WorldWideScience

Sample records for hybrid medical image

  1. A Hybrid Technique for Medical Image Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamgir Nyma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical image segmentation is an essential and challenging aspect in computer-aided diagnosis and also in pattern recognition research. This paper proposes a hybrid method for magnetic resonance (MR image segmentation. We first remove impulsive noise inherent in MR images by utilizing a vector median filter. Subsequently, Otsu thresholding is used as an initial coarse segmentation method that finds the homogeneous regions of the input image. Finally, an enhanced suppressed fuzzy c-means is used to partition brain MR images into multiple segments, which employs an optimal suppression factor for the perfect clustering in the given data set. To evaluate the robustness of the proposed approach in noisy environment, we add different types of noise and different amount of noise to T1-weighted brain MR images. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms other FCM based algorithms in terms of segmentation accuracy for both noise-free and noise-inserted MR images.

  2. Medical imaging education in biomedical engineering curriculum: courseware development and application through a hybrid teaching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weizhao; Li, Xiping; Chen, Hairong; Manns, Fabrice

    2012-01-01

    Medical Imaging is a key training component in Biomedical Engineering programs. Medical imaging education is interdisciplinary training, involving physics, mathematics, chemistry, electrical engineering, computer engineering, and applications in biology and medicine. Seeking an efficient teaching method for instructors and an effective learning environment for students has long been a goal for medical imaging education. By the support of NSF grants, we developed the medical imaging teaching software (MITS) and associated dynamic assessment tracking system (DATS). The MITS/DATS system has been applied to junior and senior medical imaging classes through a hybrid teaching model. The results show that student's learning gain improved, particularly in concept understanding and simulation project completion. The results also indicate disparities in subjective perception between junior and senior classes. Three institutions are collaborating to expand the courseware system and plan to apply it to different class settings.

  3. iMAGE cloud: medical image processing as a service for regional healthcare in a hybrid cloud environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Chen, Weiping; Nie, Min; Zhang, Fengjuan; Wang, Yu; He, Ailing; Wang, Xiaonan; Yan, Gen

    2016-11-01

    To handle the emergence of the regional healthcare ecosystem, physicians and surgeons in various departments and healthcare institutions must process medical images securely, conveniently, and efficiently, and must integrate them with electronic medical records (EMRs). In this manuscript, we propose a software as a service (SaaS) cloud called the iMAGE cloud. A three-layer hybrid cloud was created to provide medical image processing services in the smart city of Wuxi, China, in April 2015. In the first step, medical images and EMR data were received and integrated via the hybrid regional healthcare network. Then, traditional and advanced image processing functions were proposed and computed in a unified manner in the high-performance cloud units. Finally, the image processing results were delivered to regional users using the virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) technology. Security infrastructure was also taken into consideration. Integrated information query and many advanced medical image processing functions-such as coronary extraction, pulmonary reconstruction, vascular extraction, intelligent detection of pulmonary nodules, image fusion, and 3D printing-were available to local physicians and surgeons in various departments and healthcare institutions. Implementation results indicate that the iMAGE cloud can provide convenient, efficient, compatible, and secure medical image processing services in regional healthcare networks. The iMAGE cloud has been proven to be valuable in applications in the regional healthcare system, and it could have a promising future in the healthcare system worldwide.

  4. A Hybrid Fuzzy Neural Networks for the Detection of Tumors in Medical Images

    OpenAIRE

    N. Benamrane; A. Freville; R. Nekkache

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we propose an approach to detect suspect zones or tumors in medical images. The idea is to define with precision the existence of different kinds of lesions using a hybrid system, which combines Fuzzy Neural Networks and Expert System. After applying a method of image segmentation to extract regions (by region growing algorithm or by mathematical morphology algorithm), the fuzzy neural networks detect the suspect regions, which are validated by an expert system to determine the...

  5. Live level set: A hybrid method of livewire and level set for medical image segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Jianhua; Chen, David

    2008-01-01

    Livewire and level set are popular methods for medical image segmentation. In this article, the authors propose a hybrid method of livewire and level set, termed the live level set (LLS). The LLS replaces the one graph update iteration in the classic livewire with two iterations of graph updates. The first iteration generates an initial contour for a level set computation. The level set distance is then factored back into the cost function in the second iteration of graph update. The authors ...

  6. A novel hybrid reconstruction algorithm for first generation incoherent scatter CT (ISCT) of large objects with potential medical imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpuche Aviles, Jorge E; Pistorius, Stephen; Gordon, Richard; Elbakri, Idris A

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a first generation incoherent scatter CT (ISCT) hybrid (analytic-iterative) reconstruction algorithm for accurate ρ{e}imaging of objects with clinically relevant sizes. The algorithm reconstructs quantitative images of ρ{e} within a few iterations, avoiding the challenges of optimization based reconstruction algorithms while addressing the limitations of current analytical algorithms. A 4π detector is conceptualized in order to address the issue of directional dependency and is then replaced with a ring of detectors which detect a constant fraction of the scattered photons. The ISCT algorithm corrects for the attenuation of photons using a limited number of iterations and filtered back projection (FBP) for image reconstruction. This results in a hybrid reconstruction algorithm that was tested with sinograms generated by Monte Carlo (MC) and analytical (AN) simulations. Results show that the ISCT algorithm is weakly dependent on the ρ{e} initial estimate. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm reconstruct ρ{e} images with a mean error of -1% ± 3% for the AN model and from -6% to -8% for the MC model. Finally, the algorithm is capable of reconstructing qualitatively good images even in the presence of multiple scatter. The proposed algorithm would be suitable for in-vivo medical imaging as long as practical limitations can be addressed. © 2011 – IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved

  7. A hybrid flower pollination algorithm based modified randomized location for multi-threshold medical image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Zhou, Yongquan; Zhao, Chengyan; Wu, Haizhou

    2015-01-01

    Multi-threshold image segmentation is a powerful image processing technique that is used for the preprocessing of pattern recognition and computer vision. However, traditional multilevel thresholding methods are computationally expensive because they involve exhaustively searching the optimal thresholds to optimize the objective functions. To overcome this drawback, this paper proposes a flower pollination algorithm with a randomized location modification. The proposed algorithm is used to find optimal threshold values for maximizing Otsu's objective functions with regard to eight medical grayscale images. When benchmarked against other state-of-the-art evolutionary algorithms, the new algorithm proves itself to be robust and effective through numerical experimental results including Otsu's objective values and standard deviations.

  8. Mobile medical image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Samuel; Depeursinge, Adrien; Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2011-03-01

    Images are an integral part of medical practice for diagnosis, treatment planning and teaching. Image retrieval has gained in importance mainly as a research domain over the past 20 years. Both textual and visual retrieval of images are essential. In the process of mobile devices becoming reliable and having a functionality equaling that of formerly desktop clients, mobile computing has gained ground and many applications have been explored. This creates a new field of mobile information search & access and in this context images can play an important role as they often allow understanding complex scenarios much quicker and easier than free text. Mobile information retrieval in general has skyrocketed over the past year with many new applications and tools being developed and all sorts of interfaces being adapted to mobile clients. This article describes constraints of an information retrieval system including visual and textual information retrieval from the medical literature of BioMedCentral and of the RSNA journals Radiology and Radiographics. Solutions for mobile data access with an example on an iPhone in a web-based environment are presented as iPhones are frequently used and the operating system is bound to become the most frequent smartphone operating system in 2011. A web-based scenario was chosen to allow for a use by other smart phone platforms such as Android as well. Constraints of small screens and navigation with touch screens are taken into account in the development of the application. A hybrid choice had to be taken to allow for taking pictures with the cell phone camera and upload them for visual similarity search as most producers of smart phones block this functionality to web applications. Mobile information access and in particular access to images can be surprisingly efficient and effective on smaller screens. Images can be read on screen much faster and relevance of documents can be identified quickly through the use of images contained in

  9. Color Medical Image Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 20th century, medical imaging has been dominated by monochrome imaging modalities such as x-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. As a result, color information has been overlooked in medical image analysis applications. Recently, various medical imaging modalities that involve color information have been introduced. These include cervicography, dermoscopy, fundus photography, gastrointestinal endoscopy, microscopy, and wound photography. However, in comparison to monochrome images, the analysis of color images is a relatively unexplored area. The multivariate nature of color image data presents new challenges for researchers and practitioners as the numerous methods developed for monochrome images are often not directly applicable to multichannel images. The goal of this volume is to summarize the state-of-the-art in the utilization of color information in medical image analysis.

  10. Hybrid ultrasound imaging techniques (fusion imaging).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandulescu, Daniela Larisa; Dumitrescu, Daniela; Rogoveanu, Ion; Saftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-07

    Visualization of tumor angiogenesis can facilitate non-invasive evaluation of tumor vascular characteristics to supplement the conventional diagnostic imaging goals of depicting tumor location, size, and morphology. Hybrid imaging techniques combine anatomic [ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] and molecular (single photon emission CT and positron emission tomography) imaging modalities. One example is real-time virtual sonography, which combines ultrasound (grayscale, colour Doppler, or dynamic contrast harmonic imaging) with contrast-enhanced CT/MRI. The benefits of fusion imaging include an increased diagnostic confidence, direct comparison of the lesions using different imaging modalities, more precise monitoring of interventional procedures, and reduced radiation exposure.

  11. Medical imaging technology

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical imaging is a relatively young discipline that started with Conrad Wilhelm Roentgen’s discovery of the x-ray in 1885. X-ray imaging was rapidly adopted in hospitals around the world. However, it was the advent of computerized data and image processing that made revolutionary new imaging modalities possible. Today, cross-sections and three-dimensional reconstructions of the organs inside the human body is possible with unprecedented speed, detail and quality. This book provides an introduction into the principles of image formation of key medical imaging modalities: X-ray projection imaging, x-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, and radionuclide imaging. Recent developments in optical imaging are also covered. For each imaging modality, the introduction into the physical principles and sources of contrast is provided, followed by the methods of image formation, engineering aspects of the imaging devices, and a discussion of strengths and limitations of the modal...

  12. Medical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  13. Hybrid imaging labels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buckle, Tessa; Wal, Der Steffen Van; Malderen, Van Stijn J.M.; Müller, Larissa; Kuil, Joeri; Unen, Vincent Van; Peters, Ruud J.B.; Bemmel, van Greet; McDonnell, Liam A.; Velders, Aldrik H.; Koning, Frits; Vanhaeke, Frank; Leeuwen, Van Fijs W.B.

    2017-01-01

    Development of theranostic concepts that include inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) imaging can be hindered by the lack of a direct comparison to more standardly used methods for in vitro and in vivo evaluation; e.g. fluorescence or nuclear

  14. First-Generation Hybrid Compact Compton Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, M; Burks, M; Chivers, D; Cork, C; Fabris, L; Gunter, D; Krings, T; Lange, D; Hull, E; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Niedermayr, T; Protic, D; Valentine, J; Vetter, K; Wright, D

    2005-11-07

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are pursuing the development of a gamma-ray imaging system using the Compton effect. We have built our first generation hybrid Compton imaging system, and we have conducted initial calibration and image measurements using this system. In this paper, we present the details of the hybrid Compton imaging system and initial calibration and image measurements.

  15. Medical ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives an introduction to current medical ultrasound imaging systems. The basics of anatomic and blood flow imaging are described. The properties of medical ultrasound and its focusing are described, and the various methods for two- and three-dimensional imaging of the human anatomy...... are shown. Both systems using linear and non-linear propagation of ultrasound are described. The blood velocity can also be non-invasively visualized using ultrasound and the basic signal processing for doing this is introduced. Examples for spectral velocity estimation, color flow maging and the new vector...

  16. Overview of Medical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendee, William

    2008-03-01

    The use of radiation probes to image tissues in the human body has progressed through an extraordinary evolution in the past three decades. Beginning with transmission computed tomography in the 1970s, this evolution has included real-time ultrasound, emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and digital radiography. These advances have recently yielded major improvements in imaging such as multi-detector transmission computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging, dual imaging modalities built on a common platform, and image-guided intervention. These improvements and others have accelerated the usefulness of imaging methods in the early detection, definitive diagnosis, and effective intervention of a wide spectrum of diseases and disabilities. They also have led to increases in radiation doses to patients and the population, an issue of major concern to physicists and physicians. At this time there are four major frontiers for research in medical imaging: (1) molecular imaging; (2) functional imaging; (3) multi-modality imaging; and (4) information management. These research frontiers, together with the use of sophisticated imaging technologies in clinical practice, offer rich professional opportunities for physicists.

  17. Medical Imaging and Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Rebecca

    2016-11-01

    Infertility affects many couples, and medical imaging plays a vital role in its diagnosis and treatment. Radiologic technologists benefit from having a broad understanding of infertility risk factors and causes. This article describes the typical structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems, as well as congenital and acquired conditions that could lead to a couple's inability to conceive. Medical imaging procedures performed for infertility diagnosis are discussed, as well as common interventional options available to patients. © 2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  18. Characterization of continuous and pulsed emission modes of a hybrid micro focus x-ray source for medical imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wong, Molly D.; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Zheng, Bin [Center for Biomedical Engineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Rong, John X. [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Wu, Xizeng [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Liu, Hong, E-mail: liu@ou.edu [Center for Biomedical Engineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterize a micro focus x-ray tube that can operate in both continuous and pulsed emission modes. The micro focus x-ray source (Model L9181-06, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) has a varying focal spot size ranging from 16 µm to 50 µm as the source output power changes from 10 to 39 W. We measured the source output, beam quality, focal spot sizes, kV accuracy, spectra shapes and spatial resolution. Source output was measured using an ionization chamber for various tube voltages (kVs) with varying current (µA) and distances. The beam quality was measured in terms of half value layer (HVL), kV accuracy was measured with a non-invasive kV meter, and the spectra was measured using a compact integrated spectrometer system. The focal spot sizes were measured using a slit method with a CCD detector with a pixel pitch of 22 µm. The spatial resolution was quantitatively measured using the slit method with a CMOS flat panel detector with a 50 µm pixel pitch, and compared to the qualitative results obtained by imaging a contrast bar pattern. The focal spot sizes in the vertical direction were smaller than that of the horizontal direction, the impact of which was visible when comparing the spatial resolution values. Our analyses revealed that both emission modes yield comparable imaging performances in terms of beam quality, spectra shape and spatial resolution effects. There were no significantly large differences, thus providing the motivation for future studies to design and develop stable and robust cone beam imaging systems for various diagnostic applications. - Highlights: • A micro focus x-ray source that operates in both continuous and pulse emission modes was quantitatively characterized. • The source output, beam quality, focal spot measurements, kV accuracy, spectra analyses and spatial resolution were measured. • Our analyses revealed that both emission modes yield comparable imaging performances in terms of beam

  19. Medical imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frangioni, John V [Wayland, MA

    2012-07-24

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remains in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may also employ dyes or other fluorescent substances associated with antibodies, antibody fragments, or ligands that accumulate within a region of diagnostic significance. In one embodiment, the system provides an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide that is used to capture images. In another embodiment, the system is configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. More broadly, the systems described herein may be used in imaging applications where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by an image formed from fluorescent emissions from a fluorescent substance that marks areas of functional interest.

  20. Wavelets in medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahra, Noor e; Sevindir, Huliya A.; Aslan, Zafar; Siddiqi, A. H. [Sharda University, SET, Department of Electronics and Communication, Knowledge Park 3rd, Gr. Noida (India); University of Kocaeli, Department of Mathematics, 41380 Kocaeli (Turkey); Istanbul Aydin University, Department of Computer Engineering, 34295 Istanbul (Turkey); Sharda University, SET, Department of Mathematics, 32-34 Knowledge Park 3rd, Greater Noida (India)

    2012-07-17

    The aim of this study is to provide emerging applications of wavelet methods to medical signals and images, such as electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, functional magnetic resonance imaging, computer tomography, X-ray and mammography. Interpretation of these signals and images are quite important. Nowadays wavelet methods have a significant impact on the science of medical imaging and the diagnosis of disease and screening protocols. Based on our initial investigations, future directions include neurosurgical planning and improved assessment of risk for individual patients, improved assessment and strategies for the treatment of chronic pain, improved seizure localization, and improved understanding of the physiology of neurological disorders. We look ahead to these and other emerging applications as the benefits of this technology become incorporated into current and future patient care. In this chapter by applying Fourier transform and wavelet transform, analysis and denoising of one of the important biomedical signals like EEG is carried out. The presence of rhythm, template matching, and correlation is discussed by various method. Energy of EEG signal is used to detect seizure in an epileptic patient. We have also performed denoising of EEG signals by SWT.

  1. Wavelets in medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahra, Noor e.; Sevindir, Hulya Kodal; Aslan, Zafer; Siddiqi, A. H.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to provide emerging applications of wavelet methods to medical signals and images, such as electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, functional magnetic resonance imaging, computer tomography, X-ray and mammography. Interpretation of these signals and images are quite important. Nowadays wavelet methods have a significant impact on the science of medical imaging and the diagnosis of disease and screening protocols. Based on our initial investigations, future directions include neurosurgical planning and improved assessment of risk for individual patients, improved assessment and strategies for the treatment of chronic pain, improved seizure localization, and improved understanding of the physiology of neurological disorders. We look ahead to these and other emerging applications as the benefits of this technology become incorporated into current and future patient care. In this chapter by applying Fourier transform and wavelet transform, analysis and denoising of one of the important biomedical signals like EEG is carried out. The presence of rhythm, template matching, and correlation is discussed by various method. Energy of EEG signal is used to detect seizure in an epileptic patient. We have also performed denoising of EEG signals by SWT.

  2. Classification in Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Chen

    detection in a cardiovascular disease study. The third focus is to deepen the understanding of classification mechanism by visualizing the knowledge learned by a classifier. More specifically, to build the most typical patterns recognized by the Fisher's linear discriminant rule with applications......Classification is extensively used in the context of medical image analysis for the purpose of diagnosis or prognosis. In order to classify image content correctly, one needs to extract efficient features with discriminative properties and build classifiers based on these features. In addition......, a good metric is required to measure distance or similarity between feature points so that the classification becomes feasible. Furthermore, in order to build a successful classifier, one needs to deeply understand how classifiers work. This thesis focuses on these three aspects of classification...

  3. A comparative study on medical image segmentation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praylin Selva Blessy SELVARAJ ASSLEY

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Image segmentation plays an important role in medical images. It has been a relevant research area in computer vision and image analysis. Many segmentation algorithms have been proposed for medical images. This paper makes a review on segmentation methods for medical images. In this survey, segmentation methods are divided into five categories: region based, boundary based, model based, hybrid based and atlas based. The five different categories with their principle ideas, advantages and disadvantages in segmenting different medical images are discussed.

  4. A Hybrid Technique for De-Noising Multi-Modality Medical Images by Employing Cuckoo’s Search with Curvelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qaisar Javaid

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available De-noising of the medical images is very difficult task. To improve the overall visual representation we need to apply a contrast enhancement techniques, this representation provide the physicians and clinicians a good and recovered diagnosis results. Various de-noising and contrast enhancements methods are develops. However, some of the methods are not good in providing the better results with accuracy and efficiency. In our paper we de-noise and enhance the medical images without any loss of information. We uses the curvelet transform in combination with ridglet transform along with CS (Cuckoo Search algorithm. The curvlet transform adapt and represents the sparse pixel informations with all edges. The edges play very important role in understanding of the images. Curvlet transform computes the edges very efficiently where the wavelets are failed. We used the CS to optimize the de-noising coefficients without loss of structural and morphological information. Our designed method would be accurate and efficient in de-noising the medical images. Our method attempts to remove the multiplicative and additive noises. Our proposed method is proved to be an efficient and reliable in removing all kind of noises from the medical images. Result indicates that our proposed approach is better than other approaches in removing impulse, Gaussian, and speckle noises.

  5. The physics of medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    1988-01-01

    The Physics of Medical Imaging reviews the scientific basis and physical principles underpinning imaging in medicine. It covers the major imaging methods of x-radiology, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, and nuclear magnetic resonance, and considers promising new techniques. Following these reviews are several thematic chapters that cover the mathematics of medical imaging, image perception, computational requirements, and techniques. Throughout the book, the author encourages readers to consider key questions concerning imaging. This profusely illustrated and extensively indexed text is accessible to graduate physical scientists, advanced undergraduates, and research students. It logically complements books on applications of imaging techniques in medicine, making it useful for clinicians as well.

  6. Medical alert bracelet (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will be able to find. Medical identification products can help ensure proper treatment in an ...

  7. Generative Interpretation of Medical Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes, proposes and evaluates methods for automated analysis and quantification of medical images. A common theme is the usage of generative methods, which draw inference from unknown images by synthesising new images having shape, pose and appearance similar to the analysed image...

  8. Image processing in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    This Ph.D project addresses image processing in medical ultrasound and seeks to achieve two major scientific goals: First to develop an understanding of the most significant factors influencing image quality in medical ultrasound, and secondly to use this knowledge to develop image processing...... methods for enhancing the diagnostic value of medical ultrasound. The project is an industrial Ph.D project co-sponsored by BK Medical ApS., with the commercial goal to improve the image quality of BK Medicals scanners. Currently BK Medical employ a simple conventional delay-and-sum beamformer to generate......-time data acquisition system. The system were implemented using the commercial available 2202 ProFocus BK Medical ultrasound scanner equipped with a research interface and a standard PC. The main feature of the system is the possibility to acquire several seconds of interleaved data, switching between...

  9. Neural networks: Application to medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Laurence P.

    1994-01-01

    The research mission is the development of computer assisted diagnostic (CAD) methods for improved diagnosis of medical images including digital x-ray sensors and tomographic imaging modalities. The CAD algorithms include advanced methods for adaptive nonlinear filters for image noise suppression, hybrid wavelet methods for feature segmentation and enhancement, and high convergence neural networks for feature detection and VLSI implementation of neural networks for real time analysis. Other missions include (1) implementation of CAD methods on hospital based picture archiving computer systems (PACS) and information networks for central and remote diagnosis and (2) collaboration with defense and medical industry, NASA, and federal laboratories in the area of dual use technology conversion from defense or aerospace to medicine.

  10. Automated medical image segmentation techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Neeraj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate segmentation of medical images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy planning. Computed topography (CT and Magnetic resonance (MR imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis, clinical studies and treatment planning. This review provides details of automated segmentation methods, specifically discussed in the context of CT and MR images. The motive is to discuss the problems encountered in segmentation of CT and MR images, and the relative merits and limitations of methods currently available for segmentation of medical images.

  11. Scintillator requirements for medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.

    1999-09-01

    Scintillating materials are used in a variety of medical imaging devices. This paper presents a description of four medical imaging modalities that make extensive use of scintillators: planar x-ray imaging, x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT), SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) and PET (positron emission tomography). The discussion concentrates on a description of the underlying physical principles by which the four modalities operate. The scintillator requirements for these systems are enumerated and the compromises that are made in order to maximize imaging performance utilizing existing scintillating materials are discussed, as is the potential for improving imaging performance by improving scintillator properties.

  12. Medical imaging technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Iniewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    The book has two intentions. First, it assembles the latest research in the field of medical imaging technology in one place. Detailed descriptions of current state-of-the-art medical imaging systems (comprised of x-ray CT, MRI, ultrasound, and nuclear medicine) and data processing techniques are discussed. Information is provided that will give interested engineers and scientists a solid foundation from which to build with additional resources. Secondly, it exposes the reader to myriad applications that medical imaging technology has enabled.

  13. Medical image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Dougherty, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    This book is designed for end users in the field of digital imaging, who wish to update their skills and understanding with the latest techniques in image analysis. This book emphasizes the conceptual framework of image analysis and the effective use of image processing tools. It uses applications in a variety of fields to demonstrate and consolidate both specific and general concepts, and to build intuition, insight and understanding. Although the chapters are essentially self-contained they reference other chapters to form an integrated whole. Each chapter employs a pedagogical approach to e

  14. Machine Learning for Medical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Bradley J.; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Akkus, Zeynettin; Kline, Timothy L.

    2017-01-01

    Machine learning is a technique for recognizing patterns that can be applied to medical images. Although it is a powerful tool that can help in rendering medical diagnoses, it can be misapplied. Machine learning typically begins with the machine learning algorithm system computing the image features that are believed to be of importance in making the prediction or diagnosis of interest. The machine learning algorithm system then identifies the best combination of these image features for classifying the image or computing some metric for the given image region. There are several methods that can be used, each with different strengths and weaknesses. There are open-source versions of most of these machine learning methods that make them easy to try and apply to images. Several metrics for measuring the performance of an algorithm exist; however, one must be aware of the possible associated pitfalls that can result in misleading metrics. More recently, deep learning has started to be used; this method has the benefit that it does not require image feature identification and calculation as a first step; rather, features are identified as part of the learning process. Machine learning has been used in medical imaging and will have a greater influence in the future. Those working in medical imaging must be aware of how machine learning works. PMID:28212054

  15. Machine Learning for Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Bradley J; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Akkus, Zeynettin; Kline, Timothy L

    2017-01-01

    Machine learning is a technique for recognizing patterns that can be applied to medical images. Although it is a powerful tool that can help in rendering medical diagnoses, it can be misapplied. Machine learning typically begins with the machine learning algorithm system computing the image features that are believed to be of importance in making the prediction or diagnosis of interest. The machine learning algorithm system then identifies the best combination of these image features for classifying the image or computing some metric for the given image region. There are several methods that can be used, each with different strengths and weaknesses. There are open-source versions of most of these machine learning methods that make them easy to try and apply to images. Several metrics for measuring the performance of an algorithm exist; however, one must be aware of the possible associated pitfalls that can result in misleading metrics. More recently, deep learning has started to be used; this method has the benefit that it does not require image feature identification and calculation as a first step; rather, features are identified as part of the learning process. Machine learning has been used in medical imaging and will have a greater influence in the future. Those working in medical imaging must be aware of how machine learning works. © RSNA, 2017.

  16. Hybrid scintillators for x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Clifford; Rairden, Richard L.; Betz, Robert A.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this effort is to improve x-ray absorption and light production while maintaining high spatial resolution in x-ray imaging phosphor screens. Our current target is to improve screen absorption efficiency and screen brightness by factors of 2 or greater over existing screens that have 10-1p/mm resolution. In this program, commercial phosphor screens are combined with highly absorbing, high-resolution scintillating fiber-optic (SFO) face plates to provide a hybrid sensor that exhibits superior spatial resolution, x-ray absorption, and brightness values over the phosphor material alone. These characteristics of hybrid scintillators can be adjusted to meet specific x-ray imaging requirements over a wide range of x-ray energy. This paper discusses the design, fabrication, and testing of a new series of hybrid scintillators.

  17. Introduction to Medical Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    of the book is to present the fascinating world of medical image analysis in an easy and interesting way. Compared to many standard books on image analysis, the approach we have chosen is less mathematical and more casual. Some of the key algorithms are exemplified in C-code. Please note that the code...

  18. Hybrid system calibration for multidimensional magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gladiss, A.; Graeser, M.; Szwargulski, P.; Knopp, T.; Buzug, T. M.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic particle imaging visualizes the spatial distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Because of its key features of excellent sensitivity, high temporal and spatial resolution and biocompatibility of the tracer material it can be used in multiple medical imaging applications. The common reconstruction technique for Lissajous-type trajectories uses a system matrix that has to be previously acquired in a time-consuming calibration scan, leading to long downtimes of the scanning device. In this work, the system matrix is determined by a hybrid approach. Using the hybrid system matrix for reconstruction, the calibration downtime of the scanning device can be neglected. Furthermore, the signal to noise ratio of the hybrid system matrix is much higher, since the size of the required nanoparticle sample can be chosen independently of the desired voxel size. As the signal to noise ratio influences the reconstruction process, the resulting images have better resolution and are less affected by artefacts. Additionally, a new approach is introduced to address the background signal in image reconstruction. The common technique of subtraction of the background signal is replaced by extending the system matrix with an entry that represents the background. It is shown that this approach reduces artefacts in the reconstructed images.

  19. Classification in Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Chen

    to segment breast tissue and pectoral muscle area from the background in mammogram. The second focus is the choices of metric and its influence to the feasibility of a classifier, especially on k-nearest neighbors (k-NN) algorithm, with medical applications on breast cancer prediction and calcification...... and explores these challenging areas. The first focus of the thesis is to properly combine different local feature experts and prior information to design an effective classifier. The preliminary classification results, provided by the experts, are fused in order to develop an automatic segmentation method...

  20. Medical image rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, J K; Goncalves, R J

    1993-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization has recently become an established discipline in medicine. Although numerous visualization methods are currently available, a unified framework to describe and study them has been lacking. Often, the functionally independent operations in a method are integrated among themselves or with the method itself for computational efficiency. The two main aims of this article are (1) to review the methods in a unified way in a general setting so that it becomes possible to appreciate the interrelationship and interdependence of methods, and (2) to show how a variety of new methods emerge with potentially improved renditions in this unified treatment. To this end, we introduce an operator notation to describe concisely the basic 3-D imaging transforms commonly used in visualization and identify a comprehensive set of basic transforms. We describe several new basic transforms for filtering and interpolating structures and scenes, and for rendering surfaces and volumes. We show the power of the principle of treating 3-D imaging methodologies as comprising an appropriate combination of the basic operators. We show how such a treatment leads to a great variety of new rendering methods and how many such methods can lead to improved portrayal. We develop separate transform sequences to optimally render robust and frail structures (ie, structures represented in scenes with well-defined and ill-defined boundaries, respectively).

  1. Evidence based medical imaging (EBMI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Tony [Senior Lecturer in Medical Radiation Science, University Department of Rural Health, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Locked Bag 9783 NEMSC, Tamworth, NSW 2348 (Australia)], E-mail: tony.smith@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au

    2008-08-15

    Background: The evidence based paradigm was first described about a decade ago. Previous authors have described a framework for the application of evidence based medicine which can be readily adapted to medical imaging practice. Purpose: This paper promotes the application of the evidence based framework in both the justification of the choice of examination type and the optimisation of the imaging technique used. Methods: The framework includes five integrated steps: framing a concise clinical question; searching for evidence to answer that question; critically appraising the evidence; applying the evidence in clinical practice; and, evaluating the use of revised practices. Results: This paper illustrates the use of the evidence based framework in medical imaging (that is, evidence based medical imaging) using the examples of two clinically relevant case studies. In doing so, a range of information technology and other resources available to medical imaging practitioners are identified with the intention of encouraging the application of the evidence based paradigm in radiography and radiology. Conclusion: There is a perceived need for radiographers and radiologists to make greater use of valid research evidence from the literature to inform their clinical practice and thus provide better quality services.

  2. Current-mode CMOS hybrid image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyhesan, Mohammad Kassim

    Digital imaging is growing rapidly making Complimentary Metal-Oxide-Semi conductor (CMOS) image sensor-based cameras indispensable in many modern life devices like cell phones, surveillance devices, personal computers, and tablets. For various purposes wireless portable image systems are widely deployed in many indoor and outdoor places such as hospitals, urban areas, streets, highways, forests, mountains, and towers. However, the increased demand on high-resolution image sensors and improved processing features is expected to increase the power consumption of the CMOS sensor-based camera systems. Increased power consumption translates into a reduced battery life-time. The increased power consumption might not be a problem if there is access to a nearby charging station. On the other hand, the problem arises if the image sensor is located in widely spread areas, unfavorable to human intervention, and difficult to reach. Given the limitation of energy sources available for wireless CMOS image sensor, an energy harvesting technique presents a viable solution to extend the sensor life-time. Energy can be harvested from the sun light or the artificial light surrounding the sensor itself. In this thesis, we propose a current-mode CMOS hybrid image sensor capable of energy harvesting and image capture. The proposed sensor is based on a hybrid pixel that can be programmed to perform the task of an image sensor and the task of a solar cell to harvest energy. The basic idea is to design a pixel that can be configured to exploit its internal photodiode to perform two functions: image sensing and energy harvesting. As a proof of concept a 40 x 40 array of hybrid pixels has been designed and fabricated in a standard 0.5 microm CMOS process. Measurement results show that up to 39 microW of power can be harvested from the array under 130 Klux condition with an energy efficiency of 220 nJ /pixel /frame. The proposed image sensor is a current-mode image sensor which has several

  3. Role of Hybrid Brain Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhan, Amer M; Marlatt, Nicole M; Palaniyappan, Lena; Anazodo, Udunna C; Prato, Frank S

    2015-12-04

    This is a focused review of imaging literature to scope the utility of hybrid brain imaging in neuropsychiatric disorders. The review focuses on brain imaging modalities that utilize hybrid (fusion) techniques to characterize abnormal brain molecular signals in combination with structural and functional changes that have been observed in neuropsychiatric disorders. An overview of clinical hybrid brain imaging technologies for human use is followed by a selective review of the literature that conceptualizes the use of these technologies in understanding basic mechanisms of major neuropsychiatric disorders and their therapeutics. Neuronal network abnormalities are highlighted throughout this review to scope the utility of hybrid imaging as a potential biomarker for each disorder.

  4. Introduction to Medical Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    of the book is to present the fascinating world of medical image analysis in an easy and interesting way. Compared to many standard books on image analysis, the approach we have chosen is less mathematical and more casual. Some of the key algorithms are exemplified in C-code. Please note that the code...... is neither optimal nor complete and merely serves as an additional input for comprehending the algorithms. It is no secret that this book is written by two authors. The keen reader will therefore note changes in style and language throughout the text....

  5. Introduction to Medical Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    of the book is to present the fascinating world of medical image analysis in an easy and interesting way. Compared to many standard books on image analysis, the approach we have chosen is less mathematical and more casual. Some of the key algorithms are exemplified in C-code. Please note that the code...... is neither optimal nor complete and merely serves as an additional input for comprehending the algorithms. It is no secret that this book is written by two authors. The keen reader will therefore note changes in style and language throughout the text....

  6. Fundamental mathematics and physics of medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lancaster, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Authored by a leading educator, this book is ideal for medical imaging courses. Rather than focus on imaging modalities the book delves into the mechanisms of image formation and image quality common to all imaging systems: contrast mechanisms, noise, and spatial and temporal resolution. This is an extensively revised new edition of The Physics of Medical X-Ray Imaging by Bruce Hasegawa (Medical Physics Publishing, 1991). A wide range of modalities are covered including X-ray CT, MRI and SPECT.

  7. Introduction to Medical Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    This book is a result of a collaboration between DTU Informatics at the Technical University of Denmark and the Laboratory of Computer Vision and Media Technology at Aalborg University. It is partly based on the book ”Image and Video Processing”, second edition by Thomas Moeslund. The aim...... of the book is to present the fascinating world of medical image analysis in an easy and interesting way. Compared to many standard books on image analysis, the approach we have chosen is less mathematical and more casual. Some of the key algorithms are exemplified in C-code. Please note that the code...... is neither optimal nor complete and merely serves as an additional input for comprehending the algorithms. It is no secret that this book is written by two authors. The keen reader will therefore note changes in style and language throughout the text....

  8. Despeckling of Medical Ultrasound Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailovich, Oleg V.; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    Speckle noise is an inherent property of medical ultrasound imaging, and it generally tends to reduce the image resolution and contrast, thereby reducing the diagnostic value of this imaging modality. As a result, speckle noise reduction is an important prerequisite, whenever ultrasound imaging is used for tissue characterization. Among the many methods that have been proposed to perform this task, there exists a class of approaches that use a multiplicative model of speckled image formation and take advantage of the logarithmical transformation in order to convert multiplicative speckle noise into additive noise. The common assumption made in a dominant number of such studies is that the samples of the additive noise are mutually uncorrelated and obey a Gaussian distribution. The present study shows conceptually and experimentally that this assumption is oversimplified and unnatural. Moreover, it may lead to inadequate performance of the speckle reduction methods. The study introduces a simple preprocessing procedure, which modifies the acquired radio-frequency images (without affecting the anatomical information they contain), so that the noise in the log-transformation domain becomes very close in its behavior to a white Gaussian noise. As a result, the preprocessing allows filtering methods based on assuming the noise to be white and Gaussian, to perform in nearly optimal conditions. The study evaluates performances of three different, nonlinear filters—wavelet denoising, total variation filtering, and anisotropic diffusion—and demonstrates that, in all these cases, the proposed preprocessing significantly improves the quality of resultant images. Our numerical tests include a series of computer-simulated and in vivo experiments. PMID:16471433

  9. Cloud computing in medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagadis, George C; Kloukinas, Christos; Moore, Kevin; Philbin, Jim; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Alexakos, Christos; Nagy, Paul G; Visvikis, Dimitris; Hendee, William R

    2013-07-01

    Over the past century technology has played a decisive role in defining, driving, and reinventing procedures, devices, and pharmaceuticals in healthcare. Cloud computing has been introduced only recently but is already one of the major topics of discussion in research and clinical settings. The provision of extensive, easily accessible, and reconfigurable resources such as virtual systems, platforms, and applications with low service cost has caught the attention of many researchers and clinicians. Healthcare researchers are moving their efforts to the cloud, because they need adequate resources to process, store, exchange, and use large quantities of medical data. This Vision 20/20 paper addresses major questions related to the applicability of advanced cloud computing in medical imaging. The paper also considers security and ethical issues that accompany cloud computing.

  10. Medical Image Tamper Detection Based on Passive Image Authentication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulutas, Guzin; Ustubioglu, Arda; Ustubioglu, Beste; V Nabiyev, Vasif; Ulutas, Mustafa

    2017-12-01

    Telemedicine has gained popularity in recent years. Medical images can be transferred over the Internet to enable the telediagnosis between medical staffs and to make the patient's history accessible to medical staff from anywhere. Therefore, integrity protection of the medical image is a serious concern due to the broadcast nature of the Internet. Some watermarking techniques are proposed to control the integrity of medical images. However, they require embedding of extra information (watermark) into image before transmission. It decreases visual quality of the medical image and can cause false diagnosis. The proposed method uses passive image authentication mechanism to detect the tampered regions on medical images. Structural texture information is obtained from the medical image by using local binary pattern rotation invariant (LBPROT) to make the keypoint extraction techniques more successful. Keypoints on the texture image are obtained with scale invariant feature transform (SIFT). Tampered regions are detected by the method by matching the keypoints. The method improves the keypoint-based passive image authentication mechanism (they do not detect tampering when the smooth region is used for covering an object) by using LBPROT before keypoint extraction because smooth regions also have texture information. Experimental results show that the method detects tampered regions on the medical images even if the forged image has undergone some attacks (Gaussian blurring/additive white Gaussian noise) or the forged regions are scaled/rotated before pasting.

  11. A Multimodality Hybrid Gamma-Optical Camera for Intraoperative Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, John E.; Bugby, Sarah L.; Alqahtani, Mohammed S.; Jambi, Layal K.; Dawood, Numan S.; McKnight, William R.; Ng, Aik H.; Perkins, Alan C.

    2017-01-01

    The development of low profile gamma-ray detectors has encouraged the production of small field of view (SFOV) hand-held imaging devices for use at the patient bedside and in operating theatres. Early development of these SFOV cameras was focussed on a single modality—gamma ray imaging. Recently, a hybrid system—gamma plus optical imaging—has been developed. This combination of optical and gamma cameras enables high spatial resolution multi-modal imaging, giving a superimposed scintigraphic and optical image. Hybrid imaging offers new possibilities for assisting clinicians and surgeons in localising the site of uptake in procedures such as sentinel node detection. The hybrid camera concept can be extended to a multimodal detector design which can offer stereoscopic images, depth estimation of gamma-emitting sources, and simultaneous gamma and fluorescence imaging. Recent improvements to the hybrid camera have been used to produce dual-modality images in both laboratory simulations and in the clinic. Hybrid imaging of a patient who underwent thyroid scintigraphy is reported. In addition, we present data which shows that the hybrid camera concept can be extended to estimate the position and depth of radionuclide distribution within an object and also report the first combined gamma and Near-Infrared (NIR) fluorescence images. PMID:28282957

  12. Tooling Techniques Enhance Medical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    mission. The manufacturing techniques developed to create the components have yielded innovations advancing medical imaging, transportation security, and even energy efficiency.

  13. Mesh Processing in Medical Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The following topics are dealt with: mesh processing; medical image analysis; interactive freeform modeling; statistical shape analysis; clinical CT images; statistical surface recovery; automated segmentation; cerebral aneurysms; and real-time particle-based representation....

  14. [Key technologies in image analysis of comparative genomic hybridization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, J; Ji, L; Wang, M

    2001-12-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization has become a new technique in molecular-cytogenetics, and it has found significant applications in tumor pathology. Image analysis is an important part of comparative genomic hybridization. It analyzes the fluorescent images by many steps and finally determines whether there is any abnormality in the copy number of the test tumor tissue. This paper expatiates on the key steps in the image analysis of comparative genomic hybridization, including background correction, chromosome segmentation, chromosome axis determination, karyotyping and determining ratio profile. The future trend is also discussed.

  15. Application of Diffraction Enhanced Imaging to Medical Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chapman, Leroy

    2001-01-01

    This renewal report is for an academic award for Prof. Leroy Chapman to pursue a program of study to apply Diffraction Enhanced X-ray Imaging applied to mammography and other areas of medical imaging. Prof...

  16. Hybrid Simulation in Teaching Clinical Breast Examination to Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassif, Joseph; Sleiman, Abdul-Karim; Nassar, Anwar H; Naamani, Sima; Sharara-Chami, Rana

    2017-10-10

    Clinical breast examination (CBE) is traditionally taught to third-year medical students using a lecture and a tabletop breast model. The opportunity to clinically practice CBE depends on patient availability and willingness to be examined by students, especially in culturally sensitive environments. We propose the use of a hybrid simulation model consisting of a standardized patient (SP) wearing a silicone breast simulator jacket and hypothesize that this, compared to traditional teaching methods, would result in improved learning. Consenting third-year medical students (N = 82) at a university-affiliated tertiary care center were cluster-randomized into two groups: hybrid simulation (breast jacket + SP) and control (tabletop breast model). Students received the standard lecture by instructors blinded to the randomization, followed by randomization group-based learning and practice sessions. Two weeks later, participants were assessed in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), which included three stations with SPs blinded to the intervention. The SPs graded the students on CBE completeness, and students completed a self-assessment of their performance and confidence during the examination. CBE completeness scores did not differ between the two groups (p = 0.889). Hybrid simulation improved lesion identification grades (p simulation relieved the fear of missing a lesion on CBE (p = 0.043) and increased satisfaction with the teaching method among students (p = 0.002). As a novel educational tool, hybrid simulation improves the sensitivity of CBE performed by medical students without affecting its specificity. Hybrid simulation may play a role in increasing the confidence of medical students during CBE.

  17. Towards Big Data in Medical Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Benbernou, Salima; Bentounsi, Mehdi; Bourdoncle, Pierre; Lebbah, Mustapha; Ouziri, Mourad; Sahri, Soror

    2016-01-01

    National audience; We present our vision to implement a big medical imaging platform to improve medical diagnosis. We aim to link multi-scale and multimodal images through open data and ontologies to discover new correlations and scientific knowledges. The platform is based on CIRRUS, a Sorbonne-Paris-Cité private cloud for research.

  18. Medical Ultrasonic Elasticity Imaging Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Mok Keun [Department of Electronics and Communications Engineering, Daejin University, Pocheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Breast and prostate tumors or cancers tend to be stiffer than the surrounding normal tissue. However, the difference in echogenicity between cancerous and normal tissues is not clearly distinguishable in ultrasound B-mode imaging. Thus, imaging the stiffness contrast between the two different tissue types helps to diagnose lesions quantitatively, and such a method of imaging the elasticity of human tissue is termed ultrasound elasticity imaging. Recently, elasticity imaging has become an effective complementary diagnostic modality along with ultrasound B-mode imaging. This paper presents various elasticity imaging methods that have been reported up to now and describes their characteristics and principles of operation.

  19. A survey of medical diagnostic imaging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heese, V.; Gmuer, N.; Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    The fields of medical imaging and medical imaging instrumentation are increasingly important. The state-of-the-art continues to advance at a very rapid pace. In fact, various medical imaging modalities are under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source (such as MECT and Transvenous Angiography.) It is important to understand how these techniques compare with today`s more conventional imaging modalities. The purpose of this report is to provide some basic information about the various medical imaging technologies currently in use and their potential developments as a basis for this comparison. This report is by no means an in-depth study of the physics and instrumentation of the various imaging modalities; instead, it is an attempt to provide an explanation of the physical bases of these techniques and their principal clinical and research capabilities.

  20. A survey of medical diagnostic imaging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heese, V.; Gmuer, N.; Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    The fields of medical imaging and medical imaging instrumentation are increasingly important. The state-of-the-art continues to advance at a very rapid pace. In fact, various medical imaging modalities are under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source (such as MECT and Transvenous Angiography.) It is important to understand how these techniques compare with today's more conventional imaging modalities. The purpose of this report is to provide some basic information about the various medical imaging technologies currently in use and their potential developments as a basis for this comparison. This report is by no means an in-depth study of the physics and instrumentation of the various imaging modalities; instead, it is an attempt to provide an explanation of the physical bases of these techniques and their principal clinical and research capabilities.

  1. Automated Quantitative Analysis of Cardiac Medical Images

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Studies in clinical medicine often demand the quantitative analysis of medical images. These tasks need careful and time-consuming tracing and labeling on fine image structures, cost expensive medical expert labor and often suffer from low reproducibility. We present a collection of methods that quantify important parameters from cardiac computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a fully-automated mode. We first present atlas-based segmentation, active contours models an...

  2. Watermarking patient data in encrypted medical images

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3. Experimental results and discussion. In this section, we show the experimental results of our proposed schemes. To evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme, we performed computer simulations on many medical images (i.e., chest X-ray, CT image, MRI image) of size 512 × 512 pixels and were run on MS.

  3. Machine learning approaches in medical image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bruijne, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    Machine learning approaches are increasingly successful in image-based diagnosis, disease prognosis, and risk assessment. This paper highlights new research directions and discusses three main challenges related to machine learning in medical imaging: coping with variation in imaging protocols......, learning from weak labels, and interpretation and evaluation of results....

  4. Medical image analysis with artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J; Trundle, P; Ren, J

    2010-12-01

    Given that neural networks have been widely reported in the research community of medical imaging, we provide a focused literature survey on recent neural network developments in computer-aided diagnosis, medical image segmentation and edge detection towards visual content analysis, and medical image registration for its pre-processing and post-processing, with the aims of increasing awareness of how neural networks can be applied to these areas and to provide a foundation for further research and practical development. Representative techniques and algorithms are explained in detail to provide inspiring examples illustrating: (i) how a known neural network with fixed structure and training procedure could be applied to resolve a medical imaging problem; (ii) how medical images could be analysed, processed, and characterised by neural networks; and (iii) how neural networks could be expanded further to resolve problems relevant to medical imaging. In the concluding section, a highlight of comparisons among many neural network applications is included to provide a global view on computational intelligence with neural networks in medical imaging. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Medical image libraries: ICoS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honniball, John; Thomas, Peter

    1999-08-01

    FOr use of digital techniques for the production, manipulation and storage of images has resulted in the creation of digital image libraries. These libraries often store many thousands of images. While provision of storage media for such large amounts of data has been straightforward, provision of effective searching and retrieval tools has not. Medicine relies heavily on images as a diagnostic tool. The most obvious example is the x-ray, but many other image forms are in everyday use. Advances in technology are affecting the ways medical images are generated, stored and retrieved. The paper describes the work of the Image COding and Segmentation to Support Variable Rate Transmission Channels and Variable Resolution Platforms (ICoS) research project currently under way in Bristol, UK. ICoS is a project of the Mobile of England and Hewlett-Packard Research Laboratories Europe. Funding is provided by the Engineering and PHysical Sciences Research Council. The aim of the ICoS project is to demonstrate the practical application of computer networking to medical image libraries. Work at the University of the West of England concentrates on user interface and indexing issues. Metadata is used to organize the images, coded using the WWW Consortium standard Resource Description Framework. We are investigating the application of such standards to medical images, one outcome being to implement a metadata-based image library. This paper describes the ICoS project in detail and discuses both metadata system and user interfaces in the context of medical applications.

  6. Special Issue on “Medical Imaging and Image Processing”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudong Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, Medical Imaging has become an essential component in many fields of bio-medical research and clinical practice. Biologists study cells and generate 3D confocal microscopy data sets, virologists generate 3D reconstructions of viruses from micrographs, radiologists identify and quantify tumors from MRI and CT scans, and neuroscientists detect regional metabolic brain activity from PET and functional MRI scans. On the other hand, Image Processing includes the analysis, enhancement, and display of images captured via various medical imaging technologies. Image reconstruction and modeling techniques allow instant processing of 2D signals to create 3D images. In addition, image processing and analysis can be used to determine the diameter, volume, and vasculature of a tumor or organ, flow parameters of blood or other fluids, and microscopic changes that have not previously been discernible.[...

  7. Medical imaging technology reviews and computational applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dewi, Dyah

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest research findings and reviews in the field of medical imaging technology, covering ultrasound diagnostics approaches for detecting osteoarthritis, breast carcinoma and cardiovascular conditions, image guided biopsy and segmentation techniques for detecting lung cancer, image fusion, and simulating fluid flows for cardiovascular applications. It offers a useful guide for students, lecturers and professional researchers in the fields of biomedical engineering and image processing.

  8. Applied medical image processing a basic course

    CERN Document Server

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    A widely used, classroom-tested text, Applied Medical Image Processing: A Basic Course delivers an ideal introduction to image processing in medicine, emphasizing the clinical relevance and special requirements of the field. Avoiding excessive mathematical formalisms, the book presents key principles by implementing algorithms from scratch and using simple MATLAB®/Octave scripts with image data and illustrations on an accompanying CD-ROM or companion website. Organized as a complete textbook, it provides an overview of the physics of medical image processing and discusses image formats and data storage, intensity transforms, filtering of images and applications of the Fourier transform, three-dimensional spatial transforms, volume rendering, image registration, and tomographic reconstruction.

  9. ENVISION, from particle detectors to medical imaging

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Technologies developed for particle physics detectors are increasingly used in medical imaging tools like Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Produced by: CERN KT/Life Sciences and ENVISION Project Management: Manuela Cirilli 3D animation: Jeroen Huijben, Nymus3d

  10. Physics for Medical Imaging Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Caner, Alesssandra; Rahal, Ghita

    2007-01-01

    The book introduces the fundamental aspects of digital imaging and covers four main themes: Ultrasound techniques and imaging applications; Magnetic resonance and MPJ in hospital; Digital imaging with X-rays; and Emission tomography (PET and SPECT). Each of these topics is developed by analysing the underlying physics principles and their implementation, quality and safety aspects, clinical performance and recent advancements in the field. Some issues specific to the individual techniques are also treated, e.g. choice of radioisotopes or contrast agents, optimisation of data acquisition and st

  11. Medical imaging principles and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Bronzino, Joseph D; Peterson, Donald R

    2013-01-01

    This book offers a selective review of key imaging modalities focusing on modalities with established clinical utilization. It provides a detailed overview of x-ray imaging and computed tomography, fundamental concepts in signal acquisition and processes, followed by an overview of functional MRI (fMRI) and chemical shift imaging. It also covers topics in Magnetic Resonance Microcopy, the physics of instrumentation and signal collection, and their application in clinical practice. The selection of topics provides readers with an appreciation of the depth and breadth of the field and the challenges ahead of the technical and clinical community of researchers and practitioners.

  12. Leadership and power in medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yielder, Jill [School of Health and Community Studies, Unitec New Zealand, Private Bag 92 025, Mt Albert, Auckland (New Zealand)]. E-mail: jyielder@unitec.ac.nz

    2006-11-15

    This article examines the concept of professional leadership in medical imaging. It explores the context of power issues in which such leadership is located, the differences between leadership and management, the qualities needed for effective leadership and how an individual's psychology may affect it. The article concludes that in the current climate of change and development, the medical imaging profession needs strong and appropriate leadership to profile the profession effectively and to lead it through to a more autonomous future.

  13. Deep Learning in Medical Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dinggang; Wu, Guorong; Suk, Heung-Il

    2016-01-01

    The computer-assisted analysis for better interpreting images have been longstanding issues in the medical imaging field. On the image-understanding front, recent advances in machine learning, especially, in the way of deep learning, have made a big leap to help identify, classify, and quantify patterns in medical images. Specifically, exploiting hierarchical feature representations learned solely from data, instead of handcrafted features mostly designed based on domain-specific knowledge, lies at the core of the advances. In that way, deep learning is rapidly proving to be the state-of-the-art foundation, achieving enhanced performances in various medical applications. In this article, we introduce the fundamentals of deep learning methods; review their successes to image registration, anatomical/cell structures detection, tissue segmentation, computer-aided disease diagnosis or prognosis, and so on. We conclude by raising research issues and suggesting future directions for further improvements. PMID:28301734

  14. Multi-channel medical imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-12-31

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remain in the subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may provide an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide used to capture images. The system may be configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. The systems described herein provide two or more diagnostic imaging channels for capture of multiple, concurrent diagnostic images and may be used where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by two or more images that are independently marked for functional interest.

  15. Multi-channel medical imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frangioni, John V.

    2016-05-03

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remain in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may provide an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide used to capture images. The system may be configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. The systems described herein provide two or more diagnostic imaging channels for capture of multiple, concurrent diagnostic images and may be used where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by two or more images that are independently marked for functional interest.

  16. Overview of deep learning in medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kenji

    2017-09-01

    The use of machine learning (ML) has been increasing rapidly in the medical imaging field, including computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), radiomics, and medical image analysis. Recently, an ML area called deep learning emerged in the computer vision field and became very popular in many fields. It started from an event in late 2012, when a deep-learning approach based on a convolutional neural network (CNN) won an overwhelming victory in the best-known worldwide computer vision competition, ImageNet Classification. Since then, researchers in virtually all fields, including medical imaging, have started actively participating in the explosively growing field of deep learning. In this paper, the area of deep learning in medical imaging is overviewed, including (1) what was changed in machine learning before and after the introduction of deep learning, (2) what is the source of the power of deep learning, (3) two major deep-learning models: a massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) and a convolutional neural network (CNN), (4) similarities and differences between the two models, and (5) their applications to medical imaging. This review shows that ML with feature input (or feature-based ML) was dominant before the introduction of deep learning, and that the major and essential difference between ML before and after deep learning is the learning of image data directly without object segmentation or feature extraction; thus, it is the source of the power of deep learning, although the depth of the model is an important attribute. The class of ML with image input (or image-based ML) including deep learning has a long history, but recently gained popularity due to the use of the new terminology, deep learning. There are two major models in this class of ML in medical imaging, MTANN and CNN, which have similarities as well as several differences. In our experience, MTANNs were substantially more efficient in their development, had a higher performance, and required a

  17. 2D dose distribution images of a hybrid low field MRI-γ detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abril, A., E-mail: ajabrilf@unal.edu.co; Agulles-Pedrós, L., E-mail: lagullesp@unal.edu.co [Medical Physics Group, Physics department, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    The proposed hybrid system is a combination of a low field MRI and dosimetric gel as a γ detector. The readout system is based on the polymerization process induced by the gel radiation. A gel dose map is obtained which represents the functional part of hybrid image alongside with the anatomical MRI one. Both images should be taken while the patient with a radiopharmaceutical is located inside the MRI system with a gel detector matrix. A relevant aspect of this proposal is that the dosimetric gel has never been used to acquire medical images. The results presented show the interaction of the {sup 99m}Tc source with the dosimetric gel simulated in Geant4. The purpose was to obtain the planar γ 2D-image. The different source configurations are studied to explore the ability of the gel as radiation detector through the following parameters; resolution, shape definition and radio-pharmaceutical concentration.

  18. Photoacoustic Imaging: Opening New Frontiers in Medical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerthi S Valluru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In today′s world, technology is advancing at an exponential rate and medical imaging is no exception. During the last hundred years, the field of medical imaging has seen a tremendous technological growth with the invention of imaging modalities including but not limited to X-ray, ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography. These tools have led to better diagnosis and improved patient care. However, each of these modalities has its advantages as well as disadvantages and none of them can reveal all the information a physician would like to have. In the last decade, a new diagnostic technology called photoacoustic imaging has evolved which is moving rapidly from the research phase to the clinical trial phase. This article outlines the basics of photoacoustic imaging and describes our hands-on experience in developing a comprehensive photoacoustic imaging system to detect tissue abnormalities.

  19. Nanotechnology-supported THz medical imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Stylianou, Andreas; Talias, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, the achievements and progress in the field of medical imaging have dramatically enhanced the early detection and treatment of many pathological conditions. The development of new imaging modalities, especially non-ionising ones, which will improve prognosis, is of crucial importance. A number of novel imaging modalities have been developed but they are still in the initial stages of development and serious drawbacks obstruct them from offering their benefits to the ...

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of medical imaging modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, G.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Because continuous-energy Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations can be nearly exact simulations of physical reality (within data limitations, geometric approximations, transport algorithms, etc.), it follows that one should be able to closely approximate the results of many experiments from first-principles computations. This line of reasoning has led to various MCNP studies that involve simulations of medical imaging modalities and other visualization methods such as radiography, Anger camera, computerized tomography (CT) scans, and SABRINA particle track visualization. It is the intent of this paper to summarize some of these imaging simulations in the hope of stimulating further work, especially as computer power increases. Improved interpretation and prediction of medical images should ultimately lead to enhanced medical treatments. It is also reasonable to assume that such computations could be used to design new or more effective imaging instruments.

  1. Deep Learning in Medical Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dinggang; Wu, Guorong; Suk, Heung-Il

    2017-06-21

    This review covers computer-assisted analysis of images in the field of medical imaging. Recent advances in machine learning, especially with regard to deep learning, are helping to identify, classify, and quantify patterns in medical images. At the core of these advances is the ability to exploit hierarchical feature representations learned solely from data, instead of features designed by hand according to domain-specific knowledge. Deep learning is rapidly becoming the state of the art, leading to enhanced performance in various medical applications. We introduce the fundamentals of deep learning methods and review their successes in image registration, detection of anatomical and cellular structures, tissue segmentation, computer-aided disease diagnosis and prognosis, and so on. We conclude by discussing research issues and suggesting future directions for further improvement.

  2. Gamma spectroscopy and optoelectronic imaging with hybrid photon detector

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, C; Piedigrossi, D; Rosso, E; Cenceelli, V; De Notaristefani, F; Masini, Gérald; Puertolas, D; Cindolo, F; Mares, J A; Nikl, M; Abreu, M; Rato-Mendes, P; Sousa, P

    2003-01-01

    Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPD) detect light via photocathodes and accelerate the emitted photoelectrons by an electric field towards silicon PIN-anodes, where they are absorbed and generate electronic signals. We have developed two specific types of HPDs: (1) Hybrid photomultiplier tubes for photon counting and gamma spectroscopy; (2) Imaging silicon pixel array tubes for optoelectronic cameras. This paper will illustrate the main achievements, which we obtained in the last years, and will describe and discuss our present main R&D efforts, in particular, in the biomedical imaging field. (27 refs).

  3. Deep Learning- and Transfer Learning-Based Super Resolution Reconstruction from Single Medical Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YiNan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical images play an important role in medical diagnosis and research. In this paper, a transfer learning- and deep learning-based super resolution reconstruction method is introduced. The proposed method contains one bicubic interpolation template layer and two convolutional layers. The bicubic interpolation template layer is prefixed by mathematics deduction, and two convolutional layers learn from training samples. For saving training medical images, a SIFT feature-based transfer learning method is proposed. Not only can medical images be used to train the proposed method, but also other types of images can be added into training dataset selectively. In empirical experiments, results of eight distinctive medical images show improvement of image quality and time reduction. Further, the proposed method also produces slightly sharper edges than other deep learning approaches in less time and it is projected that the hybrid architecture of prefixed template layer and unfixed hidden layers has potentials in other applications.

  4. A hierarchical SVG image abstraction layer for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward; Huang, Xiaolei; Tan, Gang; Long, L. Rodney; Antani, Sameer

    2010-03-01

    As medical imaging rapidly expands, there is an increasing need to structure and organize image data for efficient analysis, storage and retrieval. In response, a large fraction of research in the areas of content-based image retrieval (CBIR) and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) has focused on structuring information to bridge the "semantic gap", a disparity between machine and human image understanding. An additional consideration in medical images is the organization and integration of clinical diagnostic information. As a step towards bridging the semantic gap, we design and implement a hierarchical image abstraction layer using an XML based language, Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG). Our method encodes features from the raw image and clinical information into an extensible "layer" that can be stored in a SVG document and efficiently searched. Any feature extracted from the raw image including, color, texture, orientation, size, neighbor information, etc., can be combined in our abstraction with high level descriptions or classifications. And our representation can natively characterize an image in a hierarchical tree structure to support multiple levels of segmentation. Furthermore, being a world wide web consortium (W3C) standard, SVG is able to be displayed by most web browsers, interacted with by ECMAScript (standardized scripting language, e.g. JavaScript, JScript), and indexed and retrieved by XML databases and XQuery. Using these open source technologies enables straightforward integration into existing systems. From our results, we show that the flexibility and extensibility of our abstraction facilitates effective storage and retrieval of medical images.

  5. An open architecture for medical image workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Hu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiangyun

    2005-04-01

    Dealing with the difficulties of integrating various medical image viewing and processing technologies with a variety of clinical and departmental information systems and, in the meantime, overcoming the performance constraints in transferring and processing large-scale and ever-increasing image data in healthcare enterprise, we design and implement a flexible, usable and high-performance architecture for medical image workstations. This architecture is not developed for radiology only, but for any workstations in any application environments that may need medical image retrieving, viewing, and post-processing. This architecture contains an infrastructure named Memory PACS and different kinds of image applications built on it. The Memory PACS is in charge of image data caching, pre-fetching and management. It provides image applications with a high speed image data access and a very reliable DICOM network I/O. In dealing with the image applications, we use dynamic component technology to separate the performance-constrained modules from the flexibility-constrained modules so that different image viewing or processing technologies can be developed and maintained independently. We also develop a weakly coupled collaboration service, through which these image applications can communicate with each other or with third party applications. We applied this architecture in developing our product line and it works well. In our clinical sites, this architecture is applied not only in Radiology Department, but also in Ultrasonic, Surgery, Clinics, and Consultation Center. Giving that each concerned department has its particular requirements and business routines along with the facts that they all have different image processing technologies and image display devices, our workstations are still able to maintain high performance and high usability.

  6. Bioresponsive nanosensors in medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Eyk

    2010-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been established as sensitive probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). While the majority of specific nanosensors are based on sterically stabilized iron oxide particles, the focus of this review is on the use of very small iron oxide particles (VSOPs) that are electrostatically stabilized by an anionic citrate acid shell. We used VSOPs to develop target-specific as well as protease-activatable nanosensors for molecular MRI. PMID:19846442

  7. Hybrid Pixel Detectors for gamma/X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzistratis, D.; Theodoratos, G.; Zografos, V.; Kazas, I.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are made by direct converting high-Z semi-insulating single crystalline material coupled to complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) readout electronics. They are attractive because direct conversion exterminates all the problems of spatial localization related to light diffusion, energy resolution, is far superior from the combination of scintillation crystals and photomultipliers and lithography can be used to pattern electrodes with very fine pitch. We are developing 2-D pixel CMOS ASICs, connect them to pixilated CdTe crystals with the flip chip and bump bonding method and characterize the hybrids. We have designed a series of circuits, whose latest member consists of a 50×25 pixel array with 400um pitch and an embedded controller. In every pixel a full spectroscopic channel with time tagging information has been implemented. The detectors are targeting Compton scatter imaging and they can be used for coded aperture imaging too. Hybridization using CMOS can overcome the limit put on pixel circuit complexity by the use of thin film transistors (TFT) in large flat panels. Hybrid active pixel sensors are used in dental imaging and other applications (e.g. industrial CT etc.). Thus X-ray imaging can benefit from the work done on dynamic range enhancement methods developed initially for visible and infrared CMOS pixel sensors. A 2-D CMOS ASIC with 100um pixel pitch to demonstrate the feasibility of such methods in the context of X-ray imaging has been designed.

  8. Hybrid micro-/nanogels for optical sensing and intracellular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiqin Zhou

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid micro-/nanogels are playing an increasing important part in a diverse range of applications, due to their tunable dimensions, large surface area, stable interior network structure, and a very short response time. We review recent advances and challenges in the developments of hybrid micro-/nanogels toward applications for optical sensing of pH, temperature, glucose, ions, and other species as well as for intracellular imaging. Due to their unique advantages, hybrid micro-/nanogels as optical probes are attracting substantial interests for continuous monitoring of chemical parameters in complex samples such as blood and bioreactor fluids, in chemical research and industry, and in food quality control. In particular, their intracellular probing ability enables the monitoring of the biochemistry and biophysics of live cells over time and space, thus contributing to the explanation of intricate biological processes and the development of novel diagnoses. Unlike most other probes, hybrid micro-/nanogels could also combine other multiple functions into a single probe. The rational design of hybrid micro-/nanogels will not only improve the probing applications as desirable, but also implement their applications in new arenas. With ongoing rapid advances in bionanotechnology, the well-designed hybrid micro-/nanogel probes will be able to provide simultaneous sensing, imaging diagnosis, and therapy toward clinical applications.

  9. Image analysis and modeling in medical image computing

    OpenAIRE

    Repečka, Aurimas

    2017-01-01

    Machine learning and neural networks are successfully applied in various regression and classification problems. Even though neural network models are used to make diagnosis based on medical images, there are still some areas where machine learning due to complexity of the problem has not been applied. One of those areas is ultrasound image analysis. The main distinct feature of this analysis is that the objects in the images are noisy and lack for clear edges. Moreover, final diagnosis requi...

  10. Radiation biology of medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Kelsey, Charles A; Sandoval, Daniel J; Chambers, Gregory D; Adolphi, Natalie L; Paffett, Kimberly S

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a thorough yet concise introduction to quantitative radiobiology and radiation physics, particularly the practical and medical application. Beginning with a discussion of the basic science of radiobiology, the book explains the fast processes that initiate damage in irradiated tissue and the kinetic patterns in which such damage is expressed at the cellular level. The final section is presented in a highly practical handbook style and offers application-based discussions in radiation oncology, fractionated radiotherapy, and protracted radiation among others. The text is also supplemented by a Web site.

  11. Hybrid image potential states in molecular overlayers on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wella, Sasfan Arman; Sawada, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Nana; Muttaqien, Fahdzi; Inagaki, Kouji; Hamada, Ikutaro; Morikawa, Yoshitada; Hamamoto, Yuji

    2017-11-01

    The structural and electronic properties of naphthalene adsorbed on graphene are studied from first principles using the van der Waals density functional method. It is shown that naphthalene molecules are stabilized by forming a superstructure with the periodicity of (2 √{3 }×2 √{3 }) and a tilted molecular adsorption geometry on graphene, in good agreement with the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Our results predict that image potential states (IPSs) are induced by intermolecular interaction on the naphthalene overlayer, hybridizing with the IPSs derived from graphene. The resultant hybrid IPSs are characterized by anisotropic effective mass reflecting the molecular structure of naphthalene. By means of STM simulations, we reveal that one of the hybrid IPSs manifests itself as an oval protrusion distinguishable from naphthalene molecular orbitals, which identifies the origin of an experimental STM image previously attributed to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of naphthalene.

  12. Shape analysis in medical image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, João

    2014-01-01

    This book contains thirteen contributions from invited experts of international recognition addressing important issues in shape analysis in medical image analysis, including techniques for image segmentation, registration, modelling and classification, and applications in biology, as well as in cardiac, brain, spine, chest, lung and clinical practice. This volume treats topics such as, anatomic and functional shape representation and matching; shape-based medical image segmentation; shape registration; statistical shape analysis; shape deformation; shape-based abnormity detection; shape tracking and longitudinal shape analysis; machine learning for shape modeling and analysis; shape-based computer-aided-diagnosis; shape-based medical navigation; benchmark and validation of shape representation, analysis and modeling algorithms. This work will be of interest to researchers, students, and manufacturers in the fields of artificial intelligence, bioengineering, biomechanics, computational mechanics, computationa...

  13. Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    higher tumor uptake was apparent in all of the mice except the mouse injected with still-caged (inactive) CMP (Fig. 3). CMP distribution within the...sensitivity and specificity of FIAU-PET in detecting orthopedic infection. Aim #2: To extend the FIAU imaging technique to pulmonary infection. Aim #3...specificity of FIAU-PET in detecting orthopedic infection. Aim #2: To extend the FIAU imaging technique to pulmonary infection. Aim #3: To transition from

  14. Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    of using non- cellular solid state compartment as a source for therapeutic targets and for selective imaging of micro-metastasis2-5. In particular...for 1 hr in sodium acetate ( pH 5). After cooling room temperature, the polymer was treated with EDTA (0.05 M) to capture free 111In ions and further...Brooks, P.C. Impact of the non- cellular tumor microenvironment on metastasis: potential therapeutic and imaging opportunities. Journal of Cellular

  15. Hyperspectral Image Recovery via Hybrid Regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arablouei, Reza; de Hoog, Frank

    2016-09-27

    Natural images tend to mostly consist of smooth regions with individual pixels having highly correlated spectra. This information can be exploited to recover hyperspectral images of natural scenes from their incomplete and noisy measurements. To perform the recovery while taking full advantage of the prior knowledge, we formulate a composite cost function containing a square-error data-fitting term and two distinct regularization terms pertaining to spatial and spectral domains. The regularization for the spatial domain is the sum of total-variation of the image frames corresponding to all spectral bands. The regularization for the spectral domain is the ��������-norm of the coefficient matrix obtained by applying a suitable sparsifying transform to the spectra of the pixels. We use an accelerated proximal-subgradient method to minimize the formulated cost function. We analyse the performance of the proposed algorithm and prove its convergence. Numerical simulations using real hyperspectral images exhibit that the proposed algorithm offers an excellent recovery performance with a number of measurements that is only a small fraction of the hyperspectral image data size. Simulation results also show that the proposed algorithm significantly outperforms an accelerated proximal-gradient algorithm that solves the classical basis-pursuit denoising problem to recover the hyperspectral image.

  16. APES Beamforming Applied to Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Ann E. A.; Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Austeng, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Recently, adaptive beamformers have been introduced to medical ultrasound imaging. The primary focus has been on the minimum variance (MV) (or Capon) beamformer. This work investigates an alternative but closely related beamformer, the Amplitude and Phase Estimation (APES) beamformer. APES offers...... added robustness at the expense of a slightly lower resolution. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the APES beamformer on medical imaging data, since correct amplitude estimation often is just as important as spatial resolution. In our simulations we have used a 3.5 MHz, 96...... element linear transducer array. When imaging two closely spaced point targets, APES displays nearly the same resolution as the MV, and at the same time improved amplitude control. When imaging cysts in speckle, APES offers speckle statistics similar to that of the DAS, without the need for temporal...

  17. Body image and cosmetic medical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwer, David B; Crerand, Canice E

    2004-01-01

    Cosmetic medical treatments have become increasingly popular over the past decade. The explosion in popularity can be attributed to several factors-the evolution of safer, minimally invasive procedures, increased mass media attention, and the greater willingness of individuals to undergo cosmetic procedures as a means to enhance physical appearance. Medical and mental health professionals have long been interested in understanding both the motivations for seeking a change in physical appearance as well as the psychological outcomes of these treatments. Body image has been thought to play a key role in the decision to seek cosmetic procedures, however, only recently have studies investigated the pre- and postoperative body image concerns of patients. While body image dissatisfaction may motivate the pursuit of cosmetic medical treatments, psychiatric disorders characterized by body image disturbances, such as body dysmorphic disorder and eating disorders, may be relatively common among these patients. Subsequent research on persons who alter their physical appearance through cosmetic medical treatments are likely provide important information on the nature of body image.

  18. Nano-images as hybrid monsters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruivenkamp, Martin; Rip, Arie; Coopmans, Catelijne; Vertesi, Janet; Lynch, Michael E.; Woolgar, Steve

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses the role of images in nanotechnology. Nanotechnology includes an array of scientific and engineering fields in which researchers observe and manipulate materials at or near the nanometer scale (one billionth of a meter). The very idea of visualizing nanoscale phenomena is

  19. Lesion Contrast Enhancement in Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.; Macovski, A.

    1997-01-01

    Methods for improving the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of low-contrast lesions in medical ultrasound imaging are described. Differences in the frequency spectra and amplitude distributions of the lesion and its surroundings can be used to increase the CNR of the lesion relative to the background....... Automated graylevel mapping is used in combination with a contrast-weighted form of frequency-diversity speckle reduction. In clinical studies, the techniques have yielded mean CNR improvements of 3.2 dB above ordinary frequency-diversity imaging and 5.6 dB over sharper conventional images, with no post...

  20. Multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles for hybrid biomedical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidt, Timo; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2013-07-01

    Iron oxide core nanoparticles are attractive imaging agents because their material properties allow the tuning of pharmacokinetics as well as the attachment of multiple moieties to their surface. In addition to affinity ligands, these include fluorochromes and radioisotopes for detection with optical and nuclear imaging. As the iron oxide core can be detected by MRI, options for combining imaging modalities are manifold. Already, preclinical imaging strategies have combined noninvasive imaging with higher resolution techniques, such as intravital microscopy, to gain unprecedented insight into steady-state biology and disease. Going forward, hybrid iron oxide nanoparticles will help to merge modalities, creating a synergy that will enable imaging in basic research and, potentially, also in the clinic. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The semiotics of medical image Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, John S H; Gibson, Eli; Eagleson, Roy; Peters, Terry M

    2018-02-01

    As the interaction between clinicians and computational processes increases in complexity, more nuanced mechanisms are required to describe how their communication is mediated. Medical image segmentation in particular affords a large number of distinct loci for interaction which can act on a deep, knowledge-driven level which complicates the naive interpretation of the computer as a symbol processing machine. Using the perspective of the computer as dialogue partner, we can motivate the semiotic understanding of medical image segmentation. Taking advantage of Peircean semiotic traditions and new philosophical inquiry into the structure and quality of metaphors, we can construct a unified framework for the interpretation of medical image segmentation as a sign exchange in which each sign acts as an interface metaphor. This allows for a notion of finite semiosis, described through a schematic medium, that can rigorously describe how clinicians and computers interpret the signs mediating their interaction. Altogether, this framework provides a unified approach to the understanding and development of medical image segmentation interfaces. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A virtual laboratory for medical image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olabarriaga, Sílvia D.; Glatard, Tristan; de Boer, Piter T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the design, implementation, and usage of a virtual laboratory for medical image analysis. It is fully based on the Dutch grid, which is part of the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE (EGEE) production infrastructure and driven by the gLite middleware. The adopted service-oriented

  3. Fast fluid registration of medical images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten; Gramkow, Claus

    1996-01-01

    This paper offers a new fast algorithm for non-rigid viscous fluid registration of medical images that is at least an order of magnitude faster than the previous method by (Christensen et al., 1994). The core algorithm in the fluid registration method is based on a linear elastic deformation...

  4. Curve Matching with Applications in Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Martin; Bruveris, Martins; Harms, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, Riemannian shape analysis of curves and surfaces has found several applications in medical image analysis. In this paper we present a numerical discretization of second order Sobolev metrics on the space of regular curves in Euclidean space. This class of metrics has several...

  5. Medical Imaging with Ultrasound: Some Basic Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, R.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are medical applications of ultrasound. The physics of the wave nature of ultrasound including its propagation and production, return by the body, spatial and contrast resolution, attenuation, image formation using pulsed echo ultrasound techniques, measurement of velocity and duplex scanning are described. (YP)

  6. From medicalization to hybridization: a postcolonial discourse for psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, P E

    2001-04-01

    I begin with an Orwellian dilemma [Orwell G. (1968) The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell, Vol. 1, p. 239. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, New York]: do I 'shoot the elephant' (by writing the abstract) to impress the editor? Or, with the courage of my postmodern convictions, do I lay down my rifle and disregard such suppressive editorial instructions? Bang! My words strafe the paper and the elephant is dead. How difficult it is to stay standing against the powerful currents of the dominant tradition. How easy it is to disavow the inequalities and injustices of that tradition when your livelihood (and your ego) depends upon it. So goes the theme of my paper, that, despite the clarion calls of the illustrious minority to reject the patriarchal model of medical psychiatry, psychiatric nurses continue to be propelled by the twin engines of illness and diagnosis. Yet as soon as psychiatry encounters the 'other' it becomes, in Homi K. Bhabha's words, 'hybridized': a pregnant pause created from the seeds of two different cultures. In this sense, every psychiatric moment becomes a golden opportunity for the psychiatric nurse to abdicate her role as medical factotum. Freed from these contractual obligations, she can join the 'other' and share in his experiences, sustaining rather than negating him within a truly therapeutic alliance. In similar fashion, this article has become a mixture of rhetorical fluidity and structured reality: a hybridized compromise which acknowledges the journal's publication boundaries yet still revels, at times, in the freedom of an open and lyrical text.

  7. Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    transconjugated dye-labeled serum proteins . 13   Future Plans The PCa imaging in animal model was mainly conducted in the lab of Dr. Pomper at the Johns...the dye can transfer from CMP onto serum proteins (e.g. albumin) resulting in an unexpected drop in signal during serum stability assays and off...specifically target digested collagens with unfolded and partially denatured collagen triple helices. 2. Demonstration of ex vivo and in vivo targeting

  8. Design patterns in medical imaging information systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, Kent S., Jr.; Wong, Stephen T. C.; Laxer, Kenneth D.; Knowlton, Robert C.; Ching, Wan

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new and important conceptual framework of software design for the medical imaging community using design patterns. Use cases are created to summarize operational scenarios of clinicians using the system to complete certain tasks such as image segmentation. During design the Unified Modeling Language is used to translate the use cases into modeling diagrams that describe how the system functions. Next, design patterns are applied to build models that describe how software components interoperate to deliver that functionality. The software components are implemented using the Java language, CORBA architecture, and other web technologies. The biomedical image information system is used in epilepsy neurosurgical planning and diagnosis. This article proposes the use of proven software design models for solving medical imaging informatics design problems. Design patterns provide an excellent vehicle to leverage design solutions that have worked in the past to solve the problems we face in building user-friendly, reliable, and efficient information systems. This work introduces this new technology for building increasing complex medical image information systems. The rigorous application of software design techniques is essential in building information systems that are easy to use, rich in functionality, maintainable, reliable, and updatable.

  9. Feature and Intensity Based Medical Image Registration Using Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Basset, Mohamed; Fakhry, Ahmed E; El-Henawy, Ibrahim; Qiu, Tie; Sangaiah, Arun Kumar

    2017-11-03

    Image registration is an important aspect in medical image analysis, and kinds use in a variety of medical applications. Examples include diagnosis, pre/post surgery guidance, comparing/merging/integrating images from multi-modal like Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and Computed Tomography (CT). Whether registering images across modalities for a single patient or registering across patients for a single modality, registration is an effective way to combine information from different images into a normalized frame for reference. Registered datasets can be used for providing information relating to the structure, function, and pathology of the organ or individual being imaged. In this paper a hybrid approach for medical images registration has been developed. It employs a modified Mutual Information (MI) as a similarity metric and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) method. Computation of mutual information is modified using a weighted linear combination of image intensity and image gradient vector flow (GVF) intensity. In this manner, statistical as well as spatial image information is included into the image registration process. Maximization of the modified mutual information is effected using the versatile Particle Swarm Optimization which is developed easily with adjusted less parameter. The developed approach has been tested and verified successfully on a number of medical image data sets that include images with missing parts, noise contamination, and/or of different modalities (CT, MRI). The registration results indicate the proposed model as accurate and effective, and show the posture contribution in inclusion of both statistical and spatial image data to the developed approach.

  10. Silicon detector for a Compton Camera in Nuclear Medical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, D; Jalocha, P; Sowicki, B; Kowal, M; Dulinski, W; Maehlum, G; Nygård, E; Yoshioka, K; Fuster, J A; Lacasta, C; Mikuz, M; Roe, S; Weilhammer, Peter; Hua, C H; Park, S J; Wilderman, S J; Zhang, L; Clinthorne, N H; Rogers, W L

    2001-01-01

    Electronically collimated gamma ca\\-me\\-ras based on Com\\-pton scattering in silicon pad sensors may improve imaging in nuclear medicine and bio-medical research. The work described here concentrates on the silicon pad detector developed for a prototype Compton camera. The silicon pad sensors are read out using low noise VLSI CMOS chips and novel fast triggering chips. Depending on the application a light weight and dense packaging of sensors and its readout electronics on a hybrid is required. We describe the silicon pad sensor and their readout with the newly designed hybrid. %The silicon detector of a Compton camera %may contain up to $10^5$~analogue channels requiring %a fast and low cost data acquisition system. We also describe a modular and low-cost data acquisition system (CCDAQ) based on a digital signal processor which is interfaced to the EPP port of personal computers. Using the CCDAQ and the hybrids energy spectra of gamma-ray photons from technetium ($^{\\rm 99m}_{43}$Tc) and americium ($^{241}_{...

  11. Medical imaging displays and their use in image interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagadis, George C; Walz-Flannigan, Alisa; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Nagy, Paul G; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Langer, Steve G

    2013-01-01

    The adequate and repeatable performance of the image display system is a key element of information technology platforms in a modern radiology department. However, despite the wide availability of high-end computing platforms and advanced color and gray-scale monitors, the quality and properties of the final displayed medical image may often be inadequate for diagnostic purposes if the displays are not configured and maintained properly. In this article-an expanded version of the Radiological Society of North America educational module "Image Display"-the authors discuss fundamentals of image display hardware, quality control and quality assurance processes for optimal image interpretation settings, and parameters of the viewing environment that influence reader performance. Radiologists, medical physicists, and other allied professionals should strive to understand the role of display technology and proper usage for a quality radiology practice. The display settings and display quality control and quality assurance processes described in this article can help ensure high standards of perceived image quality and image interpretation accuracy.

  12. Hybrid simulation using mixed reality for interventional ultrasound imaging training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschi, C; Parrini, S; Dinelli, N; Ferrari, M; Ferrari, V

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging offers advantages over other imaging modalities and has become the most widespread modality for many diagnostic and interventional procedures. However, traditional 2D US requires a long training period, especially to learn how to manipulate the probe. A hybrid interactive system based on mixed reality was designed, implemented and tested for hand-eye coordination training in diagnostic and interventional US. A hybrid simulator was developed integrating a physical US phantom and a software application with a 3D virtual scene. In this scene, a 3D model of the probe with its relative scan plane is coherently displayed with a 3D representation of the phantom internal structures. An evaluation study of the diagnostic module was performed by recruiting thirty-six novices and four experts. The performances of the hybrid (HG) versus physical (PG) simulator were compared. After the training session, each novice was required to visualize a particular target structure. The four experts completed a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire. Seventy-eight percentage of the HG novices successfully visualized the target structure, whereas only 45% of the PG reached this goal. The mean scores from the questionnaires were 5.00 for usefulness, 4.25 for ease of use, 4.75 for 3D perception, and 3.25 for phantom realism. The hybrid US training simulator provides ease of use and is effective as a hand-eye coordination teaching tool. Mixed reality can improve US probe manipulation training.

  13. MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN MEDICAL IMAGE PROCESSING

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANGENENT, SIGURD; PICHON, ERIC; TANNENBAUM, ALLEN

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe some central mathematical problems in medical imaging. The subject has been undergoing rapid changes driven by better hardware and software. Much of the software is based on novel methods utilizing geometric partial differential equations in conjunction with standard signal/image processing techniques as well as computer graphics facilitating man/machine interactions. As part of this enterprise, researchers have been trying to base biomedical engineering principles on rigorous mathematical foundations for the development of software methods to be integrated into complete therapy delivery systems. These systems support the more effective delivery of many image-guided procedures such as radiation therapy, biopsy, and minimally invasive surgery. We will show how mathematics may impact some of the main problems in this area, including image enhancement, registration, and segmentation. PMID:23645963

  14. Simplified labeling process for medical image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingchen; Huang, Junzhou; Huang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Shaoting; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2012-01-01

    Image segmentation plays a crucial role in many medical imaging applications by automatically locating the regions of interest. Typically supervised learning based segmentation methods require a large set of accurately labeled training data. However, thel labeling process is tedious, time consuming and sometimes not necessary. We propose a robust logistic regression algorithm to handle label outliers such that doctors do not need to waste time on precisely labeling images for training set. To validate its effectiveness and efficiency, we conduct carefully designed experiments on cervigram image segmentation while there exist label outliers. Experimental results show that the proposed robust logistic regression algorithms achieve superior performance compared to previous methods, which validates the benefits of the proposed algorithms.

  15. Imaging Hybrid Photon Detectors with a Reflective Photocathode

    CERN Document Server

    Ferenc, D

    2000-01-01

    Modern epitaxially grown photocathodes, like GaAsP, bring a very high inherent quantum efficiency, but are rather expensive due to the complicated manufacturing and mounting process. We argue that such photocathodes could be used in reflective mode, in order to avoid the risky and expensive removal of the epitaxial growth substrate. Besides that the quantum efficiency should increase considerably. In this paper we present results of the development of large imaging Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs), particularly designed for such reflective photocathodes.

  16. HEP technologies to address medical imaging challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Developments in detector technologies aimed at solving challenges in present and future CERN experiments, particularly at the LHC, have triggered exceptional advances in the performance of medical imaging devices, allowing for a spectacular progress in in-vivo molecular imaging procedures, which are opening the way for tailored therapies of major diseases. This talk will briefly review the recent history of this prime example of technology transfer from HEP experiments to society, will describe the technical challenges being addressed by some ongoing projects, and will present a few new ideas for further developments and their foreseeable impact.

  17. Medical Imaging Informatics: Towards a Personalized Computational Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayache, N

    2016-05-20

    Medical Imaging Informatics has become a fast evolving discipline at the crossing of Informatics, Computational Sciences, and Medicine that is profoundly changing medical practices, for the patients' benefit.

  18. Towards new functional nanostructures for medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Naomi; Rowlands, J. A. [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Nanostructures represent a promising new type of contrast agent for clinical medical imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, ultrasound, and nuclear imaging. Currently, most nanostructures are simple, single-purpose imaging agents based on spherical constructs (e.g., liposomes, micelles, nanoemulsions, macromolecules, dendrimers, and solid nanoparticle structures). In the next decade, new clinical imaging nanostructures will be designed as multi-functional constructs, to both amplify imaging signals at disease sites and deliver localized therapy. Proposals for nanostructures to fulfill these new functions will be outlined. New functional nanostructures are expected to develop in five main directions: Modular nanostructures with additive functionality; cooperative nanostructures with synergistic functionality; nanostructures activated by their in vivo environment; nanostructures activated by sources outside the patient; and novel, nonspherical nanostructures and components. The development and clinical translation of next-generation nanostructures will be facilitated by a combination of improved clarity of the in vivo imaging and biological challenges and the requirements to successfully overcome them; development of standardized characterization and validation systems tailored for the preclinical assessment of nanostructure agents; and development of streamlined commercialization strategies and pipelines tailored for nanostructure-based agents for their efficient translation to the clinic.

  19. Instrumentation of the ESRF medical imaging facility

    CERN Document Server

    Elleaume, H; Berkvens, P; Berruyer, G; Brochard, T; Dabin, Y; Domínguez, M C; Draperi, A; Fiedler, S; Goujon, G; Le Duc, G; Mattenet, M; Nemoz, C; Pérez, M; Renier, M; Schulze, C; Spanne, P; Suortti, P; Thomlinson, W; Estève, F; Bertrand, B; Le Bas, J F

    1999-01-01

    At the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) a beamport has been instrumented for medical research programs. Two facilities have been constructed for alternative operation. The first one is devoted to medical imaging and is focused on intravenous coronary angiography and computed tomography (CT). The second facility is dedicated to pre-clinical microbeam radiotherapy (MRT). This paper describes the instrumentation for the imaging facility. Two monochromators have been designed, both are based on bent silicon crystals in the Laue geometry. A versatile scanning device has been built for pre-alignment and scanning of the patient through the X-ray beam in radiography or CT modes. An intrinsic germanium detector is used together with large dynamic range electronics (16 bits) to acquire the data. The beamline is now at the end of its commissioning phase; intravenous coronary angiography is intended to start in 1999 with patients and the CT pre-clinical program is underway on small animals. The first in viv...

  20. Deep Learning in Medical Imaging: General Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, June-Goo; Jun, Sanghoon; Cho, Young-Won; Lee, Hyunna; Kim, Guk Bae

    2017-01-01

    The artificial neural network (ANN)–a machine learning technique inspired by the human neuronal synapse system–was introduced in the 1950s. However, the ANN was previously limited in its ability to solve actual problems, due to the vanishing gradient and overfitting problems with training of deep architecture, lack of computing power, and primarily the absence of sufficient data to train the computer system. Interest in this concept has lately resurfaced, due to the availability of big data, enhanced computing power with the current graphics processing units, and novel algorithms to train the deep neural network. Recent studies on this technology suggest its potentially to perform better than humans in some visual and auditory recognition tasks, which may portend its applications in medicine and healthcare, especially in medical imaging, in the foreseeable future. This review article offers perspectives on the history, development, and applications of deep learning technology, particularly regarding its applications in medical imaging. PMID:28670152

  1. Deep Learning in Medical Imaging: General Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, June-Goo; Jun, Sanghoon; Cho, Young-Won; Lee, Hyunna; Kim, Guk Bae; Seo, Joon Beom; Kim, Namkug

    2017-01-01

    The artificial neural network (ANN)-a machine learning technique inspired by the human neuronal synapse system-was introduced in the 1950s. However, the ANN was previously limited in its ability to solve actual problems, due to the vanishing gradient and overfitting problems with training of deep architecture, lack of computing power, and primarily the absence of sufficient data to train the computer system. Interest in this concept has lately resurfaced, due to the availability of big data, enhanced computing power with the current graphics processing units, and novel algorithms to train the deep neural network. Recent studies on this technology suggest its potentially to perform better than humans in some visual and auditory recognition tasks, which may portend its applications in medicine and healthcare, especially in medical imaging, in the foreseeable future. This review article offers perspectives on the history, development, and applications of deep learning technology, particularly regarding its applications in medical imaging.

  2. Deep learning in medical imaging: General overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, June Goo; Jun, Sang Hoon; Cho, Young Won; Lee, Hyun Na; KIm, Guk Bae; Seo, Joon Beom; Kim, Nam Kug [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    The artificial neural network (ANN)–a machine learning technique inspired by the human neuronal synapse system–was introduced in the 1950s. However, the ANN was previously limited in its ability to solve actual problems, due to the vanishing gradient and overfitting problems with training of deep architecture, lack of computing power, and primarily the absence of sufficient data to train the computer system. Interest in this concept has lately resurfaced, due to the availability of big data, enhanced computing power with the current graphics processing units, and novel algorithms to train the deep neural network. Recent studies on this technology suggest its potentially to perform better than humans in some visual and auditory recognition tasks, which may portend its applications in medicine and health care, especially in medical imaging, in the foreseeable future. This review article offers perspectives on the history, development, and applications of deep learning technology, particularly regarding its applications in medical imaging.

  3. Medical Image Registration and Surgery Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten

    1996-01-01

    This thesis explores the application of physical models in medical image registration and surgery simulation. The continuum models of elasticity and viscous fluids are described in detail, and this knowledge is used as a basis for most of the methods described here. Real-time deformable models......, and the use of selective matrix vector multiplication. Fluid medical image registration A new and faster algorithm for non-rigid registration using viscous fluid models is presented. This algorithm replaces the core part of the original algorithm with multi-resolution convolution using a new filter, which...... implements the linear elasticity operator. Using the filter results in a speedup of at least an order of magnitude. Use of convolution hardware is expected to improve the performance even more. Mandibular growth for time registration of mandibles Non-rigid registration using a physically valid model of bone...

  4. Concrete Crack Identification Using a UAV Incorporating Hybrid Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjun; Lee, Junhwa; Ahn, Eunjong; Cho, Soojin; Shin, Myoungsu; Sim, Sung-Han

    2017-09-07

    Crack assessment is an essential process in the maintenance of concrete structures. In general, concrete cracks are inspected by manual visual observation of the surface, which is intrinsically subjective as it depends on the experience of inspectors. Further, it is time-consuming, expensive, and often unsafe when inaccessible structural members are to be assessed. Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technologies combined with digital image processing have recently been applied to crack assessment to overcome the drawbacks of manual visual inspection. However, identification of crack information in terms of width and length has not been fully explored in the UAV-based applications, because of the absence of distance measurement and tailored image processing. This paper presents a crack identification strategy that combines hybrid image processing with UAV technology. Equipped with a camera, an ultrasonic displacement sensor, and a WiFi module, the system provides the image of cracks and the associated working distance from a target structure on demand. The obtained information is subsequently processed by hybrid image binarization to estimate the crack width accurately while minimizing the loss of the crack length information. The proposed system has shown to successfully measure cracks thicker than 0.1 mm with the maximum length estimation error of 7.3%.

  5. Concrete Crack Identification Using a UAV Incorporating Hybrid Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjun Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Crack assessment is an essential process in the maintenance of concrete structures. In general, concrete cracks are inspected by manual visual observation of the surface, which is intrinsically subjective as it depends on the experience of inspectors. Further, it is time-consuming, expensive, and often unsafe when inaccessible structural members are to be assessed. Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV technologies combined with digital image processing have recently been applied to crack assessment to overcome the drawbacks of manual visual inspection. However, identification of crack information in terms of width and length has not been fully explored in the UAV-based applications, because of the absence of distance measurement and tailored image processing. This paper presents a crack identification strategy that combines hybrid image processing with UAV technology. Equipped with a camera, an ultrasonic displacement sensor, and a WiFi module, the system provides the image of cracks and the associated working distance from a target structure on demand. The obtained information is subsequently processed by hybrid image binarization to estimate the crack width accurately while minimizing the loss of the crack length information. The proposed system has shown to successfully measure cracks thicker than 0.1 mm with the maximum length estimation error of 7.3%.

  6. Adaptive Beamforming for Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund

    This dissertation investigates the application of adaptive beamforming for medical ultrasound imaging. The investigations have been concentrated primarily on the Minimum Variance (MV) beamformer. A broadband implementation of theMV beamformer is described, and simulated data have been used...... of the influence of sound speed errors on the adaptive beamformers; MV and the Amplitude and Phase EStimation (APES) beamformer. Furthermore, the investigations of previously suggested adaptive spectral Doppler techniques are continued by additional in-vivo measurements. These investigations shows...

  7. A recommender system for medical imaging diagnostic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Eriksson; Valente, Frederico; Costa, Carlos; Oliveira, José Luís

    2015-01-01

    The large volume of data captured daily in healthcare institutions is opening new and great perspectives about the best ways to use it towards improving clinical practice. In this paper we present a context-based recommender system to support medical imaging diagnostic. The system relies on data mining and context-based retrieval techniques to automatically lookup for relevant information that may help physicians in the diagnostic decision.

  8. CERN crystals used in medical imaging

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    This crystal is a type of material known as a scintillator. When a high energy charged particle or photon passes through a scintillator it glows. These materials are widely used in particle physics for particle detection, but their uses are being realized in further fields, such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET), an area of medical imaging that monitors the regions of energy use in the body.

  9. The rise and rise of medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, Paula E-mail: Paula.Gould@absw.org.uk

    2003-08-01

    As Sydney gets ready to host the World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering later this month, Paula Gould reports on the state of the art in imaging technology. Medical physics has come a long way since Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen first described a 'new kind of ray' back in 1895. The discovery that X-rays could be used to display the innermost workings of the human body on a photographic plate was of immediate interest to the medical community at the time. Today, over a century later, the phrase 'going for a scan' can refer to any one of a multitude of different medical-imaging techniques that are used for diagnosis and treatment. The transmission and detection of X-rays still lies at the heart of radiography, angiography, fluoroscopy and conventional mammography examinations. However, traditional film-based scanners are gradually being replaced by digital systems that are based primarily on caesium-iodide scintillators coupled to flat-panel detectors. Some systems rely on charged-coupled devices (CCD) rather than flat panels but the end result is the same: the data can be viewed, moved and stored without a single piece of film ever being exposed. (U.K.)

  10. Biologically based sensor fusion for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Mario; Garrett, Aaron L.

    2001-03-01

    We present an architecture for the fusion of multiple medical image modalities that enhances the original imagery and combines the complimentary information of the various modalities. The design principles follow the organization of the color vision system in humans and primates. Mainly, the design of within- modality enhancement and between-modality combination for fusion is based on the neural connectivity of retina and visual cortex. The architecture is based on a system developed for night vision applications while the first author was at MIT Lincoln Laboratory. Results of fusing various modalities are presented, including: a) fusion of T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI images, b) fusion of PD, T1 weighted, and T2-weighted, and c) fusion of SPECT and MRI/CT. The results will demonstrate the ability to fuse such disparate imaging modalities with regard to information content and complimentarities. These results will show how both brightness and color contrast are used in the resulting color fused images to convey information to the user. In addition, we will demonstrate the ability to preserve the high spatial resolution of modalities such as MRI even when combined with poor resolution images such as from SPECT scans. We conclude by motivating the use of the fusion method to derive more powerful image features to be used in segmentation and pattern recognition.

  11. Medical imaging informatics simulators: a tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H K; Deshpande, Ruchi; Documet, Jorge; Le, Anh H; Lee, Jasper; Ma, Kevin; Liu, Brent J

    2014-05-01

    A medical imaging informatics infrastructure (MIII) platform is an organized method of selecting tools and synthesizing data from HIS/RIS/PACS/ePR systems with the aim of developing an imaging-based diagnosis or treatment system. Evaluation and analysis of these systems can be made more efficient by designing and implementing imaging informatics simulators. This tutorial introduces the MIII platform and provides the definition of treatment/diagnosis systems, while primarily focusing on the development of the related simulators. A medical imaging informatics (MII) simulator in this context is defined as a system integration of many selected imaging and data components from the MIII platform and clinical treatment protocols, which can be used to simulate patient workflow and data flow starting from diagnostic procedures to the completion of treatment. In these processes, DICOM and HL-7 standards, IHE workflow profiles, and Web-based tools are emphasized. From the information collected in the database of a specific simulator, evidence-based medicine can be hypothesized to choose and integrate optimal clinical decision support components. Other relevant, selected clinical resources in addition to data and tools from the HIS/RIS/PACS and ePRs platform may also be tailored to develop the simulator. These resources can include image content indexing, 3D rendering with visualization, data grid and cloud computing, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) methods, specialized image-assisted surgical, and radiation therapy technologies. Five simulators will be discussed in this tutorial. The PACS-ePR simulator with image distribution is the cradle of the other simulators. It supplies the necessary PACS-based ingredients and data security for the development of four other simulators: the data grid simulator for molecular imaging, CAD-PACS, radiation therapy simulator, and image-assisted surgery simulator. The purpose and benefits of each simulator with respect to its clinical relevance

  12. The quest for standards in medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibaud, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.gibaud@irisa.fr [INSERM, VisAGeS U746 Unit/Project, Faculty of Medicine, Campus de Villejean, F-35043 Rennes (France); INRIA, VisAGeS U746 Unit/Project, IRISA, Campus de Beaulieu, F-35042 Rennes (France); University of Rennes I-CNRS UMR 6074, IRISA, Campus de Beaulieu, F-35042 Rennes (France)

    2011-05-15

    This article focuses on standards supporting interoperability and system integration in the medical imaging domain. We introduce the basic concepts and actors and we review the most salient achievements in this domain, especially with the DICOM standard, and the definition of IHE integration profiles. We analyze and discuss what was successful, and what could still be more widely adopted by industry. We then sketch out a perspective of what should be done next, based on our vision of new requirements for the next decade. In particular, we discuss the challenges of a more explicit sharing of image and image processing semantics, and we discuss the help that semantic web technologies (and especially ontologies) may bring to achieving this goal.

  13. A RONI Based Visible Watermarking Approach for Medical Image Authentication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanki, Rohit; Borra, Surekha; Dwivedi, Vedvyas; Borisagar, Komal

    2017-08-09

    Nowadays medical data in terms of image files are often exchanged between different hospitals for use in telemedicine and diagnosis. Visible watermarking being extensively used for Intellectual Property identification of such medical images, leads to serious issues if failed to identify proper regions for watermark insertion. In this paper, the Region of Non-Interest (RONI) based visible watermarking for medical image authentication is proposed. In this technique, to RONI of the cover medical image is first identified using Human Visual System (HVS) model. Later, watermark logo is visibly inserted into RONI of the cover medical image to get watermarked medical image. Finally, the watermarked medical image is compared with the original medical image for measurement of imperceptibility and authenticity of proposed scheme. The experimental results showed that this proposed scheme reduces the computational complexity and improves the PSNR when compared to many existing schemes.

  14. Hybrid µCT-FMT imaging and image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremse, Felix; Doleschel, Dennis; Zafarnia, Sara; Babler, Anne; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Lammers, Twan; Lederle, Wiltrud; Kiessling, Fabian

    2015-06-04

    Fluorescence-mediated tomography (FMT) enables longitudinal and quantitative determination of the fluorescence distribution in vivo and can be used to assess the biodistribution of novel probes and to assess disease progression using established molecular probes or reporter genes. The combination with an anatomical modality, e.g., micro computed tomography (µCT), is beneficial for image analysis and for fluorescence reconstruction. We describe a protocol for multimodal µCT-FMT imaging including the image processing steps necessary to extract quantitative measurements. After preparing the mice and performing the imaging, the multimodal data sets are registered. Subsequently, an improved fluorescence reconstruction is performed, which takes into account the shape of the mouse. For quantitative analysis, organ segmentations are generated based on the anatomical data using our interactive segmentation tool. Finally, the biodistribution curves are generated using a batch-processing feature. We show the applicability of the method by assessing the biodistribution of a well-known probe that binds to bones and joints.

  15. A RESTful image gateway for multiple medical image repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Frederico; Viana-Ferreira, Carlos; Costa, Carlos; Oliveira, José Luis

    2012-05-01

    Mobile technologies are increasingly important components in telemedicine systems and are becoming powerful decision support tools. Universal access to data may already be achieved by resorting to the latest generation of tablet devices and smartphones. However, the protocols employed for communicating with image repositories are not suited to exchange data with mobile devices. In this paper, we present an extensible approach to solving the problem of querying and delivering data in a format that is suitable for the bandwidth and graphic capacities of mobile devices. We describe a three-tiered component-based gateway that acts as an intermediary between medical applications and a number of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS). The interface with the gateway is accomplished using Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) requests following a Representational State Transfer (REST) methodology, which relieves developers from dealing with complex medical imaging protocols and allows the processing of data on the server side.

  16. Hybrid PET/MR Imaging and Brain Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Marco; Cavaliere, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, brain connectivity is gaining ever-increasing interest from the interdisciplinary research community. The study of brain connectivity is characterized by a multifaceted approach providing both structural and functional evidence of the relationship between cerebral regions at different scales. Although magnetic resonance (MR) is the most established imaging modality for investigating connectivity in vivo, the recent advent of hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/MR scanners paved the way for more comprehensive investigation of brain organization and physiology. Due to the high sensitivity and biochemical specificity of radiotracers, combining MR with PET imaging may enrich our ability to investigate connectivity by introducing the concept of metabolic connectivity and cometomics and promoting new insights on the physiological and molecular bases underlying high-level neural organization. This review aims to describe and summarize the main methods of analysis of brain connectivity employed in MR imaging and nuclear medicine. Moreover, it will discuss practical aspects and state-of-the-art techniques for exploiting hybrid PET/MR imaging to investigate the relationship of physiological processes and brain connectivity.

  17. Hybrid PET/MR Imaging and Brain Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eAiello

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, brain connectivity is gaining ever-increasing interest from the interdisciplinary research community. The study of brain connectivity is characterized by a multifaceted approach providing both structural and functional evidence of the relationship between cerebral regions at different scales. Although magnetic resonance (MR is the most established imaging modality for investigating connectivity in vivo, the recent advent of hybrid positron emission tomography (PET/MR scanners paved the way for more comprehensive investigation of brain organization and physiology. Due to the high sensitivity and biochemical specificity of radiotracers, combining MR with PET imaging may enrich our ability to investigate connectivity by introducing the concept of metabolic connectivity and cometomics and promoting new insights on the physiological and molecular bases underlying high-level neural organization. This review aims to describe and summarize the main methods of analysis of brain connectivity employed in MR imaging and nuclear medicine. Moreover, it will discuss practical aspects and state-of-the-art techniques for exploiting hybrid PET/MR imaging to investigate the relationship of physiological processes and brain connectivity.

  18. Response of a hybrid pixel detector (MEDIPIX3) to different radiation sources for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumacero, E. Miguel; De Celis Alonso, B.; Martínez Hernández, M. I.; Vargas, G.; Moreno Barbosa, E., E-mail: emoreno.emb@gmail.com [Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Av. San Claudio y Rio Verde, Puebla (Mexico); Moreno Barbosa, F. [Hospital General del Sur Hospital de la Mujer, Puebla (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    The development in semiconductor CMOS technology has enabled the creation of sensitive detectors for a wide range of ionizing radiation. These devices are suitable for photon counting and can be used in imaging and tomography X-ray diagnostics. The Medipix[1] radiation detection system is a hybrid silicon pixel chip developed for particle tracking applications in High Energy Physics. Its exceptional features (high spatial and energy resolution, embedded ultra fast readout, different operation modes, etc.) make the Medipix an attractive device for applications in medical imaging. In this work the energy characterization of a third-generation Medipix chip (Medipix3) coupled to a silicon sensor is presented. We used different radiation sources (strontium 90, iron 55 and americium 241) to obtain the response curve of the hybrid detector as a function of energy. We also studied the contrast of the Medipix as a measure of pixel noise. Finally we studied the response to fluorescence X rays from different target materials (In, Pd and Cd) for the two data acquisition modes of the chip; single pixel mode and charge summing mode.

  19. A study for watermark methods appropriate to medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y; Ahn, B; Kim, J S; Kim, I Y; Kim, S I

    2001-06-01

    The network system, including the picture archiving and communication system (PACS), is essential in hospital and medical imaging fields these days. Many medical images are accessed and processed on the web, as well as in PACS. Therefore, any possible accidents caused by the illegal modification of medical images must be prevented. Digital image watermark techniques have been proposed as a method to protect against illegal copying or modification of copyrighted material. Invisible signatures made by a digital image watermarking technique can be a solution to these problems. However, medical images have some different characteristics from normal digital images in that one must not corrupt the information contained in the original medical images. In this study, we suggest modified watermark methods appropriate for medical image processing and communication system that prevent clinically important data contained in original images from being corrupted.

  20. Multimodality and nanoparticles in medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Davis, Jason J

    2011-06-21

    A number of medical imaging techniques are used heavily in the provision of spatially resolved information on disease and physiological status and accordingly play a critical role in clinical diagnostics and subsequent treatment. Though, for most imaging modes, contrast is potentially enhanced through the use of contrast agents or improved hardware or imaging protocols, no single methodology provides, in isolation, a detailed mapping of anatomy, disease markers or physiological status. In recent years, the concept of complementing the strengths of one imaging modality with those of another has come to the fore and been further bolstered by the development of fused instruments such as PET/CT and PET/MRI stations. Coupled with the continual development in imaging hardware has been a surge in reports of contrast agents bearing multiple functionality, potentially providing not only a powerful and highly sensitised means of co-localising physiological/disease status and anatomy, but also the tracking and delineation of multiple markers and indeed subsequent or simultaneous highly localized therapy ("theragnostics").

  1. Mapping the different methods adopted for diagnostic imaging instruction at medical schools in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojniak, Rubens; Carneiro, Dominique Piacenti; Moterani, Gustavo Simonetto Peres; Duarte, Ivone da Silva; Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    To map the different methods for diagnostic imaging instruction at medical schools in Brazil. In this cross-sectional study, a questionnaire was sent to each of the coordinators of 178 Brazilian medical schools. The following characteristics were assessed: teaching model; total course hours; infrastructure; numbers of students and professionals involved; themes addressed; diagnostic imaging modalities covered; and education policies related to diagnostic imaging. Of the 178 questionnaires sent, 45 (25.3%) were completed and returned. Of those 45 responses, 17 (37.8%) were from public medical schools, whereas 28 (62.2%) were from private medical schools. Among the 45 medical schools evaluated, the method of diagnostic imaging instruction was modular at 21 (46.7%), classic (independent discipline) at 13 (28.9%), hybrid (classical and modular) at 9 (20.0%), and none of the preceding at 3 (6.7%). Diagnostic imaging is part of the formal curriculum at 36 (80.0%) of the schools, an elective course at 3 (6.7%), and included within another modality at 6 (13.3%). Professors involved in diagnostic imaging teaching are radiologists at 43 (95.5%) of the institutions. The survey showed that medical courses in Brazil tend to offer diagnostic imaging instruction in courses that include other content and at different time points during the course. Radiologists are extensively involved in undergraduate medical education, regardless of the teaching methodology employed at the institution.

  2. Mapping the different methods adopted for diagnostic imaging instruction at medical schools in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojniak, Rubens; Carneiro, Dominique Piacenti; Moterani, Gustavo Simonetto Peres; Duarte, Ivone da Silva; Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Objective To map the different methods for diagnostic imaging instruction at medical schools in Brazil. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, a questionnaire was sent to each of the coordinators of 178 Brazilian medical schools. The following characteristics were assessed: teaching model; total course hours; infrastructure; numbers of students and professionals involved; themes addressed; diagnostic imaging modalities covered; and education policies related to diagnostic imaging. Results Of the 178 questionnaires sent, 45 (25.3%) were completed and returned. Of those 45 responses, 17 (37.8%) were from public medical schools, whereas 28 (62.2%) were from private medical schools. Among the 45 medical schools evaluated, the method of diagnostic imaging instruction was modular at 21 (46.7%), classic (independent discipline) at 13 (28.9%), hybrid (classical and modular) at 9 (20.0%), and none of the preceding at 3 (6.7%). Diagnostic imaging is part of the formal curriculum at 36 (80.0%) of the schools, an elective course at 3 (6.7%), and included within another modality at 6 (13.3%). Professors involved in diagnostic imaging teaching are radiologists at 43 (95.5%) of the institutions. Conclusion The survey showed that medical courses in Brazil tend to offer diagnostic imaging instruction in courses that include other content and at different time points during the course. Radiologists are extensively involved in undergraduate medical education, regardless of the teaching methodology employed at the institution. PMID:28298730

  3. Imaging Performance of the Si/Ge Hybrid Compton Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burks, M; Chivers, D; Cork, C; Cunningham, M; Fabris, L; Gunter, D; Hull, E; Lange, D; Manini, H; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Niedermayr, T; Valentine, J; Vetter, K; Wright, D

    2005-11-10

    The point spread function (PSF) of a fully-instrumented silicon/germanium Compton telescope has been measured as a function of energy and angle. Overall, the resolution ranged from 3{sup o} to 4{sup o} FWHM over most of the energy range and field of view. The various contributions to the resolution have been quantified. These contributions include the energy uncertainty and position uncertainty of the detector; source energy; Doppler broadening; and the 1/r broadening characteristic of Compton back-projection. Furthermore, a distortion of the PSF is observed for sources imaged off-axis from the detector. These contributions are discussed and compared to theory and simulations.

  4. Medical image information system 2001. Development of the medical image information system to risk management- Medical exposure management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuranishi, Makoto; Kumagai, Michitomo; Shintani, Mitsuo [Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    2000-12-01

    This paper discusses the methods and systems for optimizing the following supplements 10 and 17 for national health and medical care. The supplements 10 and 17 of DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine) system, which is now under progress for the purpose to keep compatibility within medical image information system as an international standard, are important for making the cooperation between HIS (hospital information system)/RIS (radiation information system) and modality (imaging instruments). Supplement 10 concerns the system to send the information of patients and their orders through HIS/RIS to modality and 17, the information of modality performed procedure step (MPPS) to HIS/RIS. The latter defines to document patients' exposure, a part of which has not been recognized in Japan. Thus the medical information system can be useful for risk-management of medical exposure in future. (K.H.)

  5. Hybrid detection of lung nodules on CT scan images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Lin; Tan, Yongqiang; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng, E-mail: bz2166@columbia.edu [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 West 168th Street, New York, New York 10032 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The diversity of lung nodules poses difficulty for the current computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) schemes for lung nodule detection on computed tomography (CT) scan images, especially in large-scale CT screening studies. We proposed a novel CAD scheme based on a hybrid method to address the challenges of detection in diverse lung nodules. Methods: The hybrid method proposed in this paper integrates several existing and widely used algorithms in the field of nodule detection, including morphological operation, dot-enhancement based on Hessian matrix, fuzzy connectedness segmentation, local density maximum algorithm, geodesic distance map, and regression tree classification. All of the adopted algorithms were organized into tree structures with multi-nodes. Each node in the tree structure aimed to deal with one type of lung nodule. Results: The method has been evaluated on 294 CT scans from the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) dataset. The CT scans were randomly divided into two independent subsets: a training set (196 scans) and a test set (98 scans). In total, the 294 CT scans contained 631 lung nodules, which were annotated by at least two radiologists participating in the LIDC project. The sensitivity and false positive per scan for the training set were 87% and 2.61%. The sensitivity and false positive per scan for the testing set were 85.2% and 3.13%. Conclusions: The proposed hybrid method yielded high performance on the evaluation dataset and exhibits advantages over existing CAD schemes. We believe that the present method would be useful for a wide variety of CT imaging protocols used in both routine diagnosis and screening studies.

  6. Gestalt descriptions embodiments and medical image interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen

    2017-01-01

    In this paper I will argue that medical specialists interpret and diagnose through technological mediations like X-ray and fMRI images, and by actualizing embodied skills tacitly they are determining the identity of objects in the perceptual field. The initial phase of human interpretation...... of visual perception. My argument is that biology, society and instruments constitute unique individual ontologies influencing specialist readings of the technological output, in other words, putting limits on the “truth-to-nature” relation, which is so much sought for in science....

  7. Quantification of Structure from Medical Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qazi, Arish Asif

    In this thesis, we present automated methods that quantify information from medical images; information that is intended to assist and enable clinicians gain a better understanding of the underlying pathology. The first part of the thesis presents methods that analyse the articular cartilage......, and information beyond that of traditional morphometric measures. The thesis also proposes a fully automatic and generic statistical framework for identifying biologically interpretable regions of difference (ROD) between two groups of biological objects, attributed by anatomical differences or changes relating...... to pathology, without a priori knowledge about the location, extent, or topology of the ROD. Based on quantifications from both morphometric and textural based imaging markers, our method has identified the most pathological regions in the articular cartilage. The remaining part of the thesis presents methods...

  8. Medical imaging projects meet at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    ENTERVISION, the Research Training Network in 3D Digital Imaging for Cancer Radiation Therapy, successfully passed its mid-term review held at CERN on 11 January. This multidisciplinary project aims at qualifying experts in medical imaging techniques for improved hadron therapy.   ENTERVISION provides training in physics, medicine, electronics, informatics, radiobiology and engineering, as well as a wide range of soft skills, to 16 researchers of different backgrounds and nationalities. The network is funded by the European Commission within the Marie Curie Initial Training Network, and relies on the EU-funded research project ENVISION to provide a training platform for the Marie Curie researchers. The two projects hold their annual meetings jointly, allowing the young researchers to meet senior scientists and to have a full picture of the latest developments in the field beyond their individual research project. ENVISION and ENTERVISION are both co-ordinated by CERN, and the Laboratory hosts t...

  9. Effectiveness of a Hybrid Classroom in the Delivery of Medical Terminology Course Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey S.; Kreiger, Joan E.; Apicerno, Amy L

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid courses are emerging as a viable option for content delivery across college campuses. In an attempt to maximize learning outcomes while leveraging resources, one institution used several sections of a Medical Terminology course as a pilot. Traditional and hybrid course delivery were compared utilizing a quantitative research method to…

  10. Viewpoints on Medical Image Processing: From Science to Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno (né Lehmann), Thomas M.; Handels, Heinz; Maier-Hein (né Fritzsche), Klaus H.; Mersmann, Sven; Palm, Christoph; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Medical image processing provides core innovation for medical imaging. This paper is focused on recent developments from science to applications analyzing the past fifteen years of history of the proceedings of the German annual meeting on medical image processing (BVM). Furthermore, some members of the program committee present their personal points of views: (i) multi-modality for imaging and diagnosis, (ii) analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging, (iii) model-based image analysis, (iv) registration of section images, (v) from images to information in digital endoscopy, and (vi) virtual reality and robotics. Medical imaging and medical image computing is seen as field of rapid development with clear trends to integrated applications in diagnostics, treatment planning and treatment. PMID:24078804

  11. STEM image simulation with hybrid CPU/GPU programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Y; Ge, B H; Shen, X; Wang, Y G; Yu, R C

    2016-07-01

    STEM image simulation is achieved via hybrid CPU/GPU programming under parallel algorithm architecture to speed up calculation on a personal computer (PC). To utilize the calculation power of a PC fully, the simulation is performed using the GPU core and multi-CPU cores at the same time to significantly improve efficiency. GaSb and an artificial GaSb/InAs interface with atom diffusion have been used to verify the computation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Remote Inspection of Medical Images through High-Speed Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Noro, R.; Hubaux, Jean-Pierre

    1997-01-01

    In health care practice, diagnosis and therapy tasks are founded on the analysis of medical images. Traditionally, such analysis was performed using optical devices like light boxes or microscopes installed in clinical rooms or laboratories. In the last decade, personal computers have revolutioned this practice and today medical imaging is based on soft-copies of image material rather than films or specimens. Acquisition, storage and display of medical images are performed through digital com...

  13. Machine Learning Interface for Medical Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi C; Kagen, Alexander C

    2017-10-01

    TensorFlow is a second-generation open-source machine learning software library with a built-in framework for implementing neural networks in wide variety of perceptual tasks. Although TensorFlow usage is well established with computer vision datasets, the TensorFlow interface with DICOM formats for medical imaging remains to be established. Our goal is to extend the TensorFlow API to accept raw DICOM images as input; 1513 DaTscan DICOM images were obtained from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) database. DICOM pixel intensities were extracted and shaped into tensors, or n-dimensional arrays, to populate the training, validation, and test input datasets for machine learning. A simple neural network was constructed in TensorFlow to classify images into normal or Parkinson's disease groups. Training was executed over 1000 iterations for each cross-validation set. The gradient descent optimization and Adagrad optimization algorithms were used to minimize cross-entropy between the predicted and ground-truth labels. Cross-validation was performed ten times to produce a mean accuracy of 0.938 ± 0.047 (95 % CI 0.908-0.967). The mean sensitivity was 0.974 ± 0.043 (95 % CI 0.947-1.00) and mean specificity was 0.822 ± 0.207 (95 % CI 0.694-0.950). We extended the TensorFlow API to enable DICOM compatibility in the context of DaTscan image analysis. We implemented a neural network classifier that produces diagnostic accuracies on par with excellent results from previous machine learning models. These results indicate the potential role of TensorFlow as a useful adjunct diagnostic tool in the clinical setting.

  14. Medical applications of digital image morphing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penska, Keith; Folio, Les; Bunger, Rolf

    2007-09-01

    The authors present a unique medical technical application for illustrating the success and/or failure of the physiological healing process as a dynamically morphed video. Two examples used in this report include the healing of a severely fractured humerus from an explosion in Iraq and the other of dramatic tissue destruction from a poisonous spider bite. For the humerus, several sequential x-rays obtained throughout orthopedic surgical procedures and the healing process were morphed together representing a time-lapsed video of the healing process. The end result is a video that demonstrates the healing process in an animation that radiologists envision and report to other clinicians. For the brown recluse spider bite, a seemingly benign skin lesion transforms into a wide gaping necrotic wound with dramatic appearance within days. This novel technique is not presented for readily apparent clinical advantage, rather, it may have more immediate application in providing treatment options to referring providers and/or patients, as well as educational value of healing or disease progression over time. Image morphing is one of those innovations that is just starting to come into its own. Morphing is an image processing technology that transforms one image into another by generating a series of intermediate synthetic images. It is the same process that Hollywood uses to turn people into animals in movies, for example. The ability to perform morphing, once restricted to high-end graphics workstations, is now widely available for desktop computers. The authors describe how a series of radiographic images were morphed into a short movie clip using readily available software and an average laptop. The resultant video showed the healing process of an open comminuted humerus fracture that helped demonstrate how amazingly the human body heals in a case presentation in a time-lapse fashion.

  15. Automatic medical image annotation and keyword-based image retrieval using relevance feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Byoung Chul; Lee, Jihyeon; Nam, Jae-Yeal

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents novel multiple keywords annotation for medical images, keyword-based medical image retrieval, and relevance feedback method for image retrieval for enhancing image retrieval performance. For semantic keyword annotation, this study proposes a novel medical image classification method combining local wavelet-based center symmetric–local binary patterns with random forests. For keyword-based image retrieval, our retrieval system use the confidence score that is assigned to ea...

  16. A web service for enabling medical image retrieval integrated into a social medical image sharing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinimäki, Marko; Zhou, Xin; de la Vega, Enrique; Cabrer, Miguel; Müller, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Content-based visual image access is in the process from a research domain towards real applications. So far, most image retrieval applications have been in one specialized domain such as lung CTs as diagnosis aid or for classification of general images based on anatomic region, modality, and view. This article describes the use of a content-based image retrieval system in connection with the medical image sharing platform MEDTING, so a data set with a very large variety. Similarity retrieval is possible for all cases of the social image sharing platform, so cases can be linked by either visual similarity or similarity in keywords. The visual retrieval search is based on the GIFT (GNU Image Finding Tool). The technology for updating the index with new images added by users employs RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feeds. The ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) middleware is used for the implementation of a web service for similarity retrieval, simplifying the integration of this service. Novelty of this article is the application/integration and image updating strategy. Retrieval methods themselves employ existing techniques that are all open source and can easily be reproduced.

  17. Hybrid-array-based optoacoustic and ultrasound (OPUS) imaging of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deán-Ben, X. L.; Merčep, E.; Razansky, D.

    2017-05-01

    Hybrid optoacoustic and pulse-echo ultrasound imaging is an attractive multi-modal combination owing to the highly complementary contrast of the two techniques. Efficient hybridization is often hampered by significant dissimilarities between their optimal data acquisition and image formation strategies. Herein, we introduce an approach for combined optoacoustic and ultrasound imaging based on a plano-concave detector array design with a non-uniform pitch distribution. The hybrid design optimized for both modalities allows for maintaining an extended field of view for efficient ultrasound navigation while simultaneously providing broad tomographic coverage for optimal optoacoustic imaging performance. Imaging sessions performed in tissue-mimicking phantoms and healthy volunteers demonstrate that the suggested approach renders an enhanced imaging performance as compared with the previously reported hybrid optoacoustic and ultrasound imaging approaches. Thus, it can greatly facilitate clinical translation of the optoacoustic imaging technology by means of its efficient combination with ultrasonography, a well-established clinical imaging modality.

  18. 21 CFR 892.2010 - Medical image storage device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical image storage device. 892.2010 Section 892.2010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2010 Medical image storage device. (a...

  19. NEMA image quality phantom measurements and attenuation correction in integrated PET/MR hybrid imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Susanne; Jakoby, Bjoern W; Braun, Harald; Paulus, Daniel H; Quick, Harald H

    2015-12-01

    In integrated PET/MR hybrid imaging the evaluation of PET performance characteristics according to the NEMA standard NU 2-2007 is challenging because of incomplete MR-based attenuation correction (AC) for phantom imaging. In this study, a strategy for CT-based AC of the NEMA image quality (IQ) phantom is assessed. The method is systematically evaluated in NEMA IQ phantom measurements on an integrated PET/MR system. NEMA IQ measurements were performed on the integrated 3.0 Tesla PET/MR hybrid system (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). AC of the NEMA IQ phantom was realized by an MR-based and by a CT-based method. The suggested CT-based AC uses a template μ-map of the NEMA IQ phantom and a phantom holder for exact repositioning of the phantom on the systems patient table. The PET image quality parameters contrast recovery, background variability, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were determined and compared for both phantom AC methods. Reconstruction parameters of an iterative 3D OP-OSEM reconstruction were optimized for highest lesion SNR in NEMA IQ phantom imaging. Using a CT-based NEMA IQ phantom μ-map on the PET/MR system is straightforward and allowed performing accurate NEMA IQ measurements on the hybrid system. MR-based AC was determined to be insufficient for PET quantification in the tested NEMA IQ phantom because only photon attenuation caused by the MR-visible phantom filling but not the phantom housing is considered. Using the suggested CT-based AC, the highest SNR in this phantom experiment for small lesions (PET/MR hybrid system. The superiority of CT-based AC for this phantom is demonstrated by comparison to measurements using MR-based AC. Furthermore, optimized PET image reconstruction parameters are provided for the highest lesion SNR in NEMA IQ phantom measurements.

  20. NEMA image quality phantom measurements and attenuation correction in integrated PET/MR hybrid imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, Susanne; Jakoby, Bjoern W.; Braun, Harald; Paulus, Daniel H.; Quick, Harald H.

    2015-01-01

    Background In integrated PET/MR hybrid imaging the evaluation of PET performance characteristics according to the NEMA standard NU 2?2007 is challenging because of incomplete MR-based attenuation correction (AC) for phantom imaging. In this study, a strategy for CT-based AC of the NEMA image quality (IQ) phantom is assessed. The method is systematically evaluated in NEMA IQ phantom measurements on an integrated PET/MR system. Methods NEMA IQ measurements were performed on the integrated 3.0 T...

  1. New developments in medical imaging to detect breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    medical imaging modalities are used to detect breast cancer, the most common being X-rays (mammography), ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and various radionuclide techniques.2. The purpose of this article is to review these and other novel medical imaging modalities. The American College of Radiology ...

  2. A Review on Medical Image Registration as an Optimization Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guoli; Han, Jianda; Zhao, Yiwen; Wang, Zheng; Du, Huibin

    2017-08-01

    In the course of clinical treatment, several medical media are required by a phy-sician in order to provide accurate and complete information about a patient. Medical image registra-tion techniques can provide a richer diagnosis and treatment information to doctors and to provide a comprehensive reference source for the researchers involved in image registration as an optimization problem. The essence of image registration is associating two or more different images spatial asso-ciation, and getting the translation of their spatial relationship. For medical image registration, its pro-cess is not absolute. Its core purpose is finding the conversion relationship between different images. The major step of image registration includes the change of geometrical dimensions, and change of the image of the combination, image similarity measure, iterative optimization and interpo-lation process. The contribution of this review is sort of related image registration research methods, can provide a brief reference for researchers about image registration.

  3. TSV last for hybrid pixel detectors: Application to particle physics and imaging experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, D; Berthelot, A; Cuchet, R; Chantre, C; Campbell, M

    Hybrid pixel detectors are now widely used in particle physics experiments and at synchrotron light sources. They have also stimulated growing interest in other fields and, in particular, in medical imaging. Through the continuous pursuit of miniaturization in CMOS it has been possible to increase the functionality per pixel while maintaining or even shrinking pixel dimensions. The main constraint on the more extensive use of the technology in all fields is the cost of module building and the difficulty of covering large areas seamlessly [1]. On another hand, in the field of electronic component integration, a new approach has been developed in the last years, called 3D Integration. This concept, based on using the vertical axis for component integration, allows improving the global performance of complex systems. Thanks to this technology, the cost and the form factor of components could be decreased and the performance of the global system could be enhanced. In the field of radiation imaging detectors the a...

  4. X-ray Imaging Using a Hybrid Photon Counting GaAs Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, C; Göppert, R; Heijne, Erik H M; Ludwig, J; Meddeler, G; Mikulec, B; Pernigotti, E; Rogalla, M; Runge, K; Smith, K M; Snoeys, W; Söldner-Rembold, S; Watt, J

    1999-01-01

    The performance of hybrid GaAs pixel detectors as X-ray imaging sensors were investigated at room temperature. These hybrids consist of 300 mu-m thick GaAs pixel detectors, flip-chip bonded to a CMOS Single Photon Counting Chip (PCC). This chip consists of a matrix of 64 x 64 identical square pixels (170 mu-m x 170 mu-m) and covers a total area of 1.2 cm**2. The electronics in each cell comprises a preamplifier, a discriminator with a 3-bit threshold adjust and a 15-bit counter. The detector is realized by an array of Schottky diodes processed on semi-insulating LEC-GaAs bulk material. An IV-charcteristic and a detector bias voltage scan showed that the detector can be operated with voltages around 200 V. Images of various objects were taken by using a standard X-ray tube for dental diagnostics. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) was also determined. The applications of these imaging systems range from medical applications like digital mammography or dental X-ray diagnostics to non destructive material testing (...

  5. Survey on Neural Networks Used for Medical Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhenghao; He, Lifeng; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi; Itoh, Hidenori

    2009-02-01

    This paper aims to present a review of neural networks used in medical image processing. We classify neural networks by its processing goals and the nature of medical images. Main contributions, advantages, and drawbacks of the methods are mentioned in the paper. Problematic issues of neural network application for medical image processing and an outlook for the future research are also discussed. By this survey, we try to answer the following two important questions: (1) What are the major applications of neural networks in medical image processing now and in the nearby future? (2) What are the major strengths and weakness of applying neural networks for solving medical image processing tasks? We believe that this would be very helpful researchers who are involved in medical image processing with neural network techniques.

  6. Survey on Neural Networks Used for Medical Image Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Zhenghao; He, Lifeng; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi; Itoh, Hidenori

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to present a review of neural networks used in medical image processing. We classify neural networks by its processing goals and the nature of medical images. Main contributions, advantages, and drawbacks of the methods are mentioned in the paper. Problematic issues of neural network application for medical image processing and an outlook for the future research are also discussed. By this survey, we try to answer the following two important questions: (1) Wh...

  7. Developments in medical image processing and computational vision

    CERN Document Server

    Jorge, Renato

    2015-01-01

    This book presents novel and advanced topics in Medical Image Processing and Computational Vision in order to solidify knowledge in the related fields and define their key stakeholders. It contains extended versions of selected papers presented in VipIMAGE 2013 – IV International ECCOMAS Thematic Conference on Computational Vision and Medical Image, which took place in Funchal, Madeira, Portugal, 14-16 October 2013.  The twenty-two chapters were written by invited experts of international recognition and address important issues in medical image processing and computational vision, including: 3D vision, 3D visualization, colour quantisation, continuum mechanics, data fusion, data mining, face recognition, GPU parallelisation, image acquisition and reconstruction, image and video analysis, image clustering, image registration, image restoring, image segmentation, machine learning, modelling and simulation, object detection, object recognition, object tracking, optical flow, pattern recognition, pose estimat...

  8. Collaborative Affordances of Hybrid Patient Record Technologies in Medical Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2015-01-01

    The medical record is a central artifact used to organize, communicate and coordinate information related to patient care. Despite recent deployments of electronic health records (EHR), paper medical records are still widely used because of the affordances of paper. Although a number of approaches......PR in a medical simulation. Based on these empirical studies, this paper introduces and discusses the concept of collaborative affordances, which describes a set of properties of the medical record that foster collaborative collocated work....

  9. Topics in medical image processing and computational vision

    CERN Document Server

    Jorge, Renato

    2013-01-01

      The sixteen chapters included in this book were written by invited experts of international recognition and address important issues in Medical Image Processing and Computational Vision, including: Object Recognition, Object Detection, Object Tracking, Pose Estimation, Facial Expression Recognition, Image Retrieval, Data Mining, Automatic Video Understanding and Management, Edges Detection, Image Segmentation, Modelling and Simulation, Medical thermography, Database Systems, Synthetic Aperture Radar and Satellite Imagery.   Different applications are addressed and described throughout the book, comprising: Object Recognition and Tracking, Facial Expression Recognition, Image Database, Plant Disease Classification, Video Understanding and Management, Image Processing, Image Segmentation, Bio-structure Modelling and Simulation, Medical Imaging, Image Classification, Medical Diagnosis, Urban Areas Classification, Land Map Generation.   The book brings together the current state-of-the-art in the various mul...

  10. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos; Stavros (Livermore, CA), Staggs; Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-03-21

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  11. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, Stavros (Livermore, CA); Staggs, Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-12-12

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  12. Theory of hybrid dynamical systems and its applications to biological and medical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2010-11-13

    In this introductory article, we survey the contents of this Theme Issue. This Theme Issue deals with a fertile region of hybrid dynamical systems that are characterized by the coexistence of continuous and discrete dynamics. It is now well known that there exist many hybrid dynamical systems with discontinuities such as impact, switching, friction and sliding. The first aim of this Issue is to discuss recent developments in understanding nonlinear dynamics of hybrid dynamical systems in the two main theoretical fields of dynamical systems theory and control systems theory. A combined study of the hybrid systems dynamics in the two theoretical fields might contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of hybrid dynamical systems. In addition, mathematical modelling by hybrid dynamical systems is particularly important for understanding the nonlinear dynamics of biological and medical systems as they have many discontinuities such as threshold-triggered firing in neurons, on-off switching of gene expression by a transcription factor, division in cells and certain types of chronotherapy for prostate cancer. Hence, the second aim is to discuss recent applications of hybrid dynamical systems in biology and medicine. Thus, this Issue is not only general to serve as a survey of recent progress in hybrid systems theory but also specific to introduce interesting and stimulating applications of hybrid systems in biology and medicine. As the introduction to the topics in this Theme Issue, we provide a brief history of nonlinear dynamics and mathematical modelling, different mathematical models of hybrid dynamical systems, the relationship between dynamical systems theory and control systems theory, examples of complex behaviour in a simple neuron model and its variants, applications of hybrid dynamical systems in biology and medicine as a road map of articles in this Theme Issue and future directions of hybrid systems modelling.

  13. Hybrid intraoperative imaging techniques in radioguided surgery: present clinical applications and future outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, S L; Lees, J E; Perkins, A C

    2017-01-01

    This review aims to summarise the hybrid modality radioguidance techniques currently in clinical use and development, and to discuss possible future avenues of research. Due to the novelty of these approaches, evidence of their clinical relevance does not yet exist. The purpose of this review is to inform nuclear medicine practitioners of current cutting edge research in radioguided surgery which may enter standard clinical practice within the next 5-10 years. Hybrid imaging is of growing importance to nuclear medicine diagnostics, but it is only with recent advances in technology that hybrid modalities are being investigated for use during radioguided surgery. These modalities aim to overcome some of the difficulties of surgical imaging while maintaining many benefits, or providing entirely new information unavailable to surgeons with traditional radioguidance. A literature review was carried out using online reference databases (Scopus, PubMed). Review articles obtained using this technique were citation mined to obtain further references. In total, 2367 papers were returned, with 425 suitable for further assessment. 60 papers directly related to hybrid intraoperative imaging in radioguided surgery are reported on. Of these papers, 25 described the clinical use of hybrid imaging, 22 described the development of new hybrid probes and tracers, and 13 described the development of hybrid technologies for future clinical use. Hybrid gamma-NIR fluorescence was found to be the most common clinical technique, with 35 papers associated with these modalities. Other hybrid combinations include gamma-bright field imaging, gamma-ultrasound imaging, gamma-β imaging and β-OCT imaging. The combination of preoperative and intraoperative images is also discussed. Hybrid imaging offers new possibilities for assisting clinicians and surgeons in localising the site of uptake in procedures such as in sentinel node detection.

  14. Processing, analysis, recognition, and automatic understanding of medical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadeusiewicz, Ryszard; Ogiela, Marek R.

    2004-07-01

    Paper presents some new ideas introducing automatic understanding of the medical images semantic content. The idea under consideration can be found as next step on the way starting from capturing of the images in digital form as two-dimensional data structures, next going throw images processing as a tool for enhancement of the images visibility and readability, applying images analysis algorithms for extracting selected features of the images (or parts of images e.g. objects), and ending on the algorithms devoted to images classification and recognition. In the paper we try to explain, why all procedures mentioned above can not give us full satisfaction in many important medical problems, when we do need understand image semantic sense, not only describe the image in terms of selected features and/or classes. The general idea of automatic images understanding is presented as well as some remarks about the successful applications of such ideas for increasing potential possibilities and performance of computer vision systems dedicated to advanced medical images analysis. This is achieved by means of applying linguistic description of the picture merit content. After this we try use new AI methods to undertake tasks of the automatic understanding of images semantics in intelligent medical information systems. A successful obtaining of the crucial semantic content of the medical image may contribute considerably to the creation of new intelligent multimedia cognitive medical systems. Thanks to the new idea of cognitive resonance between stream of the data extracted form the image using linguistic methods and expectations taken from the representation of the medical knowledge, it is possible to understand the merit content of the image even if the form of the image is very different from any known pattern.

  15. Synthetic Aperture Imaging in Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim; Pedersen, Morten

    2004-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture (SA) ultrasound imaging is a relatively new and unexploited imaging technique. The images are perfectly focused both in transmit and receive, and have a better resolution and higher dynamic range than conventional ultrasound images. The blood flow can be estimated from SA image...

  16. One-class kernel subspace ensemble for medical image classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yungang; Zhang, Bailing; Coenen, Frans; Xiao, Jimin; Lu, Wenjin

    2014-12-01

    Classification of medical images is an important issue in computer-assisted diagnosis. In this paper, a classification scheme based on a one-class kernel principle component analysis (KPCA) model ensemble has been proposed for the classification of medical images. The ensemble consists of one-class KPCA models trained using different image features from each image class, and a proposed product combining rule was used for combining the KPCA models to produce classification confidence scores for assigning an image to each class. The effectiveness of the proposed classification scheme was verified using a breast cancer biopsy image dataset and a 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT) retinal image set. The combination of different image features exploits the complementary strengths of these different feature extractors. The proposed classification scheme obtained promising results on the two medical image sets. The proposed method was also evaluated on the UCI breast cancer dataset (diagnostic), and a competitive result was obtained.

  17. Synthesis and assessment methods for an edge-alignment-free hybrid image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripian, Peeraya; Yamaguchi, Yasushi

    2017-07-01

    A hybrid image allows multiple image interpretations to be modulated by the viewing distance. It can be constructed on the basis of the multiscale perceptual mechanisms of the human visual system by combining the low and high spatial frequencies of two different images. The hybrid image was introduced as an experimental tool for visual recognition study in terms of spatial frequency perception. To produce a compelling hybrid image, the original hybrid image synthesis method could only use similar shapes of source images that were aligned in the edges. If any two different images can be hybrid, it would be beneficial as a new experimental tool. In addition, there is no measure for the actual perception of spatial frequency, whether a single spatial frequency or both spatial frequencies are perceived from the hybrid stimulus. This paper describes two methods for synthesizing a hybrid image from dissimilar shape images or unaligned images; this hybrid image is known as an "edge-alignment-free hybrid image." A noise-inserted method can be done by intentionally inserting and enhancing noises into the high-frequency image. With this method, the low-frequency blobs are covered with high-frequency noises when viewed up close. A color-inserted method uses complementary color gratings in the background of the high-frequency image to emphasize the high-frequency image when viewed up close, whereas the gratings disappear when viewed from far away. To ascertain that our approach successfully separates the spatial frequency at each viewing distance, we measured this property using our proposed assessment method. Our proposed method allows the experimenter to quantify the probability of perceiving both spatial frequencies and a single spatial frequency in a hybrid image. The experimental results confirmed that our proposed synthesis methods successfully hid the low-frequency image and emphasized the high-frequency image at a close viewing distance. At the same time, the

  18. Knowledge-based approach to medical image processing monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chameroy, Virginie; Aubry, Florent; Di Paola, Robert

    1995-05-01

    The clinical use of image processing requires both medical knowledge and expertise in image processing techniques. We have designed a knowledge-based interactive quantification support system (IQSS) to help the medical user in the use and evaluation of medical image processing, and in the development of specific protocols. As the user proceeds according to a heuristic and intuitive approach, our system is meant to work according to a similar behavior. At the basis of the reasoning of our monitoring system, there are the semantic features of an image and of image processing. These semantic features describe their intrinsic properties, and are not symbolic description of the image content. Their obtention requires modeling of medical image and of image processing procedures. Semantic interpretation function gives rules to obtain the values of the semantic features extracted from these models. Then, commonsense compatibility rules yield to compatibility criteria which are based on a partial order (a subsumption relationship) on image and image processing, enabling a comparison to be made between data available to be processed and appropriate image processing procedures. This knowledge-based approach makes IQSS modular, flexible and consequently well adapted to aid in the development and in the utilization of image processing methods for multidimensional and multimodality medical image quantification.

  19. An Improved FCM Medical Image Segmentation Algorithm Based on MMTD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningning Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Image segmentation plays an important role in medical image processing. Fuzzy c-means (FCM is one of the popular clustering algorithms for medical image segmentation. But FCM is highly vulnerable to noise due to not considering the spatial information in image segmentation. This paper introduces medium mathematics system which is employed to process fuzzy information for image segmentation. It establishes the medium similarity measure based on the measure of medium truth degree (MMTD and uses the correlation of the pixel and its neighbors to define the medium membership function. An improved FCM medical image segmentation algorithm based on MMTD which takes some spatial features into account is proposed in this paper. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is more antinoise than the standard FCM, with more certainty and less fuzziness. This will lead to its practicable and effective applications in medical image segmentation.

  20. Medical image of the week: moyamoya disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak S

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 52-year-old, right-handed, Caucasian woman with a history of hypertension and morbid obesity presented with acute onset of word-finding difficulty and slurred speech. Her medical and family history was negative for cerebral vascular event, coronary artery disease or smoking. Computed tomography of the patient's brain showed narrow caliber middle cerebral artery vasculature bilaterally. This abnormal finding prompted further investigation with cerebral angiogram. The angiogram showed bilateral high-grade stenosis of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries, worse on the left (Figure 1. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple left sided punctate infarcts in the frontal and parietal lobes (Figure 2. Diagnosis of ischemic stroke secondary to moyamoya disease was established. This patient was not a candidate for fibrinolytic therapy since it had been more than 4 hours from initial presentation. She was treated with aspirin, clopidogrel, and atorvastatin for secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. Two months after her discharge date, the patient …

  1. Medical image of the week: focal myopericaditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshisundaram C

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 44-year-old man with no significant past medical history was admitted with a history of two episodes of substernal chest pain unrelated to exertion which had resolved spontaneously. Admission vital signs were within normal limits and physical examination was unremarkable. Basic lab tests were normal and urine toxicology was negative. Electrocardiogram was unremarkable with no ST/T changes. Troponin I was elevated at 4.19 which trended up to 6.57. An urgent cardiac angiogram was done which revealed normal patent coronaries. His transthoracic echocardiogram was also reported to be normal. He continued to have intermittent episodes of chest pain that was partially relieved by morphine. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were elevated. Work up for autoimmune diseases, vasculitis, myocarditis panel were insignificant. Later, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with gadolinium enhanced contrast (Figure 1 was obtained which showed abnormal epicardial/subepicardial myocardial enhancement within the inferolateral wall and cardiac apex consistent with focal ...

  2. A virtual laboratory for medical image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabarriaga, Sílvia D; Glatard, Tristan; de Boer, Piter T

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the design, implementation, and usage of a virtual laboratory for medical image analysis. It is fully based on the Dutch grid, which is part of the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE (EGEE) production infrastructure and driven by the gLite middleware. The adopted service-oriented architecture enables decoupling the user-friendly clients running on the user's workstation from the complexity of the grid applications and infrastructure. Data are stored on grid resources and can be browsed/viewed interactively by the user with the Virtual Resource Browser (VBrowser). Data analysis pipelines are described as Scufl workflows and enacted on the grid infrastructure transparently using the MOTEUR workflow management system. VBrowser plug-ins allow for easy experiment monitoring and error detection. Because of the strict compliance to the grid authentication model, all operations are performed on behalf of the user, ensuring basic security and facilitating collaboration across organizations. The system has been operational and in daily use for eight months (December 2008), with six users, leading to the submission of 9000 jobs/month in average and the production of several terabytes of data.

  3. Medical image of the week: sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansra A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. We present a 58-year-old African American man with a complicated medical history including long-standing sarcoidosis that has caused him chronic, unrelenting pain for two decades. He initially underwent placement of an intrathecal morphine pump, but recently began complaining of increasing pain. Consequently, he was seen at our hospital for interrogation of his pain pump by the interventional radiologist, and was incidentally noted to have bilateral calcified hilar lymphadenopathy on fluoroscopic imaging. A dedicated chest x-ray confirmed the abnormality, which was consistent with his known diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis is a complex disease process characterized by noncaseous granulomas that can affect various organ systems, with pulmonary involvement in up to 90% of cases (1. Though sarcoidosis is a diagnosis of exclusion, clinicians should recognize that bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy is highly concerning for the underlying noncaseating granulomatous disease (2. The most common pattern of lymphadenopathy is well-defined, bilateral, symmetric hilar and right ...

  4. Medical image of the week: purpura fulminans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Power EP

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 54-year-old man with coronary artery disease, fibromyalgia and chronic sacral ulcers was brought to the emergency department due to acute changes in mentation and hypotension. He suffered a cardiac arrest shortly after arrival to the emergency department during emergent airway management. After successful resuscitation, he was admitted to the medical intensive care unit and treated for septic shock with fluid resuscitation, vasopressors and broad spectrum antibiotics. Laboratory results were significant for disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC- thrombocytopenia, decreased fibrinogen and elevated PT, PTT and D-dimer levels. Profound metabolic acidosis and lactate elevation was also seen. Blood Cultures later revealed a multi-drug resistant E. coli bacteremia. Images of the lower extremities (Figure 1 were obtained at initial assessment and are consistent with purpura fulminans. He did not survive the stay. Purpura fulminans, also referred to as skin mottling, is an evolving skin condition which is characterized by an acutely worsening reticular …

  5. Medical image of the week: pneumomediastinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco R Jr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 65 year old man presented with mild increase in shortness of breath. He had a past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and severe malnutrition with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG placement after a colectomy and end ileostomy for sigmoid volvulus. CXR (Figure 1 suggested a pneumomediastinum with subsequent chest CT (Figure 2 confirming moderate sized pneumomediastinum. He had a chronic cough from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD as well as aspiration and chest CT also demonstrated emphysema with small blebs. He denied any significant chest pain. He was followed conservatively with imaging and discharged in stable condition. Pneumomediastinum can be caused by trauma, esophageal rupture after vomiting (Boerhaave’s syndrome and can be a spontaneous event if no obvious precipitating cause is identified (1. Valsalva maneuvers such as cough, sneeze, vomiting and childbirth, can all cause pneumomediastinum. Risk factors include asthma, COPD, interstitial lung disease and inhalational recreational drug use. …

  6. Medical image of the week: disseminated coccidioidomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ynosencio T

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 67-year-old African American man with no significant past medical history presented with shortness of breath and flu-like symptoms. On exam, he was noted to be profoundly hypoxemic with imaging showing diffuse thoracic changes (Figure 1 and a diffuse papular rash (Figure 2. Initial workup included coccidioidomycosis serologies which returned positive with a titer of 1:128. While exposure to coccidioidomycosis is very common in southern Arizona, dissemination is a rare occurrence. The incidence is estimated between 0.2 and 4.7 percent. Patients at highest risk include those that are immunosuppressed or that are of African or Filipino ancestry. Common extra-pulmonary sites include skin or subcutaneous tissue, meninges of brain or spinal cord, and bones. Even rarer sites include the eyes, liver, prostate, mediastinum, and kidneys. Treatment is usually the same as with pulmonary infection which is an azole agent. However, if the patient’s symptoms are severe or if the lesions involve …

  7. Simultaneous acquisition of storage phosphor and asymmetric screen-film chest images using a hybrid cassette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Brent K.; Kimme-Smith, Carolyn; Johnson, Sandra L.; Johnson, Timothy; Aberle, Denise R.

    1994-05-01

    A hybrid cassette has been developed for simultaneous acquisition of storage phosphor and asymmetric screen-film chest images. This is important for the collection of images for Receiver Operating Characteristic studies comparing conventional radiography and computed radiography, without either increased exposure or non-identical imaging conditions. This hybrid radiographic cassette consists of a computed radiography imaging plate (in front) and an intact, high contrast variant of a commercially available asymmetric screen-film system (in the rear) with a speed of approximately 425. The high contrast, speed and efficiency of this screen-film system allow for positioning of the storage phosphor plate in the front of the cassette. As the imaging plate absorption is approximately 35%, the fast screen-film system provides high quality diagnostic images. There is minimal beam hardening, which is ameliorated by the high contrast of the asymmetric front screen. There is minimal differences in the Plexiglas step wedge phantom gray level values for CR and CR-hybrid images and in optical density values for InSightTM and InSightTM-hybrid films. The signal to noise ratio of either hybrid image, while fractionally less than their standard counterparts, is negligibly so. Only a slight modification in radiographic technique is required (10%) for use of this hybrid cassette, providing images that are virtually the same as those obtained through the standard CR and InSightTM ITC imaging methods.

  8. Image analysis and modeling in medical image computing. Recent developments and advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handels, H; Deserno, T M; Meinzer, H-P; Tolxdorff, T

    2012-01-01

    Medical image computing is of growing importance in medical diagnostics and image-guided therapy. Nowadays, image analysis systems integrating advanced image computing methods are used in practice e.g. to extract quantitative image parameters or to support the surgeon during a navigated intervention. However, the grade of automation, accuracy, reproducibility and robustness of medical image computing methods has to be increased to meet the requirements in clinical routine. In the focus theme, recent developments and advances in the field of modeling and model-based image analysis are described. The introduction of models in the image analysis process enables improvements of image analysis algorithms in terms of automation, accuracy, reproducibility and robustness. Furthermore, model-based image computing techniques open up new perspectives for prediction of organ changes and risk analysis of patients. Selected contributions are assembled to present latest advances in the field. The authors were invited to present their recent work and results based on their outstanding contributions to the Conference on Medical Image Computing BVM 2011 held at the University of Lübeck, Germany. All manuscripts had to pass a comprehensive peer review. Modeling approaches and model-based image analysis methods showing new trends and perspectives in model-based medical image computing are described. Complex models are used in different medical applications and medical images like radiographic images, dual-energy CT images, MR images, diffusion tensor images as well as microscopic images are analyzed. The applications emphasize the high potential and the wide application range of these methods. The use of model-based image analysis methods can improve segmentation quality as well as the accuracy and reproducibility of quantitative image analysis. Furthermore, image-based models enable new insights and can lead to a deeper understanding of complex dynamic mechanisms in the human body

  9. The Malawi "hybrid" medical graduates (1992-1998) | Adeloye | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many have shown encouraging interest in pursuing postgraduate education. In September 1994 the epoch of hybridisation was brought to a close with the admission of the first set of students who will train fully here in Malawi and become our first batch of home-grown doctors. Keywords: medical education, medical school, ...

  10. A Survey on Deep Learning in Medical Image Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litjens, G.J.; Kooi, T.; Ehteshami Bejnordi, B.; Setio, A.A.A.; Ciompi, F.; Ghafoorian, M.; Laak, J.A.W.M. van der; Ginneken, B. van; Sanchez, C.I.

    2017-01-01

    Deep learning algorithms, in particular convolutional networks, have rapidly become a methodology of choice for analyzing medical images. This paper reviews the major deep learning concepts pertinent to medical image analysis and summarizes over 300 contributions to the field, most of which appeared

  11. A survey of medical image registration - under review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viergever, Max A; Maintz, J B Antoine; Klein, Stefan; Murphy, Keelin; Staring, Marius; Pluim, JPW

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective view on the past two decades of the field of medical image registration is presented, guided by the article "A survey of medical image registration" (Maintz and Viergever, 1998). It shows that the classification of the field introduced in that article is still usable, although some

  12. Gadgetron: An Open Source Framework for Medical Image Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Schacht; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2013-01-01

    with a set of dedicated toolboxes in shared libraries for medical image reconstruction. This includes generic toolboxes for data-parallel (e.g., GPU-based) execution of compute-intensive components. The basic framework architecture is independent of medical imaging modality, but this article focuses on its...

  13. Medical image processing on the GPU - past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Anders; Dufort, Paul; Forsberg, Daniel; LaConte, Stephen M

    2013-12-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) are used today in a wide range of applications, mainly because they can dramatically accelerate parallel computing, are affordable and energy efficient. In the field of medical imaging, GPUs are in some cases crucial for enabling practical use of computationally demanding algorithms. This review presents the past and present work on GPU accelerated medical image processing, and is meant to serve as an overview and introduction to existing GPU implementations. The review covers GPU acceleration of basic image processing operations (filtering, interpolation, histogram estimation and distance transforms), the most commonly used algorithms in medical imaging (image registration, image segmentation and image denoising) and algorithms that are specific to individual modalities (CT, PET, SPECT, MRI, fMRI, DTI, ultrasound, optical imaging and microscopy). The review ends by highlighting some future possibilities and challenges. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. APPLICATION OF HYBRID WAVELET-FRACTAL COMPRESSION ALGORITHM FOR RADIOGRAPHIC IMAGES OF WELD DEFECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Faiza Mekhalfa; Daoud Berkani

    2011-01-01

    Based on the standard fractal transformation in spatial domain, simple relations may be found relating coefficients in detail subbands in the wavelet domain. In this work we evaluate a hybrid wavelet-fractal image coder, and we test its ability to compress radiographic images of weld defects. A comparative study between the hybrid coder and standard fractal compression technique have been made in order to investigate the compression ratio and corresponding quality of the image using peak sign...

  15. Towards integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into radiation therapy treatment planning

    OpenAIRE

    Paulus, Daniel H.; Thorwath, Daniela; Schmidt, Holger; Quick, Harald H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Multimodality imaging has become an important adjunct of state-of-the-art radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning. Recently, simultaneous PET/MR hybrid imaging has become clinically available and may also contribute to target volume delineation and biological individualization in RT planning. For integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into RT treatment planning, compatible dedicated RT devices are required for accurate patient positioning. In this study, prototype RT positioning d...

  16. [Managing digital medical imaging projects in healthcare services: lessons learned].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas de la Escalera, D

    2013-01-01

    Medical imaging is one of the most important diagnostic instruments in clinical practice. The technological development of digital medical imaging has enabled healthcare services to undertake large scale projects that require the participation and collaboration of many professionals of varied backgrounds and interests as well as substantial investments in infrastructures. Rather than focusing on systems for dealing with digital medical images, this article deals with the management of projects for implementing these systems, reviewing various organizational, technological, and human factors that are critical to ensure the success of these projects and to guarantee the compatibility and integration of digital medical imaging systems with other health information systems. To this end, the author relates several lessons learned from a review of the literature and the author's own experience in the technical coordination of digital medical imaging projects. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Digital Signal Processing for Medical Imaging Using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Gopi, E S

    2013-01-01

    This book describes medical imaging systems, such as X-ray, Computed tomography, MRI, etc. from the point of view of digital signal processing. Readers will see techniques applied to medical imaging such as Radon transformation, image reconstruction, image rendering, image enhancement and restoration, and more. This book also outlines the physics behind medical imaging required to understand the techniques being described. The presentation is designed to be accessible to beginners who are doing research in DSP for medical imaging. Matlab programs and illustrations are used wherever possible to reinforce the concepts being discussed.  ·         Acts as a “starter kit” for beginners doing research in DSP for medical imaging; ·         Uses Matlab programs and illustrations throughout to make content accessible, particularly with techniques such as Radon transformation and image rendering; ·         Includes discussion of the basic principles behind the various medical imaging tec...

  18. A hybrid fuzzy-neural system for computer-aided diagnosis of ultrasound kidney images using prominent features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommanna Raja, K; Madheswaran, M; Thyagarajah, K

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and implement a computer-aided decision support system for an automated diagnosis and classification of ultrasound kidney images. The proposed method distinguishes three kidney categories namely normal, medical renal diseases and cortical cyst. For the each pre-processed ultrasound kidney image, 36 features are extracted. Two types of decision support systems, optimized multi-layer back propagation network and hybrid fuzzy-neural system have been developed with these features for classifying the kidney categories. The performance of the hybrid fuzzy-neural system is compared with the optimized multi-layer back propagation network in terms of classification efficiency, training and testing time. The results obtained show that fuzzy-neural system provides higher classification efficiency with minimum training and testing time. It has also been found that instead of using all 36 features, ranking the features enhance classification efficiency. The outputs of the decision support systems are validated with medical expert to measure the actual efficiency. The overall discriminating capability of the systems is accessed with performance evaluation measure, f-score. It has been observed that the performance of fuzzy-neural system is superior compared to optimized multi-layer back propagation network. Such hybrid fuzzy-neural system with feature extraction algorithms and pre-processing scheme helps in developing computer-aided diagnosis system for ultrasound kidney images and can be used as a secondary observer in clinical decision making.

  19. TU-G-BRA-08: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): Hybrid PET-MRI Imaging of Acute Radiation Induced Cardiac Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sherif, O; Xhaferllari, I; Gaede, S [Western Univeristy, London, ON (United Kingdom); London Regional Cancer Program, London, ON (United Kingdom); Sykes, J; Butler, J [Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON (United Kingdom); Wisenberg, G; Prato, F [Western Univeristy, London, ON (United Kingdom); Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify the presence of low-dose radiation induced cardiac toxicity in a canine model using hybrid positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Research ethics board approval was obtained for a longitudinal imaging study of 5 canines after cardiac irradiation. Animals were imaged at baseline, 1 week post cardiac irradiation, and 1 month post cardiac irradiation using a hybrid PET- MRI system (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). The imaging protocol was designed to assess acute changes in myocardial perfusion and inflammation. Myocardial perfusion imaging was performed using N13-ammonia tracer followed by a dynamic PET acquisition scan. A compartmental tracer kinetic model was used for absolute perfusion quantification. Myocardial inflammation imaging was performed using F18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tracer. The standard uptake value (SUV) over a region encompassing the whole heart was used to compare FDG scans. All animals received a simulation CT scan (GE Medical Systems) for radiation treatment planning. Radiation treatment plans were created using the Pinncale3 treatment planning system (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems) and designed to resemble the typical cardiac exposure during left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy. Cardiac irradiations were performed in a single fraction using a TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems). Results: The delivered dose (mean ± standard deviation) to heart was 1.8±0.2 Gy. Reductions in myocardial stress perfusion relative to baseline were observed in 2 of the 5 animals 1 month post radiation. A global inflammatory response 1 month post radiation was observed in 4 of the 5 animals. The calculated SUV at 1 month post radiation was significantly higher (p=0.05) than the baseline SUV. Conclusion: Low doses of cardiac irradiation (< 2 Gy) may lead to myocardial perfusion defects and a global inflammatory response that can be detectable as early as 1 month post irradiation

  20. A Survey on Deep Learning in Medical Image Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Litjens, Geert; Kooi, Thijs; Bejnordi, Babak Ehteshami; Setio, Arnaud Arindra Adiyoso; Ciompi, Francesco; Ghafoorian, Mohsen; van der Laak, Jeroen A.W.M.; van Ginneken, Bram; Sánchez, Clara I.

    2017-01-01

    Deep learning algorithms, in particular convolutional networks, have rapidly become a methodology of choice for analyzing medical images. This paper reviews the major deep learning concepts pertinent to medical image analysis and summarizes over 300 contributions to the field, most of which appeared in the last year. We survey the use of deep learning for image classification, object detection, segmentation, registration, and other tasks and provide concise overviews of studies per applicatio...

  1. 3D/2D Registration of medical images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomaževič, D.

    2008-01-01

    The topic of this doctoral dissertation is registration of 3D medical images to corresponding projective 2D images, referred to as 3D/2D registration. There are numerous possible applications of 3D/2D registration in image-aided diagnosis and treatment. In most of the applications, 3D/2D

  2. Medical image compression using block-based transform coding techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Neve, Peter; Philips, Wilfried R.; Van Overloop, Jeroen; Lemahieu, Ignace L.

    1996-09-01

    The JPEG lossy compression technique in medical imagery has several disadvantages (at higher compression ratios), mainly due to block-distortion. We therefore investigated two methods, the lapped orthogonal transform (LOT) and the DCT/DST coder, for the use on medical image data. These techniques are block-based but they reduce the block- distortion by spreading it out over the entire image. These compression techniques were applied on four different types of medical images (MRI image, x-ray image, angiogram and CT- scan). They were then compared with results from JPEG and variable block size DCT coders. At a first stage, we determined the optimal block size for each image and for each technique. It was found that for a specific image, the optimal block size was independent of the different transform coders. For the x-ray image, the CT-scan and the angiogram an optimal block size of 32 by 32 was found, while for the MRI image the optimal block size was 16 by 16. Afterwards, for all images the rate-distortion curves of the different techniques were calculated, using the optimal block size. The overall conclusion from our experiments is that the LOT is the best transform among the ones being investigated for compressing medical images of many different kinds. However, JPEG should be used for very high image qualities, as it then requires almost the same bit rate as the LOT and as it requires fewer computations than the LOT technique.

  3. Mesh Processing in Medical-Image Analysis-a Tutorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Joshua A.; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Zhang, Yongjie

    2012-01-01

    Medical-image analysis requires an understanding of sophisticated scanning modalities, constructing geometric models, building meshes to represent domains, and downstream biological applications. These four steps form an image-to-mesh pipeline. For research in this field to progress, the imaging...

  4. An overview of medical image processing methods

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-14

    Jun 14, 2010 ... images through computer simulations has already in- creased the interests of many researchers. 3D image rendering usually refers to the analysis of the ..... Digital Image Processing. Reading,. MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company. Gose E, Johnsonbaugh R, Jost S (1996). Pattern Recognition and.

  5. Electron imaging with Medipix2 hybrid pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    McMullan, G; Chen, S; Henderson, R; Llopart, X; Summerfield, C; Tlustos, L; Faruqi, A R

    2007-01-01

    The electron imaging performance of Medipix2 is described. Medipix2 is a hybrid pixel detector composed of two layers. It has a sensor layer and a layer of readout electronics, in which each 55 μm×55 μm pixel has upper and lower energy discrimination and MHz rate counting. The sensor layer consists of a 300 μm slab of pixellated monolithic silicon and this is bonded to the readout chip. Experimental measurement of the detective quantum efficiency, DQE(0) at 120 keV shows that it can reach 85% independent of electron exposure, since the detector has zero noise, and the DQE(Nyquist) can reach 35% of that expected for a perfect detector (4/π2). Experimental measurement of the modulation transfer function (MTF) at Nyquist resolution for 120 keV electrons using a 60 keV lower energy threshold, yields a value that is 50% of that expected for a perfect detector (2/π). Finally, Monte Carlo simulations of electron tracks and energy deposited in adjacent pixels have been performed and used to calculate expected v...

  6. A survey of GPU-based medical image computing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lin; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Heye; Xie, Yongming

    2012-01-01

    Medical imaging currently plays a crucial role throughout the entire clinical applications from medical scientific research to diagnostics and treatment planning. However, medical imaging procedures are often computationally demanding due to the large three-dimensional (3D) medical datasets to process in practical clinical applications. With the rapidly enhancing performances of graphics processors, improved programming support, and excellent price-to-performance ratio, the graphics processing unit (GPU) has emerged as a competitive parallel computing platform for computationally expensive and demanding tasks in a wide range of medical image applications. The major purpose of this survey is to provide a comprehensive reference source for the starters or researchers involved in GPU-based medical image processing. Within this survey, the continuous advancement of GPU computing is reviewed and the existing traditional applications in three areas of medical image processing, namely, segmentation, registration and visualization, are surveyed. The potential advantages and associated challenges of current GPU-based medical imaging are also discussed to inspire future applications in medicine. PMID:23256080

  7. Client-side Medical Image Colorization in a Collaborative Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virag, Ioan; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara; Crişan-Vida, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents an application related to collaborative medicine using a browser based medical visualization system with focus on the medical image colorization process and the underlying open source web development technologies involved. Browser based systems allow physicians to share medical data with their remotely located counterparts or medical students, assisting them during patient diagnosis, treatment monitoring, surgery planning or for educational purposes. This approach brings forth the advantage of ubiquity. The system can be accessed from a any device, in order to process the images, assuring the independence towards having a specific proprietary operating system. The current work starts with processing of DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) files and ends with the rendering of the resulting bitmap images on a HTML5 (fifth revision of the HyperText Markup Language) canvas element. The application improves the image visualization emphasizing different tissue densities.

  8. Hybrid Optimization for Ultrasound and Multimodal Image Registration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wachowiak, Mark

    2001-01-01

    ... intra- and multimodal ultrasound registration, Stochastic and direct techniques are compared for mutual information and correlation ratio functions, A new direct/stochastic hybrid approach based...

  9. Medical physics personnel for medical imaging: requirements, conditions of involvement and staffing levels-French recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isambert, Aurélie; Le Du, Dominique; Valéro, Marc; Guilhem, Marie-Thérèse; Rousse, Carole; Dieudonné, Arnaud; Blanchard, Vincent; Pierrat, Noëlle; Salvat, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    The French regulations concerning the involvement of medical physicists in medical imaging procedures are relatively vague. In May 2013, the ASN and the SFPM issued recommendations regarding Medical Physics Personnel for Medical Imaging: Requirements, Conditions of Involvement and Staffing Levels. In these recommendations, the various areas of activity of medical physicists in radiology and nuclear medicine have been identified and described, and the time required to perform each task has been evaluated. Criteria for defining medical physics staffing levels are thus proposed. These criteria are defined according to the technical platform, the procedures and techniques practised on it, the number of patients treated and the number of persons in the medical and paramedical teams requiring periodic training. The result of this work is an aid available to each medical establishment to determine their own needs in terms of medical physics. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A New Approach To Embed Medical Information Into Medical Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Ayça Güzeldereli

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, under the light of developments in the field of computer, there has been an increasing demand for data processing in the health sector. Many different methods are being used to connect the personal information or diagnosis with the patient. These methods can differ from each other according to imaging techniques. In this thesis, this kind of data hiding/embedding techniques are mostly prefered in order to provide a privacy for patients. Also, useful to use compression techniques with data compressing for preserving the originality of the image which is damaged by large size of personal information saved in memory.

  11. Hybrid lightweight X-ray optics for half arcsecond imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Paul

    This proposal is for the development of grazing incidence optics suitable to meet the 0.5 arcsec imaging and 2.3 square meter effective area requirements of the X-ray Surveyor mission concept, currently under study by NASA. Our approach is to combine two promising technologies, as yet individually unproven at the 0.5 arcsec level, into a hybrid mirror approach. The two technologies are thin piezoelectric film adjustable optics under development at SAO and PSU, and differential deposition under development at NASA MSFC. These technologies are complementary: adjustable optics are best suited to fixing low spatial frequency errors due to piezoelectric cell size limitations, and differential deposition is best suited for fixing mid-spatial frequency errors so as to limit the amount of material that must be deposited. Thus, the combination of the two techniques extends the bandwidth of figure errors that can be corrected beyond what it was for either individual technique. Both technologies will be applied to fabricate Wolter-I mirror segment from single thermally formed glass substrates. This work is directed at mirror segments only (not full shells), as we believe segments are the most appropriate for developing the 3 m diameter X-ray Surveyor high resolution mirror. In this program we will extend differential deposition to segment surfaces (from line profiles), investigate the most realistic error bandwidths for each technology, and determine the impacts of one technologys processing steps on the other to find if there is an optimal order to combining the technologies. In addition, we will also conduct a conical/cylindrical mirror metrology "round-robin," to cross-calibrate the different cylindrical metrology to one another as a means of minimizing systematic errors. Finally, we will examine the balancing and compensating of mirror stress due to the various thin films employed (piezoelectric layer, differential deposition, X-ray reflecting layer(s)) with an eye to

  12. Backpropagation Neural Network Implementation for Medical Image Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Kamil Dimililer

    2013-01-01

    Medical images require compression, before transmission or storage, due to constrained bandwidth and storage capacity. An ideal image compression system must yield high-quality compressed image with high compression ratio. In this paper, Haar wavelet transform and discrete cosine transform are considered and a neural network is trained to relate the X-ray image contents to their ideal compression method and their optimum compression ratio.

  13. Backpropagation Neural Network Implementation for Medical Image Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Dimililer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical images require compression, before transmission or storage, due to constrained bandwidth and storage capacity. An ideal image compression system must yield high-quality compressed image with high compression ratio. In this paper, Haar wavelet transform and discrete cosine transform are considered and a neural network is trained to relate the X-ray image contents to their ideal compression method and their optimum compression ratio.

  14. Signal and image processing in medical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Amit; Rahim, B Abdul; Kumar, D Sravan

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights recent findings on and analyses conducted on signals and images in the area of medicine. The experimental investigations involve a variety of signals and images and their methodologies range from very basic to sophisticated methods. The book explains how signal and image processing methods can be used to detect and forecast abnormalities in an easy-to-follow manner, offering a valuable resource for researchers, engineers, physicians and bioinformatics researchers alike.

  15. QUANTITATIVE IMAGING AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION (FISH) OF AUREOBASIDIUM PULLULANS. (R823845)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractImage and multifactorial statistical analyses were used to evaluate the intensity of fluorescence signal from cells of three strains of A. pullulans and one strain of Rhodosporidium toruloides, as an outgroup, hybridized with either a universal o...

  16. Medical validation and CBIR of spine x-ray images over the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antani, Sameer; Cheng, Jing; Long, Jonathan; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2006-01-01

    As found in the literature, most Internet-based prototype Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) systems focus on stock photo collections and do not address challenges of large specialized image collections and topics such as medical information retrieval by image content. Even fewer have medically validated data to evaluate retrieval quality in terms of precision and relevance. To date, our research has reported over 75% relevant spine X-ray image retrieval tested on 888 validated vertebral shapes from 207 images using our prototype CBIR system operating within our local network. As a next step, we have designed and developed an Internet-based medical validation tool and a CBIR retrieval tool in MATLAB and JAVA that can remotely connect to our database. The retrieval tool supports hybrid text and image queries and also provides partial shape annotation for pathology-specific querying. These tools are initially developed for domain experts, such as radiologists and educators, to identify design issues for improved workflow. This article describes the tools and design considerations in their development.

  17. Advanced Imaging and Robotics Technologies for Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masamune, Ken; Hong, Jaesung

    2011-10-01

    Due to the importance of surgery in the medical field, a large amount of research has been conducted in this area. Imaging and robotics technologies provide surgeons with the advanced eye and hand to perform their surgeries in a safer and more accurate manner. Recently medical images have been utilized in the operating room as well as in the diagnostic stage. If the image to patient registration is done with sufficient accuracy, medical images can be used as "a map" for guidance to the target lesion. However, the accuracy and reliability of the surgical navigation system should be sufficiently verified before applying it to the patient. Along with the development of medical imaging, various medical robots have also been developed. In particular, surgical robots have been researched in order to reach the goal of minimal invasiveness. The most important factors to consider are determining the demand, the strategy for their use in operating procedures, and how it aids patients. In addition to the above considerations, medical doctors and researchers should always think from the patient's point of view. In this article, the latest medical imaging and robotic technologies focusing on surgical applications are reviewed based upon the factors described in the above.

  18. Hybrid Ti-ceramic bionanomaterials for medical engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niespodziana, K.; Miklaszewski, A.; Jurczyk, M. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Poznan University of Technology, Sklodowska-Curie 5 Sq., 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Jurczyk, K. [Department of Conservative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Medical Sciences, Bukowska 70 St., 60-812 Poznan (Poland)

    2010-05-15

    In the last decade a great interest has been observed in the field of nanoscale materials. Commercially pure titanium as well as titanium alloys have become predominant in implantology. Low hardness and poor tribiological properties of titanium alloys may become critical factor when wear phenomena are involved. One of the methods that allow the change of properties of Ti alloys is the production of nanocomposites, which will exhibit the favorable mechanical properties of titanium and excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity of ceramics. In this work hybrid Ti-x wt% ceramic (45S5 Bioglass, SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) bionanocomposites (x =0, 3 and 10) were prod-uced by the combination of mechanical alloying and powder metallurgical process. Reinforced by 45S5 Bioglass, SiO{sub 2} or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles, Vickers hardness of Ti-based nanocomposite is higher from two to six times in comparison with pure microcrystalline Ti. Additionally, the experimental results show that in Ringer's solution at 37 C, Ti-based nanocomposites have good corrosion resistance. On the other hand, in vitro studies show that these bionanocomposites have excellent biocompatibility and could integrate with bone (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. [Principles of medical liability and practice in medical imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibierge, M; Fournier, L; Cabanis, E A

    1999-07-01

    Radiologists are liable for all aspects of their practice, from the indication of an examination to the radiology report and follow-up, as well as for providing information and recommendations. They are liable for their decisions and actions. They are liable for their competence and continuous medical education. They are also liable for their own equipment and staff. In cases of litigation, the liability of a radiologist may be questioned. Four types of procedures must been known: penal, civil, administrative and disciplinary.

  20. G N Ramachandran's Contributions to Medical Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    reconstruct the function f(x, y). Instead, it was the in- sight of Ramachandran and Laksminarayanan that this could be simplified substantially. (See Box 1.) 4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). G N Ramachandran's contributions to Magnetic Reso- nance Imaging (MRI) are also well documented. In the. Projections are.

  1. A cloud collaborative medical image platform oriented by social network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Frederico B.; Araújo, Luciano V.; Nunes, Fátima L. S.

    2017-03-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis systems using medical images and three-dimensional models as input data have greatly expanded and developed, but in terms of building suitable image databases to assess them, the challenge remains. Although there are some image databases available for this purpose, they are generally limited to certain types of exams or contain a limited number of medical cases. The objective of this work is to present the concepts and the development of a collaborative platform for sharing medical images and three-dimensional models, providing a resource to share and increase the number of images available for researchers. The collaborative cloud platform, called CATALYZER, aims to increase the availability and sharing of graphic objects, including 3D images, and their reports that are essential for research related to medical images. A survey conducted with researchers and health professionals indicated that this could be an innovative approach in the creation of medical image databases, providing a wider variety of cases together with a considerable amount of shared information among its users.

  2. An interactive medical image segmentation framework using iterative refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalshetti, Pratik; Bundele, Manas; Rahangdale, Parag; Jangra, Dinesh; Chattopadhyay, Chiranjoy; Harit, Gaurav; Elhence, Abhay

    2017-04-01

    Segmentation is often performed on medical images for identifying diseases in clinical evaluation. Hence it has become one of the major research areas. Conventional image segmentation techniques are unable to provide satisfactory segmentation results for medical images as they contain irregularities. They need to be pre-processed before segmentation. In order to obtain the most suitable method for medical image segmentation, we propose MIST (Medical Image Segmentation Tool), a two stage algorithm. The first stage automatically generates a binary marker image of the region of interest using mathematical morphology. This marker serves as the mask image for the second stage which uses GrabCut to yield an efficient segmented result. The obtained result can be further refined by user interaction, which can be done using the proposed Graphical User Interface (GUI). Experimental results show that the proposed method is accurate and provides satisfactory segmentation results with minimum user interaction on medical as well as natural images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Fast Enhanced Secure Image Chaotic Cryptosystem Based on Hybrid Chaotic Magic Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Koppu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An enhanced secure image chaotic cryptosystem has been proposed based on hybrid CMT-Lanczos algorithm. We have achieved fast encryption and decryption along with privacy of images. The pseudorandom generator has been used along with Lanczos algorithm to generate root characteristics and eigenvectors. Using hybrid CMT image, pixels are shuffled to accomplish excellent randomness. Compared with existing methods, the proposed method had more robustness to various attacks: brute-force attack, known cipher plaintext, chosen-plaintext, security key space, key sensitivity, correlation analysis and information entropy, and differential attacks. Simulation results show that the proposed methods give better result in protecting images with low-time complexity.

  4. [A novel image processing and analysis system for medical images based on IDL language].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Min

    2009-08-01

    Medical image processing and analysis system, which is of great value in medical research and clinical diagnosis, has been a focal field in recent years. Interactive data language (IDL) has a vast library of built-in math, statistics, image analysis and information processing routines, therefore, it has become an ideal software for interactive analysis and visualization of two-dimensional and three-dimensional scientific datasets. The methodology is proposed to design a novel image processing and analysis system for medical images based on IDL. There are five functional modules in this system: Image Preprocessing, Image Segmentation, Image Reconstruction, Image Measurement and Image Management. Experimental results demonstrate that this system is effective and efficient, and it has the advantages of extensive applicability, friendly interaction, convenient extension and favorable transplantation.

  5. From medical imaging data to 3D printed anatomical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücking, Thore M; Hill, Emma R; Robertson, James L; Maneas, Efthymios; Plumb, Andrew A; Nikitichev, Daniil I

    2017-01-01

    Anatomical models are important training and teaching tools in the clinical environment and are routinely used in medical imaging research. Advances in segmentation algorithms and increased availability of three-dimensional (3D) printers have made it possible to create cost-efficient patient-specific models without expert knowledge. We introduce a general workflow that can be used to convert volumetric medical imaging data (as generated by Computer Tomography (CT)) to 3D printed physical models. This process is broken up into three steps: image segmentation, mesh refinement and 3D printing. To lower the barrier to entry and provide the best options when aiming to 3D print an anatomical model from medical images, we provide an overview of relevant free and open-source image segmentation tools as well as 3D printing technologies. We demonstrate the utility of this streamlined workflow by creating models of ribs, liver, and lung using a Fused Deposition Modelling 3D printer.

  6. Multi-scale visual words for hierarchical medical image categorisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markonis, Dimitrios; Seco de Herrera, Alba G.; Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2012-02-01

    The biomedical literature published regularly has increased strongly in past years and keeping updated even in narrow domains is difficult. Images represent essential information of their articles and can help to quicker browse through large volumes of articles in connection with keyword search. Content-based image retrieval is helping the retrieval of visual content. To facilitate retrieval of visual information, image categorisation can be an important first step. To represent scientific articles visually, medical images need to be separated from general images such as flowcharts or graphs to facilitate browsing, as graphs contain little information. Medical modality classification is a second step to focus search. The techniques described in this article first classify images into broad categories. In a second step the images are further classified into the exact medical modalities. The system combines the Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) and density-based clustering (DENCLUE). Visual words are first created globally to differentiate broad categories and then within each category a new visual vocabulary is created for modality classification. The results show the difficulties to differentiate between some modalities by visual means alone. On the other hand the improvement of the accuracy of the two-step approach shows the usefulness of the method. The system is currently being integrated into the Goldminer image search engine of the ARRS (American Roentgen Ray Society) as a web service, allowing concentrating image search onto clinically relevant images automatically.

  7. Medical image of the week: prozac eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty S

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old man with a past medical history significant for hypertension, obesity and depression underwent an overnight polysomnogram for high clinical suspicion for obstructive sleep apnea. His current medications include doxepin, fluoxetine, bupropion, ambien and amlodipine. A snapshot during NREM sleep is shown (Figure 1. Fluoxetine (Prozac® is a potent selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI.“Omnipause” neurons in the brainstem inhibit saccadic eye movements. NREM eye movements result from the potentiation of serotonergic neurons that inhibit these neurons (1. These eye movements occur during all stages of NREM sleep. These atypical eye movements have been reported to be present with a lower incidence with use of other antidepressants, benzodiazepines and neuroleptics and they tend to persist even after discontinuation of the medication (2. The clinical significance of these eye movements is unknown.

  8. Automatic medical X-ray image classification using annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Mueen, Ahmed; Seng, Woo Chaw

    2014-02-01

    The demand for automatically classification of medical X-ray images is rising faster than ever. In this paper, an approach is presented to gain high accuracy rate for those classes of medical database with high ratio of intraclass variability and interclass similarities. The classification framework was constructed via annotation using the following three techniques: annotation by binary classification, annotation by probabilistic latent semantic analysis, and annotation using top similar images. Next, final annotation was constructed by applying ranking similarity on annotated keywords made by each technique. The final annotation keywords were then divided into three levels according to the body region, specific bone structure in body region as well as imaging direction. Different weights were given to each level of the keywords; they are then used to calculate the weightage for each category of medical images based on their ground truth annotation. The weightage computed from the generated annotation of query image was compared with the weightage of each category of medical images, and then the query image would be assigned to the category with closest weightage to the query image. The average accuracy rate reported is 87.5 %.

  9. Implementation of Synthetic Aperture Imaging in Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Kortbek, Jacob; Nikolov, Svetoslav

    2010-01-01

    The main advantage of medical ultrasound imaging is its real time capability, which makes it possible to visualize dynamic structures in the human body. Real time synthetic aperture imaging puts very high demands on the hardware, which currently cannot be met. A method for reducing the number of ...

  10. 21 CFR 892.2040 - Medical image hardcopy device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical image hardcopy device. 892.2040 Section 892.2040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... image and associated identification information. Examples include multiformat cameras and laser printers...

  11. Automated Patient Facial Image Capture to Reduce Medical Error

    OpenAIRE

    Gillam, Michael; Feied, Craig; Birchfield, Stan; Handler, Jonathan; Smith, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The authors describe their experiences creating technology to automatically capture facial images from patients during triage and registration for integration into the electronic medical record (EMR) to reduce data retrieval and data entry errors. The prototype system was tested across a variety of ethnicities with facial images captured successfully in 100% of cases with a median time to capture of 0.75 seconds.

  12. Medical Image Registration Guided by Application-Specific Geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, F.F.

    2015-01-01

    Image registration is an important task in medical image processing. Among its applications are inter-patient registration to perform segmentation of organs, registration of follow-up scans to propagate the in tissue accumulated radiation dose of a radiotherapy, and registration to perform

  13. A parallel method to improve medical image transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maani, Rouzbeh; Camorlinga, Sergio; Arnason, Neil

    2012-02-01

    The staggering number of images acquired by modern modalities requires new approaches for medical data transmission. There have been several attempts to improve data transmission time between medical imaging systems. These attempts were mostly based on compression. Although the compression methods can help in many cases, they are sometimes ineffectual in high-speed networks. This paper introduces parallelism to provide an effective method of medical data transmission over both local area network (LAN) and wide area network (WAN). It is based on the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) protocol and uses parallel TCP connections in storage services within the protocol. Using the proposed interface in our method, current medical imaging applications can take advantage of parallelism without any modification. Experimental results show a speedup of about 1.3 to 1.5 for CT images and relatively high speedup of about 2.2 to 3.5 times for magnetic resonance (MR) images over LAN. The transmission time is improved drastically over WAN. The speedup is about 16.1 for CT images and about 5.6 to 11.5 for MR images.

  14. Improved Software to Browse the Serial Medical Images for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Koojoo; Chung, Min Suk; Park, Jin Seo; Shin, Byeong Seok; Chung, Beom Sun

    2017-07-01

    The thousands of serial images used for medical pedagogy cannot be included in a printed book; they also cannot be efficiently handled by ordinary image viewer software. The purpose of this study was to provide browsing software to grasp serial medical images efficiently. The primary function of the newly programmed software was to select images using 3 types of interfaces: buttons or a horizontal scroll bar, a vertical scroll bar, and a checkbox. The secondary function was to show the names of the structures that had been outlined on the images. To confirm the functions of the software, 3 different types of image data of cadavers (sectioned and outlined images, volume models of the stomach, and photos of the dissected knees) were inputted. The browsing software was downloadable for free from the homepage (anatomy.co.kr) and available off-line. The data sets provided could be replaced by any developers for their educational achievements. We anticipate that the software will contribute to medical education by allowing users to browse a variety of images. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  15. Interaction in the segmentation of medical images: a survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olabarriaga, S. D.; Smeulders, A. W.

    2001-01-01

    Segmentation of the object of interest is a difficult step in the analysis of digital images. Fully automatic methods sometimes fail, producing incorrect results and requiring the intervention of a human operator. This is often true in medical applications, where image segmentation is particularly

  16. 3D/2D Registration of medical images

    OpenAIRE

    Tomaževič, D.

    2008-01-01

    The topic of this doctoral dissertation is registration of 3D medical images to corresponding projective 2D images, referred to as 3D/2D registration. There are numerous possible applications of 3D/2D registration in image-aided diagnosis and treatment. In most of the applications, 3D/2D registration provides the location and orientation of the structures in a preoperative 3D CT or MR image with respect to intraoperative 2D X-ray images. The proposed doctoral dissertation tries to find origin...

  17. Ultrasound: medical imaging and beyond (an invited review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhari, Haim

    2012-09-01

    Medical applications of ultrasound were first investigated about seventy years ago. It has rapidly evolved since then, becoming an essential tool in medical imaging. Ultrasound ability to provide real time images with frame rates exceeding several hundred frames per second allows one to view rapid anatomical changes as well as to guide minimal invasive procedures. By, combining Doppler techniques with anatomical images ultrasound provides real time quantitative flow information as well. It is portable, versatile, cost effective and considered sufficiently hazardless to monitor pregnancy. Moreover, ultrasound has the unique capacity to offer therapeutic capabilities in addition to its outstanding imaging abilities. It can be used for physiotherapy, lithotripsy, and thermal ablation, and recent studies have demonstrated its usefulness in drug delivery, gene therapy and molecular imaging. The purpose of this article is to provide an introductory review of the field covering briefly topics from basic physics through current imaging methods to therapeutic applications.

  18. A Spiral And Discipline-Oriented Curriculum In Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Hanson, Lars G.; Henneberg, Kaj-Åge

    2011-01-01

    This contribution describes and evaluates an experimental combination of a spiral and discipline-oriented curriculum implemented in the bachelor’s and master’s program in Medicine and Technology. The implementation in the master’s program is in the form of a study line in Medical Imaging and Radi......This contribution describes and evaluates an experimental combination of a spiral and discipline-oriented curriculum implemented in the bachelor’s and master’s program in Medicine and Technology. The implementation in the master’s program is in the form of a study line in Medical Imaging...... and Radiation Physics containing three disciplines: Imaging modalities, Radiation therapy and Image processing. The two imaging courses in the bachelor’s program and the first imaging course in the master’s program follow a spiral curriculum in which most disciplines are encountered in all courses...

  19. Evaluation of the middle and inner ear structures: comparison of hybrid rendering, virtual endoscopy and axial 2D source images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seemann, M.D. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Seemann, O. [Department of Psychiatry, Klinikum Innenstadt, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Bonel, H.; Allen, C.M.; Reiser, M.F. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Suckfuell, M.; Naumann, A. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Englmeier, K.H. [Department of Medical Informatics and Health System Research, GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Recent developments in 3D reconstructions can enhance the quality and diagnostic value of axial 2D image data sets with direct benefits for clinical practice. To show the possible advantages of a hybrid rendering method [color-coded 3D shaded-surface display (SSD)- and volume rendering method] with the possibility of virtual endoscopy we have specifically highlighted the use in relation to the middle and inner ear structures. We examined 12 patients with both normal findings and postoperative changes, using image data sets from high-resolution spiral computed tomography (HRSCT). The middle and inner ear was segmented using an interactive threshold interval density volume-growing method and visualized with a color-coded SSD rendering method. The temporal bone was visualized using a transparent volume rendering method. The 3D- and virtual reconstructions were compared with the axial 2D source images. The evaluated middle and inner ear structures could be seen in their complete form and correct topographical relationship, and the 3D- and virtual reconstructions indicated an improved representation and spatial orientation of these structures. A hybrid and virtual endoscopic method could add information and improve the value of imaging in the diagnosis and management of patients with middle or inner ear diseases making the understanding and interpretation of axial 2D CT image data sets easier. The introduction of an improved rendering algorithm aids radiological diagnostics, medical education, surgical planning, surgical training, and postoperative assessment. (orig.)

  20. System for digitalization of medical images based on DICOM standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čabarkapa Slobodan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available According to DICOM standard, which defines both medical image information and user information, a new system for digitalizing medical images is involved as a part of the main system for archiving and retrieving medical databases. The basic characteristics of this system are described in this paper. Furthermore, the analysis of some important DICOM header's tags which are used in this system, are presented, too. Having chosen the appropriate tags in order to preserve important information, the efficient system has been created. .

  1. Deep Transfer Learning for Modality Classification of Medical Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhai Yu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Medical images are valuable for clinical diagnosis and decision making. Image modality is an important primary step, as it is capable of aiding clinicians to access required medical image in retrieval systems. Traditional methods of modality classification are dependent on the choice of hand-crafted features and demand a clear awareness of prior domain knowledge. The feature learning approach may detect efficiently visual characteristics of different modalities, but it is limited to the number of training datasets. To overcome the absence of labeled data, on the one hand, we take deep convolutional neural networks (VGGNet, ResNet with different depths pre-trained on ImageNet, fix most of the earlier layers to reserve generic features of natural images, and only train their higher-level portion on ImageCLEF to learn domain-specific features of medical figures. Then, we train from scratch deep CNNs with only six weight layers to capture more domain-specific features. On the other hand, we employ two data augmentation methods to help CNNs to give the full scope to their potential characterizing image modality features. The final prediction is given by our voting system based on the outputs of three CNNs. After evaluating our proposed model on the subfigure classification task in ImageCLEF2015 and ImageCLEF2016, we obtain new, state-of-the-art results—76.87% in ImageCLEF2015 and 87.37% in ImageCLEF2016—which imply that CNNs, based on our proposed transfer learning methods and data augmentation skills, can identify more efficiently modalities of medical images.

  2. A Novel Technique for Prealignment in Multimodality Medical Image Registration

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Zhou; Lijuan Zhang; Yaoqin Xie; Changhong Liang

    2014-01-01

    Image pair is often aligned initially based on a rigid or affine transformation before a deformable registration method is applied in medical image registration. Inappropriate initial registration may compromise the registration speed or impede the convergence of the optimization algorithm. In this work, a novel technique was proposed for prealignment in both monomodality and multimodality image registration based on statistical correlation of gradient information. A simple and robust algorit...

  3. Processing of hyperspectral medical images applications in dermatology using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Koprowski, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This book presents new methods of analyzing and processing hyperspectral medical images, which can be used in diagnostics, for example for dermatological images. The algorithms proposed are fully automatic and the results obtained are fully reproducible. Their operation was tested on a set of several thousands of hyperspectral images and they were implemented in Matlab. The presented source code can be used without licensing restrictions. This is a valuable resource for computer scientists, bioengineers, doctoral students, and dermatologists interested in contemporary analysis methods.

  4. Authentication of digital medical images with digital signature technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J P

    1995-03-01

    To determine whether digital signature technology (DST) can authenticate digital medical images to the same level of authenticity required for interbank electronic transfer of funds. Message digests were computed for two magnetic resonance images that differed only by the value of a single bit. RSA (Rivest, Shamir, and Adleman) public key cryptography was used to encrypt each message digest to form a digital signature for each image, a process analogous to the established use of RSA DST for electronic funds transfer. The process was then reversed to authenticate the original image from its digital signature. Although the images differed by less than 0.000095%, their message digests differed at 94% of their characters. The digital signature of the original image proved that it was authentic and that the altered image was not authentic. RSA DST can establish the authenticity of images to at least the level of confidence required for interbank electronic transfer of funds.

  5. A Hybrid Task Graph Scheduler for High Performance Image Processing Workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattner, Timothy; Keyrouz, Walid; Bhattacharyya, Shuvra S; Halem, Milton; Brady, Mary

    2017-12-01

    Designing applications for scalability is key to improving their performance in hybrid and cluster computing. Scheduling code to utilize parallelism is difficult, particularly when dealing with data dependencies, memory management, data motion, and processor occupancy. The Hybrid Task Graph Scheduler (HTGS) improves programmer productivity when implementing hybrid workflows for multi-core and multi-GPU systems. The Hybrid Task Graph Scheduler (HTGS) is an abstract execution model, framework, and API that increases programmer productivity when implementing hybrid workflows for such systems. HTGS manages dependencies between tasks, represents CPU and GPU memories independently, overlaps computations with disk I/O and memory transfers, keeps multiple GPUs occupied, and uses all available compute resources. Through these abstractions, data motion and memory are explicit; this makes data locality decisions more accessible. To demonstrate the HTGS application program interface (API), we present implementations of two example algorithms: (1) a matrix multiplication that shows how easily task graphs can be used; and (2) a hybrid implementation of microscopy image stitching that reduces code size by ≈ 43% compared to a manually coded hybrid workflow implementation and showcases the minimal overhead of task graphs in HTGS. Both of the HTGS-based implementations show good performance. In image stitching the HTGS implementation achieves similar performance to the hybrid workflow implementation. Matrix multiplication with HTGS achieves 1.3× and 1.8× speedup over the multi-threaded OpenBLAS library for 16k × 16k and 32k × 32k size matrices, respectively.

  6. Aliphatic polyesters for medical imaging and theranostic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottelet, Benjamin; Darcos, Vincent; Coudane, Jean

    2015-11-01

    Medical imaging is a cornerstone of modern medicine. In that context the development of innovative imaging systems combining biomaterials and contrast agents (CAs)/imaging probes (IPs) for improved diagnostic and theranostic applications focuses intense research efforts. In particular, the classical aliphatic (co)polyesters poly(lactide) (PLA), poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), attract much attention due to their long track record in the medical field. This review aims therefore at providing a state-of-the-art of polyester-based imaging systems. In a first section a rapid description of the various imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US) and radionuclide imaging (SPECT, PET) will be given. Then, the two main strategies used to combine the CAs/IPs and the polyesters will be discussed. In more detail we will first present the strategies relying on CAs/IPs encapsulation in nanoparticles, micelles, dendrimers or capsules. We will then present chemical modifications of polyesters backbones and/or polyester surfaces to yield macromolecular imaging agents. Finally, opportunities offered by these innovative systems will be illustrated with some recent examples in the fields of cell labeling, diagnostic or theranostic applications and medical devices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagonal queue medical image steganography with Rabin cryptosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mamta; Lenka, Saroj Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The main purpose of this work is to provide a novel and efficient method to the image steganography area of research in the field of biomedical, so that the security can be given to the very precious and confidential sensitive data of the patient and at the same time with the implication of the highly reliable algorithms will explode the high security to the precious brain information from the intruders. The patient information such as patient medical records with personal identification information of patients can be stored in both storage and transmission. This paper describes a novel methodology for hiding medical records like HIV reports, baby girl fetus, and patient's identity information inside their Brain disease medical image files viz. scan image or MRI image using the notion of obscurity with respect to a diagonal queue least significant bit substitution. Data structure queue plays a dynamic role in resource sharing between multiple communication parties and when secret medical data are transferred asynchronously (secret medical data not necessarily received at the same rate they were sent). Rabin cryptosystem is used for secret medical data writing, since it is computationally secure against a chosen-plaintext attack and shows the difficulty of integer factoring. The outcome of the cryptosystem is organized in various blocks and equally distributed sub-blocks. In steganography process, various Brain disease cover images are organized into various blocks of diagonal queues. The secret cipher blocks and sub-blocks are assigned dynamically to selected diagonal queues for embedding. The receiver gets four values of medical data plaintext corresponding to one ciphertext, so only authorized receiver can identify the correct medical data. Performance analysis was conducted using MSE, PSNR, maximum embedding capacity as well as by histogram analysis between various Brain disease stego and cover images.

  8. Medical image of the week: polysomnogram artifact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartell J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A 54 year-old man with a past medical history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, low back pain, and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia presented to the sleep laboratory for evaluation of sleep disordered breathing. Pertinent medications include fluoxetine, ambien, and clonazepam. His Epworth sleepiness score was 18. He had a total sleep time of 12 min. On the night of his sleep study, the patient was restless and repeatedly changed positions in bed. Figures 1 and 2 show the artifact determined to be lead displacement of O1M2 after the patient shifted in bed, inadvertently removing one of his scalp electrodes. The sine waves are 60 Hz in frequency. Once the problem was identified, the lead was quickly replaced to its proper position.

  9. Medical Applications of Digital Image Morphing

    OpenAIRE

    Penska, Keith; Folio, Les; Bunger, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    The authors present a unique medical technical application for illustrating the success and/or failure of the physiological healing process as a dynamically morphed video. Two examples used in this report include the healing of a severely fractured humerus from an explosion in Iraq and the other of dramatic tissue destruction from a poisonous spider bite. For the humerus, several sequential x-rays obtained throughout orthopedic surgical procedures and the healing process were morphed together...

  10. Medical image of the week: aspergilloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu W

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 69-year-old woman, a current smoker, with very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and prior atypical mycobacterium, was found unresponsive by her family and intubated in the field by emergency medical services for respiratory distress. Her CT thorax showed severe emphysematous disease, apical bullous disease, and a large left upper lobe cavitation with debris (Figure 1. She was treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics and anti-fungal medications. Hemoptysis was never seen. Sputum cultures over a span of two weeks repeatedly showed Aspergillus fumigatus and outside medical records confirmed the patient had a known history of stable aspergilloma not requiring therapy. Aspergillomas usually arises in cavitary areas of the lung damaged by previous infections. The fungus ball is a combination of colonization by Aspergillus hyphae and cellular debris. Individuals with aspergillomas are usually asymptomatic or have mild symptoms (chronic cough and do not require treatment unless it begins to invade into the cavity ...

  11. A Hybrid Method for Segmentation and Visualization of Teeth in Multi-Slice CT scan Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosntalab

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Various computer assisted medical procedures such as dental implant, orthodontic planning, face, jaw and cosmetic surgeries require automatic quantification and volumetric visualization of teeth. In this regard, segmentation is a major step. Material and Methods: In this paper, inspired by our previous experiences and considering the anatomical knowledge of teeth and jaws, we propose a hybrid technique for teeth segmentation and visualization in CT volumetric data. The major steps of the proposed techniques are as follows: (1 Separation of teeth in CT dataset; (2 Initial segmentation of teeth in panoramic projection; (3 Final segmentation of teeth in CT dataset; (4 3D visualization of teeth. Results: The proposed algorithm was evaluated in 30 multi-slice CT datasets. Segmented images were compared with manually outlined contours. In order to evaluate the proposed method, we utilized several common performance measures such as sensitivity, specificity, precision, accuracy and mean error rate. The experimental results reveal the effectiveness of the proposed method. Discussion and Conclusion: In the proposed algorithm, the variationallevel set technique was utilized to trace the contour of the teeth. In view of the fact that this technique is based on the characteristics of the overall region of the tooth image, it is possible to extract a very smooth and accurate tooth contour using this technique. For the available datasets, the proposed technique was more successful in teeth segmentation compared to previous techniques.

  12. Metal artifact reduction strategies for improved attenuation correction in hybrid PET/CT imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdoli, Mehrsima; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Zaidi, Habib

    Metallic implants are known to generate bright and dark streaking artifacts in x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, which in turn propagate to corresponding functional positron emission tomography (PET) images during the CT-based attenuation correction procedure commonly used on hybrid clinical

  13. Hybrid Photoacoustic/Ultrasound Tomograph for Real-Time Finger Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeri, Milan; Bost, Wolfgang; Sénégond, Nicolas; Tretbar, Steffen; Fournelle, Marc

    2017-10-01

    We report a target-enclosing, hybrid tomograph with a total of 768 elements based on capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer technology and providing fast, high-resolution 2-D/3-D photoacoustic and ultrasound tomography tailored to finger imaging. A freely programmable ultrasound beamforming platform sampling data at 80 MHz was developed to realize plane wave transmission under multiple angles. A multiplexing unit enables the connection and control of a large number of elements. Fast image reconstruction is provided by GPU processing. The tomograph is composed of four independent and fully automated movable arc-shaped transducers, allowing imaging of all three finger joints. The system benefits from photoacoustics, yielding high optical contrast and enabling visualization of finger vascularization, and ultrasound provides morphologic information on joints and surrounding tissue. A diode-pumped, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used to broaden the spectrum of emitted wavelengths to provide multispectral imaging. Custom-made optical fiber bundles enable illumination of the region of interest in the plane of acoustic detection. Precision in positioning of the probe in motion is ensured by use of a motor-driven guide slide. The current position of the probe is encoded by the stage and used to relate ultrasound and photoacoustic signals to the corresponding region of interest of the suspicious finger joint. The system is characterized in phantoms and a healthy human finger in vivo. The results obtained promise to provide new opportunities in finger diagnostics and establish photoacoustic/ultrasound-tomography in medical routine. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Medical image of the week: tracheal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsa N

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A 45 year old Caucasian man with a history of HIV/AIDS was admitted for septic shock secondary to right lower lobe community acquired pneumonia. The patient’s respiratory status continued to decline requiring emergency intubation in a non-ICU setting. Four laryngoscope intubation attempts were made including an inadvertent esophageal intubation. Subsequent CT imaging revealed a tracheal defect (Figure 1, red arrow with communication to the mediastinum and air around the trachea consistent with pneumomediastinum (Figure 2, orange arrow and figure 3, yellow arrow. Pneumopericardium (figure 4, blue arrow was also evident post-intubation. The patient’s hemodynamic status remained stable. Two days following respiratory intubation subsequent chest imaging revealed resolution of the pneumomediastinum and pneumopericardium and patient continued to do well without hemodynamic compromise or presence of subcutaneous emphysema. Post-intubation tracheal perforation is a rare complication of traumatic intubation and may be managed with surgical intervention or conservative treatment (1.

  15. Learning effectiveness and satisfaction of international medical students: Introducing a Hybrid-PBL curriculum in biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiu; Ma, Li; Zhu, Lina; Zhang, Wenli

    2017-07-08

    A biochemistry course is a fundamental but important subject in medical education in China. In recent years, the number of international medical students has increased. Curriculum reform in biochemistry teaching is needed because of the knowledge limitations of students, a close linkage of biochemical content with clinics, the shortcomings of lecture-centered teaching, and the requirements for early clinical practice training and competence. In this study, we analyzed a novel curriculum reform, "Hybrid-PBL," which combined problem-based learning (PBL) with biochemistry lectures and was implemented for biochemical teaching at Dalian Medical University (DMU) in China. The change in curriculum affected 189 international medical students. This study selected two PBL cases concerning the basic biochemical issues of carbohydrate metabolism and liver biochemistry for the analysis, and ten examples of learning issues for each case were reported by the international students. A questionnaire was utilized to evaluate students' perceptions of the Hybrid-PBL, and examination scores were analyzed to assess the curriculum reform in biochemistry teaching. A statistical analysis revealed that the Hybrid-PBL curriculum was well accepted by the international students as an effective supplement to lecture-centered teaching programs. The students obtained more abilities, higher examination scores, and an improved understanding of biomedical information from the Hybrid-PBL program than from conventional teaching methods. Our study was an innovative trial that applied a PBL curriculum to the specific discipline of biochemistry and may provide a potential and promising new teaching method that can be widely utilized. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(4):336-342, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  16. Medical image of the week: Boerhaave syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsa N

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 41-year-old woman with a history of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, asthma and iron deficiency anemia presented with complaints of right sided chest pain, nausea and emesis for several days prior to hospital presentation. She had also been experiencing progressive dysphagia to solids for a month preceding admission. CT chest imaging revealed mega-esophagus (Figure 1A with rupture into the right lung parenchyma and resultant abscess formation (Figure 1B and 1C. A subsequent echocardiogram also confirmed mitral valve endocarditis. An image-guided chest tube was placed in the abscess for drainage. Endoscopy was attempted but visualization was difficult due to the presence of retained food. Given her low albumin and poor nutritional state, a jejunostomy tube was placed. Follow up CT imaging with contrast through a nasogastric tube confirmed extravasation of esophageal contrast into the right lung parenchyma (Figure 1D. Blood and sputum cultures grew Candida glabrata. She was initially started on ...

  17. Recent advances in radiology and medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, R.E.; Sherwood, T.

    1986-01-01

    The first chapter, on the radiology of arthritis, is an overview. The second and seventh chapters are on the chest the former, on adult respiratory distress syndrome, is a brief summary, and the latter, on digital radiography of the chest with the prototype slit-scanning technique. The third chapter reviews computed tomography of the lumbar spine. The following two chapters are on MR imaging, one on the central nervous system (covering demyelinating diseases, cardiovascular disease, infections, and tumors), with excellent illustrations; and one on MR imaging of the body. The illustrations are good. The following chapter is on extracardiac digital subtraction angiography (DSA), with an interesting table comparing and contrasting conventional angiography with both intraveneous and intraarterial DSA. The eighth chapter on pediatric imaging fits a world of experience. Chapter 9 is an update on contrast media, while the next chapter is on barium infusion examination of the small intestine. The final three chapters are concerned with the present state of angioplasty, interventional radiology in the urinary tract.

  18. Introduction to wavelet-based compression of medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomer, D F; Elekes, A A; Hazle, J D; Huffman, J C; Thompson, S K; Chui, C K; Murphy, W A

    1998-01-01

    Medical image compression can significantly enhance the performance of picture archiving and communication systems and may be considered an enabling technology for telemedicine. The wavelet transform is a powerful mathematical tool with many unique qualities that are useful for image compression and processing applications. Although wavelet concepts can be traced back to 1910, the mathematics of wavelets have only recently been formalized. By exploiting spatial and spectral information redundancy in images, wavelet-based methods offer significantly better results for compressing medical images than do compression algorithms based on Fourier methods, such as the discrete cosine transform used by the Joint Photographic Experts Group. Furthermore, wavelet-based compression does not suffer from blocking artifacts, and the restored image quality is generally superior at higher compression rates.

  19. Cost containment and computerized medical imaging. Meeting one another's needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J L

    1987-01-01

    Today, computers are used in several important and fast-growing medical imaging modalities, such as digital subtraction angiography, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine, and diagnostic ultrasound. The ultimate test for the computer in medical imaging will be its ability to replace traditional film-based radiography as the mechanism for displaying, communicating, and storing imaging information. This transition will require radiologists and other imagers to accept information in digital form. The speed of that acceptance depends on the economic incentives of the health care system. These are changing as a result of cost containment, which is moving away from fee-for-service toward bundled payment. The increase in capitated health plans will encourage the development of digital radiography systems that realistically trade-off the perceived quality needs of radiologists with the costs of producing and operating such systems.

  20. [An improved medical image fusion algorithm and quality evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meiling; Tao, Ling; Qian, Zhiyu

    2009-08-01

    Medical image fusion is of very important value for application in medical image analysis and diagnosis. In this paper, the conventional method of wavelet fusion is improved,so a new algorithm of medical image fusion is presented and the high frequency and low frequency coefficients are studied respectively. When high frequency coefficients are chosen, the regional edge intensities of each sub-image are calculated to realize adaptive fusion. The choice of low frequency coefficient is based on the edges of images, so that the fused image preserves all useful information and appears more distinctly. We apply the conventional and the improved fusion algorithms based on wavelet transform to fuse two images of human body and also evaluate the fusion results through a quality evaluation method. Experimental results show that this algorithm can effectively retain the details of information on original images and enhance their edge and texture features. This new algorithm is better than the conventional fusion algorithm based on wavelet transform.

  1. Medical image of the week: hypertensive emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Raschke RA

    2017-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 39-year-old man had sudden onset of left sided hemiparesis, headache and nausea. He had a history of untreated hypertension and diabetes mellitus. On initial evaluation by emergency medical services, his blood pressure was 270/170 mm Hg. Shortly after admission, he suffered a generalized seizure treated with levetiracetam. His labs were remarkable for a creatinine of 4.4 mg/dL and microscopic hematuria. His head CT findings are consiste...

  2. Medical image of the week: refractory dyspnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malo J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A 61 year old man with an extensive smoking history and emphysema was referred for evaluation of dyspnea refractory to standard therapy. He was diagnosed with a pulmonary embolism 5 months prior to presentation and has been on warfarin since that time. Review of the patient’s CT scan performed prior to the visit demonstrated dilated main; right; and left pulmonary arteries (Figure 1. Also visualized was an eccentrically located thrombus with areas of calcification and central recanalization. Echocardiography confirmed the presence of elevated pulmonary pressures consistent with a diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH. Medical therapy and a referral for pulmonary artery endarterectomy are being considered.

  3. WG1N5327 - Medical image database for lossless codec evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Bédat, Laurent; Babel, Marie; Déforges, Olivier; Strauss, Clément; Pasteau, François

    2010-01-01

    This document presents the CAIMAN Project medical image database for JPEG commitee evaluation works purposes.; This document describes the CAIMAN ANR project contribution on medical images to be considered for AIC. In order to evaluate the medical image codec, we have compiled a list of medical image (X-ray, CT, MRI) for the development and analysis of medical image compression scheme. All images can be found on a secure FTP server, and can be use freely for research purpose.

  4. Pixel-Based Machine Learning in Medical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Machine learning (ML plays an important role in the medical imaging field, including medical image analysis and computer-aided diagnosis, because objects such as lesions and organs may not be represented accurately by a simple equation; thus, medical pattern recognition essentially require “learning from examples.” One of the most popular uses of ML is classification of objects such as lesions into certain classes (e.g., abnormal or normal, or lesions or nonlesions based on input features (e.g., contrast and circularity obtained from segmented object candidates. Recently, pixel/voxel-based ML (PML emerged in medical image processing/analysis, which use pixel/voxel values in images directly instead of features calculated from segmented objects as input information; thus, feature calculation or segmentation is not required. Because the PML can avoid errors caused by inaccurate feature calculation and segmentation which often occur for subtle or complex objects, the performance of the PML can potentially be higher for such objects than that of common classifiers (i.e., feature-based MLs. In this paper, PMLs are surveyed to make clear (a classes of PMLs, (b similarities and differences within (among different PMLs and those between PMLs and feature-based MLs, (c advantages and limitations of PMLs, and (d their applications in medical imaging.

  5. Multicentre multi-device hybrid imaging study of coronary artery disease: results from the EValuation of INtegrated Cardiac Imaging for the Detection and Characterization of Ischaemic Heart Disease (EVINCI) hybrid imaging population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liga, Riccardo; Vontobel, Jan; Rovai, Daniele; Marinelli, Martina; Caselli, Chiara; Pietila, Mikko; Teresinska, Anna; Aguadé-Bruix, Santiago; Pizzi, Maria Nazarena; Todiere, Giancarlo; Gimelli, Alessia; Chiappino, Dante; Marraccini, Paolo; Schroeder, Stephen; Drosch, Tanja; Poddighe, Rosa; Casolo, Giancarlo; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos; Pugliese, Francesca; Rouzet, Francois; Le Guludec, Dominique; Cappelli, Francesco; Valente, Serafina; Gensini, Gian Franco; Zawaideh, Camilla; Capitanio, Selene; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Marsico, Fabio; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Rincón, Luis M; Graner, Frank P; de Graaf, Michiel A; Stehli, Julia; Reyes, Eliana; Nkomo, Sandy; Mäki, Maija; Lorenzoni, Valentina; Turchetti, Giuseppe; Carpeggiani, Clara; Puzzuoli, Stefano; Mangione, Maurizio; Marcheschi, Paolo; Giannessi, Daniela; Nekolla, Stephan; Lombardi, Massimo; Sicari, Rosa; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Zamorano, José L; Underwood, S Richard; Knuuti, Juhani; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Neglia, Danilo; Gaemperli, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid imaging provides a non-invasive assessment of coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion. We sought to evaluate the added clinical value of hybrid imaging in a multi-centre multi-vendor setting. Fourteen centres enrolled 252 patients with stable angina and intermediate (20-90%) pre-test likelihood of coronary artery disease (CAD) who underwent myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS), CT coronary angiography (CTCA), and quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) with fractional flow reserve (FFR). Hybrid MPS/CTCA images were obtained by 3D image fusion. Blinded core-lab analyses were performed for CTCA, MPS, QCA and hybrid datasets. Hemodynamically significant CAD was ruled-in non-invasively in the presence of a matched finding (myocardial perfusion defect co-localized with stenosed coronary artery) and ruled-out with normal findings (both CTCA and MPS normal). Overall prevalence of significant CAD on QCA (>70% stenosis or 30-70% with FFR≤0.80) was 37%. Of 1004 pathological myocardial segments on MPS, 246 (25%) were reclassified from their standard coronary distribution to another territory by hybrid imaging. In this respect, in 45/252 (18%) patients, hybrid imaging reassigned an entire perfusion defect to another coronary territory, changing the final diagnosis in 42% of the cases. Hybrid imaging allowed non-invasive CAD rule-out in 41%, and rule-in in 24% of patients, with a negative and positive predictive value of 88% and 87%, respectively. In patients at intermediate risk of CAD, hybrid imaging allows non-invasive co-localization of myocardial perfusion defects and subtending coronary arteries, impacting clinical decision-making in almost one every five subjects. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Medical image of the week: sleep bruxism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartell J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 42 year-old man with a past medical history of insomnia, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and both migraine and tension headaches was referred for an overnight sleep study. He had presented to the sleep clinic with symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea. Medications included sumatriptan, amitryptiline, sertraline, and trazodone. His sleep study showed: sleep efficiency of 58.2%, apnea-hypopnea index of 33 events per hour, and arousal index of 14.5/hr. Periodic limb movement index was 29.2/hr. The time spent in the sleep stages included N1 (3.6%, N2 (72.5%, N3 (12.9%, and REM (10.9%. Figure 1 is representative of the several brief waveforms seen on his EEG and chin EMG. Sleep bruxism (SB is a type of sleep-related movement disorder that is characterized by involuntary masticatory muscle contraction resulting in grinding and clenching of the teeth and typically associated with arousals from sleep (1,2. The American academy of sleep medicine (AASM criteria for ...

  7. Medical image of the week: pulsus alternans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabe LM

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 52 year old man with a known past medical history of morbid obesity (BMI, 54.6 kg/m2, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, hypertension, untreated obstructive sleep apnea, and obesity hypoventilation syndrome presented with increasing dyspnea over several months accompanied by orthopnea and weight gain that the patient had treated at home with a borrowed oxygen concentrator. On arrival to the Emergency Department, the patient was in moderate respiratory distress and hypoxic to SpO2 70% on room air. Physical examination was pertinent for pitting edema to the level of the chest. Assessment of jugular venous pressure and heart and lung auscultation were limited by body habitus, but chest radiography suggested pulmonary edema. The patient refused aggressive medical care beyond supplemental oxygen and diuretic therapy. Initial transthoracic echocardiography was limited due to poor acoustic windows but suggested a newly depressed left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF of <25%. The cause, though uncertain …

  8. Medical image of the week: necrotizing pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 60-year-old man with a past medical history significant for coronary artery disease status post percutaneous coronary intervention was admitted to Banner University Medical Center for acute pancreatitis complicated by a pericardial effusion requiring pericardiocentesis. The following day, the patient developed severe shortness of breath requiring increasing amounts of supplemental oxygen. The patient was emergently transferred to ICU for noninvasive bilevel positive airway pressure ventilation, but he subsequently required intubation. Throughout his worsening condition, he denied any abdominal pain, only relaying ongoing substernal chest pain. His troponins, however, remained negative and echocardiography failed to show any reaccumulation of the pericardial effusion. CT scan of the chest failed to show any pulmonary embolism. But, CT abdomen displayed acute pancreatitis complicated by peripancreatic gas consistent with necrotizing pancreatitis (Figure 1. Emergent laparotomy was completed. There were no signs of stomach or duodenal perforation. Purulent fluid was removed from the lesser sac and ...

  9. Comment on "Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging"

    CERN Document Server

    Taibi, A; Tuffanelli, A; Gambaccini, M

    2002-01-01

    In the paper 'Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging' (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 466 (2001) 99) the infer, from simple approximations, that the use of HOPG monochromator has no advantage in mammography compared to existing systems. We show that in order to compare imaging properties of different X-ray sources it is necessary to evaluate the spectra after the attenuation of the tissue to be imaged. Indeed, quasi-monochromatic X-ray sources have the potential to enhance image contrast and to reduce patient dose.

  10. [Digital scanning converter for medical endoscopic ultrasound imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zhang, Hongxu; Zhou, Peifan; Wen, Shijie; Yu, Daoyin

    2009-02-01

    This paper mainly introduces the design of digital scanning converter (DSC) for medical endoscopic ultrasound imaging. Fast modified vector totational CORDIC (FMVR-CORDIC) arithmetic complete coordinate conversion is used to increase the speed of ultrasonic scanning imaging. FPGA is used as the kernel module to control data transferring, related circuits and relevant chips' working, and to accomplish data preprocessing. With the advantages of simple structure, nice flexibility and convenience, it satisfies the demand for real-time displaying in this system. Finally, the original polar coordinate image is transformed to rectangular coordinate grey image through coordinate transformation. The system performances have been validated by the experimental result.

  11. Method for Surface Scanning in Medical Imaging and Related Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    A method and apparatus for surface scanning in medical imaging is provided. The surface scanning apparatus comprises an image source, a first optical fiber bundle comprising first optical fibers having proximal ends and distal ends, and a first optical coupler for coupling an image from the image...... source into the proximal ends of the first optical fibers, wherein the first optical coupler comprises a plurality of lens elements including a first lens element and a second lens element, each of the plurality of lens elements comprising a primary surface facing a distal end of the first optical...... coupler, and a secondary surface facing a proximal end of the first optical coupler....

  12. The Handbook of Medical Image Perception and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samei, Ehsan; Krupinski, Elizabeth

    2014-07-01

    1. Medical image perception Ehsan Samei and Elizabeth Krupinski; Part I. Historical Reflections and Theoretical Foundations: 2. A short history of image perception in medical radiology Harold Kundel and Calvin Nodine; 3. Spatial vision research without noise Arthur Burgess; 4. Signal detection theory, a brief history Arthur Burgess; 5. Signal detection in radiology Arthur Burgess; 6. Lessons from dinners with the giants of modern image science Robert Wagner; Part II. Science of Image Perception: 7. Perceptual factors in reading medical images Elizabeth Krupinski; 8. Cognitive factors in reading medical images David Manning; 9. Satisfaction of search in traditional radiographic imaging Kevin Berbaum, Edmund Franken, Robert Caldwell and Kevin Schartz; 10. The role of expertise in radiologic image interpretation Calvin Nodine and Claudia Mello-Thoms; 11. A primer of image quality and its perceptual relevance Robert Saunders and Ehsan Samei; 12. Beyond the limitations of human vision Maria Petrou; Part III. Perception Metrology: 13. Logistical issues in designing perception experiments Ehsan Samei and Xiang Li; 14. ROC analysis: basic concepts and practical applications Georgia Tourassi; 15. Multi-reader ROC Steve Hillis; 16. Recent developments in FROC methodology Dev Chakraborty; 17. Observer models as a surrogate to perception experiments Craig Abbey and Miguel Eckstein; 18. Implementation of observer models Matthew Kupinski; Part IV. Decision Support and Computer Aided Detection: 19. CAD: an image perception perspective Maryellen Giger and Weijie Chen; 20. Common designs of CAD studies Yulei Jiang; 21. Perceptual effect of CAD in reading chest images Matthew Freedman and Teresa Osicka; 22. Perceptual issues in mammography and CAD Michael Ulissey; 23. How perceptual factors affect the use and accuracy of CAD for interpretation of CT images Ronald Summers; 24. CAD: risks and benefits for radiologists' decisions Eugenio Alberdi, Andrey Povyakalo, Lorenzo Strigini and

  13. Dictionary Pruning with Visual Word Significance for Medical Image Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Song, Yang; Cai, Weidong; Hauptmann, Alexander G.; Liu, Sidong; Pujol, Sonia; Kikinis, Ron; Fulham, Michael J; Feng, David Dagan; Chen, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Content-based medical image retrieval (CBMIR) is an active research area for disease diagnosis and treatment but it can be problematic given the small visual variations between anatomical structures. We propose a retrieval method based on a bag-of-visual-words (BoVW) to identify discriminative characteristics between different medical images with Pruned Dictionary based on Latent Semantic Topic description. We refer to this as the PD-LST retrieval. Our method has two main components. First, we calculate a topic-word significance value for each visual word given a certain latent topic to evaluate how the word is connected to this latent topic. The latent topics are learnt, based on the relationship between the images and words, and are employed to bridge the gap between low-level visual features and high-level semantics. These latent topics describe the images and words semantically and can thus facilitate more meaningful comparisons between the words. Second, we compute an overall-word significance value to evaluate the significance of a visual word within the entire dictionary. We designed an iterative ranking method to measure overall-word significance by considering the relationship between all latent topics and words. The words with higher values are considered meaningful with more significant discriminative power in differentiating medical images. We evaluated our method on two public medical imaging datasets and it showed improved retrieval accuracy and efficiency. PMID:27688597

  14. Resource estimation in high performance medical image computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banalagay, Rueben; Covington, Kelsie Jade; Wilkes, D M; Landman, Bennett A

    2014-10-01

    Medical imaging analysis processes often involve the concatenation of many steps (e.g., multi-stage scripts) to integrate and realize advancements from image acquisition, image processing, and computational analysis. With the dramatic increase in data size for medical imaging studies (e.g., improved resolution, higher throughput acquisition, shared databases), interesting study designs are becoming intractable or impractical on individual workstations and servers. Modern pipeline environments provide control structures to distribute computational load in high performance computing (HPC) environments. However, high performance computing environments are often shared resources, and scheduling computation across these resources necessitates higher level modeling of resource utilization. Submission of 'jobs' requires an estimate of the CPU runtime and memory usage. The resource requirements for medical image processing algorithms are difficult to predict since the requirements can vary greatly between different machines, different execution instances, and different data inputs. Poor resource estimates can lead to wasted resources in high performance environments due to incomplete executions and extended queue wait times. Hence, resource estimation is becoming a major hurdle for medical image processing algorithms to efficiently leverage high performance computing environments. Herein, we present our implementation of a resource estimation system to overcome these difficulties and ultimately provide users with the ability to more efficiently utilize high performance computing resources.

  15. Resource Estimation in High Performance Medical Image Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banalagay, Rueben; Covington, Kelsie Jade; Wilkes, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging analysis processes often involve the concatenation of many steps (e.g., multi-stage scripts) to integrate and realize advancements from image acquisition, image processing, and computational analysis. With the dramatic increase in data size for medical imaging studies (e.g., improved resolution, higher throughput acquisition, shared databases), interesting study designs are becoming intractable or impractical on individual workstations and servers. Modern pipeline environments provide control structures to distribute computational load in high performance computing (HPC) environments. However, high performance computing environments are often shared resources, and scheduling computation across these resources necessitates higher level modeling of resource utilization. Submission of ‘jobs’ requires an estimate of the CPU runtime and memory usage. The resource requirements for medical image processing algorithms are difficult to predict since the requirements can vary greatly between different machines, different execution instances, and different data inputs. Poor resource estimates can lead to wasted resources in high performance environments due to incomplete executions and extended queue wait times. Hence, resource estimation is becoming a major hurdle for medical image processing algorithms to efficiently leverage high performance computing environments. Herein, we present our implementation of a resource estimation system to overcome these difficulties and ultimately provide users with the ability to more efficiently utilize high performance computing resources. PMID:24906466

  16. Hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from ADF STEM images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De wael, Annelies, E-mail: annelies.dewael@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); De Backer, Annick [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, OX1 3PH Oxford (United Kingdom); Van Aert, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.vanaert@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    A hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF STEM) images of monotype crystalline nanostructures is presented. Different atom-counting methods already exist for model-like systems. However, the increasing relevance of radiation damage in the study of nanostructures demands a method that allows atom-counting from low dose images with a low signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, the hybrid method directly includes prior knowledge from image simulations into the existing statistics-based method for atom-counting, and accounts in this manner for possible discrepancies between actual and simulated experimental conditions. It is shown by means of simulations and experiments that this hybrid method outperforms the statistics-based method, especially for low electron doses and small nanoparticles. The analysis of a simulated low dose image of a small nanoparticle suggests that this method allows for far more reliable quantitative analysis of beam-sensitive materials. - Highlights: • A hybrid method for atom-counting from ADF STEM images is introduced. • Image simulations are incorporated into a statistical framework in a reliable manner. • Limits of the existing methods for atom-counting are far exceeded. • Reliable counting results from an experimental low dose image are obtained. • Progress towards reliable quantitative analysis of beam-sensitive materials is made.

  17. Hybrid Compton camera/coded aperture imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, Lucian [Livermore, CA; Vetter, Kai M [Alameda, CA

    2012-04-10

    A system in one embodiment includes an array of radiation detectors; and an array of imagers positioned behind the array of detectors relative to an expected trajectory of incoming radiation. A method in another embodiment includes detecting incoming radiation with an array of radiation detectors; detecting the incoming radiation with an array of imagers positioned behind the array of detectors relative to a trajectory of the incoming radiation; and performing at least one of Compton imaging using at least the imagers and coded aperture imaging using at least the imagers. A method in yet another embodiment includes detecting incoming radiation with an array of imagers positioned behind an array of detectors relative to a trajectory of the incoming radiation; and performing Compton imaging using at least the imagers.

  18. Medical image of the week: empyema necessitans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tey KR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A previously healthy 46-year-woman was evaluated for two week history of right shoulder pain, associated pleuritic chest pain and dyspnea. Chest radiograph showed right apical mass (Figure 1A. Imaging showed loculated fluid collection with extension into the soft tissues of the adjacent right chest wall suggestive of empyema necessitans (Figure 1B. Chest Tube placement was done along with broad spectrum antibiotics. Blood and pleural fluid cultures showed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Due to persistence of loculation despite antibiotics, she underwent a video-assisted-thoracoscopic surgery (VATS for decortication and further drainage of the effusion. Symptoms and radiologic findings improved and she was discharged with intravenous antibiotics to complete a six week course. Chest imaging at six week period showed complete resolution (Figure 2. Empyema necessitans, defined by the extension of an empyema through the parietal pleura, into surrounding tissue is becoming rare with the routine drainage of empyema and antibiotics use. Common ...

  19. A similarity-based data warehousing environment for medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Jefferson William; Annibal, Luana Peixoto; Felipe, Joaquim Cezar; Ciferri, Ricardo Rodrigues; Ciferri, Cristina Dutra de Aguiar

    2015-11-01

    A core issue of the decision-making process in the medical field is to support the execution of analytical (OLAP) similarity queries over images in data warehousing environments. In this paper, we focus on this issue. We propose imageDWE, a non-conventional data warehousing environment that enables the storage of intrinsic features taken from medical images in a data warehouse and supports OLAP similarity queries over them. To comply with this goal, we introduce the concept of perceptual layer, which is an abstraction used to represent an image dataset according to a given feature descriptor in order to enable similarity search. Based on this concept, we propose the imageDW, an extended data warehouse with dimension tables specifically designed to support one or more perceptual layers. We also detail how to build an imageDW and how to load image data into it. Furthermore, we show how to process OLAP similarity queries composed of a conventional predicate and a similarity search predicate that encompasses the specification of one or more perceptual layers. Moreover, we introduce an index technique to improve the OLAP query processing over images. We carried out performance tests over a data warehouse environment that consolidated medical images from exams of several modalities. The results demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of our proposed imageDWE to manage images and to process OLAP similarity queries. The results also demonstrated that the use of the proposed index technique guaranteed a great improvement in query processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Integrating medical imaging analyses through a high-throughput bundled resource imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, Kelsie; Welch, E. Brian; Jeong, Ha-Kyu; Landman, Bennett A.

    2011-03-01

    Exploitation of advanced, PACS-centric image analysis and interpretation pipelines provides well-developed storage, retrieval, and archival capabilities along with state-of-the-art data providence, visualization, and clinical collaboration technologies. However, pursuit of integrated medical imaging analysis through a PACS environment can be limiting in terms of the overhead required to validate, evaluate and integrate emerging research technologies. Herein, we address this challenge through presentation of a high-throughput bundled resource imaging system (HUBRIS) as an extension to the Philips Research Imaging Development Environment (PRIDE). HUBRIS enables PACS-connected medical imaging equipment to invoke tools provided by the Java Imaging Science Toolkit (JIST) so that a medical imaging platform (e.g., a magnetic resonance imaging scanner) can pass images and parameters to a server, which communicates with a grid computing facility to invoke the selected algorithms. Generated images are passed back to the server and subsequently to the imaging platform from which the images can be sent to a PACS. JIST makes use of an open application program interface layer so that research technologies can be implemented in any language capable of communicating through a system shell environment (e.g., Matlab, Java, C/C++, Perl, LISP, etc.). As demonstrated in this proof-of-concept approach, HUBRIS enables evaluation and analysis of emerging technologies within well-developed PACS systems with minimal adaptation of research software, which simplifies evaluation of new technologies in clinical research and provides a more convenient use of PACS technology by imaging scientists.

  1. Nonlinear spatial mode imaging of hybrid photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sidsel Rübner; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Laurila, Marko

    2013-01-01

    Degenerate spontaneous four wave mixing is studied for the rst time in a large mode area hybrid photonic crystal ber, where light con nement is achieved by combined index- and bandgap guiding. Four wave mixing products are generated on the edges of the bandgaps, which is veri ed by numerical...

  2. A Hybrid Soft-computing Method for Image Analysis of Digital Plantar Scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Razjouyan, Javad; Khayat, Omid; Siahi, Mehdi; Mansouri, Ali Alizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Digital foot scanners have been developed in recent years to yield anthropometrists digital image of insole with pressure distribution and anthropometric information. In this paper, a hybrid algorithm containing gray level spatial correlation (GLSC) histogram and Shanbag entropy is presented for analysis of scanned foot images. An evolutionary algorithm is also employed to find the optimum parameters of GLSC and transform function of the membership values. Resulting binary images as the thres...

  3. Flexible medical image management using service-oriented architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaham, Oded; Melament, Alex; Barak-Corren, Yuval; Kostirev, Igor; Shmueli, Noam; Peres, Yardena

    2012-01-01

    Management of medical images increasingly involves the need for integration with a variety of information systems. To address this need, we developed Content Management Offering (CMO), a platform for medical image management supporting interoperability through compliance with standards. CMO is based on the principles of service-oriented architecture, implemented with emphasis on three areas: clarity of business process definition, consolidation of service configuration management, and system scalability. Owing to the flexibility of this platform, a small team is able to accommodate requirements of customers varying in scale and in business needs. We describe two deployments of CMO, highlighting the platform's value to customers. CMO represents a flexible approach to medical image management, which can be applied to a variety of information technology challenges in healthcare and life sciences organizations.

  4. Oral antioxidants for radioprotection during medical imaging examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velauthapillai, Nivethan

    The oncogenic effect of ionizing radiation (IR) is clearly established and occurs in response to DNA damage. Many diagnostic imaging exams make use of IR and the oncogenic risk of IR-based imaging has been calculated. We hypothesized that the DNA damage sustained from IR exposure during medical imaging exams could be reduced by pre-medicating patients with antioxidants. First, we tested and validated a method for measuring DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. Afterwards, we conducted a pilot clinical study in which we administered oral antioxidants to patients undergoing bone scans, prior to radiotracer injection. We showed that oral antioxidant pre-medication reduced the number of DSBs in PBMCs induced by radiotracer injection. Our study shows proof-of-principle for this simple and inexpensive approach to radioprotection in the clinical setting.

  5. Medical imaging at risk from European directive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keevil, Stephen

    2009-09-01

    The recent Forum article by Denis Le Bihan ("Threats to ultra-high-field MRI" August pp16-17) is a valuable addition to the ongoing debate about the impact on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the European Commission's Physical Agents (EMF) directive. When this directive was introduced in 2004, exposure limits for static magnetic fields were excluded, because it was known that guidance published by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) in 1994 was being revised. It is likely that the new ICNIRP guidelines, to which Le Bihan refers, will now be incorporated into the directive. If so, this could indeed impact on ultra-highfield MRI, in which Europe has a worldleading position.

  6. Medical image of the week: azygous lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupinder Natt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 59 year old man underwent chest radiography for evaluation of fever and cough. Imaging showed an accessory azygous lobe. An azygos lobe is found in 1% of anatomic specimens and forms when the right posterior cardinal vein, one of the precursors of the azygos vein, fails to migrate over the apex of the lung (1. Instead, the vein penetrates the lung carrying along pleural layers that entrap a portion of the right upper lobe. The vein appears to run within the lung, but is actually surrounded by both parietal and visceral pleura. The azygos fissure therefore consists of four layers of pleura, two parietal layers and two visceral layers, which wrap around the vein giving the appearance of a tadpole. Apart from an interesting incidental radiological finding, it is of limited clinical importance except that its presence should be recognized during thoracoscopic procedures. This patient was found to have …

  7. Ultrasonography Fused with PET-CT Hybrid Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Ewertsen, Caroline; Gran, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    We present a method with fusion of images of three modalities 18F-FDG PET, CT, and 3-D ultrasound (US) applied to imaging of the anal canal and the rectum. To obtain comparable geometries in the three imaging modalities, a plexiglas rod, with the same dimensions as the US transducer, is placed in...

  8. Secure public cloud platform for medical images sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wei; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Bouslimi, Dalel; Prigent, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing promises medical imaging services offering large storage and computing capabilities for limited costs. In this data outsourcing framework, one of the greatest issues to deal with is data security. To do so, we propose to secure a public cloud platform devoted to medical image sharing by defining and deploying a security policy so as to control various security mechanisms. This policy stands on a risk assessment we conducted so as to identify security objectives with a special interest for digital content protection. These objectives are addressed by means of different security mechanisms like access and usage control policy, partial-encryption and watermarking.

  9. A Total Information Management System For All Medical Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouimette, Donald; Nudelman, Sol; Ramsby, Gale; Spackman, Thomas

    1985-09-01

    A PACS has been designed for the University of Connecticut Health Center to serve all departments acquiring images for diagnosis, surgery and therapy. It incorporates a multiple community communications architecture to provide complete information management for medical images, medical data and departmental administrative matter. The system is modular and expandable. It permits an initial installation for radiology and subsequent expansion to include other departments at the Health Center, beginning with internal medicine, surgery, ophthalmology and dentistry. The design permits sufficient expansion to offer the potential for accepting the additional burden of a hospital information system. Primary parameters that led to this system design were based on the anticipation that departments in time could achieve generating 60 to 90% of their images suited to insertion in a PACS, that a high network throughput for large block image transfers would be essen-tial and that total system reliability was fundamental to success.

  10. Transmission and storage of medical images with patient information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya U, Rajendra; Subbanna Bhat, P; Kumar, Sathish; Min, Lim Choo

    2003-07-01

    Digital watermarking is a technique of hiding specific identification data for copyright authentication. This technique is adapted here for interleaving patient information with medical images, to reduce storage and transmission overheads. The text data is encrypted before interleaving with images to ensure greater security. The graphical signals are interleaved with the image. Two types of error control-coding techniques are proposed to enhance reliability of transmission and storage of medical images interleaved with patient information. Transmission and storage scenarios are simulated with and without error control coding and a qualitative as well as quantitative interpretation of the reliability enhancement resulting from the use of various commonly used error control codes such as repetitive, and (7,4) Hamming code is provided.

  11. Enhancement of Satellite Image Compression Using a Hybrid (DWT-DCT) Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihab, Halah Saadoon; Shafie, Suhaidi; Ramli, Abdul Rahman; Ahmad, Fauzan

    2017-12-01

    Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) and Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) image compression techniques have been utilized in most of the earth observation satellites launched during the last few decades. However, these techniques have some issues that should be addressed. The DWT method has proven to be more efficient than DCT for several reasons. Nevertheless, the DCT can be exploited to improve the high-resolution satellite image compression when combined with the DWT technique. Hence, a proposed hybrid (DWT-DCT) method was developed and implemented in the current work, simulating an image compression system on-board on a small remote sensing satellite, with the aim of achieving a higher compression ratio to decrease the onboard data storage and the downlink bandwidth, while avoiding further complex levels of DWT. This method also succeeded in maintaining the reconstructed satellite image quality through replacing the standard forward DWT thresholding and quantization processes with an alternative process that employed the zero-padding technique, which also helped to reduce the processing time of DWT compression. The DCT, DWT and the proposed hybrid methods were implemented individually, for comparison, on three LANDSAT 8 images, using the MATLAB software package. A comparison was also made between the proposed method and three other previously published hybrid methods. The evaluation of all the objective and subjective results indicated the feasibility of using the proposed hybrid (DWT-DCT) method to enhance the image compression process on-board satellites.

  12. Medical image of the week: lung entrapment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natt B

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 74-year-old woman with a history of breast cancer 10 years ago treated with lumpectomy and radiation presented for evaluation of shortness of breath. She was diagnosed with left sided pleural effusion which was recurrent requiring multiple thoracenteses. There was increased pleural fludeoxyglucose (FDG uptake on PET-CT indicative of recurrent metastatic disease. She underwent a medical pleuroscopy since the pleural effusion analysis did not reveal malignant cells although the suspicion was high and tunneled pleural catheter placement as adjuvant chemotherapy was initiated. Figure 1 shows a pleurscopic view of the collapsed left lung and the effusion in the left hemi thorax. Figure 2 shows extensive involvement of the visceral pleura with metastatic disease preventing complete lung inflation. Figure 3 shows persistent pneumothorax-ex-vacuo despite pleural catheter placement confirming the diagnosis of entrapment. Incomplete lung inflation can be due to pleural disease, endobronchial lesions or chronic telecasts. Lung entrapment and trapped lung ...

  13. Medical image of the week: arachnoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erisman M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 40 year-old woman with adult attention deficit hyperactive and bipolar 1 disorder presents with an altered mental status. Per her family, she had been non-verbal, with reduced oral intake, confusion and sedated for the past three days. Per her husband, she had episodes of diarrhea and abdominal discomfort. She was on multiple medications including ramelteon 8mg nightly, atomoxetine 40mg daily, hydroxyzine 25mg twice daily, bupropion 75mg twice daily and risperidone 2mg daily with recent addition of lithium ER 1200mg/daily started one month prior to presentation with unknown adherence. Upon arrival, vital signs were within normal limits. Physical exam revealed an overweight Caucasian woman with a significant coarse tremor visible at rest, restlessness and diaphoresis. Neurological examination was limited by patient hesitancy, however, it did not demonstrate focal deficits except for altered consciousness with Glasgow Coma Scale of 10. Notable laboratory findings were Na+ 134 mEq/L, K+ 3.2 mEq/L, and ...

  14. Medical image of the week: panloubular emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathur A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 60 year old female, non-smoker with a past medical history of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps presented with an eight year history of productive cough and dyspnea. Previous treatment with inhaled corticosteroids, courses of systemic corticosteroids and antibiotics provided modest improvement in her symptoms. Pulmonary function testing revealed a severe obstructive ventilatory defect without significant bronchodilator response and reduced diffusing capacity (DLCO. Chest x-ray surprisingly revealed lower lobe predominant emphysematous changes (Figure 1. Alpha-1-antitrypsin level was within normal range at 137 mg/dL. Panlobular emphysema represents permanent destruction of the entire acinus distal to the respiratory bronchioles and is more likely to affect the lower lobes compared to centrilobular emphysema (1. Panlobular emphysema is associated with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, intravenous drug abuse specifically with methylphenidate and methadone, Swyer-James syndrome, and obliterative bronchiolitis. Whether this pattern is seen as part of normal senescence in non-smoking individuals remains controversial (2. Panlobular emphysema may ...

  15. Medical image of the week: hypertensive emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raschke RA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 39-year-old man had sudden onset of left sided hemiparesis, headache and nausea. He had a history of untreated hypertension and diabetes mellitus. On initial evaluation by emergency medical services, his blood pressure was 270/170 mm Hg. Shortly after admission, he suffered a generalized seizure treated with levetiracetam. His labs were remarkable for a creatinine of 4.4 mg/dL and microscopic hematuria. His head CT findings are consistent with two simultaneous neurological hypertensive emergencies – intracranial hemorrhage of the basal ganglia and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES (Figure 1 (1. PRES is areas of edema seen as multiple cortico-subcortical areas of hyperintense (white signal involving the occipital and parietal lobes bilaterally and pons. His renal failure likely represents a third hypertensive emergency. His blood pressure was lowered into the 140/90 range within 2 hours by nicardipine infusion and intravenous labetalol boluses. He subsequently suffered worsening mental status and unilateral pupillary dilation and …

  16. Medical image of the week: phytobezoar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansra A

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 10-year-old boy with a history of non-verbal autism presented to the hospital with symptoms of chronic malnourishment. He was recently started on a specific carbohydrate rich diet, as outlined by a popular mainstream nutrition book, with hopes of improvement in adverse behavior. Prior to the start of this new diet, he consistently demonstrated an increased craving for food and was described to have an insatiable appetite. Though he was relatively non-verbal at baseline, he intermittently voiced his hunger and associated abdominal pain. A supine abdominal radiograph obtained immediately after admission showed a moderate gastric distension with a significant stool burden. Follow-up radiographs of the abdomen were obtained after two days of medical attempts to clear out the gastrointestinal system. The supine frontal radiograph at this time showed a massively distended stomach with a mottled appearance and considerable mass effect on the transverse colon (Figure 1. The interpreting pediatric radiologist ...

  17. Medical image of the week: splenic infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey DJ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 52-year-old Hispanic woman with a past medical history significant for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, hypertension, and rheumatoid arthritis presented with left upper quadrant pain for one day. Her review of systems was positive for bloating, severe epigastric and left upper quadrant tenderness that radiated to the back and left shoulder, nausea with non-bilious emesis, and diarrhea for one day prior to admission. Physical exam only revealed epigastric and left upper quadrant tenderness to light palpation without rebound or guarding. Abdominal computed tomography of the abdomen demonstrated a new acute or subacute splenic infarct with no clear evidence of an embolic source in the abdomen or pelvis (Figure 1. Echocardiogram with bubble study and contrast did not demonstrate valve abnormalities, cardiac mass, vegetation, valve or wall motion abnormalities and no evidence of patent foramen ovale. Splenic infarction should be suspected when patients present with sharp, acute left upper quadrant pain ...

  18. Medical image of the week: asbestosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strawter C

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 76-year-old man with a past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and an unspecified industrial-related asbestos exposure presented to the hospital after a syncopal episode and a ground level fall. A computed tomography (CT of the chest was performed on admission which revealed several abnormalities including multiple bilateral calcified pleural plaques, pleural thickening, peripheral groundglass opacities (GGO in the nondependent portion of the lungs and subpleural reticular and band like opacities. The patient unfortunately developed alcohol withdrawal and aspiration pneumonia requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation and was unable to provide additional details regarding his lung disease. Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral that historically was praised for its versatility. Its properties including heat and electrical resistance, tensile strength, and insulating capabilities made it a common component in materials used in both commercial and domestic settings. Exposure to asbestos is linked to numerous respiratory diseases, including pleural and parenchymal disease, both ...

  19. Medical image of the week: septic emboli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malakkla N

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 46-year-old man was admitted with altered mental status. His past medical history included HIV/AIDS on HAART therapy, hepatitis B and C, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, deep venous thrombosis with insertion of an inferior vena caval filter, and poly-substance abuse. Vitals revealed fever and tachycardia. On exam, he was lethargic and confused, and had bilateral crackles on lung auscultation. Computerized axial tomography (CT of the head was unremarkable and chest X-ray revealed patchy nodular infiltrates in the right upper lobe and bilateral lower lobes. Work up for an infectious cause was initiated including opportunistic infections and he was started on empiric antibiotics for pneumonia. On Day 2, his roommate who came to visit him, revealed that he was recently admitted in another hospital for headache and flu-like symptoms, and discharged with a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC in place as he was scheduled for a positron emission tomography (PET the next ...

  20. Medical image of the week: acute epiglottitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai C

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 24 year old man without a significant past medical history presented with a 3 day history of sore throat, fever and less than 24 hour history of pain with breathing and swallowing secretions. He was intubated using fiberoptic nasopharyngoscopy in the emergency department due to stridor with a 6.0 mm endotracheal tube until successfully extubated five days later. Initially he was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics and methylprednisolone 40 mg intravenously every 12 hours. A CT scan of the neck did not show an epiglottic abscess. Acute epiglottitis in adults appears to have a rising incidence with an associated mortality of 7% that is related to Haemophilus influenzae type b, as well as other miscellaneous pathogens, mechanical injury or smoke inhalation. Risk factors associated with obstruction are drooling, rapid onset of symptoms, evidence of abscess formation and a history of diabetes mellitus. Epiglottic abscess is infrequent sequelae of acute …

  1. Medical image of the week: stomach rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raschke RA

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 61-year-old man was transferred from another hospital for further care. He had a history of oxygen-dependent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in addition to congestive heart failure, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. He had been seen earlier in the day at his primary care physician’s office for a routine visit. Although he was asymptomatic, emergency medical services (EMS were called because of significant hypoxemia detected by pulse oximetry. EMS noted that the patient said he “feels OK”. However, a decision was made to intubate the patient. Multiple failed intubation attempts failed and he suffered a cardiopulmonary arrest. He was successfully resuscitated and underwent a cricotracheotomy with an uncuffed endotracheal tube. When transferred his mouth was taped shut and his nose clamped. His abdomen was markedly distended and tympanic (Figure 1. A supine chest x-ray showed air under the diaphragm. Abdominal exploration showed a ruptured stomach which was repaired. He made an …

  2. Medical image of the week: bronchopleural fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai H

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 58-year-old man with past medical history significant for chronic smoking and seizures was referred to the emergency room after a chest x-ray done by his primary care physician for evaluation of cough showed a hydropneumothorax. His symptoms included dry cough for past 2 months without fever, chills or other associated symptoms. He did not have any thoracic procedures performed and had no past history of recurrent infections. He was hemodynamically stable. Physical examination was only significant with decreased breath sounds on the right side of the chest. Thoracic CT with contrast was performed which showed complete collapse of the right lower lobe, near complete collapse of right middle lobe as well as an air-fluid level. There was a suspicion of a direct communication between bronchi and pleural space at the posterior lateral margin of the collapsed right lower lobe (Figure 1. The presence of bronchopleural fistula (BPF was confirmed ...

  3. Establishing advanced practice for medical imaging in New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yielder, Jill, E-mail: j.yielder@auckland.ac.nz [University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Young, Adrienne; Park, Shelley; Coleman, Karen [University of Otago, Wellington (New Zealand); University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This article presents the outcome and recommendations following the second stage of a role development project conducted on behalf of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT). The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that may be used to formulate Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession. It commenced in 2011, following on from initial research that occurred between 2005 and 2008 investigating role development and a possible career structure for medical radiation technologists (MRTs) in New Zealand (NZ). Methods: The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that could be used to develop Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession through inviting 12 specialist medical imaging groups in NZ to participate in a survey. Results: Findings showed strong agreement on potential profiles and on generic criteria within them; however, there was less agreement on specific skills criteria within specialist areas. Conclusions: The authors recommend that one Advanced Scope of Practice be developed for Medical Imaging, with the establishment of generic and specialist criteria. Systems for approval of the overall criteria package for any individual Advanced Practitioner (AP) profile, audit and continuing professional development requirements need to be established by the Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB) to meet the local needs of clinical departments. It is further recommended that the NZIMRT and MRTB promote and support the need for an AP pathway for medical imaging in NZ.

  4. Techniques and software architectures for medical visualisation and image processing

    OpenAIRE

    Botha, C.P.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents a flexible software platform for medical visualisation and image processing, a technique for the segmentation of the shoulder skeleton from CT data and three techniques that make contributions to the field of direct volume rendering. Our primary goal was to investigate the use of visualisation techniques to assist the shoulder replacement process. This motivated the need for a flexible environment within which to test and develop new visualisation and also image processin...

  5. Novel compact photoacoustic imaging system to explore the applications in the medical imaging field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irisawa, Kaku; Wada, Takatsugu; Hayakawa, Toshiro; Ishihara, Miya

    2017-04-01

    PhotoAcoustic (PA) imaging is a promising imaging method using the pulsed-laser light source and ultrasound detector. PA image shows the features of optical contrast in biological tissue with ultrasound-like depth and resolution. In the human body, Hemoglobin of the blood is strong optical absorber, so the high-contrast blood distribution (vascular) image is obtained by PA imaging. Recently, FUJIFILM has developed the PA imaging system to explore its application in medical imaging field. In this system, the fusion of PA and conventional ultrasound image is realized, for example, ultrasound Doppler image is superposed to the PA and B-mode image. The system features and some results of clinical studies will be introduced.

  6. VR interaction techniques for medical imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapichler, C; Haubner, M; Engelbrecht, R; Englmeier, K H

    1998-04-01

    Methods of virtual reality (VR) offer new ways of human-computer interaction. Medicine is predestined to benefit from this new technology in many ways. Virtual environments can support physicians in their work, alleviate communication between specialists from different fields or be established in educational and training applications. For the field of visualization and analysis of three-dimensional anatomical images (e.g. CT or MRI scans), an application is introduced which expedites recognition of spatial coherencies and the exploration and manipulation of the 3D data. To avoid long periods of learning and accustoming and to facilitate work in such an environment, a powerful human-oriented interface is required allowing interactions similar to the real world and utilization of our natural experiences. This paper shows the use of eye tracking parameters for a level-of-detail algorithm and the integration of a glove-based hand gesture recognition into the virtual environment as an essential component of the human-machine interface. Furthermore, virtual bronchoscopy and virtual angioscopy are presented as examples for the use of the virtual environment.

  7. Medical Imaging for Understanding Sleep Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kenneth

    2011-10-01

    Sleep is essential for the health of the nervous system. Lack of sleep has a profound negative effect on cognitive ability and task performance. During sustained military operations, soldiers often suffer from decreased quality and quantity of sleep, increasing their susceptibility to neurological problems and limiting their ability to perform the challenging mental tasks that their missions require. In the civilian sector, inadequate sleep and overt sleep pathology are becoming more common, with many detrimental impacts. There is a strong need for new, in vivo studies of human brains during sleep, particularly the initial descent from wakefulness. Our research team is investigating sleep using a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and electroencephalography (EEG). High resolution MRI combined with PET enables localization of biochemical processes (e.g., metabolism) to anatomical structures. MRI methods can also be used to examine functional connectivity among brain regions. Neural networks are dynamically reordered during different sleep stages, reflecting the disconnect with the waking world and the essential yet unconscious brain activity that occurs during sleep.[4pt] In collaboration with Linda Larson-Prior, Washington University; Alpay Ozcan, Virginia Tech; Seong Mun, Virginia Tech; and Zang-Hee Cho, Gachon University.

  8. Medical image of the week: Chilaiditi syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makkar P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. X-ray evidence of air under right hemi-diaphragm in proper clinical context is almost a definitive sign of gastrointestinal tract perforation except in an extremely rare clinical entity called "Chilaiditi Syndrome". We present this unique image and clinical scenario to expand on physician`s knowledge to identify this rare clinical syndrome and to help distinguish it from a dreaded condition like gastrointestinal perforation. An 81-year-old man with multiple co-morbidities was admitted to the intensive care unit with a diagnosis of acute hypoxic respiratory failure. An X-ray of the chest showed a lucency under the right hemi-diaphragm interposed between the liver and diaphragm (Figure 1. Due to radiological concern of gastrointestinal perforation, an emergent CT scan was performed to rule out perforation. CT scan revealed gas filled distended hepatic flexure interposed between the elevated right hemi-diaphragm and the liver (Figure 2. The patient had no gastro-intestinal tract symptoms and no pathological signs were ...

  9. Medical image of the week: Zenker's diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stockdall C

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 71-year-old man with history of recurrent aspiration pneumonia and previous esophageal surgery presented to the Emergency Department with acute hypoxia and leukocytosis. Imaging, above, showed a consolidation in the RUL and on lateral view an air fluid level. This was suspicious for infection or malignancy. For the ongoing concern for possible esophageal pathology given previous surgery, GI was consulted and upper endoscopy performed. He was found to have an esophageal dilation at repair site of a previous Zenker’s diverticulum filled with food. Zenker’s Diverticulum is a defect in the muscular wall of the hypopharynx in an area known as Killian's triangle. This condition is male predominant mainly occurring in the 3rd to 4th decade and/or the 7th to 8th decade of life. The out pouching created will accumulate food and eventually lead to high incidences of aspiration pneumonia. Treatment is usually surgical in nature and can cause vocal cord …

  10. Medical image of the week: Pott's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thao C

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 22 year-old man with a history of asthma presented with a two-month history of progressive right upper extremity weakness with back pain, weight loss, and night sweats. CT scan of the chest revealed mass-like infiltrative mass in the right lung apex with mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy (Figure 1. An MRI cervical spine showed a large infiltrating process at the right medial lung apex with vertebral body compression (Figure 2. A CT-guided lung biopsy was performed and it showed necrotizing granulomatous inflammation (Figure 3. Pott’s disease was diagnosed and the patient started on anti-tuberculous treatment with a good recovery. Pott’s disease is a common cause of spinal infection and its clinical presentations are nonspecific. Early findings on imaging may reveal loss of vertebral body height, bone sequestration, sclerosis, and paraspinal mass with calcification (1. A diagnosis of this condition must be made early as prompt treatment may reduce significant morbidity ...

  11. Natural user interfaces in medical image analysis cognitive analysis of brain and carotid artery images

    CERN Document Server

    Ogiela, Marek R

    2014-01-01

    This unique text/reference highlights a selection of practical applications of advanced image analysis methods for medical images. The book covers the complete methodology for processing, analysing and interpreting diagnostic results of sample CT images. The text also presents significant problems related to new approaches and paradigms in image understanding and semantic image analysis. To further engage the reader, example source code is provided for the implemented algorithms in the described solutions. Features: describes the most important methods and algorithms used for image analysis; e

  12. Teaching the physics of medical imaging: an active learning approach involving imaging of biological tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Lonsdale, Markus Nowak

    2008-01-01

    Introduction to medical imaging is an experimentally oriented course in the physics of medical imaging, where the students record, process and analyse 3D data of an unknown piece of formalin fixed animal tissue embedded in agar in order to estimate the tissue types present. Planar X-ray, CT, MRI......, ultrasound and SPECT/PET images are recorded, showing the tissue in very different ways. In order for the students to estimate the tissue type, they need to study the physical principles of the imaging modalities. The “true” answer is subsequently revealed by slicing the tissue....

  13. Fluorescence Image Analyzer - FLIMA: software for quantitative analysis of fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, H C M; Martins-Júnior, M M C; Ribeiro, L B; Matoso, D A

    2017-03-30

    The Fluorescence Image Analyzer (FLIMA) software was developed for the quantitative analysis of images generated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Currently, the images of FISH are examined without a coefficient that enables a comparison between them. Through GD Graphics Library, the FLIMA software calculates the amount of pixels on image and recognizes each present color. The coefficient generated by the algorithm shows the percentage of marks (probes) hybridized on the chromosomes. This software can be used for any type of image generated by a fluorescence microscope and is able to quantify digoxigenin probes exhibiting a red color, biotin probes exhibiting a green color, and double-FISH probes (digoxigenin and biotin used together), where the white color is displayed.

  14. Adapting smartphones for low-cost optical medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Vollet-Filho, José D.; Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Blanco, Kate; Inada, Natalia M.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Optical images have been used in several medical situations to improve diagnosis of lesions or to monitor treatments. However, most systems employ expensive scientific (CCD or CMOS) cameras and need computers to display and save the images, usually resulting in a high final cost for the system. Additionally, this sort of apparatus operation usually becomes more complex, requiring more and more specialized technical knowledge from the operator. Currently, the number of people using smartphone-like devices with built-in high quality cameras is increasing, which might allow using such devices as an efficient, lower cost, portable imaging system for medical applications. Thus, we aim to develop methods of adaptation of those devices to optical medical imaging techniques, such as fluorescence. Particularly, smartphones covers were adapted to connect a smartphone-like device to widefield fluorescence imaging systems. These systems were used to detect lesions in different tissues, such as cervix and mouth/throat mucosa, and to monitor ALA-induced protoporphyrin-IX formation for photodynamic treatment of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia. This approach may contribute significantly to low-cost, portable and simple clinical optical imaging collection.

  15. A protocol-based evaluation of medical image digitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathopoulos, E P; Costaridou, L; Kocsis, O; Panayiotakis, G

    2001-09-01

    Medical film digitizers play an important transitory role as digital-to-analogue bridges in radiology. Their use requires performance evaluation to assure medical image quality. A complete quality control protocol is presented, based on a set of test objects adaptable to the specification of various digitizers. The protocol includes parameters such as uniformity, input-output response, noise, geometric distortion, spatial resolution, low contrast discrimination, film slippage and light leakage, as well as associated measurement methods. The applicability of the protocol is demonstrated with two types of medical film digitizers; a charge-coupled device (CCD) digitizer and a laser digitizer. The potential value of the protocol is also discussed.

  16. Log analysis to understand medical professionals' image searching behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikrika, Theodora; Müller, Henning; Kahn, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the analysis of the query logs of a visual medical information retrieval system that provides access to radiology resources. Our analysis shows that, despite sharing similarities with general Web search and also with biomedical text search, query formulation and query modification when searching for visual biomedical information have unique characteristics that need to be taken into account in order to enhance the effectiveness of the search support offered by such systems. Typical information needs of medical professionals searching radiology resources are also identified with the goal to create realistic search tasks for a medical image retrieval evaluation benchmark.

  17. Hybrid material as contrast agent in magnetic resonance images

    OpenAIRE

    Botella Asunción, Pablo; Cabrera García, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a contrast agent of magnetic resonance based on a hybrid material formed by an organo-metallic core derived from Prussian blue and a silica cover, and optionally, molecules of a poly(ethylene glycol), a fluorescent agent, a radio nucleus and/or a substance that directs to specific receptors, cells or tissues, joined by covalent bonding to the surface of the inorganic cover.

  18. Plane-Wave Imaging Challenge in Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebgott, Herve; Molares, Alfonso Rodriguez; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-01-01

    Plane-Wave imaging enables very high frame rates, up to several thousand frames per second. Unfortunately the lack of transmit focusing leads to reduced image quality, both in terms of resolution and contrast. Recently, numerous beamforming techniques have been proposed to compensate...... for this effect, but comparing the different methods is difficult due to the lack of appropriate tools. PICMUS, the Plane-Wave Imaging Challenge in Medical Ultrasound aims to provide these tools. This paper describes the PICMUS challenge, its motivation, implementation, and metrics....

  19. An active learning approach to the physics of medical imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, J.E.; Pihl, M.J.; Jensen, M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an experimentally oriented medical imaging course where the students record, process and analyse 3D data of an unknown piece of formalin fixed porcine tissue hidden in agar in order to estimate the tissue types present in a selected 2D slice. The recorded planar X-ray, CT, MRI......, ultrasound and SPECT images show the tissue in very different ways. The students can only estimate the tissue type by studying the physical principles of the imaging modalities. The true answer is later revealed by anatomical photographs obtained from physical slicing. The paper describes the phantoms...

  20. Significant Radiation Dose Reduction in the Hybrid Operating Room Using a Novel X-ray Imaging Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Haak, R F F; Hamans, B C; Zuurmond, K; Verhoeven, B A N; Koning, O H J

    2015-10-01

    To prospectively quantify radiation dose change in aortoiliac endovascular procedures in the hybrid operating room (OR) for patients and medical staff with a novel X-ray imaging technology (ClarityIQ technology), and to assess whether procedure or fluoroscopy time or dose of iodinated contrast was affected. A prospective study including 138 patients was performed to compare radiation dose before and after installation of a novel X-ray imaging technology. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) was performed in 37 patients and an endovascular procedure for aortoiliac occlusive disease (AIOD) in 101. Patient radiation dose in air kerma (AK) and dose area product (DAP), patient demographics, and procedural data were recorded. Staff radiation dose was measured with real time personal dosimetry measurements. In both the EVAR and AIOD groups the reference system, ALX (AlluraXper FD20; Philips Healthcare, Best, the Netherlands), was compared with the upgraded X-ray system, CIQ (AlluraClarity FD20; Philips Healthcare). Procedure time, fluoroscopy time, and iodinated contrast dose were recorded. Patient radiation dose reduction in the EVAR group, in median AK, was 56% (ALX = 1,262.5 mGy; CIQ = 556.0 mGy [p X-ray imaging technology in the hybrid OR suite resulted in a significant reduction of patient and staff radiation dose without affecting procedure length, fluoroscopy time, or use of contrast. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Multimodal Medical Image Fusion by Adaptive Manifold Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Geng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical image fusion plays an important role in diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as image-guided radiotherapy and surgery. The modified local contrast information is proposed to fuse multimodal medical images. Firstly, the adaptive manifold filter is introduced into filtering source images as the low-frequency part in the modified local contrast. Secondly, the modified spatial frequency of the source images is adopted as the high-frequency part in the modified local contrast. Finally, the pixel with larger modified local contrast is selected into the fused image. The presented scheme outperforms the guided filter method in spatial domain, the dual-tree complex wavelet transform-based method, nonsubsampled contourlet transform-based method, and four classic fusion methods in terms of visual quality. Furthermore, the mutual information values by the presented method are averagely 55%, 41%, and 62% higher than the three methods and those values of edge based similarity measure by the presented method are averagely 13%, 33%, and 14% higher than the three methods for the six pairs of source images.

  2. Science means business: medical imaging shows colour of money

    CERN Multimedia

    Macfie, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Doctors have used x-ray machines for 100 years, but they remain an imprecise and limited diagnostic tool. But a team of Canterbury University researchers is aiming to revolutionise medical x-ray technology with high-precision colour imaging. (1,5 page)

  3. An active learning approach to the physics of medical imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Lonsdale, Markus Nowak

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an experimentally oriented medical imaging course where the students record, process and analyse 3D data of an unknown piece of formalin fixed porcine tissue hidden in agar in order to estimate the tissue types present in a selected 2D slice. The recorded planar X-ray, CT, MRI...

  4. Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamformation applied to medical imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Hansen, Jens Munk; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) is applied to medical ultrasound imaging using a multi element convex array transducer. The main motivation for SASB is to apply synthetic aperture techniques without the need for storing RF-data for a number of elements and hereby devise a system ...

  5. Techniques and software architectures for medical visualisation and image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botha, C.P.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents a flexible software platform for medical visualisation and image processing, a technique for the segmentation of the shoulder skeleton from CT data and three techniques that make contributions to the field of direct volume rendering. Our primary goal was to investigate the use

  6. Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention - MICCAI 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads; Sporring, Jon

    The two-volume set LNCS 4190 and LNCS 4191 constitute the refereed proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2006, held in Copenhagen, Denmark in October 2006. The program committee carefully selected 39 revised full papers...

  7. Collocation for diffeomorphic deformations in medical image registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Sune; Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru; Liptrot, Matthew George

    2018-01-01

    Diffeomorphic deformation is a popular choice in medical image registration. A fundamental property of diffeomorphisms is in vertibility, implying that once the relation between two points A to B is found, then the relation B to A is given per definition. Consistency is a measure of a numerical...

  8. Infection imaging in nuclear medicine | Vangu | Continuing Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 31, No 8 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Infection imaging in nuclear medicine. MW Vangu. Abstract.

  9. The Design and Implementation in $0.13\\mu m$ CMOS of an Algorithm Permitting Spectroscopic Imaging with High Spatial Resolution for Hybrid Pixel Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Ballabriga, Rafael; Campbell, Michael; Vilasís-Cardona, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Advances in pixel detector technology are opening up new possibilities in many fields of science. Modern High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments use pixel detectors in tracking systems where excellent spatial resolution, precise timing and high signal-to-noise ratio are required for accurate and clean track reconstruction. Many groups are working worldwide to adapt the hybrid pixel technology to other fields such as medical X-ray radiography, protein structure analysis or neutron imaging. The M...

  10. FUSION OF CRYPTOGRAPHIC WATERMARKING MEDICAL IMAGE SYSTEM WITH REVERSIBLE PROPERTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Viswanathan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Large amount of medical information of patients to be maintained in online, hence more uploading is needed, which may reflects the problem in amount of time and privacy of information. This can be solved by watermarking which provide privacy and cryptography provides security. The proposed algorithm provides a single system of cryptographic watermarking method. Initially the patient information is encrypted using the symmetric key and then while hiding, the key will be extracted to retain the quality of the medical image after copyright extraction. During authentication the embedded information is extracted and decrypted. Further, the decrypted information is compared with the patient information. Finally, the extracted key is used to recover the medical image.The algorithm gives high payload capacity, less computational complexity, privacy of the patient and good reversible quality.

  11. A machine learning methodology for medical imaging anonymization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Eriksson; Costa, Carlos; Oliveira, Jose Luis

    2015-08-01

    Privacy protection is a major requirement for the complete success of EHR systems, becoming even more critical in collaborative scenarios, where data is shared among institutions and practitioners. While textual data can be easily de-identified, patient data in medical images implies a more elaborate approach. In this work we present a solution for sensitive word identification in medical images based on a combination of two machine-learning models, achieving a F1-score of 0.94. Three experts evaluated the system performance. They analyzed the output of the present methodology and categorized the studies in three groups: studies that had their sensitive words removed (true positive), studies with complete patient identity (false negative) and studies with mistakenly removed data (false positive). The experts were unanimous regarding the relevance of the present tool in collaborative medical environments, as it may improve the exchange of anonymized patient data between institutions.

  12. Gadgetron: an open source framework for medical image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Michael Schacht; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2013-06-01

    This work presents a new open source framework for medical image reconstruction called the "Gadgetron." The framework implements a flexible system for creating streaming data processing pipelines where data pass through a series of modules or "Gadgets" from raw data to reconstructed images. The data processing pipeline is configured dynamically at run-time based on an extensible markup language configuration description. The framework promotes reuse and sharing of reconstruction modules and new Gadgets can be added to the Gadgetron framework through a plugin-like architecture without recompiling the basic framework infrastructure. Gadgets are typically implemented in C/C++, but the framework includes wrapper Gadgets that allow the user to implement new modules in the Python scripting language for rapid prototyping. In addition to the streaming framework infrastructure, the Gadgetron comes with a set of dedicated toolboxes in shared libraries for medical image reconstruction. This includes generic toolboxes for data-parallel (e.g., GPU-based) execution of compute-intensive components. The basic framework architecture is independent of medical imaging modality, but this article focuses on its application to Cartesian and non-Cartesian parallel magnetic resonance imaging. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Open-source software platform for medical image segmentation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namías, R.; D'Amato, J. P.; del Fresno, M.

    2017-11-01

    Segmenting 2D and 3D images is a crucial and challenging problem in medical image analysis. Although several image segmentation algorithms have been proposed for different applications, no universal method currently exists. Moreover, their use is usually limited when detection of complex and multiple adjacent objects of interest is needed. In addition, the continually increasing volumes of medical imaging scans require more efficient segmentation software design and highly usable applications. In this context, we present an extension of our previous segmentation framework which allows the combination of existing explicit deformable models in an efficient and transparent way, handling simultaneously different segmentation strategies and interacting with a graphic user interface (GUI). We present the object-oriented design and the general architecture which consist of two layers: the GUI at the top layer, and the processing core filters at the bottom layer. We apply the framework for segmenting different real-case medical image scenarios on public available datasets including bladder and prostate segmentation from 2D MRI, and heart segmentation in 3D CT. Our experiments on these concrete problems show that this framework facilitates complex and multi-object segmentation goals while providing a fast prototyping open-source segmentation tool.

  14. Mediaprocessors in medical imaging for high performance and flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managuli, Ravi; Kim, Yongmin

    2002-05-01

    New high performance programmable processors, called mediaprocessors, have been emerging since the early 1990s for various digital media applications, such as digital TV, set-top boxes, desktop video conferencing, and digital camcorders. Modern mediaprocessors, e.g., TI's TMS320C64x and Hitachi/Equator Technologies MAP-CA, can offer high performance utilizing both instruction-level and data-level parallelism. During this decade, with continued performance improvement and cost reduction, we believe that the mediaprocessors will become a preferred choice in designing imaging and video systems due to their flexibility in incorporating new algorithms and applications via programming and faster-time-to-market. In this paper, we will evaluate the suitability of these mediaprocessors in medical imaging. We will review the core routines of several medical imaging modalities, such as ultrasound and DR, and present how these routines can be mapped to mediaprocessors and their resultant performance. We will analyze the architecture of several leading mediaprocessors. By carefully mapping key imaging routines, such as 2D convolution, unsharp masking, and 2D FFT, to the mediaprocessor, we have been able to achieve comparable (if not better) performance to that of traditional hardwired approaches. Thus, we believe that future medical imaging systems will benefit greatly from these advanced mediaprocessors, offering significantly increased flexibility and adaptability, reducing the time-to-market, and improving the cost/performance ratio compared to the existing systems while meeting the high computing requirements.

  15. From medical imaging data to 3D printed anatomical models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thore M Bücking

    Full Text Available Anatomical models are important training and teaching tools in the clinical environment and are routinely used in medical imaging research. Advances in segmentation algorithms and increased availability of three-dimensional (3D printers have made it possible to create cost-efficient patient-specific models without expert knowledge. We introduce a general workflow that can be used to convert volumetric medical imaging data (as generated by Computer Tomography (CT to 3D printed physical models. This process is broken up into three steps: image segmentation, mesh refinement and 3D printing. To lower the barrier to entry and provide the best options when aiming to 3D print an anatomical model from medical images, we provide an overview of relevant free and open-source image segmentation tools as well as 3D printing technologies. We demonstrate the utility of this streamlined workflow by creating models of ribs, liver, and lung using a Fused Deposition Modelling 3D printer.

  16. Global Hybrid HRSC+OMEGA Image Mosaics of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, P. C.; Walter, S. H. G.; van Gasselt, S.; Dunke, A.; Dunker, T.; Gross, C.; Michael, G.; Wendt, L.; Audouard, J.; Ody, A.; Poulet, F.

    2014-04-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on the Mars Express (MEx) orbiter has acquired 3640 images (with 'preliminary level 4' processing as described in [1]) of the Martian surface since arriving in orbit in 2003, covering over 90% of the planet [2]. At resolutions that can reach 10 meters/pixel, these MEx/HRSC images [3-4] are constructed in a pushbroom manner from 9 different CCD line sensors, including a panchromatic nadir-looking (Pan) channel, 4 color channels (R, G, B, IR), and 4 other panchromatic channels for stereo imaging or photometric imaging. In [5], we discussed our approach towards automatically mosaicking hundreds of the MEx/HRSC Pan or RGB images together. Herein, we present our latest results using this approach (Fig. 1; PDF is zoomable). Currently, our best results consist of adding a high-pass-filtered version of the HRSC mosaic to a low-pass-filtered version of the MEx/OMEGA [6] global mosaic.

  17. Applications of terahertz (THz) technology to medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnone, Donald D.; Ciesla, Craig M.; Corchia, Alessandra; Egusa, S.; Pepper, Michael; Chamberlain, J. Martyn; Bezant, C.; Linfield, Edmund H.; Clothier, R.; Khammo, N.

    1999-09-01

    An imaging system has been developed based on pulses of Terahertz (THz) radiation generated and detected using all- optical effects accessed by irradiating semiconductors with ultrafast pulses of visible laser light. This technique, commonly referred to as T-Ray Imaging or THz Pulse Imaging (TPI), holds enormous promise for certain aspects of medical imaging. We have conducted an initial survey of possible medical applications of TPI and demonstrated that TPI images show good contrast between different animal tissue types. Moreover, the diagnostic power of TPI has been elicidated by the spectra available at each pixel in the image, which are markedly different for the different tissue types. This suggests that the spectral information inherent in TPI might be used to identify the type of soft and hard tissue at each pixel in an image and provide other diagnostic information not afforded by conventional imagin techniques. Preliminary TPI studies of pork skin show that 3D tomographic imaging of the skin surface and thickness is possible, and data from experiments on models of the human dermis are presented which demonstrate that different constituents of skin have different refractive indices. Lastly, we present the first THz image of human tissue, namely an extracted tooth. The time of flight of THz pulses through the tooth allows the thickness of the enamel to be determined, and is used to create an image showing the enamel and dentine regions. Absorption of THz pulses in the tooth allows the pulp cavity region to be identified. Initial evidence strongly suggests that TPI my be used to provide valuable diagnostic information pertaining to the enamel, dentine, and the pump cavity.

  18. From Roentgen to magnetic resonance imaging: the history of medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scatliff, James H; Morris, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging has advanced in remarkable ways since the discovery of x-rays 120 years ago. Today's radiologists can image the human body in intricate detail using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, ultrasound, and various other modalities. Such technology allows for improved screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease, but it also comes with risks. Many imaging modalities expose patients to ionizing radiation, which potentially increases their risk of developing cancer in the future, and imaging may also be associated with possible allergic reactions or risks related to the use of intravenous contrast agents. In addition, the financial costs of imaging are taxing our health care system, and incidental findings can trigger anxiety and further testing. This issue of the NCMJ addresses the pros and cons of medical imaging and discusses in detail the following uses of medical imaging: screening for breast cancer with mammography, screening for osteoporosis and monitoring of bone mineral density with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, screening for congenital hip dysplasia in infants with ultrasound, and evaluation of various heart conditions with cardiac imaging. Together, these articles show the challenges that must be met as we seek to harness the power of today's imaging technologies, as well as the potential benefits that can be achieved when these hurdles are overcome.

  19. Object-oriented design of medical imaging software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligier, Y; Ratib, O; Logean, M; Girard, C; Perrier, R; Scherrer, J R

    1994-01-01

    A special software package for interactive display and manipulation of medical images was developed at the University Hospital of Geneva, as part of a hospital wide Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS). This software package, called Osiris, was especially designed to be easily usable and adaptable to the needs of noncomputer-oriented physicians. The Osiris software has been developed to allow the visualization of medical images obtained from any imaging modality. It provides generic manipulation tools, processing tools, and analysis tools more specific to clinical applications. This software, based on an object-oriented paradigm, is portable and extensible. Osiris is available on two different operating systems: the Unix X-11/OSF-Motif based workstations, and the Macintosh family.

  20. A survey on deep learning in medical image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litjens, Geert; Kooi, Thijs; Bejnordi, Babak Ehteshami; Setio, Arnaud Arindra Adiyoso; Ciompi, Francesco; Ghafoorian, Mohsen; van der Laak, Jeroen A W M; van Ginneken, Bram; Sánchez, Clara I

    2017-12-01

    Deep learning algorithms, in particular convolutional networks, have rapidly become a methodology of choice for analyzing medical images. This paper reviews the major deep learning concepts pertinent to medical image analysis and summarizes over 300 contributions to the field, most of which appeared in the last year. We survey the use of deep learning for image classification, object detection, segmentation, registration, and other tasks. Concise overviews are provided of studies per application area: neuro, retinal, pulmonary, digital pathology, breast, cardiac, abdominal, musculoskeletal. We end with a summary of the current state-of-the-art, a critical discussion of open challenges and directions for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Towards integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into radiation therapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, Daniel H., E-mail: daniel.paulus@imp.uni-erlangen.de [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Thorwath, Daniela [Section for Biomedical Physics, University Hospital for Radiation Oncology, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Schmidt, Holger [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens-Foundation, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen 45141 (Germany); High Field and Hybrid MR-Imaging, University Hospital Essen, Essen 45147 (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Multimodality imaging has become an important adjunct of state-of-the-art radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning. Recently, simultaneous PET/MR hybrid imaging has become clinically available and may also contribute to target volume delineation and biological individualization in RT planning. For integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into RT treatment planning, compatible dedicated RT devices are required for accurate patient positioning. In this study, prototype RT positioning devices intended for PET/MR hybrid imaging are introduced and tested toward PET/MR compatibility and image quality. Methods: A prototype flat RT table overlay and two radiofrequency (RF) coil holders that each fix one flexible body matrix RF coil for RT head/neck imaging have been evaluated within this study. MR image quality with the RT head setup was compared to the actual PET/MR setup with a dedicated head RF coil. PET photon attenuation and CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of the hardware components has been quantitatively evaluated by phantom scans. Clinical application of the new RT setup in PET/MR imaging was evaluated in anin vivo study. Results: The RT table overlay and RF coil holders are fully PET/MR compatible. MR phantom and volunteer imaging with the RT head setup revealed high image quality, comparable to images acquired with the dedicated PET/MR head RF coil, albeit with 25% reduced SNR. Repositioning accuracy of the RF coil holders was below 1 mm. PET photon attenuation of the RT table overlay was calculated to be 3.8% and 13.8% for the RF coil holders. With CT-based AC of the devices, the underestimation error was reduced to 0.6% and 0.8%, respectively. Comparable results were found within the patient study. Conclusions: The newly designed RT devices for hybrid PET/MR imaging are PET and MR compatible. The mechanically rigid design and the reproducible positioning allow for straightforward CT-based AC. The systematic evaluation within this study provides the

  2. Towards integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into radiation therapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Daniel H; Thorwath, Daniela; Schmidt, Holger; Quick, Harald H

    2014-07-01

    Multimodality imaging has become an important adjunct of state-of-the-art radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning. Recently, simultaneous PET/MR hybrid imaging has become clinically available and may also contribute to target volume delineation and biological individualization in RT planning. For integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into RT treatment planning, compatible dedicated RT devices are required for accurate patient positioning. In this study, prototype RT positioning devices intended for PET/MR hybrid imaging are introduced and tested toward PET/MR compatibility and image quality. A prototype flat RT table overlay and two radiofrequency (RF) coil holders that each fix one flexible body matrix RF coil for RT head/neck imaging have been evaluated within this study. MR image quality with the RT head setup was compared to the actual PET/MR setup with a dedicated head RF coil. PET photon attenuation and CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of the hardware components has been quantitatively evaluated by phantom scans. Clinical application of the new RT setup in PET/MR imaging was evaluated in anin vivo study. The RT table overlay and RF coil holders are fully PET/MR compatible. MR phantom and volunteer imaging with the RT head setup revealed high image quality, comparable to images acquired with the dedicated PET/MR head RF coil, albeit with 25% reduced SNR. Repositioning accuracy of the RF coil holders was below 1 mm. PET photon attenuation of the RT table overlay was calculated to be 3.8% and 13.8% for the RF coil holders. With CT-based AC of the devices, the underestimation error was reduced to 0.6% and 0.8%, respectively. Comparable results were found within the patient study. The newly designed RT devices for hybrid PET/MR imaging are PET and MR compatible. The mechanically rigid design and the reproducible positioning allow for straightforward CT-based AC. The systematic evaluation within this study provides the technical basis for the clinical

  3. Medical Imaging Field of Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Identification of Specialties within the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if specialty areas are emerging in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profession due to advancements made in the medical sciences, imaging technology, and clinical applications used in MRI that would require new developments in education/training programs and national registry examinations. In this…

  4. Establishing an international reference image database for research and development in medical image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsch, A.D.; Prinz, M.; Schneider, S.; Sipilä, O; Spinnler, K.; Vallée, J-P; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I; Vogl, R.; Wittenberg, T.; Zahlmann, G.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The lack of comparability of evaluation results is one of the major obstacles of research and development in Medical Image Processing (MIP). The main reason for that is the usage of different image datasets with different quality, size and Gold standard. OBJECTIVES: Therefore, one of

  5. [Medical museology the exhibition: The history of Rome medical faculty through images and documents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serarcangeli, Carla

    2004-01-01

    The Museum and Library of History of Medicine celebrated the 700th anniversary of the foundation of the University of Rome "La Sapienza" with an exhibition of images and documents recalling the history of the medical faculty. Dissecting tools and surgical instruments testify to the long history of anatomical and surgical studies and to the great worth of the teachers at Rome University. Documents, archival papers, books and pictures document the historical inheritance of the Medical School in Rome.

  6. Development of a hybrid magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Victoria; Civale, John; Rivens, Ian; Collins, David J; Leach, Martin O; ter Haar, Gail R

    2014-01-01

    A system which allows magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound (US) image data to be acquired simultaneously has been developed. B-mode and Doppler US were performed inside the bore of a clinical 1.5 T MRI scanner using a clinical 1-4 MHz US transducer with an 8-metre cable. Susceptibility artefacts and RF noise were introduced into MR images by the US imaging system. RF noise was minimised by using aluminium foil to shield the transducer. A study of MR and B-mode US image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of transducer-phantom separation was performed using a gel phantom. This revealed that a 4 cm separation between the phantom surface and the transducer was sufficient to minimise the effect of the susceptibility artefact in MR images. MR-US imaging was demonstrated in vivo with the aid of a 2 mm VeroWhite 3D-printed spherical target placed over the thigh muscle of a rat. The target allowed single-point registration of MR and US images in the axial plane to be performed. The system was subsequently demonstrated as a tool for the targeting and visualisation of high intensity focused ultrasound exposure in the rat thigh muscle.

  7. Development of a Hybrid Magnetic Resonance and Ultrasound Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Sherwood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A system which allows magnetic resonance (MR and ultrasound (US image data to be acquired simultaneously has been developed. B-mode and Doppler US were performed inside the bore of a clinical 1.5 T MRI scanner using a clinical 1–4 MHz US transducer with an 8-metre cable. Susceptibility artefacts and RF noise were introduced into MR images by the US imaging system. RF noise was minimised by using aluminium foil to shield the transducer. A study of MR and B-mode US image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR as a function of transducer-phantom separation was performed using a gel phantom. This revealed that a 4 cm separation between the phantom surface and the transducer was sufficient to minimise the effect of the susceptibility artefact in MR images. MR-US imaging was demonstrated in vivo with the aid of a 2 mm VeroWhite 3D-printed spherical target placed over the thigh muscle of a rat. The target allowed single-point registration of MR and US images in the axial plane to be performed. The system was subsequently demonstrated as a tool for the targeting and visualisation of high intensity focused ultrasound exposure in the rat thigh muscle.

  8. Hybridizing Differential Evolution with a Genetic Algorithm for Color Image Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. V. Krishna

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a hybrid of differential evolution and genetic algorithms to solve the color image segmentation problem. Clustering based color image segmentation algorithms segment an image by clustering the features of color and texture, thereby obtaining accurate prototype cluster centers. In the proposed algorithm, the color features are obtained using the homogeneity model. A new texture feature named Power Law Descriptor (PLD which is a modification of Weber Local Descriptor (WLD is proposed and further used as a texture feature for clustering. Genetic algorithms are competent in handling binary variables, while differential evolution on the other hand is more efficient in handling real parameters. The obtained texture feature is binary in nature and the color feature is a real value, which suits very well the hybrid cluster center optimization problem in image segmentation. Thus in the proposed algorithm, the optimum texture feature centers are evolved using genetic algorithms, whereas the optimum color feature centers are evolved using differential evolution.

  9. Predicting Semantic Descriptions from Medical Images with Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegl, Thomas; Waldstein, Sebastian M; Vogl, Wolf-Dieter; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Langs, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Learning representative computational models from medical imaging data requires large training data sets. Often, voxel-level annotation is unfeasible for sufficient amounts of data. An alternative to manual annotation, is to use the enormous amount of knowledge encoded in imaging data and corresponding reports generated during clinical routine. Weakly supervised learning approaches can link volume-level labels to image content but suffer from the typical label distributions in medical imaging data where only a small part consists of clinically relevant abnormal structures. In this paper we propose to use a semantic representation of clinical reports as a learning target that is predicted from imaging data by a convolutional neural network. We demonstrate how we can learn accurate voxel-level classifiers based on weak volume-level semantic descriptions on a set of 157 optical coherence tomography (OCT) volumes. We specifically show how semantic information increases classification accuracy for intraretinal cystoid fluid (IRC), subretinal fluid (SRF) and normal retinal tissue, and how the learning algorithm links semantic concepts to image content and geometry.

  10. Digital Pathology: Data-Intensive Frontier in Medical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lee A. D.; Carter, Alexis B.; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Fusheng; Kong, Jun; Gutman, David A.; Widener, Patrick; Pan, Tony C.; Cholleti, Sharath R.; Sharma, Ashish; Kurc, Tahsin M.; Brat, Daniel J.; Saltz, Joel H.

    2013-01-01

    Pathology is a medical subspecialty that practices the diagnosis of disease. Microscopic examination of tissue reveals information enabling the pathologist to render accurate diagnoses and to guide therapy. The basic process by which anatomic pathologists render diagnoses has remained relatively unchanged over the last century, yet advances in information technology now offer significant opportunities in image-based diagnostic and research applications. Pathology has lagged behind other healthcare practices such as radiology where digital adoption is widespread. As devices that generate whole slide images become more practical and affordable, practices will increasingly adopt this technology and eventually produce an explosion of data that will quickly eclipse the already vast quantities of radiology imaging data. These advances are accompanied by significant challenges for data management and storage, but they also introduce new opportunities to improve patient care by streamlining and standardizing diagnostic approaches and uncovering disease mechanisms. Computer-based image analysis is already available in commercial diagnostic systems, but further advances in image analysis algorithms are warranted in order to fully realize the benefits of digital pathology in medical discovery and patient care. In coming decades, pathology image analysis will extend beyond the streamlining of diagnostic workflows and minimizing interobserver variability and will begin to provide diagnostic assistance, identify therapeutic targets, and predict patient outcomes and therapeutic responses. PMID:25328166

  11. Hybrid FMT-MRI applied to in vivo atherosclerosis imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoqiang; Maafi, Foued; Berti, Romain; Pouliot, Philippe; Rhéaume, Eric; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lesage, Frederic

    2014-05-01

    Combining Fluorescent Molecular Tomography (FMT) with anatomical imaging, e.g. MRI facilitates interpreting functional information. Furthermore, using a heterogeneous model for light propagation has been shown in simulations to be superior to homogeneous modeling to quantify fluorescence. Here, we present a combined FMT-MRI system and apply it to heart and aorta molecular imaging, a challenging area due to strong tissue heterogeneity and the presence of air-voids due to lungs. First investigating performance in a phantom and mouse corpse, the MRI-enabled heterogeneous models resulted in an improved quantification of fluorescence reconstructions. The system was then used in mice for in vivo atherosclerosis molecular imaging. Results show that, when using the heterogeneous model, reconstructions were in agreement with the ex vivo measurements. Therefore, the proposed system might serve as a powerful imaging tool for atherosclerosis in mice.

  12. Primary gamma ray selection in a hybrid timing/imaging Cherenkov array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postnikov E.B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is a methodical study on hybrid reconstruction techniques for hybrid imaging/timing Cherenkov observations. This type of hybrid array is to be realized at the gamma-observatory TAIGA intended for very high energy gamma-ray astronomy (> 30 TeV. It aims at combining the cost-effective timing-array technique with imaging telescopes. Hybrid operation of both of these techniques can lead to a relatively cheap way of development of a large area array. The joint approach of gamma event selection was investigated on both types of simulated data: the image parameters from the telescopes, and the shower parameters reconstructed from the timing array. The optimal set of imaging parameters and shower parameters to be combined is revealed. The cosmic ray background suppression factor depending on distance and energy is calculated. The optimal selection technique leads to cosmic ray background suppression of about 2 orders of magnitude on distances up to 450 m for energies greater than 50 TeV.

  13. Defining the medical imaging requirements for a rural health center

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book establishes the criteria for the type of medical imaging services that should be made available to rural health centers, providing professional rural hospital managers with information that makes their work more effective and efficient. It also offers valuable insights into government, non-governmental and religious organizations involved in the planning, establishment and operation of medical facilities in rural areas. Rural health centers are established to prevent patients from being forced to travel to distant urban medical facilities. To manage patients properly, rural health centers should be part of regional and more complete systems of medical health care installations in the country on the basis of a referral and counter-referral program, and thus, they should have the infrastructure needed to transport patients to urban hospitals when they need more complex health care. The coordination of all the activities is only possible if rural health centers are led by strong and dedicated managers....

  14. The Verification of Hybrid Image Deformation algorithm for PIV

    OpenAIRE

    Novotný Jan; Nováková Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to test a newly designed algorithm for more accurate calculation of the image displacement of seeding particles when taking measurement using the Particle Image Velocimetry method. The proposed algorithm is based on modification of a classical iterative approach using a three-point subpixel interpolation and method using relative deformation of individual areas for accurate detection of signal peak position. The first part briefly describes the tested algorithm toget...

  15. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver S Grosser

    Full Text Available Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT or positron emission tomography (PET with computed tomography (CT. Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR on the image quality of the low-dose CT images.Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88 and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04. In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001.In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality.

  16. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosser, Oliver S.; Kupitz, Dennis; Ruf, Juri; Czuczwara, Damian; Steffen, Ingo G.; Furth, Christian; Thormann, Markus; Loewenthal, David; Ricke, Jens; Amthauer, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) with computed tomography (CT). Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR) on the image quality of the low-dose CT images. Methodology/Principal Findings Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU) values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04). In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion/Significance In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality. PMID:26390216

  17. Multiple sclerosis medical image analysis and information management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lifeng; Meier, Dominik; Polgar-Turcsanyi, Mariann; Karkocha, Pawel; Bakshi, Rohit; Guttmann, Charles R G

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a central tool for patient management, as well as research, in multiple sclerosis (MS). Measurements of disease burden and activity derived from MRI through quantitative image analysis techniques are increasingly being used. There are many complexities and challenges in building computerized processing pipelines to ensure efficiency, reproducibility, and quality control for MRI scans from MS patients. Such paradigms require advanced image processing and analysis technologies, as well as integrated database management systems to ensure the most utility for clinical and research purposes. This article reviews pipelines available for quantitative clinical MRI research in MS, including image segmentation, registration, time-series analysis, performance validation, visualization techniques, and advanced medical imaging software packages. To address the complex demands of the sequential processes, the authors developed a workflow management system that uses a centralized database and distributed computing system for image processing and analysis. The implementation of their system includes a web-form-based Oracle database application for information management and event dispatching, and multiple modules for image processing and analysis. The seamless integration of processing pipelines with the database makes it more efficient for users to navigate complex, multistep analysis protocols, reduces the user's learning curve, reduces the time needed for combining and activating different computing modules, and allows for close monitoring for quality-control purposes. The authors' system can be extended to general applications in clinical trials and to routine processing for image-based clinical research.

  18. MEMS ultrasonic probe rotary scanning imaging system for medical endoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Wen, Shijie; Yu, Daoyin

    2006-11-01

    Medical ultrasonic endoscope is the combination of electronic endoscope and ultrasonic sensor technology. Ultrasonic endoscope sends the ultrasonic probe into coelom through the biopsy channel of an electronic endoscope and rotates it by a micro motor, acquiring fault histology features of digestive organs. Compared with external ultrasonic detection, the system reduces the distance between the transducer and the organ, diminishing the effects on imaging of fats and body cavity gas. On the basis of ultrasonic imaging system, this paper implements a pulse echo imaging system. We describe the ultrasonic probe, emission circuit, receiving circuit and protective circuit in detail. With the demodulation circuit, we get the amplitude of echo which indicates the objects. And to achieve the rotary scan, we design a synchronous control circuit and a data transfer circuit basing on the USB2.0 interface. Finally we get a grey image with 256 grey levels after coordinate conversion.

  19. Hybridization State Detection of DNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles Using Hyperspectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Murdock

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging has the unique ability of capturing spectral data for multiple wavelengths at each pixel in an image. This gives the ability to distinguish, with certainty, different nanomaterials and/or distinguish nanomaterials from biological materials. In this study, 4 nm and 13 nm gold nanoparticles (Au NPs were synthesized, functionalized with complimentary oligonucleotides, and hybridized to form large networks of NPs. Scattering spectra were collected from each sample (unfunctionalized, functionalized, and hybridized and evaluated. The spectra showed unique peaks for each size of Au NP sample and also exhibited narrowing and intensifying of the spectra as the NPs were functionalized and then subsequently hybridized. These spectra are different from normal aggregation effects where the LSPR and reflected spectrum broaden and are red-shifted. Rather, this appears to be dependent on the ability to control the interparticle distance through oligonucleotide length, which is also investigated through the incorporation of a poly-A spacer. Also, hybridized Au NPs were exposed to cells with no adverse effects and retained their unique spectral signatures. With the ability to distinguish between hybridization states at nearly individual NP levels, this could provide a new method of tracking the intracellular actions of nanomaterials as well as extracellular biosensing applications.

  20. Lossless medical image compression through lightweight binary arithmetic coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartrina-Rapesta, Joan; Sanchez, Victor; Serra-Sagristà, Joan; Marcellin, Michael W.; Aulí-Llinà s, Francesc; Blanes, Ian

    2017-09-01

    A contextual lightweight arithmetic coder is proposed for lossless compression of medical imagery. Context definition uses causal data from previous symbols coded, an inexpensive yet efficient approach. To further reduce the computational cost, a binary arithmetic coder with fixed-length codewords is adopted, thus avoiding the normalization procedure common in most implementations, and the probability of each context is estimated through bitwise operations. Experimental results are provided for several medical images and compared against state-of-the-art coding techniques, yielding on average improvements between nearly 0.1 and 0.2 bps.

  1. A Development of Hybrid Drug Information System Using Image Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HwaMin Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to prevent drug abuse or misuse cases and avoid over-prescriptions, it is necessary for medicine taker to be provided with detailed information about the medicine. In this paper, we propose a drug information system and develop an application to provide information through drug image recognition using a smartphone. We designed a contents-based drug image search algorithm using the color, shape and imprint of drug. Our convenient application can provide users with detailed information about drugs and prevent drug misuse.

  2. An efficient neural network based method for medical image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbati, Nima; Ayatollahi, Ahmad; Kermani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to propose a new neural network based method for medical image segmentation. Firstly, a modified self-organizing map (SOM) network, named moving average SOM (MA-SOM), is utilized to segment medical images. After the initial segmentation stage, a merging process is designed to connect the objects of a joint cluster together. A two-dimensional (2D) discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is used to build the input feature space of the network. The experimental results show that MA-SOM is robust to noise and it determines the input image pattern properly. The segmentation results of breast ultrasound images (BUS) demonstrate that there is a significant correlation between the tumor region selected by a physician and the tumor region segmented by our proposed method. In addition, the proposed method segments X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) head images much better than the incremental supervised neural network (ISNN) and SOM-based methods. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Content Based Medical Image Retrieval for Histopathological, CT and MRI Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarnambiga AYYACHAMY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A content based approach is followed for medical images. The purpose of this study is to access the stability of these methods for medical image retrieval. The methods used in color based retrieval for histopathological images are color co-occurrence matrix (CCM and histogram with meta features. For texture based retrieval GLCM (gray level co-occurrence matrix and local binary pattern (LBP were used. For shape based retrieval canny edge detection and otsu‘s method with multivariable threshold were used. Texture and shape based retrieval were implemented using MRI (magnetic resonance images. The most remarkable characteristics of the article are its content based approach for each medical imaging modality. Our efforts were focused on the initial visual search. From our experiment, histogram with meta features in color based retrieval for histopathological images shows a precision of 60 % and recall of 30 %. Whereas GLCM in texture based retrieval for MRI images shows a precision of 70 % and recall of 20 %. Shape based retrieval for MRI images shows a precision of 50% and recall of 25 %. The retrieval results shows that this simple approach is successful.

  4. ImageParser: a tool for finite element generation from three-dimensional medical images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamada T

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The finite element method (FEM is a powerful mathematical tool to simulate and visualize the mechanical deformation of tissues and organs during medical examinations or interventions. It is yet a challenge to build up an FEM mesh directly from a volumetric image partially because the regions (or structures of interest (ROIs may be irregular and fuzzy. Methods A software package, ImageParser, is developed to generate an FEM mesh from 3-D tomographic medical images. This software uses a semi-automatic method to detect ROIs from the context of image including neighboring tissues and organs, completes segmentation of different tissues, and meshes the organ into elements. Results The ImageParser is shown to build up an FEM model for simulating the mechanical responses of the breast based on 3-D CT images. The breast is compressed by two plate paddles under an overall displacement as large as 20% of the initial distance between the paddles. The strain and tangential Young's modulus distributions are specified for the biomechanical analysis of breast tissues. Conclusion The ImageParser can successfully exact the geometry of ROIs from a complex medical image and generate the FEM mesh with customer-defined segmentation information.

  5. A New Application of MSPIHT for Medical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athmane ZITOUNI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new application for medical imaging to image compression based on the principle of Set Partitioning In Hierarchical Tree algorithm (SPIHT. Our approach called , the modified SPIHT (MSPIHT, distributes entropy differently than SPIHT and also optimizes the coding. This approach can produce results that are a significant improvement on the Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR and compression ratio obtained by SPIHT algorithm, without affecting the computing time. These results are also comparable with those obtained using the Set Partitioning In Hierarchical Tree (SPIHT and Joint Photographic Experts Group 2000 (JPG2 algorithms.

  6. Clinical perspectives of hybrid proton-fluorine magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Martijn; Mohades, Seyede G; Hackeng, Tilman M; Post, Mark J; Kooi, Marianne E; Backes, Walter H

    2013-05-01

    The number of applications of fluorine 19 (19F) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spectroscopy in biomedical and clinical research is steadily growing. The 100% natural abundance of fluorine and its relatively high sensitivity for MR (83% to that of protons) make it an interesting nucleus for a wide range of MR applications. Fluorinated contrast media have a number of advantages over the conventionally used gadolinium-based or iron-based contrast agents. The absence of an endogenous fluorine background intensity in the human body facilitates reliable quantification of fluorinated contrast medium or drugs. Anatomy can be visualized separately with proton MR imaging, creating the application of hybrid hydrogen 1 (1H)/19F MR imaging. The availability of 2 channels (ie, the 1H and 19F channels) enables dual-targeted molecular imaging. Recently, novel developments have emerged on fluorine-based contrast media in preclinical studies and imaging techniques. The developments in fluorine MR seem promising for clinical applications, with contributions in therapy monitoring, assessment of lung function, angiography, and molecular imaging. This review outlines the translation from recent advances in preclinical MR imaging and spectroscopy to future perspectives of clinical hybrid 1H/19/F MR imaging applications.

  7. A Nonlinear Hybrid Filter for Salt & Pepper Noise Removal from Color Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isma Irum

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Impulse noise reduction or removal is a very active research area of image processing. A nonlinear hybrid filter for removing fixed impulse noise (salt & pepper noise from color images has been proposed in this study. Technique is based on mathematical morphology and trimmed standard median filter. Proposed filter is composed of a sequence of morphological standard and well known operations erosion-dilation and trimmed standard median filter. It removes the fixed impulse noise (salt & pepper very well without distorting the image features, color components and edges. It does not introduce blurring and moving effects even in high noise densities (up to 90%. The standard similarity measure peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR and computation time have been used to evaluate the performance of proposed hybrid filter.

  8. Hybrid multispectral optoacoustic and ultrasound tomography for morphological and physiological brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olefir, Ivan; Merčep, Elena; Burton, Neal C.; Ovsepian, Saak V.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-08-01

    Expanding usage of small animal models in biomedical research necessitates development of technologies for structural, functional, or molecular imaging that can be readily integrated in the biological laboratory. Herein, we consider dual multispectral optoacoustic (OA) and ultrasound tomography based on curved ultrasound detector arrays and describe the performance achieved for hybrid morphological and physiological brain imaging of mice in vivo. We showcase coregistered hemodynamic parameters resolved by OA tomography under baseline conditions and during alterations of blood oxygen saturation. As an internal reference, we provide imaging of abdominal organs. We illustrate the performance advantages of hybrid curved detector ultrasound and OA tomography and discuss immediate and long-term implications of our findings in the context of animal and human studies.

  9. A hybrid solution for extracting structured medical information from unstructured data in medical records via a double-reading/entry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ligang; Li, Liping; Hu, Jiajia; Wang, Xiaozhe; Hou, Boulin; Zhang, Tianze; Zhao, Lue Ping

    2016-08-30

    Healthcare providers generate a huge amount of biomedical data stored in either legacy system (paper-based) format or electronic medical records (EMR) around the world, which are collectively referred to as big biomedical data (BBD). To realize the promise of BBD for clinical use and research, it is an essential step to extract key data elements from unstructured medical records into patient-centered electronic health records with computable data elements. Our objective is to introduce a novel solution, known as a double-reading/entry system (DRESS), for extracting clinical data from unstructured medical records (MR) and creating a semi-structured electronic health record database, as well as to demonstrate its reproducibility empirically. Utilizing the modern cloud-based technologies, we have developed a comprehensive system that includes multiple subsystems, from capturing MRs in clinics, to securely transferring MRs, storing and managing cloud-based MRs, to facilitating both machine learning and manual reading, and to performing iterative quality control before committing the semi-structured data into the desired database. To evaluate the reproducibility of extracted medical data elements by DRESS, we conduct a blinded reproducibility study, with 100 MRs from patients who have undergone surgical treatment of lung cancer in China. The study uses Kappa statistic to measure concordance of discrete variables, and uses correlation coefficient to measure reproducibility of continuous variables. Using the DRESS, we have demonstrated the feasibility of extracting clinical data from unstructured MRs to create semi-structured and patient-centered electronic health record database. The reproducibility study with 100 patient's MRs has shown an overall high reproducibility of 98 %, and varies across six modules (pathology, Radio/chemo therapy, clinical examination, surgery information, medical image and general patient information). DRESS uses a double-reading, double

  10. AMIDE: A Free Software Tool for Multimodality Medical Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Markus Loening

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Amide's a Medical Image Data Examiner (AMIDE has been developed as a user-friendly, open-source software tool for displaying and analyzing multimodality volumetric medical images. Central to the package's abilities to simultaneously display multiple data sets (e.g., PET, CT, MRI and regions of interest is the on-demand data reslicing implemented within the program. Data sets can be freely shifted, rotated, viewed, and analyzed with the program automatically handling interpolation as needed from the original data. Validation has been performed by comparing the output of AMIDE with that of several existing software packages. AMIDE runs on UNIX, Macintosh OS X, and Microsoft Windows platforms, and it is freely available with source code under the terms of the GNU General Public License.

  11. AMIDE: a free software tool for multimodality medical image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loening, Andreas Markus; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2003-07-01

    Amide's a Medical Image Data Examiner (AMIDE) has been developed as a user-friendly, open-source software tool for displaying and analyzing multimodality volumetric medical images. Central to the package's abilities to simultaneously display multiple data sets (e.g., PET, CT, MRI) and regions of interest is the on-demand data reslicing implemented within the program. Data sets can be freely shifted, rotated, viewed, and analyzed with the program automatically handling interpolation as needed from the original data. Validation has been performed by comparing the output of AMIDE with that of several existing software packages. AMIDE runs on UNIX, Macintosh OS X, and Microsoft Windows platforms, and it is freely available with source code under the terms of the GNU General Public License.

  12. Development of gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid system for simultaneous imaging of I-131 radionuclide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Suzuki, Mayumi; Kato, Katsuhiko [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ogata, Yoshimune [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Hatazawa, Jun [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2016-09-11

    Although iodine 131 (I-131) is used for radionuclide therapy, high resolution images are difficult to obtain with conventional gamma cameras because of the high energy of I-131 gamma photons (364 keV). Cerenkov-light imaging is a possible method for beta emitting radionuclides, and I-131 (606 MeV maximum beta energy) is a candidate to obtain high resolution images. We developed a high energy gamma camera system for I-131 radionuclide and combined it with a Cerenkov-light imaging system to form a gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system to compare the simultaneously measured images of these two modalities. The high energy gamma imaging detector used 0.85-mm×0.85-mm×10-mm thick GAGG scintillator pixels arranged in a 44×44 matrix with a 0.1-mm thick reflector and optical coupled to a Hamamatsu 2 in. square position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT: H12700 MOD). The gamma imaging detector was encased in a 2 cm thick tungsten shield, and a pinhole collimator was mounted on its top to form a gamma camera system. The Cerenkov-light imaging system was made of a high sensitivity cooled CCD camera. The Cerenkov-light imaging system was combined with the gamma camera using optical mirrors to image the same area of the subject. With this configuration, we simultaneously imaged the gamma photons and the Cerenkov-light from I-131 in the subjects. The spatial resolution and sensitivity of the gamma camera system for I-131 were respectively ~3 mm FWHM and ~10 cps/MBq for the high sensitivity collimator at 10 cm from the collimator surface. The spatial resolution of the Cerenkov-light imaging system was 0.64 mm FWHM at 10 cm from the system surface. Thyroid phantom and rat images were successfully obtained with the developed gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, allowing direct comparison of these two modalities. Our developed gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system will be useful to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these two

  13. XEMIS: A liquid xenon detector for medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego Manzano, L., E-mail: Lucia.Gallego-Manzano@subatech.in2p3.fr [SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Université de Nantes, 4 rue Alfred Kastler cedex 03 44307 Nantes (France); Bassetto, S. [AIR LIQUIDE Advanced Technologies Division, 2 rue Clémencière, F-38360 Sassenage (France); Beaupere, N. [SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Université de Nantes, 4 rue Alfred Kastler cedex 03 44307 Nantes (France); Briend, P. [AIR LIQUIDE Advanced Technologies Division, 2 rue Clémencière, F-38360 Sassenage (France); Carlier, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nantes, 1 place Alexis-Ricordeau, 44093 Nantes (France); Cherel, M. [INSERM U892 équipe 13, 8 quai Moncousu, 44000 Nantes (France); Cussonneau, J-P.; Donnard, J. [SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Université de Nantes, 4 rue Alfred Kastler cedex 03 44307 Nantes (France); Gorski, M. [AIR LIQUIDE Advanced Technologies Division, 2 rue Clémencière, F-38360 Sassenage (France); Hamanishi, R. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Kraeber Bodéré, F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nantes, 1 place Alexis-Ricordeau, 44093 Nantes (France); Le Ray, P.; Lemaire, O.; Masbou, J. [SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Université de Nantes, 4 rue Alfred Kastler cedex 03 44307 Nantes (France); Mihara, S. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Morteau, E.; Scotto Lavina, L. [SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Université de Nantes, 4 rue Alfred Kastler cedex 03 44307 Nantes (France); and others

    2015-07-01

    A new medical imaging technique based on the precise 3D location of a radioactive source by the simultaneous detection of 3γ rays has been proposed by Subatech laboratory. To take advantage of this novel technique a detection device based on a liquid xenon Compton telescope and a specific (β{sup +}, γ) emitter radionuclide, {sup 44}Sc, are required. A first prototype of a liquid xenon time projection chamber called XEMIS1 has been successfully developed showing very promising results for the energy and spatial resolutions for the ionization signal in liquid xenon, thanks to an advanced cryogenics system, which has contributed to a high liquid xenon purity with a very good stability and an ultra-low noise front-end electronics (below 100 electrons) operating at liquid xenon temperature. The very positive results obtained with XEMIS1 have led to the development of a second prototype for small animal imaging, XEMIS2, which is now under development. To study the feasibility of the 3γ imaging technique and optimize the characteristics of the device, a complete Monte Carlo simulation has been also carried out. A preliminary study shows very positive results for the sensitivity, energy and spatial resolutions of XEMIS2. - Highlights: • We present the principle of a new functional medical imaging technique called three gamma imaging. • We present a first prototype of a liquid xenon Compton telescope, XEMIS1, developed to prove the feasibility of the three gamma imaging technique. • Good results obtained with the first prototype XEMIS1 have led to the development of a new prototype for small animal imaging, XEMIS2. • We present the main characteristics of this new prototype, which is now under construction. • A complete Monte Carlo simulation shows promising results for the sensitivity, energy and spatial resolution of XEMIS2.

  14. Digital Pathology: Data-Intensive Frontier in Medical Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Lee A. D.; Carter, Alexis B.; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Fusheng; Kong, Jun; Gutman, David A.; Widener, Patrick; Pan, Tony C.; Cholleti, Sharath R.; Sharma, Ashish; Kurc, Tahsin M.; Brat, Daniel J.; Saltz, Joel H.

    2012-01-01

    Pathology is a medical subspecialty that practices the diagnosis of disease. Microscopic examination of tissue reveals information enabling the pathologist to render accurate diagnoses and to guide therapy. The basic process by which anatomic pathologists render diagnoses has remained relatively unchanged over the last century, yet advances in information technology now offer significant opportunities in image-based diagnostic and research applications. Pathology has lagged behind other healt...

  15. Superconductors and medical imaging; Supraconducteurs et imagerie medicale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, Guy [Univ. Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); CEA/DSM/IRFU, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-07-01

    After difficult beginnings in the 1970's, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved to become nowadays the jewel in the crown of medical technology. Superconductors have been a key factor for the extraordinary expansion of MRI which in turn represents about 75 % of their total market. After recalling some basic principles, this article traces their common history and refers to future developments. (author)

  16. Scintillator developments for high energy physics and medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2000-01-01

    Scintillating crystals have been for a long time developed as a basic component in particle detectors with a strong spin-off in the field of medical imaging. A typical example is BGO, which has become the main component of PET scanners since the large effort made by the L3 experiment at CERN to develop low cost production methods for this crystal. Systematic R&D on basic mechanism in inorganic scintillators, initiated by the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN 10 years ago, has contributed not to a small amount, to the development of new materials for high energy physics and for a new generation of medical imaging devices with increased resolution and sensitivity. The examples of the lead tungstate crystal for the CMS experiment at CERN (high energy physics) as well as of new materials under development for medical imaging will be described with an emphasis on the mutual benefit both fields can extract from a common R&D effort. (14 refs).

  17. Medical image segmentation on GPUs--a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smistad, Erik; Falch, Thomas L; Bozorgi, Mohammadmehdi; Elster, Anne C; Lindseth, Frank

    2015-02-01

    Segmentation of anatomical structures, from modalities like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound, is a key enabling technology for medical applications such as diagnostics, planning and guidance. More efficient implementations are necessary, as most segmentation methods are computationally expensive, and the amount of medical imaging data is growing. The increased programmability of graphic processing units (GPUs) in recent years have enabled their use in several areas. GPUs can solve large data parallel problems at a higher speed than the traditional CPU, while being more affordable and energy efficient than distributed systems. Furthermore, using a GPU enables concurrent visualization and interactive segmentation, where the user can help the algorithm to achieve a satisfactory result. This review investigates the use of GPUs to accelerate medical image segmentation methods. A set of criteria for efficient use of GPUs are defined and each segmentation method is rated accordingly. In addition, references to relevant GPU implementations and insight into GPU optimization are provided and discussed. The review concludes that most segmentation methods may benefit from GPU processing due to the methods' data parallel structure and high thread count. However, factors such as synchronization, branch divergence and memory usage can limit the speedup. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Verification of Hybrid Image Deformation algorithm for PIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novotný Jan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to test a newly designed algorithm for more accurate calculation of the image displacement of seeding particles when taking measurement using the Particle Image Velocimetry method. The proposed algorithm is based on modification of a classical iterative approach using a three-point subpixel interpolation and method using relative deformation of individual areas for accurate detection of signal peak position. The first part briefly describes the tested algorithm together with the results of the performed synthetic tests. The other part describes the measurement setup and the overall layout of the experiment. Subsequently, a comparison of results of the classical iterative scheme and our designed algorithm is carried out. The conclusion discusses the benefits of the tested algorithm, its advantages and disadvantages.

  19. Controlled searching in reversibly de-identified medical imaging archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jorge Miguel; Pinho, Eduardo; Monteiro, Eriksson; Silva, João Figueira; Costa, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, digital medical imaging in healthcare has become a fundamental tool for medical diagnosis. This growth has been accompanied by the development of technologies and standards, such as the DICOM standard and PACS. This environment led to the creation of collaborative projects where there is a need to share medical data between different institutions for research and educational purposes. In this context, it is necessary to maintain patient data privacy and provide an easy and secure mechanism for authorized personnel access. This paper presents a solution that fully de-identifies standard medical imaging objects, including metadata and pixel data, providing at the same time a reversible de-identifier mechanism that retains search capabilities from the original data. The last feature is important in some scenarios, for instance, in collaborative platforms where data is anonymized when shared with the community but searchable for data custodians or authorized entities. The solution was integrated into an open source PACS archive and validated in a multidisciplinary collaborative scenario. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. X-space MPI: magnetic nanoparticles for safe medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwill, Patrick William; Saritas, Emine Ulku; Croft, Laura Rose; Kim, Tyson N; Krishnan, Kannan M; Schaffer, David V; Conolly, Steven M

    2012-07-24

    One quarter of all iodinated contrast X-ray clinical imaging studies are now performed on Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients. Unfortunately, the iodine contrast agent used in X-ray is often toxic to CKD patients' weak kidneys, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Hence, we are pioneering a new medical imaging method, called Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI), to replace X-ray and CT iodinated angiography, especially for CKD patients. MPI uses magnetic nanoparticle contrast agents that are much safer than iodine for CKD patients. MPI already offers superb contrast and extraordinary sensitivity. The iron oxide nanoparticle tracers required for MPI are also used in MRI, and some are already approved for human use, but the contrast agents are far more effective at illuminating blood vessels when used in the MPI modality. We have recently developed a systems theoretic framework for MPI called x-space MPI, which has already dramatically improved the speed and robustness of MPI image reconstruction. X-space MPI has allowed us to optimize the hardware for fi ve MPI scanners. Moreover, x-space MPI provides a powerful framework for optimizing the size and magnetic properties of the iron oxide nanoparticle tracers used in MPI. Currently MPI nanoparticles have diameters in the 10-20 nanometer range, enabling millimeter-scale resolution in small animals. X-space MPI theory predicts that larger nanoparticles could enable up to 250 micrometer resolution imaging, which would represent a major breakthrough in safe imaging for CKD patients.

  1. A novel technique for prealignment in multimodality medical image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wu; Zhang, Lijuan; Xie, Yaoqin; Liang, Changhong

    2014-01-01

    Image pair is often aligned initially based on a rigid or affine transformation before a deformable registration method is applied in medical image registration. Inappropriate initial registration may compromise the registration speed or impede the convergence of the optimization algorithm. In this work, a novel technique was proposed for prealignment in both monomodality and multimodality image registration based on statistical correlation of gradient information. A simple and robust algorithm was proposed to determine the rotational differences between two images based on orientation histogram matching accumulated from local orientation of each pixel without any feature extraction. Experimental results showed that it was effective to acquire the orientation angle between two unregistered images with advantages over the existed method based on edge-map in multimodalities. Applying the orientation detection into the registration of CT/MR, T1/T2 MRI, and monomadality images with respect to rigid and nonrigid deformation improved the chances of finding the global optimization of the registration and reduced the search space of optimization.

  2. A Novel Technique for Prealignment in Multimodality Medical Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Image pair is often aligned initially based on a rigid or affine transformation before a deformable registration method is applied in medical image registration. Inappropriate initial registration may compromise the registration speed or impede the convergence of the optimization algorithm. In this work, a novel technique was proposed for prealignment in both monomodality and multimodality image registration based on statistical correlation of gradient information. A simple and robust algorithm was proposed to determine the rotational differences between two images based on orientation histogram matching accumulated from local orientation of each pixel without any feature extraction. Experimental results showed that it was effective to acquire the orientation angle between two unregistered images with advantages over the existed method based on edge-map in multimodalities. Applying the orientation detection into the registration of CT/MR, T1/T2 MRI, and monomadality images with respect to rigid and nonrigid deformation improved the chances of finding the global optimization of the registration and reduced the search space of optimization.

  3. A review of GPU-based medical image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Després, Philippe; Jia, Xun

    2017-10-01

    Tomographic image reconstruction is a computationally demanding task, even more so when advanced models are used to describe a more complete and accurate picture of the image formation process. Such advanced modeling and reconstruction algorithms can lead to better images, often with less dose, but at the price of long calculation times that are hardly compatible with clinical workflows. Fortunately, reconstruction tasks can often be executed advantageously on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), which are exploited as massively parallel computational engines. This review paper focuses on recent developments made in GPU-based medical image reconstruction, from a CT, PET, SPECT, MRI and US perspective. Strategies and approaches to get the most out of GPUs in image reconstruction are presented as well as innovative applications arising from an increased computing capacity. The future of GPU-based image reconstruction is also envisioned, based on current trends in high-performance computing. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. An Intelligent Cloud Storage Gateway for Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana-Ferreira, Carlos; Guerra, António; Silva, João F; Matos, Sérgio; Costa, Carlos

    2017-09-01

    Historically, medical imaging repositories have been supported by indoor infrastructures. However, the amount of diagnostic imaging procedures has continuously increased over the last decades, imposing several challenges associated with the storage volume, data redundancy and availability. Cloud platforms are focused on delivering hardware and software services over the Internet, becoming an appealing solution for repository outsourcing. Although this option may bring financial and technological benefits, it also presents new challenges. In medical imaging scenarios, communication latency is a critical issue that still hinders the adoption of this paradigm. This paper proposes an intelligent Cloud storage gateway that optimizes data access times. This is achieved through a new cache architecture that combines static rules and pattern recognition for eviction and prefetching. The evaluation results, obtained from experiments over a real-world dataset, show that cache hit ratios can reach around 80%, leading to reductions of image retrieval times by over 60%. The combined use of eviction and prefetching policies proposed can significantly reduce communication latency, even when using a small cache in comparison to the total size of the repository. Apart from the performance gains, the proposed system is capable of adjusting to specific workflows of different institutions.

  5. The mathematics of medical imaging a beginner’s guide

    CERN Document Server

    Feeman, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    The basic mathematics of computerized tomography, the CT scan, are aptly presented for an audience of undergraduates in mathematics and engineering. Assuming no prior background in advanced mathematical analysis, topics such as the Fourier transform, sampling, and discrete approximation algorithms are introduced from scratch and are developed within the context of medical imaging. A chapter on magnetic resonance imaging focuses on manipulation of the Bloch equation, the system of differential equations that is the foundation of this important technology. Extending the ideas of the acclaimed first edition, new material has been added to render an even more accessible textbook for course usage. This edition includes new discussions of the Radon transform, the Dirac delta function and its role in X-ray imaging, Kacmarz’s method and least squares approximation, spectral filtering,  and more.  Copious examples and exercises, several new computer-based exercises, and additional graphics have been added to fur...

  6. Synthesis and Development of Diagnostic Tools for Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaarup-Jensen, Henrik

    The need for novel diagnostic tools in medical imaging is increasing since they can improve the positive therapeutic outcome as well as patient compliance. In this thesis different diagnostic tools were developed within an interdisciplinary project, whereas the main work reported in this thesis...... was the synthesis of different materials. The first project introduces the development of injectable fiducial markers within the field of image-guided radiotherapy. Fiducial markers for computed tomography (CT)-imaging are today needed in order to correlate the positioning of the tumor to provide a more precise...... engineering of the gold nanoparticles that will allow full dispersion of AuNPs within the hydrophobic environment of the SAIB matrix. As stabilizing coating-materials PEG, PNIPAM polymers and a dithiolane SAIB derivative were tested. The unique gelation properties of the SAIB matrix led to the second project...

  7. Trends in the Use of Medical Imaging to Diagnose Appendicitis at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repplinger, Michael D; Weber, Andrew C; Pickhardt, Perry J; Rajamanickam, Victoria P; Svenson, James E; Ehlenbach, William J; Westergaard, Ryan P; Reeder, Scott B; Jacobs, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    To quantify the trends in imaging use for the diagnosis of appendicitis. A retrospective study covering a 22-year period was conducted at an academic medical center. Patients were identified by International Classification of Diseases-9 diagnosis code for appendicitis. Medical record data extraction of these patients included imaging test used (ultrasound, CT, or MRI), gender, age, and body mass index (BMI). The proportion of patients undergoing each scan was calculated by year. Regression analysis was performed to determine whether age, gender, or BMI affected imaging choice. The study included a total of 2,108 patients, including 967 (43.5%) females and 599 (27%) children (use increased over time for the entire cohort (2.9% to 82.4%, P use increased more in females and adults than in males and children, but differences in trends were not statistically significant (male versus female, P = .8; adult versus child, P = .1). The percentage of patients who had no imaging used for the diagnosis of appendicitis decreased over time (P use of ultrasound or MRI over the study period. With increasing BMI, CT was more frequently used. Of those diagnosed with appendicitis at an academic medical center, CT use increased more than 20-fold. However, no statistically significant trend was found for increased use of ultrasound or MRI. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The quest for 'diagnostically lossless' medical image compression: a comparative study of objective quality metrics for compressed medical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik-Urbaniak, Ilona; Brunet, Dominique; Wang, Jiheng; Koff, David; Smolarski-Koff, Nadine; Vrscay, Edward R.; Wallace, Bill; Wang, Zhou

    2014-03-01

    Our study, involving a collaboration with radiologists (DK,NSK) as well as a leading international developer of medical imaging software (AGFA), is primarily concerned with improved methods of assessing the diagnostic quality of compressed medical images and the investigation of compression artifacts resulting from JPEG and JPEG2000. In this work, we compare the performances of the Structural Similarity quality measure (SSIM), MSE/PSNR, compression ratio CR and JPEG quality factor Q, based on experimental data collected in two experiments involving radiologists. An ROC and Kolmogorov-Smirnov analysis indicates that compression ratio is not always a good indicator of visual quality. Moreover, SSIM demonstrates the best performance, i.e., it provides the closest match to the radiologists' assessments. We also show that a weighted Youden index1 and curve tting method can provide SSIM and MSE thresholds for acceptable compression ratios.

  9. Implementation methods of medical image sharing for collaborative health care based on IHE XDS-I profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, Kai; Yang, Yuanyuan; Sun, Jianyong; Ling, Tonghui; Wang, Mingqing; Bak, Peter

    2015-10-01

    IHE XDS-I profile proposes an architecture model for cross-enterprise medical image sharing, but there are only a few clinical implementations reported. Here, we investigate three pilot studies based on the IHE XDS-I profile to see whether we can use this architecture as a foundation for image sharing solutions in a variety of health-care settings. The first pilot study was image sharing for cross-enterprise health care with federated integration, which was implemented in Huadong Hospital and Shanghai Sixth People's Hospital within the Shanghai Shen-Kang Hospital Management Center; the second pilot study was XDS-I-based patient-controlled image sharing solution, which was implemented by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) team in the USA; and the third pilot study was collaborative imaging diagnosis with electronic health-care record integration in regional health care, which was implemented in two districts in Shanghai. In order to support these pilot studies, we designed and developed new image access methods, components, and data models such as RAD-69/WADO hybrid image retrieval, RSNA clearinghouse, and extension of metadata definitions in both the submission set and the cross-enterprise document sharing (XDS) registry. We identified several key issues that impact the implementation of XDS-I in practical applications, and conclude that the IHE XDS-I profile is a theoretically good architecture and a useful foundation for medical image sharing solutions across multiple regional health-care providers.

  10. Parallel Digital Watermarking Process on Ultrasound Medical Images in Multicores Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liang Khor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advancement of technology in communication network, it facilitated digital medical images transmitted to healthcare professionals via internal network or public network (e.g., Internet, but it also exposes the transmitted digital medical images to the security threats, such as images tampering or inserting false data in the images, which may cause an inaccurate diagnosis and treatment. Medical image distortion is not to be tolerated for diagnosis purposes; thus a digital watermarking on medical image is introduced. So far most of the watermarking research has been done on single frame medical image which is impractical in the real environment. In this paper, a digital watermarking on multiframes medical images is proposed. In order to speed up multiframes watermarking processing time, a parallel watermarking processing on medical images processing by utilizing multicores technology is introduced. An experiment result has shown that elapsed time on parallel watermarking processing is much shorter than sequential watermarking processing.

  11. Hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from ADF STEM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wael, Annelies; De Backer, Annick; Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D; Van Aert, Sandra

    2017-06-01

    A hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF STEM) images of monotype crystalline nanostructures is presented. Different atom-counting methods already exist for model-like systems. However, the increasing relevance of radiation damage in the study of nanostructures demands a method that allows atom-counting from low dose images with a low signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, the hybrid method directly includes prior knowledge from image simulations into the existing statistics-based method for atom-counting, and accounts in this manner for possible discrepancies between actual and simulated experimental conditions. It is shown by means of simulations and experiments that this hybrid method outperforms the statistics-based method, especially for low electron doses and small nanoparticles. The analysis of a simulated low dose image of a small nanoparticle suggests that this method allows for far more reliable quantitative analysis of beam-sensitive materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Hybrid Imaging Labels: Providing the Link Between Mass Spectrometry-Based Molecular Pathology and Theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, Tessa; van der Wal, Steffen; van Malderen, Stijn J M; Müller, Larissa; Kuil, Joeri; van Unen, Vincent; Peters, Ruud J B; van Bemmel, Margaretha E M; McDonnell, Liam A; Velders, Aldrik H; Koning, Frits; Vanhaeke, Frank; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2017-01-01

    Development of theranostic concepts that include inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) imaging can be hindered by the lack of a direct comparison to more standardly used methods for in vitro and in vivo evaluation; e.g. fluorescence or nuclear medicine. In this study a bimodal (or rather, hybrid) tracer that contains both a fluorescent dye and a chelate was used to evaluate the existence of a direct link between mass spectrometry (MS) and in vitro and in vivo molecular imaging findings using fluorescence and radioisotopes. At the same time, the hybrid label was used to determine whether the use of a single isotope label would allow for MS-based diagnostics. A hybrid label that contained both a DTPA chelate (that was coordinated with either 165Ho or 111In) and a Cy5 fluorescent dye was coupled to the chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) targeting peptide Ac-TZ14011 (hybrid-Cy5-Ac-TZ4011). This receptor targeting tracer was used to 1) validate the efficacy of (165Ho-based) mass-cytometry in determining the receptor affinity via comparison with fluorescence-based flow cytometry (Cy5), 2) evaluate the microscopic binding pattern of the tracer in tumor cells using both fluorescence confocal imaging (Cy5) and LA-ICP-MS-imaging (165Ho), 3) compare in vivo biodistribution patterns obtained with ICP-MS (165Ho) and radiodetection (111In) after intravenous administration of hybrid-Cy5-Ac-TZ4011 in tumor-bearing mice. Finally, LA-ICP-MS-imaging (165Ho) was linked to fluorescence-based analysis of excised tissue samples (Cy5). Analysis with both mass-cytometry and flow cytometry revealed a similar receptor affinity, respectively 352 ± 141 nM and 245 ± 65 nM (p = 0.08), but with a much lower detection sensitivity for the first modality. In vitro LA-ICP-MS imaging (165Ho) enabled clear discrimination between CXCR4 positive and negative cells, but fluorescence microscopy was required to determine the intracellular distribution. In

  13. A virtual image chain for perceived image quality of medical display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchessoux, Cédric; Jung, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    This paper describes a virtual image chain for medical display (project VICTOR: granted in the 5th framework program by European commission). The chain starts from raw data of an image digitizer (CR, DR) or synthetic patterns and covers image enhancement (MUSICA by Agfa) and both display possibilities, hardcopy (film on viewing box) and softcopy (monitor). Key feature of the chain is a complete image wise approach. A first prototype is implemented in an object-oriented software platform. The display chain consists of several modules. Raw images are either taken from scanners (CR-DR) or from a pattern generator, in which characteristics of DR- CR systems are introduced by their MTF and their dose-dependent Poisson noise. The image undergoes image enhancement and comes to display. For soft display, color and monochrome monitors are used in the simulation. The image is down-sampled. The non-linear response of a color monitor is taken into account by the GOG or S-curve model, whereas the Standard Gray-Scale-Display-Function (DICOM) is used for monochrome display. The MTF of the monitor is applied on the image in intensity levels. For hardcopy display, the combination of film, printer, lightbox and viewing condition is modeled. The image is up-sampled and the DICOM-GSDF or a Kanamori Look-Up-Table is applied. An anisotropic model for the MTF of the printer is applied on the image in intensity levels. The density-dependent color (XYZ) of the hardcopy film is introduced by Look-Up-tables. Finally a Human Visual System Model is applied to the intensity images (XYZ in terms of cd/m2) in order to eliminate nonvisible differences. Comparison leads to visible differences, which are quantified by higher order image quality metrics. A specific image viewer is used for the visualization of the intensity image and the visual difference maps.

  14. Design of hybrid multimodal poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymer nanoparticles for neutrophil labeling, imaging and tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuan; Palankar, Raghavendra; Echeverría, María; Medvedev, Nikolay; Moya, Sergio E.; Delcea, Mihaela

    2013-11-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) incorporating quantum dots (QDs), superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and gold (Au) NPs for neutrophil labeling were fabricated via the w/o/w double emulsion method. QDs and SPIONs were entrapped in the PLGA core during emulsification while Au NPs were assembled on top of the PLGA NPs via electrostatic interactions. Transmission Electron Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CLSM) were applied to characterize the hybrid PLGA NPs. The uptake of the hybrid PLGA NPs by human neutrophils was studied by Flow Cytometry and confocal microscopy. In addition, the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neutrophils after incubation with the hybrid PLGA NPs was assessed. Magnetophoresis experiments showed that neutrophils with internalized hybrid PLGA NPs can be effectively laterally displaced towards the magnetic field. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the hybrid PLGA NPs resulted in images with a contrast enhancement linearly dependent on the concentration of the hybrid PLGA NPs. Research reported in this work is relevant for imaging, tracking and manipulating neutrophils and has potential for in vivo applications, e.g., tumor visualization and localized photothermal treatment.Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) incorporating quantum dots (QDs), superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and gold (Au) NPs for neutrophil labeling were fabricated via the w/o/w double emulsion method. QDs and SPIONs were entrapped in the PLGA core during emulsification while Au NPs were assembled on top of the PLGA NPs via electrostatic interactions. Transmission Electron Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CLSM) were applied to characterize the hybrid PLGA NPs. The uptake of the hybrid PLGA NPs by human neutrophils was studied by Flow Cytometry and confocal microscopy. In addition, the induction of

  15. Recent Progress in Delivery of Therapeutic and Imaging Agents Utilizing Organic-inorganic Hybrid Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzina, Haque Sheikh; Chowdhury, Ezharul

    2017-11-19

    Delivery of conventional small molecule drugs and currently evolving nucleic acid-based therapeutics, such as small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and genes, and contrast agents for high resolution imaging, to the target site of action is highly demanding to increase the therapeutic and imaging efficacy while minimizing the off-target effects of the delivered molecules, as well as develop novel therapeutic and imaging approaches. Organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles offer a number of advantages by combining the unique properties of the organic and inorganic counterparts, thus improving the pharmacokinetic behavior and targetability of drugs and contrast agents, and conferring the exclusive optical and magnetic properties for both therapeutic and imaging purposes. Different polymers, lipids, dendrimers, peptides, cell membranes, and small organic molecules were attached via covalent or non-covalent interactions with diverse inorganic nanoparticles of gold, mesoporous silica, magnetic iron oxide, carbon nanotubes and quantum dots for efficient drug delivery and imaging purposes. In this review, we highlight the progress made so far in utilizing different organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles for in vivo delivery of anti-cancer drugs, siRNA, genes and imaging agents. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Multi-wave and hybrid imaging techniques: a new direction for nondestructive testing and structural health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuhua; Deng, Yiming; Cao, Jing; Xiong, Xin; Bai, Libing; Li, Zhaojun

    2013-11-27

    In this article, the state-of-the-art multi-wave and hybrid imaging techniques in the field of nondestructive evaluation and structural health monitoring were comprehensively reviewed. A new direction for assessment and health monitoring of various structures by capitalizing the advantages of those imaging methods was discussed. Although sharing similar system configurations, the imaging physics and principles of multi-wave phenomena and hybrid imaging methods are inherently different. After a brief introduction of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) , structure health monitoring (SHM) and their related challenges, several recent advances that have significantly extended imaging methods from laboratory development into practical applications were summarized, followed by conclusions and discussion on future directions.

  17. Low-noise phase imaging by hybrid uniform and structured illumination transport of intensity equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yunhui; Shanker, Aamod; Tian, Lei; Waller, Laura; Barbastathis, George

    2014-11-03

    We demonstrate a new approach to the transport of intensity equation (TIE) phase retrieval method which uses structured illumination to improve low-frequency noise performance. In the hybrid scheme, two phase images are acquired: one with uniform and one with sinusoidal grating illumination intensity. The former preserves the high spatial frequency features of the phase best, whereas the latter dramatically increase the response at low spatial frequencies (where traditional TIE notoriously suffers). We then theoretically prove the design of a spectral filter that optimally combines the two phase results while suppressing noise. The combination of uniformly and structured illuminated TIE (hybrid TIE) phase imaging is experimentally demonstrated optically with a calibrated pure phase object.

  18. Segmentation of interest region in medical volume images using geometric deformable model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myungeun; Cho, Wanhyun; Kim, Sunworl; Park, Soonyoung; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we present a new segmentation method using the level set framework for medical volume images. The method was implemented using the surface evolution principle based on the geometric deformable model and the level set theory. And, the speed function in the level set approach consists of a hybrid combination of three integral measures derived from the calculus of variation principle. The terms are defined as robust alignment, active region, and smoothing. These terms can help to obtain the precise surface of the target object and prevent the boundary leakage problem. The proposed method has been tested on synthetic and various medical volume images with normal tissue and tumor regions in order to evaluate its performance on visual and quantitative data. The quantitative validation of the proposed segmentation is shown with higher Jaccard's measure score (72.52%-94.17%) and lower Hausdorff distance (1.2654 mm-3.1527 mm) than the other methods such as mean speed (67.67%-93.36% and 1.3361mm-3.4463 mm), mean-variance speed (63.44%-94.72% and 1.3361 mm-3.4616 mm), and edge-based speed (0.76%-42.44% and 3.8010 mm-6.5389 mm). The experimental results confirm that the effectiveness and performance of our method is excellent compared with traditional approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Hybrid Information Retrieval System for Medical Field Using MeSH Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Vahid; Borujerdi, Mohammad Reza Matash

    Using semantic relations between different terms beside their syntactical similarities in a search engine would result in systems with better overall precision. One major problem in achieving such systems is to find an appropriate way of calculating semantic similarity scores and combining them with those of classic methods. In this paper, we propose a hybrid approach for information retrieval in medical field using MeSH ontology. Our approach contains proposing a new semantic similarity measure and eliminating records with semantic score less than a specific threshold from syntactic results. Proposed approach in this paper outperforms VSM, graph comparison, neural network, Bayesian network and latent semantic indexing based approaches in terms of precision vs. recall.

  20. A Multimodal Search Engine for Medical Imaging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Eduardo; Godinho, Tiago; Valente, Frederico; Costa, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    The use of digital medical imaging systems in healthcare institutions has increased significantly, and the large amounts of data in these systems have led to the conception of powerful support tools: recent studies on content-based image retrieval (CBIR) and multimodal information retrieval in the field hold great potential in decision support, as well as for addressing multiple challenges in healthcare systems, such as computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). However, the subject is still under heavy research, and very few solutions have become part of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) in hospitals and clinics. This paper proposes an extensible platform for multimodal medical image retrieval, integrated in an open-source PACS software with profile-based CBIR capabilities. In this article, we detail a technical approach to the problem by describing its main architecture and each sub-component, as well as the available web interfaces and the multimodal query techniques applied. Finally, we assess our implementation of the engine with computational performance benchmarks.

  1. Using deep learning for content-based medical image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qinpei; Yang, Yuanyuan; Sun, Jianyong; Yang, Zhiming; Zhang, Jianguo

    2017-03-01

    Content-Based medical image retrieval (CBMIR) is been highly active research area from past few years. The retrieval performance of a CBMIR system crucially depends on the feature representation, which have been extensively studied by researchers for decades. Although a variety of techniques have been proposed, it remains one of the most challenging problems in current CBMIR research, which is mainly due to the well-known "semantic gap" issue that exists between low-level image pixels captured by machines and high-level semantic concepts perceived by human[1]. Recent years have witnessed some important advances of new techniques in machine learning. One important breakthrough technique is known as "deep learning". Unlike conventional machine learning methods that are often using "shallow" architectures, deep learning mimics the human brain that is organized in a deep architecture and processes information through multiple stages of transformation and representation. This means that we do not need to spend enormous energy to extract features manually. In this presentation, we propose a novel framework which uses deep learning to retrieval the medical image to improve the accuracy and speed of a CBIR in integrated RIS/PACS.

  2. Novel Applications of Laser Doppler Vibration Measurements to Medical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabai, Habib; Oliver, David E.; Rohrbaugh, John W.; Papadopoulos, Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) has been widely used in engineering applications involving non-contact vibration and sound measurements. This technique has also been used in some biomedical applications including hearing research. The detectable frequencies are in the range of near-DC to 1 GHz or higher. This paper reviews applications of LDV in biomedical engineering and proposes new medical imaging applications based on measuring surface vibrations of tissues and organs. Tests were conducted on human skin using single point and scanning laser vibrometers. These tests suggest that skin vibrations due to the forcing excitation from the heart can be used in imaging of blood flow. The results of these tests illustrate the potential of such vibration measurements in a variety of diagnostic medical imaging applications including blood flow/restrictions, real-time monitoring of blood pressure variations, wound healing, muscle movements, etc. The fact that the measurements can be conducted remotely (non-contact) is an important benefit that adds to the promise of this approach.

  3. Combined analysis of cervical smears. Cytopathology, image cytometry and in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, H; Bruder, E; Elit, L

    1993-01-01

    This study was an attempt to correlate the Bethesda System of Papanicolaou smear classification with DNA content by image analysis and the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) as determined by in situ hybridization. DNA histograms were classified as normal diploid, diploid proliferative....... HPV infection correlated with DNA polyploidy but was seen in 15 of 29 smears classified as cytologically normal. Morphologically abnormal Papanicolaou smears correlated with aneuploid DNA content. Smears classified as intraepithelial neoplasia correlated with aneuploid DNA content in all 12 cases...

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the inner ear by using a hybrid radiofrequency coil at 7 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Heo, Phil; Kim, Young-Bo; Han, Gyu-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of the membranous structures of the inner ear has been limited to the detection of the normal fluid signal intensity within the bony labyrinth by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipped with a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnet. High-field (HF) MRI has been available for more than a decade, and numerous studies have documented its significant advantages over conventional MRI with regards to its use in basic scientific research and routine clinical assessments. No previous studies of the inner ear by using HF MRI have been reported, in part because high-quality resolution of mastoid pneumatization is challenging due to artifacts generated in the HF environment and insufficient performance of radiofrequency (RF) coils. Therefore, a hybrid RF coil with integrated circuitry was developed at 7 T and was targeted for anatomical imaging to achieve a high resolution image of the structure of the human inner ear, excluding the bony portion. The inner-ear's structure is composed of soft tissues containing hydrogen ions and includes the membranous labyrinth, endolymphatic space, perilymphatic space, and cochlear-vestibular nerves. Visualization of the inner-ear's anatomy was performed in-vivo with a custom-designed hybrid RF coil and a specific imaging protocol based on an interpolated breath-held examination sequence. The comparative signal intensity value at 30-mm away from the phantom side was 88% higher for the hybrid RF coil and 24% higher for the 8-channel transmit/receive (Tx/Rx) coil than for the commercial birdcage coil. The optimized MRI protocol employed a hybrid RF coil because it enabled high-resolution imaging of the inner-ear's anatomy and accurate mapping of structures including the cochlea and the semicircular canals. These results indicate that 7 T MRI achieves high spatial resolution visualization of the inner-ear's anatomy. Therefore, MRI imaging using a hybrid RF coil at 7 T could provide a powerful tool for clinical investigations of petrous

  5. Generation of hybrid sinograms for the recovery of kV-CT images with metal artifacts for helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hosang; Park, Dahl; Youn, Hanbean; Nam, Jiho; Lee, Jayoung; Kim, Wontaek; Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Yong Ho; Lee, Ju Hye; Kim, Dongwon; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2015-08-01

    The overall goal of this study is to restore kilovoltage computed tomography (kV-CT) images which are disfigured by patients' metal prostheses. By generating a hybrid sinogram that is a combination of kV and megavoltage (MV) projection data, the authors suggest a novel metal artifact-reduction (MAR) method that retains the image quality to match that of kV-CT and simultaneously restores the information of metal prostheses lost due to photon starvation. CT projection data contain information about attenuation coefficients and the total length of the attenuation. By normalizing raw kV projections with their own total lengths of attenuation, mean attenuation projections were obtained. In the same manner, mean density projections of MV-CT were obtained by the normalization of MV projections resulting from the forward projection of density-calibrated MV-CT images with the geometric parameters of the kV-CT device. To generate the hybrid sinogram, metal-affected signals of the kV sinogram were identified and replaced by the corresponding signals of the MV sinogram following a density calibration step with kV data. Filtered backprojection was implemented to reconstruct the hybrid CT image. To validate the authors' approach, they simulated four different scenarios for three heads and one pelvis using metallic rod inserts within a cylindrical phantom. Five inserts describing human body elements were also included in the phantom. The authors compared the image qualities among the kV, MV, and hybrid CT images by measuring the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the densities of all inserts, and the spatial resolution. In addition, the MAR performance was compared among three existing MAR methods and the authors' hybrid method. Finally, for clinical trials, the authors produced hybrid images of three patients having dental metal prostheses to compare their MAR performances with those of the kV, MV, and three existing MAR methods. The authors compared

  6. Generation of hybrid sinograms for the recovery of kV-CT images with metal artifacts for helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Hosang [Department of Radiation Oncology and Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan 626-770 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dahl; Kim, Wontaek; Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Yong Ho; Lee, Ju Hye; Kim, Dongwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Hanbean [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Jiho; Lee, Jayoung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan 626-770 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho Kyung, E-mail: hokyung@pusan.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering and the Center for Advanced Medical Engineering Research, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: The overall goal of this study is to restore kilovoltage computed tomography (kV-CT) images which are disfigured by patients’ metal prostheses. By generating a hybrid sinogram that is a combination of kV and megavoltage (MV) projection data, the authors suggest a novel metal artifact-reduction (MAR) method that retains the image quality to match that of kV-CT and simultaneously restores the information of metal prostheses lost due to photon starvation. Methods: CT projection data contain information about attenuation coefficients and the total length of the attenuation. By normalizing raw kV projections with their own total lengths of attenuation, mean attenuation projections were obtained. In the same manner, mean density projections of MV-CT were obtained by the normalization of MV projections resulting from the forward projection of density-calibrated MV-CT images with the geometric parameters of the kV-CT device. To generate the hybrid sinogram, metal-affected signals of the kV sinogram were identified and replaced by the corresponding signals of the MV sinogram following a density calibration step with kV data. Filtered backprojection was implemented to reconstruct the hybrid CT image. To validate the authors’ approach, they simulated four different scenarios for three heads and one pelvis using metallic rod inserts within a cylindrical phantom. Five inserts describing human body elements were also included in the phantom. The authors compared the image qualities among the kV, MV, and hybrid CT images by measuring the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the densities of all inserts, and the spatial resolution. In addition, the MAR performance was compared among three existing MAR methods and the authors’ hybrid method. Finally, for clinical trials, the authors produced hybrid images of three patients having dental metal prostheses to compare their MAR performances with those of the kV, MV, and three existing MAR

  7. Doppler-scanning tunneling microscopy current imaging in superconductor-ferromagnet hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, S. A.; Plummer, G.; Fedor, J.; Pearson, J. E.; Novosad, V.; Karapetrov, G.; Iavarone, M.

    2016-01-25

    Mapping the distribution of currents inside a superconductor is usually performed indirectly through imaging of the stray magnetic fields above the surface. Here, we show that by direct imaging of the Doppler shift contribution to the quasiparticle excitation spectrum in the superconductor using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, we obtain directly the distribution of supercurrents inside the superconductor. We demonstrate the technique at the example of superconductor/ferromagnet hybrid structure that produces intricate current pattern consisting of combination Meissner shielding currents and Abrikosov vortex currents.

  8. Radiation protection in medical imaging and radiation oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Stoeva, Magdalena S

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Protection in Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology focuses on the professional, operational, and regulatory aspects of radiation protection. Advances in radiation medicine have resulted in new modalities and procedures, some of which have significant potential to cause serious harm. Examples include radiologic procedures that require very long fluoroscopy times, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, and intravascular brachytherapy. This book summarizes evidence supporting changes in consensus recommendations, regulations, and health physics practices associated with these recent advances in radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology. It supports intelligent and practical methods for protection of personnel, the public, and patients. The book is based on current recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and is complemented by detailed practical sections and professional discussions by the world’s leading medical and health physics professionals. It also ...

  9. Applied Fourier analysis from signal processing to medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Tim

    2017-01-01

    The first of its kind, this focused textbook serves as a self-contained resource for teaching from scratch the fundamental mathematics of Fourier analysis and illustrating some of its most current, interesting applications, including medical imaging and radar processing. Developed by the author from extensive classroom teaching experience, it provides a breadth of theory that allows students to appreciate the utility of the subject, but at as accessible a depth as possible. With myriad applications included, this book can be adapted to a one or two semester course in Fourier Analysis or serve as the basis for independent study. Applied Fourier Analysis assumes no prior knowledge of analysis from its readers, and begins by making the transition from linear algebra to functional analysis. It goes on to cover basic Fourier series and Fourier transforms before delving into applications in sampling and interpolation theory, digital communications, radar processing, medical i maging, and heat and wave equations. Fo...

  10. Hybrid iterative reconstruction algorithm improves image quality in craniocervical CT angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löve, Askell; Siemund, Roger; Höglund, Peter; Ramgren, Birgitta; Undrén, Per; Björkman-Burtscher, Isabella M

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of a hybrid iterative reconstruction algorithm for improving image quality in craniocervical CT angiography (CTA) and to assess observer performance. Thirty patients (mean age, 58 years; range 16-80 years) underwent standard craniocervical CTA (volume CT dose index, 6.8 mGy, 2.8 mSv). Images were reconstructed using both filtered back projection (FBP) and a hybrid iterative reconstruction algorithm. Five neuroradiologists assessed general image quality and delineation of the vessel lumen in seven arterial segments using a 4-grade scale. Interobserver and intraobserver variability were determined. Mean attenuation and noise were measured and signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios calculated. Descriptive statistics are presented and data analyzed using linear mixed-effects models. In pooled data, image quality in iterative reconstruction was graded superior to FBP regarding all five quality criteria (p Iterative reconstruction resulted in elimination of arterial segments graded poor. Interobserver percentage agreement was significantly better (p = 0.024) for iterative reconstruction (69%) than for FBP (66%) but worse than intraobserver percentage agreement (mean, 79%). Noise levels, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly (p iterative reconstruction at all measured levels. The iterative reconstruction algorithm significantly improves image quality in craniocervical CT, especially at the thoracic inlet. Despite careful study design, considerable interobserver and intraobserver variability was noted.

  11. Spatio-Temporal Encoding in Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation two methods for spatio-temporal encoding in medical ultrasound imaging are investigated. The first technique is based on a frequency division approach. Here, the available spectrum of the transducer is divided into a set of narrow bands. A waveform is designed for each band...... are also included in the dissertation. The second method is based on encoding the transmitters with pseudo-random sequences. The signals can be separated after only one transmission using an estimation based technique. Broadband decoding can, therefore, be performed at the receiver after a single...

  12. Integrating patient digital photographs with medical imaging examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, Senthil; Bhatti, Pamela; Arepalli, Chesnal D; Salama, Mohamed; Provenzale, James M; Tridandapani, Srini

    2013-10-01

    We introduce the concept, benefits, and general architecture for acquiring, storing, and displaying digital photographs along with medical imaging examinations. We also discuss a specific implementation built around an Android-based system for simultaneously acquiring digital photographs along with portable radiographs. By an innovative application of radiofrequency identification technology to radiographic cassettes, the system is able to maintain a tight relationship between these photographs and the radiographs within the picture archiving and communications system (PACS) environment. We provide a cost analysis demonstrating the economic feasibility of this technology. Since our architecture naturally integrates with patient identification methods, we also address patient privacy issues.

  13. Medical image of the week: severe atelectasis with tracheal shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poojary I

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old woman with severe oxygen dependent COPD presented with acute respiratory distress requiring intubation and was found to have left lower lobe collapse with tracheal shift. Her past medical history consists of severe malnutrition, alcohol abuse, and emphysema with recurrent pneumonias associated with acute respiratory failure often requiring intubation. She has greater than a 50-pack year history of tobacco use. She has undergone bronchoscopy and multiple CT Chest imaging without evidence of an endobronchial lesion or malignancy. Postural drainage and percussion along with antibiotics and inhaled bronchodilators resulted in marked improvement in the left lower lobe.

  14. Dicoogle Mobile: a medical imaging platform for Android.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana-Ferreira, Carlos; Ferreira, Daniel; Valente, Frederico; Monteiro, Eriksson; Costa, Carlos; Oliveira, José Luís

    2012-01-01

    Mobile computing technologies are increasingly becoming a valuable asset in healthcare information systems. The adoption of these technologies helps to assist in improving quality of care, increasing productivity and facilitating clinical decision support. They provide practitioners with ubiquitous access to patient records, being actually an important component in telemedicine and tele-work environments. We have developed Dicoogle Mobile, an Android application that provides remote access to distributed medical imaging data through a cloud relay service. Besides, this application has the capability to store and index local imaging data, so that they can also be searched and visualized. In this paper, we will describe Dicoogle Mobile concept as well the architecture of the whole system that makes it running.

  15. Bioassay Phantoms Using Medical Images and Computer Aided Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. X. Geroge Xu

    2011-01-28

    A radiation bioassay program relies on a set of standard human phantoms to calibrate and assess radioactivity levels inside a human body for radiation protection and nuclear medicine imaging purposes. However, the methodologies in the development and application of anthropomorphic phantoms, both physical and computational, had mostly remained the same for the past 40 years. We herein propose a 3-year research project to develop medical image-based physical and computational phantoms specifically for radiation bioassay applications involving internally deposited radionuclides. The broad, long-term objective of this research was to set the foundation for a systematic paradigm shift away from the anatomically crude phantoms in existence today to realistic and ultimately individual-specific bioassay methodologies. This long-term objective is expected to impact all areas of radiation bioassay involving nuclear power plants, U.S. DOE laboratories, and nuclear medicine clinics.

  16. Segmentation of medical image sequence by parallel active contour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekir, Abdelkader; Benamrane, Nacéra

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an original approach for detecting and tracking of objects in medical image sequence. We propose a multi-agent system (MAS) based on NetLogo platform for implementing parametric contour active model or snake. In NetLogo, mobile agents (turtles) move over a grid of stationary agents (patches). In our proposed MAS, each mobile agent represents a point of snake (snaxel) and it minimizes, in parallel with other turtles, the energy functional attached to its snaxel. Then, these turtles move over the image represented by a grid of patches. The set of these agents is supervised by Observer, the NetLogo global agent. In addition, Observer loads successively the frames of sequence and initializes the turtles in the first frame. The efficiency of our system is shown through some experimental results.

  17. In-vivo synthetic aperture flow imaging in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2003-01-01

    is used for generating a parabolic laminar flow, and a research scanner is used for acquiring RF data from individual transducer elements. A reference profile is calculated from a mass flow meter. The parabolic velocity profile is estimated using the new approach with a relative standard deviation of 2......A new method for acquiring flow images using synthetic aperture techniques in medical ultrasound is presented. The new approach makes it possible to have a continuous acquisition of flow data throughout the whole image simultaneously, and this can significantly improve blood velocity estimation....... Any type of filter can be used for discrimination between tissue and blood flow without initialization, and the number of lines used for velocity estimation is limited only by the nonstationarity of the flow. The new approach is investigated through both simulations and measurements. A flow rig...

  18. Medical image segmentation using object atlas versus object cloud models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phellan, Renzo; Falcão, Alexandre X.; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    2015-03-01

    Medical image segmentation is crucial for quantitative organ analysis and surgical planning. Since interactive segmentation is not practical in a production-mode clinical setting, automatic methods based on 3D object appearance models have been proposed. Among them, approaches based on object atlas are the most actively investigated. A key drawback of these approaches is that they require a time-costly image registration process to build and deploy the atlas. Object cloud models (OCM) have been introduced to avoid registration, considerably speeding up the whole process, but they have not been compared to object atlas models (OAM). The present paper fills this gap by presenting a comparative analysis of the two approaches in the task of individually segmenting nine anatomical structures of the human body. Our results indicate that OCM achieve a statistically significant better accuracy for seven anatomical structures, in terms of Dice Similarity Coefficient and Average Symmetric Surface Distance.

  19. Section E9 of the American College of Medical Genetics technical standards and guidelines: fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarello, James T; Hirsch, Betsy; Kearney, Hutton M; Ketterling, Rhett P; Olson, Susan B; Quigley, Denise I; Rao, Kathleen W; Tepperberg, James H; Tsuchiya, Karen D; Wiktor, Anne E

    2011-07-01

    This updated Section E9 has been incorporated into and supersedes the previous Section E9 in Section E: Clinical Cytogenetics of the 2008 Edition (Revised 02/2007) American College of Medical Genetics Standards and Guidelines for Clinical Genetics Laboratories. This section deals specifically with the standards and guidelines applicable to fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis.

  20. Optimal embedding for shape indexing in medical image databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaoning; Tagare, Hemant D; Fulbright, Robert K; Long, Rodney; Antani, Sameer

    2010-06-01

    This paper addresses the problem of indexing shapes in medical image databases. Shapes of organs are often indicative of disease, making shape similarity queries important in medical image databases. Mathematically, shapes with landmarks belong to shape spaces which are curved manifolds with a well defined metric. The challenge in shape indexing is to index data in such curved spaces. One natural indexing scheme is to use metric trees, but metric trees are prone to inefficiency. This paper proposes a more efficient alternative. We show that it is possible to optimally embed finite sets of shapes in shape space into a Euclidean space. After embedding, classical coordinate-based trees can be used for efficient shape retrieval. The embedding proposed in the paper is optimal in the sense that it least distorts the partial Procrustes shape distance. The proposed indexing technique is used to retrieve images by vertebral shape from the NHANES II database of cervical and lumbar spine X-ray images maintained at the National Library of Medicine. Vertebral shape strongly correlates with the presence of osteophytes, and shape similarity retrieval is proposed as a tool for retrieval by osteophyte presence and severity. Experimental results included in the paper evaluate (1) the usefulness of shape similarity as a proxy for osteophytes, (2) the computational and disk access efficiency of the new indexing scheme, (3) the relative performance of indexing with embedding to the performance of indexing without embedding, and (4) the computational cost of indexing using the proposed embedding versus the cost of an alternate embedding. The experimental results clearly show the relevance of shape indexing and the advantage of using the proposed embedding. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Integration of PET/MR Hybrid Imaging into Radiation Therapy Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tong; Das, Shiva; Wong, Terence Z

    2017-05-01

    Hybrid PET/MR imaging is in early development for treatment planning. This article briefly reviews research and clinical applications of PET/MR imaging in radiation oncology. With improvements in workflow, more specific tracers, and fast and robust acquisition protocols, PET/MR imaging will play an increasingly important role in better target delineation for treatment planning and have clear advantages in the evaluation of tumor response and in a better understanding of tumor heterogeneity. With advances in treatment delivery and the potential of integrating PET/MR imaging with research on radiomics for radiation oncology, quantitative and physiologic information could lead to more precise and personalized RT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Differential cryptanalysis of a medical image cryptosystem with multiple rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Wang, Shihong

    2015-10-01

    Recently, Fu et al. proposed a chaos-based medical image encryption scheme that has permutation-substitution architecture. The authors believe that the scheme with bit-level cat map shuffling can be achieved at high level of security even if it is only applied with a few encryption rounds. However, we find that the scheme cannot resist differential cryptanalysis. The differential cryptanalysis shows that the security of the original scheme depends only on permutation key instead of on all of the keys. Moreover, 17 chosen plain-images can reveal equivalent permutation key for 1-round and 2-round encryption. We propose a novel analysis method called double differential cryptanalysis comparison (DDCC) that is valid to break multi-round encryption with 16N(2)+1 chosen plain-images, where N(2) is the size of the image. We also point out several weaknesses of the cryptosystem. The theoretical analysis and simulation results indicate that the encryption scheme is insecure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fat-constrained 18F-FDG PET reconstruction in hybrid PET/MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevrhal, Sven; Heinzer, Susanne; Wülker, Christian; Renisch, Steffen; Ratib, Osman; Börnert, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Fusion of information from PET and MR imaging can increase the diagnostic value of both modalities. This work sought to improve (18)F FDG PET image quality by using MR Dixon fat-constrained images to constrain PET image reconstruction to low-fat regions, with the working hypothesis that fatty tissue metabolism is low in glucose consumption. A novel constrained PET reconstruction algorithm was implemented via a modification of the system matrix in list-mode time-of-flight ordered-subsets expectation maximization reconstruction, similar to the way time-of-flight weighting is incorporated. To demonstrate its use in PET/MR imaging, we modeled a constraint based on fat/water-separating Dixon MR images that shift activity away from regions of fat tissue during PET image reconstruction. PET and MR imaging scans of a modified National Electrical Manufacturers Association/International Electrotechnical Commission body phantom simulating body fat/water composition and in vivo experiments on 2 oncology patients were performed on a commercial time-of-flight PET/MR imaging system. Fat-constrained PET reconstruction visibly and quantitatively increased resolution and contrast between high-uptake and fatty-tissue regions without significantly affecting the images in nonfat regions. The incorporation of MR tissue information, such as fat, in image reconstruction can improve the quality of PET images. The combination of a variety of potential other MR tissue characteristics with PET represents a further justification for merging MR data with PET data in hybrid systems. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  4. Segmentation of Brain Lesions in MRI and CT Scan Images: A Hybrid Approach Using k-Means Clustering and Image Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ritu; Sharma, Manisha; Singh, Bikesh Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Manual segmentation and analysis of lesions in medical images is time consuming and subjected to human errors. Automated segmentation has thus gained significant attention in recent years. This article presents a hybrid approach for brain lesion segmentation in different imaging modalities by combining median filter, k means clustering, Sobel edge detection and morphological operations. Median filter is an essential pre-processing step and is used to remove impulsive noise from the acquired brain images followed by k-means segmentation, Sobel edge detection and morphological processing. The performance of proposed automated system is tested on standard datasets using performance measures such as segmentation accuracy and execution time. The proposed method achieves a high accuracy of 94% when compared with manual delineation performed by an expert radiologist. Furthermore, the statistical significance test between lesion segmented using automated approach and that by expert delineation using ANOVA and correlation coefficient achieved high significance values of 0.986 and 1 respectively. The experimental results obtained are discussed in lieu of some recently reported studies.

  5. Visual performance in medical imaging using liquid crystal displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchou, Philip Marcel

    2007-12-01

    This thesis examined the contrast performance of liquid crystal display (LCD) devices for use in medical imaging. Novel experimental methods were used to measure the ability of medical LCD devices to produce just noticeable contrast. It was demonstrated that medical LCD devices are capable of high performance in medical imaging and are suitable for conducting psychovisual research experiments. Novel methods for measuring and controlling the luminance response of an LCD were presented in Chapter 3 and used to develop a software tools to apply DICOM GSDF calibrations. Several medical LCD systems were calibrated, demonstrating that the methods can be used to reliably measure luminance and manipulate fine contrast. Chapter 4 reports on a novel method to generate low contrast bi-level bar patterns by using the full palette of available gray values. The method was used in a two alternative forced choice (2AFC) psychovisual experiment to measure the contrast threshold of human observers. Using a z-score analysis method, the results were found to be consistent with the Barten model of contrast sensitivity. Chapter 5 examined error distortion associated with using z-scores. A maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method was presented as an alternative and was used to reevaluate the results from Chapter 4. The new results were consistent with the Barten model. Simulations were conducted to evaluate the statistical precision of the MLE method in relation to the number and distribution of trials. In Chapter 6, 2AFC tests were conducted examining contrast thresholds for complex sinusoid, white noise, and filtered noise patterns. The sinusoid test results were consistent with the Barten model while the noise patterns required more contrast for visibility. The effects of adaptation were also demonstrated. A noise visibility index (NVI) was introduced to describe noise power weighted by contrast sensitivity. Just noticeable white and filtered noise patterns exhibited similar NVI

  6. Medical image classification based on multi-scale non-negative sparse coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruijie; Shen, Jian; Wei, Fushan; Li, Xiong; Sangaiah, Arun Kumar

    2017-05-27

    With the rapid development of modern medical imaging technology, medical image classification has become more and more important in medical diagnosis and clinical practice. Conventional medical image classification algorithms usually neglect the semantic gap problem between low-level features and high-level image semantic, which will largely degrade the classification performance. To solve this problem, we propose a multi-scale non-negative sparse coding based medical image classification algorithm. Firstly, Medical images are decomposed into multiple scale layers, thus diverse visual details can be extracted from different scale layers. Secondly, for each scale layer, the non-negative sparse coding model with fisher discriminative analysis is constructed to obtain the discriminative sparse representation of medical images. Then, the obtained multi-scale non-negative sparse coding features are combined to form a multi-scale feature histogram as the final representation for a medical image. Finally, SVM classifier is combined to conduct medical image classification. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed algorithm can effectively utilize multi-scale and contextual spatial information of medical images, reduce the semantic gap in a large degree and improve medical image classification performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Imaging Atherosclerosis with Hybrid Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of atherosclerosis could potentially move patient management towards individualized triage, treatment, and followup. The newly introduced combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system could emerge as a key player in this context. Both ...

  8. A hybrid approach to simulate multiple photon scattering in X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freud, N. [CNDRI, Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiations, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint-Exupery, 20, avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: nicolas.freud@insa-lyon.fr; Letang, J.-M. [CNDRI, Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiations, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint-Exupery, 20, avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Babot, D. [CNDRI, Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiations, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint-Exupery, 20, avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2005-01-01

    A hybrid simulation approach is proposed to compute the contribution of scattered radiation in X- or {gamma}-ray imaging. This approach takes advantage of the complementarity between the deterministic and probabilistic simulation methods. The proposed hybrid method consists of two stages. Firstly, a set of scattering events occurring in the inspected object is determined by means of classical Monte Carlo simulation. Secondly, this set of scattering events is used as a starting point to compute the energy imparted to the detector, with a deterministic algorithm based on a 'forced detection' scheme. For each scattering event, the probability for the scattered photon to reach each pixel of the detector is calculated using well-known physical models (form factor and incoherent scattering function approximations, in the case of Rayleigh and Compton scattering respectively). The results of the proposed hybrid approach are compared to those obtained with the Monte Carlo method alone (Geant4 code) and found to be in excellent agreement. The convergence of the results when the number of scattering events increases is studied. The proposed hybrid approach makes it possible to simulate the contribution of each type (Compton or Rayleigh) and order of scattering, separately or together, with a single PC, within reasonable computation times (from minutes to hours, depending on the number of pixels of the detector). This constitutes a substantial benefit, compared to classical simulation methods (Monte Carlo or deterministic approaches), which usually requires a parallel computing architecture to obtain comparable results.

  9. Monitoring biofilm attachment on medical devices surfaces using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Hitchins, Victoria M.; Ilev, Ilko K.; Kim, Do-Hyun

    2014-02-01

    Microbial biofilm is a colony of single bacteria cells (planktonic) that attached to surfaces, attract other microorganisms to attach and grow, and together they build an extracellular matrix composed of polysaccharides, protein, and DNA. Eventually, some cells will detach and spread to other surface. Biofilm on medical devices can cause severe infection to all age ranges from infant to adult. Therefore, it is important to detect biofilm in a fast and efficient manner. Hyperspectral imaging was utilized for distinguishing wide area of biofilm coverage on various materials and on different textures of stainless steeltest coupons. Not only is the coverage of biofilm important, but also the shear stress of biofilm on the attached surfaces is significant. This study investigates the effects of shear stress on the adhesion of biofilms on common medical device surfaces such as glass, polycarbonate, polytetrafluoroethylene, and stainless steel with different textures. Biofilm was grown using Ps. aeruginosa and growth was monitored after 24 and 48 hours at 37° C. The coupons covered with biofilm were tilted at 45 degrees and 90 degrees for 30 seconds to induce shear stress and Hyperspectral images were taken. We hypothesize that stronger attachment on rough surface would be able to withstand greater shear stress compared to smooth surface.

  10. Log-Gabor Energy Based Multimodal Medical Image Fusion in NSCT Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Yang; Song Tong; Shuying Huang; Pan Lin

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal medical image fusion is a powerful tool in clinical applications such as noninvasive diagnosis, image-guided radiotherapy, and treatment planning. In this paper, a novel nonsubsampled Contourlet transform (NSCT) based method for multimodal medical image fusion is presented, which is approximately shift invariant and can effectively suppress the pseudo-Gibbs phenomena. The source medical images are initially transformed by NSCT followed by fusing low- and high-frequency components. ...

  11. Medical Image Fusion Algorithm Based on Nonlinear Approximation of Contourlet Transform and Regional Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the pros and cons of contourlet transform and multimodality medical imaging, here we propose a novel image fusion algorithm that combines nonlinear approximation of contourlet transform with image regional features. The most important coefficient bands of the contourlet sparse matrix are retained by nonlinear approximation. Low-frequency and high-frequency regional features are also elaborated to fuse medical images. The results strongly suggested that the proposed algorithm could improve the visual effects of medical image fusion and image quality, image denoising, and enhancement.

  12. Hybrid protein-inorganic nanoparticles: From tumor-targeted drug delivery to cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzoghby, Ahmed O; Hemasa, Ayman L; Freag, May S

    2016-12-10

    Recently, a great interest has been paid to the development of hybrid protein-inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) for drug delivery and cancer diagnostics in order to combine the merits of both inorganic and protein nanocarriers. This review primarily discusses the most outstanding advances in the applications of the hybrids of naturally-occurring proteins with iron oxide, gadolinium, gold, silica, calcium phosphate NPs, carbon nanotubes, and quantum dots in drug delivery and cancer imaging. Various strategies that have been utilized for the preparation of protein-functionalized inorganic NPs and the mechanisms involved in the drug loading process are discussed. How can the protein functionalization overcome the limitations of colloidal stability, poor dispersibility and toxicity associated with inorganic NPs is also investigated. Moreover, issues relating to the influence of protein hybridization on the cellular uptake, tumor targeting efficiency, systemic circulation, mucosal penetration and skin permeation of inorganic NPs are highlighted. A special emphasis is devoted to the novel approaches utilizing the protein-inorganic nanohybrids in combined cancer therapy, tumor imaging, and theranostic applications as well as stimuli-responsive drug release from the nanohybrids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Interpretation of medical imaging data with a mobile application: a mobile digital imaging processing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng Kuan; Nicolini, Oliver; Waxenegger, Harald; Galloway, Graham J; Ullmann, Jeremy F P; Janke, Andrew L

    2013-01-01

    Digital Imaging Processing (DIP) requires data extraction and output from a visualization tool to be consistent. Data handling and transmission between the server and a user is a systematic process in service interpretation. The use of integrated medical services for management and viewing of imaging data in combination with a mobile visualization tool can be greatly facilitated by data analysis and interpretation. This paper presents an integrated mobile application and DIP service, called M-DIP. The objective of the system is to (1) automate the direct data tiling, conversion, pre-tiling of brain images from Medical Imaging NetCDF (MINC), Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (NIFTI) to RAW formats; (2) speed up querying of imaging measurement; and (3) display high-level of images with three dimensions in real world coordinates. In addition, M-DIP provides the ability to work on a mobile or tablet device without any software installation using web-based protocols. M-DIP implements three levels of architecture with a relational middle-layer database, a stand-alone DIP server, and a mobile application logic middle level realizing user interpretation for direct querying and communication. This imaging software has the ability to display biological imaging data at multiple zoom levels and to increase its quality to meet users' expectations. Interpretation of bioimaging data is facilitated by an interface analogous to online mapping services using real world coordinate browsing. This allows mobile devices to display multiple datasets simultaneously from a remote site. M-DIP can be used as a measurement repository that can be accessed by any network environment, such as a portable mobile or tablet device. In addition, this system and combination with mobile applications are establishing a virtualization tool in the neuroinformatics field to speed interpretation services.

  14. Interpretation of Medical Imaging Data with a Mobile Application: A Mobile Digital Imaging Processing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng Kuan; Nicolini, Oliver; Waxenegger, Harald; Galloway, Graham J.; Ullmann, Jeremy F. P.; Janke, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Digital Imaging Processing (DIP) requires data extraction and output from a visualization tool to be consistent. Data handling and transmission between the server and a user is a systematic process in service interpretation. The use of integrated medical services for management and viewing of imaging data in combination with a mobile visualization tool can be greatly facilitated by data analysis and interpretation. This paper presents an integrated mobile application and DIP service, called M-DIP. The objective of the system is to (1) automate the direct data tiling, conversion, pre-tiling of brain images from Medical Imaging NetCDF (MINC), Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (NIFTI) to RAW formats; (2) speed up querying of imaging measurement; and (3) display high-level of images with three dimensions in real world coordinates. In addition, M-DIP provides the ability to work on a mobile or tablet device without any software installation using web-based protocols. M-DIP implements three levels of architecture with a relational middle-layer database, a stand-alone DIP server, and a mobile application logic middle level realizing user interpretation for direct querying and communication. This imaging software has the ability to display biological imaging data at multiple zoom levels and to increase its quality to meet users’ expectations. Interpretation of bioimaging data is facilitated by an interface analogous to online mapping services using real world coordinate browsing. This allows mobile devices to display multiple datasets simultaneously from a remote site. M-DIP can be used as a measurement repository that can be accessed by any network environment, such as a portable mobile or tablet device. In addition, this system and combination with mobile applications are establishing a virtualization tool in the neuroinformatics field to speed interpretation services. PMID:23847587

  15. Efficient medical image access in diagnostic environments with limited resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eduardo Venson

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A medical application running outside the workstation environment has to deal with several constraints, such as reduced available memory and low network bandwidth. The aim of this paper is to present an approach to optimize the data flow for fast image transfer and visualization on mobile devices and remote stationary devices. Methods We use a combination of client- and server-side procedures to reduce the amount of information transferred by the application. Our approach was implemented on top of a commercial PACS and evaluated through user experiments with specialists in typical diagnosis tasks. The quality of the system outcome was measured in relation to the accumulated amount of network data transference and the amount of memory used in the host device. Besides, the system's quality of use (usability was measured through participants’ feedback. Results Contrarily to previous approaches, ours keeps the application within the memory constraints, minimizing data transferring whenever possible, allowing the application to run on a variety of devices. Moreover, it does that without sacrificing the user experience. Experimental data point that over 90% of the users did not notice any delays or degraded image quality, and when they did, they did not impact on the clinical decisions. Conclusion The combined activities and orchestration of our methods allow the image viewer to run on resource-constrained environments, such as those with low network bandwidth or little available memory. These results demonstrate the ability to explore the use of mobile devices as a support tool in the medical workflow.

  16. XEMIS: A liquid xenon detector for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego Manzano, L.; Bassetto, S.; Beaupere, N.; Briend, P.; Carlier, T.; Cherel, M.; Cussonneau, J.-P.; Donnard, J.; Gorski, M.; Hamanishi, R.; Kraeber Bodéré, F.; Le Ray, P.; Lemaire, O.; Masbou, J.; Mihara, S.; Morteau, E.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Stutzmann, J.-S.; Tauchi, T.; Thers, D.

    2015-07-01

    A new medical imaging technique based on the precise 3D location of a radioactive source by the simultaneous detection of 3γ rays has been proposed by Subatech laboratory. To take advantage of this novel technique a detection device based on a liquid xenon Compton telescope and a specific (β+, γ) emitter radionuclide, 44Sc, are required. A first prototype of a liquid xenon time projection chamber called XEMIS1 has been successfully developed showing very promising results for the energy and spatial resolutions for the ionization signal in liquid xenon, thanks to an advanced cryogenics system, which has contributed to a high liquid xenon purity with a very good stability and an ultra-low noise front-end electronics (below 100 electrons) operating at liquid xenon temperature. The very positive results obtained with XEMIS1 have led to the development of a second prototype for small animal imaging, XEMIS2, which is now under development. To study the feasibility of the 3γ imaging technique and optimize the characteristics of the device, a complete Monte Carlo simulation has been also carried out. A preliminary study shows very positive results for the sensitivity, energy and spatial resolutions of XEMIS2.

  17. Targeted diagnostic magnetic nanoparticles for medical imaging of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, I; Strauss, A; Dobiasch, S; Weis, C; Szanyi, S; Gil-Iceta, L; Alonso, E; González Esparza, M; Gómez-Vallejo, V; Szczupak, B; Plaza-García, S; Mirzaei, S; Israel, L L; Bianchessi, S; Scanziani, E; Lellouche, J-P; Knoll, P; Werner, J; Felix, K; Grenacher, L; Reese, T; Kreuter, J; Jiménez-González, M

    2015-09-28

    Highly aggressive cancer types such as pancreatic cancer possess a mortality rate of up to 80% within the first 6months after diagnosis. To reduce this high mortality rate, more sensitive diagnostic tools allowing an early stage medical imaging of even very small tumours are needed. For this purpose, magnetic, biodegradable nanoparticles prepared using recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) and incorporated iron oxide (maghemite, γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles were developed. Galectin-1 has been chosen as target receptor as this protein is upregulated in pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions but not in healthy pancreatic tissue nor in pancreatitis. Tissue plasminogen activator derived peptides (t-PA-ligands), that have a high affinity to galectin-1 have been chosen as target moieties and were covalently attached onto the nanoparticle surface. Improved targeting and imaging properties were shown in mice using single photon emission computed tomography-computer tomography (SPECT-CT), a handheld gamma camera, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Medical ultrasound: imaging of soft tissue strain and elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Peter N T; Liang, Hai-Dong

    2011-11-07

    After X-radiography, ultrasound is now the most common of all the medical imaging technologies. For millennia, manual palpation has been used to assist in diagnosis, but it is subjective and restricted to larger and more superficial structures. Following an introduction to the subject of elasticity, the elasticity of biological soft tissues is discussed and published data are presented. The basic physical principles of pulse-echo and Doppler ultrasonic techniques are explained. The history of ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue strain and elasticity is summarized, together with a brief critique of previously published reviews. The relevant techniques-low-frequency vibration, step, freehand and physiological displacement, and radiation force (displacement, impulse, shear wave and acoustic emission)-are described. Tissue-mimicking materials are indispensible for the assessment of these techniques and their characteristics are reported. Emerging clinical applications in breast disease, cardiology, dermatology, gastroenterology, gynaecology, minimally invasive surgery, musculoskeletal studies, radiotherapy, tissue engineering, urology and vascular disease are critically discussed. It is concluded that ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue strain and elasticity is now sufficiently well developed to have clinical utility. The potential for further research is examined and it is anticipated that the technology will become a powerful mainstream investigative tool.

  19. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) signal analysis using automated generated projection images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingwei; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Yuhua; Liu, Hong; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Roy R; Zheng, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests provide promising molecular imaging biomarkers to more accurately and reliably detect and diagnose cancers and genetic disorders. Since current manual FISH signal analysis is low-efficient and inconsistent, which limits its clinical utility, developing automated FISH image scanning systems and computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes has been attracting research interests. To acquire high-resolution FISH images in a multi-spectral scanning mode, a huge amount of image data with the stack of the multiple three-dimensional (3-D) image slices is generated from a single specimen. Automated preprocessing these scanned images to eliminate the non-useful and redundant data is important to make the automated FISH tests acceptable in clinical applications. In this study, a dual-detector fluorescence image scanning system was applied to scan four specimen slides with FISH-probed chromosome X. A CAD scheme was developed to detect analyzable interphase cells and map the multiple imaging slices recorded FISH-probed signals into the 2-D projection images. CAD scheme was then applied to each projection image to detect analyzable interphase cells using an adaptive multiple-threshold algorithm, identify FISH-probed signals using a top-hat transform, and compute the ratios between the normal and abnormal cells. To assess CAD performance, the FISH-probed signals were also independently visually detected by an observer. The Kappa coefficients for agreement between CAD and observer ranged from 0.69 to 1.0 in detecting/counting FISH signal spots in four testing samples. The study demonstrated the feasibility of automated FISH signal analysis that applying a CAD scheme to the automated generated 2-D projection images.

  20. Novel X-Ray Detectors for Medical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knüpfer, W.; Hell, E.; Mattern, D.

    1999-08-01

    A number of different imaging systems are in use in X-ray medical diagnostics (e.g. digital radiography or computer tomography). The design goal of these imaging systems is to optimally use the information contained in X-ray quanta that have passed through the patient. The best image quality, as well as the minimisation of the X-ray dose applied to the patient are of prime importance. We report about innovations for novel detectors which reduce the X-ray dose and improve the image quality simultaneously. Advances in thin film electronics have permitted the development of large a-Si:H imaging arrays to design fat panel solid state detectors (short FD, up to 45 × 45 cm 2) for both digital radiography and fluoroscopy. The proposed detector consists of a CsI:T1 needle shaped scintillation crystal layer (thickness: 450 μm, needle diameter ˜ 10 μm) in front of an a-Si:H-panel. The Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) is about 65% (at spatial frequency zero) and spatial resolution is 2.8 lp/mm at 20% of the MTF and 6.2 lp/mm at 4%. In computed tomography (CT), a new geenration of linear detector array consists of Gadolinium Oxysulfid (GOS) ceramic scintillator elements, glued onto photodiodes. Important criteria for the selection of the detector material are good absorption of the incident X-rays (α > 95%) and high efficiency of conversion of the absorbed radiation energy to an electrical signal. A very short decay time to extremely low levels of afterglow is an advantage for the very short scanning times in CT. One gets a DQE (at 0 mm -1) about 80%. The next step toward dose reduction could be implemented by the application of monochromatic instead of polychromatic X-rays. This would additionally improve the DQE and thus enhance image quality. In addition, with the application of monochromatic X-rays, scattered radiation could be suppressed to a large extent by energy-selective single photon measurement, without loss of unscattered photons. At present, large area

  1. Novel X-ray detectors for medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuepfer, W.; Hell, E.; Mattern, D

    1999-08-01

    A number of different imaging systems are in use in X-ray medical diagnostics (e. g. digital radiography or computer tomography). The design goal of these imaging systems is to optimally use the information contained in X-ray quanta that have passed through the patient. The best image quality, as well as the minimisation of the X-ray dose applied to the patient are of prime importance. We report about innovations for novel detectors which reduce the X-ray dose and improve the image quality simultaneously. Advances in thin film electronics have permitted the development of large a-Si:H imaging arrays to design flat panel solid state detectors (short FD, up to 45 x 45 cm{sup 2}) for both digital radiography and fluoroscopy. The proposed detector consists of a CsI:Tl needle shaped scintillation crystal layer (thickness: 450 {upsilon}m, needle diameter {approx} 10 {upsilon}m) in front of an a-Si:H-panel. The Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) is about 65% (at spatial frequency zero) and spatial resolution is 2.8 lp/mm at 20% of the MTF and 6.2 lp/mm at 4%. In computed tomography (CT), a new generation of linear detector array consists of Gadolinium Oxysulfid (GOS) ceramic scintillator elements, glued onto photodiodes. Important criteria for the selection of the detector material are good absorption of the incident X-rays ({alpha} > 95%) and high efficiency of conversion of the absorbed radiation energy to an electrical signal. A very short decay time to extremely low levels of afterglow is an advantage for the very short scanning times in CT. One gets a DQE (at 0 mm{sup -1}) about 80%. The next step toward dose reduction could be implemented by the application of monochromatic instead of polychromatic X-rays. This would additionally improve the DQE and thus enhance image quality. In addition, with the application of monochromatic X-rays, scattered radiation could be suppressed to a large extent by energy-selective single photon measurement, without loss of unscattered

  2. Software components for medical image visualization and surgical planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starreveld, Yves P.; Gobbi, David G.; Finnis, Kirk; Peters, Terence M.

    2001-05-01

    Purpose: The development of new applications in medical image visualization and surgical planning requires the completion of many common tasks such as image reading and re-sampling, segmentation, volume rendering, and surface display. Intra-operative use requires an interface to a tracking system and image registration, and the application requires basic, easy to understand user interface components. Rapid changes in computer and end-application hardware, as well as in operating systems and network environments make it desirable to have a hardware and operating system as an independent collection of reusable software components that can be assembled rapidly to prototype new applications. Methods: Using the OpenGL based Visualization Toolkit as a base, we have developed a set of components that implement the above mentioned tasks. The components are written in both C++ and Python, but all are accessible from Python, a byte compiled scripting language. The components have been used on the Red Hat Linux, Silicon Graphics Iris, Microsoft Windows, and Apple OS X platforms. Rigorous object-oriented software design methods have been applied to ensure hardware independence and a standard application programming interface (API). There are components to acquire, display, and register images from MRI, MRA, CT, Computed Rotational Angiography (CRA), Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), 2D and 3D ultrasound, video and physiological recordings. Interfaces to various tracking systems for intra-operative use have also been implemented. Results: The described components have been implemented and tested. To date they have been used to create image manipulation and viewing tools, a deep brain functional atlas, a 3D ultrasound acquisition and display platform, a prototype minimally invasive robotic coronary artery bypass graft planning system, a tracked neuro-endoscope guidance system and a frame-based stereotaxy neurosurgery planning tool. The frame-based stereotaxy module has been

  3. Evaluation of spinal and pelvic parameters from three-dimensional medical images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrtovec, T.

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging of the spine and pelvis is usually performed by conventional and digital radiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Radiographic imaging provides two-dimensional (2D) projection images, while CT and MR imaging provide a series of 2D cross-sections that

  4. Medical image computing for computer-supported diagnostics and therapy. Advances and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handels, H; Ehrhardt, J

    2009-01-01

    Medical image computing has become one of the most challenging fields in medical informatics. In image-based diagnostics of the future software assistance will become more and more important, and image analysis systems integrating advanced image computing methods are needed to extract quantitative image parameters to characterize the state and changes of image structures of interest (e.g. tumors, organs, vessels, bones etc.) in a reproducible and objective way. Furthermore, in the field of software-assisted and navigated surgery medical image computing methods play a key role and have opened up new perspectives for patient treatment. However, further developments are needed to increase the grade of automation, accuracy, reproducibility and robustness. Moreover, the systems developed have to be integrated into the clinical workflow. For the development of advanced image computing systems methods of different scientific fields have to be adapted and used in combination. The principal methodologies in medical image computing are the following: image segmentation, image registration, image analysis for quantification and computer assisted image interpretation, modeling and simulation as well as visualization and virtual reality. Especially, model-based image computing techniques open up new perspectives for prediction of organ changes and risk analysis of patients and will gain importance in diagnostic and therapy of the future. From a methodical point of view the authors identify the following future trends and perspectives in medical image computing: development of optimized application-specific systems and integration into the clinical workflow, enhanced computational models for image analysis and virtual reality training systems, integration of different image computing methods, further integration of multimodal image data and biosignals and advanced methods for 4D medical image computing. The development of image analysis systems for diagnostic support or

  5. Research on an Improved Medical Image Enhancement Algorithm Based on P-M Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Beibei; Yang, Jingjing; Hao, Shangfu; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Image enhancement can improve the detail of the image and so as to achieve the purpose of the identification of the image. At present, the image enhancement is widely used in medical images, which can help doctor's diagnosis. IEABPM (Image Enhancement Algorithm Based on P-M Model) is one of the most common image enhancement algorithms. However, it may cause the lost of the texture details and other features. To solve the problems, this paper proposes an IIEABPM (Improved Image Enhancement Algorithm Based on P-M Model). Simulation demonstrates that IIEABPM can effectively solve the problems of IEABPM, and improve image clarity, image contrast, and image brightness.

  6. Impact of Point-Spread Function Modeling on PET Image Quality in Integrated PET/MR Hybrid Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aklan, Bassim; Oehmigen, Mark; Beiderwellen, Karsten; Ruhlmann, Marcus; Paulus, Daniel H; Jakoby, Bjoern W; Ritt, Philipp; Quick, Harald H

    2016-01-01

    with PSF were substantially increased in the range of 6%-75%, 5%-131%, and 5%-148% for SUVmean, SUVpeak, and SUVmax, respectively. A regression analysis showed that the relative increase in SUVmean/peak/max decreases with increasing lesion size, whereas it increases with the distance from the center of the PET field of view. In whole-body PET/MR hybrid imaging, PSF-based PET reconstructions can improve activity recovery and image noise, especially at lateral positions of the PET field of view. This has been demonstrated quantitatively in phantom experiments as well as in patient imaging, for which additionally an improvement of image quality could be observed. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  7. An Optimal Partial Differential Equations-based Stopping Criterion for Medical Image Denoising

    OpenAIRE

    Khanian, Maryam; Feizi, Awat; Davari, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Improving the quality of medical images at pre- and post-surgery operations are necessary for beginning and speeding up the recovery process. Partial differential equations-based models have become a powerful and well-known tool in different areas of image processing such as denoising, multiscale image analysis, edge detection and other fields of image processing and computer vision. In this paper, an algorithm for medical image denoising using anisotropic diffusion filter with a convenient s...

  8. RayPlus: a Web-Based Platform for Medical Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Rong; Luo, Ming; Sun, Zhi; Shi, Shuyue; Xiao, Peng; Xie, Qingguo

    2017-04-01

    Medical image can provide valuable information for preclinical research, clinical diagnosis, and treatment. As the widespread use of digital medical imaging, many researchers are currently developing medical image processing algorithms and systems in order to accommodate a better result to clinical community, including accurate clinical parameters or processed images from the original images. In this paper, we propose a web-based platform to present and process medical images. By using Internet and novel database technologies, authorized users can easily access to medical images and facilitate their workflows of processing with server-side powerful computing performance without any installation. We implement a series of algorithms of image processing and visualization in the initial version of Rayplus. Integration of our system allows much flexibility and convenience for both research and clinical communities.

  9. Selenium coated CMOS passive pixel array for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Shaikh Hasibul; Goldan, Amir H.; Hadji, Bahman; Belev, George; Kasap, Safa; Karim, Karim S.

    2011-03-01

    Digital imaging systems for medical applications use amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) technology due to its ability to be manufactured over large areas. However, TFT technology is far inferior to crystalline silicon CMOS technology in terms of the speed, stability, noise susceptibility, and feature size. This work investigates the feasibility of integrating an imaging array fabricated in CMOS technology with an a-Se detector. The design of a CMOS passive pixel sensor (PPS) array is presented, in addition to how an 8×8 PPS array is integrated with the 75 micron thick stabilized amorphous selenium detector. A non-linear increase in the dark current of 200 pA, 500 pA and 2 nA is observed with 0.27, 0.67 and 1.33 V/micron electric field respectively, which shows a successful integration of selenium layer with the CMOS array. Results also show that the integrated Selenium-CMOS PPS array has good responsivity to optical light and X-rays, leaving the door open for further research on implementing CMOS imaging architectures going forward. Demonstrating that the PPS chips using CMOS technology can use a-Se as a detector is thus the first step in a promising path of research, which should yield substantial and exciting results for the field. Though area may still prove challenging, larger CMOS wafers can be manufactured and tiled to allow for a large enough size for certain diagnostic imaging applications and potentially even large area applications like digital mammography.

  10. Multimodality medical image database for temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siadat, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Fotouhi, Farshad A.; Elisevich, Kost

    2003-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a human brain multi-modality database for surgical candidacy determination in temporal lobe epilepsy. The focus of the paper is on content-based image management, navigation and retrieval. Several medical image-processing methods including our newly developed segmentation method are utilized for information extraction/correlation and indexing. The input data includes T1-, T2-Weighted and FLAIR MRI and ictal/interictal SPECT modalities with associated clinical data and EEG data analysis. The database can answer queries regarding issues such as the correlation between the attribute X of the entity Y and the outcome of a temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. The entity Y can be a brain anatomical structure such as the hippocampus. The attribute X can be either a functionality feature of the anatomical structure Y, calculated with SPECT modalities, such as signal average, or a volumetric/morphological feature of the entity Y such as volume or average curvature. The outcome of the surgery can be any surgery assessment such as non-verbal Wechsler memory quotient. A determination is made regarding surgical candidacy by analysis of both textual and image data. The current database system suggests a surgical determination for the cases with relatively small hippocampus and high signal intensity average on FLAIR images within the hippocampus. This indication matches the neurosurgeons expectations/observations. Moreover, as the database gets more populated with patient profiles and individual surgical outcomes, using data mining methods one may discover partially invisible correlations between the contents of different modalities of data and the outcome of the surgery.

  11. An approach to assessing stochastic radiogenic risk in medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolbarst, Anthony B.; Hendee, William R. [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine and Division of Radiation Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55901 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: This letter suggests a formalism, the medical effective dose (MED), that is suitable for assessing stochastic radiogenic risks in diagnostic medical procedures. Methods: The MED is derived from radiobiological and probabilistic first principals, including: (1) The independence of radiation-induced biological effects in neighboring voxels at low doses; (2) the linear no-threshold assumption for stochastic radiation injury (although other dose-response relationships could be incorporated, instead); (3) the best human radiation dose-response data currently available; and (4) the built-in possibility that the carcinogenic risk to an irradiated organ may depend on its volume. The MED involves a dose-risk summation over irradiated voxels at high spatial resolution; it reduces to the traditional effective dose when every organ is irradiated uniformly and when the dependence of risk on organ volumes is ignored. Standard relative-risk tissue weighting factors can be used with the MED approach until more refined data become available. Results: The MED is intended for clinical and phantom dosimetry, and it provides an estimate of overall relative radiogenic stochastic risk for any given dose distribution. A result of the MED derivation is that the stochastic risk may increase with the volume of tissue (i.e., the number of cells) irradiated, a feature that can be activated when forthcoming radiobiological research warrants it. In this regard, the MED resembles neither the standard effective dose (E) nor the CT dose index (CTDI), but it is somewhat like the CT dose-length product (DLP). Conclusions: The MED is a novel, probabilistically and biologically based means of estimating stochastic-risk-weighted doses associated with medical imaging. Built in, ab initio, is the ability to link radiogenic risk to organ volume and other clinical factors. It is straightforward to implement when medical dose distributions are available, provided that one is content, for the time

  12. Physical Constraint Finite Element Model for Medical Image Registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingya; Wang, Jiajun; Wang, Xiuying; Gao, Xin; Feng, Dagan

    2015-01-01

    Due to being derived from linear assumption, most elastic body based non-rigid image registration algorithms are facing challenges for soft tissues with complex nonlinear behavior and with large deformations. To take into account the geometric nonlinearity of soft tissues, we propose a registration algorithm on the basis of Newtonian differential equation. The material behavior of soft tissues is modeled as St. Venant-Kirchhoff elasticity, and the nonlinearity of the continuum represents the quadratic term of the deformation gradient under the Green- St.Venant strain. In our algorithm, the elastic force is formulated as the derivative of the deformation energy with respect to the nodal displacement vectors of the finite element; the external force is determined by the registration similarity gradient flow which drives the floating image deforming to the equilibrium condition. We compared our approach to three other models: 1) the conventional linear elastic finite element model (FEM); 2) the dynamic elastic FEM; 3) the robust block matching (RBM) method. The registration accuracy was measured using three similarities: MSD (Mean Square Difference), NC (Normalized Correlation) and NMI (Normalized Mutual Information), and was also measured using the mean and max distance between the ground seeds and corresponding ones after registration. We validated our method on 60 image pairs including 30 medical image pairs with artificial deformation and 30 clinical image pairs for both the chest chemotherapy treatment in different periods and brain MRI normalization. Our method achieved a distance error of 0.320±0.138 mm in x direction and 0.326±0.111 mm in y direction, MSD of 41.96±13.74, NC of 0.9958±0.0019, NMI of 1.2962±0.0114 for images with large artificial deformations; and average NC of 0.9622±0.008 and NMI of 1.2764±0.0089 for the real clinical cases. Student's t-test demonstrated that our model statistically outperformed the other methods in comparison (p

  13. Physical Constraint Finite Element Model for Medical Image Registration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingya Zhang

    Full Text Available Due to being derived from linear assumption, most elastic body based non-rigid image registration algorithms are facing challenges for soft tissues with complex nonlinear behavior and with large deformations. To take into account the geometric nonlinearity of soft tissues, we propose a registration algorithm on the basis of Newtonian differential equation. The material behavior of soft tissues is modeled as St. Venant-Kirchhoff elasticity, and the nonlinearity of the continuum represents the quadratic term of the deformation gradient under the Green- St.Venant strain. In our algorithm, the elastic force is formulated as the derivative of the deformation energy with respect to the nodal displacement vectors of the finite element; the external force is determined by the registration similarity gradient flow which drives the floating image deforming to the equilibrium condition. We compared our approach to three other models: 1 the conventional linear elastic finite element model (FEM; 2 the dynamic elastic FEM; 3 the robust block matching (RBM method. The registration accuracy was measured using three similarities: MSD (Mean Square Difference, NC (Normalized Correlation and NMI (Normalized Mutual Information, and was also measured using the mean and max distance between the ground seeds and corresponding ones after registration. We validated our method on 60 image pairs including 30 medical image pairs with artificial deformation and 30 clinical image pairs for both the chest chemotherapy treatment in different periods and brain MRI normalization. Our method achieved a distance error of 0.320±0.138 mm in x direction and 0.326±0.111 mm in y direction, MSD of 41.96±13.74, NC of 0.9958±0.0019, NMI of 1.2962±0.0114 for images with large artificial deformations; and average NC of 0.9622±0.008 and NMI of 1.2764±0.0089 for the real clinical cases. Student's t-test demonstrated that our model statistically outperformed the other methods in

  14. Satellite Image Pansharpening Using a Hybrid Approach for Object-Based Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thanh Hoan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Intensity-Hue-Saturation (IHS, Brovey Transform (BT, and Smoothing-Filter-Based-Intensity Modulation (SFIM algorithms were used to pansharpen GeoEye-1 imagery. The pansharpened images were then segmented in Berkeley Image Seg using a wide range of segmentation parameters, and the spatial and spectral accuracy of image segments was measured. We found that pansharpening algorithms that preserve more of the spatial information of the higher resolution panchromatic image band (i.e., IHS and BT led to more spatially-accurate segmentations, while pansharpening algorithms that minimize the distortion of spectral information of the lower resolution multispectral image bands (i.e., SFIM led to more spectrally-accurate image segments. Based on these findings, we developed a new IHS-SFIM combination approach, specifically for object-based image analysis (OBIA, which combined the better spatial information of IHS and the more accurate spectral information of SFIM to produce image segments with very high spatial and spectral accuracy.

  15. A new concept for medical imaging centered on cellular phone technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Yair; Ivorra, Antoni; Rubinsky, Boris

    2008-04-30

    According to World Health Organization reports, some three quarters of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In addition, in developing countries over 50% of medical equipment that is available is not being used because it is too sophisticated or in disrepair or because the health personnel are not trained to use it. The goal of this study is to introduce and demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept in medical imaging that is centered on cellular phone technology and which may provide a solution to medical imaging in underserved areas. The new system replaces the conventional stand-alone medical imaging device with a new medical imaging system made of two independent components connected through cellular phone technology. The independent units are: a) a data acquisition device (DAD) at a remote patient site that is simple, with limited controls and no image display capability and b) an advanced image reconstruction and hardware control multiserver unit at a central site. The cellular phone technology transmits unprocessed raw data from the patient site DAD and receives and displays the processed image from the central site. (This is different from conventional telemedicine where the image reconstruction and control is at the patient site and telecommunication is used to transmit processed images from the patient site). The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that the cellular phone technology can function in the proposed mode. The feasibility of the concept is demonstrated using a new frequency division multiplexing electrical impedance tomography system, which we have developed for dynamic medical imaging, as the medical imaging modality. The system is used to image through a cellular phone a simulation of breast cancer tumors in a medical imaging diagnostic mode and to image minimally invasive tissue ablation with irreversible electroporation in a medical imaging interventional mode.

  16. A new concept for medical imaging centered on cellular phone technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Granot

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available According to World Health Organization reports, some three quarters of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In addition, in developing countries over 50% of medical equipment that is available is not being used because it is too sophisticated or in disrepair or because the health personnel are not trained to use it. The goal of this study is to introduce and demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept in medical imaging that is centered on cellular phone technology and which may provide a solution to medical imaging in underserved areas. The new system replaces the conventional stand-alone medical imaging device with a new medical imaging system made of two independent components connected through cellular phone technology. The independent units are: a a data acquisition device (DAD at a remote patient site that is simple, with limited controls and no image display capability and b an advanced image reconstruction and hardware control multiserver unit at a central site. The cellular phone technology transmits unprocessed raw data from the patient site DAD and receives and displays the processed image from the central site. (This is different from conventional telemedicine where the image reconstruction and control is at the patient site and telecommunication is used to transmit processed images from the patient site. The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that the cellular phone technology can function in the proposed mode. The feasibility of the concept is demonstrated using a new frequency division multiplexing electrical impedance tomography system, which we have developed for dynamic medical imaging, as the medical imaging modality. The system is used to image through a cellular phone a simulation of breast cancer tumors in a medical imaging diagnostic mode and to image minimally invasive tissue ablation with irreversible electroporation in a medical imaging interventional mode.

  17. Parallel and Efficient Sensitivity Analysis of Microscopy Image Segmentation Workflows in Hybrid Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiros, Willian; Teodoro, George; Kurc, Tahsin; Kong, Jun; Melo, Alba C M A; Saltz, Joel

    2017-09-01

    We investigate efficient sensitivity analysis (SA) of algorithms that segment and classify image features in a large dataset of high-resolution images. Algorithm SA is the process of evaluating variations of methods and parameter values to quantify differences in the output. A SA can be very compute demanding because it requires re-processing the input dataset several times with different parameters to assess variations in output. In this work, we introduce strategies to efficiently speed up SA via runtime optimizations targeting distributed hybrid systems and reuse of computations from runs with different parameters. We evaluate our approach using a cancer image analysis workflow on a hybrid cluster with 256 nodes, each with an Intel Phi and a dual socket CPU. The SA attained a parallel efficiency of over 90% on 256 nodes. The cooperative execution using the CPUs and the Phi available in each node with smart task assignment strategies resulted in an additional speedup of about 2×. Finally, multi-level computation reuse lead to an additional speedup of up to 2.46× on the parallel version. The level of performance attained with the proposed optimizations will allow the use of SA in large-scale studies.

  18. ENVISION, innovative medical imaging tools for particle therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Particle therapy is an advanced technique of cancer radiation therapy, using protons or other ions to target the cancerous mass. ENVISION aims at developing medical imaging tools to improve the dose delivery to the patient, to ensure a safer and more effective treatment. The animation covers some of these tools, including Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), motion monitoring techniques and simulation. The ENVISION project is co-funded by the European Commission under FP7 Grant Agreement N. 241851. ENVISION serves as a training platform for the Marie Curie Initial Training Programme ENTERVISION, funded by the European Commission under FP7 Grant Agreement N. 264552. Project Management: Manuela Cirilli 3D animation: Jeroen Huijben, Nymus3d Produced by: CERN KT/Life Sciences and ENVISION

  19. Medical image of the week: alpha intrusion into REM sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty S

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old woman with a past medical history of hypertension and chronic headaches was referred to the sleep laboratory for high clinical suspicion for sleep apnea based on a history of snoring, witnessed apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness. An overnight sleep study was performed. Images during N3 Sleep and REM sleep are shown (Figures 1 and 2. Alpha intrusion in delta sleep is seen in patients with fibromyalgia, depression, chronic fatigue syndrome, anxiety disorder, and primary sleep disorders like psychophysiological insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, circadian disorders and narcolepsy (1. Bursts of alpha waves during REM sleep may be more common during phasic REM than tonic REM. The REM alpha bursts (alpha activity lasting at least 3 seconds without an increase in EMG amplitude may represent microarousals (2. Hypersynchronous theta activity should be differentiated from the spike and waveform activity seen in seizures.

  20. A 3D medical image database management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, M; Cody, W; Faloutsos, C; Richardson, J; Toga, A

    1996-01-01

    We describe the design and implementation of QBISM (Query By Interactive, Spatial Multimedia), a prototype for querying and visualizing 3D spatial data. Our medical image application is focused on the brain mapping requirements for multimodality relationships across multiple subjects. It incorporates data describing both structure and function. It includes data structures that describe anatomy, physiology, coordinates using rendered imagery and statistical output. The system is built on top of the Starburst DBMS extended to handle spatial data types, specially, scalar fields and arbitrary regions or space within such fields. In this paper we list the requirements of the application, discuss the logical and physical database design issues, and present timing results from our prototype. We observed that the DBMS' early spatial filtering results in significant performance savings because the system response time is dominated by the amount of data retrieved, transmitted, and rendered.

  1. Retina Image Vessel Segmentation Using a Hybrid CGLI Level Set Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guannan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As a nonintrusive method, the retina imaging provides us with a better way for the diagnosis of ophthalmologic diseases. Extracting the vessel profile automatically from the retina image is an important step in analyzing retina images. A novel hybrid active contour model is proposed to segment the fundus image automatically in this paper. It combines the signed pressure force function introduced by the Selective Binary and Gaussian Filtering Regularized Level Set (SBGFRLS model with the local intensity property introduced by the Local Binary fitting (LBF model to overcome the difficulty of the low contrast in segmentation process. It is more robust to the initial condition than the traditional methods and is easily implemented compared to the supervised vessel extraction methods. Proposed segmentation method was evaluated on two public datasets, DRIVE (Digital Retinal Images for Vessel Extraction and STARE (Structured Analysis of the Retina (the average accuracy of 0.9390 with 0.7358 sensitivity and 0.9680 specificity on DRIVE datasets and average accuracy of 0.9409 with 0.7449 sensitivity and 0.9690 specificity on STARE datasets. The experimental results show that our method is effective and our method is also robust to some kinds of pathology images compared with the traditional level set methods.

  2. Hybrid fluorescence and electron cryo-microscopy for simultaneous electron and photon imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hirofumi; Fukuda, Yoshiyuki; Arai, Yoshihiro; Terakawa, Susumu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    Integration of fluorescence light and transmission electron microscopy into the same device would represent an important advance in correlative microscopy, which traditionally involves two separate microscopes for imaging. To achieve such integration, the primary technical challenge that must be solved regards how to arrange two objective lenses used for light and electron microscopy in such a manner that they can properly focus on a single specimen. To address this issue, both lateral displacement of the specimen between two lenses and specimen rotation have been proposed. Such movement of the specimen allows sequential collection of two kinds of microscopic images of a single target, but prevents simultaneous imaging. This shortcoming has been made up by using a simple optical device, a reflection mirror. Here, we present an approach toward the versatile integration of fluorescence and electron microscopy for simultaneous imaging. The potential of simultaneous hybrid microscopy was demonstrated by fluorescence and electron sequential imaging of a fluorescent protein expressed in cells and cathodoluminescence imaging of fluorescent beads. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A virtual imaging platform for multi-modality medical image simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatard, Tristan; Lartizien, Carole; Gibaud, Bernard; da Silva, Rafael Ferreira; Forestier, Germain; Cervenansky, Frédéric; Alessandrini, Martino; Benoit-Cattin, Hugues; Bernard, Olivier; Camarasu-Pop, Sorina; Cerezo, Nadia; Clarysse, Patrick; Gaignard, Alban; Hugonnard, Patrick; Liebgott, Hervé; Marache, Simon; Marion, Adrien; Montagnat, Johan; Tabary, Joachim; Friboulet, Denis

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the Virtual Imaging Platform (VIP), a platform accessible at http://vip.creatis.insa-lyon.fr to facilitate the sharing of object models and medical image simulators, and to provide access to distributed computing and storage resources. A complete overview is presented, describing the ontologies designed to share models in a common repository, the workflow template used to integrate simulators, and the tools and strategies used to exploit computing and storage resources. Simulation results obtained in four image modalities and with different models show that VIP is versatile and robust enough to support large simulations. The platform currently has 200 registered users who consumed 33 years of CPU time in 2011.

  4. Hybrid Data Hiding Scheme Using Right-Most Digit Replacement and Adaptive Least Significant Bit for Digital Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Hussain

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of image steganographic methods considers three main key issues: high embedding capacity, good visual symmetry/quality, and security. In this paper, a hybrid data hiding method combining the right-most digit replacement (RMDR with an adaptive least significant bit (ALSB is proposed to provide not only high embedding capacity but also maintain a good visual symmetry. The cover-image is divided into lower texture (symmetry patterns and higher texture (asymmetry patterns areas and these textures determine the selection of RMDR and ALSB methods, respectively, according to pixel symmetry. This paper has three major contributions. First, the proposed hybrid method enhanced the embedding capacity due to efficient ALSB utilization in the higher texture areas of cover images. Second, the proposed hybrid method maintains the high visual quality because RMDR has the closest selection process to generate the symmetry between stego and cover pixels. Finally, the proposed hybrid method is secure against statistical regular or singular (RS steganalysis and pixel difference histogram steganalysis because RMDR is capable of evading the risk of RS detection attacks due to pixel digits replacement instead of bits. Extensive experimental tests (over 1500+ cover images are conducted with recent least significant bit (LSB-based hybrid methods and it is demonstrated that the proposed hybrid method has a high embedding capacity (800,019 bits while maintaining good visual symmetry (39.00% peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR.

  5. Stochastic Primal-Dual Hybrid Gradient Algorithm with Arbitrary Sampling and Imaging Application

    KAUST Repository

    Chambolle, Antonin

    2017-06-15

    We propose a stochastic extension of the primal-dual hybrid gradient algorithm studied by Chambolle and Pock in 2011 to solve saddle point problems that are separable in the dual variable. The analysis is carried out for general convex-concave saddle point problems and problems that are either partially smooth / strongly convex or fully smooth / strongly convex. We perform the analysis for arbitrary samplings of dual variables, and obtain known deterministic results as a special case. Several variants of our stochastic method significantly outperform the deterministic variant on a variety of imaging tasks.

  6. Quality Assurance of Pixel Hybrid Photon Detectors for the LHCb Ring Imaging Cherenkov Counters

    CERN Document Server

    Carson, Laurence

    Pion/kaon discrimination in the LHCb experiment will be provided by two Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) counters. These use arrays of 484 Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) to detect the Cherenkov photons emitted by charged particles traversing the RICH. The results from comprehensive quality assurance tests on the 550 HPDs manufactured for LHCb are described. Leakage currents, dead channel probabilities, dark count rates and ion feedback rates are reported. Furthermore, measurements carried out on a sample of tubes to determine the efficiency of the HPD pixel chip by measuring the summed analogue response from the backplane of the silicon sensor are described.

  7. Multifunctional hybrid nanoparticles for two-photon fluorescence imaging and photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldeck, Patrice L.; Maurin, Mathieu; Philipot, Cecile; Zaiba, Soraya; Gallavardin, Thibault; Maury, Olivier; Andraud, Chantal; Dubois, Fabien; Ibanez, Alain; Lerouge, Frédéric; Parola, Stéphane; Stephan, Olivier; van Der Sanden, Baudwin

    2011-02-01

    We review our work on several strategies to elaborate multifunctional nanoparticules for two-photon imaging or/and photodynamic therapy. Our first strategy is based on the incorporation of two-photon hydrophobic fluorophors in bio-compatible pluronic micelles using the mini-emulsion technique. Our second strategy is based on fluorescent organic nanocrystal grown in silicate spheres. These core-shell hybrid nanoparticles are obtained by a spray-drying process from sol-gel solutions. Our third strategy consists in the encapsulation of hydrophilic molecules in the water core of gold nanospheres. They are obtained by a stabilized emulsion in biphasic liquid-liquid medium without surfactant.

  8. Towards improved hardware component attenuation correction in PET/MR hybrid imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, D. H.; Tellmann, L.; Quick, H. H.

    2013-11-01

    In positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) hybrid imaging attenuation correction (AC) of the patient tissue and patient table is performed by converting the CT-based Hounsfield units (HU) to linear attenuation coefficients (LAC) of PET. When applied to the new field of hardware component AC in PET/magnetic resonance (MR) hybrid imaging, this conversion method may result in local overcorrection of PET activity values. The aim of this study thus was to optimize the conversion parameters for CT-based AC of hardware components in PET/MR. Systematic evaluation and optimization of the HU to LAC conversion parameters has been performed for the hardware component attenuation map (µ-map) of a flexible radiofrequency (RF) coil used in PET/MR imaging. Furthermore, spatial misregistration of this RF coil to its µ-map was simulated by shifting the µ-map in different directions and the effect on PET quantification was evaluated. Measurements of a PET NEMA standard emission phantom were performed on an integrated hybrid PET/MR system. Various CT parameters were used to calculate different µ-maps for the flexible RF coil and to evaluate the impact on the PET activity concentration. A 511 keV transmission scan of the local RF coil was used as standard of reference to adapt the slope of the conversion from HUs to LACs at 511 keV. The average underestimation of the PET activity concentration due to the non-attenuation corrected RF coil in place was calculated to be 5.0% in the overall phantom. When considering attenuation only in the upper volume of the phantom, the average difference to the reference scan without RF coil is 11.0%. When the PET/CT conversion is applied, an average overestimation of 3.1% (without extended CT scale) and 4.2% (with extended CT scale) is observed in the top volume of the NEMA phantom. Using the adapted conversion resulting from this study, the deviation in the top volume of the phantom is reduced to -0.5% and shows the lowest

  9. Application of integral imaging autostereoscopic display to medical training equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Hiroyuki

    2010-02-01

    We applied an autostereoscopic display based on the integral imaging method (II method) to training equipment for medical treatment in an attempt to recover the binocular vision performance of strabismus or amblyopia (lazy eye) patients. This report summarizes the application method and results. The point of the training is to recognize the parallax using both eyes. The strabismus or amblyopia patients have to recognize the information on both eyes equally when they gaze at the display with parallax and perceive the stereo depth of the content. Participants in this interactive training engage actively with the image. As a result, they are able to revive their binocular visual function while playing a game. Through the training, the observers became able to recognize the amount of parallax correctly. In addition, the training level can be changed according to the eyesight difference between a right eye and a left eye. As a result, we ascertained that practical application of the II method for strabismus or amblyopia patients would be possible.

  10. Thermal Imaging of Medical Saw Blades and Guides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Steffner, Thomas E [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Better Than New, LLC., has developed a surface treatment to reduce the friction and wear of orthopedic saw blades and guides. The medical saw blades were thermally imaged while sawing through fresh animal bone and an IR camera was used to measure the blade temperature as it exited the bone. The thermal performance of as-manufactured saw blades was compared to surface-treated blades, and a freshly used blade was used for temperature calibration purposes in order to account for any emissivity changes due to organic transfer layers. Thermal imaging indicates that the treated saw blades cut faster and cooler than untreated blades. In orthopedic surgery, saw guides are used to perfectly size the bone to accept a prosthesis. However, binding can occur between the blade and guide because of misalignment. This condition increases the saw blade temperature and may result in tissue damage. Both treated ad untreated saw guides were also studied. The treated saw guide operated at a significantly lower temperature than untreated guide. Saw blades and guides that operate at a cooler temperature are expected to reduce the amount of tissue damage (thermal necrosis) and may reduce the number of post-operative complications.

  11. Investigation of Bias in Continuous Medical Image Label Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fangxu; Prince, Jerry L; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-01-01

    Image labeling is essential for analyzing morphometric features in medical imaging data. Labels can be obtained by either human interaction or automated segmentation algorithms, both of which suffer from errors. The Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) algorithm for both discrete-valued and continuous-valued labels has been proposed to find the consensus fusion while simultaneously estimating rater performance. In this paper, we first show that the previously reported continuous STAPLE in which bias and variance are used to represent rater performance yields a maximum likelihood solution in which bias is indeterminate. We then analyze the major cause of the deficiency and evaluate two classes of auxiliary bias estimation processes, one that estimates the bias as part of the algorithm initialization and the other that uses a maximum a posteriori criterion with a priori probabilities on the rater bias. We compare the efficacy of six methods, three variants from each class, in simulations and through empirical human rater experiments. We comment on their properties, identify deficient methods, and propose effective methods as solution.

  12. Investigation of Bias in Continuous Medical Image Label Fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangxu Xing

    Full Text Available Image labeling is essential for analyzing morphometric features in medical imaging data. Labels can be obtained by either human interaction or automated segmentation algorithms, both of which suffer from errors. The Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE algorithm for both discrete-valued and continuous-valued labels has been proposed to find the consensus fusion while simultaneously estimating rater performance. In this paper, we first show that the previously reported continuous STAPLE in which bias and variance are used to represent rater performance yields a maximum likelihood solution in which bias is indeterminate. We then analyze the major cause of the deficiency and evaluate two classes of auxiliary bias estimation processes, one that estimates the bias as part of the algorithm initialization and the other that uses a maximum a posteriori criterion with a priori probabilities on the rater bias. We compare the efficacy of six methods, three variants from each class, in simulations and through empirical human rater experiments. We comment on their properties, identify deficient methods, and propose effective methods as solution.

  13. Isoluminance: a color technique for visualizing multivariable medical image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminger, Bradley M.

    1993-06-01

    We have developed a technique for visualizing medical image data sets that have multiple values at each physical location. These data sets are increasingly common as physicians attempt to correlate between modalities (for instance, CT and nuclear medicine, MR and PET, CT and MR) as well as within modalities (for instance, MR metabolic and anatomical scans). Our technique, termed 'isoluminance', is designed primarily for displaying sets that have two scalar values associated with each physical (x,y) location on a two dimensional scan. A perceptually uniform luminance scale is used to encode one dimension. At each step of the luminance scale a set of isoluminant hue steps are used to encode the other dimension. The hue scale is chosen to be perceptually uniform and as 'natural' as possible. The resulting data set can then be displayed as a single image on a color display. We have found observers using our technique are able to comprehend both of the data sets, to understand relationships between the data sets, and, when using interactive manipulation techniques, are able to select or label specific features of the data set.

  14. Discriminative generalized Hough transform for object localization in medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppertshofen, Heike; Lorenz, Cristian; Rose, Georg; Schramm, Hauke

    2013-07-01

    This paper proposes the discriminative generalized Hough transform (DGHT) as an efficient and reliable means for object localization in medical images. It is meant to give a deeper insight into the underlying theory and a comprehensive overview of the methodology and the scope of applications. The DGHT combines the generalized Hough transform (GHT) with a discriminative training technique for the GHT models to obtain more efficient and robust localization results. To this end, the model points are equipped with individual weights, which are trained discriminatively with respect to a minimal localization error. Through this weighting, the models become more robust since the training focuses on common features of the target object over a set of training images. Unlike other weighting strategies, our training algorithm focuses on the error rate and allows for negative weights, which can be employed to encode rivaling structures into the model. The basic algorithm is presented here in conjunction with several extensions for fully automatic and faster processing. These include: (1) the automatic generation of models from training images and their iterative refinement, (2) the training of joint models for similar objects, and (3) a multi-level approach. The algorithm is tested successfully for the knee in long-leg radiographs (97.6 % success rate), the vertebrae in C-arm CT (95.5 % success rate), and the femoral head in whole-body MR (100 % success rate). In addition, it is compared to Hough forests (Gall et al. in IEEE Trans Pattern Anal Mach Intell 33(11):2188-2202, 2011) for the task of knee localization (97.8 % success rate). Conclusion The DGHT has proven to be a general procedure, which can be easily applied to various tasks with high success rates.

  15. Hybrid imaging, PET-CT and SPECT-CT: What impact on nuclear medicine education and practice in France?; Imagerie hybride, TEP-TDM et TEMP-TDM. En quoi peut-elle influencer la formation et la pratique en medecine nucleaire en France?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundler, O. [CHU Timone, Universite de la Mediterrane, Service Central de Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2009-02-15

    To define the policy of our specialty with a consensus opinion, a questionnaire entitled 'hybrid imaging' was sent to practicing nuclear medicine specialist physicians in France to obtain their opinion on the impact of this recent method in training and in the practice of nuclear medicine and on the relations between nuclear medicine specialists and other medical imaging specialists. This questionnaire, written by the office of the French Society of Nuclear Medicine (F.S.N.M.) and molecular imaging, was divided into four parts: Profile and experience in hybrid imaging, Relations with radiologists, Practice of CT scans with hybrid equipment, and the Future of the specialty and of training in nuclear medicine. The response rate was 60%, i.e. 374 completed questionnaires. Overall, the responses were uniform, whatever the respondent's experience, type and place of practice. Regular participation in hybrid imaging practice was the reply provided by the majority of respondents. In terms of relations with radiologists, such contacts existed in over 85% of cases and are considered as being of high quality in over 90% of cases. The vast majority of practitioners believe that hybrid imaging will become the standard. Opinions on the diagnostic use of CT scans are divided, as well as their interpretation by a radiologist, a nuclear medicine specialist or by both. In the opinion of the vast majority, hybrid equipment systems should be managed by nuclear medicine specialists. With regard to the future, nuclear medicine should remain an independent specialty with enhanced training in morphological imaging and a residency training program whose length should be increased to 5 years. (author)

  16. Systematization of a hybrid costing method for medical procedures: a concomitant apllication of the ABC and UEP methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Zanievicz da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study consists in systematization Hybrid Costing Methodology supported by the concepts of Activity Based Costing (ABC and the Production Effort Unit (UEP to quantify the cost of medical procedures in hospitals. By means of theory-concept research, the hybrid method application stages were organized and then tested at the University Hospital of the University of the State of Santa Catarina with the purpose of determining the cost of medical procedures, more specifically childbirth. The execution process flow of childbirth is divided into seven distinct procedures because of its variations. Besides presenting the cost calculations of this process, the research establishes a numerical value called Activity Effort Measure which is based on the execution cost for all the activities necessary to achieve it. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can be applied to quantify the costs, as well as support the management of the several hospital activities.

  17. Facilitating medical information search using Google Glass connected to a content-based medical image retrieval system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, Antoine; Schaer, Roger; Markonis, Dimitrios; Muller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Wearable computing devices are starting to change the way users interact with computers and the Internet. Among them, Google Glass includes a small screen located in front of the right eye, a camera filming in front of the user and a small computing unit. Google Glass has the advantage to provide online services while allowing the user to perform tasks with his/her hands. These augmented glasses uncover many useful applications, also in the medical domain. For example, Google Glass can easily provide video conference between medical doctors to discuss a live case. Using these glasses can also facilitate medical information search by allowing the access of a large amount of annotated medical cases during a consultation in a non-disruptive fashion for medical staff. In this paper, we developed a Google Glass application able to take a photo and send it to a medical image retrieval system along with keywords in order to retrieve similar cases. As a preliminary assessment of the usability of the application, we tested the application under three conditions (images of the skin; printed CT scans and MRI images; and CT and MRI images acquired directly from an LCD screen) to explore whether using Google Glass affects the accuracy of the results returned by the medical image retrieval system. The preliminary results show that despite minor problems due to the relative stability of the Google Glass, images can be sent to and processed by the medical image retrieval system and similar images are returned to the user, potentially helping in the decision making process.

  18. [ACADEMIC SURGICAL SERVICES IN A TERTIARY MEDICAL CENTER IN THE NEGEV-DESERT, PERIPHERY OF ISRAEL: IS IT A HYBRID?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Solly

    2016-02-01

    Soroka Medical Center, a major affiliated hospital of the Faculty of Health Sciences in Ben Gurion University of the Negev, serving 1,000,000 citizens in the south part of Israel and is designated as a "peripheral hospital". Herein, we address the factors that influence our high level academic surgical training program with its broad base surgical experience, which focused on the "spirit of Beer Sheba". Should we call our program a hybrid?

  19. The "Juggler" algorithm: a hybrid deformable image registration algorithm for adaptive radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Junyi; Chen, Yunmei; Samant, Sanjiv S.

    2007-03-01

    Fast deformable registration can potentially facilitate the clinical implementation of adaptive radiation therapy (ART), which allows for daily organ deformations not accounted for in radiotherapy treatment planning, which typically utilizes a static organ model, to be incorporated into the fractionated treatment. Existing deformable registration algorithms typically utilize a specific diffusion model, and require a large number of iterations to achieve convergence. This limits the online applications of deformable image registration for clinical radiotherapy, such as daily patient setup variations involving organ deformation, where high registration precision is required. We propose a hybrid algorithm, the "Juggler", based on a multi-diffusion model to achieve fast convergence. The Juggler achieves fast convergence by applying two different diffusion models: i) one being optimized quickly for matching high gradient features, i.e. bony anatomies; and ii) the other being optimized for further matching low gradient features, i.e. soft tissue. The regulation of these 2 competing criteria is achieved using a threshold of a similarity measure, such as cross correlation or mutual information. A multi-resolution scheme was applied for faster convergence involving large deformations. Comparisons of the Juggler algorithm were carried out with demons method, accelerated demons method, and free-form deformable registration using 4D CT lung imaging from 5 patients. Based on comparisons of difference images and similarity measure computations, the Juggler produced a superior registration result. It achieved the desired convergence within 30 iterations, and typically required <90sec to register two 3D image sets of size 256×256×40 using a 3.2 GHz PC. This hybrid registration strategy successfully incorporates the benefits of different diffusion models into a single unified model.

  20. Color-coded Live Imaging of Heterokaryon Formation and Nuclear Fusion of Hybridizing Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Takuro; Hasegawa, Kosuke; Nakamura, Miki; Kunisada, Takahiro; Shimizu, Masahito; Saji, Shigetoyo; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-08-01

    Fusion of cancer cells has been studied for over half a century. However, the steps involved after initial fusion between cells, such as heterokaryon formation and nuclear fusion, have been difficult to observe in real time. In order to be able to visualize these steps, we have established cancer-cell sublines from the human HT-1080 fibrosarcoma, one expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) linked to histone H2B in the nucleus and a red fluorescent protein (RFP) in the cytoplasm and the other subline expressing RFP in the nucleus (mCherry) linked to histone H2B and GFP in the cytoplasm. The two reciprocal color-coded sublines of HT-1080 cells were fused using the Sendai virus. The fused cells were cultured on plastic and observed using an Olympus FV1000 confocal microscope. Multi-nucleate (heterokaryotic) cancer cells, in addition to hybrid cancer cells with single-or multiple-fused nuclei, including fused mitotic nuclei, were observed among the fused cells. Heterokaryons with red, green, orange and yellow nuclei were observed by confocal imaging, even in single hybrid cells. The orange and yellow nuclei indicate nuclear fusion. Red and green nuclei remained unfused. Cell fusion with heterokaryon formation and subsequent nuclear fusion resulting in hybridization may be an important natural phenomenon between cancer cells that may make them more malignant. The ability to image the complex processes following cell fusion using reciprocal color-coded cancer cells will allow greater understanding of the genetic basis of malignancy. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. GENIE: A HYBRID GENETIC ALGORITHM FOR FEATURE CLASSIFICATION IN MULTI-SPECTRAL IMAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. PERKINS; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    We consider the problem of pixel-by-pixel classification of a multi-spectral image using supervised learning. Conventional supervised classification techniques such as maximum likelihood classification and less conventional ones such as neural networks, typically base such classifications solely on the spectral components of each pixel. It is easy to see why the color of a pixel provides a nice, bounded, fixed dimensional space in which these classifiers work well. It is often the case however, that spectral information alone is not sufficient to correctly classify a pixel. Maybe spatial neighborhood information is required as well. Or may be the raw spectral components do not themselves make for easy classification, but some arithmetic combination of them would. In either of these cases we have the problem of selecting suitable spatial, spectral or spatio-spectral features that allow the classifier to do its job well. The number of all possible such features is extremely large. How can we select a suitable subset? We have developed GENIE, a hybrid learning system that combines a genetic algorithm that searches a space of image processing operations for a set that can produce suitable feature planes, and a more conventional classifier which uses those feature planes to output a final classification. In this paper we show that the use of a hybrid GA provides significant advantages over using either a GA alone or more conventional classification methods alone. We present results using high-resolution IKONOS data, looking for regions of burned forest and for roads.

  2. A review of current clinical photography guidelines in relation to smartphone publishing of medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Karl F B; Tahim, Arpan; Goodson, Alexander M C; Delaney, Margaret; Fan, Kathleen

    2012-12-01

    The rise in popularity of smartphones has seen a surge in the number of smartphone-specific software applications (apps) available. Among these apps, many are medical and healthcare related, of benefit to both the general public and healthcare staff. With this improved technology comes the ability to display full-colour images and videos, for which medical images could be utilised. We reviewed current clinical photography guidelines in relation to the publishing of medical images in smartphone apps. Of the 5 relevant guidelines, none discussed hand-held electronic media or smartphone app publishing. This creates confusion for clinicians as to how to interpret current guidelines for this purpose. Medical illustrators, clinicians and NHS Trusts need to be aware of the changes in technology and the ethical considerations of allowing medical images to be published within smartphones. We discuss the issues surrounding consent and provide practical tips for obtaining informed consent from patients to publish medical images in smartphone apps.

  3. Development of a medical image filing system based on superhigh-definition image and its functional evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Matsumura, Yasushi; Okada, Takeo; Kuwata, Shigeki; Wada, Minoru; Hashimoto, Tsutomu

    1997-05-01

    Although many images are handled in the medical filed, image monitoring deices and filing methods vary due to differences in resolution and pixel depth. If a system enabling such images to be filed synthetically without losing its quality were to exist, and if retrieval of such images were made easily, such a system could be applied in various ways. In order to determine whether a super high definition (SHD) image system running at a series of 2048 resolution X 2048 line X 60 frame/sec was capable of such purposes, we established a filing system for medical images on this system. All images of various types produced form one case of cardiovascular disease were digitized and registered into this filing system. Images consisted of plain chest x-ray, electrocardiogram, ultrasound cardiogram, cardiac scintigram, coronary angiogram, left ventriculogram and so on. All images were animated and totaled a number of 243. We prepared a graphic user interface for image retrieval based on the medical events and modalities. Twenty one cardiac specialists evaluated quality of the SHD images to be somewhat poor compared to the original pictures but sufficient for making diagnoses, and effective as a tool for teaching and case study group purposes because of its operability of the retrieval system. The system capability of simultaneously displaying several animated images was especially deemed effective in grasping comprehension of diagnosis. efficient input methods, and creating a capacity of filing all produced images are future issue.

  4. Reduced speckle noise on medical ultrasound images using cellular neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunkyung; Nishimura, Toshihiro

    2007-01-01

    Speckle noise is indispensable get from ultrasound image. In general tends to reduce the image resolution and contrast. In addition to the doctor diagnosis, is lacking for judgment accuracy. This paper is reduced the speckle noise and enhanced boundary of a tumor in the medical ultrasound images. The proposed method is valuated using numerical phantom simulating ultrasound B-mode images, and the effect is confirmed by applying to medical ultrasound images. Therefore, some important features such as tissue boundaries and small tumors may be overlooked. A cellular neural network which is a kind of recurrent neural network can deal with images by the weight of neurons called a cell. It could be obtained more detail images recognition compared with the previous studies. Determination template parameters of the cellular neural network for ultrasound image processing are discussed. The experimental results show effectiveness of applying the proposed method to boundary enhancement and the speckle noise reduction of medical ultrasound image.

  5. Hemato-oncological imaging. Importance of hybrid procedures; Haematoonkologische Bildgebung. Stellenwert der Hybridverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E. [Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Abteilung fuer Allgemeine und Kinderradiologie, Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Wien (Austria); Haug, A. [Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Abteilung fuer Nuklearmedizin, Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Wien (Austria)

    2016-07-15

    Biomedical imaging procedures play a major role in hemato-oncological diseases with respect to pre-therapeutic staging and assessment of treatment response. Originally, the therapeutic management was the domain of computed tomography (CT) and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Over the last decade these purely morphological techniques have gradually been replaced by hybrid imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography-CT (PET/CT) and PET/MRI, which also provide metabolic and functional information. For lymphomas, the PET tracer 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18 F-FDG) is meanwhile so well-established that its use is a cornerstone of the Lugano classification; however, for multiple myeloma the search for an optimal PET tracer that can also detect early disease stages is still ongoing. Functional MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging have shown promising results for both lymphomas and multiple myelomas. The PET/MRI technique can combine the different types of information due to its truly multiparametric approach. In the future PET/MRI could possibly become the hybrid imaging technique of choice for hemato-oncological diseases. (orig.) [German] Bildgebende Verfahren spielen bei haematoonkologischen Erkrankungen eine wesentliche Rolle fuer das Staging vor der Therapie und die Beurteilung des Therapieansprechens. Urspruenglich waren es v. a. die CT und die Ganzkoerper-MRT, welche die fuer das therapeutische Management relevanten Informationen lieferten. Im letzten Jahrzehnt erfolgte bei dieser Gruppe von Tumorerkrankungen jedoch eine Abkehr von den rein morphologischen Verfahren hin zu den Hybridverfahren Positronenemissionstomographie(PET)-CT und PET-MRT, welche auch metabolische und funktionelle Informationen liefern. Bei Lymphomen steht der PET-Tracer {sup 18}F-Fluordesoxyglukose ({sup 18}F-FDG) mittlerweile im Zentrum der Diagnostik und ist auch fest in der aktuellen

  6. Fiber bundle probes for interconnecting miniaturized medical imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Vanessa; Hofmann, Jens; Marx, Sebastian; Herter, Jonas; Nguyen, Dennis; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Schröder, Henning

    2017-02-01

    Miniaturization of medical imaging devices will significantly improve the workflow of physicians in hospitals. Photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technologies offer a high level of miniaturization. However, they need fiber optic interconnection solutions for their functional integration. As part of European funded project (InSPECT) we investigate fiber bundle probes (FBPs) to be used as multi-mode (MM) to single-mode (SM) interconnections for PIC modules. The FBP consists of a set of four or seven SM fibers hexagonally distributed and assembled into a holder that defines a multicore connection. Such a connection can be used to connect MM fibers, while each SM fiber is attached to the PIC module. The manufacturing of these probes is explored by using well-established fiber fusion, epoxy adhesive, innovative adhesive and polishing techniques in order to achieve reliable, low-cost and reproducible samples. An innovative hydrofluoric acid-free fiber etching technology has been recently investigated. The preliminary results show that the reduction of the fiber diameter shows a linear behavior as a function of etching time. Different etch rate values from 0.55 μm/min to 2.3 μm/min were found. Several FBPs with three different type of fibers have been optically interrogated at wavelengths of 630nm and 1550nm. Optical losses are found of approx. 35dB at 1550nm for FBPs composed by 80μm fibers. Although FBPs present moderate optical losses, they might be integrated using different optical fibers, covering a broad spectral range required for imaging applications. Finally, we show the use of FBPs as promising MM-to-SM interconnects for real-world interfacing to PIC's.

  7. New amorphous-silicon image sensor for x-ray diagnostic medical imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisfield, Richard L.; Hartney, Mark A.; Street, Robert A.; Apte, Raj B.

    1998-07-01

    This paper introduces new high-resolution amorphous Silicon (a-Si) image sensors specifically configured for demonstrating film-quality medical x-ray imaging capabilities. The devices utilizes an x-ray phosphor screen coupled to an array of a-Si photodiodes for detecting visible light, and a-Si thin-film transistors (TFTs) for connecting the photodiodes to external readout electronics. We have developed imagers based on a pixel size of 127 micrometer X 127 micrometer with an approximately page-size imaging area of 244 mm X 195 mm, and array size of 1,536 data lines by 1,920 gate lines, for a total of 2.95 million pixels. More recently, we have developed a much larger imager based on the same pixel pattern, which covers an area of approximately 406 mm X 293 mm, with 2,304 data lines by 3,200 gate lines, for a total of nearly 7.4 million pixels. This is very likely to be the largest image sensor array and highest pixel count detector fabricated on a single substrate. Both imagers connect to a standard PC and are capable of taking an image in a few seconds. Through design rule optimization we have achieved a light sensitive area of 57% and optimized quantum efficiency for x-ray phosphor output in the green part of the spectrum, yielding an average quantum efficiency between 500 and 600 nm of approximately 70%. At the same time, we have managed to reduce extraneous leakage currents on these devices to a few fA per pixel, which allows for very high dynamic range to be achieved. We have characterized leakage currents as a function of photodiode bias, time and temperature to demonstrate high stability over these large sized arrays. At the electronics level, we have adopted a new generation of low noise, charge- sensitive amplifiers coupled to 12-bit A/D converters. Considerable attention was given to reducing electronic noise in order to demonstrate a large dynamic range (over 4,000:1) for medical imaging applications. Through a combination of low data lines capacitance

  8. Imaging Voltage in Genetically Defined Neuronal Subpopulations with a Cre Recombinase-Targeted Hybrid Voltage Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayguinov, Peter O; Ma, Yihe; Gao, Yu; Zhao, Xinyu; Jackson, Meyer B

    2017-09-20

    Genetically encoded voltage indicators create an opportunity to monitor electrical activity in defined sets of neurons as they participate in the complex patterns of coordinated electrical activity that underlie nervous system function. Taking full advantage of genetically encoded voltage indicators requires a generalized strategy for targeting the probe to genetically defined populations of cells. To this end, we have generated a mouse line with an optimized hybrid voltage sensor (hVOS) probe within a locus designed for efficient Cre recombinase-dependent expression. Crossing this mouse with Cre drivers generated double transgenics expressing hVOS probe in GABAergic, parvalbumin, and calretinin interneurons, as well as hilar mossy cells, new adult-born neurons, and recently active neurons. In each case, imaging in brain slices from male or female animals revealed electrically evoked optical signals from multiple individual neurons in single trials. These imaging experiments revealed action potentials, dynamic aspects of dendritic integration, and trial-to-trial fluctuations in response latency. The rapid time response of hVOS imaging revealed action potentials with high temporal fidelity, and enabled accurate measurements of spike half-widths characteristic of each cell type. Simultaneous recording of rapid voltage changes in multiple neurons with a common genetic signature offers a powerful approach to the study of neural circuit function and the investigation of how neural networks encode, process, and store information. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Genetically encoded voltage indicators hold great promise in the study of neural circuitry, but realizing their full potential depends on targeting the sensor to distinct cell types. Here we present a new mouse line that expresses a hybrid optical voltage sensor under the control of Cre recombinase. Crossing this line with Cre drivers generated double-transgenic mice, which express this sensor in targeted cell types. In

  9. An Ensemble of Fine-Tuned Convolutional Neural Networks for Medical Image Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashnil; Kim, Jinman; Lyndon, David; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2017-01-01

    The availability of medical imaging data from clinical archives, research literature, and clinical manuals, coupled with recent advances in computer vision offer the opportunity for image-based diagnosis, teaching, and biomedical research. However, the content and semantics of an image can vary depending on its modality and as such the identification of image modality is an important preliminary step. The key challenge for automatically classifying the modality of a medical image is due to the visual characteristics of different modalities: some are visually distinct while others may have only subtle differences. This challenge is compounded by variations in the appearance of images based on the diseases depicted and a lack of sufficient training data for some modalities. In this paper, we introduce a new method for classifying medical images that uses an ensemble of different convolutional neural network (CNN) architectures. CNNs are a state-of-the-art image classification technique that learns the optimal image features for a given classification task. We hypothesise that different CNN architectures learn different levels of semantic image representation and thus an ensemble of CNNs will enable higher quality features to be extracted. Our method develops a new feature extractor by fine-tuning CNNs that have been initialized on a large dataset of natural images. The fine-tuning process leverages the generic image features from natural images that are fundamental for all images and optimizes them for the variety of medical imaging modalities. These features are used to train numerous multiclass classifiers whose posterior probabilities are fused to predict the modalities of unseen images. Our experiments on the ImageCLEF 2016 medical image public dataset (30 modalities; 6776 training images, and 4166 test images) show that our ensemble of fine-tuned CNNs achieves a higher accuracy than established CNNs. Our ensemble also achieves a higher accuracy than methods in

  10. Analyzing the medical image by using clustering algorithms through segmentation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Papendra; Kumar, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Basic aim of our study is to analyze the medical image. In computer vision, segmentationRefers to the process of partitioning a digital image into multiple regions. The goal ofSegmentation is to simplify and/or change the representation of an image into something thatIs more meaningful and easier to analyze. Image segmentation is typically used to locateObjects and boundaries (lines, curves, etc.) in images.There is a lot of scope of the analysis that we have done in our project; our analysis couldBe used for the purpose of monitoring the medical image. Medical imaging refers to theTechniques and processes used to create images of the human body (or parts thereof) forClinical purposes (medical procedures seeking to reveal, diagnose or examine disease) orMedical science (including the study of normal anatomy and function).As a discipline and in its widest sense, it is part of biological imaging and incorporatesRadiology (in the wider sense), radiological sciences, endoscopy, (medical) thermography, Medical photography and microscopy (e.g. for human pathological investigations).Measurement and recording techniques which are not primarily designed to produce images.

  11. Computer-generated optical multiwavelet filters for hybrid image-classification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stollfuss, A; Teiwes, S; Wyrowski, F

    1995-08-10

    Optical coherent Fourier correlators are applicable in real-time image analysis such as image classification. The functionality of Fourier correlators can be increased by use of multifunctional filters, which have many spatially multiplexed impulse responses. The concept of multiresolution analysis on the basis of wavelet theory offers profitable methods to design multifunctional filters for image analysis. The applicability of such filters is demonstrated by an example in which different characteristic textures of medical images are extracted. The physical implementation of multiwavelet filters is restricted by modulation-domain constraints imposed by the use of spatial-light-modulator or of diffractive-element fabrication technology. Coding methods of diffractive optics are shown to be helpful to transform the original complex-valued distributions of multiwavelet filters into light-efficient quantized phase-only distributions by preservation of the original filter functionality. The quality of the designed diffractive phase filters is documented by computer experiments.

  12. Design and development of high bioluminescent resonance energy transfer efficiency hybrid-imaging constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Kovalski, Letícia; Broyles, David; Hunt, Eric A; Daftarian, Pirouz; Dikici, Emre; Daunert, Sylvia; Deo, Sapna K

    2016-04-01

    Here we describe the design and construction of an imaging construct with high bioluminescent resonance energy transfer (BRET) efficiency that is composed of multiple quantum dots (QDs; λem = 655 nm) self-assembled onto a bioluminescent protein, Renilla luciferase (Rluc). This is facilitated by the streptavidin-biotin interaction, allowing the facile formation of a hybrid-imaging construct (HIC) comprising up to six QDs (acceptor) grafted onto a light-emitting Rluc (donor) core. The resulting assembly of multiple acceptors surrounding a donor permits this construct to exhibit high resonance energy transfer efficiency (∼64.8%). The HIC was characterized using fluorescence excitation anisotropy measurements and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. To demonstrate the application of our construct, a generation-5 (G5) polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) nanocarrier was loaded with our HIC for in vitro and in vivo imaging. We envision that this design of multiple acceptors and bioluminescent donor will lead to the development of new BRET-based systems useful in sensing, imaging, and other bioanalytical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Activatable Hybrid Nanotheranostics for Tetramodal Imaging and Synergistic Photothermal/Photodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Shreya; Ferreira, Carolina A; Chen, Feng; Ellison, Paul A; Siamof, Cerise M; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo

    2017-12-21

    A multifunctional core-satellite nanoconstruct is designed by assembling copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticles on the surface of [89 Zr]-labeled hollow mesoporous silica nanoshells filled with porphyrin molecules, for effective cancer imaging and therapy. The hybrid nanotheranostic demonstrates three significant features: (1) simple and robust construction from biocompatible building blocks, demonstrating prolonged blood retention, enhanced tumor accumulation, and minimal long-term systemic toxicity, (2) rationally selected functional moieties that interact together to enable simultaneous tetramodal (positron emission tomography/fluorescence/Cerenkov luminescence/Cerenkov radiation energy transfer) imaging for rapid and accurate delineation of tumors and multimodal image-guided therapy in vivo, and (3) synergistic interaction between CuS-mediated photothermal therapy and porphyrin-mediated photodynamic therapy which results in complete tumor elimination within a day of treatment with no visible recurrence or side effects. Overall, this proof-of-concept study illustrates an efficient, generalized approach to design high-performance core-satellite nanohybrids that can be easily tailored to combine a wide variety of imaging and therapeutic modalities for improved and personalized cancer theranostics in the future. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. A Hybrid Vehicle Detection Method Based on Viola-Jones and HOG + SVM from UAV Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongzheng; Yu, Guizhen; Wang, Yunpeng; Wu, Xinkai; Ma, Yalong

    2016-08-19

    A new hybrid vehicle detection scheme which integrates the Viola-Jones (V-J) and linear SVM classifier with HOG feature (HOG + SVM) methods is proposed for vehicle detection from low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) images. As both V-J and HOG + SVM are sensitive to on-road vehicles' in-plane rotation, the proposed scheme first adopts a roadway orientation adjustment method, which rotates each UAV image to align the roads with the horizontal direction so the original V-J or HOG + SVM method can be directly applied to achieve fast detection and high accuracy. To address the issue of descending detection speed for V-J and HOG + SVM, the proposed scheme further develops an adaptive switching strategy which sophistically integrates V-J and HOG + SVM methods based on their different descending trends of detection speed to improve detection efficiency. A comprehensive evaluation shows that the switching strategy, combined with the road orientation adjustment method, can significantly improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the vehicle detection from UAV images. The results also show that the proposed vehicle detection method is competitive compared with other existing vehicle detection methods. Furthermore, since the proposed vehicle detection method can be performed on videos captured from moving UAV platforms without the need of image registration or additional road database, it has great potentials of field applications. Future research will be focusing on expanding the current method for detecting other transportation modes such as buses, trucks, motors, bicycles, and pedestrians.

  15. Multi-Wave and Hybrid Imaging Techniques: A New Direction for Nondestructive Testing and Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhua Cheng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the state-of-the-art multi-wave and hybrid imaging techniques in the field of nondestructive evaluation and structural health monitoring were comprehensively reviewed. A new direction for assessment and health monitoring of various structures by capitalizing the advantages of those imaging methods was discussed. Although sharing similar system configurations, the imaging physics and principles of multi-wave phenomena and hybrid imaging methods are inherently different. After a brief introduction of nondestructive evaluation (NDE , structure health monitoring (SHM and their related challenges, several recent advances that have significantly extended imaging methods from laboratory development into practical applications were summarized, followed by conclusions and discussion on future directions.

  16. Mapping Iterative Medical Imaging Algorithm on Cell Accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meilian Xu

    2011-01-01

    architectures that exploit data parallel applications, medical imaging algorithms such as OS-SART can be studied to produce increased performance. In this paper, we map OS-SART on cell broadband engine (Cell BE. We effectively use the architectural features of Cell BE to provide an efficient mapping. The Cell BE consists of one powerPC processor element (PPE and eight SIMD coprocessors known as synergetic processor elements (SPEs. The limited memory storage on each of the SPEs makes the mapping challenging. Therefore, we present optimization techniques to efficiently map the algorithm on the Cell BE for improved performance over CPU version. We compare the performance of our proposed algorithm on Cell BE to that of Sun Fire ×4600, a shared memory machine. The Cell BE is five times faster than AMD Opteron dual-core processor. The speedup of the algorithm on Cell BE increases with the increase in the number of SPEs. We also experiment with various parameters, such as number of subsets, number of processing elements, and number of DMA transfers between main memory and local memory, that impact the performance of the algorithm.

  17. Creating a classification of image types in the medical literature for visual categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Henning; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Antani, Sameer

    2012-02-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) from specialized collections has often been proposed for use in such areas as diagnostic aid, clinical decision support, and teaching. The visual retrieval from broad image collections such as teaching files, the medical literature or web images, by contrast, has not yet reached a high maturity level compared to textual information retrieval. Visual image classification into a relatively small number of classes (20-100) on the other hand, has shown to deliver good results in several benchmarks. It is, however, currently underused as a basic technology for retrieval tasks, for example, to limit the search space. Most classification schemes for medical images are focused on specific areas and consider mainly the medical image types (modalities), imaged anatomy, and view, and merge them into a single descriptor or classification hierarchy. Furthermore, they often ignore other important image types such as biological images, statistical figures, flowcharts, and diagrams that frequently occur in the biomedical literature. Most of the current classifications have also been created for radiology images, which are not the only types to be taken into account. With Open Access becoming increasingly widespread particularly in medicine, images from the biomedical literature are more easily available for use. Visual information from these images and knowledge that an image is of a specific type or medical modality could enrich retrieval. This enrichment is hampered by the lack of a commonly agreed image classification scheme. This paper presents a hierarchy for classification of biomedical illustrations with the goal of using it for visual classification and thus as a basis for retrieval. The proposed hierarchy is based on relevant parts of existing terminologies, such as the IRMA-code (Image Retrieval in Medical Applications), ad hoc classifications and hierarchies used in imageCLEF (Image retrieval task at the Cross-Language Evaluation

  18. Understanding by seeing before treating: present and future of medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentourkia, M'hamed

    2012-10-01

    In the last three decades, the development of medical imaging gave a burst to modern medicine. A considerable budget has been affected to develop and equip departments of radiology, nuclear medicine, medical imaging, radiotherapy, and emergency services. Several imaging installations have become intensively and exclusively used by the clinic where most of the imaging exams are performed for diagnoses, while for other imaging installations, the time of usage is shared between the clinical and research departments. However, very few centers restrain their installations to the research groups only,as their budgets are not sufficient to maintain the devices. The increase in medical imaging demand is mainly attributed to: (1) the drastic increase in the technology of electronic and computing sciences, which has made the imaging devices efficient and easy to operate, and (2) to the public and private insurers who consent the reimbursement of the imaging fees for some determined medical exams. Because the imaging modalities are based on different physical properties, they can be used individually, complementary but distinctly, or jointly. Despite their beneficial contribution, the imaging devices should be used with care as they can provoke undesirable effects. The future of the imaging technologies is, a priori, to exploit the full potential of the actual instruments, to target experiments at the molecular level, and to be able to monitor a biological phenomenon at its time of occurrence. In this paper,rapid overview and perspectives are proposed as the field of medical imaging is vast and encompasses several domains of knowledge.

  19. An Integrated Dictionary-Learning Entropy-Based Medical Image Fusion Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanqiu Qi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Image fusion is widely used in different areas and can integrate complementary and relevant information of source images captured by multiple sensors into a unitary synthetic image. Medical image fusion, as an important image fusion application, can extract the details of multiple images from different imaging modalities and combine them into an image that contains complete and non-redundant information for increasing the accuracy of medical diagnosis and assessment. The quality of the fused image directly affects medical diagnosis and assessment. However, existing solutions have some drawbacks in contrast, sharpness, brightness, blur and details. This paper proposes an integrated dictionary-learning and entropy-based medical image-fusion framework that consists of three steps. First, the input image information is decomposed into low-frequency and high-frequency components by using a Gaussian filter. Second, low-frequency components are fused by weighted average algorithm and high-frequency components are fused by the dictionary-learning based algorithm. In the dictionary-learning process of high-frequency components, an entropy-based algorithm is used for informative blocks selection. Third, the fused low-frequency and high-frequency components are combined to obtain the final fusion results. The results and analyses of comparative experiments demonstrate that the proposed medical image fusion framework has better performance than existing solutions.

  20. An Optimal Partial Differential Equations-based Stopping Criterion for Medical Image Denoising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanian, Maryam; Feizi, Awat; Davari, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Improving the quality of medical images at pre- and post-surgery operations are necessary for beginning and speeding up the recovery process. Partial differential equations-based models have become a powerful and well-known tool in different areas of image processing such as denoising, multiscale image analysis, edge detection and other fields of image processing and computer vision. In this paper, an algorithm for medical image denoising using anisotropic diffusion filter with a convenient stopping criterion is presented. In this regard, the current paper introduces two strategies: utilizing the efficient explicit method due to its advantages with presenting impressive software technique to effectively solve the anisotropic diffusion filter which is mathematically unstable, proposing an automatic stopping criterion, that takes into consideration just input image, as opposed to other stopping criteria, besides the quality of denoised image, easiness and time. Various medical images are examined to confirm the claim.