providing a vacuum barrier so that helium gas does not leak into the beam line and the storage ring. The beam line must also be designed to have protection in the case that a window does fail in order to minimize adverse effects to the ring and other systems. The details of the design for the vacuum system used on beam lines for the Center for X-ray Lithography at the University of Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center 1-GeV electron storage ring are reported. Curved beryllium windows with a 1×5-cm2 aperture and 13 μm thick that have a leak rate less than 10-10 Torr l/s have been successfully used at the experimental chamber beam-line interface. This thin flat beryllium foil is mounted in a curved housing with a wire seal to minimize helium leakage. The window assembly is designed and has been tested to withstand substantial overpressure before failure. If the beryllium window does fail, the beamline has an acoustic delay line that is designed to delay the incoming shock wave of helium gas so that a fast valve at the end of the beam line will close and minimize leakage of helium into the storage ring. The acoustic delay line is designed with baffles to slow the shock front and a secondary thin window to protect against molecular diffusion into the storage ring. The acoustic delay line has been tested to determine the effect of baffle design on delay of the shock wave. A theoretical model that provides a good description of the acoustic delay has also been developed.

  4. Polyarylenesulfonium Salt as a Novel and Versatile Nonchemically Amplified Negative Tone Photoresist for High-Resolution Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Pulikanti Guruprasad; Pal, Satyendra Prakash; Kumar, Pawan; Pradeep, Chullikkattil P; Ghosh, Subrata; Sharma, Satinder K; Gonsalves, Kenneth E

    2017-01-11

    The present report demonstrates the potential of a polyarylenesulfonium polymer, poly[methyl(4-(phenylthio)-phenyl)sulfoniumtrifluoromethanesulfonate] (PAS), as a versatile nonchemically amplified negative tone photoresist for next-generation lithography (NGL) applications starting from i-line (λ ∼ 365 nm) to extreme ultraviolet (EUV, λ ∼ 13.5 nm) lithography. PAS exhibited considerable contrast (γ), 0.08, toward EUV and patterned 20 nm features successfully.

  5. Deep lithography with protons Modelling and predicting the performances of a novel fabrication technology for micro-optical components

    CERN Document Server

    Volckaerts, B; Veretennicoff, I; Thienpont, H

    2002-01-01

    We developed a simulation package that predicts 3D-dose distributions in proton irradiated poly(methylmetacrylate) samples considering primary energy transfer and scattering phenomena. In this paper, we apply this code to predict the surface flatness and maximum thickness of micro-optical and mechanical structures fabricated with deep lithography with protons (DLP). We compare these simulation results with experimental data and highlight the fundamental differences between DLP and deep X-ray lithography.

  6. Intuitionistic hybrid logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braüner, Torben

    2011-01-01

    Intuitionistic hybrid logic is hybrid modal logic over an intuitionistic logic basis instead of a classical logical basis. In this short paper we introduce intuitionistic hybrid logic and we give a survey of work in the area.......Intuitionistic hybrid logic is hybrid modal logic over an intuitionistic logic basis instead of a classical logical basis. In this short paper we introduce intuitionistic hybrid logic and we give a survey of work in the area....

  7. Continuity Controlled Hybrid Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Bergstra, J. A.; Middelburg, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the connections between the process algebra for hybrid systems of Bergstra and Middelburg and the formalism of hybrid automata of Henzinger et al. We give interpretations of hybrid automata in the process algebra for hybrid systems and compare them with the standard interpretation of hybrid automata as timed transition systems. We also relate the synchronized product operator on hybrid automata to the parallel composition operator of the process algebra. It turns out that the f...

  8. ATOMIC FORCE LITHOGRAPHY OF NANO MICROFLUIDIC CHANNELS FOR VERIFICATION AND MONITORING IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, R.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Lam, P.

    2011-06-09

    The growing interest in the physics of fluidic flow in nanoscale channels, as well as the possibility for high sensitive detection of ions and single molecules is driving the development of nanofluidic channels. The enrichment of charged analytes due to electric field-controlled flow and surface charge/dipole interactions along the channel can lead to enhancement of sensitivity and limits-of-detection in sensor instruments. Nuclear material processing, waste remediation, and nuclear non-proliferation applications can greatly benefit from this capability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a low-cost alternative for the machining of disposable nanochannels. The small AFM tip diameter (< 10 nm) can provide for features at scales restricted in conventional optical and electron-beam lithography. This work presents preliminary results on the fabrication of nano/microfluidic channels on polymer films deposited on quartz substrates by AFM lithography.

  9. ATOMIC FORCE LITHOGRAPHY OF NANO/MICROFLUIDIC CHANNELS FOR VERIFICATION AND MONITORING OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez-Torres, A.; Torres, R.; Lam, P.

    2011-07-15

    The growing interest in the physics of fluidic flow in nanoscale channels, as well as the possibility for high sensitive detection of ions and single molecules is driving the development of nanofluidic channels. The enrichment of charged analytes due to electric field-controlled flow and surface charge/dipole interactions along the channel can lead to enhancement of sensitivity and limits-of-detection in sensor instruments. Nuclear material processing, waste remediation, and nuclear non-proliferation applications can greatly benefit from this capability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a low-cost alternative for the machining of disposable nanochannels. The small AFM tip diameter (< 10 nm) can provide for features at scales restricted in conventional optical and electron-beam lithography. This work presents preliminary results on the fabrication of nano/microfluidic channels on polymer films deposited on quartz substrates by AFM lithography.

  10. A new algorithm of inverse lithography technology for mask complexity reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yanghuan; Shi Zheng; Geng Zhen; Yang Yiwei; Yan Xiaolang

    2012-01-01

    A new complexity penalty term called the global wavelet penalty is introduced,which evaluates the high-frequency components of masks more profoundly by applying four distinctive Haar wavelet transforms and choosing the optimal direction on which the highest frequency components of the mask will be removed.Then,a new gradient-based inverse lithography technology (ILT) algorithm is proposed,with the computation of the global wavelet penalty as the emphasis of its first phase for mask complexity reduction.Experiments with three typical 65 nm flash ROM patterns under existing 90 nm lithographic conditions show that compared with the gradientbased algorithm,which relies on the so-called local wavelet penalty,the total vertices of the three results created by the proposed algorithm can be reduced by 12.89%,12.63% and 12.64%,respectively,while the accuracy of the lithography results remains the same.

  11. Reaching the theoretical resonance quality factor limit in coaxial plasmonic nanoresonators fabricated by helium ion lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melli, M; Polyakov, A; Gargas, D; Huynh, C; Scipioni, L; Bao, W; Ogletree, D F; Schuck, P J; Cabrini, S; Weber-Bargioni, A

    2013-06-12

    Optical antenna structures have revolutionized the field of nano-optics by confining light to deep subwavelength dimensions for spectroscopy and sensing. In this work, we fabricated coaxial optical antennae with sub-10-nanometer critical dimensions using helium ion lithography (HIL). Wavelength dependent transmission measurements were used to determine the wavelength-dependent optical response. The quality factor of 11 achieved with our HIL fabricated structures matched the theoretically predicted quality factor for the idealized flawless gold resonators calculated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD). For comparison, coaxial antennae with 30 nm critical dimensions were fabricated using both HIL and the more common Ga focus ion beam lithography (Ga-FIB). The quality factor of the Ga-FIB resonators was 60% of the ideal HIL results for the same design geometry due to limitations in the Ga-FIB fabrication process.

  12. Polymer microfluidic bioreactor fabrication by means of gray scale lithography technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierakowski, Andrzej; Prokaryn, Piotr; Dobrowolski, Rafał; Malinowska, Anna; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Grabiec, Piotr; Trojanowski, Damian; Jakimowicz, Dagmara; Zakrzewska-Czerwinska, Jolanta

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we present a new method of polymer microfluidic bioreactor fabrication by means of a gray scale lithography technique. As a result of the gray scale lithography process the 3D model of the bioreactor is defined in photoresist. The obtained model serves as a sacrificial layer for the subsequent transfer of the 3D shape into the polymer material. The proposed method allows simultaneous definition of both the overall bioreactor geometry and the multi steps cell traps in a single photolithography step. Such microfluidic structure can be used for sorting cells based on their size. The developed solution significantly simplifies the production technology and reduces its costs in comparison to standard photolithography techniques.

  13. Fabrication of sub-12 nm thick silicon nanowires by processing scanning probe lithography masks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyoung Ryu, Yu; Garcia, Ricardo, E-mail: r.garcia@csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Aitor Postigo, Pablo; Garcia, Fernando [Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (IMM-CNM-CSIC), 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-06-02

    Silicon nanowires are key elements to fabricate very sensitive mechanical and electronic devices. We provide a method to fabricate sub-12 nm silicon nanowires in thickness by combining oxidation scanning probe lithography and anisotropic dry etching. Extremely thin oxide masks (0.3–1.1 nm) are transferred into nanowires of 2–12 nm in thickness. The width ratio between the mask and the silicon nanowire is close to one which implies that the nanowire width is controlled by the feature size of the nanolithography. This method enables the fabrication of very small single silicon nanowires with cross-sections below 100 nm{sup 2}. Those values are the smallest obtained with a top-down lithography method.

  14. Evaluation of nanoimprint lithography as a fabrication method of distributed feedback laser diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, M; Tsuji, Y; Yoshinaga, H; Hiratsuka, K [Transmission Devices R and D Laboratories, Sumitomo Electric Industries, LTD., 1, Taya-cho, Sakae-ku, Yokohama, 244-8588 Kanagawa (Japan); Taniguchi, J, E-mail: myanagsw@sei.co.j [Faculty of Industrial Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, 278-8510 Chiba (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    We have succeeded in employing nanoimprint lithography (NIL) to form the diffraction gratings of distributed feedback laser diodes (DFB LDs) used in optical communication. Uniform gratings and phase-shifted gratings with periods of 232 nm have been formed by using a reverse NIL with a step-and-repeat imprint tool. Line edge roughness has been sufficiently low with the fabricated gratings. DFB LDs fabricated by NIL have indicated comparable characteristics with LDs fabricated by electron beam lithography. We have also demonstrated that phase-shifted DFB LDs show better uniformity in characteristics than uniform-grating DFB LDs. The results of this study indicate that NIL has high potential for the fabrication of DFB LDs.

  15. Recent Advances in Unconventional Lithography for Challenging 3D Hierarchical Structures and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Uk Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In nanoscience and nanotechnology, nanofabrication is critical. Among the required processes for nanofabrication, lithography is one of core issues. Although conventional photolithography with recent remarkable improvement has contributed to the industry during the past few decades, fabrication of 3-dimensional (3D nanostructure is still challenging. In this review, we summarize recent advances for the construction of 3D nanostructures by unconventional lithography and the combination of two top-down approaches or top-down and bottom-up approaches. We believe that the 3D hierarchical nanostructures described here will have a broad range of applications having adaptable levels of functional integration of precisely controlled nanoarchitectures that are required by not only academia, but also industry.

  16. Deep X-ray lithography for the fabrication of microstructures at ELSA

    CERN Document Server

    Pantenburg, F J

    2001-01-01

    Two beamlines at the Electron Stretcher Accelerator (ELSA) of Bonn University are dedicated for the production of microstructures by deep X-ray lithography with synchrotron radiation. They are equipped with state-of-the-art X-ray scanners, maintained and used by Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. Polymer microstructure heights between 30 and 3000 mu m are manufactured regularly for research and industrial projects. This requires different characteristic energies. Therefore, ELSA operates routinely at 1.6, 2.3 and 2.7 GeV, for high-resolution X-ray mask fabrication, deep and ultra-deep X-ray lithography, respectively. The experimental setup, as well as the structure quality of deep and ultra deep X-ray lithographic microstructures are described.

  17. Formation and properties of 3D metamaterial composites fabricated using nanometer scale laser lithography (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokes, Sharka M.; Perkins, Frank K.; Glembocki, Orest J.

    2015-08-01

    Metamaterials designed for the visible or near IR wavelengths require patterning on the nanometer scale. To achieve this, e-beam lithography is used, but it is extremely difficult and can only produce 2D structures. A new alternative technique to produce 2D and 3D structures involves laser fabrication using the Nanoscribe 3D laser lithography system. This is a direct laser writing technique which can form arbitrary 3D nanostructures on the nanometer scale and is based on multi-photon polymerization. We are creating 2D and 3D metamaterials via this technique, and subsequently conformally coating them using Atomic Layer Deposition of oxides and Ag. We will discuss the optical properties of these novel composite structures and their potential for dual resonant metamaterials.

  18. Neutral particle lithography: a simple solution to charge-related artefacts in ion beam proximity printing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, J C; Craver, B P [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Nanosystem Manufacturing Center, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-4005 (United States)

    2008-01-21

    Neutral particle lithography (NPL) is a high resolution, proximity exposure technique where a broad beam of energetic neutral atoms floods a stencil mask and transmitted beamlets transfer the mask pattern to resist on a substrate. It preserves the advantages of ion beam lithography, including extremely large depth-of-field, sub-5 nm resist scattering, and the near absence of diffraction, yet is intrinsically immune to charge-related artefacts including line-edge roughness and pattern placement errors due to charge accumulation on the mask and substrate. This paper reviews the principles of NPL, surveys recent advances in the field and discusses applications involving insulating substrates, large proximity gaps or ultra-small features where the approach has particular advantages.

  19. Surface energy-tunable iso decyl acrylate based molds for low pressure-nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Hyowon; Tahk, Dongha; Jeong, Chanho; Lee, Sori; Kim, Tae-il

    2017-10-01

    We presented surface energy-tunable nanoscale molds for unconventional lithography. The mold is highly robust, transparent, has a minimized haze, does not contain additives, and is a non-fluorinated isodecyl acrylate and trimethylolpropane triacrylate based polymer. By changing the mixing ratio of the polymer components, the cross-linking density, mechanical modulus, and surface energy (crucial factors in low pressure ((1–2) × 105 N m‑2) low pressure-nanoimprint lithography (LP-NIL)), can be controlled. To verify these properties of the molds, we also characterized the surface energy by measuring the contact angles and calculating the work of adhesion among the wafer, polymer film, and mold for successful demolding in nanoscale structures. Moreover, the molds showed high optical clarity and precisely tunable mechanical and surface properties, capable of replicating sub-100 nm patterns by thermal LP-NIL and UV-NIL.

  20. High-power laser interference lithography process on photoresist: Effect of laser fluence and polarisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellman, M. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018, San Sebastian (Spain)], E-mail: mellman@ceit.es; Rodriguez, A.; Perez, N.; Echeverria, M. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018, San Sebastian (Spain); Verevkin, Y.K. [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ul' yanova Street, 603600 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Peng, C.S. [ORC (Tampere University of Technology), Korkeakoulunkatu 3, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Berthou, T. [SILIOS Technologies SA, Rue Gaston Imbert prolongee 13790 Peynier (France); Wang, Z. [MEC (Cardiff University), Queen' s Buildings, The Parade, Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Olaizola, S.M.; Ayerdi, I. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018, San Sebastian (Spain)

    2009-03-01

    High throughput and low cost fabrication techniques in the sub-micrometer scale are attractive for the industry. Laser interference lithography (LIL) is a promising technique that can produce one, two and three-dimensional periodical patterns over large areas. In this work, two- and four-beam laser interference lithography systems are implemented to produce respectively one- and two-dimensional periodical patterns. A high-power single pulse of {approx}8 ns is used as exposure process. The optimum exposure dose for a good feature patterning in a 600 nm layer of AZ-1505 photoresist deposited on silicon wafers is studied. The best aspect ratio is found for a laser fluence of 20 mJ/cm{sup 2}. A method to control the width of the sub-micrometer structures based on controlling the resist thickness and the laser fluence is proposed.

  1. Three-Dimensional Organic Microlasers with Low Lasing Thresholds Fabricated by Multiphoton Lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Vincent W; Lafargue, Clement; Mansfield, Eric S; Yom, Jeannie; Johnstone, Luke; Hales, Joel M; Bittner, Stefan; Charpignon, Severin; Ulbricht, David; Lautru, Joseph; Denisyuk, Igor; Zyss, Joseph; Perry, Joseph W; Lebental, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Cuboid-shaped organic microcavities containing a pyrromethene laser dye and supported upon a photonic crystal have been investigated as an approach to reducing the lasing threshold of the cavities. Multiphoton lithography facilitated fabrication of the cuboid cavities directly on the substrate or on the decoupling structure, while similar structures were fabricated on the substrate by UV lithography for comparison. Significant reduction of the lasing threshold by up to a factor of 4 has been observed for cavities supported by the photonic crystal relative to those fabricated on the substrate. The lasing mode spectra of the cuboid microresonators provide strong evidence showing that the lasing modes are localized in the horizontal plane, with the shape of an inscribed diamond.

  2. Full-chip characterization of compression algorithms for direct-write maskless lithography systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhor, Avideh; Dai, Vito; Cramer, George

    2009-03-01

    Future lithography systems must produce more dense microchips with smaller feature sizes, while maintaining throughput comparable to today's optical lithography systems. This places stringent data-handling requirements on the design of any maskless lithography system. Today's optical lithography systems transfer one layer of data from the mask to the entire wafer in about sixty seconds. To achieve a similar throughput for a direct-write maskless lithography system with a pixel size of 22 nm, data rates of about 12 Tb/s are required. Over the past 8 years, we have proposed a datapath architecture for delivering such a data rate to a parallel array of writers. Our proposed system achieves this data rate contingent on two assumptions: consistent 10 to 1 compression of lithography data, and implementation of real-time hardware decoder, fabricated on a microchip together with a massively parallel array of lithography writers, capable of decoding 12 Tb/s of data. To address the compression efficiency problem, in the past few years, we have developed a new technique, Context Copy Combinatorial Coding (C4), designed specifically for microchip layer images, with a low-complexity decoder for application to the datapath architecture. C4 combines the advantages of JBIG and ZIP, to achieve compression ratios higher than existing techniques. We have also devised Block C4, a variation of C4 with up to hundred times faster encoding times, with little or no loss in compression efficiency. While our past work has focused on characterizing the compression efficiency of C4 and Block C4 on samples of a variety of industrial layouts, there has been no full chip performance characterization of these algorithms. In this paper, we show compression efficiency results of Block C4 and competing techniques such as BZIP2 and ZIP for the Poly, Active, Contact, Metal1, Via1, and Metal2 layers of a complete industry 65 nm layout. Overall, we have found that compression efficiency varies

  3. Fast fabrication of curved microlens array using DMD-based lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Curved microlens array is the core element of the biologically inspired artificial compound eye. Many existing fabrication processes remain expensive and complicated, which limits a broad range of application of the artificial compound eye. In this paper, we report a fast fabrication method for curved microlens array by using DMD-based maskless lithography. When a three-dimensional (3D target curved profile is projected into a two-dimensional (2D mask, arbitrary curved microlens array can be flexibly and efficiently obtained by utilizing DMD-based lithography. In order to verify the feasibility of this method, a curved PDMS microlens array with 90 micro lenslets has been fabricated. The physical and optical characteristics of the fabricated microlens array suggest that this method is potentially suitable for applications in artificial compound eye.

  4. Light-sheet based lithography technique for patterning an array of microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Kavya; Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2017-02-08

    We propose a Light-sheet laser interference lithography technique for fabricating periodic microfluidic channels. This technique uses multiple light-sheet illumination pattern that is generated using a spatial filter at the back-aperture of the cylindrical lens. Specially designed spatial filter is used that give rise to a periodic pattern at the focal plane which is essentially a 1D Fourier transform of the spatial filter transfer function. One-dimensional focusing property of the cylindrical lens result in the generation of line shaped channel geometry. To design microfluidic channels, the illumination pattern is exposed to the glass substrate coated with a photopolymer sensitized to 532 nm and subsequently developed using standard chemical protocols. Experimentally, the 1D periodic channel structure has an approximate width and periodicity of approximately 11.25 microns. Light-sheets based lithography technique offer a fast and single-shot process to generate microfluidic channels. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Fabrication of Spin-Transfer Nano-Oscillator by Colloidal Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We fabricate nanoscale spin-transfer oscillators (STOs by utilizing colloidal nanoparticles as a lithographic mask. By this approach, high quality STO devices can be fabricated, and as an example the fabricated STO devices using MgO magnetic tunnel junction as the basic cell exhibit current-induced microwave emission with a large frequency tunability of 0.22 GHz/mA. Compared to the conventional approaches that involve a step of defining nanoscale elements by means of electron beam lithography, which is not readily available for many groups, our strategy for STO fabrication does not require the sophisticated equipment (~ million dollars per unit and expensive lithography resist, while being cost-effective and easy to use in laboratory level. This will accelerate efforts to implement STO into on-chip integrated high-radio frequency applications.

  6. Design and Simulation of Symmetric Nanostructures Using Two-beam Modulated Interference Lithography Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Raj, A Alfred Kiruba; Devaprakasam, D

    2013-01-01

    Interferometry lithography is a maturing technology for patterning sub-micron structures in arrays covering large areas. This paper presents a method for the measurement of nanoscale surface patterns produced by two-beam laser interference lithography (LIL). The objective in this study is to simulate and design periodic and quasi-periodic 1D, 2D and 3D nanostructures using two-beam interference technique. We designed and simulated periodic and quasi-periodic structures by two-beam interference patterning using a MATLAB program by varying angle of incidence, wavelength and geometry. The simulated patterns show that the symmetries of the interference maxima depend mostly on the angles of incidence and perturbations of incidents beams. Using this technique, we can achieve potentially high-volume of uniformity, throughput, process control, and repeatability. By varying different input parameters, we have optimized simulated patterns with controlled periodicity, density and aspect ratio also it can be programmed t...

  7. Fabrication of PECVD-grown fluorinated hydrocarbon nanoparticles and circular nanoring arrays using nanosphere lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, D.K. [Industrial Chair on Atmospheric Icing of Power Network Equipment (CIGELE) and Canada Research Chair on Atmospheric Icing Engineering of Power Networks (INGIVRE) at Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, Quebec (Canada)], E-mail: dsarkar@uqac.ca; Farzaneh, M. [Industrial Chair on Atmospheric Icing of Power Network Equipment (CIGELE) and Canada Research Chair on Atmospheric Icing Engineering of Power Networks (INGIVRE) at Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, Quebec (Canada)

    2008-04-30

    Nanosphere lithography (NSL) masks were created by spin-coating of polystyrene particles onto silicon surfaces. Fluorinated hydrocarbon films were coated on the nanosphere lithography masks using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to obtain ordered arrays of fluorinated hydrocarbon. Atomic force microscope images show hexagonally ordered nanodots of dimension 225 {+-} 11 nm with a height of 23 {+-} 4 nm. Every hexagon encloses a circular ring of diameter 540 {+-} 24 nm having a height and width of 13.5 {+-} 0.6 nm and 203 {+-} 16 nm, respectively. FTIR analysis shows two distinct zones of atomic bonding of CH{sub x} and CF{sub x} in the plasma coated ordered fluorinated hydrocarbon films.

  8. Hybridized tetraquarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Esposito

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new interpretation of the neutral and charged X,Z exotic hadron resonances. Hybridized-tetraquarks are neither purely compact tetraquark states nor bound or loosely bound molecules but rather a manifestation of the interplay between the two. While meson molecules need a negative or zero binding energy, its counterpart for h-tetraquarks is required to be positive. The formation mechanism of this new class of hadrons is inspired by that of Feshbach metastable states in atomic physics. The recent claim of an exotic resonance in the Bs0π± channel by the D0 Collaboration and the negative result presented subsequently by the LHCb Collaboration are understood in this scheme, together with a considerable portion of available data on X,Z particles. Considerations on a state with the same quantum numbers as the X(5568 are also made.

  9. Hybridized Tetraquarks

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, A.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new interpretation of the neutral and charged X, Z exotic hadron resonances. Hybridized-tetraquarks are neither purely compact tetraquark states nor bound or loosely bound molecules. The latter would require a negative or zero binding energy whose counterpart in h-tetraquarks is a positive quantity. The formation mechanism of this new class of hadrons is inspired by that of Feshbach metastable states in atomic physics. The recent claim of an exotic resonance in the Bs pi+- channel by the D0 collaboration and the negative result presented subsequently by the LHCb collaboration are understood in this scheme, together with a considerable portion of available data on X, Z particles. Considerations on a state with the same quantum numbers as the X(5568) are also made.

  10. Direct Release of Sombrero-Shaped Magnetite Nanoparticles via Nanoimprint Lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Byung Seok [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Zhang, Wei [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL 60439 USA; Li, Zheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Krishnan, Kannan M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA

    2015-01-10

    Magnetic nanoparticles produced via nanoimprint lithography can change the current paradigm of fabrication processes from chemical “bottom-up” synthesis to “top-down” fabrication. The combination of controlled nondirectional magnetron sputtering, ETFE mold, bilayer lift-off, and dry etching release can control the shape, size, and structure of the fabricated nanoparticles. The resulting magnetic nanoparticles have a novel “sombrero” shape with complex and unique physical/magnetic properties.

  11. Nanostructures of functionalized gold nanoparticles prepared by particle lithography with organosilanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusker, Kathie L; Li, Jie-Ren; Garno, Jayne C

    2011-11-01

    Periodic arrays of organosilane nanostructures were prepared with particle lithography to define sites for selective adsorption of functionalized gold nanoparticles. Essentially, the approach for nanoparticle lithography consists of procedures with two masks. First, latex mesospheres were used as a surface mask for deposition of an organosilane vapor, to produce an array of holes within a covalently bonded, organic thin film. The latex particles were readily removed with solvent rinses to expose discrete patterns of nanosized holes of uncovered substrate. The nanostructured film of organosilanes was then used as a surface mask for a second patterning step, with immersion in a solution of functionalized nanoparticles. Patterned substrates were fully submerged in a solution of surface-active gold nanoparticles coated with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane. Regularly shaped, nanoscopic areas of bare substrate produced by removal of the latex mask provided sites to bind silanol-terminated gold nanoparticles, and the methyl-terminated areas of the organosilane film served as an effective resist, preventing nonspecific adsorption on masked areas. Characterizations with atomic force microscopy demonstrate the steps for lithography with organosilanes and functionalized nanoparticles. Patterning was accomplished for both silicon and glass substrates, to generate nanostructures with periodicities of 200-300 nm that match the diameters of the latex mesospheres of the surface masks. Nanoparticles were shown to bind selectively to uncovered, exposed areas of the substrate and did not attach to the methyl-terminal groups of the organosilane mask. Billions of well-defined nanostructures of nanoparticles can be generated using this high-throughput approach of particle lithography, with exquisite control of surface density and periodicity at the nanoscale.

  12. Quantum atomic lithography via cross-cavity optical Stern-Gerlach setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Máximo, C. E.; Batalhão, T. B.; Bachelard, R.; de Moraes Neto, G. D.; de Ponte, M. A.; Moussa, M. H. Y.

    2014-10-01

    We present a fully quantum scheme to perform 2D atomic lithography based on a cross-cavity optical Stern-Gerlach setup: an array of two mutually orthogonal cavities crossed by an atomic beam perpendicular to their optical axes, which is made to interact with two identical modes. After deriving an analytical solution for the atomic momentum distribution, we introduce a protocol allowing us to control the atomic deflection by manipulating the amplitudes and phases of the cavity field states.

  13. Optofluidic in situ maskless lithography of charge selective nanoporous hydrogel for DNA preconcentration

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    An optofluidic maskless photopolymerization process was developed for in situ negatively charged nanoporous hydrogel [poly-AMPS (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid)] fabrication. The optofluidic maskless lithography system, which combines a high power UV source and digital mirror device, enables fast polymerization of arbitrary shaped hydrogels in a microfluidic device. The poly-AMPS hydrogel structures were positioned near the intersections of two microchannels, and were used as a ...

  14. NEMS/CMOS sensor for monitoring deposition rates in stencil lithography

    OpenAIRE

    Sansa, Marc; Arcamone, Julien; Verd, Jaume; Uranga, Arantxa; Abadal, Gabriel; Núria, Barniol; Savu, Veronica; van den Boogaart, Marc; Brugger, Jürgen; Perez-Murano, Francesc

    2009-01-01

    A nanoelectromechanical mass sensor is used to characterize material deposition rates in stencil lithography. The material flux through micron size apertures is mapped with high spatial (below 1 μm) and deposition rate (below 10 pm/s) resolutions by displacing the stencil apertures over the sensor. The sensor is based on a resonating metallic beam (with submicron size width and thickness) monolithically integrated with a CMOS circuit, resulting in a CMOS/NEMS self-oscillator. The sensor is us...

  15. A system to optimize mix-and-match overlay in lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamoto, Shinji; Ishii, Yuuki; Yasukawa, Koji; Maejima, Shinroku; Kato, Atsuhiko; Robinson, John C.; Choi, Dong-Sub

    2008-03-01

    Critical processing factors in the lithography process include overlaying the pattern properly to previous layers and properly exposing the pattern to achieve the desired line width. Proper overlay can only be attained in the lithography process while the desired line width accuracy is achieved by both lithography and etch processes. Since CD is substantially influenced by etch processing, therefore, it is possible to say that overlay is one of the most important processing elements in the lithography process. To achieve the desired overlay accuracy, it is desirable to expose critical layers with the same exposure tool that exposed the previous or target layer. This need to dedicate a particular exposure tool, however, complicates the lot dispatching schedule and, even worse, decreases exposure tool utilization. In order to allow any exposure tool available to print the arriving lot, M&M (Mix and Match) overlay control becomes necessary. By reducing overlay errors in M&M control, lot dispatching scheduling will become more flexible and exposure tool utilization will improve. Since each exposure tool has a unique registration signature, high order errors appear when overlaying multiple layers exposed with different tools. Even with the same exposure tool, if a different illumination is used, a similar error will be seen. A correction scheme to make the signature differences has to be implemented, however manually characterizing each tool's signature per illumination condition is extremely tedious, and is subject human errors. The challenge is to design a system to perform the corrections automatically. In the previous paper(1), we have outlined concepts of the system scheme. The system has subsequently been developed and tested using exposure tools. In this paper test results are shown using automated distortion correction. By analyzing the results, suggestions for further improvements and further developments are shown.

  16. Guided immobilisation of single gold nanoparticles by chemical electron beam lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A. Schaal

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of periodic arrays of single metal nanoparticles is of great current interest. In this paper we present a straight-forward three-step procedure based on chemical electron beam lithography, which is capable of producing such arrays with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs. Preformed 6 nm AuNPs are immobilised on thiol patterns with a pitch of 100 nm by guided self-assembly. Afterwards, these arrays are characterised by using atomic force microscopy.

  17. Theoretical Explanation and Improvement to the Flare Model of Lithography Based on the Kirk Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN De-Liang; CAO Yi-Ping; HUANG Zhen-Fen

    2011-01-01

    @@ The Kirk test has good precision for measuring stray light in optical lithography and is the usual method of measuring stray light.However, Kirk did not provide a theoretical explanation to his simulation model.We attempt to give Kirk's model a kind of theoretical explanation and a little improvement based on the model of point spread function of scattering and the theory of statistical optics.It is indicated by simulation that the improved model fits Kirk's measurement data better.

  18. Hierarchical structural nanopore arrays fabricated by pre-patterning aluminum using nanosphere lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinnan; Xu, Shuping; Cong, Ming; Li, Haibo; Gu, Yuejiao; Xu, Weiqing

    2012-04-10

    A highly ordered and hierarchical structural nanopore array is fabricated via anodizing a pre-patterned aluminum foil under an optimized voltage. A pre-patterned hexagonal nanoindentation array on an aluminum substrate is prepared via the nanosphere lithography method. This pattern leads to an elaborate nanochannel structure with seven nanopores in each nanoindentation after anodization treatment. The structure achieved in our study is new, interesting, and likely to be applied in photonic devices.

  19. Novel Nano-scale Overlay Alignment Method for Room-temperature Imprint Lithography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; DING Yu-cheng; LU Bing-heng; LI Han-song; YAN Le; QIU Zhi-hui; LIU Hong-zhong; YIN Lie

    2005-01-01

    A novel nano-scale alignment technique based on Moiré signal for room-temperature imprint are used to estimate the alignment errors in x and y directions. The experiment result indicates that complex and the alignment resolutions obtained in x and y directions are ±20 nm(3σ) and ±24 nm(3σ). They can meet the requirement of alignment accuracy for submicron imprint lithography.

  20. Functionalized 3D Architected Materials via Thiol-Michael Addition and Two-Photon Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Daryl W; Schulz, Michael D; Grubbs, Robert H; Greer, Julia R

    2017-04-01

    Fabrication of functionalized 3D architected materials is achieved by a facile method using functionalized acrylates synthesized via thiol-Michael addition, which are then polymerized using two-photon lithography. A wide variety of functional groups can be attached, from Boc-protected amines to fluoroalkanes. Modification of surface wetting properties and conjugation with fluorescent tags are demonstrated to highlight the potential applications of this technique. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.