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Sample records for hybrid friction stir

  1. Hybrid Friction Stir Welding of High-carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Don-Hyun Choi; Seung-Boo Jung; Chang-Yong Lee; Byung-Wook Ahn; Jung-Hyun Choi; Yun-Mo Yeon; Keun Song; Seung-Gab Hong; Won-Bae Lee; Ki-Bong Kang

    2011-01-01

    A high-carbon steel joint, SK5 (0.84 wt% C), was successfully welded by friction stir welding (FSW), both without and with a gas torch, in order to control the cooling rate during welding. After welding, the weld zone comprised gray and black regions, corresponding to microstructural variation: a martensite structure and a duplex structure of ferrite and cementite, respectively. The volume fraction of the martensite structure and the Vickers hardness in the welds were decreased with the using of the gas torch, which was related with the lower cooling rate.

  2. Hybrid manufacturing processes for fusion welding and friction stir welding of aerospace grade aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegesky, Megan Alexandra

    Friction stir welding and processing can provide for joints in aerospace grade aluminum alloys that have preferable material properties as compared to fusion welding techniques. Aerospace grade aluminum alloys such as AA2024-T3 and AA7075-T6 are considered non-weldable by traditional fusion welding techniques. Improved mechanical properties over previously used techniques are usually preferable for aerospace applications. Therefore, by combining traditional fusion welding and friction stir processing techniques, it could be plausible to create more difficult geometries in manufactured parts instead of using traditional techniques. While this combination of fusion welding and friction stir processing is not a new technology, its introduction to aerospace grade aluminum alloys as well as non-weldable alloys, is new. This is brought about by a lowered required clamping force required by adding a fusion weld before a friction stir processing technique. The changes in properties associated with joining techniques include: microstructural changes, changes in hardness, tensile strength, and corrosion resistance. This thesis illustrates these changes for the non-weldable AA2024-T351 and AA7075-T651 as well as the weldable alloy AA5052-H32. The microhardness, tensile strength and corrosion resistance of the four processing states: base material, fusion welded material, friction stir welded material, and friction stir processed fusion welded material is studied. The plausibility of this hybrid process for the three different materials is characterized, as well as plausible applications for this joining technique.

  3. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  4. Hybrid joints manufactured by ultrasound enhanced friction stir welding (USE-FSW) - corrosion properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfer, S.; Fürbeth, W.; Thomä, M.; Wagner, G.; Straß, B.; Wolter, B.

    2017-03-01

    To realize lightweight structures of material combinations like aluminum/magnesium and aluminum/steel an Ultrasound Enhanced Friction Stir Welding (USE-FSW) process was used. This process has a beneficial influence on the resulting microstructure (elimination of the brittle intermetallic phase Al3Mg2 as coherent layer) and the mechanical properties (increased tensile strength) of Al/Mg-joints and was now also applied for Al/steel-hybrid joints. Besides the mechanical properties the corrosion properties of the hybrid joints may play a significant role concerning the later use of the hybrid materials. Therefore, the corrosion properties of various hybrid joints have been investigated by different methods. With the Scanning Kelvin Probe (SKP) Volta potential differences between the base alloys and the welded area were investigated in air. The two-dimensional color-plots illustrate not only the Volta potential differences between the different phases but also their oxidation properties in air during the measurement time. Electrochemical measurements (open circuit potential and potentiodynamic polarization) have been carried out for the investigation of the corrosion properties of the FSW and USE-FSW hybrid joints in 0.5 molar NaCl solution. A three electrode setup within a mini-cell was used to enable measurements on different areas of the joints. This allows to observe the corrosion activity of the base alloys and the nugget phase separately. Differences between Al/steel-hybrid joints processed with and without ultrasound enhancement are discussed and compared with Al/Mg-hybrids.

  5. Effect of Preheating in Hybrid Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaduwanshi, D. K.; Bag, S.; Pal, S.

    2014-10-01

    The controlled energy input into the system by introducing an extra heat source to enhance the material flow along with reduction of the plunging force remains a potential area of considerate for the development of hybrid friction stir welding (FSW) process. Hence, the effect of preheating on the weld joint properties is evaluated using plasma-assisted friction stir welding (P-FSW) process for joining aluminum alloy. A comparative study of mechanical and macro-microstructural characterizations of weld joint by FSW and P-FSW has been performed. Transverse tensile strength of weld joint is approximately 95% of base metal produced by P-FSW and is 8% more than conventional FSW welds. The effect of preheating enhances material flow and dissolution of fine oxide particles by plasma arc results in increase of strength and marginal modification of deformation behavior. The preheating brings uniformly distributed hardness in weld zone and the magnitude is higher in the advancing side with overall increase in average hardness value. Grain sizes are much finer due to the pinning effect of Al2O3 particles that retarded grain growth following recrystallization during P-FSW and thus led to more pronounced reduction in grain size and relatively brittle fracture during tensile loading of welded joint. Overall, the influence of preheating acts quite homogeneously throughout the structure as compared to conventional FSW. However, the results reveal that the development of P-FSW is still in initial stage and needs to improve in various aspects.

  6. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  7. Wear Behavior of Aluminum Matrix Hybrid Composites Fabricated through Friction Stir Welding Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Halil Ibrahim KURT; Murat ODUNCUOGLU; Ramazan ASMATULU

    2016-01-01

    Effects of friction stir processing (FSP)parameters and reinforcements on the wear behavior of 6061-T6 based hybrid composites were investigated.A mathematical formulation was derived to calculate the wear volume loss of the composites.The experimental results were contrasted with the results of the proposed model.The influ-ences of sliding distance,tool traverse and rotational speeds,as well as graphite (Gr)and titanium carbide (TiC) volume fractions on the wear volume loss of the composites were also investigated using the prepared formulation. The results demonstrated that the wear volume loss of the composites significantly increased with increasing sliding distance,tool traverse speed,and rotational speed;while the wear volume loss decreased with increasing volume fraction of the reinforcements.A minimum wear volume loss for the hybrid composites with complex reinforcements was specified at the inclusion ratio of 50% TiC+50% Al2 O3 because of improved lubricant ability,as well as resist-ance to brittleness and wear.New possibilities to develop wear-resistant aluminum-based composites for different in-dustrial applications were proposed.

  8. Hybrid Search for Faster Production and Safer Process Conditions in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Deb, Kalyanmoy; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate optimum process parameters and tool geometries in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) to minimize temperature difference between the leading edge of the tool probe and the work piece material in front of the tool shoulder, and simultaneously maximize traverse...... choices have been offered based on several process specific performance and cost related criteria....

  9. Hot deformation behavior of an aluminum-matrix hybrid nanocomposite fabricated by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodabakhshi, F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Gerlich, A.P. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Simchi, A., E-mail: simchi@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokabi, A.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-25

    A fine-grained aluminum-matrix hybrid nanocomposite reinforced with TiO{sub 2}, MgO and Al{sub 3}Ti nanoparticles was prepared via reactive friction stir processing (FSP) of an Al–Mg sheet with pre-placed TiO{sub 2} particles (50 nm; 3.1 vol%). The microstructure of the hybrid nanocomposite comprises high-angle grain boundaries (~90%) with an average size of 2 µm and hard inclusions with sizes in the range of 30–50 nm. Evaluation of the hot deformation behavior of the nanocomposite by uniaxial tensile testing at different temperatures (300–450 °C) and strain rates (0.001–0.1 s{sup −1}) shows that the deformation apparent activation energy of the nanocomposite is 137 kJ mol{sup −1} at ≤300 °C. The values of the activation energy for the Al–Mg alloy before and after FSP at this temperature range are about 105 and 135 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively. This observation highlights the role of ultrafine hard particles and the structural changes induced by FSP on the deformation process. At the higher temperatures, the deformation activation energy for the aluminum alloy without and with the reinforcing particles is 303 and 456 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively. Detailed microstructural analysis by electron back scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy suggests that dynamic recrystallization is responsible for the deformation behavior at the elevated temperatures. Meanwhile, the presence of the hard nanoparticles operates as a grain growth inhibitor improving the thermal stability of the fine-grained aluminum alloy.

  10. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Laser-Friction Stir Welding between AA6061-T6 Al Alloy and AZ31 Mg Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Woong-Seong Chang; S.R.Rajesh; Chang-Keun Chun; Heung-Ju Kim

    2011-01-01

    For the purpose of improving the strength of this dissimilar joint, the present study was carried out to investigate the improvement in intermetallic layer by using a third material foil between the faying edges of the friction stir welded and hybrid welded Al6061-T6/AZ31 alloy plates. The difference in microstructural and mechanical characteristics of friction stir welded and hybrid welded Al6061-T6/AZ31 joint was compared. Hybrid buttwelding of aluminum alloy plate to a magnesium alloy plate was successfully achieved with Ni foil as filler material, while defect-free laser-friction stir welding (FSW) hybrid welding was achieved by using a laser power of 2 kW. Transverse tensile strength of the joint reached about 66% of the Mg base metal tensile strength in the case of hybrid welding with Ni foil and showed higher value than that of the friction stir welded joint with and without the third material foil. This may be due to the presence of less brittle Ni-based intermetallic phases instead of Al12Mg17.

  11. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  12. Flexible Friction Stir Joining Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lim, Yong Chae [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mahoney, Murray [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Sanderson, Samuel [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Larsen, Steve [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Steel, Russel [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Fleck, Dale [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Fairchild, Doug P [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC), Houston, TX (United States); Wasson, Andrew J [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC), Houston, TX (United States); Babb, Jon [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Higgins, Paul [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States)

    2015-07-23

    Reported herein is the final report on a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) project with industry cost-share that was jointly carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company (ExxonMobil), and MegaStir Technologies (MegaStir). The project was aimed to advance the state of the art of friction stir welding (FSW) technology, a highly energy-efficient solid-state joining process, for field deployable, on-site fabrications of large, complex and thick-sectioned structures of high-performance and high-temperature materials. The technology innovations developed herein attempted to address two fundamental shortcomings of FSW: 1) the inability for on-site welding and 2) the inability to weld thick section steels, both of which have impeded widespread use of FSW in manufacturing. Through this work, major advance has been made toward transforming FSW technology from a “specialty” process to a mainstream materials joining technology to realize its pervasive energy, environmental, and economic benefits across industry.

  13. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  14. Wiping Metal Transfer in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Much evidence suggests that as the friction stir pin-tool moves along a weld seam the displacement of metal takes place by a wiping action at the surface of a plug of metal that rotates with the tool. The wiping model is explained and some consequences for the friction stir welding process are drawn.

  15. Fabrication of Al/Graphite/Al2O3 Surface Hybrid Nano Composite by Friction Stir Processing and Investigating The Wear and Microstructural Properties of The Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mostafapour

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing was applied for fabricating an aluminum alloy based hybrid nano composite reinforced with nano sized Al2O3 and micro sized graphite particles. A mixture of Al2O3 and graphite particles was packed into a groove with 1 mm width and 4.5 mm depth, which had been cut in 5083 aluminum plate of 10 mm thick. Packed groove was subjected to friction stir processing in order to implement powder mixture into the aluminum alloy matrix. Microstructural properties were investigated by means of optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. It was found that reinforcement particle mixture was distributed uniformly in nugget zone. Wear resistance of composite was measured by dry sliding wear test. As a result, hybrid composite revealed significant reduction in wear rate in comparison with Al/AL2O3 composite produced by friction stir processing. Worn surface of the wear test samples were examined by SEM in order to determine wear mechanism.

  16. Friction Stir Welding and Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2015-05-01

    With nearly twenty years of international research and collaboration in friction stir welding (FSW) and processing industrial applications have spread into nearly every feasible market. Currently applications exist in aerospace, railway, automotive, personal computers, technology, marine, cutlery, construction, as well as several other markets. Implementation of FSW has demonstrated diverse opportunities ranging from enabling new materials to reducing the production costs of current welding technologies by enabling condensed packaging solutions for traditional fabrication and assembly. TMS has sponsored focused instruction and communication in this technology area for more than fifteen years, with leadership from the Shaping and Forming Committee, which organizes a biannual symposium each odd year at the annual meeting. A focused publication produced from each of these symposia now comprises eight volumes detailing the primary research and development activities in this area over the last two decades. The articles assembled herein focus on both recent developments and technology reviews of several key markets from international experts in this area.

  17. Hybrid Al/steel-joints manufactured by ultrasound enhanced friction stir welding (USE-FSW): Process comparison, nondestructive testing and microscopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomä, M.; Wagner, G.; Straß, B.; Wolter, B.; Benfer, S.; Fürbeth, W.

    2017-03-01

    The process of friction stir welding (FSW) is an innovative joining technique, which proved its potential in joining dissimilar metals that are poorly fusion weldable. This ability opens a wide range for applications in industrial fields, where weight reduction by partial substitution of conventional materials through lightweight materials is a current central aim. As a consequence of this, the realization of aluminum / steel-joints is of great interest. For this material compound, several friction stir welds were carried out by different researchers for varying Al/steel-joints, whereas the definition of optimal process parameters as well as the increase of mechanical properties was in the focus of the studies. To achieve further improved properties for this dissimilar joint a newly developed hybrid process named “ultrasound enhanced friction stir welding (USE-FSW)” was applied. In this paper the resulting properties of Al/steel-joints using FSW and USE-FSW will be presented and compared. Furthermore, first results by using the nondestructive testing method “computer laminography” to analyze the developed joining area will be shown supplemented by detailed light-microscopic investigations, scanning electron microscopic analysis, and EDX.

  18. Experimental comparison of the MIG, friction stir welding, cold metal transfer and hybrid laser-MIG processes for AA 6005-T6 aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Serafino; Sgambitterra, Emanuele; Rinaldi, Sergio; Gallone, Antonello; Viscido, Lucio; Filice, Luigino; Umbrello, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties of welded joints of AA 6005-T6 aluminum alloy obtained with hybrid laser-MIG and cold metal transfer (CMT) welding were analyzed. The performance of hybrid laser-MIG and CMT welded joints were identified using tensile, bending, shear and fatigue life tests. Taking into account the process conditions and requirements, hybrid laser-MIG and CMT welding processes were compared with friction stir welding (FSW) and conventional metal inert gas (MIG) welding processes, shown in a previous work, to understand the advantages and disadvantages of the processes for welding applications of studied Al alloy. Better tensile, bending and shear strength and fatigue life behavior were obtained with hybrid laser-MIG and FSW welded joints compared with conventional MIG processes.

  19. Torque Control of Friction Stir Welding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Longhurst Engineering, PLC and Vanderbilt University propose the innovation of torque control of friction stir welding (FSW) as a replacement to force control of...

  20. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  1. Nano-Sized Grain Refinement Using Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    friction stir weld is a very fine grain microstructure produced as a result of dynamic recrystallization. The friction stir ... Friction Stir Processing, Magnesium, Nano-size grains Abstract A key characteristic of a friction stir weld is a very fine grain microstructure...state process developed on the basis of the friction stir welding (FSW) technique invented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991 [2]. During

  2. Gimballed Shoulders for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert; Lawless, Kirby

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement of tooling for friction stir welding, gimballed shoulders would supplant shoulders that, heretofore, have been fixedly aligned with pins. The proposal is especially relevant to self-reacting friction stir welding. Some definitions of terms, recapitulated from related prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed improvement. In friction stir welding, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a pin that rotates with the shoulder and protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. In conventional friction stir welding, the main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional friction stir welding is augmented with an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or forcecontrol system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding as practiced heretofore, there are two shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. Both shoulders rotate with the pin and remain aligned coaxially with the pin. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft into the friction-stir-welding machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. This concludes the prerequisite definitions of terms.

  3. Study of Mechanical Properties and Characterization of Pipe Steel welded by Hybrid (Friction Stir Weld + Root Arc Weld) Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Sanderson, Samuel [MegaStir Technologies LLC; Mahoney, Murray [Consultant; Wasson, Andrew J [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC); Fairchild, Doug P [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC); Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has recently attracted attention as an alternative construction process for gas/oil transportation applications due to advantages compared to fusion welding techniques. A significant advantage is the ability of FSW to weld the entire or nearly the entire wall thickness in a single pass, while fusion welding requires multiple passes. However, when FSW is applied to a pipe or tube geometry, an internal back support anvil is required to resist the plunging forces exerted during FSW. Unfortunately, it may not be convenient or economical to use internal backing support due to limited access for some applications. To overcome this issue, ExxonMobil recently developed a new concept, combining root arc welding and FSW. That is, a root arc weld is made prior to FSW that supports the normal loads associated with FSW. In the present work, mechanical properties of a FSW + root arc welded pipe steel are reported including microstructure and microhardness.

  4. Friction stir welding of single crystal aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonda, Richard Warren; Wert, John A.; Reynolds, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Friction stir welds were prepared in different orientations in an aluminium single crystal. The welds were quenched to preserve the microstructure surrounding the tool and then electron backscattered diffraction was used to reveal the generation of grain boundaries and the evolution of crystallog......Friction stir welds were prepared in different orientations in an aluminium single crystal. The welds were quenched to preserve the microstructure surrounding the tool and then electron backscattered diffraction was used to reveal the generation of grain boundaries and the evolution...

  5. Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zhi-hong; HE Di-qiu; WANG Hong

    2004-01-01

    Friction stir welding(FSW), a new solid-state welding technology invited in the early 1990s,enables us weld aluminum alloys and titanium alloys etc. The processing of FSW, the microstructure in FSW alloysand the factors influencing weld quality are introduced. The complex factors affecting the properties are researched.

  6. Forming of aluminium alloy friction stir welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    The present paper aims at investigating, through analytical models, numerical models and experiments, the effect of the warm deformation phase, realised with an in temperature upsetting, on the weld previously performed by friction stir lap welding on aluminium alloy blanks. The investigation allows to show the deformation zones after upsetting that determine the homogenisation of the weld section. The analytical model allows to relate the friction factor with the upsetting load. The presence on the weld of not elevated friction factor values determines the deformation and localisation levels very useful for the weld. Such methodology allows to improve the weld itself with the forming phase.

  7. Ferrous friction stir weld physical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Seth Jason

    2006-04-01

    Traditional fusion welding processes have several drawbacks associated with the melting and solidification of metal. Weld defects associated with the solidification of molten metal may act as initiation sites for cracks. Segregation of alloying elements during solidification may cause local changes in resistance to corrosion. The high amount of heat required to produce the molten metal in the weld can produce distortion from the intended position on cooling. The heat from the electric arc commonly used to melt metal in fusion welds may also produce metal fumes which are a potential health hazard. Friction stir welding is one application which has the potential to make full thickness welds in a single pass, while eliminating fume, reducing distortion, and eliminating solidification defects. Currently the friction stir welding process is used in the aerospace industry on aluminum alloys. Interest in the process by industries which rely on iron and its alloys for structural material is increasing. While friction stir welding has been shown to be feasible with iron alloys, the understanding of friction stir welding process effects on these materials is in its infancy. This project was aimed to better that understanding by developing a procedure for physical simulation of friction stir welding. Friction stir weld material tracer experiments utilizing stainless steel markers were conducted with plates of ingot iron and HSLA-65. Markers of 0.0625" diameter 308 stainless steel worked well for tracing the end position of material moved by the friction stir welding tool. The markers did not produce measurable increases in the loading of the tool in the direction of travel. Markers composed of 0.25" diameter 304 stainless steel did not perform as well as the smaller markers and produced increased loads on the friction stir welding tool. The smaller markers showed that material is moved in a curved path around the tool and deposited behind the tool. Material near the surface

  8. Thermal modelling of friction stir welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to present the basic elements of the thermal modelling of friction stir welding as well as to clarify some of the uncertainties in the literature regarding the different contributions to the heat generation. Some results from a new thermal pseudomechanical model...... in which the temperature-dependent yield stress of the weld material controls the heat generation are also presented....

  9. Welding defects at friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Podržaj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of different types of defects at friction stir welding. In order to explain the reasons for their occurrence a short theoretical background of the process is given first. The main emphasis is on the parameters that influence the process. An energy supply based division of defects into three disjoint groups was used. The occurring defects are demonstrated on various materials.

  10. Friction Stir Processing for Efficient Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mr. Christopher B. Smith; Dr. Oyelayo Ajayi

    2012-01-31

    Friction at contacting surfaces in relative motion is a major source of parasitic energy loss in machine systems and manufacturing processes. Consequently, friction reduction usually translates to efficiency gain and reduction in energy consumption. Furthermore, friction at surfaces eventually leads to wear and failure of the components thereby compromising reliability and durability. In order to reduce friction and wear in tribological components, material surfaces are often hardened by a variety of methods, including conventional heat treatment, laser surface hardening, and thin-film coatings. While these surface treatments are effective when used in conjunction with lubrication to prevent failure, they are all energy intensive and could potentially add significant cost. A new concept for surface hardening of metallic materials and components is Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Compared to the current surface hardening technologies, FSP is more energy efficient has no emission or waste by products and may result in better tribological performance. FSP involves plunging a rotating tool to a predetermined depth (case layer thickness) and translating the FSP tool along the area to be processed. This action of the tool produces heating and severe plastic deformation of the processed area. For steel the temperature is high enough to cause phase transformation, ultimately forming hard martensitic phase. Indeed, FSP has been used for surface modification of several metals and alloys so as to homogenize the microstructure and refine the grain size, both of which led to improved fatigue and corrosion resistance. Based on the effect of FSP on near-surface layer material, it was expected to have beneficial effects on friction and wear performance of metallic materials. However, little or no knowledge existed on the impact of FSP concerning friction and wear performance the subject of the this project and final report. Specifically for steel, which is the most dominant

  11. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Sabina Luisa Campanelli; Giuseppe Casalino; Caterina Casavola; Vincenzo Moramarco

    2013-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e., no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the we...

  12. Electrochemical Studies of Passive Film Formation and Corrosion of Friction Stir Processed Nickel Aluminum Bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    friction stir welding (FSW) but is used for the purpose of refining...mechanical properties [11]. C. FRICTION STIR WELDING AND PROCESSING Friction Stir Processing (FSP) is derived from Friction Stir Welding (FSW) which was...Temple-Smith, and C. Dawes, Friction - stir butt welding , GB Patent No. 9125978.8, International patent application No. PCT/GB92/02203, 1991. [4

  13. Numerical simulation of friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding is a solid-state welding technique that utilizes thermo-mechanical influence of the rotating welding tool on parent material resulting with monolith joint-weld. On the contact of welding tool and parent material, significant stirring and deformation of parent material appears, and during this process mechanical energy is partially transformed into heat. The paper describes the software for the numerical simulation of friction stir welding developed at Mechanical Engineering Faculty, University of Nis. Numerical solution for estimation of welding plates temperature is estimated using finite difference method-explicit scheme with adaptive grid, considering influence of temperature on material's conductivity, contact conditions between welding tool and parent material, material flow around welding tool etc. The calculated results are in good agreement with the experimental results. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR35034: The research of modern non-conventional technologies application in manufacturing companies with the aim of increase efficiency of use, product quality, reduce of costs and save energy and materials

  14. Tool For Friction Stir Tack Welding of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerald W.; Dingler, Johnny W.; Loftus, Zachary

    2003-01-01

    A small friction-stir-welding tool has been developed for use in tack welding of aluminum-alloy workpieces. It is necessary to tack-weld the workpieces in order to hold them together during friction stir welding because (1) in operation, a full-size friction-stir-welding tool exerts a large force that tends to separate the workpieces and (2) clamping the workpieces is not sufficient to resist this force. It is possible to tack the pieces together by gas tungsten arc welding, but the process can be awkward and time-consuming and can cause sufficient damage to necessitate rework. Friction stir tack welding does not entail these disadvantages. In addition, friction stir tack welding can be accomplished by use of the same automated equipment (except for the welding tool) used in subsequent full friction stir welding. The tool for friction stir tack welding resembles the tool for full friction stir welding, but has a narrower shoulder and a shorter pin. The shorter pin generates a smaller workpiece-separating force so that clamping suffices to keep the workpieces together. This tool produces a continuous or intermittent partial-penetration tack weld. The tack weld is subsequently consumed by action of the larger tool used in full friction stir welding tool.

  15. Friction stir processing on carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasov, Sergei Yu., E-mail: tsy@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Melnikov, Alexander G., E-mail: melnikov-ag@tpu.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Rubtsov, Valery E., E-mail: rvy@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    Friction stir processing of medium carbon steel samples has been carried out using a milling machine and tools made of cemented tungsten carbide. Samples have been machined from 40 and 40X steels. The tools have been made in the shape of 5×5×1.5 mm and 3×3×1.5 mm tetrahedrons. The microstructure of stirred zone has been obtained using the smaller tool and consists of fine recrystallized 2-3 μm grains, whereas the larger tool has produced the 'onion-like' structures comprising hard quenched 'white' 500-600 MPa layers with 300-350 MPa interlayers of bainite needles. The mean values of wear intensity obtained after measuring the wear scar width were 0.02 mm/m and 0.001 mm/m for non-processed and processed samples, respectively.

  16. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  17. Peak Stir Zone Temperatures during Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Oh-Ishi, Keiichiro; Zhilyaev, Alexander P.; Fuller, Christian B.; London, Blair; Mahoney, Murray W.; McNelley, Terry R.

    2010-03-01

    The stir zone (SZ) temperature cycle was measured during the friction stir processing (FSP) of NiAl bronze plates. The FSP was conducted using a tool design with a smooth concave shoulder and a 12.7-mm step-spiral pin. Temperature sensing was accomplished using sheathed thermocouples embedded in the tool path within the plates, while simultaneous optical pyrometry measurements of surface temperatures were also obtained. Peak SZ temperatures were 990 °C to 1015 °C (0.90 to 0.97 T Melt) and were not affected by preheating to 400 °C, although the dwell time above 900 °C was increased by the preheating. Thermocouple data suggested little variation in peak temperature across the SZ, although thermocouples initially located on the advancing sides and at the centerlines of the tool traverses were displaced to the retreating sides, precluding direct assessment of the temperature variation across the SZ. Microstructure-based estimates of local peak SZ temperatures have been made on these and on other similarly processed materials. Altogether, the peak-temperature determinations from these different measurement techniques are in close agreement.

  18. Thermomechanical Modelling of Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2009-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a fully coupled thermomechanical process and should in general be modelled as such. Basically, there are two major application areas of thermomechanical models in the investigation of the FSW process: i) Analysis of the thermomechanical conditions such as e.g. heat ...... together with selected modelling results including prediction of material flow during welding, prediction of heat generation with the thermal-pseudo mechanical model as well as residual stress and deformation analysis combined with in-service loads.......Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a fully coupled thermomechanical process and should in general be modelled as such. Basically, there are two major application areas of thermomechanical models in the investigation of the FSW process: i) Analysis of the thermomechanical conditions such as e.g. heat......, typically on a local scale, the latter will very often be based on a semi-coupled, global procedure where the transient temperatures drive the stresses but not vice-versa. However, in the latter, prior knowledge about the heat generation must be obtained somehow, and if experimental data are not available...

  19. Microstructure Evolution during Friction Stir Spot Welding of TRIP Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Colding; Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the feasibility of friction stir spot welding of TRIP steel is investigated. In addition to manufacturing successful welds, the present study aims at a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms occurring at the (sub)micron scale during friction stir spot welding. As one of the main...

  20. Friction Stir Welding Technology: Adapting NASA's Retractable Pin Tool

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    In late 1991, The Welding Institute (TWI), a British research and technology organization, invented and patented a welding process named Friction Stir Welding (FSW). Friction Stir Welding is a highly significant advancement in aluminum welding technology that can produce stronger, lighter, and more efficient welds than any previous process.

  1. Damage Tolerance Behavior of Friction Stir Welds in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of various aerospace structures. Self-reacting and conventional friction stir welding are variations of the friction stir weld process employed in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks which are classified as pressurized structure in many spaceflight vehicle architectures. In order to address damage tolerance behavior associated with friction stir welds in these safety critical structures, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data describing fracture behavior, residual strength capability, and cyclic mission life capability of friction stir welds at ambient and cryogenic temperatures have been generated and will be presented in this paper. Fracture behavior will include fracture toughness and tearing (R-curve) response of the friction stir welds. Residual strength behavior will include an evaluation of the effects of lack of penetration on conventional friction stir welds, the effects of internal defects (wormholes) on self-reacting friction stir welds, and an evaluation of the effects of fatigue cycled surface cracks on both conventional and selfreacting welds. Cyclic mission life capability will demonstrate the effects of surface crack defects on service load cycle capability. The fracture data will be used to evaluate nondestructive inspection and proof test requirements for the welds.

  2. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  3. Thermomechanical Modelling of Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2009-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a fully coupled thermomechanical process and should in general be modelled as such. Basically, there are two major application areas of thermomechanical models in the investigation of the FSW process: i) Analysis of the thermomechanical conditions such as e.g. heat...... generation and local material deformation (often referred to as flow) during the welding process itself. ii) Prediction of the residual stresses that will be present in the joint structure post to welding. While the former in general will call for a fully-coupled thermomechanical procedure, however...... for the FSW process at hand, the heat generation must either be prescribed analytically or based on a fully coupled analysis of the welding process itself. Along this line, a recently proposed thermal-pseudo-mechanical model is presented in which the temperature dependent yield stress of the weld material...

  4. Friction stir welding of copper alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Shuhua; Liu Meng; Wang Deqing; Xu Zhenyue

    2007-01-01

    Copper plates,brass plates and copper/brass plates were friction stir welded with various parameters. Experimental results show that the microstructure of the weld is characterized by its much finer grains as contrasted with the coarse grains of parent materials and the heat-affected zones are very narrow. The microhardness of the copper weld is a little higher than that of parent plate. The microhardness of brass weld is about 25% higher than that of parent material. The tensile strength of copper joints increases with increasing welding speed in the test range. The range of parameters to obtain good welds for copper is much wider than that for brass. When different materials were welded, the position of copper plate before welding affected the quality of FSW joints. If the copper plate was put on the advancing side of weld, the good quality of weld could be got under proper parameters.

  5. Tool Forces Developed During Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, M.; Tang, W.; Schmidt, C.; McClure, J. C.; Nunes, A. C.; Murr, L. E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper will describe a technique for measuring the various forces and the torque that exist on the Friction Stir Welding pin tool. Results for various plunge depths, weld speeds, rotational speed, and tool configurations will be presented. Welds made on 6061 aluminum with typical welding conditions require a downward force of 2800 lbs. (12.5 kN) a longitudinal force in the direction of motion of 300 lbs (1.33 kN), a transverse force in the omega x v direction of 30 lbs (135 N). Aluminum 2195 under typical weld conditions requires a downward force of 3100 lbs. (1.38 kN), a longitudinal force of 920 lbs. (4.1 kN), and a transverse force of 45 lbs. (200 N) in the omega x v direction.

  6. Metal Flow in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The plastic deformation field in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is compared to that in metal cutting. A shear surface around the FSW tool analogous to the metal cutting shear plane is identified and comprises the basis of the "rotating plug" flow field model and the "wiping" model of tool interaction with weld metal. Within the context of these models: The FSW shear rate is estimated to be comparable to metal cutting shear rates. The effect of tool geometry on the FSW shear surface is discussed and related to published torque measurements. Various FS W structural features are explained, including a difference in structure of bimetallic welds when alloys on the advancing and retreating sides of the weld seam are exchanged. The joining mechanism and critical parameters of the FSW process are made clear.

  7. Localized Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Processed Sensitized 5456-H116 Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    stir welding (FSW) but it does not create a joint. Friction stir welding is a solid state joining process where the material is softened such that...small randomly distributed porosity. The volumetric defects are representative of those seen in friction stir processing and friction stir welding ...retreating side on the second pass, are typical defects seen in aluminum friction stir processing and friction stir welding

  8. Friction Stir Welding of very thin plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Galvão

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The results obtained in present research, relative to friction stir welding of 1 mm thick plates of aluminium, copper, copper-zinc and zinc alloys, prove that the application of the process in the joining of very thin plates is feasible and desirable. In fact, independently of the base material, the welds produced presented very good morphological characteristics and significant grain refinement in the nugget. Tensile and hardness tests proved that all the welds were at least in even-match relative to the base material properties. Based on the AA 5182 aluminium alloy results it was also possible to conclude that augmenting the welding speed, which improves process productivity, increases grain refinement in the nugget, improving the mechanical properties of the welds.Os resultados obtidos no presente estudo, referentes a friction stir welding de chapas de alumínio, cobre, cobre-zinco e zinco com 1 mm de espessura, provam que a aplicação desta tecnologia para a ligação de chapas muito finas é possível e desejável. De fato, independentemente do material de base, as soldas produzidas apresentaram características morfológicas muito boas e um significativo refinamento do grão na zona do nugget. Ensaios de dureza e tração provaram que todas as soldas apresentavam, no mínimo, propriedades mecânicas semelhantes às dos materiais de base. Com base nos resultados da liga de alumínio AA 5182 foi também possível concluir que ao aumentar a velocidade de soldagem, o que melhora a produtividade do processo, aumenta-se o refinamento do grão no nugget, melhorando as propriedades mecânicas das soldas.

  9. In-process discontinuity detection during friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Amber

    The objective of this work is to develop a method for detecting the creation of discontinuities (e.g., voids) during friction stir welding. Friction stir welding is inherently cost-effective, however, the need for significant weld inspection can make the process cost-prohibitive. A new approach to weld inspection is required -- where an in-situ characterization of weld quality can be obtained, reducing the need for post-process inspection. Friction stir welds with discontinuity and without discontinuity were created. In this work, discontinuities are generated by reducing the friction stir tool rotation frequency and increasing the tool traverse speed in order to create "colder" welds. During the welds, forces are measured. Discontinuity sizes for welds are measured by computerized tomography. The relationship between the force transients and the discontinuity sizes indicate that the force measurement during friction stir welding can be effectively used for detecting discontinuities in friction stir welds. The normalized force transient data and normalized discontinuity size are correlated to develop a criterion for discontinuity detection. Additional welds are performed to validate the discontinuity detection method. The discontinuity sizes estimated by the force measurement based method are in good agreement with the discontinuity sizes measured by computerized tomography. These results show that the force measurement based discontinuity detection model method can be effectively used to detect discontinuities during friction stir welding.

  10. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

    2009-11-13

    Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

  11. Applications of Friction Stir Processing during Engraving of Soft Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kočović

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing has extensive application in many technological operations. Application area of friction stir processing can be extended to the processing of non-metallic materials, such as wood. The paper examines the friction stir processing contact between a specially designed hard and temperature-resistant rotating tool and workpiece which is made of wood. Interval of speed slip and temperature level under which the combustion occurs and carbonization layer of soft material was determined. The results of the research can be applied in technological process of wood engraving operations which may have significant technological and aesthetic effects.

  12. In-Space Friction Stir Welding Machine Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Longhurst Engineering, PLC, and Vanderbilt University propose an in-space friction stir welding (FSW) machine for joining complex structural aluminum components. The...

  13. Magnetic Properties of Friction Stir Processed Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shamiparna; Martinez, Nelson Y.; Das, Santanu; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Grant, Glenn J.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Polikarpov, Evgueni

    2016-07-01

    Of the many existing inspection or monitoring systems, each has its own advantages and drawbacks. These systems are usually comprised of semi-remote sensors that frequently cause difficulty in reaching complex areas of a component. This study proposes to overcome that difficulty by developing embedded functional composites, so that embedding can be achieved in virtually any component part and periodically can be interrogated by a reading device. The "reinforcement rich" processed areas can then be used to record properties such as strain, temperature, and stress state, to name a few, depending on the reinforcement material. Friction stir processing was used to fabricate a magnetostrictive composite by embedding galfenol particles into a nonmagnetic aluminum matrix. The aim was to develop a composite that produces strain in response to a varying magnetic field. Reinforcements were distributed uniformly in the matrix. Magnetization curves were studied using a vibrating sample magnetometer. A simple and cost-effective setup was developed to measure the magnetostrictive strain of the composites. Important factors affecting the magnetic properties were identified and the processing route was modified to improve the magnetic response.

  14. Magnetic properties of friction stir processed composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Shamiparna; Martinez, Nelson Y.; Das, Santanu; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Grant, Glenn J.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Polikarpov, Evgueni

    2016-03-29

    There are many existing inspection systems each with their own advantages and drawbacks. These usually comprise of semi-remote sensors which frequently causes difficulty in reaching complex areas of a component. This study proposes to overcome that difficulty by developing embedded functional composites. Through this route, embedding can be achieved in virtually any component part and can be periodically interrogated by a reading device. The “reinforcement rich” processed areas can then be utilized to record properties like strain, temperature, stress state etc. depending on the reinforcement material. In this work, friction stir processing (FSP) was utilized to fabricate a magnetostrictive composite by embedding galfenol particles into a nonmagnetic aluminum (Al) matrix. It targets to develop a composite that produces strain in a varying magnetic field. Reinforcements were observed to be distributed uniformly in the matrix. Magnetization curves were studied using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). A simple and cheap setup was developed to measure the magnetostrictive strain of the composites. Important factors affecting the magnetic properties were identified and ways to improve the magnetic properties discussed.

  15. Inspecting Friction Stir Welding using Electromagnetic Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchen, David G.

    2004-01-01

    A report describes the use of advanced electromagnetic probes to measure the dimensions, the spatial distribution of electrical conductivity, and related other properties of friction stir welds (FSWs) between parts made of the same or different aluminum alloy(s). The probes are of the type described in in another Tech Brief. To recapitulate: A probe of this type is essentially an eddy-current probe that includes a primary (driver) winding that meanders and multiple secondary (sensing) windings that meander along the primary winding. Electrical conductivity is commonly used as a measure of heat treatment and tempering of aluminum alloys, but prior to the development of these probes, the inadequate sensitivity and limited accuracy of electrical-conductivity probes precluded such use on FSWs between different aluminum alloys, and the resolution of those probes was inadequate for measurement of FSW dimensions with positions and metallurgical properties. In contrast, the present probes afford adequate accuracy and spatial resolution for the purposes of measuring the dimensions of FSW welds and correlating spatially varying electrical conductivities with metallurgical properties, including surface defects.

  16. The Plunge Phase of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, John C.

    2005-01-01

    The many advantages of Friction Stir Welding have led to a relatively rapid acceptance in the often conservative welding community. Because the process is so different from traditional fusion welding, with which most investigators are most familiar, there remain many aspects of FSW for which there is no clear consensus. For example, the well known onion rings seen in transverse sections have been variously interpreted as grain size variations, variation in density of second phase particles and parts of the carousel of material rotating with the pin that have been shed from the carousel. Using Orientation Imaging Microscopy, Schneider has recently noted that the onion rings have a different orientation (and hence etch differently) than the surrounding material, and this orientation is consistent with slip plane orientations at the edge of the carousel. Likewise, the forces and torque exerted by the FSW tool on the work piece largely remain unaccounted for. Although these forces are routinely measured by investigators with commercial instrumented welders, they are rarely reported or even qualitatively analyzed. This paper will introduce a model based on a carousel or disk of material that rotates with the tool to estimate the torque and plunge force required to plunge a tool into the work piece. A stationary tool is modeled rather than the moving tool because effects such as thermal transients and metallurgical changes in the sample (primarily aging in aluminum) can be more easily accounted for. It is believed, however, that with some modifications the model should be applicable to a moving tool also.

  17. Metal Flow During Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, M.; Schmidt, C.; McClure, J. C.; Murr, L. E.; Nunes, A. C.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flow of metal during Friction Stir Welding is clarified using a faying surface tracer and a nib frozen in place during welding. It is shown that material is transported by two processes. The first is a wiping of material from the advancing front side of the nib onto a plug of material that rotates and advances with the nib. The material undergoes a helical motion within the plug that both rotates and advances with the plug and descends in the wash of the threads on the nib and rises on the outer part of the plug. After one or more rotations, this material is sloughed off the plug in its wake, primarily on the advancing side. The second process is an entrainment of material from the front retreating side of the nib that fills in between the sloughed off pieces from the advancing side. These two processes produce material with different mechanical properties and the strength of a weld should depend on the relative importance of the processes.

  18. Nondestructive Ultrasonic Inspection of Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaeipour, M.; Hettler, J.; Delrue, S.; Van Den Abeele, K.

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively new solid-state welding procedure developed at The Welding Institute (TWI-UK) and the technique is widely employed for welding aluminum alloys in various applications. In order to examine the quality of the welds and to detect a variety of welding flaws such as wormholes and root-flaws, it is required to develop a methodical inspection technique that can be used for the identification and localization of such defects. The most prevalent and risky defect in this type of welding is the barely visible root flaw with a length varying from 100-700 μm. Due to the extreme characteristics of the flaw, off-the-shelf ultrasonic weld inspection methods are not always able to readily detect this type of minute defect feature. Here, we propose a novel approach to characterize root flaws using an oblique incident ultrasonic C-scan backscattering analysis. The implementation consists of an immersion ultrasonic testing method in pulse echo (i.e. backscatter) mode with a 3.5 MHz transducer, and makes use of an empirical procedure to engender of a shear wave dominated excitation at the root surface, and to properly gate the received signal for root flaw examination. By scanning the surface above the welded component, a C-scan image displaying the backscatter response from the root surface of the nugget zone can be obtained which allows a simple interpretation of the root flaw status of the weld.

  19. Stir zone microstructure of commercial purity titanium friction stir welded using pcBN tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yu [Department of Materials Processing, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-02 Aramaki-aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)], E-mail: a5td9524@stu.material.tohoku.ac.jp; Sato, Yutaka S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki [Department of Materials Processing, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-02 Aramaki-aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Park, Seung Hwan C.; Hirano, Satoshi [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Omika 7-1-1, Hitachi 319-1292 (Japan)

    2008-08-15

    In the present study, friction stir welding was applied to commercial purity titanium using a polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tool, and microstructure and hardness in the weld were examined. Additionally, the microstructural evolution during friction stir welding was also discussed. The stir zone consisted of fine equiaxed {alpha} grains surrounded by serrate grain boundaries, which were produced through the {beta} {yields} {alpha} allotropic transformation during the cooling cycle of friction stir welding. The fine {alpha} grains caused higher hardness than that in the base material. A lath-shaped {alpha} grain structure containing Ti borides and tool debris was observed in the surface region of the stir zone, whose hardness was the highest in the weld.

  20. Cladding of Advanced Al Alloys Employing Friction Stir Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelt, van der A.A.; Bor, T.C.; Geijselaers, H.J.M.; Akkerman, R.; Boogaard, van den A.H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an advanced solid state cladding process, based on Friction Stir Welding, is presented. The Friction Surface Cladding (FSC) technology enables the deposition of a solid-state coating using filler material on a substrate with good metallurgical bonding. A relatively soft AA1050 filler m

  1. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Sabina Luisa; Casalino, Giuseppe; Casavola, Caterina; Moramarco, Vincenzo

    2013-12-18

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e., no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the weld. In this work FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 6 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in butt joint configuration. LAFSW is studied firstly to demonstrate the weldability of aluminum alloy using that technique. Secondly, process parameters, such as laser power and temperature gradient are investigated in order to evaluate changes in microstructure, micro-hardness, residual stress, and tensile properties. Once the possibility to achieve sound weld using LAFSW is demonstrated, it will be possible to explore the benefits for tool wear, higher welding speeds, and lower clamping force.

  2. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Luisa Campanelli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a solid-state joining process; i.e., no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the weld. In this work FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 6 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in butt joint configuration. LAFSW is studied firstly to demonstrate the weldability of aluminum alloy using that technique. Secondly, process parameters, such as laser power and temperature gradient are investigated in order to evaluate changes in microstructure, micro-hardness, residual stress, and tensile properties. Once the possibility to achieve sound weld using LAFSW is demonstrated, it will be possible to explore the benefits for tool wear, higher welding speeds, and lower clamping force.

  3. Mechanism for Self-Reacted Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venable, Richard; Bucher, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    A mechanism has been designed to apply the loads (the stirring and the resection forces and torques) in self-reacted friction stir welding. This mechanism differs somewhat from mechanisms used in conventional friction stir welding, as described below. The tooling needed to apply the large reaction loads in conventional friction stir welding can be complex. Self-reacted friction stir welding has become popular in the solid-state welding community as a means of reducing the complexity of tooling and to reduce costs. The main problems inherent in self-reacted friction stir welding originate in the high stresses encountered by the pin-and-shoulder assembly that produces the weld. The design of the present mechanism solves the problems. The mechanism includes a redesigned pin-and-shoulder assembly. The welding torque is transmitted into the welding pin by a square pin that fits into a square bushing with set-screws. The opposite or back shoulder is held in place by a Woodruff key and high-strength nut on a threaded shaft. The Woodruff key reacts the torque, while the nut reacts the tensile load on the shaft.

  4. MICROSTRUCTURAL STUDIES OF FRICTION STIR WELDED AZ31 MAGNESIUM ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Zhang; S.B.Lin; L.Wu; J.C.Feng

    2004-01-01

    Friction stir welding achieves the weld in solid phase by locally introducing frictional heating and plastic flow arising from rotation of the welding tool, which results in changes in the local microstructure of magnesium alloy. The purpose in the paper is to study the microstructures of friction stir welded AZ3I magnesium alloy. Residual microstructures,including dynamic re-crystallization zone and nugget structures have been systematically investigated utilizing optical microscopy (OM), scanning electric microscopy (SEM),transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and micro-hardness. AZ31 magnesium alloy has been successfully friction stir welded and exhibits the variations of microstructure including dynamically recrystallized,equaxied grains in the weld nugget. Residual hardness in the nugget was found slightly lower than the parent but not too obvious.

  5. Friction Stir Processing of Particle Reinforced Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Solomon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to provide a review of friction stir processing (FSP technology and its application for microstructure modification of particle reinforced composite materials. The main focus of FSP was on aluminum based alloys and composites. Recently, many researchers have investigated this technology for treating other alloys and materials including stainless steels, magnesium, titanium, and copper. It is shown that FSP technology is very effective in microstructure modification of reinforced metal matrix composite materials. FSP has also been used in the processing and structure modification of polymeric composite materials. Compared with other manufacturing processes, friction stir processing has the advantage of reducing distortion and defects in materials. The layout of this paper is as follows. The friction stir processing technology will be presented first. Then, the application of this technology in manufacturing and structure modification of particle reinforced composite materials will be introduced. Future application of friction stir processing in energy field, for example, for vanadium alloy and composites will be discussed. Finally, the challenges for improving friction stir processing technology will be mentioned.

  6. Process Model for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Glynn

    1996-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new process being applied for joining of metal alloys. The process was initially developed by The Welding Institute (TWI) in Cambridge, UK. The FSW process is being investigated at NASA/MSEC as a repair/initial weld procedure for fabrication of the super-light-weight aluminum-lithium shuttle external tank. The FSW investigations at MSFC were conducted on a horizontal mill to produce butt welds of flat plate material. The weldment plates are butted together and fixed to a backing plate on the mill bed. A pin tool is placed into the tool holder of the mill spindle and rotated at approximately 400 rpm. The pin tool is then plunged into the plates such that the center of the probe lies at, one end of the line of contact, between the plates and the shoulder of the pin tool penetrates the top surface of the weldment. The weld is produced by traversing the tool along the line of contact between the plates. A lead angle allows the leading edge of the shoulder to remain above the top surface of the plate. The work presented here is the first attempt at modeling a complex phenomenon. The mechanical aspects of conducting the weld process are easily defined and the process itself is controlled by relatively few input parameters. However, in the region of the weld, plasticizing and forging of the parent material occurs. These are difficult processes to model. The model presented here addresses only variations in the radial dimension outward from the pin tool axis. Examinations of the grain structure of the weld reveal that a considerable amount of material deformation also occurs in the direction parallel to the pin tool axis of rotation, through the material thickness. In addition, measurements of the axial load on the pin tool demonstrate that the forging affect of the pin tool shoulder is an important process phenomenon. Therefore, the model needs to be expanded to account for the deformations through the material thickness and the

  7. Low temperature friction stir welding of P91 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Rao Kalvala

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bead-on-plate friction stir welds were made on P91 alloy with low and high rotational speeds (100 and 1000 RPM to study their effects on weld microstructural changes and impression creep behavior. Temperatures experienced by the stir zone were recorded at the weld tool tip. Different zones of welds were characterized for their microstructural changes, hardness and creep behavior (by impression creep tests. The results were compared with submerged arc fusion weld. Studies revealed that the stir zone temperature with 100 RPM was well below Ac1 temperature of P91 steel while it was above Ac3 with 1000 RPM. The results suggest that the microstructural degradation in P91 welds can be controlled by low temperature friction stir welding technique.

  8. Performance Improvement of Friction Stir Welds by Better Surface Finish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Sam; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The as-welded friction stir weld has a cross section that may act as a stress concentrator. The geometry associated with the stress concentration may reduce the weld strength and it makes the weld challenging to inspect with ultrasound. In some cases, the geometry leads to false positive nondestructive evaluation (NDE) indications and, in many cases, it requires manual blending to facilitate the inspection. This study will measure the stress concentration effect and develop an improved phased array ultrasound testing (PAUT) technique for friction stir welding. Post-welding, the friction stir weld (FSW) tool would be fitted with an end mill that would machine the weld smooth, trimmed shaved. This would eliminate the need for manual weld preparation for ultrasonic inspections. Manual surface preparation is a hand operation that varies widely depending on the person preparing the welds. Shaving is a process that can be automated and tightly controlled.

  9. Heat Control via Torque Control in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venable, Richard; Colligan, Kevin; Knapp, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In a proposed advance in friction stir welding, the torque exerted on the workpiece by the friction stir pin would be measured and controlled in an effort to measure and control the total heat input to the workpiece. The total heat input to the workpiece is an important parameter of any welding process (fusion or friction stir welding). In fusion welding, measurement and control of heat input is a difficult problem. However, in friction stir welding, the basic principle of operation affords the potential of a straightforward solution: Neglecting thermal losses through the pin and the spindle that supports it, the rate of heat input to the workpiece is the product of the torque and the speed of rotation of the friction stir weld pin and, hence, of the spindle. Therefore, if one acquires and suitably processes data on torque and rotation and controls the torque, the rotation, or both, one should be able to control the heat input into the workpiece. In conventional practice in friction stir welding, one uses feedback control of the spindle motor to maintain a constant speed of rotation. According to the proposal, one would not maintain a constant speed of rotation: Instead, one would use feedback control to maintain a constant torque and would measure the speed of rotation while allowing it to vary. The torque exerted on the workpiece would be estimated as the product of (1) the torque-multiplication ratio of the spindle belt and/or gear drive, (2) the force measured by a load cell mechanically coupled to the spindle motor, and (3) the moment arm of the load cell. Hence, the output of the load cell would be used as a feedback signal for controlling the torque (see figure).

  10. Numerical optimisation of friction stir welding: review of future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, the combination of increasingly more advanced numerical simulation software with high computational power has resulted in models for friction stir welding (FSW), which have improved the understanding of the determining physical phenomena behind the process substantially....... This has made optimisation of certain process parameters possible and has in turn led to better performing friction stir welded products, thus contributing to a general increase in the popularity of the process and its applications. However, most of these optimisation studies do not go well beyond manual...

  11. Near Net Manufacturing Using Thin Gage Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Jennifer; Potter, David; Holquin, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) and near net spin forming of FSW aluminumn blanks were investigated for large-scale pressure vessel applications. With a specific focus on very thin gage 2xxx and 7xxx aluminum alloys, the program concentrated on the following: the criteria used for material selection, a potential manufacturing flow, and the effectiveness and associated risks of near net spin forming. Discussion will include the mechanical properties of the friction stir welds and the parent material from before and after the spin forming process. This effort was performed under a NASA Space Exploration initiative focused on increasing the affordability, reliability and performance of pressure vessels larger than 10 ft. diameter.

  12. Friction stir weld tools having fine grain structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Glenn J.; Frye, John G.; Kim, Jin Yong; Lavender, Curt A.; Weil, Kenneth Scott

    2016-03-15

    Tools for friction stir welding can be made with fewer process steps, lower cost techniques, and/or lower cost ingredients than other state-of-the-art processes by utilizing improved compositions and processes of fabrication. Furthermore, the tools resulting from the improved compositions and processes of fabrication can exhibit better distribution and homogeneity of chemical constituents, greater strength, and/or increased durability. In one example, a friction stir weld tool includes tungsten and rhenium and is characterized by carbide and oxide dispersoids, by carbide particulates, and by grains that comprise a solid solution of the tungsten and rhenium. The grains do not exceed 10 micrometers in diameter.

  13. Microstructural evolution of 6063 aluminum during friction-stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Y.S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Materials Processing; Enomoto, Masatoshi [Showa Aluminum Corp., Oyama City, Tochigi (Japan); Jogan, Shigetoshi [Showa Aluminum Corp., Sakai, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    The microstructural distribution associated with a hardness profile in a friction-stir-welded, age-hardenable 6063 aluminum alloy has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM). The friction-stir process produces a softened region in the 6063 Al weld. Frictional heating and plastic flow during friction-stir welding create fine recrystallized grains in the weld zone and recovered grains in the thermomechanically affected zone. The hardness profile depends greatly on the precipitate distribution and only slightly on the grain size. The softened region is characterized by dissolution and growth of the precipitates during the welding. Simulated weld thermal cycles with different peak temperatures have shown that the precipitates are dissolved at temperatures higher than 675 K and that the density of the strengthening precipitate was reduced by thermal cycles lower than 675 K. A comparison between the thermal cycles and isothermal aging has suggested precipitation sequences in the softened region during friction-stir welding.

  14. Friction Stir Welding of Thick Section Aluminum for Military Vehicle Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Friction Stir Welding of Thick Section Aluminum for Military Vehicle Applications by Brian Thompson, Kevin Doherty, Craig Niese, Mike Eff...International Symposium on Friction Stir Welding (9ISFSW), Huntsville, AL, 15–17 May 2012. Approved for public release...Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 ARL-RP-417 December 2012 Friction Stir Welding of Thick Section Aluminum for Military

  15. Temporarily alloying titanium to facilitate friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2009-05-01

    While historically hydrogen has been considered an impurity in titanium, when used as a temporary alloying agent it promotes beneficial changes to material properties that increase the hot-workability of the metal. This technique known as thermohydrogen processing was used to temporarily alloy hydrogen with commercially pure titanium sheet as a means of facilitating the friction stir welding process. Specific alloying parameters were developed to increase the overall hydrogen content of the titanium sheet ranging from commercially pure to 30 atomic percent. Each sheet was evaluated to determine the effect of the hydrogen content on process loads and tool deformation during the plunge phase of the friction stir welding process. Two materials, H-13 tool steel and pure tungsten, were used to fabricate friction stir welding tools that were plunged into each of the thermohydrogen processed titanium sheets. Tool wear was characterized and variations in machine loads were quantified for each tool material and weld metal combination. Thermohydrogen processing was shown to beneficially lower plunge forces and stabilize machine torques at specific hydrogen concentrations. The resulting effects of hydrogen addition to titanium metal undergoing the friction stir welding process are compared with modifications in titanium properties documented in modern literature. Such comparative analysis is used to explain the variance in resulting process loads as a function of the initial hydrogen concentration of the titanium.

  16. Recent developments in Micro Friction Stir Welding: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithole, Keydon; Vasudeva Rao, Veeredhi

    2016-02-01

    The advent of friction stir welding (FSW) in 1991 has been evolutionary in the joining of metals and related materials. Friction stir welding has enabled the joining of metals that could not be joined by other welding processes. Research has shown that dissimilar materials with very different properties, plastics, composites and even wood can be joined by FSW. Recent activities in the application of FSW has seen the development of micro friction stir welding (μFSW), which is the FSW of very thin sections of thickness 1000 μm (1 mm) or less. Micro friction stir welding further extends the applications of FSW to areas such as copper electrical contacts, tailor-welded blanks, wood. Though μFSW is relatively new development significant work has been done to date with interesting research findings being reported. This paper aims to review developments in μFSW to date. The focus of the paper will be on problems peculiar to μFSW due to downscaling to the micro scale and other practical considerations.

  17. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Carpenter, Joseph A.; Warren, C. D.; Smith, Mark T.

    2008-12-28

    Experiments are continuing to evaluate the feasibility of friction stir spot welding advanced high-strength steels including, DP780, martensitic hot-stamp boron steel, and TRIP steels. Spot weld lap-shear strengths can exceed those required by industry standards such as AWS D8.1.

  18. Temporarily alloying titanium to facilitate friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2009-05-01

    While historically hydrogen has been considered an impurity in titanium, when used as a temporary alloying agent it promotes beneficial changes to material properties that increase the hot-workability of the metal. This technique known as thermohydrogen processing was used to temporarily alloy hydrogen with commercially pure titanium sheet as a means of facilitating the friction stir welding process. Specific alloying parameters were developed to increase the overall hydrogen content of the titanium sheet ranging from commercially pure to 30 atomic percent. Each sheet was evaluated to determine the effect of the hydrogen content on process loads and tool deformation during the plunge phase of the friction stir welding process. Two materials, H-13 tool steel and pure tungsten, were used to fabricate friction stir welding tools that were plunged into each of the thermohydrogen processed titanium sheets. Tool wear was characterized and variations in machine loads were quantified for each tool material and weld metal combination. Thermohydrogen processing was shown to beneficially lower plunge forces and stabilize machine torques at specific hydrogen concentrations. The resulting effects of hydrogen addition to titanium metal undergoing the friction stir welding process are compared with modifications in titanium properties documented in modern literature. Such comparative analysis is used to explain the variance in resulting process loads as a function of the initial hydrogen concentration of the titanium.

  19. A Brief Introduction to the Theory of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and is already an important welding process for the aerospace industry, where welds of optimal quality are demanded. The structure of welds determines weld properties. The structure of friction stir welds is determined by the flow field in the weld metal in the vicinity of the weld tool. A simple kinematic model of the FSW flow field developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, which enables the basic features of FSW microstructure to be understood and related to weld process parameters and tool design, is explained.

  20. Unraveling the Processing Parameters in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is translated along a weld seam, literally stirring the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path or paths is required. In this study, various markers are used to trace the flow paths of the metal. X-ray radiographs record the segmentation and position of the wire. Several variations in the trajectories can be differentiated within the weld zone.

  1. Effects of Friction Stir Welding Speed on AA2195 alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ho-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of friction stir welding (FSW to aerospace has grown rapidly due to the high efficiency and environmental friendly nature of the process. FSW is achieved by plastic flow of frictionally heated material in solid state and offers many advantages of avoiding hot cracking and limiting component distortion. Recently low density, high modulus and high strength AA2195 are used as substitute for conventional aluminum alloys since the weight saving is critical in aerospace applications. One of the problems for this alloy is weld metal porosity formation leading to hot cracking. Combination of FSW and AA2195 provides synergy effect to improve mechanical properties and weight saving of aerospace structure such as cryogenic fuel tanks for launch systems. The objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of friction stir welding speed on mechanical and microstructural properties of AA2195. The friction stir welded materials were joined with four different tool rotation speeds (350~800 rpm and five welding speeds (120~360 mm/min, which are the two prime welding parameters in this process.

  2. Temperature dependent effective friction coefficient estimation in friction stir welding with the bobbin tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction coefficient in many friction stir welding researches is generally used as an effective, constant value without concern on the adaptable and changeable nature of the friction during welding sequence. This is understandable because the main problem in analyzing friction in friction stir welding are complex nature of the friction processes, case-dependent and time dependent contact between the bodies, influence of the temperature, sliding velocity, etc. This paper is presenting a complex experimental-numerical-analytical model for estimating the effective friction coefficient on contact of the bobbin tool and welding plates during welding, considering the temperature at the contact as the most influencing parameter on friction. The estimation criterion is the correspondence of the experimental temperature and temperature from the numerical model. The estimation procedure is iterative and parametric - the heat transport parameters and friction coefficient are adapted during the estimation procedure in a realistic manner to achieve relative difference between experimental and model’s temperature lower than 3%. The results show that friction coefficient varies from 0.01 to 0.21 for steel-aluminium alloy contact and temperature range from 406°C to 22°C.

  3. Investigation of the Microstructure of Joints of Aluminum Alloys Produced by Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-02-01

    Special features of the microstructure of joints of aluminum-magnesium and aluminum-copper alloys produced by friction stir welding are analyzed. It is demonstrated that a layered structure with ultradisperse grains is produced by friction stir welding at the center of the weld joint. An analogy is drawn between the microstructures of joints produced by friction stir welding and surface layer produced by sliding friction.

  4. FRICTION STIR LAP WELDING OF ALUMINUM - POLYMER USING SCRIBE TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2015-02-16

    Friction Stir Scribe (FSS) technology is a relatively new variant of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) which enables lap joining of dissimilar material with very different melting points and different high temperature flow behaviors. The cutter scribe attached at the tip of FSW tool pin effectively cuts the high melting point material such that a mechanically interlocking feature is created between the dissimilar materials. The geometric shape of this interlocking feature determines the shear strength attained by the lap joint. This work presents first use of scribe technology in joining polymers to aluminum alloy. Details of the several runs of scribe welding performed in lap joining of ~3.175mm thick polymers including HDPE, filled and unfilled Nylon 66 to 2mm thick AA5182 are presented. The effect of scribe geometry and length on weld interlocking features is presented along with lap shear strength evaluations.

  5. Corrosion of friction stir welded magnesium alloy AM50

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Rongchang [School of Material Science and Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Xingshenglu Rd. 4, Chongqing 400050 (China)], E-mail: rczeng2001@yahoo.com.cn; Chen Jun [School of Material Science and Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Xingshenglu Rd. 4, Chongqing 400050 (China); Dietzel, Wolfgang; Zettler, Rudolf; Santos, Jorge F. dos [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Max Planck Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Lucia Nascimento, M. [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Fachgebiet Werkstofftechnik, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Kainer, Karl Ulrich [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Max Planck Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    The microstructure of a friction stir welded magnesium alloy AM50 was examined by means of optical light microscopy. The chemical composition, particularly the iron content, and morphology of the oxide film were analyzed and discerned via auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Corrosion behaviour of the welds and base materials were investigated by virtue of neutral salt spray tests and potentiodynamic polarization measurements in conventional cells and in a mini cell. The results demonstrate that minor increases in iron concentration as might be speculated to occur as a consequence of tool/work piece interaction during the welding process on the corrosion resistance of the weld can be ignored. The corrosion morphology was predominantly influenced by the distribution of the Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase. Here, it was also found that the corrosion resistance of the friction stir weld varied in response to changes in the joint microstructure.

  6. Predicting the forming limit of friction stir welded blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramulu, Perumalla Janaki; Narayanan, R. Ganesh

    2011-05-01

    Friction stir welded blanks (FSWB) are tailored blanks made by friction stir welding of sheets of different thicknesses and quality. In order to reduce the trial-and-error principles and costs, the computational simulation of stamping processes of FSW blanks is required for which a feasible methodology or theory to evaluate the forming characteristics has to be incorporated. In the present work, the validity of effective strain rate based necking criterion (ESRC) in both original and modified forms to predict the forming limit of FSW blanks made of AA6111, DP590 is analyzed. The FLC thus predicted is compared with FLC from thickness gradient based necking criterion and from literature. It is found from the validation done with literature results that a consistent and accurate forming limit prediction is obtained from modified ESRC when compared to original ESRC. The failure pattern prediction is also agreeing well with the literature results.

  7. Friction stir welding of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林三宝; 张华; 吴林; 冯吉才; 戴鸿滨

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is an new solid-phase joining technology which has more advantages over fusion welding methods in welding of aluminum and other non-ferrous metals. The effects of welding parameters on mechanical properties and microstructure during friction stir welding of AZ31 magnesium alloy were studied in this paper. Microstructures and mechanical properties of the joints were investigated by means of optical microscopy, scanning electric microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness analysis, and tensile test. Experimental results show that the magnesium alloy can be successfully welded by FSW method, and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of FSW joint reaches up to 90 percent of base metal. The microstructures of welded joints exhibit the variation from dynamically recrystallized fine grains to greatly deformed grains. Hardness in nugget zone was found lower than the base metal but not too obvious.

  8. Effect of friction stir welding parameters on defect formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Eliseev, A. A.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Ivanov, A. N.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding is a perspective method for manufacturing automotive parts, aviation and space technology. One of the major problems is the formation of welding defects and weld around the welding zone. The formation of defect is the main reason failure of the joint. A possible way to obtain defect-free welded joints is the selection of the correct welding parameters. Experimental results describing the effect of friction stir welding process parameters on the defects of welded joints on aluminum alloy AMg5M have been shown. The weld joint defects have been characterized using the non-destructive radioscopic and ultrasound phase array methods. It was shown how the type and size of defects determine the welded joint strength.

  9. Process optimization of friction stir welding based on thermal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates how to apply optimization methods to numerical models of a friction stir welding process. The work is intended as a proof-of-concept using different methods that are applicable to models of high complexity, possibly with high computational cost, and without the possibility...... information of the high-fidelity model. The optimization schemes are applied to stationary thermal models of differing complexity of the friction stir welding process. The optimization problems considered are based on optimizing the temperature field in the workpiece by finding optimal translational speed....... Also an optimization problem based on a microstructure model is solved, allowing the hardness distribution in the plate to be optimized. The use of purely thermal models represents a simplification of the real process; nonetheless, it shows the applicability of the optimization methods considered...

  10. Feasibility of Underwater Friction Stir Welding of HY-80 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    control procedures. A single tool of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) in a Tungsten -Rhenium binder was used to conduct three bead-on-plate FSW... Tungsten -Rhenium binder was used to conduct three bead-on-plate FSW traverses, approximately 40 inches in length on 0.25 inch HY-80 steel. The...the processing of nickel aluminum bronze propellers used on Navy ships and submarines. Friction stir welding is accomplished by using a cylindrical

  11. Numerical Simulation of Friction Stir Welding by Natural Element Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Alfaro, I.; Fratini, L.; CUETO, Elias; Chinesta, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    International audience; In this work we address the problem of numerically simulating the Friction Stir Welding process. Due to the special characteristics of this welding method (i.e., high speed of the rotating pin, very large deformations, etc.) finite element methods (FEM) encounter several difficulties. While Lagrangian simulations suffer from mesh distortion, Eulerian or Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) ones still have difficulties due to the treatment of convective terms, the treatm...

  12. Surface Hardness of Friction Stir Welded AA6063 Pipe

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail Azman; Awang Mokhtar

    2014-01-01

    The external surface hardness of friction stir welded aluminum alloy 6063 pipe joint was investigated in this paper. The 89mm of outside diameter pipe with 5mm of wall thickness was used as test pipe piece for this experiment on closed butt joint configuration by utilising Bridgeport 2216 CNC milling machine and orbital clamping unit specially designed to cater for this task and function. Several welded samples were produced on varying process parameters which were successfully joined by usin...

  13. Feasibility of underwater friction stir welding of HY-80 steel

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, William Chad

    2011-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The purpose of this thesis is to determine the feasibility of underwater friction stir welding (FSW) of high-strength; quench and temper low carbon steels that are susceptible to hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC). The specific benefits of underwater FSW would be weld repairs of ship and submarine control surfaces and hulls without the need for drydocking and extensive environmental control procedures. A single tool of polycrystallin...

  14. Thermo-Mechanical Processing in Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid-phase joining, or welding process that was invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute (TWI). The process is potentially capable of joining a wide variety of aluminum alloys that are traditionally difficult to fusion weld. The friction stir welding (FSW) process produces welds by moving a non-consumable rotating pin tool along a seam between work pieces that are firmly clamped to an anvil. At the start of the process, the rotating pin is plunged into the material to a pre-determined load. The required heat is produced by a combination of frictional and deformation heating. The shape of the tool shoulder and supporting anvil promotes a high hydrostatic pressure along the joint line as the tool shears and literally stirs the metal together. To produce a defect free weld, process variables (RPM, transverse speed, and downward force) and tool pin design must be chosen carefully. An accurate model of the material flow during the process is necessary to guide process variable selection. At MSFC a plastic slip line model of the process has been synthesized based on macroscopic images of the resulting weld material. Although this model appears to have captured the main features of the process, material specific interactions are not understood. The objective of the present research was to develop a basic understanding of the evolution of the microstructure to be able to relate it to the deformation process variables of strain, strain rate, and temperature.

  15. Friction Stir Welding of Al 5052 with Al 6061 Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. T. Kumbhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW, a solid-state joining technique, is being extensively used in similar as well as dissimilar joining of Al, Mg, Cu, Ti, and their alloys. In the present study, friction stir welding of two aluminium alloys—AA6061 and AA5052—was carried out at various combinations of tool rotation speeds and tool traverse speeds. The transverse cross-section of the weld was used for optical as well as electron microscopy observations. The microstructural studies were used to get an indication of the extent of material mixing both at the macro- and microscales. It was observed that, at the interface region, both materials exhibited similar texture despite the nonrigorous mixing of the materials in the nugget. The extent of interdiffusion of alloying elements at the interface was studied using electron probe microanalysis. The tensile testing evaluation of these specimens showed good mechanical properties. The interdiffusion of alloying elements and development of similar orientations in the nugget could have contributed to the better tensile properties of the friction-stir-welded AA5052-AA6061 specimens.

  16. Modeling of material flow in friction stir welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D numerical model to study the material flow in the friction stir welding process. Results indicate that the material in front of the pin moves upwards due to the extrusion of the pin, and then the upward material rotates with the pin. Behind the rotating tool, the material starts to move downwards and to deposit in the wake. This process is the real cause to make friction stir welding process continuing successfully. The tangent movement of the material takes the main contribution to the flow of the material in friction stir welding process. There exists a swirl on the advancing side and with the increase of the translational velocity the inverse flow of the material on the advancing side becomes faster. The shoulder can increase the velocity of material flow in both radial direction and tangent direction near the top surface. The variations of process parameters do have an effect on the velocity field near the pin, especially in the region in which the material flow is faster.

  17. Repair welding process of friction stir welding groove defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hui-jie; ZHANG Hui-jie

    2009-01-01

    The groove defect formed in the friction stir welding dramatically deteriorates weld appearances and mechanical properties of the joints owing to its larger size and penetration. Therefore, the friction stir repair welding was utilized to remove such a groove defect, and the focus was placed on the mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of the repair joints so as to obtain an optimum repair welding process. The experimental results indicate that the groove defect can be removed by friction stir repair welding, and the offset repair welding process is superior to the symmetrical repair welding process. In the symmetrical repair welding process, a large number of fine cavity defects and an obvious aggregation of hard-brittle phase Al2Cu occur, accordingly the mechanical properties of the repair joint are weakened, and the fracture feature of repair joint is partially brittle and partially plastic. A good-quality repair joint can be obtained by the offset repair welding process, and the repair joint is fractured near the interface between the weld nugget zone and thermal-mechanically affected zone.

  18. Friction stir welding of 5052 aluminum alloy plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Jai KWON; Seong-Beom SHIM; Dong-Hwan PARK

    2009-01-01

    Friction stir welding between 5052 aluminum alloy plates with a thickness of 2 mm was performed. The tool for welding was rotated at speeds ranging from 500 to 3 000 r/min under a constant traverse speed of 100 mm/min. The results show that at all tool rotation speeds, defect-free welds are successfully obtained. Especially at 1 000, 2 000 and 3 000 r/min, the welds exhibit very smooth surface morphologies. At 500, 1 000, and 2 000 r/min, onion ring structure is clearly observed in the friction-stir-welded zone (SZ). In addition, the onion ring structure region becomes wider as the tool rotation speed is increased. The gain size in the SZ is smaller than that in the base metal, and is decreased with a decrease of the tool rotation speed. In all tool rotation speeds, the SZ exhibits higher average hardness than the base metal. Especially at 500 r/min, the average hardness of the SZ reaches a level about 33% greater than that of the base metal. At 500, 1 000 and 2 000 r/min, the tensile strength of the friction stir welded (FSWed) plates is similar to that of the base metal (about 204 Mpa). The elongation of the FSWed plates is lower than that of the base metal (about 22%). However, it is noticeable that the maximum elongation of about 21% is obtained at 1 000 r/min.

  19. Recent Developments in Friction Stir Welding of Al-alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çam, Gürel; Mistikoglu, Selcuk

    2014-06-01

    The diversity and never-ending desire for a better life standard result in a continuous development of the existing manufacturing technologies. In line with these developments in the existing production technologies the demand for more complex products increases, which also stimulates new approaches in production routes of such products, e.g., novel welding procedures. For instance, the friction stir welding (FSW) technology, developed for joining difficult-to-weld Al-alloys, has been implemented by industry in manufacturing of several products. There are also numerous attempts to apply this method to other materials beyond Al-alloys. However, the process has not yet been implemented by industry for joining these materials with the exception of some limited applications. The microstructures and mechanical properties of friction stir welded Al-alloys existing in the open literature will be discussed in detail in this review. The correlations between weld parameters used during FSW and the microstructures evolved in the weld region and thus mechanical properties of the joints produced will be highlighted. However, the modeling studies, material flow, texture formation and developments in tool design are out of the scope of this work as well as the other variants of this technology, such as friction stir spot welding (FSSW).

  20. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  1. Friction stir welding characteristics of two aluminum alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘会杰; 藤井英俊; 前田将克; 野城清

    2003-01-01

    The friction stir welding characteristics of the strain-hardened AA1050-H24 and precipitate-hardened AA2017-T351 aluminum alloys were examined in order to reveal the effects of the alloy properties on the friction stir welding behavior of the base materials. The results show that (1) for AA1050-H24, the weld possesses a smooth surface and clear ripples, there is no elliptical weld nugget in the weld, there is not discernible interface between the stir zone and the thermo-mechanically affected zone(TMAZ), and the internal defect of the weld looks like a long crack and is located in the lower part of the weld; (2) for AA2017-T351, the weld usually possesses a rough surface and visible ripples, the elliptical weld nugget clearly exists in the weld and there is obvious plastic flow and a discernible interface between the nugget and the TMAZ, and the internal defect of the weld is composed of many voids and distributed in the middle part of the weld; (3) the effective ranges of the welding parameters for AA1050-H24 and AA2017-T351 are both narrow, especially for the latter; and (4) the tensile strength efficiencies of the joints for the two typical alloys are similar, i e 79% for AA1050-H24 and 82% for AA2017-T351.

  2. Modeling of AA5083 Material-Microstructure Evolution During Butt Friction-Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    B. Clausen, and K. An, In Situ Neutron Diffraction Measurements of Temperature and Stresses During Friction Stir Welding of 6061 -T6 Aluminium Alloy...Analytical Modelling of Friction Stir Welding, INALCO98: Seventh International Conference on Joints in Aluminium , M.J. Russell and R. Shercliff R, Ed...Fujii, M. Maeda, and K. Nogi, Tensile Fracture Location Characterisation of Friction Stir Welded Joints of Different Aluminium Alloys, J. Mater. Sci

  3. Spatial Mechanical Response and Strain Gradient Evolution of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-2139

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Spatial Mechanical Response and Strain Gradient Evolution of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-2139 by Brian Justusson, Jessica Medintz, Jian...Evolution of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-2139 Brian Justusson and Jessica Medintz Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Jian Yu...and Strain Gradient Evolution of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-2139 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ORISE 1120-1120-99 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  4. Microstructural Investigation and Evaluation of Mechanical Properties in Friction Stir Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Properties in Friction Stir Welded Joints BRIAN JUSTUSSON MENTORS: DR. CONSTANTINE FOUNTZOULAS AND DR. CHIAN-FONG YEN U.S. ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY...2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Microstructural Investigation And Evaluation Of Mechanical Properties In Friction Stir Welded Joints 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...of the weldment can be costly and needs to be addressed. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state welding technique, which involves local softening

  5. Multiaxial fatigue of aluminium friction stir welded joints: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Hattingh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research is to check the accuracy of the Modified Wöhler Curve Method (MWCM in estimating the fatigue strength of friction stir (FS welded tubular joints of Al 6082-T6 subjected to in-phase and out-of-phase multiaxial fatigue loading. The welded samples being investigated were manufactured by equipping an MTS I-STIR process development system with a retracting tool that was specifically designed and optimised for this purpose. These specimens were tested under proportional and non-proportional tension and torsion, the effect of non-zero mean stresses being also investigated. The validation exercise carried out by using the generated experimental results allowed us to prove that the MWCM (applied in terms of nominal stresses is highly accurate in predicting the fatigue strength of the tested FS welded joints, its usage resulting in estimates falling with the uniaxial and torsional calibration scatter bands.

  6. Heat generation during plunge stage in friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljić Darko M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the heat generation in the Al alloy Al2024-T3 plate under different rotating speeds and plunge speeds during the plunge stage of friction stir welding (FSW. A three-dimensional finite element model (FEM is developed in the commercial code ABAQUS/Explicit using the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation, the Johnson-Cook material law and Coulomb’s Law of friction. The heat generation in FSW can be divided into two parts: frictional heat generated by the tool and heat generated by material deformation near the pin and the tool shoulder region. Numerical results obtained in this work indicate a more prominent influence from the friction-generated heat. The slip rate of the tool relative to the workpiece material is related to this portion of heat. The material velocity, on the other hand, is related to the heat generated by plastic deformation. Increasing the plunging speed of the tool decreases the friction-generated heat and increases the amount of deformation-generated heat, while increasing the tool rotating speed has the opposite influence on both heat portions. Numerical results are compared with the experimental ones, in order to validate the numerical model, and a good agreement is obtained.

  7. Retractable Pin Tools for the Friction Stir Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Two companies have successfully commercialized a specialized welding tool developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Friction stir welding uses the high rotational speed of a tool and the resulting frictional heat created from contact to crush, 'stir' together, and forge a bond between two metal alloys. It has had a major drawback, reliance on a single-piece pin tool. The pin is slowly plunged into the joint between two materials to be welded and rotated as high speed. At the end of the weld, the single-piece pin tool is retracted and leaves a 'keyhole,' something which is unacceptable when welding cylindrical objects such as drums, pipes and storage tanks. Another drawback is the requirement for different-length pin tools when welding materials of varying thickness. An engineer at the MSFC helped design an automatic retractable pin tool that uses a computer-controlled motor to automatically retract the pin into the shoulder of the tool at the end of the weld, preventing keyholes. This design allows the pin angle and length to be adjusted for changes in material thickness and results in a smooth hole closure at the end of the weld. Benefits of friction stir welding, using the MSFC retractable pin tool technology, include the following: The ability to weld a wide range of alloys, including previously unweldable and composite materials; provision of twice the fatigue resistance of fusion welds and no keyholes; minimization of material distortion; no creation of hazards such as welding fumes, radiation, high voltage, liquid metals, or arcing; automatic retraction of the pin at the end of the weld; and maintaining full penetration of the pin.

  8. Controlling Force and Depth in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Glynn; Loftus, Zachary; McCormac, Nathan; Venable, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Feedback control of the penetration force applied to a pin tool in friction stir welding has been found to be a robust and reliable means for controlling the depth of penetration of the tool. This discovery has made it possible to simplify depth control and to weld with greater repeatability, even on workpieces with long weld joints. Prior to this discovery, depths of penetration in friction stir welding were controlled by hard-tooled roller assemblies or by depth actuators controlled by feedback from such external sensors as linear variable-differential transformers or laser-based devices. These means of control are limited: A hard-tooled roller assembly confines a pin tool to a preset depth that cannot be changed easily during the welding process. A measurement by an external sensor is only an indirect indicative of the depth of penetration, and computations to correlate such a measurement with a depth of penetration are vulnerable to error. The present force-feedback approach exploits the proportionality between the depth and the force of penetration Unlike a depth measurement taken by an external sensor, a force measurement can be direct because it can be taken by a sensor coupled directly to the pin tool. The reading can be processed through a modern electronic servo control system to control an actuator to keep the applied penetration force at the desired level. In comparison with the older depth-control methods described above, this method offers greater sensitivity to plasticizing of the workpiece metal and is less sensitive to process noise, resulting in a more consistent process. In an experiment, a tapered panel was friction stir welded while controlling the force of penetration according to this method. The figure is a plot of measurements taken during the experiment, showing that force was controlled with a variation of 200 lb (890 N), resulting in control of the depth of penetration with a variation of 0.004 in. (0.1 mm).

  9. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  10. Phased array ultrasonic inspection of Friction Stir Weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarre, André; Moles, Michael; Lupien, Vincent

    2000-05-01

    Phased array ultrasonic inspection methods have been developed for the rapid inspection of Friction Stir Weldments (FSW) on Delta rocket cryogenic tanks. A comprehensive review was performed to identify NDE methods that are suitable for the detection of defects in this new welding process. The search included a review of traditional and advanced NDE methods that were capable of demonstrating both the sensitivity and inspection rates required for this examination. This paper will discuss the theory behind phased array techniques, fundamentals of several probe designs for FSW configurations, and the advantages of using phased arrays over conventional NDE methods for this applications.

  11. Micromechanical Simulation of Deformation of Friction Stir Welded Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidle, B. C.; Dawson, P. R.; Boyce, D. E.

    2004-06-01

    A microstructure-based finite element formulation for the mechanical response of friction stir welded AL-6XN stainless steel is presented. The welding process generates regions of substantial variations in material state and properties that contribute to strong heterogeneities in the mechanical behavior of welded components We modeled the system with a multiscale elastoplastic formulation in which polycrystalline behavior is computed as the integrated responses of constituent crystals. Model validation is made through comparisons to post-test measurements of shape and hardness and to lattice strain measurements from in situ neutron diffraction experiments.

  12. Friction stir welding (FSW of aluminium foam sandwich panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bušić

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the influence of welding speed and tool tilt angle upon the mechanical properties at the friction stir welding of aluminium foam sandwich panels. Double side welding was used for producing butt welds of aluminium sandwich panels applying insertion of extruded aluminium profile. Such insertion provided lower pressure of the tool upon the aluminium panels, providing also sufficient volume of the material required for the weldment formation. Ultimate tensile strength and flexural strength for three-point bending test have been determined for samples taken from the welded joints. Results have confirmed anticipated effects of independent variables.

  13. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Santella, M. L.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2009-12-28

    Friction stir spot welding was used to join two advanced high-strength steels using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tooling. Numerous tool designs were employed to study the influence of tool geometry on weld joints produced in both DP780 and a hot-stamp boron steel. Tool designs included conventional, concave shouldered pin tools with several pin configurations; a number of shoulderless designs; and a convex, scrolled shoulder tool. Weld quality was assessed based on lap shear strength, microstructure, microhardness, and bonded area. Mechanical properties were functionally related to bonded area and joint microstructure, demonstrating the necessity to characterize processing windows based on tool geometry.

  14. Friction Stir Processing of ODS and FM Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Young Bum; Noh, Sang Hoon; Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In ODS steels, it is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion, however, those advantages will be disappeared while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for welding traditionally difficult to weld materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. Friction stir processing (FSP) is a method of changing the properties of a metal through intense, localized plastic deformation. FSW is the precursor of the FSP technique. When ideally implemented, this process mixes the material without changing the phase and creates a microstructure with fine, equiaxed grains. This homogeneous grain structure, separated by high-angle boundaries, allows some alloys to take on superplastic properties. In this study, FSW is used as a substitutive welding process between FMS tube and ODS parts. The dimension of tube is 7.0 OD, 0.5 T. During the FSW, dynamic-recrystallized grains are developed; the uniform oxides dispersion is preserved in the metal matrix. The microstructure and microtexture of the material near the stir zone is found to be influenced by the rotational behavior of the tool. The additive effect from FSP on sample surface is considered. Since the mechanical alloying (MA) and FSP commonly apply extreme shear deformation on materials, the dispersion of oxide particle in ODS steels is very active during both processes. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels in the form of sheet and tube. FSW could successfully produce defect-free welds on FMS tubes and ODS ring assembly. FSW produces a fine grain structure consisting of ferrite and martensite, and the oxide

  15. Developing Friction Stir Welding Process Model for ICME Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    A framework for developing a product involving manufacturing processes was developed with integrated computational materials engineering approach. The key component in the framework is a process modeling tool which includes a thermal model, a microstructure model, a thermo-mechanical, and a property model. Using friction stir welding (FSW) process as an example, development of the process modeling tool was introduced in detail. The thermal model and the microstructure model of FSW of steels were validated with the experiment data. The model can predict reasonable temperature and hardness distributions as observed in the experiment. The model was applied to predict residual stress and joint strength of a pipe girth weld.

  16. Interfacial Reaction during Friction Stir Welding of Al and Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genevois, C.; Girard, M.; Huneau, B.; Sauvage, X.; Racineux, G.

    2011-08-01

    Commercially pure copper was joined to a 1050 aluminum alloy by friction stir welding. A specific configuration where the tool pin was fully located in the aluminum plate was chosen. In such a situation, there is no mechanical mixing between the two materials, but frictional heating gives rise to a significant thermally activated interdiffusion at the copper/aluminum interface. This gives rise to the formation of defect-free joints where the bonding is achieved by a very thin intermetallic layer at the Cu/Al interface. Nanoscaled grains within this bonding layer were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Two phases were identified, namely, Al2Cu and Al4Cu9 phases. The nucleation and growth of these two phases are discussed and compared to the standard reactive interdiffusion reactions between Cu and Al.

  17. Joining Dissimilar Materials Using Friction Stir Scribe Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Piyush [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland 99352, WA e-mail: piyush.upadhyay@pnnl.gov; Hovanski, Yuri [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland 99352, WA; Jana, Saumyadeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland 99352, WA; Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland 99352, WA

    2016-10-03

    Development of a robust and cost-effective method of joining dissimilar materials could provide a critical pathway to enable widespread use of multi-material designs and components in mainstream industrial applications. The use of multi-material components such as steel-aluminum and aluminum-polymer would allow design engineers to optimize material utilization based on service requirements and could often lead to weight and cost reductions. However, producing an effective joint between materials with vastly different thermal, microstructural, and deformation responses is highly problematic using conventional joining and/or fastening methods. This is especially challenging in cost sensitive, high volume markets that largely rely on low cost joining solutions. Friction stir scribe technology was developed to meet the demands of joining materials with drastically different properties and melting regimes. The process enables joining of light metals like magnesium and aluminum to high temperature materials like steel and titanium. Viable joints between polymer composites and metal can also be made using this method. This paper will present the state of the art, progress made, and challenges associated with this innovative derivative of friction stir welding in reference to joining dissimilar metals and polymer/metal combinations.

  18. Friction Stir Welding of Shipbuilding Steel with Primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Azevedo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Friction Stir Welding has proven its merits for welding of aluminium alloys and is focused in expanding its material database to steel and titanium and also to assess new joint configurations. The use of welded structures in shipbuilding industry has a long tradition and continuously seeks for innovation in terms of materials and processes maintaining, or even, reducing costs. Several studies have been performed in the past years on FSW of steel. However, just recently were reported defect-free welds, free of martensite with stable parameters in steel without Primer. FSW of steel with primer has not been addressed. This work aims to fulfil a knowledge gap related to the use of friction stir for welding shipbuilding steel by analysing the effect of welding parameters on the metallurgical characteristics and mechanical properties of welds obtained with an innovative FSW tool in joining steel plates with a primer. Welds were performed in 4mm thick GL-A36 steel plates painted with a zinc based primer followed by a detailed microscopic, chemical and mechanical analysis. The results that matching fatigue properties are obtained using this technique, in FSW of shipbuilding steel with Primer.

  19. JOINING DISSIMILAR MATERIALS USING FRICTION STIR SCRIBE TECHNIQUE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Jana, Saumyadeep; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2016-09-01

    Development of robust and cost effective method of joining dissimilar materials can provide a critical pathway to enable widespread use of multi-material design and components in mainstream industrial applications. The use of multi-material components such as Steel-Aluminum, Aluminum-Polymer allows design engineers to optimize material utilization based on service requirements and often lead weight and cost reductions. However producing an effective joint between materials with vastly different thermal, microstructural and deformation response is highly problematic using conventional joining and /or fastening methods. This is especially challenging in cost sensitive high volume markets that largely rely on low–cost joining solutions. Friction Stir Scribe technology was developed to meet the demands of joining materials with drastically different properties and melting regimes. The process enables joining of light metals like Magnesium and Aluminum to high temperature materials like Steels and Titanium. Additionally viable joints between polymer composites and metal can also be made using this method. This paper will present state of the art, progress made and challenges associated with this innovative derivative of Friction Stir welding in reference to joining dissimilar metals and polymer/metal combinations.

  20. Metal Cutting Theory and Friction Stir Welding Tool Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Lewis N.

    2003-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively new industrial process that was invented at The Weld Institute (TWI, United Kingdom) and patented in 1992 under research funded by in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Often quoted advantages of the process include good strength and ductility along with minimization of residual stress and distortion. Less well advertised are the beneficial effects of this solid state welding process in the field of occupational and environmental safety. It produces superior weld products in difficult to weld materials without producing any toxic fumes or solid waste that must be controlled as hazardous waste. In fact, it reduces noise pollution in the workspace as well. In the early days of FSW, most welding was performed on modified machine tools, in particular on milling machines with modified milling cutters. In spite of the obvious milling heritage of the process, the techniques and lessons learned from almost 250 years of successful metalworking with milling machines have not been applied in the field of modern Friction Stir Welding. The goal of the current research was to study currently successful FSW tools and parameterize the process in such a way that the design of new tools for new materials could be accelerated. Along the way, several successful new tooling designs were developed for current issues at the Marshall Space Flight Center with accompanying patent disclosures

  1. Friction Stir Lap Welding: material flow, joint structure and strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.W. Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding has been studied intensively in recent years due to its importance in industrial applications. The majority of these studies have been based on butt joint configuration and friction stir lap welding (FSLW has received considerably less attention. Joining with lap joint configuration is also widely used in automotive and aerospace industries and thus FSLW has increasingly been the focus of FS research effort recently. number of thermomechancal and metallurgical aspects of FSLW have been studied in our laboratory. In this paper, features of hooking formed during FSLW of Al-to-Al and Mg-to-Mg will first be quantified. Not only the size measured in the vertical direction but hook continuity and hooking direction have been found highly FS condition dependent. These features will be explained taking into account the effects of the two material flows which are speed dependent and alloy deformation behaviour dependent. Strength values of the welds will be presented and how strength is affected by hook features and by alloy dependent local deformation behaviours will be explained. In the last part of the paper, experimental results of FSLW of Al-to-steel will be presented to briefly explain how joint interface microstructures affect the fracturing process during mechanical testing and thus the strength. From the results, tool positioning as a mean for achieving maximum weld strength can be suggested.

  2. Effects of Laser Peening, and Shot Peening, on Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Hackel, Lloyd; Rankin, Jon; Truong, Chanh; Walter, Matt

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the effects of laser peening and shot peening on friction stir welding is shown. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Friction Stir Welding (FSW); 3) Microstructure; 4) Laser & Shot Peening; 5) Residual Stresses; 6) Tensile Behavior; 7) Fatigue Life & Surface Roughness; 8) Crack Growth; and 9) Benefits.

  3. Fatigue and Damage Tolerance of Friction Stir Welded Joints for Aerospace Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmen, H.J.K.

    2010-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a young welding process with high potential to replace riveted joints in aerospace structures like the fuselage. Friction stir welding is a robust process and capable of welding high strength aluminum alloys. Therefore it can lead to both costs and weight savings. To substit

  4. Fully Coupled Thermomechanical Finite Element Analysis of Material Evolution During Friction-Stir Welding of AA5083

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-03

    Sharma, S. R., and Mishra, R. S. Effect of friction stir processing on the microstructure of cast A356 aluminum . Mater. Sci. Engng A, 2006, 433, 269...J. and Thomas, W. M. Friction stir process welds aluminum alloys. Welding J., 1996, 75, 41–52. 3 Thomas, W. M. and Dolby, R. E. Friction stir welding...273. 8 Su, J. Q., Nelson, T. W., Mishra, R., and Mahoney, M. Microstructural investigation of friction stir welded 7050-T651 aluminum . Acta Mater., 2003

  5. Tensile strength on friction stir processed AMg5 (5083) aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumaevsky, A. V.; Eliseev, A. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Tarasov, S. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    The results of the tensile tests carried out both on AMg5 (5083) aluminum alloy samples base and those obtained using friction stir processing technique are reported. The tensile test samples have been prepared from the friction stir processed plates so that their tensile axis was parallel to the processing direction. The maximum tensile strength of the processed samples was 9% higher than of the base metal. The fractographic examination shows the presence of flat areas inherent of the brittle fracture in all three friction processed samples. The load-extension curves show that friction stir processing may suppress the serrated yielding.

  6. Development of Finite Element Forulations for High-Fidelity Polycrystals and Damage Avoidance in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    simulate friction stir welding processes with a focus on computing conditions that lead to the formation and...focused on advancing the technology of friction stir welding (FSW) in shipbuilding. We developed finite element based simulation methods that can help... simulation capability we com- puted the sensitivity of defect formation to a number of variables associated with friction stir welding , including pin

  7. Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A tool that would be useable in both conventional and self-reacting friction stir welding (FSW) has been proposed. The tool would embody both a prior tooling concept for self-reacting FSW and an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability developed previously as an augmentation for conventional FSW. Some definitions of terms are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed tool. In conventional FSW, depicted in Figure 1, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a rotating pin that protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. The main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional FSW is augmented with an APT capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or force-control system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding (SR-FSW), there are two rotating shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft, back into the FSW machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. A tool for SRFSW embodying this concept was reported in "Mechanism for Self-Reacted Friction Stir Welding" (MFS-31914), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 10 (October 2004), page 53. In its outward appearance, the proposed tool (see Figure 2) would fit the above description of an SR

  8. Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Tool Advance Speed via Monte-Carlo Simulation of the Friction Stir Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk A. Fraser

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of the friction stir welding process is growing in the aeronautical and aero-space industries. To make the process more available to the structural fabrication industry (buildings and bridges, being able to model the process to determine the highest speed of advance possible that will not cause unwanted welding defects is desirable. A numerical solution to the transient two-dimensional heat diffusion equation for the friction stir welding process is presented. A non-linear heat generation term based on an arbitrary piecewise linear model of friction as a function of temperature is used. The solution is used to solve for the temperature distribution in the Al 6061-T6 work pieces. The finite difference solution of the non-linear problem is used to perform a Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS. A polynomial response surface (maximum welding temperature as a function of advancing and rotational speed is constructed from the MCS results. The response surface is used to determine the optimum tool speed of advance and rotational speed. The exterior penalty method is used to find the highest speed of advance and the associated rotational speed of the tool for the FSW process considered. We show that good agreement with experimental optimization work is possible with this simplified model. Using our approach an optimal weld pitch of 0.52 mm/rev is obtained for 3.18 mm thick AA6061-T6 plate. Our method provides an estimate of the optimal welding parameters in less than 30 min of calculation time.

  9. Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Tool Advance Speed via Monte-Carlo Simulation of the Friction Stir Welding Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Kirk A; St-Georges, Lyne; Kiss, Laszlo I

    2014-04-30

    Recognition of the friction stir welding process is growing in the aeronautical and aero-space industries. To make the process more available to the structural fabrication industry (buildings and bridges), being able to model the process to determine the highest speed of advance possible that will not cause unwanted welding defects is desirable. A numerical solution to the transient two-dimensional heat diffusion equation for the friction stir welding process is presented. A non-linear heat generation term based on an arbitrary piecewise linear model of friction as a function of temperature is used. The solution is used to solve for the temperature distribution in the Al 6061-T6 work pieces. The finite difference solution of the non-linear problem is used to perform a Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS). A polynomial response surface (maximum welding temperature as a function of advancing and rotational speed) is constructed from the MCS results. The response surface is used to determine the optimum tool speed of advance and rotational speed. The exterior penalty method is used to find the highest speed of advance and the associated rotational speed of the tool for the FSW process considered. We show that good agreement with experimental optimization work is possible with this simplified model. Using our approach an optimal weld pitch of 0.52 mm/rev is obtained for 3.18 mm thick AA6061-T6 plate. Our method provides an estimate of the optimal welding parameters in less than 30 min of calculation time.

  10. Microstructure characterization of Friction Stir Spot Welded TRIP steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Colding; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Peterson, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels have not yet been successfully joined by any welding technique. It is desirable to search for a suitable welding technique that opens up for full usability of TRIP steels. In this study, the potential of joining TRIP steel with Friction Stir Spot......-mechanically affected zones (TMAZ), and two heat-affected zones (HAZ). The dual behavior of the microstructure in the zones is related to the two transition temperatures in steel: A1 and A3. In parts of the TMAZ the microstructure contains ultra fine-grained ferrite. This finding parallels the observation in thermo......-mechanically processed steels, where severe deformation at elevated temperatures is used to produce ultra fine-grained microstructures. Several possible transformation mechanisms could in principle explain the development of ultra fine-grained ferrite, e.g. dynamic recrystallization, strain-induced ferrite...

  11. Micro friction stir welding of copper electrical contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Klobčar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of micro friction stir welding (μFSW of electrolytic tough pitch copper (CuETP in a lap and butt joint. Experimental plan was done in order to investigate the influence of tool design and welding parameters on the formation of defect free joints. The experiments were done using universal milling machine where the tool rotation speed varied between 600 and 1 900 rpm, welding speed between 14 and 93 mm/min and tilt angle between 3° and 5°. From the welds samples for analysis of microstructure and samples for tensile tests were prepared. The grain size in the nugget zone was greatly reduced compared to the base metal and the joint tensile strength exceeded the strength of the base metal.

  12. Comparison of fatigue property between friction stir and TIG welds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xunhong Wang; Kuaishe Wang; Yang Shen; Kai Hu

    2008-01-01

    The alloy 5052 was welded by friction stir welding (FSW) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. The effect of welding processes (FSW and TIG) on the fatigue properties of 5052 aluminum-welded joints was analyzed based on fatigue testing, and the S-N curve of the joints were established. The results show that the fatigue properties of FSW welded joints are better than those of TIG welded joints. The fatigue strength is determined as 65 Mpa under 106 cycling of fatigue life. The microstructure of joints is fine grains and narrow HAZ zone in FSW welds, which inhibit the growth of cracks and produce high fatigue life compared with that of TIG welds. Fracture morphologies also show that the fatigue fracture results from weld defects.

  13. Pin Tool Geometry Effects in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querin, J. A.; Rubisoff, H. A.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW) there is significant evidence that material can take one of two different flow paths when being displaced from its original position in front of the pin tool to its final position in the wake of the weld. The geometry of the pin tool, along with the process parameters, plays an important role in dictating the path that the material takes. Each flow path will impart a different thermomechanical history on the material, consequently altering the material microstructure and subsequent weld properties. The intention of this research is to isolate the effect that different pin tool attributes have on the flow paths imparted on the FSWed material. Based on published weld tool geometries, a variety of weld tools were fabricated and used to join AA2219. Results from the tensile properties and microstructural characterization will be presented.

  14. Prolegomena to the Study of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The literature contains many approaches toward modeling of the friction stir welding (FSW) process with varying treatments of the weld metal properties. It is worthwhile to consider certain fundamental features of the process before attempting to interpret FSW phenomena: Because of the unique character of metal deformation (as opposed to, say, viscous deformation) a velocity "discontinuity" or shear surface occurs in FSW and determines much of the character of the welding mechanism. A shear surface may not always produce a sound bond. Balancing mechanical power input against conduction and convection heat losses yields a relation, a "temperature index", between spindle speed and travel speed to maintain constant weld temperature. But many process features are only weakly dependent upon temperature. Thus, unlike modeling of metal forming processes, it may be that modeling the FSW process independently of the material conditions has some merit.

  15. Modelling the Thermomechanical Conditions in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich

    Friction Stir Welding is a solid-state welding process invented by TWI in 1991. The FSW process is unique in the sense that joining of un-weldable alloys readily can be made. The thermomechanical conditions present in the workpiece during the welding process are of great interest since...... these control the properties of the weld. In the present work, a set of experimental, analytical and numerical analyses are carried out in order to evaluate the thermomechanical conditions descriptive for welding of aluminium, in this case AA2024-T3, under a specific set of welding parameters. Despite...... these specific data, the developed models can be applied for other alloys and welding parameters as well. A detailed experiment is carried out which constitutes the basis for the development and validation of the numerical and analytical models presented in this work. The contact condition at the tool...

  16. Joining dissimilar materials using Friction Stir scribe technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Jana, Saumyadeep; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2016-10-03

    The ability to effectively join materials with vastly different melting points like Aluminum-Steel, Polymer composites - metals has been one of the road blocks in realizing multi-material components for light weighting efforts. Friction stir scribe (FSS) technique is a promising method that produces continuous overlap joint between materials with vastly different melting regimes and high temperature flow characteristics. FSS uses an offset cutting tool at the tip of the FSW pin to create an insitu mechanical interlock between material interfaces. With investments from Vehicle Technology office, US DOE and several automotive manufacturers and suppliers PNNL is developing the FSS process and has demonstrated viability of joining several material combinations. Details of welding trails, unique challenges and mitigation strategies in different material combinations will be discussed. Joint characterization including mechanical tests and joint performances will also be presented.

  17. Tool Geometry for Friction Stir Welding—Optimum Shoulder Diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, M.; Arora, A.; de, A.; Debroy, T.

    2011-09-01

    The most important geometric parameter in the friction stir welding (FSW) tool design is the shoulder diameter, which is currently estimated by trial and error. Here, we report a combined experimental and theoretical investigation on the influence of shoulder diameter on thermal cycles, peak temperatures, power requirements, and torque during FSW of AA7075-T6. An optimum tool shoulder diameter is identified using a three-dimensional, heat transfer and materials flow model. First, the predictive capability of the model is tested by comparing the computed values of peak temperature, spindle power, and torque requirements for various shoulder diameters against the corresponding experimental data. The change in the values of these variables with shoulder diameter is correctly predicted by the model. The model is then used to identify the optimum tool shoulder diameter that facilitates maximal use of the supplied torque in overcoming interfacial sticking. The tool with optimum shoulder diameter is shown to result in acceptable yield strength (YS) and ductility.

  18. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-01

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this work, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  19. Friction stir welding (FSW process of copper alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Miličić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper analyzes the structure of the weld joint of technically pure copper, which is realized using friction stir welding (FSW. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical processes of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established. Parameters of the FSW welding technology influencing the zone of the seam material and the mechanical properties of the resulting joint were analyzed. The physical joining consists of intense mixing the base material along the joint line in the “doughy” phase. Substantial plastic deformations immediately beneath the frontal surface of tool provide fine-grained structure and a good quality joint. The optimum shape of the tool and the optimum welding regime (pressure force, rotation speed and the traverse speed of the tool in the heat affected zone enable the achievement of the same mechanical properties as those of the basic material, which justifies its use in welding reliable structures.

  20. Metal cutting analogy for establishing Friction Stir Welding process parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Sylvester Allen

    A friction stir weld (FSW) is a solid state joining operation whose processing parameters are currently determined by lengthy trial and error methods. To implement FSWing rapidly in various applications will require an approach for predicting process parameters based on the physics of the process. Based on hot working conditions for metals, a kinematic model has been proposed for calculating the shear strain and shear strain rates during the FSW process, validation of the proposed model with direct measuring is difficult however. Since the shear strain and shear strain rates predicted for the FSW process, are similar to those predicted in metal cutting, validation of the FSW algorithms with microstructural studies of metal chips may be possible leading to the ability to predict FSW processing parameters.

  1. Microstructure Evolution during Friction Stir Spot Welding of TRIP steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Colding

    Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels have been developed for automotive applications due to the excellent high strength and formability. The microstructure of TRIP steels is a complex mixture of various microstructural constituents; ferrite, bainite, martensite and retained austenite....... The TRIP effect is activated under the influence of an external load, thereby leading to a martensitic transformation of the retained austenite. This transformation induced plasticity contributes to the excellent mechanical properties of this class of steels and provides high tensile strength without...... and thereby reduced weight of the vehicles. One of the limitations for the wide application of TRIP steel is associated with joining, since so far no method has succeeded in joining TRIP steel, without comprising the steel properties. In this study, the potential of joining TRIP steel with Friction Stir Spot...

  2. Designing aluminium friction stir welded joints against multiaxial fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Susmel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates the accuracy of the Modified Wöhler Curve Method (MWCM in estimating multiaxial fatigue strength of aluminium friction stir (FS welded joints. Having developed a bespoke joining technology, circumferentially FS welded tubular specimens of Al 6082-T6 were tested under proportional and non-proportional tension and torsion, the effect of non-zero mean stresses being also investigated. The validation exercise carried out using the experimental results have demonstrated that the MWCM applied in terms of nominal stresses, notch stresses, and also the Point Method is accurate in predicting the fatigue lifetime of the tested FS welded joints, with its use resulting in life estimates that fall within the uniaxial and torsional calibration scatter bands.

  3. Simulation of Friction Stir Processing in 304L Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A major dilemma facing the nuclear industry is repair or replacement of stainless steel reactor components that have been exposed to neutron irradiation. When conventional fusion welding is used for weld repair, the high temperatures and thermal stresses inherent in the process enhance the growth of helium bubbles, causing intergranular cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ. Friction stir processing (FSP has potential as a weld repair technique for irradiated stainless steel, because it operates at much lower temperatures than fusion welding, and is therefore less likely to cause cracking in the HAZ. Numerical simulation of the FSP process in 304L stainless steel was performed using an Eulerian finite element approach. Model input required flow stresses for the large range of strain rates and temperatures inherent in the FSP process. Temperature predictions in three locations adjacent to the stir zone were accurate to within 4% of experimentally measure values. Prediction of recrystallized grain size at a location about 6mm behind the tool center was less accurate, because the empirical model employed for the prediction did not account for grain growth that occurred after deformation in the experiment was halted.

  4. A coupled thermo-mechanical model of friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljić Darko M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A coupled thermo-mechanical model was developed to study the temperature fields, the plunge force and the plastic deformations of Al alloy 2024-T351 under different rotating speed: 350, 400 and 450 rpm, during the friction stir welding (FSW process. Three-dimensional FE model has been developed in ABAQUS/Explicit using the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation, the Johnson-Cook material law and the Coulomb’s Law of friction. Numerical results indicate that the maximum temperature in the FSW process is lower than the melting point of the welding material. The temperature filed is approximately symmetrical along the welding line. A lower plastic strain region can be found near the welding tool in the trailing side on the bottom surface. With increasing rotation speed, the low plastic strain region is reduced. When the rotational speed is increased, the plunge force can be reduced. Regions with high equivalent plastic strains are observed which correspond to the nugget and the flow arm.

  5. Effects of Fusion Tack Welds on Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Pendleton, M. L.; Brooke, S. A.; Russell, C. K.

    2012-01-01

    In order to know whether fusion tack welds would affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir seam welds in 2195-T87 aluminum alloy, the fracture stresses of 144 tensile test coupons cut from 24 welded panels containing segments of friction stir welds were measured. Each of the panels was welded under unique processing conditions. A measure of the effect of the tack welds for each panel was devised. An analysis of the measures of the tack weld effect supported the hypothesis that fusion tack welds do not affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir welds to a 5% level of confidence.

  6. Microstructure Evolution during Friction Stir Welding of Mill-Annealed Ti-6Al-4V (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2011-4300 MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION DURING FRICTION STIR WELDING OF MILL-ANNEALED Ti-6Al-4V (Preprint) A.L. Pilchak...DURING FRICTION STIR WELDING OF MILL-ANNEALED Ti-6Al-4V (Preprint) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Transactions A. Document contains color. 14. ABSTRACT In this study, mill-annealed Ti-6Al-4V plates were successfully friction stir welded over a

  7. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  8. Fatigue Performance of Friction-Stir-Welded Al-Mg-Sc Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhemchuzhnikova, Daria; Mironov, Sergey; Kaibyshev, Rustam

    2017-01-01

    Fatigue behavior of a friction-stir-welded Al-Mg-Sc alloy was examined in cast and hot-rolled conditions. In both cases, the joints failed in the base material region and therefore the joint efficiency was 100 pct. The specimens machined entirely from the stir zone demonstrated fatigue strength superior to that of the base material in both preprocessed tempers. It was shown that the excellent fatigue performance of friction-stir joints was attributable to the ultra-fine-grained microstructure, the low dislocation density evolved in the stir zone, and the preservation of Al3Sc coherent dispersoids during welding. The formation of such structure hinders the initiation and growth of fatigue microcracks that provides superior fatigue performance of friction-stir welds.

  9. An Alternative Frictional Boundary Condition for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gaoqiang; Feng, Zhili; Zhu, Yucan; Shi, Qingyu

    2016-09-01

    For better application of numerical simulation in optimization and design of friction stir welding (FSW), this paper presents a new frictional boundary condition at the tool/workpiece interface for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of FSW. The proposed boundary condition is based on an implementation of the Coulomb friction model. Using the new boundary condition, the CFD simulation yields non-uniform distribution of contact state over the tool/workpiece interface, as validated by the experimental weld macrostructure. It is found that interfacial sticking state is present over large area at the tool-workpiece interface, while significant interfacial sliding occurs at the shoulder periphery, the lower part of pin side, and the periphery of pin bottom. Due to the interfacial sticking, a rotating flow zone is found under the shoulder, in which fast circular motion occurs. The diameter of the rotating flow zone is smaller than the shoulder diameter, which is attributed to the presence of the interfacial sliding at the shoulder periphery. For the simulated welding condition, the heat generation due to friction and plastic deformation makes up 54.4 and 45.6% of the total heat generation rate, respectively. The simulated temperature field is validated by the good agreement to the experimental measurements.

  10. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Friction Stir Welded and Bolted Cold Plates with Al/Cu Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Suresh, M.; Sibi Varshan, M.

    2015-05-01

    An attempt is made to design and fabricate a cold plate with aluminum-copper dissimilar interface joined by friction stir welding. Optimum welding conditions for obtaining sound-quality corner and T joints with an aluminum-copper interface were established. Welded cross sections of the friction stir welded cold plate were analyzed to understand the bonding characteristics. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to evaluate the fluid-flow characteristics and thermal resistance of friction stir welded cold plate and the resulted are compared with the conventional bolted cold plate configuration. For CFD modeling of a cold plate with a dissimilar interface, a new methodology is proposed. From the CFD analysis and experimental results, it is observed that friction stir welded cold plate offered better thermal performance compared to the bolted cold plate and it is due to the metallurgical bonding at the aluminum-copper interface with the dispersion of copper particles.

  11. Influential Parameters and Numerical Simulation of Heat Generated in the Process of Friction Stir Welding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KOVACEVIC, Ilija; DJELOSEVIC, Mirko; TEPIC, Goran; MILISAVLJEVIC, Stevan

    2016-01-01

    The paper analyzes the problem of friction stir welding (FSW) technology. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical process of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established...

  12. Probing weld quality monitoring in friction stir welding through characterization of signals by fractal theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Bipul; Bag, Swarup; Pal, Sukhomay [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam (India)

    2017-05-15

    Providing solutions towards the improvisation of welding technologies is the recent trend in the Friction stir welding (FSW) process. We present a monitoring approach for ultimate tensile strength of the friction stir welded joints based on information extracted from process signals through implementing fractal theory. Higuchi and Katz algorithms were executed on current and tool rotational speed signals acquired during friction stir welding to estimate fractal dimensions. Estimated fractal dimensions when correlated with the ultimate tensile strength of the joints deliver an increasing trend with the increase in joint strength. It is observed that dynamicity of the system strengthens the weld joint, i.e., the greater the fractal dimension, the better will be the quality of the weld. Characterization of signals by fractal theory indicates that the single-valued indicator can be an alternative for effective monitoring of the friction stir welding process.

  13. Nonlinear Time Reversal Acoustic Method of Friction Stir Weld Assessment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of the project is demonstration of the feasibility of Friction Stir Weld (FSW) assessment by novel Nonlinear Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) method. Time...

  14. Composite Aluminum-Copper Sheet Material by Friction Stir Welding and Cold Rolling

    OpenAIRE

    Kahl, S; Osikowicz, W

    2013-01-01

    An aluminum alloy and a pure copper material were butt-joined by friction stir welding and subsequently cold rolled. The cold-rolling operation proved to be very advantageous because small voids present after friction stir welding were closed, the interface area per material thickness was enlarged, a thin intermetallic layer was partitioned, and the joint was strengthened by strain hardening. Tensile test specimens fractured in the heat-affected zone in the aluminum material; tensile strength...

  15. A review of using computational fluid dynamic in simulating of friction stir welding and parametric studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hamza, Esam

    2016-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is still gradually evolving where it is newer than most thermomechanical processes and due to its ability to avoid many of the common defects in other welding techniques it has become largely used, particularly for those materials that are soft.[1]\\ud Since the invention of friction stir welding by The Welding Institute (TWI), Cambridge, UK, there have been many attempts to comprehend the physical phenomena that take place during this process. These phenomena can b...

  16. STUDY ON THE TEXTURE OF A FRICTION STIR WELDED Mg-Al-Ca ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.T. Zhang; M. Suzuki; K. Maruyama

    2006-01-01

    Macro-texture of an Mg-Al-Ca alloy prepared by friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated through pole figure measurement and X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern analysis. It was found that at the top and bottom surfaces of friction stir zone (FSZ), (0002) basal planes of magnesium tend to be arranged parallel to the plate surface. In the cross section of FSZ, no obvious texture had evolved and (0002) basal planes showed a random distribution.

  17. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  18. Multi-Criteria Optimization in Friction Stir Welding Using a Thermal Model with Prescribed Material Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Deb, Kalyanmoy; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is an innovative solid-state joining process providing products with superior mechanical properties. It utilizes a rotating tool being submerged into the joint line and traversed while stirring the two pieces of metal together to form the weld. The temperature distribu...

  19. Friction stir processing (FSP: refining microstructures and improving properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNelley, T. R.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available FSP is reviewed as an allied technology of friction stir welding (FSW and additional considerations such as processing pattern and step over distance are introduced. The application of FSP to continuously cast AA5083 material in the as-cast condition is described and the extent of grain refinement and homogenization of microstructure is documented. The FSP-induced superplastic response of this material is compared to the response of conventionally processed AA5083 and the improved ductility of the FSP material is related to grain refinement and microstructure homogenization.

    Se revisa el procesado por fricción batida (FSP como un aliado tecnológico de la soldadura por fricción batida (FSW y se introducen consideraciones adicionales tales como el patrón de procesado y el paso en función de la distancia. Se describe la aplicación de FSP al material AA5083 por colada continua en la condición de colada y se documenta el grado de afino de grano y homogeneización de la microestructura. La respuesta de superplasticidad inducida por FSP se compara con la respuesta de la aleación AA5083 procesada convencionalmente y la mejora de ductilidad del material FSP se relaciona con el afino de grano y la homogeneización de la microestructura.

  20. Process Optimization for Friction-Stir-Welded Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, M.; Kumar, K.; Mishra, R. S.

    2012-06-01

    Advanced high-strength M190 steel sheets were joined by friction-stir welding under different tool rotational and traversing speeds. The optical microstructure of the joints exhibited complete martensite and partial martensite at the weld nugget depending on the cooling rate during welding. The first heat-affected zone outside of the weld nugget revealed ferrite-pearlite phase aggregate, and the second heat-affected zone showed a tempered martensitic structure. The interplay of process variables in terms of peak temperature and cooling rate was studied to observe their effect on joint efficiency under shear testing. The peak hardness at weld nugget was close to the parent alloy at an intermediate cooling rate of 294 to 313 K/s. The lowest hardness was observed at the first heat-affected zone for all welded joints. Joint efficiency was dependent on relative quantity of ferrite-pearlite at first heat-affected zone. In that respect, the intermediate temperature to the tune of ~1193 K to 1273 K (~920 °C to 1000 °C) at the weld nugget was found to be beneficial for obtaining an adequate quantity of pearlite at the first heat-affected zone to provide joint efficiency of more than 50 pct of that of parent alloy.

  1. Manual adjustable probe tool for friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelgoetz, Peter A. (Inventor); Ding, Jeff (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A friction stir welding tool is provided generally comprising three parts: a rotatable welding tool body (22) that has an outer threaded surface (32) and a probe (24) extending from a distal end of the body, a shoulder (26), which has a threaded inner surface (40) and a bore (36) at a distal end of the shoulder, and a jam nut (28), which has a threaded inner surface (42). The shoulder is threaded onto the tool body such that the probe extends from the shoulder through the bore by a preferred length. The jam nut is then threaded onto the tool body to secure the shoulder. The tool is operatively connected to a drive motor for rotating the tool body. The shoulder may include a knife edge projecting from the distal end (38) thereof adjacent the bore. The knife edge inhibits the weld material from migrating along the probe to intrude inside the shoulder, where it may prevent separation of the tool body and the shoulder when readjustment of the tool is necessary.

  2. Friction Stir Additive Manufacturing: Route to High Structural Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanivel, S.; Sidhar, H.; Mishra, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    Aerospace and automotive industries provide the next big opportunities for additive manufacturing. Currently, the additive industry is confronted with four major challenges that have been identified in this article. These challenges need to be addressed for the additive technologies to march into new frontiers and create additional markets. Specific potential success in the transportation sectors is dependent on the ability to manufacture complicated structures with high performance. Most of the techniques used for metal-based additive manufacturing are fusion based because of their ability to fulfill the computer-aided design to component vision. Although these techniques aid in fabrication of complex shapes, achieving high structural performance is a key problem due to the liquid-solid phase transformation. In this article, friction stir additive manufacturing (FSAM) is shown as a potential solid-state process for attaining high-performance lightweight alloys for simpler geometrical applications. To illustrate FSAM as a high-performance route, manufactured builds of Mg-4Y-3Nd and AA5083 are shown as examples. In the Mg-based alloy, an average hardness of 120 HV was achieved in the built structure and was significantly higher than that of the base material (97 HV). Similarly for the Al-based alloy, compared with the base hardness of 88 HV, the average built hardness was 104 HV. A potential application of FSAM is illustrated by taking an example of a simple stiffener assembly.

  3. Design of Friction Stir Welding Tool for Avoiding Root Flaws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shude Ji

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve material flow behavior during friction stir welding and avoid root flaws of weld, a tool with a half-screw pin and a tool with a tapered-flute pin are suggested. The effect of flute geometry in tool pins on material flow velocity is investigated by the software ANSYS FLUENT. Numerical simulation results show that high material flow velocity appears near the rotational tool and material flow velocity rapidly decreases with the increase of distance away from the axis of the tool. Maximum material flow velocity by the tool with the tapered-flute pin appears at the beginning position of flute and the velocity decreases with the increase of flow length in flute. From the view of increasing the flow velocity of material near the bottom of the workpiece or in the middle of workpiece, the tool with the half-screw pin and the tool with the tapered-flute pin are both better than the conventional tool.

  4. Counterrotating-Shoulder Mechanism for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A counterrotating-shoulder mechanism has been proposed as an alternative to the mechanism and fixtures used in conventional friction stir welding. The mechanism would internally react most or all of the forces and torques exerted on the workpiece, making it unnecessary to react the forces and torques through massive external fixtures. In conventional friction stir welding, a rotating pin tool is inserted into, and moved along, a weld seam. As the pin tool moves, it stirs together material from the opposite sides of the seam to form the weld. A large axial plunge force must be exerted upon the workpiece through and by the pin tool and a shoulder attached above the pin tool in order to maintain the pressure necessary for the process. The workpiece is secured on top of an anvil, which supports the workpiece against the axial plunge force and against the torque exerted by the pin tool and shoulder. The anvil and associated fixtures must be made heavy (and, therefore, are expensive) to keep the workpiece stationary. In addition, workpiece geometries must be limited to those that can be accommodated by the fixtures. The predecessor of the proposed counterrotating-shoulder mechanism is a second-generation, self-reacting tool, resembling a bobbin, that makes it possible to dispense with the heavy anvil. This tool consists essentially of a rotating pin tool with opposing shoulders. Although the opposing shoulders maintain the necessary pressure without need to externally apply or react a large plunge force, the torque exerted on the workpiece remains unreacted in the absence of a substantial external fixture. Depending on the RPM and the thickness of the workpiece, the torque can be large. The proposed mechanism (see figure) would include a spindle attached to a pin tool with a lower shoulder. The spindle would be coupled via splines to the upper one of three bevel gears in a differential drive. The middle bevel gear would be the power-input gear and would be coupled to the

  5. Effect of cooling rate on microstructure of friction-stir welded AA1100 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, D.; Mironov, S.; Sato, Y. S.; Kokawa, H.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the microstructural changes occurring during cooling of friction-stir welded aluminum alloy AA1100 were evaluated. To this end, friction-stir welding (FSW) was performed in a wide range of cooling rates of 20-62 K/s and the evolved microstructures were studied by using electron backscatter diffraction. Below 0.6 Tm (Tm being the melting point), the stir zone material was found to experience no significant changes during cooling. At higher FSW temperatures, however, notable changes occurred in the welded material, including grain growth, sharpening of texture, reduction of the fraction of high-angle boundaries and material softening.

  6. Experimental studies of parameters affecting the heat generation in friction stir welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat generation is a complex process of transformation of a specific type of energy into heat. During friction stir welding, one part of mechanical energy delivered to the welding tool is consumed in the welding process, another is used for deformational processes etc., and the rest of the energy is transformed into heat. The analytical procedure for the estimation of heat generated during friction stir welding is very complex because it includes a significant number of variables and parameters, and many of them cannot be fully mathematically explained. Because of that, the analytical model for the estimation of heat generated during friction stir welding defines variables and parameters that dominantly affect heat generation. These parameters are numerous and some of them, e. g. loads, friction coefficient, torque, temperature, are estimated experimentally. Due to the complex geometry of the friction stir welding process and requirements of the measuring equipment, adequate measuring configurations and specific constructional solutions that provide adequate measuring positions are necessary. This paper gives an overview of the process of heat generation during friction stir welding, the most influencing parameters on heat generation, constructional solutions for the measuring equipment needed for these experimental researches and examples of measured values.

  7. Stir Friction Welding Used in Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts friction stir welding used in manufacturing aluminum panels that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel. The aluminum panels are subjected to confidence panel tests during which the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  8. Modifications in the AA5083 Johnson-Cook Material Model for Use in Friction Stir Welding Computational Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    REPORT Modifications in the AA5083 Johnson-Cook Material Model for Use in Friction Stir Welding Computational Analyses 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...TERMS AA5083, friction stir welding , Johnson-Cook material model M. Grujicic, B. Pandurangan, C.-F. Yen, B. A. Cheeseman Clemson University Office of...Use in Friction Stir Welding Computational Analyses Report Title ABSTRACT Johnson-Cook strength material model is frequently used in finite-element

  9. Characterization of Residual Stress as a Function of Friction Stir Welding Parameters in ODS Steel MA956

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    OF RESIDUAL STRESS AS A FUNCTION OF FRICTION STIR WELDING PARAMETERS IN ODS STEEL MA956 by Martin S. Bennett June 2013 Thesis Advisor...characterizes the residual stresses generated by friction stir welding of ODS steel MA956 as a function of heat index. The heat index of a weld is used to...determine relative heat input among different friction stir welding conditions. It depends on a combination of the rotational speed and traverse, or

  10. A Rotating Plug Model of Friction Stir Welding Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghulapadu J. K.; Peddieson, J.; Buchanan, G. R.; Nunes, A. C.

    2006-01-01

    A simplified rotating plug model is employed to study the heat transfer phenomena associated with the fiction stir welding process. An approximate analytical solution is obtained based on this idealized model and used both to demonstrate the qualitative influence of process parameters on predictions and to estimate temperatures produced in typical fiction stir welding situations.

  11. Mitigating Abnormal Grain Growth for Friction Stir Welded Al-Li 2195 Spun Formed Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Shou; Russell, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Formability and abnormal grain growth (AGG) are the two major issues that have been encountered for Al alloy spun formed dome development using friction stir welded blanks. Material properties that have significant influence on the formability include forming range and strain hardening exponent. In this study, tensile tests were performed for two 2195 friction stir weld parameter sets at 400 F to study the effects of post weld anneal on the forming range and strain hardening exponent. It was found that the formability can be enhanced by applying a newly developed post weld anneal to heat treat the friction stir welded panels. This new post weld anneal leads to a higher forming range and much improved strain hardening exponent. AGG in the weld nugget is known to cause a significant reduction of ductility and fracture toughness. This study also investigated how AGG may be influenced by the heating rate to the solution heat treatment temperature. After post-weld annealing, friction stir welds were strained to 15% and 39% by compression at 400 F before they were subjected to SHT at 950 F for 1 hour. Salt bath SHT is very effective in reducing the grain size as it helps arrest the onset of AGG and promote normal recrystallization and grain growth. However, heat treating a 18 ft dome using a salt bath is not practical. Efforts are continuing at Marshall Space Flight Center to identify the welding parameters and heat treating parameters that can help mitigate the AGG in the friction stir welds.

  12. Effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Wentuo, E-mail: hanwentuo@hotmail.com [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tsuda, Naoto [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Serizawa, Hisashi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Chen, Dongsheng [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Je, Hwanil [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Fujii, Hidetoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Ha, Yoosung [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Morisada, Yoshiaki [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Noto, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    The weldability of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels is a critical obstructive in the development and use of these steels. Friction stir welding has been considered to be a promising way to solve this problem. The main purpose of this work was to reveal the effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded ODS ferritic steel. The grain appearances and the misorientation angles of grain boundaries in different welded zones were investigated by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Results showed that the mechanical force imposed by the stir tool can activate and promote the recrystallization characterized by the transformation of boundaries from LABs to HABs, and contribute to the grain refinement. The type of recrystallization in the stir zone can be classified as the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX)

  13. Finite Element Simulation in Superplastic forming of Friction Stir Welded Aluminium Alloy 6061-T6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Ganesh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Superplasticity in materials is the ability of materials to achieve large elongation only under specific conditions of temperature and strain rate. Superplastic Forming (SPF is an important industrial process that has found application in sheet metal forming in the aerospace and automotive industries. Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a solid state joining process that can alter the grain structure of the parent material. FSW process is an effective tool to refine the grain structure of the sheet metal and enhance their Superplasticity. Friction Stir Welding was used to join Superplastic AA 6061-T6 sheets. The Finite Element Simulation was performed for the Superplastic Forming of the Friction Stir Welded joints to evaluate the thinning and formability of AA 6061-T6 for hemispherical shape. The commercially available Finite Element Software ABAQUS was used to execute these simulations.

  14. Temperature comparison of initial, middle and final point of polypropylene friction stir welded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusharjanta, Bambang; Raharjo, Wahyu P.; Triyono

    2016-03-01

    Friction Stir Welding is known as a new solid state joining process. This process is applied in thermoplastic polymers material recently. One of member thermoplastic polymer is polypropylene. Polypropylene sheet 6 mm thick was friction stir welded with a cone cut steel pin. Tool rotation, travelling speed, and plunge depth, as welding parameters were 620 rpm, 7.3 mm/minutes and 0.02 mm respectively. Temperature at the initial, middle, and final point of advance side working piece were measured and compared. Measurement were done by thermocouple and recorded by data acquisition. Based on this research, it is concluded that temperature at the initial, middle and final point of friction stir welding process are different. The highest temperature peak reach at the middle point on the advance side which affects face bending strength.

  15. Effect of Tool Shoulder and Pin Probe Profiles on Friction Stirred Aluminum Welds - a Comparative Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. K. Mohanty; M. M. Mahapatra; P. Kumar; P. Biswas; N. R. Mandal

    2012-01-01

    In marine application,marine grade steel is generally used for haul and superstructures.However,aluminum has also become a good choice due to its lightweight qualities,while rusting of aluminum is minimal compared to steel.In this paper a study on friction stir welding of aluminum alloys was presented.The present investigation deals with the effects of different friction stir welding tool geometries on mechanical strength and the microstructure properties of aluminum alloy welds.Three distinct tool geometries with different types of shoulder and tool probe profiles were used in the investigation according to the design matrix.The effects of each tool shoulder and probe geometry on the weld was evaluated.It was also observed that the friction stir weld tool geometry has a significant effect on the weldment reinforcement,microhardness,and weld strength.

  16. Effect of tool geometry on friction stir spot welding of polypropylene sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Bilici

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of tool geometry and properties on friction stir spot welding properties of polypropylene sheets were studied. Four different tool pin geometries, with varying pin angles, pin lengths, shoulder diameters and shoulder angles were used for friction stir spot welding. All the welding operations were done at the room temperature. Lap-shear tensile tests were carried out to find the weld static strength. Weld cross section appearance observations were also done. From the experiments the effect of tool geometry on friction stir spot weld formation and weld strength were determined. The optimum tool geometry for 4 mm thick polypropylene sheets were determined. The tapered cylindrical pin gave the biggest and the straight cylindrical pin gave the lowest lap-shear fracture load.

  17. Process parameters optimization for friction stir welding of RDE-40 aluminium alloy using Taguchi technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.K.LAKSHMINARAYANAN; V.BALASUBRAMANIAN

    2008-01-01

    Taguchi approach was applied to determine the most influential control factors which will yield better tensile strength of the joints of friction stir welded RDE-40 aluminium alloy. In order to evaluate the effect of process parameters such as tool rotational speed, traverse speed and axial force on tensile strength of friction stir welded RDE-40 aluminium alloy, Taguchi parametric design and optimization approach was used. Through the Taguchi parametric design approach, the optimum levels of process parameters were determined. The results indicate that the rotational speed, welding speed and axial force are the significant parameters in deciding the tensile strength of the joint. The predicted optimal value of tensile strength of friction stir welded RDE-40 aluminium alloy is 303 MPa. The results were confirmed by further experiments.

  18. Friction stir welding of F82H steel for fusion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Ando, Masami; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Kimura, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, friction stir welding was employed to join F82H steels and develop a potential joining technique for a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. The microstructures and mechanical properties on the joint region were investigated to evaluate the applicability of friction stir welding. F82H steel sheets were successfully butt-joined with various welding parameters. In welding conditions, 100 rpm and 100 mm/min, the stirred zone represented a comparable hardness distribution with a base metal. Stirred zone induced by 100 rpm reserved uniformly distributed precipitates and very fine ferritic grains, whereas the base metal showed a typical tempered martensite with precipitates on the prior austenite grain boundary and lath boundary. Although the tensile strength was decreased at 550 °C, the stirred zone treated at 100 rpm showed comparable tensile behavior with base metal up to 500 °C. Therefore, friction stir welding is considered a potential welding method to preserve the precipitates of F82H steel.

  19. Mechanical properties and structure of friction stir welds of rolled Zr-modified AA5083 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malopheyev, S.; Mironov, S.; Kaibyshev, R.

    2016-11-01

    Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welds of Zr-modified AA5083 aluminum sheets were studied. The sheets were produced by cold or hot rolling with a total reduction of 80%. In both rolled conditions, the average high angle boundary spacing was 17-18 µm. The density of free dislocations was ˜5.6 × 1013 and ˜3.5 × 1014 m-2 in hot rolled and cold rolled conditions, respectively. The volume fraction of incoherent Al6Mn dispersoids with an average diameter of ˜25 nm was measured to be ˜0.076%. Defect-free welds were produced by double-side friction stir welding (FSW). Friction stir welding led to the formation of fully recrystallized microstructures with the average grain size about 2.5 µm and low dislocation density in the stir zone in both conditions. The average size and volume fraction of Al6Mn particles increased to ˜25 nm and ˜0.1%, respectively. The joint efficiency of the friction stir welds for ultimate tensile strength was found to be 74 and 94% in the cold-rolled and hot-rolled preprocessed material conditions. The relatively low weld strength was attributed to the elimination of dislocation substructure strengthening during FSW.

  20. Friction Stir Spot Welding: A Review on Joint Macro- and Microstructure, Property, and Process Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. W. Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir spot welding (FSSW is a very useful variant of the conventional friction stir welding (FSW, which shows great potential to be a replacement of single-point joining processes like resistance spot welding and riveting. There have been many reports and some industrial applications about FSSW. Based on the open literatures, the process features and variants, macro- and microstructural characteristics, and mechanical properties of the resultant joints and numerical simulations of the FSSW process were summarized. In addition, some applications of FSSW in aerospace, aviation, and automobile industries were also reviewed. Finally, the current problems and issues that existed in FSSW were indicated.

  1. Characteristics of the kissing-bond in friction stir welded Al alloy 1050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yutaka S. [Department of Materials Processing, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-02 Aramaki-aza-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)]. E-mail: ytksato@material.tohoku.ac.jp; Takauchi, Hideaki [Department of Materials Processing, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-02 Aramaki-aza-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Park, Seung Hwan C. [Department of Materials Processing, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-02 Aramaki-aza-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kokawa, Hiroyuki [Department of Materials Processing, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-02 Aramaki-aza-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2005-09-25

    Initial oxide layer on the butt surface fragments during friction stir welding (FSW) often remaining as a faint zigzag-line pattern on the cross section. When remnants of the oxide layer often adversely affects the mechanical properties in the weld, it is called as 'kissing-bond'. The present study systematically examines the effect of oxide array on the bend property in the root region of friction stir (FS) welded Al alloy 1050 by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to clarify the identity of 'kissing-bond'.

  2. Ultrasonic-assisted friction stir welding on V95AT1 (7075) aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. Ye.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Ivanov, A. N.; Fortuna, S. V.; Eliseev, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic-assisted friction stir butt welding on aluminum alloy V95AT1 (7075) has been carried out. Samples have been characterized using metallography, microhardness and XRD. As shown, ultrasonic treatment during welding provides extra plasticizing of metal and better stirring efficiency. The latter serves for elimination of defects, such as root flaw and grain refining in the stir zone. The stress state in the welded joint is characterized by tensile stress in the direction of the weld seam centerline and compression in the transversal direction. The ultrasonic treatment was shown to increase the compression stress and relieve the tensile one.

  3. Characterization And Study of Friction Stir Welding of AA6101 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Aditya

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW combines two plates by frictional heating at the interface with the localized plastic deformation within the material. In friction stir welding heat is generated by the friction between rotating tool shoulder and the plates to be welded. The heat thus generated results in thermal softening of the material. The softened material is then forced to flow by the translation of the tool from the front to the back of the pin. There it cools, consolidates and results in joint formation. In the process, strength of the joint and percentage elongation varies from the parent material. AA6101 is equivalent to AA 6061 and AA6063. At present AA6101 is used by the electrical industries only. A detailed experimental study has been done on AA 6101 to its utility as an Aluminum alloy for structural fabrication

  4. Friction stir welding and processing of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weiju

    2014-11-11

    A method of welding including forming a filler material of a first oxide dispersoid metal, the first oxide dispersoid material having first strengthening particles that compensate for decreases in weld strength of friction stir welded oxide dispersoid metals; positioning the filler material between a first metal structure and a second metal structure each being comprised of at least a second oxide dispersoid metal; and friction welding the filler material, the first metal structure and the second metal structure to provide a weld.

  5. Formation of Oxides in the Interior of Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Chen, Po; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSWing) the actual solid state joining takes place between the faying surfaces which form the weld seam. Thus the seam trace is often investigated for clues when the strength of the weld is reduced. Aluminum and its alloys are known to form a native, protective oxide on the surface. If these native surface oxides are not sufficiently broken up during the FSW process, they are reported to remain in the FSW interior and weaken the bond strength. This type of weld defect has been referred to as a lazy "S", lazy "Z", joint line defect, kissing bond, or residual oxide defect. Usually these defects are mitigated by modification of the process parameters, such as increased tool rotation rate, which causes a finer breakup of the native oxide particles. This study proposes that there may be an alternative mechanism for formation of oxides found within the weld nugget. As the oxidation rate increases at elevated temperatures above 400ºC, it may be possible for enhanced oxidation to occur on the interior surfaces during the FSW process from entrained air entering the seam gap. Normally, FSWs of aluminum alloys are made without a purge gas and it is unknown how process parameters and initial fit up could affect a potential air path into the interior during the processing. In addition, variations in FSW parameters, such as the tool rotation, are known to have a strong influence on the FSW temperature which may affect the oxidation rate if internal surfaces are exposed to entrained air. A series of FSWs were made in 3 different thickness panels of AA2219 (0.95, 1.27 and 1.56 cm) at 2 different weld pitches. As the thickness of the panels increased, there was an increased tendency for a gap to form in advance of the weld tool. If sufficient air is able to enter the workpiece gap prior to consolidation, the weld temperature can increase the oxidation rate on the interior surfaces. These oxidation rates would also be accelerated in areas of localized

  6. Physical Simulation of Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Nickel-Base Alloys Using Hot Torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, James R.; Lippold, John C.

    2013-08-01

    The Gleeble hot torsion test was utilized in an attempt to simulate the friction stir-processed microstructure of three Ni-base alloys: Hastelloy X, Alloy 625, and Alloy 718. The simulation temperatures were based on actual thermal cycles measured by embedded thermocouples during friction stir processing of these alloys. Peak process temperatures were determined to be approximately 1423 K (1150 °C) for Hastelloy X and Alloy 625 K and 1373 K (352 °C and 1100 °C) for Alloy 718. The peak temperature and cooling rates were programed into the Gleeble™ 3800 thermo-mechanical simulator to reproduce the stir zone and thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) microstructures. The TMAZ was successfully simulated using this technique, but the stir zone microstructure could not be accurately reproduced, with hot torsion samples exhibiting larger grain size than actual friction stir processing trials. Shear stress and strain rates as a function of temperature were determined for each material using hot torsion simulation.

  7. Ductile damage development in friction stir welded aluminum (AA2024) joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2008-01-01

    Ductile damage development in a friction stir welded aluminum joint subjected to tension is analyzed numerically by FE-analysis, based on a total Lagrangian formulation. An elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation that accounts for nucleation and growth of microvoids is applied. Main focus...

  8. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction stir welding of stainless steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Selvaraj

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes a new slip factor based three-dimensional thermal model to predict the temperature distribution during friction stir welding of 304L stainless steel plates. The proposed model employs temperature and radius dependent heat source to study the thermal cycle, temperature distribution, power required, the effect of process parameters on heat generation per mm length of the weld and peak temperature during the friction stir welding process. Simulations of friction stir welding process were carried out on 304L stainless steel workpieces for various rotational and welding speeds. The predicted thermal cycle, power required and temperature distributions were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The heat generation per mm length of weld and peak temperature were found to be directly proportional to rotational speed and inversely proportional to welding speed. The rate of increase in heat generation per mm length of the weld and peak temperature are found to be higher at lower rotational speeds and lower at higher rotational speed. The heat generation during friction stir welding was found to be 80.8 % at shoulder, 16.1 % at pin side and 3.1 % at the bottom of the pin.

  9. Strain hardening and damage in 6xxx series aluminum alloy friction stir welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simar, Aude; Nielsen, Kim Lau; de Meester, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    A friction stir weld in 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy has been prepared and analyzed by micro-hardness measurements, tensile testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The locations of the various weld zones were determined by micro-hardness indentation measurements. The flow behavior of the various...

  10. Mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys 5083 and 5383

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeom Kee Paik

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of high-strength aluminum alloys is increasing in shipbuilding industry, particularly for the design and construction of war ships, littoral surface craft and combat ships, and fast passenger ships. While various welding methods are used today to fabricate aluminum ship structures, namely gas metallic arc welding (GMAW, laser welding and friction stir welding (FSW, FSW technology has been recognized to have many advantages for the construction of aluminum structures, as it is a low-cost welding process. In the present study, mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys are examined experimentally. Tensile testing is undertaken on dog-bone type test specimen for aluminum alloys 5083 and 5383. The test specimen includes friction stir welded material between identical alloys and also dissimilar alloys, as well as unwelded (base alloys. Mechanical properties of fusion welded aluminum alloys are also tested and compared with those of friction stir welded alloys. The insights developed from the present study are documented together with details of the test database. Part of the present study was obtained from the Ship Structure Committee project SR-1454 (Paik, 2009, jointly funded by its member agencies.

  11. Optimization of Thermal Aspects of Friction Stir Welding – Initial Studies Using a Space Mapping Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher;

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize a thermal model of a friction stir welding process. The optimization is performed using a space mapping technique in which an analytical model is used along with the FEM model to be optimized. The results are compared to traditional gradient based optimization...

  12. Friction stir processed Al - Metal oxide surface composites: Anodization and optical appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jensen, Flemming; Canulescu, Stela

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-pass friction stir processing (FSP) was employed to impregnate metal oxide (TiO2, Y2O3 and CeO2) particles into the surface of an Aluminium alloy. The surface composites were then anodized in a sulphuric acid electrolyte. The effect of anodizing parameters on the resulting optical...

  13. Multi-objective Optimization of Process Parameters in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    The objective of this paper is to investigate optimum process parameters in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) to minimize residual stresses in the work piece and maximize production efficiency meanwhile satisfying process specific constraints as well. More specifically, the choices of tool rotational...

  14. Multiple pass and multiple layer friction stir welding and material enhancement processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhili [Knoxville, TN; David, Stan A [Knoxville, TN; Frederick, David Alan [Harriman, TN

    2010-07-27

    Processes for friction stir welding, typically for comparatively thick plate materials using multiple passes and multiple layers of a friction stir welding tool. In some embodiments a first portion of a fabrication preform and a second portion of the fabrication preform are placed adjacent to each other to form a joint, and there may be a groove adjacent the joint. The joint is welded and then, where a groove exists, a filler may be disposed in the groove, and the seams between the filler and the first and second portions of the fabrication preform may be friction stir welded. In some embodiments two portions of a fabrication preform are abutted to form a joint, where the joint may, for example, be a lap joint, a bevel joint or a butt joint. In some embodiments a plurality of passes of a friction stir welding tool may be used, with some passes welding from one side of a fabrication preform and other passes welding from the other side of the fabrication preform.

  15. Structure and properties of fixed joints formed by ultrasonic-assisted friction-stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortuna, S. V., E-mail: s-fortuna@ispms.ru; Ivanov, K. V., E-mail: ikv@ispms.ru; Eliseev, A. A., E-mail: alan@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials ScienceTomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Tarasov, S. Yu., E-mail: tsy@ispms.ru; Ivanov, A. N., E-mail: ivan@ispms.ru; Rubtsov, V. E., E-mail: rvy@ispms.ru; Kolubaev, E. A., E-mail: eak@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials ScienceTomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    This paper deals with structure and properties of aluminum alloy 7475 and its joints obtained by friction stir welding including under ultrasonic action. Microhardness measurements show that ultrasonic action increases strength properties of the joints. Optical and transmission electron microscopy reveals that this effect is related to the precipitation of tertiary coherent S-and T-phase particles.

  16. An analytical model for the heat generation in friction stir welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich; Hattel, Jesper; Wert, John

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is to establish an analytical model for heat generation by friction stir welding (FSW), based on different assumptions of the contact condition between the rotating tool surface and the weld piece. The material flow and heat generation are characterized by the contact...

  17. Fatigue Behavior of Friction Stir-Welded Joints Repaired by Grinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, C.; Infante, V.

    2014-04-01

    Fatigue is undoubtedly the most important design criterion in aeronautic structures. Although friction stir-welded joints are characterized by a high mechanical performance, they can enclose some defects, especially in their root. These defects along with the relatively low residual stresses of the friction stir-welding thermomechanical cycle can turn into primary sources of crack initiation. In this context, this article deals with the fatigue behavior of friction stir-welded joints subjected to surface smoothing by grinding improvement technique. The 4-mm-thick aluminum alloy 2024-T351 was used in this study. The fatigue strength of the base material, joints in the as-welded condition, and the sound and defective friction stir-welded joints improved by grinding were investigated in detail. The tests were carried out with a constant amplitude loading and with a stress ratio of R = 0. The fatigue results show that an improvement in fatigue behavior was obtained in the joints repaired by superficial grinding technique. The weld grinding technique is better especially for lower loads and increases the high cycle fatigue strength. The fatigue strength of the improved welded joints was higher than that of the base material.

  18. Microstructure of AA 2024 fixed joints formed by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseev, A. A.; Kalashnikova, T. A.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Fortuna, S. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welded butt joints on 2024T3 alloy have been obtained using different process parameters. The microstructures of all the weld joint zones have been examined and such structural parameters as grain size, particle size and volume content of particles have been determined in order to find correlations with the microhardness of the corresponding zones of the weld.

  19. Optimization of Thermal Aspects of Friction Stir Welding – Initial Studies Using a Space Mapping Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize a thermal model of a friction stir welding process. The optimization is performed using a space mapping technique in which an analytical model is used along with the FEM model to be optimized. The results are compared to traditional gradient based optimization...

  20. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide - cobalt chromium, chromium carbide - nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the MMC aligns with the improved dispersion of reinforcing particles throughout the aluminium matrix.

  1. Processing-Microstructure Relationships in Friction Stir Welding of MA956 Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Bradford W.; Menon, E. Sarath K.; McNelley, Terry R.; Brewer, Luke N.; El-Dasher, Bassem; Farmer, Joseph C.; Torres, Sharon G.; Mahoney, Murray W.; Sanderson, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive set of processing-microstructure relationships is presented for friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened MA956 steel. Eight rotational speed/traverse speed combinations were used to produce friction stir welds on MA956 plates using a polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tool. Weld conditions with high thermal input produced defect-free, full-penetration welds. Electron backscatter diffraction results showed a significant increase in grain size, a persistent body centered cubic torsional texture in the stir zone, and a sharp transition in grain size across the thermo-mechanically affected zone sensitive to weld parameters. Micro-indentation showed an asymmetric reduction in hardness across a transverse section of the weld. This gradient in hardness was greatly increased with higher heat inputs. The decrease in hardness after welding correlates directly with the increase in grain size and may be explained with a Hall-Petch type relationship.

  2. Mechanical properties of friction stir butt-welded Al-5086 H32 plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Çam

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to study Al-5086 H32 plates with a thickness of 3 mm friction stir butt-welded using different welding speeds at a tool rotational speed of 1600 rpm. Design/methodology/approach: The effect of welding speed on the weld performance of the joints was investigated by conducting optical microscopy, microhardness measurements and mechanical tests (i.e. tensile and bend tests. The effect of heat input during friction stir welding on the microstructure, and thus mechanical properties, of cold-rolled Al- 5086 plates was also determined.Findings: The experimental results indicated that the maximum tensile strength of the joints, which is about 75% that of the base plate, was obtained with a traverse speed of 200 mm/min at the tool rotational speed used, e.g. 1600 rpm, and the maximum bending angle of the joints can reach 180º. The maximum ductility performance of the joints was, on the other hand, relatively low, e.g. about 20%. These results are not unexpected due to the loss of the cold-work strengthening in the weld region as a result of the heat input during welding, and thus the confined plasticity within the stirred zone owing to strength undermatching. Higher joint performances can also be achieved by increasing the penetration depth of the stirring probe in butt-friction stir welding of Al-5086 H32 plates.Research limitations/implications: The results suggest that both strength and ductility performances can be increased by optimizing the tool penetration depth.Originality/value: Examination of mechanical properties of friction stir butt-welded Al-5086 H32 plate.

  3. 3D numerical simulation of the three stages of Friction Stir Welding based on friction parameters calibration

    OpenAIRE

    Fourment, Lionel; Guerdoux, Simon

    2008-01-01

    International audience; An Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation was developed to simulate the different stages of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process with the FORGE3® F.E. software. A splitting method was utilized: a) the material velocity/pressure and temperature fields are calculated, b) the mesh velocity is derived from the domain boundary evolution and an adaptive refinement criterion provided by error estimation, c) P1 and P0 variables are remapped. The proposed ALE formul...

  4. Deformation Characterization of Friction-Stir-Welded Tubes by Hydraulic Bulge Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Q.; Hu, Z. L.; Pan, X.; Zuo, X. Q.

    2014-10-01

    In this article, the large-diameter thin-walled aluminum alloy tubes were produced using a hybrid process combining friction-stir welding (FSW) and spinning. For this novel process, rolled aluminum alloy sheets with a thickness about 2-3 times the wall thickness of target tube, were FSW to form cylinders, and then the cylinders were subjected to spinning to get thin-walled aluminum alloy tubes. Both experimental and simulation study were conducted to investigate the deformation characterization of the FSW tube during hydraulic bulge testing, and the stress and strain states and thickness distribution of the FSW tube were investigated. It was found that the common defects of FSW tube can be significantly improved by specific welding devices. The ductility of the tube is considerably improved with nearly two times higher bulge ratio than as-spun tube after annealing treatment at 300°C. But the annealed tube still shows a high nonuniform wall thickness distribution due to the inhomogeneous deformation characteristics. With increasing deformation of the tube, the gap between the hoop and axial stress for the weld and base metal (BM) decreases. However, the hoop and axial stress of the weld are always greater than those of the BM at the same pressure.

  5. The effect of postprocessing on tensile property and microstructure evolution of friction stir welding aluminum alloy joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Z.L., E-mail: zhilihuhit@163.com [Hubei Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology of Automobile Parts, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China); Wang, X.S. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Pang, Q. [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Wuhan Donghu University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang, F.; Qin, X.P.; Hua, L. [Hubei Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology of Automobile Parts, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Friction stir welding is an efficient manufacturing method for joining aluminum alloy and can dramatically reduce grain size conferring excellent plastic deformation properties. Consequently, friction stir welding is used to manufacture tailor welded blanks to optimize weight or performance in the final component. In the study, the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of friction stir welding joint during plastic forming and subsequent heat treatment were investigated. The microstructural characteristics of the friction stir welding joints were studied by Electron Backscattered Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile and microhardness tests. It is found that the tensile and yield strengths of friction stir welding joints are significantly improved after severe plastic deformation due to the grain refinement. Following heat treatment, the strength of the friction stir welding joints significantly decrease due to the obvious abnormal grain growth. Careful attention must be given to the processing route of any friction stir welding joint intended for plastic forming, especially the annealing between forming passes. Severe plastic deforming of the friction stir welding joint leads to a high level of stored energy/dislocation density, which causes the abnormal grain growth during subsequent heat treatment, and consequently reduce the mechanical properties of the friction stir welding joint. - Highlights: • Great changes are observed in the microstructure of FSW joint after postprocessing. • Postprocessing shows great effect on the microstructure stability of FSW joint. • The weld shows more significant decrease in strength than the BM due to the AGG. • Attention must be given to the processing route of FSW joint for plastic forming.

  6. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 and Hot-Stamp Boron Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L.; Frederick, Alan; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.

    2008-05-16

    Friction stir spot welds were made in two high-strength steels: DP780, and a hot-stamp-boron steel with tensile strength of 1500 MPa. The spot welds were made at either 800 or 1600 rpm using either of two polycrystalline boron nitride tools. One stir tool, BN77, had the relatively common pin-tool shape. The second tool, BN46, had a convex rather than a concave shoulder profile and a much wider and shorter pin. The tools were plunged to preprogrammed depths either at a continuous rate (1-step schedule) or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate. In all cases, the welds were completed in 4s. The range of lap-shear values were compared to values required for resistance spot welds on the same steels. The minimum value of 10.3 kN was exceeded for friction stir spot welding of DP780 using a 2-step schedule and either the BN77- or the BN46-type stir tool. The respective minimum value of 12 kN was also exceeded for the HSB steel using the 2-step process and the BN46 stir tool.

  7. The Effect of Friction Stir Welding on Corrosion Behavior of Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasresfahani, Ali Reza; Soltanipur, Abdol Reza; Farmanesh, Khosro; Ghasemi, Ali

    2017-09-01

    Fusion welding can deteriorate corrosion behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. However, the use of friction stir welding leads to a more appropriate corrosion resistance. In this study, the corrosion resistance of welded zones of Ti-6Al-4V alloy using friction stir welding technique is evaluated. For these purposes, the study of structural characteristics using SEM and FESEM equipped with EDS micro-analyses was conducted. Micro-hardness test was also employed to estimate the hardness of welded zones. Corrosion behavior was investigated by a potentiostat instrument. SEM micrographs, EDS and XRD analyses confirmed non-uniformity of chemical composition within the welded zones. The results reveal that the stir zone contains typical alpha and prior beta phases. Nevertheless, thermomechanical zone included equiaxed and bimodal lamellae structure. Furthermore, the presence of different types of phases and microstructure in the thermomechanical zone led to reduced corrosion resistance. The corresponding values of corrosion current density in the stir zone, thermomechanical zone and base metal were 0.048, 0.55 and 0.032 µA, respectively. Corresponding corrosion potential for these zones was estimated as -207, -110 and -157 mV. Evidently, the results show that corrosion resistance of thermomechanical zone is less than that of the stir zone and both zones have lower value than the base metal.

  8. Optimizing friction stir welding parameters to maximize tensile strength of AA2219 aluminum alloy joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, S.; Elangovan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balasubramanian, M.

    2009-04-01

    AA2219 aluminium alloy (Al-Cu-Mn alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of lightweight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. In contrast to the fusion welding processes that are routinely used for joining structural aluminium alloys, the friction stir welding (FSW) process is an emerging solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded does not melt and recast. This process uses a non-consumable tool to generate frictional heat in the abutting surfaces. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial force etc., and the tool pin profile play a major role in determining the joint strength. An attempt has been made here to develop a mathematical model to predict the tensile strength of friction stir welded AA2219 aluminium alloy by incorporating FSW process parameters. A central composite design with four factors and five levels has been used to minimize the number of experimental conditions. The response surface method (RSM) has been used to develop the model. The developed mathematical model has been optimized using the Hooke and Jeeves search technique to maximize the tensile strength of the friction stir welded AA2219 aluminium alloy joints.

  9. Optimization of friction stir welding parameters for improved corrosion resistance of AA2219 aluminum alloy joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rambabu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aluminium alloy AA2219 (Al–Cu–Mg alloy is widely used in the fabrication of lightweight structures with high strength-to-weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. Welding is main fabrication method of AA2219 alloy for manufacturing various engineering components. Friction stir welding (FSW is a recently developed solid state welding process to overcome the problems encountered in fusion welding. This process uses a non-consumable tool to generate frictional heat on the abutting surfaces. The welding parameters, such as tool pin profile, rotational speed, welding speed and axial force, play major role in determining the microstructure and corrosion resistance of welded joint. The main objective of this work is to develop a mathematical model to predict the corrosion resistance of friction stir welded AA2219 aluminium alloy by incorporating FSW process parameters. In this work a central composite design with four factors and five levels has been used to minimize the experimental conditions. Dynamic polarization testing was carried out to determine critical pitting potential in millivolt, which is a criteria for measuring corrosion resistance and the data was used in model. Further the response surface method (RSM was used to develop the model. The developed mathematical model was optimized using the simulated annealing algorithm optimizing technique to maximize the corrosion resistance of the friction stir welded AA2219 aluminium alloy joints.

  10. Numerical Simulation of the Friction Stir Welding Process Using Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordache, M.; Badulescu, C.; Iacomi, D.; Nitu, E.; Ciuca, C.

    2016-08-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process that relies on frictional heating and plastic deformation realized at the interaction between a non-consumable welding tool that rotates on the contact surfaces of the combined parts. The experiments are often time consuming and costly. To overcome these problems, numerical analysis has frequently been used in last years. Several simplified numerical models were designed to elucidate various aspects of the complex thermo-mechanical phenomena associated with FSW. This research investigates a thermo-mechanical finite element model based on Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian method to simulate the friction stir welding of the AA 6082-T6 alloy. Abaqus/cae software is used in order to simulate the welding stage of the Friction Stir Welding process. This paper presents the steps of the numerical simulation using the finite elements method, in order to evaluate the boundary conditions of the model and the geometry of the tools by using the Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian method.

  11. A Study of Friction Stir Welded 2195 Al-Li Alloy by the Scanning Reference Electrode Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donford, M. D.; Ding, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    A study of the corrosion of friction stir welded 2195 Al-Li alloy has been carried out using the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET). The results are compared to those obtained from a study of heterogeneously welded samples.

  12. Modeling the Effects of Tool Shoulder and Probe Profile Geometries on Friction Stirred Aluminum Welds Using Response Surface Methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.K.Mohanty; M.M.Mahapatra; P.Kumar; P.Biswas; N.R.Mandal

    2012-01-01

    The present paper discusses the modeling of tool geometry effects on the friction stir aluminum welds using response surface methodology.The friction stir welding tools were designed with different shoulder and tool probe geometries based on a design matrix.The matrix for the tool designing was made for three types of tools,based on three types of probes,with three levels each for defining the shoulder surface type and probe profile geometries.Then,the effects of tool shoulder and probe geometries on friction stirred aluminum welds were experimentally investigated with respect to weld strength,weld cross section area,grain size of weld and grain size of thermo-mechanically affected zone.These effects were modeled using multiple and response surface regression analysis.The response surface regression modeling were found to be appropriate for defining the friction stir weldment characteristics.

  13. Structure and Properties of Thick-Walled Joints of Alloy 1570s Prepared by Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velichko, O. V.; Ivanov, S. Yu.; Karkhin, V. A.; Lopota, V. A.; Makhin, I. D.

    2016-09-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of thick-walled joints of Al - Mg - Sc alloy 1570S, prepared by friction stir welding are studied. Joint microstructural and mechanical inhomogeneity are revealed.

  14. Effect of cryogenic cooling on corrosion of friction stir welded AA7010-T7651

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jariyaboon, Manthana; Davenport, A. J.; Ambat, Rajan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to study how cryogenic CO2 cooling during the welding process affects corrosion behaviour of friction stir welding (FSW) AA7010-T7651. Design/methodology/approach - Friction stir welded AA7010-17651 was produced with a rotation speed of 288 rpm and a travel...... a gel visualisation test and potentiodynamic polarisation measurements using a micro-electrochemical technique. Findings - The main corrosion region for both FSWs AA7010-T7651 produced with and without cryogenic CO2 cooling is in the HAZ region, which exhibited intergranular attack. Cryogenic cooling...... the nugget region of uncooled welds. Originality/value - There has been no previous work to investigate the effect of cryogenic CO2 cooling on the corrosion behaviour of FSW AA7010-T7651. The paper relates the microstructures of both uncooled and cooled welds to their anodic and cathodic reactivities using...

  15. Friction stir welding: multi-response optimisation using Taguchi-based GRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitender Kundu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In present experimental work, friction stir welding of aluminium alloy 5083- H321 is performed for optimisation of process parameters for maximum tensile strength. Taguchi’s L9 orthogonal array has been used for three parameters – tool rotational speed (TRS, traverse speed (TS, and tool tilt angle (TTA with three levels. Multi-response optimisation has been carried out through Taguchi-based grey relational analysis. The grey relational grade has been calculated for all three responses – ultimate tensile strength, percentage elongation, and micro-hardness. Analysis of variance is the tool used for obtaining grey relational grade to find out the significant process parameters. TRS and TS are the two most significant parameters which influence most of the quality characteristics of friction stir welded joint. Validation of predicted values done through confirmation experiments at optimum setting shows a good agreement with experimental values.

  16. Experimental Investigation and Prediction of Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya BOZKURT

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is a relatively contemporary solid state welding process and has been employed in aerospace, railway, automotive and marine industries for joining of aluminum, magnesium, zinc, titanium, copper alloys, dissimilar metals and thermoplastics. The FSW process parameters such as tool rotation speed, tool traverse speed and tilt angle play an important role in deciding the joining quality. The present study defines the effect of FSW process on the tensile properties of the AA2124/SiC/25p metal matrix composite (MMC plates. Obtained results showed that the joint efficiency decreases by increasing the tool traverse speed while tool rotation speed was kept constant. Second contribution of this study is the application of decision tree technique to predict the tensile properties of friction stir welded MMC plates. It is seen that methodology can be applied with great accuracy.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.4.3092

  17. Thermo-mechanical Modeling for Residual Stresses of Friction Stir Welding of Dissimilar Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDUL ARIF

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding is an advanced joining process that has been used for high production since 1996. FSW produces a weld that is strong than the base material because melting does not occur and joining takes place below the melting temperature of the material. FSW produces no fumes and can join aluminum alloys, magnesium, steels, copper and titanium. In this study, a thermo-mechanical model with improved potential is developed to study the formation of residual stress field in dissimilar materials. The model predictions were confirmed with experimental data obtained by Jamshidi et al. on dissimilar aluminum alloys AA6061 to AA5086. A commercial finite element software ANSYS® is used for simulation of friction stir welding. Longitudinal and transverse residual stresses are obtained when AA5086-O on the advancing side and AA6061- T6 on the retreating side after 15sec.

  18. A Review: Welding Of Dissimilar Metal Alloys by Laser Beam Welding & Friction Stir Welding Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Deepika Harwani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Welding of dissimilar metals has attracted attention of the researchers worldwide, owing to its many advantages and challenges. There is no denial in the fact that dissimilar welded joints offer more flexibility in the design and production of the commercial and industrial components. Many welding techniques have been analyzed to join dissimilar metal combinations. The objective of this paper is to review two such techniques – Laser welding and Friction stir welding. Laser beam welding, a high power density and low energy-input process, employs a laser beam to produce welds of dissimilar materials. Friction stir welding, a solid-state joining process, is also successfully used in dissimilar welding applications like aerospace and ship building industries. This paper summarizes the trends and advances of these two welding processes in the field of dissimilar welding. Future aspects of the study are also discussed.

  19. Effect of Process Parameters of Friction Stir Welded Joint for Similar Aluminium Alloys H30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanita S. Thete

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the effect of process parameters of friction stir welded joint for similar aluminium alloys H30 was studied. Taper cylindrical with three flutes all made of High speed steel was used for the friction stir welding (FSW aluminium alloy H30 and the tensile test of the welded joint were tested by universal testing method. The optimization done using detailed mathematical model is simulated by Minitab17. In this investigation, an effective approach based on Taguchi method, has been developed to determine the optimum conditions leading to higher tensile strength. Experiments were conducted on varying rotational speed, transverse speed, and axial force using L9 orthogonal array of Taguchi method. The present study aims at optimizing process parameters to achieve high tensile strength.

  20. Optimisation of process parameters in friction stir welding based on residual stress analysis: a feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2010-01-01

    The present paper considers the optimisation of process parameters in friction stir welding (FSW). More specifically, the choices of rotational speed and traverse welding speed have been investigated using genetic algorithms. The welding process is simulated in a transient, two-dimensional sequen......The present paper considers the optimisation of process parameters in friction stir welding (FSW). More specifically, the choices of rotational speed and traverse welding speed have been investigated using genetic algorithms. The welding process is simulated in a transient, two......, and this is presented as a Pareto optimal front. Moreover, a higher welding speed for a fixed rotational speed results, in general, in slightly higher stress levels in the tension zone, whereas a higher rotational speed for a fixed welding speed yields somewhat lower peak residual stress, however, a wider tension zone...

  1. Application of artificial neural network to predict Vickers microhardness of AA6061 friction stir welded sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vahid Moosabeiki Dehabadi; Saeede Ghorbanpour; Ghasem Azimi

    2016-01-01

    The application of friction stir welding (FSW) is growing owing to the omission of difficulties in traditional welding processes. In the current investigation, artificial neural network (ANN) technique was employed to predict the microhardness of AA6061 friction stir welded plates. Specimens were welded employing triangular and tapered cylindrical pins. The effects of thread and conical shoulder of each pin profile on the microhardness of welded zone were studied using tow ANNs through the different distances from weld centerline. It is observed that using conical shoulder tools enhances the quality of welded area. Besides, in both pin profiles threaded pins and conical shoulders increase yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. Mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) for train and test data sets did not exceed 5.4% and 7.48%, respectively. Considering the accurate results and acceptable errors in the models’ responses, the ANN method can be used to economize material and time.

  2. A Study on Friction Stir Welding of 12mm Thick Aluminum Alloy Plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deepati Anil Kumar; Pankaj Biswas; Sujoy Tikader; M. M. Mahapatra; N. R. Mandal

    2013-01-01

    Most of the investigations regarding friction stir welding (FSW) of aluminum alloy plates have been limited to about 5 to 6 mm thick plates. In prior work conducted the various aspects concerning the process parameters and the FSW tool geometry were studied utilizing friction stir welding of 12 mm thick commercial grade aluminum alloy. Two different simple-to-manufacture tool geometries were used. The effect of varying welding parameters and dwell time of FSW tool on mechanical properties and weld quality was examined. It was observed that in order to achieve a defect free welding on such thick aluminum alloy plates, tool having trapezoidal pin geometry was suitable. Adequate tensile strength and ductility can be achieved utilizing a combination of high tool rotational speed of about 2000 r/min and low speed of welding around 28 mm/min. At very low and high dwell time the ductility of welded joints are reduced significantly.

  3. Thinning Behavior Simulations in Superplastic Forming of Friction Stir Processed Titanium 6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Paul D.; Sanders, Daniel G.; Ramulu, M.; Grant, Glenn; Trapp, Tim; Comley, Peter

    2010-06-01

    A study was undertaken to simulate the thinning behavior of titanium 6Al-4V alloy sheet during Superplastic Forming and to evaluate the feasibility of controlling thinning in areas of interest with Friction Stir Processing (FSP) of the material. The commercially available Finite Element Analysis software ABAQUS was used to execute these simulations. Material properties of the parent sheet and the Friction Stir Processed regions input into the models were determined experimentally by elevated temperature tensile testing. The results of these simulations were compared to experimental test results via Superplastically Forming representative aerospace parts and analytical computations for validation. It was found that numerical simulations can be used to predict the thin-out characteristics of superplastically formed titanium parts and the thin-out can be controlled in desired areas by FSP, locally, prior to forming.

  4. A study on heat-flow analysis of friction stir welding on a rotation affected zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Wook; Jang, Beom Seon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Woong [Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering Co., Soeul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    In recent years, as interest in environmental protection and energy conservation rose, technological development for lightweight efficiency of transport equipment, such as aircrafts, railcars, automobiles and vessels, have been briskly proceeding. This has led to an expansion of the application of lightweight alloys such as aluminum and magnesium. For the welding of these lightweight alloys, friction stir welding has been in development by many researchers. Heat-flow analysis of friction stir welding is one such research. The flow and energy equation is solved using the computational fluid dynamic commercial program 'Fluent'. In this study, a rotation affected zone concept is imposed. The rotation affected zone is a constant volume. In this volume, flow is rotated the same as the tool rotation speed and so plastic dissipation occurs. Through this simulation, the temperature distribution results are calculated and the simulation results are compared with the experimental results.

  5. Process of friction-stir welding high-strength aluminum alloy and mechanical properties of joint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王大勇; 冯吉才; 郭德伦; 孙成彬; 栾国红; 郭和平

    2004-01-01

    The process of friction-stir welding 2A12CZ alloy has been studied. And strength and elongation tests have been performed, which demonstrated that the opportunity existed to manipulate friction-stir welding parameters in order to improve a range of material properties. The results showed that the joint strength and elongation arrived at their parameters changing, joint tensile strength and elongation had similar development. Hardness measurement indicated that the weld was softened. However, there was considerable difference in softening degree for different joint zone. The weld top had lower hardness and wider softening zone than other zone of the weld. And softening zone at advancing side was wider than that at retreating side.

  6. EFFECT OF PROCESS PARAMETERS ON THE TENSILE STRENGTH OF FRICTION STIR WELDED DISSIMILAR ALUMINUM JOINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. PADMANABAN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding is one of the recent solid state joining processes that has drawn the attention of the metal joining community. In this work the effects of tool rotation speed (TRS and welding speed (WS on the tensile strength of dissimilar friction stir welded AA2024-AA7075 joints are investigated. Response surface methodology is used for developing a mathematical model for the tensile strength of the dissimilar aluminum alloy joints. The model is used to investigate the effect of TRS and WS on the tensile strength of the joints. It is seen that the tensile strength of the joint increases with the increase in TRS up to a limit of 1050 rpm and decreases thereafter. The tensile strength of the joints is also seen increasing with the WS up to 15 mm/min. Further increase in WS results in a reduction of the tensile strength of the joints.

  7. Simulation of 3D material flow in friction stir welding of AA6061-T6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhao; Zhang Hongwu

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the numerical simulation of the 3D material flow in friction stir welding process by using finite element methods based on solid mechanics. It is found that the material flow behind the pin is much faster than that in front of the pin. The material in front of the pin moves upwards and then rotates with the pin due to the effect of the rotating tool. Behind of the pin, the material moves downwards. This process of material movement is the real cause to make the friction stir welding process continuing successfully. With the increase of the translational velocity or the rotational velocity of the pin, the material flow becomes faster.

  8. Microstructure of friction stir welded joints of 2017A aluminium alloy sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczka, K; Dutkiewicz, J; Pietras, A

    2010-03-01

    The present study examines a friction stir welded 2017A aluminium alloy. Transmission electron microscope investigations of the weld nugget revealed the average grain size of 5 microm, moderate density of dislocations as well as the presence of nanometric precipitates located mostly in grains interiors. Scanning electron microscope observations of fractures showed the presence of ductile fracture in the region of the weld nugget with brittle precipitates in the lower part. The microhardness analysis performed on the cross-section of the joints showed fairly small changes; however, after the artificial ageing process an increase in hardness was observed. The change of the joint hardness subject to the ageing process indicates partial supersaturation in the material during friction stir welding and higher precipitation hardening of the joint.

  9. Microstructures and electrochemical behaviors of the friction stir welding dissimilar weld.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Changbin; Zhang, Jiayan; Ge, Jiping

    2011-06-01

    By using optical microscope, the microstructures of 5083/6082 friction stir welding (FSW) weld and parent materials were analyzed. Meanwhile, at ambient temperature and in 0.2 mol/L NaHS03 and 0.6 mol/L NaCl solutionby gravimetric test, potentiodynamic polarization curve test, electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation, the electrochemical behavior of 5083/6082 friction stir welding weld and parent materials were comparatively investigated by gravimetric test, potentiodynamic polarization curve test, electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation. The results indicated that at given processing parameters, the anti-corrosion property of the dissimilar weld was superior to those of the 5083 and 6082 parent materials.

  10. Microstructure and anisotropic mechanical behavior of friction stir welded AA2024 alloy sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhihan [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072, Shaanxi (China); Li, Wenya, E-mail: liwy@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072, Shaanxi (China); Li, Jinglong [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072, Shaanxi (China); Chao, Y.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Vairis, A. [Mechanical Engineering Department, TEI of Crete, Heraklion, Crete 71004 (Greece)

    2015-09-15

    The anisotropic mechanical properties of friction stir welded (FSW) AA2024-T3 alloy joints were investigated based on the uniaxial tensile tests. The joint microstructure was examined by using electron back-scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscope. Results show that the evident anisotropic failure and yielding are present in the FSW joints. With the increase of loading angle from 0° to 90° the ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the specimens consistently decrease, or at first decrease and then increase, depending on the FSW process parameters. The specimen cut from the weld direction, i.e. a loading angle of 0°, exhibits the highest strength and elongation. - Highlights: • Microstructure and anisotropy of friction stir welded joints were studied. • The evident anisotropic failure and yielding are present in joints. • The lowest yield stress and UTS are at 45° and 60° loadings, respectively. • Rotation speed heavily impact on the anisotropy of joints.

  11. The microstructural evolution of friction stir welded AA6082-T6 aluminum alloy during cyclic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, A.S., E-mail: atef.hamada@oulu.fi [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez University, Suez 43721 (Egypt); Järvenpää, A. [Oulu Southern Institute, University of Oulu, Pajatie 5, FI-85500 Nivala (Finland); Ahmed, M.M.Z. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez University, Suez 43721 (Egypt); Jaskari, M. [Oulu Southern Institute, University of Oulu, Pajatie 5, FI-85500 Nivala (Finland); Wynne, B.P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Porter, D.A.; Karjalainen, L.P. [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2015-08-26

    The fatigue behavior of a thick section friction stir welded AA6082-T6 aluminum alloy was studied to compare damage mechanisms in the weld zone and the base metal. Fully reversed tension–compression strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted to determine the cyclic stress response and stored energy to failure. Microstructure evolution during cyclic straining was followed using secondary electron imaging and electron backscatter diffraction in a scanning electron microscope. Fatigue cracking along grain boundaries and the formation of slip bands were observed to be the fatigue-induced microstructural features in the friction-stir-welded structure. In the base metal, micron-sized particles led to particle-induced cracking.

  12. Friction Stir Welding of a Thick Al-Zn-Mg Alloy Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchibabu, V.; Reddy, G. M.; Kulkarni, D.; De, A.

    2016-03-01

    Al-Zn-Mg alloys are widely used as structural materials due to high strength-to-weight ratio and impact toughness. As fusion welds in these alloys commonly face hot cracking and macro porosity, friction stir welding is increasingly becoming the preferred recourse. We report here a detailed experimental study on friction stir welding of a specific Al-Zn-Mg alloy with its chemical compositions close to AA7039. The effect of tool rotational speed and welding speed on the weld profile, joint microstructure, and mechanical properties is studied extensively. The results show sound weld profiles and joint properties within the selected range of process conditions. Within the selected range of welding conditions, the welds made at a tool rotational speed of 350 rpm and welding speed of 3 mm/s have showed joint structure, tensile, and impact toughness properties fairly close to that of the base material.

  13. Thermal Management in Friction-Stir Welding of Precipitation-Hardening Aluminum Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Reynolds, Anthony

    2015-05-25

    Process design and implementation in FSW is mostly dependent on empirical information gathered through experience. Basic science of friction stir welding and processing can only be complete when fundamental interrelationships between process control parameters and response variables and resulting weld microstructure and properties are established to a reasonable extent. It is known that primary process control parameters like tool rotation and translation rate and forge axis force have complicated and interactive relationships to the process response variables such as peak temperature, time at temperature etc. Of primary influence to the other process response parameters are temperature and its gradient at the deformation and heat affected zones. Through review of pertinent works in the literature and some experimental results from boundary condition work performed in precipitation hardening aluminum alloys this paper will partially elucidate the nature and effects of temperature transients caused by variation of thermal boundaries in Friction Stir Welding.

  14. Spatially resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy on friction stir weld induced defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Karin; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Pikart, Philip; Böni, Peter

    2010-04-01

    A friction stir welded (FSW) Al alloy sample was investigated by Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) of the positron annihilation line. The spatially resolved defect distribution showed that the material in the joint zone becomes completely annealed during the welding process at the shoulder of the FSW tool, whereas at the tip, annealing is prevailed by the deterioration of the material due to the tool movement. This might be responsible for the increased probability of cracking in the heat affected zone of friction stir welds. Examination of a material pairing of steel S235 and the Al alloy Silafont36 by coincident Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS) indicates the formation of annealed steel clusters in the Al alloy component of the sample. The clear visibility of Fe in the CDB spectra is explained by the very efficient trapping at the interface between steel cluster and bulk.

  15. Effects of forming parameters on temperature in frictional stir incremental sheet forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin; Jiang, Husen [Qingdao Technological University, Qingdao (China); Li, Lihua [Qingdao University, Qingdao (China)

    2016-05-15

    Frictional stir Incremental sheet forming (ISF) is a new technology used to fabricate parts of hard-to-form materials without using heating equipment. Thus far, limited information is known about the effects of main forming parameters, except spindle speed of the tool, on the temperature of formed sheet in friction-stir ISF. The effects of six forming parameters, namely, sheet thickness, tool vertical step, tool diameter, spindle speed, feed rate, and wall angle of the formed part, were identified using the design of experiment of orthogonal array, analysis of response tables and graphs, and analysis of variance. Results show that spindle speed, feed rate, sheet thickness, and tool vertical step significantly affect the temperature of the sheet. In addition, the temperature of the sheet is significantly increased by increasing sheet thickness, tool vertical step, and spindle speed but significantly decreased with increasing tool feed rate.

  16. Experimental Investigation and Prediction of Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya BOZKURT

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is a relatively contemporary solid state welding process and has been employed in aerospace, railway, automotive and marine industries for joining of aluminum, magnesium, zinc, titanium, copper alloys, dissimilar metals and thermoplastics. The FSW process parameters such as tool rotation speed, tool traverse speed and tilt angle play an important role in deciding the joining quality. The present study defines the effect of FSW process on the tensile properties of the AA2124/SiC/25p metal matrix composite (MMC plates. Obtained results showed that the joint efficiency decreases by increasing the tool traverse speed while tool rotation speed was kept constant. Second contribution of this study is the application of decision tree technique to predict the tensile properties of friction stir welded MMC plates. It is seen that methodology can be applied with great accuracy.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.4.3092

  17. Themo-mechanical and microstructural modeling of friction stir welding of 6111-T4 aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Barlat, Frédéric; Kim, Chongmin; Chung, Kwansoo

    2009-02-01

    Plastic deformation and thermal history as well as microstructure evolution of friction stir welded 6111-T4 aluminum alloys were numerically simulated. Material and heat flow during friction stir welding were calculated considering the momentum balance equation and energy balance equation under the steady state condition. Based on the calculated temperature history, the coupled nucleation, growth, and coarsening of precipitates were simulated using microstructural modeling, as proposed by Myhr et al. [7,8]. Finally, the distribution of precipitates was used to calculate the mechanical properties of the weld zone, particularly the yield stress, based on the dislocation theory. The results compared well with the measurements, suggesting that the method can be applicable to predict yield stress.

  18. The Mechanical Behavior of Friction-Stir Spot Welded Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, Hande

    2014-10-01

    Aluminum and alloys are widely used in the automotive industry due to the light weight, good formability, and malleability. Spot welding is the most commonly used joining method of these materials, but the high current requirements and the inconsistent quality of the final welds make this process unsuitable. An alternative welding technique, the friction-stir spot welding process, can also be successfully used in joining of aluminum and alloys. In this study, 1-mm-thick AA5754 Al-alloy plates in the H-111 temper conditions were joined by friction-stir spot welding using two different weld parameters such as tool rotational speed and dwell time. Mechanical properties of the joints were obtained with extensive hardness measurements and tensile shear tests. The effect of these parameters on the failure modes of welded joints was also determined.

  19. Structure and Hardness of 01570 Aluminum Alloy Friction Stir Welds Processed Under Different Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'yasov, R. R.; Avtokratova, E. V.; Markushev, M. V.; Predko, P. Yu.; Konkevich, V. Yu.

    2015-10-01

    Structure and hardness of the 01570 aluminum alloy joints processed by friction stir welding at various speeds are investigated. It is shown that increasing the traverse tool speed lowers the probability of macrodefect formation in the nugget zone; however, this can lead to anomalous grain growth in the zone of contact with the tool shoulder. Typical "onion-like" structure of the weld consisting of rings that differ by optical contrast is formed for all examined welding regimes. It is demonstrated that this contrast is caused by the difference in the grain sizes in the rings rather than by their chemical or phase composition. Mechanisms of transformation of the alloy structure during friction stir welding are discussed.

  20. Spatially resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy on friction stir weld induced defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Hain, Christoph Hugenschmidt, Philip Pikart and Peter Böni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A friction stir welded (FSW Al alloy sample was investigated by Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS of the positron annihilation line. The spatially resolved defect distribution showed that the material in the joint zone becomes completely annealed during the welding process at the shoulder of the FSW tool, whereas at the tip, annealing is prevailed by the deterioration of the material due to the tool movement. This might be responsible for the increased probability of cracking in the heat affected zone of friction stir welds. Examination of a material pairing of steel S235 and the Al alloy Silafont36 by coincident Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS indicates the formation of annealed steel clusters in the Al alloy component of the sample. The clear visibility of Fe in the CDB spectra is explained by the very efficient trapping at the interface between steel cluster and bulk.

  1. Experimental Investigations on Formability of Aluminum Tailor Friction Stir Welded Blanks in Deep Drawing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesharwani, R. K.; Panda, S. K.; Pal, S. K.

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, tailor friction stir welded blanks (TFSWBs) were fabricated successfully using 2.0-mm-thick AA5754-H22 and AA5052-H32 sheet metals with optimized tool design and process parameters. Taguchi L9 orthogonal array has been used to design the friction stir welding experiments, and the Grey relational analysis has been applied for the multi objective optimization in order to maximize the weld strength and total elongation reducing the surface roughness and energy consumption. The formability of the TFSWBs and parent materials was evaluated and compared in terms of limiting drawing ratio (LDR) using a conventional circular die. It was found that the formability of the TFSWBs was comparable with that of both the parent materials without failure in the weldment. A modified conical tractrix die (MCTD) was proposed to enhance the LDR of the TFSWBs. It was found that the formability was improved by 27% using the MCTD.

  2. Multiple Crack Growth Prediction in AA2024-T3 Friction Stir Welded Joints, Including Manufacturing Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Citarella, Roberto; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard

    2016-01-01

    boundary element method (FEM-DBEM) procedure, coupling the welding process simulation to the subsequent crack growth assessment, is proposed and applied to simulate multiple crack propagation, with allowance for manufacturing effects. The friction stir butt welding process of the precipitation hardened AA......2024-T3 alloy was simulated using a thermo-mechanical FEM model to predict the process induced residual stress field and material softening. The computed stress field was transferred to a DBEM environment and superimposed to the stress field produced by a remote fatigue traction load applied......A great deal of attention is currently paid by several industries toward the friction stir welding process to realize lightweight structures. Within this aim, the realistic prediction of fatigue behavior of welded assemblies is a key factor. In this work an integrated finite element method - dual...

  3. Microstructural and Mechanical Characteristics of Aluminum Alloy AA5754 Friction Stir Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, T. S.; Khalifa, T. A.

    2014-03-01

    In the present investigation, friction stir spot welding on annealed aluminum alloy AA5754 sheets was performed. The influences of the tool rotational speed and tool stirring (dwell) time on the weld structure and static strength of welds were evaluated. The results revealed that the width of the completely metallurgical-bonded region increases with the increasing tool rotational speed and/or the dwell time up to certain levels. Increasing such parameters beyond these levels slightly reduces the width of the bonding region. The stirred zone exhibited higher microhardness than that of the base material. The tensile-shear force was found to increase with the increasing tool rotational speed and/or dwell time up to a certain level (9s). Higher tool rotational speeds and/or prolonged dwell times slightly reduce(s) the tensile-shear force.

  4. Optimization of process parameters of aluminum alloy AA 2014-T6 friction stir welds by response surface methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanjaneyulu Kadaganchi; Madhusudhan Reddy Gankidi; Hina Gokhale

    2015-01-01

    The heat treatable aluminum–copper alloy AA2014 finds wide application in the aerospace and defence industry due to its high strength-to-weight ratio and good ductility. Friction stir welding (FSW) process, an emerging solid state joining process, is suitable for joining this alloy compared to fusion welding processes. This work presents the formulation of a mathematical model with process parameters and tool geometry to predict the responses of friction stir welds of AA 2014-T6 aluminum allo...

  5. A numerical investigation of grain shape and crystallographic texture effects on the plastic strain localization in friction stir weld zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, V.; Balokhonov, R.; Batukhtina, E.; Shakhidjanov, V.

    2015-10-01

    Crystal plasticity approaches were adopted to build models accounting for the microstructure and texture observed in different friction stir weld zones. To this end, a numerical investigation of crystallographic texture and grain shape effects on the plastic strain localization in a friction stir weld of an aluminum-base alloy was performed. The presence of texture was found to give rise to pronounced mesoscale plastic strain localization.

  6. Computational Investigation of Hardness Evolution During Friction-Stir Welding of AA5083 and AA2139 Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    and R.S. Mishra, Effect of Friction Stir 940Processing on the Microstructure of Cast A356 Aluminum , Mater. Sci. 941Eng. A, 2006, 433, p 269–278...REPORT Computational Investigation of Hardness Evolution During Friction-Stir Welding of AA5083 and AA2139 Aluminum Alloys 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...is combined with the basic physical metallurgy of two wrought aluminum alloys to predict/assess their FSW behaviors. The two alloys selected are AA5083

  7. Heat input effect of friction stir welding on aluminium alloy AA 6061-T6 welded joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedmak Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the heat input and maximum temperature developed during friction stir welding with different parameters. Aluminium alloy (AA 6061-T6 has been used for experimental and numerical analysis. Experimental analysis is based on temperature measurements by using infrared camera, whereas numerical analysis was based on empirical expressions and finite element method. Different types of defects have been observed in respect to different levels of heat input.

  8. Friction Stir.Welding is an advance metal joining process: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umasankar Das,

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The friction stir welding is recently developed solid state welding process which overcome the problem associated with fusion welding technology. The properties achieved by friction stir welding is better than that achieve by fusion welding technique It has been invented as a solid-state joining technique and initially applied to aluminum alloys. FSW is used to replace rivets joints in the aeronautical industry. Recently the aircraft and military industries widely have been using aluminum alloys particularly because of their fine strength to weight ratio. However in compare with steels they represent welding difficulties and also lower ductility. In last years it has been observed that Friction Stir Welding (FSW method represents better microstructure and mechanical properties than conventional methods in welding aluminum alloys. It has been widely investigated for mostly low melting materials, such as Al, Mg and Cu alloys. Aluminum is the most usable material in engineering application and a lot of improvement is needed in the area of its welding. The latest works on friction stir welding of aluminum have been directed towards improving the quality of weld, reducing defects and applying the process of FSW to aluminum for specific applications. This joining technique is energy efficient, environment friendly, and versatile. In particular, it can be used to join high-strength aerospace aluminum alloys and other metallic alloys that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. FSW is considered to be the most significant development in metal joining in a last decade. The FSW of Aluminums and its alloys has been commercialized; and recent interest is focused on joining dissimilar materials. However, in order to commercialize the process, research studies are required to characterize and establish proper process parameters for FSW. This paper summarizes the trends and advances of this welding processes in the field of welding. Future aspects of

  9. The Effect of Tool Position for Aluminum and Copper at High Rotational Friction Stir Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Recep Çakır; Sare Çelik

    2015-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process used for welding similar and dissimilar materials. This welding technique allows welding of Aluminum alloys which present difficulties in fusion joining and allows different material couples to be welded continuously. In this study, 1050 aluminum alloy and commercially pure copper to increase heat input were produced at high rotation rate (2440 rev/min) with four different pin position (0-1-1.5-2 mm) and three different weld speeds ...

  10. Thermo-mechanical Modeling for Residual Stresses of Friction Stir Welding of Dissimilar Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    ABDUL ARIF; ABHISHEK; K. N. Pandey

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an advanced joining process that has been used for high production since 1996. FSW produces a weld that is strong than the base material because melting does not occur and joining takes place below the melting temperature of the material. FSW produces no fumes and can join aluminum alloys, magnesium, steels, copper and titanium. In this study, a thermo-mechanical model with improved potential is developed to study the formation of residual stress field in dissimilar ...

  11. Manufacturing Systems Demonstration: Bimetallic Friction STIR Joining of AA6061 and High Hardness Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    tool’s first use. In all tools made of alloy having hafnium carbide, we’ve commonly seen small voids (0.0-1.0 mm dia.) on the surface of machined...distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Focus: HOPE (FH) has developed the process parameters to successfully join AA6061 aluminum alloy ...to successfully join AA6061 aluminum alloy and High Hardness Armor (HHA) steel using the friction stir process (FSP). Metallographic analysis

  12. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of WE43 Alloy Produced Via Additive Friction Stir Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Calvert, Jacob Rollie

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to save weight, transportation and aerospace industries have increasing investigated magnesium alloys because of their high strength-to-weight ratio. Further efforts to save on material use and machining time have focused on the use of additive manufacturing. However, anisotropic properties can be caused by both the HCP structure of magnesium alloys as well as by layered effects left by typical additive manufacturing processes. Additive Friction Stir (AFS) is a relatively new add...

  13. Characterization of boron carbide particulate reinforced in situ copper surface composites synthesized using friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiskumar, R., E-mail: sathiscit2011@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Murugan, N., E-mail: murugan@cit.edu.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, V V College of Engineering, Tisaiyanvilai, 627 657 Tamil Nadu (India); Vijay, S.J., E-mail: vijayjoseph@karunya.edu [Centre for Research in Metallurgy (CRM), School of Mechanical Sciences, Karunya University, Coimbatore, 641 114 Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-10-15

    Friction stir processing has evolved as a novel solid state technique to fabricate surface composites. The objective of this work is to apply the friction stir processing technique to fabricate boron carbide particulate reinforced copper surface composites and investigate the effect of B{sub 4}C particles and its volume fraction on microstructure and sliding wear behavior of the same. A groove was prepared on 6 mm thick copper plates and packed with B{sub 4}C particles. The dimensions of the groove was varied to result in five different volume fractions of B{sub 4}C particles (0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 vol.%). A single pass friction stir processing was done using a tool rotational speed of 1000 rpm, travel speed of 40 mm/min and an axial force of 10 kN. Metallurgical characterization of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites was carried out using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The sliding wear behavior was evaluated using a pin-on-disk apparatus. Results indicated that the B{sub 4}C particles significantly influenced the area, dispersion, grain size, microhardness and sliding wear behavior of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites. When the volume fraction of B{sub 4}C was increased, the wear mode changed from microcutting to abrasive wear and wear debris was found to be finer. Highlights: • Fabrication of Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composite by friction stir processing • Analyzing the effect of B{sub 4}C particles on the properties of Cu/B4C surface composite • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles reduced the area of surface composite. • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles enhanced the microhardness and wear rate. • B{sub 4}C particles altered the wear mode from microcutting to abrasive.

  14. Phased Array Ultrasound: Initial Development of PAUT Inspection of Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rairigh, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of Phased Array Ultrasound (PAUT) as a non-destructive examination method for Self Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). PAUT is the only NDE method which has been shown to detect detrimental levels of Residual Oxide Defect (ROD), which can result in significant decrease in weld strength. The presentation reviews the PAUT process, and shows the results in comparison with x-ray radiography.

  15. Influence of vibrational treatment on thermomechanical response of material under conditions identical to friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalenko, Ivan S., E-mail: ivkon@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Konovalenko, Igor S., E-mail: igkon@ispms.tsc.ru; Kolubaev, Evgeniy A., E-mail: eak@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Dmitriev, Andrey I., E-mail: dmitr@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Psakhie, Sergey G., E-mail: sp@ms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    A molecular dynamics model was constructed to describe material loading on the atomic scale by the mode identical to friction stir welding. It was shown that additional vibration applied to the tool during the loading mode provides specified intensity values and continuous thermomechanical action during welding. An increase in additional vibration intensity causes an increase both in the force acting on the workpiece from the rotating tool and in temperature within the welded area.

  16. Influence of vibrational treatment on thermomechanical response of material under conditions identical to friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko, Ivan S.; Konovalenko, Igor S.; Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Kolubaev, Evgeniy A.

    2015-10-01

    A molecular dynamics model was constructed to describe material loading on the atomic scale by the mode identical to friction stir welding. It was shown that additional vibration applied to the tool during the loading mode provides specified intensity values and continuous thermomechanical action during welding. An increase in additional vibration intensity causes an increase both in the force acting on the workpiece from the rotating tool and in temperature within the welded area.

  17. Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic Impact Loading Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Sheet) Continuation for Block 13 ARO Report Number Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Alumin Block 13: Supplementary Note © 2013 . Published in...nose, steel jacketed, hard tungsten core (1400 Hv), armor piercing (AP) projectile (Ref 1). As mentioned above, this failure mechanism is often...zones being impacted with blunt, lower hardness projectiles [e.g., 20-mm caliber, 53 g, blunt, chamfered right circular cylindrical steel fragment

  18. A theoretical study of the influence of technological friction stir welding parameters on weld structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafurov, Sergey; Shilko, Evgeny; Kolubaev, Evgeny; Psakhie, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    Computer simulation by the movable cellular automaton method was performed to study the dynamics of friction stir welding of duralumin plates. It was shown that the ratio of the rotation rate to the translational velocity of the rotating tool has a great influence on the quality of the welded joint. A suitably chosen ratio of these parameters combined with an additional ultrasonic impact reduces considerably the porosity and the amount of microcracks in the weld.

  19. Modeling of the mechanical behavior of aluminum alloys with friction stir welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balokhonov, Ruslan R.; Romanova, Varvara A.; Batukhtina, Ekaterina E.

    2015-10-01

    The deformation and fracture of a macroscopic duralumin sample with a friction stir weld are investigated numerically under compressive loading applied to the sample surface. A boundary-value problem is solved using a dynamic plane strain approximation. The weld zone structure corresponds to that observed experimentally and is taken into account explicitly in calculations. The mechanisms of the plastic strain localization and crack propagation operating in different zones of the weld are examined.

  20. Evaluation of Friction Stir Processing of HY-80 Steel Under Wet and Dry Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Garth William II

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the microstructural and mechanical property changes associated with Friction Stir Processing (FSP) of HY-80 steel under dry and underwater conditions. HY-80 is a low-carbon alloy steel that is used in a quenched and tempered condition and is highly susceptible to hydrogen assisted cracking associated with conventional fusion welding. FSW/P (400 RPM/ 2 IPM) was conducted using a polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tool having a pin length of 6.35 mm. Two sets ...

  1. 3D modeling of material flow and temperature in Friction Stir Welding Modelagem 3D do fluxo de material e da temperatura na soldagem "Friction Stir"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Santiago

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The process of Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a welding method developed by the "The Welding Institute" (TWI of England in 1991. The welding equipment consists of a tool that rotates and progresses along the joint of two restrained sheets. The joint is produced by frictional heating which causes the softening of both components into a viscous-plastic condition and also by the resultant flow between the sheets to be joined. Numerical Modeling of the process can provide realistic prediction of the main variables of the process, reducing the number of experimental tests, thus accelerating the design processes while reducing costs and optimizing the involved technological variables. In this study the friction stir welding process is modeled using a general purpose finite element based program, reproducing the material thermal map and the corresponding mass flow. Numerical thermal results are compared against experimental thermographic maps and numerical material flow results are compared with material flow visualization techniques, with acceptable concordance.O processo denominado "Friction Stir Welding" (FSW é um método de soldagem desenvolvido pelo "The Welding Institute" (TWI na Inglaterra em 1991. O equipamento de soldagem consiste de uma ferramenta que gira e avança ao longo da interface entre duas chapas fixas. A junção é produzida pelo calor gerado por fricção o qual causa o amolecimento de ambos os componentes atingindo uma condição visco-plástica e também pelo escoamento resultante entre as laminas a ser unidas. A modelagem numérica do processo pode fornecer uma predição real das principais variáveis do processo, reduzindo o número de testes experimentais, acelerando, portanto os processos de projeto ao mesmo tempo em que reduz custos e permite a otimização das variáveis tecnológicas envolvidas. Neste trabalho, o processo de soldagem por fricção é modelado empregando um programa de propósito geral baseado no m

  2. The Effect of Tool Position for Aluminum and Copper at High Rotational Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Çakır

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a solid state welding process used for welding similar and dissimilar materials. This welding technique allows welding of Aluminum alloys which present difficulties in fusion joining and allows different material couples to be welded continuously. In this study, 1050 aluminum alloy and commercially pure copper to increase heat input were produced at high rotation rate (2440 rev/min with four different pin position (0-1-1.5-2 mm and three different weld speeds (20-30-50 mm/min by friction stir welding. The influence of welding parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints was investigated. Tensile and bending tests and microhardness measurements were used to determine of mechanical properties. Nugget zone microstructures were investigated by optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM and were analyzed in energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. Depending on the XRD analysis results intermetallic phase was observed to form in the interfacial region. In the tensile test results, 83.55% weld performance was obtained in the friction stir welding merge of Al-Cu.

  3. 3D visualization of the material flow in friction stir welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Yanhua; Lin Sanbao; Shen Jiajie; Wu Lin

    2005-01-01

    The material flow in friction stir welded 2014 Al alloy has been investigated using a marker insert technique (MIT). Results of the flow visualization show that the material flow is asymmetrical during the friction stir welding(FSW)process and there are also significant differences in the flow patterns observed on advancing side and retreating side. On advancing side, some material transport forward and some move backward, but on retreating side, material only transport backward. At the top surface of the weld, significant material traasport forward due to the action of the rotating tool shoulder.Combining the data from all the markers, a three-dimensional flow visualization, similar to the 3D image reconstruction technique, was obtained. The three-dimensional plot gives the tendency chart of material flow in friction stir welding process and from the plot it can be seen that there is a vertical, circular motion around the longitudinal axis of the weld. On the advancing side of the weld, the material is pushed downward but on the retreating side, the material is pushed toward the crown of the weld. The net result of the two relative motions in both side of the advancing and the retreating is that a circular motion comes into being. Comparatively, the material flow around the longitudinal axis is a secondary motion.

  4. Improvement of Weldment Properties by Hot Forming Quenching of Friction Stir Welded TWB Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Hoon Ko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to improve the mechanical properties and formability of friction stir welded tailor-welded blanks (TWBs of Al6061 alloy with a new forming method called hot forming quenching (HFQ in which solid-solution heat-treated aluminum sheets are formed at elevated temperature. Forming and quenching during HFQ are simultaneously performed with the forming die for the solid-solution heat-treated sheet. In this study, specimens of aluminum TWBs were prepared by friction stir welding (FSW with a butt joint. The effectiveness of FSW joining was evaluated by observation of the macrostructure for different sheet thicknesses. In order to evaluate the formability of TWBs by HFQ, a hemisphere dome stretching test of the limit dome height achieved without specimen failure was performed with various tool temperatures. A Vickers test was also performed to measure weldment hardness as a function of position. The formability and mechanical properties of products formed by HFQ are compared with those formed by conventional forming methods, demonstrating the suitability of HFQ for sheet metal forming of friction stir welded TWBs.

  5. Residual stresses analysis of friction stir welding using one-way FSI simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Wook; Jang, Beom Seon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ha Cheol [Mokpo National University, Muan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    When certain mechanisms, such as plastic deformations and temperature gradients, occur and are released in a structure, stresses remain because of the shape of the structure and external constraints. These stresses are referred to as residual stresses. The base material locally expands during heating in the welding process. When the welding is completed and cooled to room temperature, the residual stresses are left at nearly the yield strength level. In the case of friction stir welding, the maximum temperature is 80% to 90% of the melting point of the materials. Thus, the residual stresses in the welding process are smaller than those in other fusion welding processes; these stresses have not been considered previously. However, friction stir welding residual stresses are sometimes measured at approximately 70% or above. These residual stresses significantly affect fatigue behavior and lifetime. The present study investigates the residual stress distributions in various welding conditions and shapes of friction stir welding. In addition, the asymmetric feature is considered in temperature and residual stress distribution. Heat transfer analysis is conducted using the commercial computational fluid dynamics program Fluent, and results are used in the finite element structural analysis with the ANSYS Multiphysics software. The calculated residual stresses are compared with experimental values using the X-ray diffraction method.

  6. Laser-assisted friction stir welding of aluminum alloy lap joints: microstructural and microhardness characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalino, Giuseppe; Campanelli, Sabina L.; Contuzzi, Nicola; Angelastro, Andrea; Ludovico, Antonio D.

    2014-02-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e., no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. The laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) combines a Friction Stir Welding machine and a laser system. Laser power is used to preheat and to plasticize the volume of the workpiece ahead of the rotating tool; the workpiece is then joined in the same way as in the conventional FSW process. In this work an Ytterbium fiber laser with maximum power of 4 kW and a commercial FSW machine were coupled. Both FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 3 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in lap joint configuration with a constant tool rotation rate and with different feed rates. The two processes were compared and evaluated in terms of differences in the microstructure and in the micro-hardness profile.

  7. Comparative analysis of the friction stir welded aluminum-magnesium alloy joint grain structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaikina, A. A.; Sizova, O. V.; Novitskaya, O. S.

    2015-10-01

    A comparative test of the friction stir welded aluminum-magnesium alloy joint microstructure for plates of a different thickness was carried out. Finding out the structuring regularities in the weld nugget zone, that is the strongest zone of the weld, the effects of temperature-deformational conditions on the promotion of a metal structure refinement mechanism under friction stir welding can be determined. In this research friction stir welded rolled plates of an AMg5M alloy; 5 and 8 mm thick were investigated. Material fine structure pictures of the nugget zone were used to identify and measure subgrain and to define a second phase location. By means of optical microscopy it was shown that the fine-grained structure developed in the nugget zone. The grain size was 5 flm despite the thickness of the plates. In the sample 5.0 mm thick grains were coaxial, while in the sample 8.0 mm thick grains were elongate at a certain angle to the tool travel direction.

  8. Bobbin-Tool Friction-Stir Welding of Thick-Walled Aluminum Alloy Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalder, E C; Pastrnak, J W; Engel, J; Forrest, R S; Kokko, E; Ternan, K M; Waldron, D

    2007-06-06

    It was desired to assemble thick-walled Al alloy 2219 pressure vessels by bobbin-tool friction-stir welding. To develop the welding-process, mechanical-property, and fitness-for-service information to support this effort, extensive friction-stir welding-parameter studies were conducted on 2.5 cm. and 3.8 cm. thick 2219 Al alloy plate. Starting conditions of the plate were the fully-heat-treated (-T62) and in the annealed (-O) conditions. The former condition was chosen with the intent of using the welds in either the 'as welded' condition or after a simple low-temperature aging treatment. Since preliminary stress-analyses showed that stresses in and near the welds would probably exceed the yield-strength of both 'as welded' and welded and aged weld-joints, a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging treatment was also examined. Once a suitable set of welding and post-weld heat-treatment parameters was established, the project divided into two parts. The first part concentrated on developing the necessary process information to be able to make defect-free friction-stir welds in 3.8 cm. thick Al alloy 2219 in the form of circumferential welds that would join two hemispherical forgings with a 102 cm. inside diameter. This necessitated going to a bobbin-tool welding-technique to simplify the tooling needed to react the large forces generated in friction-stir welding. The bobbin-tool technique was demonstrated on both flat-plates and plates that were bent to the curvature of the actual vessel. An additional issue was termination of the weld, i.e. closing out the hole left at the end of the weld by withdrawal of the friction-stir welding tool. This was accomplished by friction-plug welding a slightly-oversized Al alloy 2219 plug into the termination-hole, followed by machining the plug flush with both the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. The second part of the project involved demonstrating that the welds were fit for the intended

  9. Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Tubes by Means of Tube Bulge Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Urso, G.; Longo, M.; Giardini, C.

    2011-05-01

    Mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints are generally evaluated by means of conventional tensile test. This testing method might provide insufficient information because maximum strain obtained in tensile test before necking is small; moreover, the application of tensile test is limited when the joint path is not linear or even when the welds are executed on curved surfaces. Therefore, in some cases, it would be preferable to obtain the joints properties from other testing methods. Tube bulge test can be a valid solution for testing circumferential or longitudinal welds executed on tubular workpieces. The present work investigates the mechanical properties and the formability of friction stir welded tubes by means of tube bulge tests. The experimental campaign was performed on tubular specimens having a thickness of 3 mm and an external diameter of 40 mm, obtained starting from two semi-tubes longitudinally friction stir welded. The first step, regarding the fabrication of tubes, was performed combining a conventional forming process and friction stir welding. Sheets in Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy AA6060 T6 were adopted for this purpose. Plates having a dimension of 225×60 mm were bent (with a bending axis parallel to the main dimension) in order to obtain semi-tubes. A particular care was devoted to the fabrication of forming devices (punch and die) in order to minimize the springback effects. Semi-tubes were then friction stir welded by means of a CNC machine tool. Some preliminary tests were carried out by varying the welding parameters, namely feed rate and rotational speed. A very simple tool having flat shoulder and cylindrical pin was used. The second step of the research was based on testing the welded tubes by means of tube bulge test. A specific equipment having axial actuators with a conical shape was adopted for this study. Some analyses were carried out on the tubes bulged up to a certain pressure level. In particular, the burst pressure and the

  10. Multi-Objective Optimization of Friction Stir Welding of Aluminium Alloy Using Grey Relation Analysis with Entropy Measurement Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAURABH KUMAR GUPTA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research focus on optimization of Friction Stir Welding (FSW process parameters for joining of AA6061 aluminium alloy using hybrid approach. The FSW process parameters considered are tool rotational speed, welding speed and axial force. The quality characteristics considered are tensile strength (TS and percentage of tensile elongation (TE. Taguchi based experimental design L9 orthogonal array is used for determining the experimental results. The value of weights corresponding to each quality characteristic is determined by using the entropy measurement method so that their importance can be properly explained. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA is used to determine the contribution of FSW process parameters. The confirmation tests also have been done for verifying the results.

  11. Modelling of the Contact Condition at the Tool/Matrix Interface in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich; Hattel, Jesper; Wert, John

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to investigate the heat generation and contact condition during Friction Stir Welding (FSW). For this purpose, an analytical model is developed for the heat generation and this is combined with a Eulerian FE-analysis of the temperature field. The heat...... generation is closely related to the friction condition at the contact interface between the FSW tool and the weld piece material as well as the material flow in the weld matrix, since the mechanisms for heat generation by frictional and plastic dissipation are different. The heat generation from the tool...... is governed by the contact condition, i.e. whether there is sliding, sticking or partial sliding/sticking. The contact condition in FSW is complex (dependent on alloy, welding parameters, tool design etc.), and previous models (both analytical and numerical) for simulation of the heat generation assume...

  12. Microstructural Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Thick 5083 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Murshid; Sun, Yufeng; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Ma, Ninshu; Tsutsumi, Seiichiro; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2016-10-01

    Joining thick sections of aluminum alloys by friction stir welding (FSW) in a single pass needs to overcome many challenges before it comes to full-scale industrial use. Important parameters controlling the structure-properties relationships both across weld cross-section and through thickness direction were investigated through mechanical testing, electron backscatter diffraction technique, transmission electron microscopy, and occurrence of serrated plastic flow. The evolution of the properties in the weld cross-section shows that the presence of undissolved and fragmented Al_6 MnFe particles cause discrepancies in establishing the Hall-Petch relationship, and derive the strengthening from the Orowan strengthening mechanism. A `stop action' friction stir weld has been prepared to understand the role of geometrical features of the tool probe in the development of the final microstructure after complete weld. Sectioning through the `stop action' weld with the probe in situ displays the individual effect of thread and flat on the grain structure formation. The material at the thread surface experiences more severe deformation than the material at flat surface. Both the high-angle boundaries and mean grain size are found to be higher at the thread surface. The strain hardening capacity, stress serration amplitude, and frequency are observed to be higher in the stir zone than other weld regions.

  13. Friction Stir Weldabilities of AA1050-H24 and AA6061-T6 Aluminum Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huijie LIU; Hidetoshi FUJIN; Masakatsu MAEDA; Kiyoshi NOGI

    2005-01-01

    The friction stir weldabilities of the strain-hardened AA1050-H24 and precipitate-hardened AA6061-T6 aluminum alloys were examined to reveal the effects of material properties on the friction stir welding behavior. The experimental results are obtlained. (1) For AA1050-H24, the weld can possess smoother surface ripples; there is no elliptical weld nugget in the weld; there is no discernible interface between the stir zone and the thermomechanically affected zone;and the internal defect of the weld looks like a long crack and is located in the lower part of the weld. (2) For AA6061-T6, the weld usually possesses slightly rougher surface ripples; an elliptical weld nugget clearly exists in the weld; there are discernible interfaces among the weld nugget, thermomechanically affected zone and heat affected zone; and the internal defect of the weld is similar to that of the AA1050-H24 weld. (3) The effective range of welding parameters for AA1050-H24 is narrow, while the one for AA6061-T6 is very wide. (4) The maximum tensile strength efficiency of the AA1050-H24 joints is similar to that of the AA6061-T6 joints, i.e. 79% and 77%, respectively.

  14. Effect of Shoulder Size on Weld Properties of Dissimilar Metal Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinlabi, E. T.

    2012-07-01

    This article reports a research study that shows the effect of shoulder diameter size on the resulting weld properties of dissimilar friction stir welds between 5754 aluminum alloy (AA) and C11000 copper (Cu). Welds were produced using three different shoulder diameter tools: 15, 18, and 25 mm by varying the rotational speed between 600 and 1200 rpm and the traverse speed between 50 and 300 mm/min to achieve the best result. Each parameter combination was chosen to represent different heat input conditions (low, intermediates and high). The welds were characterized through microstructural evaluation, tensile testing, microhardness measurements, x-ray diffraction analysis, and electrical resistivity. Microstructural evaluation of the welds revealed that the welds produced consisted of all the friction stir welding (FSW) microstructure zones with organized flow lines comprising mixture layers of aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) at the Stir Zones. The average Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) of the welds considered ranged from 178 to 208 MPa. Higher Vickers microhardness values were measured at the joint interfaces of all the welds because of the presence of intermetallic compounds in these regions. The x-ray diffraction analysis revealed the presence of Al4Cu9 and Al2Cu intermetallics at the interfacial regions, and low electrical resistivities were obtained at the joint interfaces. An optimized parameter setting for FSW of Al and Cu was obtained at the weld produced at 950 rpm and 50 mm/min with the 18-mm shoulder diameter tool.

  15. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded 5083 and 7075 Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalemba-Rec, I.; Hamilton, C.; Kopyściański, M.; Miara, D.; Krasnowski, K.

    2017-02-01

    Through microscopy, mechanical testing, and numerical modeling, the microstructure and mechanical performance of friction stir welded aluminum alloys 7075-T651 and 5083-H111 were characterized. In particular, the influence of the weld configuration, i.e., the locations of the 7075 and 5083 alloys alternately on the advancing and retreating sides, on material flow, microstructure, and mechanical properties was considered. Thermographic data in conjunction with a process simulation demonstrated that the weld configuration significantly impacts heat generation during friction stir welding. The microstructure in the stir zone was a clear visualization of the material flow and was characterized by a vortex-like structure with alternating bands of the alloys being joined. These bands differed in elemental content and grain size. The microstructure became more complex when greater heat generation (higher temperatures) occurred. The weld configuration strongly influenced the material flow, but did not impact the tensile properties (such as yield strength, tensile strength, and elongation). The configuration of 5083 on the advancing side and 7075 on the retreating side produced the most uniform material flow. The joint efficiencies of all tested welds were above 100%.

  16. Closed-Loop Control System for Friction Stir Welding Retractable Pin Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Romine, Peter L.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA invention disclosure, NASA Case No. MFS-31413, entitled "System for Controlling the Stirring Pin of a Friction Stir Welding Apparatus", (Patent Pending) authored by Jeff Ding, Dr Peter Romine and Pete Oelgoetz, addresses the precision control of the friction stir welding process. The closed-loop control system automatically adjusts the spinning welding pin, real-time, to maintain a precise penetration ligament (i.e., distance between pin-tip and weld panel backside surface). A specific pin length can be maintained while welding constant thickness or tapered material thickness weld panels. The closed-loop control system provides operator data and information relative to the exact position of the welding pin inside the weld joint. This paper presents the closed-loop RPT control system that operates using the auto-feedback of force signals sensed by the tip and shoulder of the welding pin. Significance: The FSW process can be successfully used in a production environment only if there is a method or technique that informs the FSW operator the precise location of the welding pin inside the weld joint. This is essential for applications in aerospace, automotive, pressure vessel, commercial aircraft and other industries.

  17. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, B.; Yu, X.; Edmondson, P. D.; Parish, C. M.; Miller, M. K.; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  18. Microstructural Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Thick 5083 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Murshid; Sun, Yufeng; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Ma, Ninshu; Tsutsumi, Seiichiro; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2017-01-01

    Joining thick sections of aluminum alloys by friction stir welding (FSW) in a single pass needs to overcome many challenges before it comes to full-scale industrial use. Important parameters controlling the structure-properties relationships both across weld cross-section and through thickness direction were investigated through mechanical testing, electron backscatter diffraction technique, transmission electron microscopy, and occurrence of serrated plastic flow. The evolution of the properties in the weld cross-section shows that the presence of undissolved and fragmented Al_6MnFe particles cause discrepancies in establishing the Hall-Petch relationship, and derive the strengthening from the Orowan strengthening mechanism. A `stop action' friction stir weld has been prepared to understand the role of geometrical features of the tool probe in the development of the final microstructure after complete weld. Sectioning through the `stop action' weld with the probe in situ displays the individual effect of thread and flat on the grain structure formation. The material at the thread surface experiences more severe deformation than the material at flat surface. Both the high-angle boundaries and mean grain size are found to be higher at the thread surface. The strain hardening capacity, stress serration amplitude, and frequency are observed to be higher in the stir zone than other weld regions.

  19. Thermal analysis of friction stir welding process and investigation into affective parameters using simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Mahmoud [University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Behrouz [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Keivani, Rasoul [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) as an efficient solid state joining process has numerous applications in industries. Temperature distribution analysis through simulation not only brings the possibility to characterize the microstructure of different zones, but also enables one to save cost and energy as optimum welding variables are obtained with less concern. In the present study, the temperature distribution during the friction stir welding (FSW) process of AA6061-T6 was evaluated using finite element method (FEM). Since experimental measurements cannot be readily made in the weld region, it is difficult to understand physics in the stir zone of the welds without simulation. Abaqus software was applied to model the parts and simulate the process of welding, while Johnson-Cook law utilized to evaluate the effect of strain rate and generated heat. FE-results were verified by experimental results. The comparisons revealed a good compatibility between the results. The effect of probe shape on temperature distribution was also studied. It was found that spherical pins result in the highest temperatures at workpieces with respect to cylindrical and tapered pins. Additionally, it was concluded that more heat is generated in workpieces as pin angle increases.

  20. Microstructural Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of 7050-T7451 Aluminum Alloy Friction Stir-Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Wang, T.; Zhou, W. L.; Li, Z. Y.; Huang, Y. X.; Feng, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    The ultra-high-strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy, 7050-T7451, was friction stir welded at a constant tool rotation speed of 600 rpm. Defect-free welds were successfully obtained at a welding speed of 100 mm/min, but lack-of-penetration defect was formed at a welding speed of 400 mm/min. The as-received material was mainly composed of coarse-deformed grains with some fine recrystallized grains. Fine equiaxed, dynamic, recrystallized grains were developed in the stir zone, and elongated grains were formed in the thermomechanically affected zone with dynamic recovered subgrains. Grain sizes in different regions of friction stir-welded joints varied depending on the welding speed. The sizes and distributions of precipitates changed in different regions of the joint, and wider precipitation free zone was developed in the heat-affected zone compared to that in the base material. Hardness of the heat-affected zone was obviously lower than that of the base material, and the softening region width was related to the welding speed. The tensile strength of the defect-free joints increased with the increasing welding speed, while the lack-of-penetration defect greatly reduced the tensile strength. The tensile fracture path was significantly influenced by the position and orientation of lack-of-penetration defect.

  1. Microstructural evolution characterization of friction stirring welded AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hua; LIN Sanbao; WU Lin; FENG Jicai

    2004-01-01

    A friction stirring welding to joint 5 mm rolled AZ31 magnesium had been developed. The microstructures in various regions including the weld nugget, thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) were investigated and compared with unaffected parent metal using optical microscopy. The results showed that the heat and mechanical process had great effect on the microstructure evolution. In weld nugget, the heat was enough to produce sufficient superplastic material flow and the mechanical effect was greatest, and the dynamic recrystallization was completed thoroughly. In TMAZ, the mechanical effect was indirectly affected by the welding tool and only some grains had undergone dynamic recrystallization. The various regions were studied in detail to better understand the microstructural evolution during friction stirring welding (FSW). The cross section near the "key hole" showed clear onion rings because the material was stirred only by the rotation of the probe and materials rotated with the probe and did not move along welding direction and in vertical direction, there was no material flow and the flow movement can be regarded as two dimensional layer flow.

  2. Plastic flow pattern and its effect in friction stir welding of A2024 and A1060

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xi-jing; ZHANG Zhong-ke; LI Jing; DA Chao-bing

    2006-01-01

    During the friction stir welding (FSW), the property of the welding joint is highly affected by the plastic and viscous flow behavior of the softened material. The flow pattern of the welded material was examined through observing the microstructural distribution of friction stir welded joints between dissimilar 2024 and 1060 aluminum alloy. The experimental results show that the flow patterns of material at different locations in the weld are different and can be divided into four layers along the thickness direction: surface flow layer influenced by the shoulder of the tool, in which the material tends to flow as integrity; horizontal flow layer influenced by the surface flow layer, in which the material of surface flow layer enters and flows forwards under the advancing force of the tool; vertical flow layer (plastic flow area induced by stirring of the pin), in which the flow pattern is complex and onion rings can often be observed; unstirred bottom layer because of the length of the pin being shorter than the thickness of the plates. The effect of plastic flow on welding quality was further investigated. The study suggests that welding quantity is significantly influenced by the flow pattern and defects always appear in horizontally lamellar flow region because of the complex flow pattern.

  3. A Preliminary Report on the Strength and Metallography of a Bimetallic Friction Stir Weld Joint Between AA6061 and MIL-DTL-46100E High Hardness Steel Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    bimetallic friction stir weld joint between AA6061 and MIL-DTL-46100E High Hardness steel armor. ABSTRACT One half inch thick plates of 6061-T6 aluminum...alloy and High Hardness steel armor (MIL- STD-46100) were successfully joined by the friction stir welding (FSW) process using a tungsten-rhenium...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A preliminary report on the strength and metallography of a bimetallic friction stir weld joint between AA6061 and MIL-DTL

  4. Microstructural characteristics and effects of TC4 titanium alloy processed by using friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo LI

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding technique is used for the processing of TC4 titanium alloy under protective atmosphere, and it results with good formability. The research focues on the evolution mechanisms of α+β dual phase microstructure in stirred zone and the effects of processing parameters on structures hardness. The results show that with optimized technological parameters, stir zone structure experiences the α/β transformation, and finally changes to the α+β duplex structure which is based on the β phase. After mixing head leaves and the structure cools, the precipitated lamellar α phase is among and/or within-regions. Grain refining of α+β dual phase is obvious. The shortened α/β lamellar spacing distance may improve the strengthening effect of the α+β duplex phase and enhance the hardness of the stir zone. The increasing of the tool rotation speed could coarsen β-regions, while the increasing of the travel speed could help reduce the α phase ratio and generate needle-type Martensites.

  5. Optimum condition by mechanical characteristic evaluation in friction stir welding for 5083-O Al alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min-Su HAN; Seung-Jun LEE; Jae-Cheul PARK; Seok-Cheol KO; Yong-Bin WOO; Seong-Jong KIM

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical characteristics for friction stir welding (FSW) of 5083-O Al alloy were evaluated. The results show that in FSW at 800 r/min and 124 mm/min, a weld defect is observed at the start point. However, the button shape at the end point is good and the stir zone has a soft appearance. At 267 mm/min, a void occurs at the button. A slight weld defect and rough stir zone are seen both at the start and end points at 342 mm/min. Moreover, at the bottom, a tunnel-type void is observed from an early stage to the end point, and at 1 800 r/min, a weld defect can be found from an early stage to the end point. These defects are rough with imperfect joining due to excessive rotation speed and high physical force. Weld fractures relative to rotational and travel speeds are observed at the stir zone. The optimum FSW conditions are a welding speed of 124 mm/min and a rotational speed of 800 r/min.

  6. Material Flow and Oxide Particle Distributions in Friction-Stir Welded F/M-ODS Sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Noh, Sanghoon; Jin, Hyun Ju; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    It is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion in ODS(Oxide dispersion strengthened) steel. However, these advantages will disappear while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. There is only limited literature available on the joining of ODS steels. Friction stir welding (FSW) is considered to be the best welding technique for welding ODS steels as the technique helps in retaining the homogeneous nano-oxide particles distributions in matrix. FSW is a solid.state, hot.shear joining process in which a rotating tool with a shoulder and terminating in a threaded pin, moves along the butting surfaces of two rigidly clamped plates placed on a backing plate. Heat generated by friction at the shoulder and to a lesser extent at the pin surface, softens the material being welded. Severe plastic deformation and flow of this plasticised metal occurs as the tool is translated along the welding direction. Material is transported from the front of the tool to the trailing edge where it is forged into a joint. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels. This study found that, during FSW, the forward movement of the tool pin results in loose contact between the tool pin and the receding material on the advancing side.

  7. Friction stir spot welding of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy with SiC nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paidar, Moslem; Sarab, Mahsa Laali [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy with 1.6 mm thickness was investigated. The effects of the silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles on the metallurgical and mechanical properties were discussed. The effects of particles on tension shear and wear tests were also investigated. The process was conducted at a constant rotational speed of 1000 rpm. Results showed that adding SiC nanoparticles to the weld during FSSW had a major effect on the mechanical properties. In fact, the addition of nanoparticles as barriers prevented grain growth in the Stir zone (SZ). The data obtained in the tensile-shear and wear tests showed that tensile-shear load and wear resistance increased with the addition of SiC nanoparticles, which was attributed to the fine grain size produced in the SZ.

  8. Natural Aging Behavior Of Friction Stir Welded Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalemba I.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The long term natural aging behavior of friction stir welded aluminum 7136-T76 and 7042 T6 extrusions was investigated. The microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties in the as-welded and six years naturally aged conditions were studied and correlated to a coupled thermal/material flow model of the joining process. Hardness profiles for the 7136 alloy taken along the mid-plane thickness of the workpiece displayed the characteristic W-shape. With natural aging, hardness recovery occurred on both sides of the weld, but the position of the hardness minima, particularly on the advancing side, shifted away from the weld centerline. The hardness profile for the 7042 alloy displayed U-shape in the as-welded condition and W-shape after natural aging. The hardness behavior upon natural aging correlated to the temperature profile developed during welding and the degree to which phase dissolution occurred in the regions adjacent to the stir zone.

  9. Control of Structure in Conventional Friction Stir Welds through a Kinematic Theory of Metal Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubisoff, H.A.; Schneider, J.A.; Nunes, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating pin is translated along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. Metal is prevented from flowing up the pin, which would result in plowing/cutting instead of welding, by a shoulder on the pin. In conventional FSW, the weld metal rests on an "anvil", which supports the heavy "plunge" load on the tool. In this study, both embedded tungsten wires along and copper plating on the faying surfaces were used to trace the flow of AA2219 weld metal around the C-FSW tool. The effect of tool rotational speed, travel speed, plunge load, and pin thread pitch on the resulting weld metal flow was evaluated. Plan, longitudinal, and transverse section x-ray radiographs were examined to trace the metal flow paths. The results are interpreted in terms of a kinematic theory of metal flow in FSW.

  10. Microstructural evolution of as-rolled modified 9Cr-1Mo steel during friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung-Gu; Lee, Min-Ku; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Nuclear Materials Development Div.; Kim, Ju-Myoung [Nano Technology Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). R and D Center

    2013-09-15

    Friction stir welding was tried on a modified 9Cr-1Mo (wt.%) ferritic steel in an as-rolled condition. The microstructure of the resultant weld was divided into four distinct regions according to each thermo-mechanical history experienced during welding; i.e., stir zone, thermo-mechanically affected zone, inner heat-affected zone, and outer heat-affected zone. The first three zones showed distinct martensite morphologies depending on the different recrystallization phenomena during the heating cycle in the single-phase austenite region. In the outer heat-affected zone, however, only tempering occurred without phase transformation owing to a relatively low heating temperature. Hardness distribution of the weld closely reflected such microstructural differences, indicating that a considerable softening occurred in the thermo-mechanically affected zone and outer heat-affected zone owing to the coarsening and tempering effects, respectively. (orig.)

  11. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welds of 11Cr-Ferritic/Martensitic Steel to 316 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yutaka S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Hiromichi T.; Yano, Yasuhide; Sekio, Yoshihiro

    2015-12-01

    Dissimilar joints between ferritic and austenitic steels are of interest for selected applications in next generation fast reactors. In this study, dissimilar friction-stir welding of an 11 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic steel to a 316 austenitic stainless steel was attempted and the mechanical properties and microstructure of the resulting welds were examined. Friction-stir welding produces a stir zone without macroscopic weld-defects, but the two dissimilar steels are not intermixed. The two dissimilar steels are interleaved along a sharp zigzagging interface in the stir zone. During small-sized tensile testing of the stir zone, this sharp interface did not act as a fracture site. Furthermore, the microstructure of the stir zone was refined in both the ferritic/martensitic steel and the 316 stainless steel resulting in improved mechanical properties over the adjacent base material regions. This study demonstrates that friction-stir welding can produce welds between dissimilar steels that contain no macroscopic weld-defects and display suitable mechanical properties.

  12. Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafarzadegan, M. [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China); Feng, A.H. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China); Abdollah-zadeh, A., E-mail: zadeh@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saeid, T. [Advanced Materials Research Center, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box: 51335-1996, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shen, J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China); Assadi, H. [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

  13. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Lap Welded Aluminum Alloy AA2014

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Babu; G.D. Janaki Ram; P.V. Venkitakrishnan; G. Madhusudhan Reddy; K. Prasad Rao

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir lap welds were produced in 3 mm thick Alclad sheets of Al alloy 2014-T4 using two different tools (with triangular and threaded taper cylindrical pins). The effects of tool geometry on weld microstructure, lap-shear performance and failure mode were investigated. The pin profile was found to significantly influence the hook geometry, which in turn strongly influenced the joint strength and the failure mode. Welds produced in alloy 2014-T4 Alclad sheets by using triangular and threaded taper cylindrical tools exhibited an average lap-shear failure load of 16.5 and 19.5 kN, respectively, while the average failure load for standard riveted joints was only 3.4 kN. Welds produced in alloy 2014-T6 Alclad sheets and in alloy 2014-T4 bare sheets (i.e., no Alclad) were comparatively evaluated with those produced in alloy 2014-T4 Alclad sheets. While the welds made (with threaded taper cylindrical tool) in T6 and T4 conditions showed very similar lap-shear failure loads, the joint efficiency of the welds made in T6 condition (43%) was considerably lower (because of the higher base material strength) than those made in T4 condition (51%). The Alclad layers were found to present no special problems in friction stir lap welding. Welds made with triangular tool in alloy 2014-T4 Alclad and bare sheets showed very similar lap-shear failure loads. The present work provides some useful insights into the use of friction stir welding for joining Al alloys in lap configuration.

  14. An investigation into friction stir welding of copper niobium nanolamellar composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Josef Benjamin

    The workpiece materials used in this study are CuNb nano-layered composites (NLC) which are produced in bulk form by accumulative roll bonding (ARB). CuNb NLC panels are of interest because of their increase in strength and radiation damage tolerance when compared to either of their bulk constituents. These increased properties stem from the bi-metal interface, and the nanometer length-scale of the layers. However to be commercially viable, methods to successfully join the ARB NLC which retain the layered structure panels are needed. Friction stir welding is investigated in this study as a possible joining method that can join the material while maintaining its layered structure and hence its properties. Mechanical properties of the weld were measured at a macro level using tensile testing, and at a local level via nano-indentation. The post weld layer structure was analyzed to provide insight into the flow paths. The grain orientation of the resulting weld nugget was also analyzed using electron backscatter diffraction and transmission Kikuchi diffraction. Results from this study show that the nano-layered structure can be maintained in the CuNb NLC by control of the friction stir welding parameters. The resulting microstructure is dependent on the strain experienced during the joining process. A variation in layer thickness reduction is correlated with increasing shear strain. Above a critical level of shear strain, the NLC microstructure was observed to fragment into equiaxed grains with a higher hardness than the NLC panels. Results from this study are also used to further the understanding of the material flow and hot working conditions experienced during the friction stir welding process.

  15. Structure-property relationships of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinones, Rogie Irwin Rodriguez

    In this work, the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of dissimilar friction stir welded AA6061-to-AA7050 aluminum alloys were evaluated. Experimental results from this study revealed that static strength increased with the tool rotational speed and was correlated with the material intermixing. Fully-reversed low cycle fatigue experimental results showed an increase in the strain hardening properties as well as the number of cycles-to-failure as the tool rotational speed was increased. Furthermore, under both static and cyclic loading, fracture of the joint was dominated by the AA6061 alloy side of the weld. In addition, inspection of the fatigue surfaces revealed that cracks initiated from intermetallic particles located near the surface. In order to determine the corrosion resistance of the dissimilar joint, corrosion defects were produced on the crown surface of the weld by static immersion in 3.5% NaCl for various exposure times. Results revealed localized corrosion damage in the thermo-mechanically affected and heat affected zones. Results demonstrated a decrease in the fatigue life, with evidence of crack initiation at the corrosion defects; however, the fatigue life was nearly independent of the exposure time. This can be attributed to total fatigue life dominated by incubation time. Furthermore, two types of failure were observed: fatigue crack initiation in the AA6061 side at high strain amplitudes (>0.3%); and fatigue crack initiation in the AA7050 side at low strain amplitudes (friction stir welded joints in order to capture the crack initiation and propagation in as-welded and pre-corroded conditions. Good correlation between experimental fatigue results and the model was achieved based on the variation in the initial defect size, microstructure, and mechanical properties of the dissimilar friction stir welded AA6061-to-AA7050 aluminum alloys.

  16. Robust Optimization of Thermal Aspects of Friction Stir Welding Using Manifold Mapping Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Lahaye, Domenico; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher;

    2008-01-01

    and use the manifold mapping technique to solve the optimization problems using a fast analytical coarse and an expensive accurate fine model. The statistics of the response are calculated using Taylor expansions and are compared to Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the use of manifold......The aim of this paper is to optimize a friction stir welding process taking robustness into account. The optimization problems are formulated with the goal of obtaining desired mean responses while reducing the variance of the response. We restrict ourselves to a thermal model of the process...

  17. Influence of Friction Stir Welding on Corrosion Properties of Aw-7020M Alloy in Sea Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudzik K.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW, provides an alternative to MIG and TIG welding methods for joining aluminium alloys. The article presents the results of electrochemical corrosion resistance test of alloy AW- 7020M and its joints welded by FSW. The study was performed using the method of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. Impedance spectroscopy studies showed that both, the FSW welded joint and base material AW-7020M has a good resistance to electrochemical corrosion in sea water environment, wherein the welded joint has a higher susceptibility to this type of corrosion. Research has indicated the desirability of applying the FSW method for joining AW-7020M alloy in shipbuilding industry.

  18. Friction Stir Welding: Standards and Specifications in Today's U.S. Manufacturing and Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    New welding and technology advancements are reflected in the friction stir welding (FSW) specifications used in the manufacturing sector. A lack of publicly available specifications as one of the reasons that the FSW process has not propagate through the manufacturing sectors. FSW specifications are an integral supporting document to the legal agreement written between two entities for deliverable items. Understanding the process and supporting specifications is essential for a successful FSW manufacturing operation. This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of current FSW standards in the industry and discusses elements common to weld specifications.

  19. Microstructure evolution in hot rolled 7075 Al via friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mei Ling; Tan, Ming Jen; Liu, Feng Chao; Song, Xu; Chua, Beng Wah

    2016-10-01

    Friction stir processed (FSP) hot rolled 7075 Al alloy with grain size of 5.2 μm was investigated in the temperature range 350 °C-500 °C and strain rates from 3x10-4 to 10-1 s-1. Maximum superplastic elongation of 776.4 % was achieved at 500 °C and strain rate 10-3 s-1. The microstructure evolution of FSP 7075 Al during superplastic deformation was studied by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Further analyses of superplastic results indicated the main deformation mechanism of FSP 7075 Al was grain boundary sliding (GBS).

  20. Multi-Response Optimization of Friction-Stir-Welded AA1100 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajakumar, S.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2012-06-01

    AA1100 aluminum alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures. Friction stir welding process (FSW) is an emerging solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded does not melt and recast. The process and tool parameters of FSW play a major role in deciding the joint characteristics. In this research, the relationships between the FSW parameters (rotational speed, welding speed, axial force, shoulder diameter, pin diameter, and tool hardness) and the responses (tensile strength, hardness, and corrosion rate) were established. The optimal welding conditions to maximize the tensile strength and minimize the corrosion rate were identified for AA1100 aluminum alloy and reported here.

  1. Focused Acoustic Beam Evaluation of Aluminum — Lithium Friction Stir Weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, Shamachary; Jata, Kumar V.; Martin, Richard W.; Reibel, Richard

    2007-03-01

    Local elastic variations were measured across a friction stir welded zone in Al-Li alloy with the use of a focused acoustic beam. The near surface microstructure was investigated by measuring both the amplitude and the local velocity of the Rayleigh Surface Waves (RSW). Both the amplitude and velocity of the focused longitudinal acoustic waves propagating through the thickness of the sample has been used for examination of the variations in the localized bulk elastic properties. The variations observed across the weld zone are explained based on microstructure and residual stress variations.

  2. Optimization of the Process Parameters for Controlling Residual Stress and Distortion in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    , is investigated. The welding process is simulated in 2-dimensions with a sequentially coupled transient thermo-mechanical model using ANSYS. The numerical optimization problem is implemented in modeFRONTIER and solved using the Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA-II). An engineering-wise evaluation or ranking......In the present paper, numerical optimization of the process parameters, i.e. tool rotation speed and traverse speed, aiming minimization of the two conflicting objectives, i.e. the residual stresses and welding time, subjected to process-specific thermal constraints in friction stir welding...

  3. Texture Analyses of Ti/Al2O3 Nanocomposite Produced Using Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei-Zarghani, Aziz; Kashani-Bozorg, Seyed Farshid; Gerlich, Adrian P.

    2016-11-01

    The texture evolution of Ti/Al2O3 nanocomposite fabricated using friction stir processing (FSP) was investigated at both macroscopic and microscopic levels employing X-ray diffraction and electron backscattering diffraction techniques. The developed textures were compared with ideal shear textures of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure, revealing that the fabricated nanocomposite is dominated by the P 1 hcp (fiber { 10bar{1}1} continuous dynamic recrystallization as well as increasing the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries within the developed microstructure.

  4. Thermal Modeling of Al-Al and Al-Steel Friction Stir Spot Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrasiak, P.; Shercliff, H. R.; Reilly, A.; McShane, G. J.; Chen, Y. C.; Wang, L.; Robson, J.; Prangnell, P.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a finite element thermal model for similar and dissimilar alloy friction stir spot welding (FSSW). The model is calibrated and validated using instrumented lap joints in Al-Al and Al-Fe automotive sheet alloys. The model successfully predicts the thermal histories for a range of process conditions. The resulting temperature histories are used to predict the growth of intermetallic phases at the interface in Al-Fe welds. Temperature predictions were used to study the evolution of hardness of a precipitation-hardened aluminum alloy during post-weld aging after FSSW.

  5. Parametric study of friction stir spot welding of aluminium alloy 5754

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Klobčar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a parametric analysis of friction stir spot welding (FSSW of aluminium alloy 5754 in a lap joint. Experimental plan was done according to the response surface methodology (RSM, where tool rotation speed varied between 988 and 3511 rpm, plunge rate between 24,4 and 150 mm/min and dwell time between 1 and 3,5s. The plunge depth was held constant at 0,4 mm. The welds were tensile-shear tested and the microstructure was analysed. Mathematical models describing the relationship between welding parameters and spot strength, axial force and rotational moment were developed and the optimal FSSW parameters were found.

  6. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Complex Curvature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Randy J.; Martin, W.; Schneider, J.; Hartley, P. J.; Russell, Carolyn; Lawless, Kirby; Jones, Chip

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph representation provides an overview of sucessful research conducted by Lockheed Martin and NASA to develop an advanced self-reacting friction stir technology for complex curvature aluminum alloys. The research included weld process development for 0.320 inch Al 2219, sucessful transfer from the 'lab' scale to the production scale tool and weld quality exceeding strenght goals. This process will enable development and implementation of large scale complex geometry hardware fabrication. Topics covered include: weld process development, weld process transfer, and intermediate hardware fabrication.

  7. Microscopic analysis of the morphology of seams in friction stir welded polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Kiss

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Supermolecular structure of welded seams prepared by friction stir welding (FSW of polypropylene sheets has been studied by optical and electron microscopy. It has been shown that in the central parts of the seam spherulitic structures similar to that of the base material are formed, while at the borderline of the seam, a complex supermolecular structure could be identified. Lower welding rotation speed resulted in a border transition zone of more complex feature than the higher rotation speed during FSW. This was accompanied by reduced joint efficiency.

  8. Microstructural evolution during friction stir welding of AlSi1MgMn alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Janjić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the research of the infl uence of geometric and kinematic parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of welded joint of aluminum alloy AlSi1MgMn (6082-T6 obtained through the Friction Stir Welding (FSW process. The experiment parameters were welding speed, rotation speed, angle of pin slope, pin diameter and shoulder diameter. On the obtained welded workpieces the dynamic testing on the impact toughness, and determination of microstructural zones were carried out.

  9. Radiographic detection of defects in friction stir welding on aluminum alloy AMg5M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasov, Sergei Yu., E-mail: tsy@ispms.ru; Kolubaev, Evgeny A., E-mail: eak@ispms.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050, Russia and Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Rubtsov, Valery E., E-mail: rvy@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    In order to reveal weld defects specific to friction stir welding we undertook radiographic inspection of AMg5M aluminum alloy welded joints. Weld defects in the form of voids have been revealed in the weld obtained under the non-optimal rotation and feed rate. Both shape and size of these defects have been confirmed by examining metallographically successive sections prepared in the weld plane as well as in the plane transversal to the tool feed direction. Linear defects have been also found in the sections that are not seen in the radiographic images. Both the preferable localization and origination of the defects have been analyzed.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Friction Stir Welding Process by Using Rate-dependent Constitutive Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwu ZHANG; Zhao ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    Rate-dependent constitutive model was used to simulate the friction stir welding process. The effect of the viscosity coefficient and the process parameters on the material behaviors and the stress distributions around the pin were studied. Results indicate that the stress in front of the pin is larger than that behind the pin. The difference between the radial/circumferential stress in front of the pin and that behind it becomes smaller when the material gets closer to the top surface. This difference increases with increasing the viscosity coefficient and becomes smaller when the welding speed decreases. The variation of the angular velocity does not significantly affect the difference.

  11. Influence of Processing Parameters on the Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J. A.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid phase welding process that unites thermal and mechanical aspects to produce a high quality joint. The process variables are rpm, translational weld speed, and downward plunge force. The strain-temperature history of a metal element at each point on the cross-section of the weld is determined by the individual flow path taken by the particular filament of metal flowing around the tool as influenced by the process variables. The resulting properties of the weld are determined by the strain-temperature history. Thus to control FSW properties, improved understanding of the processing parameters on the metal flow path is necessary.

  12. Dissimilar Joining of ODS and F/M Steel Tube by Friction Stir Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Jun Hwan; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Oxide Dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels, it is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion, however, those advantages will be disappeared while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for welding traditionally difficult to weld materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. Friction stir processing (FSP) is a method of changing the properties of a metal through intense, localized plastic deformation. FSW is the precursor of the FSP technique. When ideally implemented, this process mixes the material without changing the phase and creates a microstructure with fine, equiaxed grains. This homogeneous grain structure, separated by high-angle boundaries, allows some alloys to take on superplastic properties. In this study, FSW is used as a substitutive welding process between FMS tube and ODS parts. The dimension of tube is 7.0 OD, 0.5 T. During the FSW, dynamic-recrystallized grains are developed; the uniform oxides Dispersion is preserved in the metal matrix. The microstructure and microtexture of the material near the stir zone is found to be influenced by the rotational behavior of the tool. The additive effect from FSP on sample surface is considered. Since the mechanical alloying (MA) and FSP commonly apply extreme shear deformation on materials, the Dispersion of oxide particle in ODS steels is very active during both processes. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels in the form of sheet and tube. FSW could successfully produce defect-free welds on FMS tubes and ODS ring assembly. FSW produces a fine grain structure consisting of ferrite and

  13. Comparison of friction stir welding heat transfer analysis methods and parametric study on unspecified input variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Wook; Jang, Beom Seon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A three-dimensional numerical model was constructed to analyze the heat transfer of friction stir welding using Fluent and ANSYS multi-physics. The analysis result was used to calculate welding deformation and residual stress. Before the numerical simulation, several simplifying assumptions were applied to the model. Three different methods of heat transfer analysis were employed, and several assumptions were applied to each heat source model. In this work, several parametric studies were performed for certain unspecified variables. The calculated temperature data were compared with experimental data from relevant studies. Additionally, the advantages and disadvantages of the three heat transfer analysis methods were compared.

  14. Analysing the strength of friction stir spot welded joints of aluminium alloy by fuzzy logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaira Vignesh, R.; Padmanaban, R.; Arivarasu, M.; Karthick, K. P.; Abirama Sundar, A.; Gokulachandran, J.

    2016-09-01

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is a recent joining technique developed for spot welding of thin metal sheets. This process currently finds application in automotive, aerospace, marine and sheet metal industry. In this work, the effect of FSSW process parameters namely tool rotation speed, shoulder diameter and dwell time on Tensile shear failure load (TSFL) is investigated. Box-Behnken design is selected for conducting experiments. Fuzzy based soft computing is used to develop a model for TSFL of AA6061 joints fabricated by FSSW. The interaction of the process parameters on TSFL is also presented.

  15. Microstructure and optical appearance of anodized friction stir processed Al - Metal oxide surface composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jensen, Flemming; Bordo, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-pass friction stir processing (FSP) was employed to impregnate Ti, Y and Ce oxide powders into the surface of an Aluminium alloy. The FSP processed surface composite was subsequently anodized with an aim to develop optical effects in the anodized layer owing to the presence of incorporated...... oxide particles which will influence the scattering of light. This paper presents the investigations on relation between microstructure of the FSP zone and optical appearance of the anodized layer due to incorporation of metal oxide particles and modification of the oxide particles due to the anodizing...

  16. Initial Development in Joining of ODS Alloys Using Friction Stir Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2007-08-01

    Solid-state welding of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy MA956 sheets using friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated. Butt weld was successfully produced. The weld and base metals were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, and energy dispersion x-ray spectrum. Microhardness mapping was also conducted over the weld region. Analyses indicate that the distribution of the strengthening oxides was preserved in the weld. Decrease in microhardness of the weld was observed but was insignificant. The preliminary results seem to confirm the envisioned feasibility of FSW application to ODS alloy joining. For application to Gen IV nuclear reactor heat exchanger, further investigation is suggested.

  17. Corrosion behavior of Al6061 alloy weldment produced by friction stir welding process

    OpenAIRE

    Farhad Gharavi; Khamirul Amin Matori; Robiah Yunus; Norinsan Kamil Othman; Firouz Fadaeifard

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the corrosion behavior of welded lap joints of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy produced by friction stir welding process has been investigated. Corrosion properties of welded lap joints were studied by cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. All tests were performed in an aerated 0.6 mol L−1 NaCl aqueous solution with pH = 6.5 at a temperature of 30 °C to characterize corrosion morphology and realize corrosion features of weld regions as opposed to the par...

  18. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  19. Effect of weld line shape on material flow during friction stir welding of aluminum and steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Toshiaki; Ando, Naoyuki; Morinaka, Shinpei; Mizushima, Hiroki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    The effect of weld line shape on material flow during the friction stir welding of aluminum and steel was investigated. The material flow velocity was evaluated with simulated experiments using plasticine as the simulant material. The validity of the simulated experiments was verified by the marker material experiments on aluminum. The circumferential velocity of material around the probe increased with the depth from the weld surface. The effect is significant in cases where the advancing side is located on the outside of curve and those with higher curvature. Thus, there is an influence of weld line shape on material flow.

  20. Influence of Stored Strain on Fabricating of Al/SiC Nanocomposite by Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorrami, M. Sarkari; Kazeminezhad, M.; Kokabi, A. H.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, 1050 aluminum (Al) sheets were annealed and severely deformed by 1, 2, and 3 passes of constrained groove pressing process to obtain the various initial stored strain values of 0, 1.16, 2.32, and 3.48, respectively. Friction stir processing (FSP) was then applied using SiC nanoparticles to fabricate Al/SiC nanocomposite with approximately 1.5 vol pct reinforced particles. Microstructural examinations revealed that an increase in the initial stored strain of the base metal led to the formation of finer grain structure after 1 pass of FSP. The finer grain structure occurred in the stir zone where a sufficient amount of nanoparticles with a relatively proper distribution existed. However, the initial stored strain value had a contrary influence in the regions with low volume fraction of nanoparticles. In fact, more stored strain in the base metal provided more driving force for both nucleation and grain growth of newly recrystallized grains at the stir zone. Pinning effect of well-distributed nanoparticles could effectively retard grain growth leading to the formation of very fine grain structure. Also it was observed that the initial stored strain values did not have impressive rule in the microstructural evolutions at the stir zone during the second and third FSP passes signifying that all of the stored energy in the base metal would be released after 1 pass of FSP. The results obtained with microhardness measurement at the stir zone were fairly in agreement with those achieved by the microstructure assessments.

  1. Application of Taguchi approach to optimize friction stir welding parameters of polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bejaoui S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental and numerical results of butt friction stir welding of high density polyethylene. The FSW designed tool insulates the welded samples and preserves the heat gained from friction thus avoiding the appearance of blisters and splits after welding. The experimental tests, conducted according to combinations of process factors such as rotation speed, welding speed, pin diameter and hold time at beginning welding, were carried out according the Taguchi orthogonal table L27 in randomized way. Temperatures in the joint during the welding operation and flow stresses from the tensile tests of welded samples were measured and variances were analyzed. Identified models were used to simulate, by finite elements, the tensile tests performed on specimens having a weld cordon in their active area. The results show coherence between the numerical predictions and experimental observations in different cases of weld cordon mechanical behaviour.

  2. Reduction of Defects in Al-6061 Friction Stir Welding and Verified by Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaravel, D.; Bupesh Raja, V. K., Dr; Potnuru, Chakravarthy; Polina, Navakanth

    2017-05-01

    Friction Stir Welding is a new innovating process of joining of two work pieces. It is an relatively a new joining process and highly useful in welding method, which can produce high strength weld without using any toxic materials like electrodes. In this method, weld is obtained by frictional produced between shoulder and work piece [1, 2]. Main parameters which are to be considered for FSW are spindle speed and feed rate. By providing suitable parameter during welding defects will not be occurring. Also, FSW is an eco-friendly process because there is no fumes production and no filler material. To get high quality of weld, then high heat should be generated. In this paper, Al-6061 material is welded by H-13 tool with different parameters and quality of weld is examined by using a non destructive testing method called Radiography.

  3. Improvement the wear behavior of low carbon steels by friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekban, D. M.; Aktarer, S. M.; Yanar, H.; Alsaran, A.; Purcek, G.

    2017-02-01

    A low carbon structural steel was surface-hardened by friction stir processing (FSP) through 4 mm thickness from the surface. The hardness of the alloy increased from 140 Hv0.1 to about 240 Hv0.1 after single-pass FSP. This improvement came from the substantial microstructural refinement due to both severe plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization. Both yield and tensile strength of the alloy increased without a considerable decrease in ductility after FSP. Friction and wear behavior of the alloy before and after FSP was investigated by a pin-on-disk type tribometer according to ASTM-G133. The substantial increase in both hardness and yield strength resulted in a considerable improvement in wear resistance of the alloy depending on applied pressure. In this study, metallurgical and mechanical reasons for such improvement in wear behavior and any change in wear mechanisms after FSP were investigated.

  4. Application of Taguchi approach to optimize friction stir welding parameters of polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezgui, M. A.; Ayadi, M.; Cherouat, A.; Hamrouni, K.; Zghal, A.; Bejaoui, S.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents experimental and numerical results of butt friction stir welding of high density polyethylene. The FSW designed tool insulates the welded samples and preserves the heat gained from friction thus avoiding the appearance of blisters and splits after welding. The experimental tests, conducted according to combinations of process factors such as rotation speed, welding speed, pin diameter and hold time at beginning welding, were carried out according the Taguchi orthogonal table L27 in randomized way. Temperatures in the joint during the welding operation and flow stresses from the tensile tests of welded samples were measured and variances were analyzed. Identified models were used to simulate, by finite elements, the tensile tests performed on specimens having a weld cordon in their active area. The results show coherence between the numerical predictions and experimental observations in different cases of weld cordon mechanical behaviour.

  5. Modelling thermomechanical conditions at the tool/matrix interface in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich; Hattel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    In friction stir welding the material flow is among others controlled by the contact condition at the tool interface, the thermomechanical state of the matrix and the welding parameters. The conditions under which the deposition process is successful are not fully understood and in most models...... presented previously in literature, the modelling of the material flow at the tool interface has been prescribed as boundary conditions, i.e. the material is forced to keep contact with the tool. The objective of the present work is to analyse the thermomechanical conditions under which a consolidated weld...... frictional and plastic dissipation. Of special interest is the contact condition along the shoulder/matrix and probe/matrix interfaces, as especially the latter affects the efficiency of the deposition process. The thermo-mechanical state in the workpiece is established by modelling both the dwell and weld...

  6. Numerical simulation of friction stir spot welding process for aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongun; Badarinarayan, Harsha; Ryu, Ill; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Chongmin; Okamoto, Kazutaka; Wagoner, R. H.; Chung, Kwansoo

    2010-04-01

    Thermo-mechanical simulations of the Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) processes were performed for AA5083-H18 and AA6022-T4, utilizing commercial Finite Element Method (FEM) and Finite Volume Method (FVM) codes, which are based on Lagrangian and Eulerian formulations, respectively. The Lagrangian explicit dynamic FEM code, PAM-CRASH, and the Eulerian Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) FVM code, STAR-CD, were utilized to understand the effect of pin geometry on weld strength and material flow under the unsteady state condition. Using FVM code, material flow patterns near the tool boundary were analyzed to explain weld strength difference between welds by a cylindrical pin and welds by a triangular pin, whereas the frictional energy concept using the FEM code had a limited capacity to explain the weld strength difference.

  7. Effect of process control mode on weld quality of friction stir welded plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Sorour, Sherif; Alian, Ahmed R. [Faculty of Engineering, The British University in Egypt, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-01-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process which requires no filler material where the heat input is generated by frictional energy between the tool and workpiece. The objective of the present work is to conduct a fully coupled thermomechanical finite element analysis based on Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation for both 'Force-Controlled' and 'Displacement-Controlled' FSW process to provide more detailed insight of their effect on the resulting joint quality. The developed finite element models use Johnson- Cook material model and temperature dependent physical properties for the welded plates. Efforts on proper modeling of the underlying process physics are done focusing on the heat generation of the tool/workpiece interface to overcome the shortcomings of previous investigations. Finite elements results show that 'Force-Controlled' FSW process provides better joint quality especially at higher traveling speed of the tool which comes to an agreement with published experimental results.

  8. Modelling thermomechanical conditions at the tool/matrix interface in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich; Hattel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    In friction stir welding the material flow is among others controlled by the contact condition at the tool interface, the thermomechanical state of the matrix and the welding parameters. The conditions under which the deposition process is successful are not fully understood and in most models...... frictional and plastic dissipation. Of special interest is the contact condition along the shoulder/matrix and probe/matrix interfaces, as especially the latter affects the efficiency of the deposition process. The thermo-mechanical state in the workpiece is established by modelling both the dwell and weld...... presented previously in literature, the modelling of the material flow at the tool interface has been prescribed as boundary conditions, i.e. the material is forced to keep contact with the tool. The objective of the present work is to analyse the thermomechanical conditions under which a consolidated weld...

  9. Design of Friction Stir Spot Welding Tools by Using a Novel Thermal-Mechanical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Ming Su

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple thermal-mechanical model for friction stir spot welding (FSSW was developed to obtain similar weld performance for different weld tools. Use of the thermal-mechanical model and a combined approach enabled the design of weld tools for various sizes but similar qualities. Three weld tools for weld radii of 4, 5, and 6 mm were made to join 6061-T6 aluminum sheets. Performance evaluations of the three weld tools compared fracture behavior, microstructure, micro-hardness distribution, and welding temperature of welds in lap-shear specimens. For welds made by the three weld tools under identical processing conditions, failure loads were approximately proportional to tool size. Failure modes, microstructures, and micro-hardness distributions were similar. Welding temperatures correlated with frictional heat generation rate densities. Because the three weld tools sufficiently met all design objectives, the proposed approach is considered a simple and feasible guideline for preliminary tool design.

  10. Effect of viscosity on material behavior in friction stir welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-wu; ZHANG Zhao; BIE Jun; ZHOU Lei; CHEN Jin-tao

    2006-01-01

    Temperature-dependent elastic viscoplastic material model was used for the numerical simulation of the friction stir welding process. The non-elastic response of the rate-dependent material in the large deformation problems was calculated by using the closest point algorithm. The numerical results show that the shape of the equivalent plastic strain looks like onion rings and the spacing of the rings is approximately equal to the forward movement of the tool in one rotation. The equivalent plastic strain is increased with the increase of viscosity coefficient due to the increase of friction stress in the pin-plate interface. The region which is influenced by the rotating tool is decreased with the decrease of viscosity coefficient. The radial and circumferential stresses in front of the pin are greater than the ones behind the pin. This difference can be reduced with the decrease of viscosity.

  11. Friction Stir Welding of SiC/Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    1999-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a new solid state process for joining metals by plasticizing and consolidating materials around the bond line using thermal energy producing from frictional forces. A feasibility study for FSW of Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) was investigated using aluminum 6092 alloy reinforced with 17% SiC particulates. FSW process consists of a special rotating pin tool that is positioned to plunge into the MMC surface at the bond line. As the tool rotates and move forward along the bond line, the material at the bond line is heated up and forced to flow around the rotating tip to consolidate on the tip's backside to form a solid state joint. FSW has the potential for producing sound welds with MMC because the processing temperature occurs well below the melting point of the metal matrix; thereby eliminating the reinforcement-to-matrix solidification defects, reducing the undesirable chemical reactions and porosity problems.

  12. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wei [ORNL; Chen, Gaoqiang [ORNL; Chen, Jian [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  13. The Effect of Tool Press Force to Weldability of AA5754 and AA6061 Alloys with Friction Stir Welding Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tevfik Küçükömeroğlu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study AA5754 and A6061 alloys have been butt welded to each other by using friction stir welding (FSW. At constant tool geometry and tool angle experiments were carried out, joints were performed using different welding speed, rotation speed and especially tool press force. The mechanical properties of the welded samples were determined by using tensile test, bending test and micro hardness. Generated microstructure and hardness profile was obtained in the welding zone. In this friction stir welding study the parameters which affect the joint structure are the tool press force, welding speed and tool rotation speed which were determined. At the end of study it is determined that AA5754 and AA6061 alloys can be successfully welded by using Friction Stir Welding method under different tool press forces at least 6kN.

  14. Friction Stir Welding Effect on Transverse Rigidity and Sound Transmission Characteristics of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Zhi; Hao Zhiyong; Ni Dingrui; Zheng Xu

    2015-01-01

    AZ31B magnesium alloy was subjected to friction stir welding withvarious welding parameters. The equivalent Young’s moduli of the friction stir welded samples and the base material were obtained by the three-point method, and their transverse rigidities were obtained as well. Furthermore, the sound transmission characteristics of those samples were experimentally studied by four-microphone impedance tube method. The experimental results indicate that the transverse rigidities of the friction stir welded samples were only 79%, 83% and 92% of thoseof the base material, respectively. The sound transmission losses of the processed samples were also lower, which was largely due to the reduction of transverse rigidities induced by the decrease of equivalent Young’s moduli.

  15. Mechanical Characteristics of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy 6061 T6 Formed by Arc and Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astarita, A.; Squillace, A.; Nele, L.

    2016-01-01

    Butt welds formed by arc welding in inert gas with nonconsumable electrode (tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding) and by friction stir welding (FSW) from aluminum alloy AA6061 T6 are studied. Comparative analysis of the structures and mechanical properties of the welded joints is performed using the results of optical and electron microscopy, tensile tests, tests for residual bending ductility, and measurements of microhardness. The changes in the microstructure in different zones and the degrees of degradation of the mechanical properties after the welding are determined. It is shown that the size of the tool for the friction stir welding affects the properties of the welds. Quantitative results showing the relation between the microscopic behavior of the alloy and the welding-induced changes in the microstructure are obtained. Friction stir welding is shown to provide higher properties of the welds.

  16. Microstructures and properties analysis of dissimilar metal joint in the friction stir welded copper to aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xijing; Zhang Zhongke; Da Chaobing; Li Jing

    2007-01-01

    This paper mainly concentrated on the feasibility of friction stir welding of dissimilar metal of aluminum alloy to copper (T2) and a preliminary analysis of welding parameters influencing on the microstructures and properties of joint was carried out. The results indicated that the thickness of workpiece played an important role in the welding parameters which could succeed in the friction stir welding of dissimilar metal of copper to aluminum alloy, and the parameters were proved to be a narrow choice. The interfacial region between copper and aluminum in the dissimilar joint was not uniformly mixed, constituted with part of incomplete mixing zone, complete mixing zone, dispersion zone and the most region's boundary was obvious. Meantime a kind banded structure with inhomogeneous width was formed. The intermetallic compounds generated during friction stir welding in the interfacial region were mainly Cu9Al4 , Al2Cu etc, and their hardness was higher than others.

  17. Influence of the microstructural changes and induced residual stresses on tensile properties of wrought magnesium alloy friction stir welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Commin, Loreleie, E-mail: lorelei.commin@kit.edu [LMPF, Arts et Metiers ParisTech, rue St Dominique, 51000 Chalons en Champagne (France); Dumont, Myriam [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, IM2NP (UMR 6242), Faculte St-Jerome, Case 261, Av. Escadrille Normandie-Niemen, 13 397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Rotinat, Rene; Pierron, Fabrice [LMPF, Arts et Metiers ParisTech, rue St Dominique, 51000 Chalons en Champagne (France); Masse, Jean-Eric; Barrallier, Laurent [MecaSurf, Arts et Metiers ParisTech, 2 cours des Arts et Metiers, 13100 Aix en Provence (France)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of AZ31 FSW mechanical behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early yielding occurs in the TMAZ, the nugget and base metal zones undergo almost no plastic strains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Texture gradient in the TMAZ localises the deformations in this area. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residual stresses have a major influence in FSW mechanical behaviour. - Abstract: Friction stir welding induces a microstructural evolution and residual stresses that will influence the resulting mechanical properties. Friction stir welds produced from magnesium alloy hot rolled plates were studied. Electron back scattered diffraction was used to determine the texture evolution, residual stresses were analysed using X ray diffraction and tensile tests coupled with speckle interferometry were performed. The residual stresses induced during friction stir welding present a major influence on the final mechanical properties.

  18. Microstructure and mechanical properties of hard zone in friction stir welded X80 pipeline steel relative to different heat input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, Hakan, E-mail: hakanay@uludag.edu.tr [Engineering and Architecture Faculty, Mechanical Engineering Department, Uludag University, 16059 Gorukle-Bursa (Turkey); Nelson, Tracy W. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Brigham Young University, 435 CTB, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties of the hard zone in friction stir welded X80 pipeline steel at different heat inputs. Microstructural analysis of the welds was carried out using optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and microhardness. Heat input during friction stir welding process had a significant influence on the microstructure and mechanical properties in the hard zone along the advancing side of the weld nugget. Based on the results, the linear relationships between heat input and post-weld microstructures and mechanical properties in the hard zone of friction stir welded X80 steels were established. It can be concluded that with decrease in heat input the bainitic structure in the hard zone becomes finer and so hard zone strength increases.

  19. A Transient Thermal Model for Friction Stir Weld. Part I: The Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. X.; Xiao, B. L.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2011-10-01

    Current analytical thermal models for friction stir welding (FSW) are mainly focused on the steady-state condition. To better understand the FSW process, we propose a transient thermal model for FSW, which considers all the periods of FSW. A temperature-dependent apparent friction coefficient solved by the inverse solution method (ISM) is used to estimate the heat generation rate. The physical reasonableness, self-consistency, and relative achievements of this model are discussed, and the relationships between the heat generation, friction coefficient, and temperature are established. The negative feedback mechanism and positive feedback mechanism are proposed for the first time and found to be the dominant factors in controlling the friction coefficient, heat generation, and in turn the temperature. Furthermore, the negative feedback mechanism is found to be the controller of the steady-state level of FSW. The validity of the proposed model is proved by applying it to FSW of the 6061-T651 and 6063-T5 aluminum alloys.

  20. Dissimilar Al/steel friction stir welding lap joints for automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, D.; Spena, P. Russo; Buffa, G.; Fratini, L.

    2016-10-01

    A widespread usage of aluminum alloys for the fabrication of car-body parts is conditional on the employment of appropriate welding methods, especially if dissimilar welding must be performed with automotive steel grades. Dissimilar welding of aluminum alloys and steel grades poses some issues concerning the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds, difference in physical and chemical properties of the parent metals, and poor wetting behavior of aluminum. Friction stir welding is considered to be a reasonable solution to obtain sound aluminum/steel joints. A study on the join quality of dissimilar lap joints of steel and aluminum alloy sheets after friction stir welding is proposed here. A low carbon steel is joined with AA6016 aluminum alloy to study preliminarily the feasibility to assembly car-body parts. The joints, welded with tool rotation and feed rate varying in a wide range, have been studied from a visual examination and microstructural point of view. Optical microscopy has been used to characterize the microstructure of the examined sheets in as-received and welded conditions. Micro-hardness measurements have been carried out to quantitatively analyze the local hardness of the welded joints. Set welding process parameters are identified to assemble without the presence of macroscopic defects the examined steel and aluminum welded parts.

  1. Numerical modeling of friction stir welding using the tools with polygonal pins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mehta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding using the tools with polygonal pins is often found to improve the mechanical strength of weld joint in comparison to the tools with circular pins. However, the impacts of pin profile on the peak temperature, tool torque and traverse force, and the resultant mechanical stresses experienced by the tool have been rarely reported in a systematic manner. An estimation of the rate of heat generation for the tools with polygonal pins is challenging due to their non-axisymmetric cross-section about the tool axis. A novel methodology is presented to analytically estimate the rate of heat generation for the tools with polygonal pins. A three-dimensional heat transfer analysis of friction stir welding is carried out using finite element method. The computed temperature field from the heat transfer model is used to estimate the torque, traverse force and the mechanical stresses experienced by regular triangular, square, pentagon and hexagon pins following the principles of solid mechanics. The computed results show that the peak temperature experienced by the tool pin increases with the number of pin sides. However, the resultant maximum shear stress experienced by the pin reduces from the triangular to hexagonal pins.

  2. Experimental Investigation on Friction Stir Welding of Cryorolled AA2219 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, K. Kamal; Panneerselvam, K.; Sathiya, P.; Haq, A. Noorul; Sundarrajan, S.; Mastanaiah, P.; Murthy, C. V. Srinivasa

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, experimental investigation on cryorolled aluminum AA2219-T87 plate by using friction stir welding (FSW) process is carried out. AA2219-T87 plates with a size of 200×100×22.4 mm were rolled and reduced to 12.2mm thickness (more than 45% of reduction in total thickness of the base material) at cryogenic temperature (operating temperature range -90--30∘C). The cryorolled (CR) plates have reduced grain size, improved hardness and increased corrosion resistance property compared with the uncryorolled AA2219-T87 plates. FSW joints of cryorolled AA2219-T87 plates were prepared using cylindrical threaded FSW tool pin profile. Mechanical and metallurgical behaviors of friction stir welded joints were analyzed and the effects of the FSW process parameters are discussed in this paper. The variation of microhardness in the FSW joint regions were correlated with the microstructure of FSW joints. Cryorolled plate and FSW joints were tested for corrosion resistance using potentiodynamic polarization test. FSW joints shows better result during the corrosion resistance analysis compared to base AA2219-T87. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) test results showed that fine α-Al grains with eutectic phase (Al2Cu) were present in the weld nugget (WN). The large clusters of strengthening precipitates were reduced in size and merged with the weld nugget portion.

  3. Processing Parameters Influence on Wear Resistance Behaviour of Friction Stir Processed Al-TiC Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. Akinlabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP being a novel process is employed for the improvement of the mechanical properties of a material and the production of surface layer composites. The vital role of the integrity of surface characteristics in the mechanical properties of materials has made the research studies into surface modification important in order to improve the performance in practical applications. This study investigates the effect of processing parameters on the wear resistance behavior of friction stir processed Al-TiC composites. This was achieved through microstructural characterization by using both the optical and scanning electron microscope (SEM, microhardness profiling, and tribological characterization by means of the wear. The microhardness profiling of the processed samples revealed an increased hardness value, which was a function of the TiC particles incorporated when compared to the parent material. The wear resistance property was also found to increase as a result of the TiC powder addition. The right combination of processing parameters was found to improve the wear resistance property of the composites produced.

  4. Optimization in Friction Stir Welding - With Emphasis on Thermo-mechanical Aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal

    This book deals with the challenging multidisciplinary task of combining variant thermal and thermo-mechanical simulations for the manufacturing process of friction stir welding (FSW) with numerical optimization techniques in the search for optimal process parameters. The FSW process is character......This book deals with the challenging multidisciplinary task of combining variant thermal and thermo-mechanical simulations for the manufacturing process of friction stir welding (FSW) with numerical optimization techniques in the search for optimal process parameters. The FSW process...... is characterized by multiphysics involving solid material flow, heat transfer, thermal softening, recrystallization and the formation of residual stresses. Initially, the thermal models were addressed since they in essence constitute the basis of all other models of FSW. Following this, several integrated thermo...... combined with classical single-objective and evolutionary multi-objective optimization algorithms (i.e. SQP and NSGA-II), to find the optimum process parameters (heat input, rotational and traverse welding speeds) that would result in favorable thermo-mechanical conditions for the process....

  5. Composite Aluminum-Copper Sheet Material by Friction Stir Welding and Cold Rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, S.; Osikowicz, W.

    2013-08-01

    An aluminum alloy and a pure copper material were butt-joined by friction stir welding and subsequently cold rolled. The cold-rolling operation proved to be very advantageous because small voids present after friction stir welding were closed, the interface area per material thickness was enlarged, a thin intermetallic layer was partitioned, and the joint was strengthened by strain hardening. Tensile test specimens fractured in the heat-affected zone in the aluminum material; tensile strengths of the joints exceeded the tensile strengths of the base materials and were as high as 335 MPa. During soft annealing of the composite material, a 6-8-μm-thick intermetallic layer was grown at the interface. Nevertheless, tensile fracture still occurred in the heat-affected zone of the aluminum material. Electrical resistivity of the joint was smaller than resistivity of the aluminum material. Production of such composite material would result in coiled sheet material that could be subjected to further treatments such as electroplating and forming operations in an efficient and economically viable manner. The new composite material is promising for emerging automotive and industrial electrical applications.

  6. Development of Inspection for Friction Stir Welds for Rocket Fuel Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Samuel S.

    2012-01-01

    During development of the Ares I weld processes nondestructive and destructive testing were used to identify and characterize defects that occurred. These defects were named and character noted. This catalogue of defects and characteristics was then used to develop inspection methods for Self Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR ]FSW) and Conventional Friction Stir Welds (C ]FSW). Dye penetrant, eddy current, x ]radiography, single element ultrasonic, and phased array ultrasonic (PAUT) inspection procedures were developed to target the expected defects. Once the method procedure was developed a comparison was performed to allow for selection of the best inspection method. Tests of the effectiveness of the inspection were performed on purposely fabricated flawed specimens and electrodischarge machined notches. The initial test results prompted a revisit of the PAUT procedure and a redesign of the inspection. Subsequent testing showed that a multi ]angle PAUT inspection resulted in better detection capability. A discussion of the most effective orientations of the PAUT transducer will be presented. Also, the implementation of the inspection on production hardware will be presented. In some cases the weld tool is used as the transducer manipulator and in some cases a portable scanner is used

  7. Improvement in cavitation erosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajian, M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollah-zadeh, A., E-mail: zadeh@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei-Nejad, S.S.; Assadi, H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadavi, S.M.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MA University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chung, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Engineering Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shokouhimehr, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Commercial AISI 316L plates with the initial grain size of 14.8 μm were friction stir processed (FSP) with different processing parameters, resulting in two fine-grained microstructures with the grain sizes of 4.6 and 1.7 μm. The cavitation erosion behavior, before and after FSP, was evaluated in terms of incubation time, cumulative mass loss and mean depth of erosion. A separate cavitation erosion test was performed on the transverse cross section of a FSP sample to reveal the effect of grain structure. It was observed that FSP samples, depending on their grain size, are at least 3–6 times more resistant than the base material against cavitation erosion. The improvement in cavitation erosion resistance is attributed to smaller grain structure, lower fraction of twin boundaries, and favorable crystallographic orientation of grains in FSP samples. The finer the grain size, the more cavitation erosion resistance was achieved. Moreover, the microstructures of eroded surfaces were studied using a scanning electron microscope equipped with EBSD, and an atomic force microscope. The mechanisms controlling the cavitation erosion damage in friction stir processed AISI 316L are also discussed.

  8. Effect of tool rotational speed and penetration depth on dissimilar aluminum alloys friction stir spot welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín M. Piccini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, the automotive industry is looking for the use of aluminum parts in replace of steel parts in order to reduce the vehicles weight. These parts have to be joined, for instance, by welding processes. The more common welding process in the automotive industry is the Resistance Spot Welding (RSW technique. However, RSW of aluminum alloys has many disadvantages. Regarding this situation, a variant of the Friction Stir Welding process called Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW has been developed, showing a strong impact in welding of aluminum alloys and dissimilar materials in thin sheets. Process parameters affect the characteristics of the welded joints. However, the information available on this topic is scarce, particularly for dissimilar joints and thin sheets. The aim of this work was to study the effect of the rotational speed and the tool penetration depth on the characteristics of dissimilar FSS welded joints. Defects free joints have been achieved with higher mechanical properties than the ones reported. The maximum fracture load was 5800 N. It was observed that the effective joint length of the welded spots increased with the tool penetration depth, meanwhile the fracture load increased and then decreased. Finally, welding at 1200 RPM produced welded joints with lower mechanical properties than the ones achieved at 680 and 903 RPM.

  9. Effects of different friction stir welding conditions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of copper plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nia, Ali Alavi; Shirazi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Friction stir welding is a new and innovative welding method used to fuse materials. In this welding method, the heat generated by friction and plastic flow causes significant changes in the microstructure of the material, which leads to local changes in the mechanical properties of the weld. In this study, the effects of various welding parameters such as the rotational and traverse speeds of the tool on the microstructural and mechanical properties of copper plates were investigated; additionally, Charpy tests were performed on copper plates for the first time. Also, the effect of the number of welding passes on the aforementioned properties has not been investigated in previous studies. The results indicated that better welds with superior properties are produced when less heat is transferred to the workpiece during the welding process. It was also found that although the properties of the stir zone improved with an increasing number of weld passes, the properties of its weakest zone, the heat-affected zone, deteriorated.

  10. High-Speed Friction-Stir Welding To Enable Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carsley, John; Luzanski, Tom; Carlson, Blair; Eisenmenger, Mark; Soulami, Ayoub; Marshall, Dustin; Landino, Brandon; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Current joining technologies for automotive aluminum alloys are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high-volumes. While friction stir welding has been traditionally applied at linear velocities less than one meter per minute, high volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low to moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high speed linear friction stir welding. Therefore, in order to facilitate production of high volume aluminum welded components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of three meters per minute. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for post-weld formability utilizing a combination of numerical and experimental methods. Evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor-welded blanks, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory scale tests.

  11. Friction Stir Welding of GR-Cop 84 for Combustion Chamber Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Carolyn K.; Carter, Robert; Ellis, David L.; Goudy, Richard

    2004-01-01

    GRCop-84 is a copper-chromium-niobium alloy developed by the Glenn Research Center for liquid rocket engine combustion chamber liners. GRCop-84 exhibits superior properties over conventional copper-base alloys in a liquid hydrogen-oxygen operating environment. The Next Generation Launch Technology program has funded a program to demonstrate scale-up production capabilities of GR-Cop 84 to levels suitable for main combustion chamber production for the prototype rocket engine. This paper describes a novel method of manufacturing the main combustion chamber liner. The process consists of several steps: extrude the GR-Cop 84 powder into billets, roll the billets into plates, bump form the plates into cylinder halves and friction stir weld the halves into a cylinder. The cylinder is then metal spun formed to near net liner dimensions followed by finish machining to the final configuration. This paper describes the friction stir weld process development including tooling and non-destructive inspection techniques, culminating in the successful production of a liner preform completed through spin forming.

  12. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded thin sheets of 2024-T4 aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lian; TONG Jian-hua; WAN Fa-rong; LONG Yi

    2006-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a new and promising welding processing that can produce low-cost and high-quality joints of aluminum alloys. 1 mm thick sheets of 2024-T4 aluminum alloys which are always used as building and decorating materials were welded by FSW. The microstrueture and mechanical properties of friction stir welded 1 mm thick sheets of 2024-T4 aluminum alloy were studied. It was found that the thinner the 2024 aluminum alloy, the larger the FSW technological parameters field. The grains size of weld nugget zone (WNZ) is approximately 10 times smaller than that of the parent material, but the second phase in the material is not refined apparently in the welding. The FS welded joints have about 40% higher yield strength than the parent material,but the elongation of FS welded joints is under about 50% of the parent material. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)results show that there are much more low angle boundaries (LAB) in WNZ than that in parent material, which indicates that FSW causes a number of sub-grain structures in WNZ, and this is also the reason of the increase of yield strength and Vickers hardness of the welded joint.

  13. Formability of Friction Stir-Welded Blanks with Different Thickness Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolahgar, Sina; Ghaffarpour, Morteza; Habibi, Niloufar; Kokabi, Amir Hossein; Akbarzadeh, Abbas

    2016-05-01

    Welded sheets with different thicknesses are one of the interesting types of tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) that are widely used in metal-forming industries. In the present work, the formability behavior of different 1100-aluminum TWBs was studied. In this regard, the TWBs were made with different thickness ratios by using friction stir welding (FSW) at different welding rotational speeds ( ω). The thickness ratios of 1.0, 1.3, and 1.7 were investigated where the thinner sheets had 1.5 mm thick for all conditions; i.e., the volume of welded material increased when the thickness ratio increased. Macrostructural observations, mechanical investigations, and sheet-forming limit tests were conducted. The results indicate that increasing ω leads to increasing the weld nugget size up to a maximum level and welding became impossible at higher ω. Furthermore, increasing heat input during FSW, the ultimate tensile strength of welds reduced in comparison with the initial cold-worked base metal. However, the ductility improved by increasing the heat input, which produced the sound welds. Formability studies of the friction stir-welded blanks with equal thicknesses have shown that the forming ratio improves up to 2.8 times the base metal. Forming limit curves also illustrate that increasing the thickness ratio of TWB causes the formability ratio to decrease steadily. Thus, when the thickness ratio becomes 1.7, the formability of TWB decreases approximately to the thinnest base metal.

  14. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding of Al Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2003-01-01

    The innovative process of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has generated tremendous interest since its inception about a decade or so ago since the first patent in 1991 by TWI of Cambridge, England. This interest has been seen in many recent international conferences and publications on the subject and relevant published literature. Still the process needs both intensive basic study of deformation mechanisms during this FSW process and analysis and feasibility study to evaluate production methods that will yield high quality strong welds from the stirring action of the appropriate pin tool into the weld plate materials. Development of production processes is a complex task that involves effects of material thickness, materials weldability, pin tool design, pin height, and pin shoulder diameter and related control conditions. The frictional heating with rotational speeds of the pin tool as it plunges into the material and the ensuing plastic flow arising during the traverse of the welding faying surfaces provide the known special advantages of the FSW process in the area of this new advanced joining technology.

  15. Nanomechanical properties of friction stir welded AA6082-T6 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koumoulos, E.P. [National Technical University of Athens, Department of Chemical Engineering 9 Heroon, Polytechneiou st., Zografos, Athens, GR-157 80 (Greece); Charitidis, C.A., E-mail: charitidis@chemeng.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, Department of Chemical Engineering 9 Heroon, Polytechneiou st., Zografos, Athens, GR-157 80 (Greece); Daniolos, N.M.; Pantelis, D.I. [National Technical University of Athens, Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering 9 Heroon, Polytechneiou st., Zografos, Athens, GR-157 80 (Greece)

    2011-11-25

    Lightweight alloys are of major concern, due to their functionality and applications in transport and industry applications. Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state welding process for joining aluminum and other metallic alloys and has been employed in aerospace, rail, automotive and marine industries. Compared to the conventional welding techniques, FSW produces joints which do not exhibit defects caused by melting. The objective of the present study is to investigate the surface hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E) in friction stir welded aluminum alloy AA6082-T6. The findings of the present study reveal that the welding process softens the material, since the weld nugget is the region where the most deformations are recorded (dynamic recrystallization, production of an extremely fine, equiaxial structure), confirmed by optical microscopy and reduced nanomechanical properties in the welding zone. A yield-type pop-in occurs upon low loading and represents the start of phase transformation, which is monitored through a gradual slope change of the load-displacement curve. Significant pile-up is recorded during nanoindentation of the alloy through SPM imaging.

  16. Modeling the Material Flow and Heat Transfer in Reverse Dual-Rotation Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, L.; Wu, C. S.; Liu, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    Reverse dual-rotation friction stir welding (RDR-FSW) is a novel modification of conventional friction stir welding (FSW) process. During the RDR-FSW process, the tool pin and the assisted shoulder are separated and rotate with opposite direction independently, so that there are two material flows with reverse direction. The material flow and heat transfer in RDR-FSW have significant effects on the microstructure and properties of the weld joint. A 3D model is developed to quantitatively analyze the effects of the separated tool pin and the assisted shoulder which rotate in reverse direction on the material flow and heat transfer during RDR-FSW process. Numerical simulation is conducted to predict the temperature profile, material flow field, streamlines, strain rate, and viscosity distributions near the tool. The calculated results show that as the rotation speed of the tool pin increases, the temperature near the tool gets higher, the zone with higher temperature expands, and approximately symmetric temperature distribution is obtained near the tool. Along the workpiece thickness direction, the calculated material flow velocity and its layer thickness near the tool get lowered because the effect of the shoulder is weakened as the distance away from the top surface increases. The model is validated by comparing the predicted values of peak temperature at some typical locations with the experimentally measured ones.

  17. Taguchi analysis of dissimilar aluminum sheets joined by friction stir spot welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kemal BİLİCİ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the welding of materials of new and complex structure constitutes a problem for the industry. The solid state welding method for joining of these materials were effective. Sheets produced from aluminum and aluminum alloys, especially in areas such as automotive, railway and defense industry have revealed the requirement of the application of solid state welding methods. The friction stir spot welding is one of the solid state welding method. Welding parameters is very important FSSW in order to obtain the maximum welding strength in FSSW. SKNK as parameters (tool rotational speed, depth, dive team, team and team inclination angle of standby time is selected. In this study has investigated the joining of AA2024-T3 and AA5754-H22 aluminum alloy sheets with FSSW technique by Taguchi analysis. “The highest -the better” quality control characteristic using the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA method were obtained the optimum welding parameters. The results have been analyzed both the graphical methods and numerical data. The most important parameters affecting the weld tensile strength were detected as tool rotation speed (44.74% and the team of waiting time (31.60%. Weld tensile strength by Taguchi analysis result conducted for comparing experiments the increased by 42% compared to the initial parameters.Keywords: Friction stir spot welding, Mechanical properties, Taguchi method, Optimization

  18. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of single and double pass Aluminum AA6061 friction stir weld joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, N. H.; Shah, L. H.; Ishak, M.

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on the effect of single pass (SP), double sided pass (DSP) and normal double pass (NDP) method on friction stir welding of aluminum AA6061. Two pieces of AA6061 alloy with thickness of 6 mm were friction stir welded by using conventional milling machine. The rotational speeds that were used in this study were 800 rpm, 1000 rpm and 1200 rpm, respectively. The welding speed is fixed to 100 mm/min. Microstructure observation of welded area was studied by using optical microscope. Tensile test and Vickers hardness test were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of this specimen. Mechanical property analysis results indicate that at low rotational speeds, defects such as surface lack of fill and tunneling in the welded area can be observed. Vickers hardness of specimens however did not vary much when rotational speed is varied. Welded specimens using single pass method shows higher tensile strength and hardness value compared to both double pass methods up to 180.61 MPa. Moreover, DSP showed better tensile test and hardness test compared to NDP method. The optimum parameters were found to be single pass method with 1200 rpm of rotational speed. Therefore economically sound to only perform SP method to obtain maximum tensile strength for AA6061 FSW with thickness of 6 mm.

  19. Enabling high speed friction stir welding of aluminum tailor welded blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high-volumes. While friction stir welding (FSW) has traditionally been applied at linear velocities less than one meter per minute, high volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low to moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high speed linear friction stir welding. Therefore, in order to facilitate production of high volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of three meters per minute. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for post-weld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. Evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor-welded blanks, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory scale tests.

  20. Nondestructive Evaluation of Friction Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy to Coated Steel Sheet Lap Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, H.; Kumar, A.; Rajkumar, K. V.; Saravanan, T.; Jayakumar, T.; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Dissimilar lap joints of aluminum sheet (AA 6061) of 2 mm thickness and zinc-coated steel sheet of 1 mm thickness were produced by friction stir welding with different combinations of rotational speed and travel speed. Ultrasonic C- and B-scanning, and radiography have been used in a complementary manner for detection of volumetric (cavity and flash) and planar (de bond) defects as the defects are in micron level. Advanced ultrasonic C-scanning did not provide any idea about the defects, whereas B-scanning cross-sectional image showed an exclusive overview of the micron-level defects. A digital x-ray radiography methodology is proposed for quality assessment of the dissimilar welds which provide three-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio with improved defect detection sensitivity. The present study clearly shows that the weld tool rotational speed and travel speed have a decisive role on the quality of the joints obtained by the friction stir welding process. The suitability of the proposed NDE techniques to evaluate the joint integrity of dissimilar FSW joints is thus established.

  1. Precipitation sequence in friction stir weld of 6063 aluminum during aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Y.S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Enomoto, Masatoshi; Jogan, Shigetoshi; Hashimoto, Takenori

    1999-12-01

    The precipitation sequence in friction stir weld of 6063 aluminum during postweld aging, associated with Vickers hardness profiles, has been examined by transmission electron microscopy. Friction stir welding produces a softened region in the weld, which is characterized by dissolution and growth of the precipitates. The precipitate-dissolved region contains a minimum hardness region in the as-welded condition. In the precipitate-dissolved region , postweld aging markedly increases the density of strengthening precipitates and leads to a large increase in hardness. On the other hand, aging forms few new precipitates in the precipitate-coarsened region, which shows a slight increase in hardness. The postweld aging at 443 K for 43.2 ks (12 hours) gives greater hardness in the overall weld than in the as-received base material and shifts the minimum hardness from the as-welded minimum hardness region t the precipitate-coarsened region. These hardness changes are consistent with the subsequent precipitation behavior during postweld aging. The postweld solution heat treatment (SHT) and aging achieve a high density of strengthening precipitates and bring a high hardness homogeneously in the overall weld.

  2. Friction Stir Processing of Al with Mechanically Alloyed Al-TiO2-Graphite Powder: Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beygi, R.; Mehrizi, M. Zarezadeh; Eisaabadi B, G.

    2017-02-01

    Commercial pure aluminum was friction stir processed with Al-TiO2-graphite mixture pre-placed into a groove in Al. Two kinds of powders were used as starting particles for friction stir processing; as-mixed powder and 60-h ball-milled powder. Characterization by XRD, SEM and EDS analysis showed that with as-mixed powder an Al composite reinforced with Al3Ti and Al2O3 was produced. Graphite particles were remained in the matrix unchanged. Using 60-h ball-milled powder as starting particle in friction stir processing, resulted in an Al composite reinforced with TiC-Al2O3 nanoparticles dispersed uniformly into the matrix having the size of 100 nm on average. In this state, the microhardness values obtained in the stir zone were higher than those ones obtained using as-mixed powders. The mechanism of phases formation during friction stir processing with two different kinds of powders are elaborated and discussed in this study. Also the mechanical properties of samples were investigated.

  3. Friction stir welding of AZ31 magnesium alloys processed by equal channel angular pressing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bing; YUAN Shouqian; WANG Xunhong

    2008-01-01

    Equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) is an effective thermo-mechanical process to make ultrafine grains.An investigation was carried out on the friction stir welding (FSW) of ECAPed AZ31 magnesium alloys with a thickness of 15 mm.For different process parameters,the optimum FSW conditions of ECAPed AZ31 magnesium alloys were examined.The basic characterization of weld formation and the mechanical properties of the joints were discussed.The results show that the effect of welding parameters on welding quality was evident and welding quality was sensitive to welding speed.Sound joints could be obtained when the welding speed was 37.5 mm/min and the rotation speed of the stir tool was 750 r/min.The maximum tensile strength (270 MPa) of FSW was 91% that of the base materials.The value of microhardness varied between advancing side and retreating side because of the speed field near the pin of the stir tool,which weakened the deformed stress field.The value of microhardness of the welding zone was lower than that of the base materials.The maximum value was located near the heat-affected zone (HAZ).Remarkable ductile character was observed from the fracture morphologies of welded joints.

  4. Development of Microstructure and Crystallographic Texture in a Double-Sided Friction Stir Welded Microalloyed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, S.; Wynne, B. P.; Baker, T. N.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure and crystallographic texture has been investigated in double-sided friction stir welded microalloyed steel, using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The microstructure analyses show that the center of stirred zone reached a temperature between Ac1 and Ac3 during FSW, resulting in a dual-phase austenitic/ ferritic microstructure. The temperatures in the thermo-mechanically affected zone and the overlapped area between the first and second weld pass did not exceed the Ac1. The shear generated by the rotation probe occurs in austenitic/ferritic phase field where the austenite portion of the microstructure is transformed to a bainitic ferrite, on cooling. Analysis of crystallographic textures with regard to shear flow lines generated by the probe tool shows the dominance of simple shear components across the whole weld. The austenite texture at Ac1 - Ac3 is dominated by the B { {1bar{1}2} }stirred zone and the ferrites in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and the overlapped area underwent shear deformation with textures dominated by the D1 { {bar{1}bar{1}2} }weld pass. This is due to continuous dynamic strain-induced recrystallization as a result of simultaneous severe shear deformation and drastic undercooling.

  5. Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Nickel-Aluminum Bronze (NAB) Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükömeroğlu, T.; Şentürk, E.; Kara, L.; İpekoğlu, G.; Çam, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the applicability of friction stir welding to cast NAB alloy (i.e., C95800) with a thickness of 9 mm has been investigated. The joint performance was determined by conducting optical microscopy, microhardness measurements, and mechanical testing (e.g., tensile and Charpy impact tests). The effect of stir intensity on joint performance was also determined. A grain refinement (equiaxed fine grain structure) as well as evolution of a Widmanstätten structure was achieved within the stir zone of all the joints produced. Thus, all of the joints produced exhibited higher proof stress (i.e., between 512 and 616 MPa) than that of the base material, i.e., 397 MPa. On the other hand, only half of the specimens exhibited higher tensile strength values than that of the base plate (i.e., 794 MPa), whereas the other specimens displayed lower tensile strength than the base plate due to the existence of weld defects, namely cold bonding and/or tunnel defect.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Tension Properties for Al-Cu Alloy Friction Stir-Welded Joints with GTN Damage Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guo-Qin; Sun, Feng-Yang; Cao, Fang-Li; Chen, Shu-Jun; Barkey, Mark E.

    2015-11-01

    The numerical simulation of tensile fracture behavior on Al-Cu alloy friction stir-welded joint was performed with the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) damage model. The parameters of the GTN model were studied in each region of the friction stir-welded joint by means of inverse identification. Based on the obtained parameters, the finite element model of the welded joint was built to predict the fracture behavior and tension properties. Good agreement can be found between the numerical and experimental results in the location of the tensile fracture and the mechanical properties.

  7. Feasibility of surface-coated friction stir welding tools to join AISI 304 grade austenitic stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.K. LAKSHMINARAYANAN; C.S.RAMACHANDRAN; V.BALASUBRAMANIAN

    2014-01-01

    An attempt is made to develop the tools that are capable enough to withstand the shear, impact and thermal forces that occur during friction stir welding of stainless steels. The atmospheric plasma spray and plasma transferred arc hardfacing processes are employed to deposit refractory ceramic based composite coatings on the Inconel 738 alloy. Five different combinations of self-fluxing alloy powder and 60% ceramic rein-forcement particulate mixtures are used for coating. The best friction stir welding tool selected based on tool wear analysis is used to fabricate the austenitic stainless steel joints.

  8. “Effect of Tool Geometries on Thermal and Mechanical Behaviour of Friction Stir Welding Welds of Aluminum Alloy”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuber Singh Patel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding is an advanced solid state joining technique, widely being used in various applications for joining aluminum alloys in aerospace, marine, automotive and many other applications of profitable importance. The welding parameters and tool pin profile play a major role in deciding the weld quality. It is an attempt to being made to analyze the effect of tool geometries, the effect of tool rotation and welding speeds on the mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints made for sample of profitable grade aluminum alloy and ANSYS is used to compare and prove the attempts made for various analyses

  9. Recent Developments for Ultrasonic-Assisted Friction Stir Welding: Joining, Testing, Corrosion - an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomä, M.; Wagner, G.; Straß, B.; Conrad, C.; Wolter, B.; Benfer, S.; Fürbeth, W.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the steadily increasing demand on innovative manufacturing processes, modern lightweight construction concepts become more and more important. Especially joints of dissimilar metals offer a variety of advantages due to their high potential for lightweight construction. The focus of the investigations was Al/Mg-joints. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an efficient process to realize high strength joints between these materials in ductile condition. Furthermore, for a simultaneous transmission of power ultrasound during the FSW-process (US-FSW) a positive effect on the achievable tensile strength of the Al/Mg-joints was proven. In the present work the industrial used die cast alloys EN AC-48000 (AlSi12CuNiMg) and AZ80 (MgAl8Zn) were joined by a machining center modified especially for Ultrasound Supported Friction Stir Welding. The appearing welding zone and the formation of intermetallic phases under the influence of power ultrasound were examined in particular. In order to identify optimal process parameters extensive preliminary process analyzes have been carried out. Following this, an ultrasound-induced more intensive stirring of the joining zone and as a result of this a considerably modified intermetallic zone was detected. At the same time an increase of the tensile strength of about 25% for US-FSW-joints and for fatigue an up to three times higher number of cycles to failure in comparison to a conventional welding process was observed. Moreover, detailed corrosion analyzes have shown that especially the welding zone was influenced by the corrosive attack. To expand and deepen the knowledge of the US-FSW-process further material combinations such as Ti/Steel and Al/Steel will be considered in future.

  10. Study of Simulated Temperature of Butt Joint during Friction Stir Welding Of Aluminium Alloy by Using Hyperworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Anees Siddiqui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is one of the latest welding technology that utilizes a special tool for generation of frictional heat in the work piece by its rotation due to which joining occurs without melting of metal. For this reason friction stir welding lies under the category of solid state joining. A part from experimental work, there is large space to work on simulation of FSW by using simulation tools. In the present paper, simulation of friction stir welding of aluminium alloy AA-6061 is done by using HyperWeld module of Altair HyperWorks. The virtual experiment of friction stir welding is conducted for variable tool rotational speeds with constant travelling speed and study of simulation results of variation in temperature distribution along the weld line of butt joint is done. The results of simulation shows that the temperature is symmetrically distributed along the weld line. It is observed that the maximum temperature along the weld line increases with the increase in rotational speed. It is also observed that the temperature at advancing side is greater that retreating side.

  11. The Effect of Premixed Al-Cu Powder on the Stir Zone in Friction Stir Welding of AA3003-H18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abnar, B.; Kazeminezhad, M.; Kokabi, A. H.

    2015-02-01

    In this research, 3-mm-thick AA3003-H18 non-heat-treatable aluminum alloy plates were joined by friction stir welding (FSW). It was performed by adding pure Cu and premixed Cu-Al powders at various rotational speeds of 800, 1000, and 1200 rpm and constant traveling speeds of 100 mm/min. At first, the powder was filled into the gap (0.2 or 0.4 mm) between two aluminum alloy plates, and then the FSW process was performed in two passes. The microstructure, mechanical properties, and formation of intermetallic compounds were investigated in both cases of using pure Cu and premixed Al-Cu powders. The results of using pure Cu and premixed Al-Cu powders were compared in the stir zone at various rotational speeds. The copper particle distribution and formation of Al-Cu intermetallic compounds (Al2Cu and AlCu) in the stir zone were desirable using premixed Al-Cu powder into the gap. The hardness values were significantly increased by formation of Al-Cu intermetallic compounds in the stir zone and it was uniform throughout the stir zone when premixed Al-Cu powder was used. Also, longitudinal tensile strength from the stir zone was higher when premixed Al-Cu powder was used instead of pure Cu powder.

  12. The Influence of Friction Stir Weld Tool Form and Welding Parameters on Weld Structure and Properties: Nugget Bulge in Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Brendel, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Although friction stir welding (FSW) was patented in 1991, process development has been based upon trial and error and the literature still exhibits little understanding of the mechanisms determining weld structure and properties. New concepts emerging from a better understanding of these mechanisms enhance the ability of FSW engineers to think about the FSW process in new ways, inevitably leading to advances in the technology. A kinematic approach in which the FSW flow process is decomposed into several simple flow components has been found to explain the basic structural features of FSW welds and to relate them to tool geometry and process parameters. Using this modelling approach, this study reports on a correlation between the features of the weld nugget, process parameters, weld tool geometry, and weld strength. This correlation presents a way to select process parameters for a given tool geometry so as to optimize weld strength. It also provides clues that may ultimately explain why the weld strength varies within the sample population.

  13. The Correlation of Stir Zone Texture Development with Base Metal Texture and Tool-Induced Deformation in Friction Stir Processing of Severely Deformed Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkari Khorrami, M.; Kazeminezhad, Mohsen; Miyashita, Y.; Kokabi, A. H.

    2017-01-01

    The texture development during friction stir processing (FSP) of 1050 aluminum severely deformed at the strain magnitude of 2.32 was comprehensively discussed. It was observed that the component bar{B} of the ideal shear texture along with the cube texture was developed in the severely deformed base metal. The effects of base metal texture on the texture development of stir zone, thermo-mechanically affected zone, and heat-affected zone during FSP were examined. Also, the developed texture components in the vicinity of the FSP tool and the stir zone were correlated to the deformation induced by the rotating tool which consisted of pin and shoulder. The observed texture components in the longitudinal section of the stir zone were found coincided with the ideal shear ones, but different from those observed in the severely deformed base metal. It could be responsible for the fact that the material beneath the FSP tool is predominantly deformed and stirred by the shoulder rather than the pin. The independency of texture development in the stir zone from pin-induced deformation was also consistent with the observation associated with the stir zone geometry which was independent of the pin geometry. Microstructural evolutions in the regions located ahead of the FSP tool manifested the incident of static recovery and recrystallization as a result of the stored strain in the severely deformed base metal. These led to the development of almost random texture and the deterioration of base metal texture in this region. This suggested the independency of texture development in the stir zone from the texture of severely deformed base metal.

  14. Microstructure, Hardness and Impact Toughness of Heat-Treated Nanodispersed Surface and Friction Stir-Processed Aluminum Alloy AA7075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, M.; Elashery, A.; Toschi, S.; Ahmed, M. M. Z.; Morri, A.; El-Mahallawi, I.; Ceschini, L.

    2016-11-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) is a recent surface engineering processing technique that is gaining wide recognition for manufacturing nanodispersed surface composites, which are of high specific strength, hardness and resistance to wear and corrosion. Herein, four-pass FSP was applied on aluminum alloy 7075 (AA7075-O) with and without the addition of alumina nanoparticles (Al2O3) of average size 40 nm. All FSP parameters were constant at 40 mm/min transverse speed, 500 rpm and tilt angle of 3°. FSP rotation direction was reversed every other pass. The friction stir-processed materials were sectioned and solution treated at 515 °C for 1.5 h, followed by age hardening at 120 °C for 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 h. The effect of heat treatment regimes on microstructure, hardness and toughness was examined, as well as the fracture mode. The new friction stir-processed surfaces without and with nanodispersion showed enhancement in the hardness of the surface of the AA7075-O material (65 HV) to almost a double (100 and 140 HV) after four-pass FSP (before heat treatment) without and with incorporating nanoalumina particles, respectively. After 48-h aging at 120 °C, a significant enhancement in impact toughness was achieved for both the friction stir-processed without and with nanodispersion (181 and 134 J, respectively), compared to the reference material AA7075 in T6 condition (104 J).

  15. Identifying Combination of Friction Stir Welding Parameters to Maximize Strength of Lap Joints of AA2014-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendrana C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AA2014 aluminum alloy (Al-Cu alloy has been widely utilized in fabrication of lightweight structures like aircraft structures, demanding high strength to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. The fusion welding of these alloys will lead to solidification problems such as hot cracking. Friction stir welding is a new solid state welding process, in which the material being welded does not melt and recast. Lot of research works have been carried out by many researchers to optimize process parameters and establish empirical relationships to predict tensile strength of friction stir welded butt joints of aluminum alloys. However, very few investigations have been carried out on friction stir welded lap joints of aluminum alloys. Hence, in this investigation, an attempt has been made to optimize friction stir lap welding (FSLW parameters to attain maximum tensile strength using statistical tools such as design of experiment (DoE, analysis of variance (ANOVA, response graph and contour plots. By this method, it is found that maximum tensile shear fracture load of 12.76 kN can be achieved if a joint is made using tool rotational speed of 900 rpm, welding speed of 110 mm/min, tool shoulder diameter of 12 mm and tool tilt angle of 1.5°.

  16. Comparison of ALE finite element method and adaptive smoothed finite element method for the numerical simulation of friction stir welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelt, van der A.A.; Bor, T.C.; Geijselaers, H.J.M.; Quak, W.; Akkerman, R.; Huetink, J.; Menary, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the material flow around the pin during friction stir welding (FSW) is simulated using a 2D plane strain model. A pin rotates without translation in a disc with elasto-viscoplastic material properties and the outer boundary of the disc is clamped. Two numerical methods are used to sol

  17. Effect of the Preheating Temperature on Process Time in Friction Stir Welding of Al 6061-T6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained and the deductions made from an analytical modeling involving friction stir welding of Al 6061-T6. A new database was developed to simulate the contact temperature between the tool and the workpiece. A second-order equation is proposed for simulating...

  18. Global and Local Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Friction Stir Welds with Dissimilar Materials and/or Thicknesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadpoor, A.A.; Sinke, J.; Benedictus, R.

    2010-01-01

    This article studies the properties of a wide range of friction-stir-welded joints with dissimilar aluminum alloys or thicknesses. Two aluminum alloys, namely, 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, are selected for the study and are welded in ten different combinations of alloys and thicknesses. The welding paramete

  19. Effect Of Process Parameters On Mechanical Properties Of Friction Stir.Welded Joint Of Two Similar &Dissimilar Al-Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umasankar Das,

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is an advance joining process for different similar and dissimilar materials. It is commonly used for joining of Aluminum alloys. However it is necessary to overcome some challenges for its wide-spread uses. Tool design and the selection of process parameters are critical issues in the usage of this process. This study focuses on the process parameters that is required for producing effective friction stir welding of two similar aluminum alloys (AA6101T6 to AA6101T6 and dissimilar Aluminum alloys (AA6101T6 alloy to AA6351T6 . Three different tool diameters such as 20 mm, 25 mm and 30 mm with three different tool rotational speeds such as 600 rpm, 800 rpm and 1200 rpm have been used to weld the joints. The welded samples were tested for mechanical properties as well as microstructure. It was observed that 30 mm tool gives better weld quality for friction stir welding of similar aluminum alloy but 25 mm tool with 1200 rpm rotational speed gave satisfactory weld quality for friction stir welding of dissimilar aluminum alloys. It is one of the important welding process that can adopted for welding of aluminum alloys with excellent mechanical properties. The results were confirmed by further experiments.

  20. Microstructure and Fatigue Behavior of Friction Stir-welded Noncombustive Mg-9Al-Zn-Ca Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Li, Z. Y.; Nakata, K.; Feng, J. C.; Huang, Y. X.; Liao, J. S.

    2016-06-01

    Microstructure and fatigue behavior of friction stir-welded noncombustive Mg-9Al-Zn-Ca magnesium alloy were investigated. The as-received hot-extruded material consisted of equiaxed α-Mg grains with β-Mg17Al12 and Al2Ca compounds distributed along the grain boundaries. Friction stir welding produced much refined α-Mg grains accompanied by the dissolution of the eutectic β-Mg17Al12 phase, while Al2Ca phase was dispersed homogenously into the Mg matrix. Friction stir welding produced slightly increased hardness and tensile strength in the defect-free welds compared with the base material due to microstructural refinement and uniform distribution of intermetallic compounds. The load-controlled uniaxial tensile high-cycle fatigue tests indicated that fatigue strength of 90 MPa was obtained for the friction stir-welded joint with fatigue crack initiated basically near the specimen's surface and at the retreating side of the joint. Crack propagation was characterized by cleavage and fatigue striations.

  1. Global and Local Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Friction Stir Welds with Dissimilar Materials and/or Thicknesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadpoor, A.A.; Sinke, J.; Benedictus, R.

    2010-01-01

    This article studies the properties of a wide range of friction-stir-welded joints with dissimilar aluminum alloys or thicknesses. Two aluminum alloys, namely, 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, are selected for the study and are welded in ten different combinations of alloys and thicknesses. The welding

  2. Prediction of grain size and mechanical properties in friction stir welded pure copper joints using a thermal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidarzadeh, A.; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Esmaily, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a thermal model was developed and applied to simulate the friction stir welding of pure copper plates with the thickness of 2 mm. The different traverse speeds of 100, 200, 300, and 400 mm min−1 and rotational speeds of 400, 700, 900 rev min−1 were considered as welding parameters....

  3. Modelling residual stresses in friction stir welding of Al alloys - a review of possibilities and future trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard; Tutum, Cem C.

    2015-01-01

    Residual stresses are very important in any joining process of materials since they act as pre-stresses in the loading situation of the joint, thereby affecting the final mechanical performance of the component. This is also the case for friction stir welding (FSW) which is a complex solid-state ...

  4. INFLUENCES OF TOOL PIN PROFILE ON THE MECHANICAL AND METALLURGICAL PROPERTIES OF FRICTION STIR WELDING OF DISSIMILAR ALUMINUM ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.PALANIVEL

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of the Friction Stir Welding has provided an alternative improved way of producing aluminium joints, in a faster and reliable manner. In this study the effect of tool pin profile on the mechanical and metallurgical properties of dissimilar AA6351- AA5083H111 joints produced by FSW is analyzed. Five different tool pin profiles are developed such as straight cylindrical, threaded cylindrical, square, tapered square, and tapered octagon to weld the joints. All the welds are produced perpendicularly to the rolling direction for both alloys. Tensile tests are performed to evaluate the mechanical properties by using computerized universal testing machine. Color metallographic is carried out along various zones of the friction stir welded .Among the five tools square pin profile give better tensile strength and the stirred zone of the welded area has finer grains compared to other weld zones.

  5. Development of mathematical model to predict the mechanical properties of friction stir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Palanivel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a systematic approach to develop the mathematical model for predicting the ultimate tensile strength,yield strength, and percentage of elongation of AA6351 aluminum alloy which is widely used in automotive, aircraft anddefense Industries by incorporating (FSW friction stir welding process parameter such as tool rotational speed, weldingspeed, and axial force. FSW has been carried out based on three factors five level central composite rotatable design withfull replications technique. Response surface methodology (RSM is employed to develop the mathematical model. Analysisof variance (ANOVA Technique is used to check the adequacy of the developed mathematical model. The developedmathematical model can be used effectively at 95% confidence level. The effect of FSW process parameter on mechanicalproperties of AA6351 aluminum alloy has been analyzed in detail.

  6. Effect of Traverse/Rotational Speed on Material Deformations and Temperature Distributions in Friction Stir Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao ZHANG; Jun BIE; Yali LIU; Hongwu ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    A fully coupled thermo-mechanical model was developed to study the temperature fields and the plastic deformations of alloy AL6061-T6 under different process parameters during the friction stir welding (FSW) process.Three-dimensional results under different process parameters were presented.Results indicate that the maximum temperature is lower than the melting point of the welding material.The higher temperature gradient occurs in the leading side of the workpiece.The calculated temperature field can be fitted well with the one from the experimental test.A lower plastic strain region can be found near the welding tool in the trailing side on the bottom surface,which is formed by the specific material flow patterns in FSW.The maximum temperature can be increased with increasing the welding speed and the angular velocity in the current numerical modelling.

  7. Thermal Management in Friction-Stir Welding of Precipitation-Hardened Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Reynolds, Anthony P.

    2015-05-01

    Process design and implementation in friction-stir welding (FSW) is mostly dependent on empirical information. Basic science of FSW and processing can only be complete when fundamental interrelationships between the process control parameters and response variables and the resulting weld microstructure and properties are established to a reasonable extent. It is known that primary process control parameters such as tool rotation, translation rates, and forge axis force have complicated and interactive relationships to process-response variables such as peak temperature and time at temperature. Of primary influence on the other process-response parameters are temperature and its gradient in the deformation and heat-affected zones. Through a review of pertinent works in the literature and results from boundary condition experiments performed in precipitation-hardening aluminum alloys, this article partially elucidates the nature and effects of temperature transients caused by variation of thermal boundaries in FSW.

  8. Heat source models in simulation of heat flow in friction stir welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich; Hattel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    . The convective heat transfer due to the material flow affects the temperature fields. Models presented previously in the literature allow the heat to flow through the probe volume, and the majority neglects the influence of the contact condition as the sliding condition is assumed. In this work, a number......The objective of the present paper is to investigate the effect of including the tool probe and the material flow in the numerical modelling of heat flow in friction stir welding (FSW). The contact condition at the interface between the tool and workpiece controls the heat transfer mechanisms...... of cases is established. Each case represents a combination of a contact condition, i.e. sliding and sticking, and a stage of refinement regarding the heat source distribution. In the most detailed models, the heat flow is forced around the probe volume by prescribing a velocity field in shear layers...

  9. Heat Source Models in Simulation of Heat Flow in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich; Hattel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    . The convective heat transfer due to the material flow affects the temperature fields. Models presented previously in literature allow the heat to flow through the probe volume, and the majority of them neglect the influence of the contact condition as the sliding condition is assumed. In the present work......The objective of the present paper is to investigate the effect of including the tool probe and the material flow in the numerical modelling of heat flow in Friction Stir Welding (FSW). The contact condition at the interface between the tool and workpiece controls the heat transfer mechanisms......, a number of cases are established. Each case represents a combination of a contact condition, i.e. sliding and sticking, and a stage of refinement regarding the heat source distribution. In the most detailed models the heat flow is forced around the probe volume by prescribing a velocity field in shear...

  10. Fabrication of novel fiber reinforced aluminum composites by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arab, Seyyed Mohammad; Karimi, Saeed; Jahromi, Seyyed Ahmad Jenabali, E-mail: jahromi@shirazu.ac.ir; Javadpour, Sirus; Zebarjad, Seyyed Mojtaba

    2015-04-24

    In this study, chopped and attrition milled high strength carbon, E-glass, and S-glass fibers have been used as the reinforcing agents in an aluminum alloy (Al1100) considered as the matrix. The Surface Metal Matrix Composites (SMMCs) then are produced by Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Tensile and micro-hardness examinations represent a magnificent improvement in the hardness, strength, ductility and toughness for all of the processed samples. Scanning Electron Micrographs reveal a proper distribution of the reinforcements in the matrix and a change in the fracture behavior of the FSPed specimens. The synergetic effects of reinforcing by fibers and Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) lead to an extra ordinary improvement in the mechanical properties.

  11. Impact of friction stir welding on the microstructure of ODS steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, H.; Serrano, M.; Cater, S.; Iqbal, N.; Almásy, L.; Tian, Q.; Jimenez-Melero, E.

    2017-04-01

    We have assessed the impact of the welding parameters on the nano-sized oxide dispersion and the grain size in the matrix of an ODS steel after friction stir welding. Our results, based on combined small angle neutron scattering and electron microscopy, reveal a decrease in the volume fraction of the particles smaller than 80 nm in the welds, mainly due to particle agglomeration. The increase in tool rotation speed or decrease in transverse speed leads to a higher reduction in nano-sized particle fraction, and additionally to the occurrence of particle melting. The dependence of the average grain size in the matrix on the particle volume fraction follows a Zener pinning-type relationship. This result points to the principal role that the particles have in pinning grain boundary movement, and consequently in controlling the grain size during welding.

  12. Microstructural Evolution During Friction Stir Welding of Mild Steel and Ni-Based Alloy 625

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Johnnatan Rodriguez; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2017-03-01

    Microstructure evolution during friction stir welding (FSW) of mild steel and Ni-based alloy 625 was studied. Regarding the Ni-based alloy, the welding process led to grain refinement caused by discontinuous and continuous dynamic recrystallization, where bulging of the pre-existing grains and subgrain rotation were the primary mechanisms of recrystallization. In the steel, discontinuous dynamic recrystallization was identified as the recovery process experienced by the austenite. Simple shear textures were observed in the regions affected by the deformation of both materials. Although the allotropic transformation obscured the deformation history, the thermo-mechanically affected zone was identified in the steel by simple shear texture components. A new methodology for the study of texture evolution based on rotations of the slip systems using pole figures is presented as an approximation to describe the texture evolution in FSW.

  13. The Effect of Ultrasonic Impact Treatment on the Fatigue Resistance of Friction Stir Welded Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodopoulos, C. A.; Pantelakis, Sp. G.; Papadopoulos, M. P.

    2009-12-01

    In this work, the results of an experimental study for assessing the effects of Ultrasonic Impact Treatment on the fatigue resistance of Friction Stir Welded aluminum alloy panels are presented. Although the significant compressive residual stress introduced on the material by ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT) was expected to cause retardation in the crack growth rate, this was only noted at low initial Δ Κ values. At high Δ Κ values, the effect of UIT practically diminishes. The phenomenon was attributed to the relaxation/redistribution of the residual stresses with fatigue damage. This provides an alarming situation where damage tolerance design relies on models where only the initial residual stress profile is taken into account without knowledge of the potential re-distribution of the residual stresses caused by the fatigue damage accumulation. The findings of this work also indicate that any FCG tests performed can only be considered as case-specific and conclusions can only be drawn for the case studied.

  14. Optimizing Friction Stir Welding via Statistical Design of Tool Geometry and Process Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blignault, C.; Hattingh, D. G.; James, M. N.

    2012-06-01

    This article considers optimization procedures for friction stir welding (FSW) in 5083-H321 aluminum alloy, via control of weld process parameters and tool design modifications. It demonstrates the potential utility of the "force footprint" (FF) diagram in providing a real-time graphical user interface (GUI) for process optimization of FSW. Multiple force, torque, and temperature responses were recorded during FS welding using 24 different tool pin geometries, and these data were statistically analyzed to determine the relative influence of a number of combinations of important process and tool geometry parameters on tensile strength. Desirability profile charts are presented, which show the influence of seven key combinations of weld process variables on tensile strength. The model developed in this study allows the weld tensile strength to be predicted for other combinations of tool geometry and process parameters to fall within an average error of 13%. General guidelines for tool profile selection and the likelihood of influencing weld tensile strength are also provided.

  15. Optimizing Powder Distribution in Production of Surface Nano-Composite via Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydarian, Arash; Dehghani, Kamran; Slamkish, Taymor

    2014-06-01

    Notwithstanding the extensive interest in using friction stir processing (FSP) for producing metal matrix composite (MMC), more uniform powder distribution along the composite zone is still needed. In most studies, one groove is machined out of the specimen, filled with powder, and then processed by identical passes. In this investigation, an innovative technique was used that involved machining out of three gradient grooves with increasing depth from the advancing side to the retreating side instead of using a conventional sample with just a groove. Macro, optical, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and microhardness test were used to evaluate the powder distribution. The images indicated that the most uniform distribution of SiC particles in the whole composite zone was related to a three-gradient grooves sample. Microohardness measurement of a three-gradient grooves sample, carried out along the cross section and perpendicular to the traverse direction of FSP, experiences less fluctuation in hardness compared with other techniques.

  16. Impacts of friction stir processing on irradiation effects in vacuum-plasma-spray coated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Kazumi, E-mail: ozawa.kazumi@jaea.go.jp [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Obuchi-Omotedate, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Obuchi-Omotedate, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Morisada, Yoshiaki; Fujii, Hidetoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    In order to examine the impacts of friction stir processing (FSP) on irradiation effects in vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) coated tungsten (W), nano indentation hardness was evaluated of three kinds of W materials after self-ion-irradiation to 5.0–5.4 dpa at 500 and 800 °C. The VPS-FSP clearly got grains refined and isotropic compared to bulk-W and the as-VPS-W. Nano indentation hardness remains unchanged for the as-VPS-W and VPS-FSP × 2-W irradiated to 5.4 dpa at 500 °C and it decreased from 1 dpa at 800 °C, while typical irradiation induced hardening was observed for the bulk-W irradiated at 500 °C.

  17. Low temperature enhanced ductility of friction stir processed 5083 aluminum alloy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ehab A El-Danaf; Magdy M El-Rayes; Mahmoud S Soliman

    2011-12-01

    Commercial 5083 Al rolled plates were subjected to friction stir processing (FSP) with two different processing parameters, having 430 and 850 rpm tool rotational speed with a single traverse feed rate of 90 mm/min. These FSP conditions resulted in two fine grained microstructures of 0.95 m (430 rpm) and 2.6 m (850 rpm). Tensile elongations were measured at a relatively low temperature of 250°C at three strain rates, and demonstrated that a decrease in grain size resulted in significantly enhanced ductility and lower forming loads. The occurrence of a relatively high value of strain rate sensitivity, of 0.45 for a grain size of 0.95 m, suggests the operation of superplastic deformation under these present experimental conditions.

  18. Microstructural Evolution During Friction Stir Welding of Mild Steel and Ni-Based Alloy 625

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Johnnatan Rodriguez; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2017-01-01

    Microstructure evolution during friction stir welding (FSW) of mild steel and Ni-based alloy 625 was studied. Regarding the Ni-based alloy, the welding process led to grain refinement caused by discontinuous and continuous dynamic recrystallization, where bulging of the pre-existing grains and subgrain rotation were the primary mechanisms of recrystallization. In the steel, discontinuous dynamic recrystallization was identified as the recovery process experienced by the austenite. Simple shear textures were observed in the regions affected by the deformation of both materials. Although the allotropic transformation obscured the deformation history, the thermo-mechanically affected zone was identified in the steel by simple shear texture components. A new methodology for the study of texture evolution based on rotations of the slip systems using pole figures is presented as an approximation to describe the texture evolution in FSW.

  19. Tensile properties and mechanical heterogeneity of friction stir welded joints of 2014 aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan-hua; LIN San-bao; WU Lin; QU Fu-xing

    2005-01-01

    2014 Al alloy of 8mm in thickness was successfully welded by friction stir welding method. The experimental results show that the tensile properties of the joints are significantly affected by the welding parameters. When the weld pitch is 0.25mm/r corresponding to the rotation speed of 400r/min and the welding speed of 100mm/min, the maximum ultimate strength of the joints is 78% that of the base material. For a certain weld joint, different parts possess different mechanical properties. In the three parts of the joint, the upper part is strongest and the middle part is poorest in mechanical properties. The mechanical properties and fracture locations of the joints are dependent on the microstructure variation and micro-hardness distributions of the joints, which attributes to the different thermo-mechanical actions on the different parts of the joints.

  20. Pinless Friction Stir Welding of AA2024-T3 Joint and Its Failure Modes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文亚; 李锦锋; 张志函; 高大路; 王卫兵; 栾国红

    2014-01-01

    The joining of aluminum alloy sheets with thickness less than 2.0 mm is difficult via conventional friction stir welding owing to the defects in the joint, such as root flaw, keyhole and lazy S. In the present research, a newly designed pinless tool with involute grooves on its shoulder surface was applied to weld 1.5 mm thick AA2024-T3. The effects of the rotating speed and welding speed on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints were ana-lyzed. The experimental results showed that the root flaw and keyhole were successfully eliminated. The lazy S was also eliminated under the optimized welding parameters. The maximum tensile strength of the joints was 326 MPa, which is about 74.1% that of the base material. Moreover, all the tensile samples fractured from the retreating side. Two fracture modes were observed during the tensile tests, which are related with the lazy S.

  1. Corrosion behavior of friction stir welded AZ31B Mg alloy - Al6063 alloy joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ratna Sunil

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, AZ31B Mg alloy and Al6063 alloy-rolled sheets were successfully joined by friction stir welding. Microstructural studies revealed a sound joint with good mechanical mixing of both the alloys at the nugget zone. Corrosion performance of the joint was assessed by immersing in 3.5% NaCl solution for different intervals of time and the corrosion rate was calculated. The joint has undergone severe corrosion attack compared with both the base materials (AZ31B and Al6063 alloys. The predominant corrosion mechanism behind the high corrosion rate of the joint was found to be high galvanic corrosion. From the results, it can be suggested that the severe corrosion of dissimilar Mg–Al joints must be considered as a valid input while designing structures intended to work in corroding environment.

  2. Parametric optimization of friction stir welding process of age hardenable aluminum alloys-ANFIS modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D Vijayan; V Seshagiri Rao

    2016-01-01

    A comparative approach was performed between the response surface method (RSM) and the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to enhance the tensile properties, including the ultimate tensile strength and the tensile elongation, of friction stir welded age hardenable AA6061 and AA2024 aluminum alloys. The effects of the welding parameters, namely the tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial load and pin profile, on the ultimate tensile strength and the tensile elongation were analyzed using a three-level, four-factor Box-Behnken experimental design. The developed design was utilized to train the ANFIS models. The predictive capabilities of RSM and ANFIS were compared based on the root mean square error, the mean absolute error, and the correlation coefficient based on the obtained data set. The results demonstrate that the developed ANFIS models are more effective than the RSM model.

  3. Friction Stir Welding in Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys: Heat Transfer Modeling and Thermal History Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi; Lados, Diana A.

    2017-02-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a technique that can be used for materials joining and local microstructural refinement. Owing to the solid-state character of the process, FSW has significant advantages over traditional fusion welding, including reduced part distortion and overheating. In this study, a novel heat transfer model was developed to predict weld temperature distributions and quantify peak temperatures under various combinations of processing parameters for different wrought and cast Al alloys. Specifically, an analytical analysis was first developed to characterize and predict heat generation rate within the weld nugget, and then a two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation was performed to evaluate the temperature distribution in the weld cross-section and top-view planes. A further three-dimensional (3D) simulation was developed based on the heat generation analysis. The model was validated by measuring actual temperatures near the weld nugget using thermocouples, and good agreement was obtained for all studied materials and conditions.

  4. Using two-pass friction stir processing to produce nanocrystalline microstructure in AZ61 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Despite their interesting properties,nanostructured materials have found limited use as a result of the cost of preparation and the difficulty in scaling up.Herein,a two-pass friction stir processing(FSP)technique is employed to refine grain sizes to a nanoscale.Nanocrystalline AZ61 Mg alloy with an av-erage grain size of less than 100nm was successfully obtained using FSP.Corresponding to this,the highest microhardness of the nano-grained region reached triple times that of AZ61 substrate.In prin-ciple,by applying multiple overlapping passes,it should be possible to produce any desired size thin sheet of nanostructure using this technique.We expect that the FSP technique may pave a way to large-scale structural applications of nanostructured metals and alloys.

  5. Influence of tool shape on lattice rearrangement under loading conditions reproducing friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko, Ivan S.; Konovalenko, Igor S.

    2015-10-01

    Metal behavior under loading conditions that reproduce friction stir welding was studied on the atomic scale. Calculations were conducted based on molecular dynamics simulation with potentials calculated within the embedded atom method. The loading of the interface between two crystallites, whose structure corresponded to aluminum alloy 2024, was simulated by the motion of a cone-shaped tool along the interface with constant angular and translational velocities. The motion of the rotating tool causes fracture of the workpiece crystal structure with subsequent mixing of surface atoms of the interfacing crystallites. It is shown that the resistance force acting on the moving tool from the workpiece and the process of structural defect formation in the workpiece depend on the tool shape.

  6. Influence of tool shape on lattice rearrangement under loading conditions reproducing friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalenko, Ivan S., E-mail: ivkon@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Konovalenko, Igor S., E-mail: igkon@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    Metal behavior under loading conditions that reproduce friction stir welding was studied on the atomic scale. Calculations were conducted based on molecular dynamics simulation with potentials calculated within the embedded atom method. The loading of the interface between two crystallites, whose structure corresponded to aluminum alloy 2024, was simulated by the motion of a cone-shaped tool along the interface with constant angular and translational velocities. The motion of the rotating tool causes fracture of the workpiece crystal structure with subsequent mixing of surface atoms of the interfacing crystallites. It is shown that the resistance force acting on the moving tool from the workpiece and the process of structural defect formation in the workpiece depend on the tool shape.

  7. Role of welding parameters on interfacial bonding in dissimilar steel/aluminum friction stir welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Shen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, lap welds between Al5754 to DP600 steel (aluminum plate top, and steel plate bottom were manufactured by friction stir welding (FSW. The effects of welding parameters (i.e. travel speeds and penetration depth into lower steel sheet on the interfacial bonding, tensile strength, and failure mechanism were investigated. The results show that intermetallic compound of Fe4Al13 was detected at the Al/Fe interface. The weld strength increases significantly by increasing the penetration depth into the lower steel substrate at all travel speeds. The failure mode under overlap shear loadings is premature failure through the aluminum substrate when the penetration depth is more than 0.17 mm, and shear fracture when the penetration depth is less than 0.17 mm.

  8. Influence of the Tool Shoulder Contact Conditions on the Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doude, Haley R.; Schneider, Judy A.; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2014-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSWing) is a solid-state joining process of special interest in joining alloys that are traditionally difficult to fusion weld. In order to optimize the process, various numeric modeling approaches have been pursued. Of importance to furthering modeling efforts is a better understanding of the contact conditions between the workpiece and the weld tool. Both theoretical and experimental studies indicate the contact conditions between the workpiece and weld tool are unknown, possibly varying during the FSW process. To provide insight into the contact conditions, this study characterizes the material flow in the FSW nugget by embedding a lead (Pb) wire that melted at the FSWing temperature of aluminum alloy 2195. The Pb trace provided evidence of changes in material flow characteristics which were attributed to changes in the contact conditions between the weld tool and workpiece, as driven by temperature, as the tool travels the length of a weld seam.

  9. Heterogeneity of the Nugget Microstructure in a Thick 2050 Al Friction-Stirred Weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avettand-Fenoel, Marie-Noëlle; Taillard, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The current article deals with 19-mm-thick welds of AA 2050. These joints obtained by friction stir butt welding on half penetration were subsequently strained and artificially aged. The nugget's hardness weakens along the plate thickness from the top surface. This evolution is explained by the modification of the precipitation state, which overcomes the effects of the changes of size and preferred orientation of grains along the nugget's depth. This modification of microstructure arises from the various strains, strain rates, and temperatures encountered in the different areas in the nugget. The postwelding treatment did not manage to suppress either the undermatching of the original nugget compared to the base material or the differences of thermal stabilities at the different depths in the nugget.

  10. Friction Stir Welding of 7075-T651 Aluminum Plates and Its Fatigue Crack Growth Property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chi Ok; Sohn, Hye Jeong; Kim, Seon Jin [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) method has extensively been used in manufacturing methods because of the several advantages over conventional welding methods, such as better mechanical properties, reduced occurrence of joining defects, high material saving, and low production time, etc. The aim of this paper is to review the optimal FSW conditions using the previous experimental results and is to investigate the fatigue crack growth rate in three different zones, WM, HAZ and BM for FSWed Al7075-T651 aluminum plates. As far as our experiments are concerned, the optimal conditions are obtained as rotation speed, 800rpm and travelling speed, 0.5mm/sec. The fatigue crack growth rate showed strong dependency on three different zones WM, HAZ and BM, and crack driving force.

  11. Robust Optimization of Thermal Aspects of Friction Stir Welding Using Manifold Mapping Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Lahaye, Domenico; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize a friction stir welding process taking robustness into account. The optimization problems are formulated with the goal of obtaining desired mean responses while reducing the variance of the response. We restrict ourselves to a thermal model of the process...... and use the manifold mapping technique to solve the optimization problems using a fast analytical coarse and an expensive accurate fine model. The statistics of the response are calculated using Taylor expansions and are compared to Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the use of manifold...... mapping reduces the number of fine model evaluations required and that the Taylor expansion approach gives good results when compared to Monte Carlo simulations....

  12. Complete inspection of friction stir welds in aluminum using ultrasonic and eddy current arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamarre, A.; Dupuis, O. [R/D Tech, Quebec, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: andre.lamarre@rd-tech.com; olivier.dupuis@rd-tech.com; Moles, M. [R/D Tech, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Michael.moles@rd-tech.com

    2006-07-15

    Ultrasonic phased-array offers tremendous advantages for the inspection of Friction stir welds (FSW), a new method of joining metals using a solid state bonding process. Phased array ultrasonics can reliably detect all internal volumetric defects in FSW, such as cracks, inclusion, porosity and lack-of-penetration. Spot-focused beams improve detection, inspection angles can be optimized electronically and electronic scan of the beam normal to the welds gives rapid one-line scan inspection to assure full coverage. Furthermore, a technique using ultrasonic attenuation measurements shows the presence or absence of conditions for forming kissing bonds (or entrapped oxide defects). Also, eddy current arrays can be used for surface inspection, and can help to detect tight kissing bonds. Using all three approaches, the overall detection capability of kissing bonds is high. (author)

  13. Caratterizzazione microstrutturale e prove di resilienza su giunti Friction Stir Welding e Linear Friction Welding di compositi a matrice metallica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Merlin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In questo studio sono stati caratterizzati giunti Friction Stir Welding e Linear Friction Welding su compositi a matrice in lega di alluminio e rinforzo particellare ceramico. Il processo FSW è stato applicato a due compositi ottenuti con processo fusorio, quindi estrusi e trattati termicamente T6: AA6061/20%vol.Al2O3p e AA7005/10%vol.Al2O3p. I giunti LFW sono stati invece realizzati su un composito con matrice in lega di alluminio e rinforzo particellare in carburo di silicio, ottenuto mediante metallurgia delle polveri, quindi forgiato e trattato termicamente T4: AA2124/25%vol.SiCp. Sono stati esaminati gli effetti della saldatura sullecaratteristiche microstrutturali dei giunti, avvalendosi di tecniche di microscopia ottica con analisi di immagine e di microscopia elettronica in scansione (SEM con microsonda a dispersione di energia (EDS. Sono state quindi condotte prove di resilienza con pendolo strumentato Charpy. Lo studio dei meccanismi di danneggiamento è stato effettuato mediante analisi al SEM delle superfici di frattura. Entrambi i processi di saldatura hanno portato a giunti sostanzialmente esenti da difetti. La microstruttura dei cordoni è risultata dipendente sia dalle caratteristiche microstrutturali iniziali dei compositi considerati, sia dalla tipologia di processo di saldatura. Nel caso dei compositi AA6061/20%Al2O3p e AA7005/10%Al2O3p saldati FSW si è osservato un sostanziale incremento di resilienza, rispetto al materiale base, in conseguenza dell’affinamento dei grani della matrice, della riduzione della dimensione media delle particelle di rinforzo e della loro spigolosità, indotte dal processo di saldatura. Il composito AA2124/25%SiCp saldato LFW ha presentato valori di resilienza confrontabili con quelli del materiale base, in conseguenza, soprattutto, dei limitati effetti della saldatura su dimensione e distribuzione delle particelle di rinforzo.

  14. Friction stir processed Al–TiO{sub 2} surface composites: Anodising behaviour and optical appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy, E-mail: chakri_gvc@yahoo.co.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Jensen, Flemming [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Simar, Aude [iMMC, Université Catholique de Louvain, Place Sainte Barbe 2, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Shabadi, Rajashekhara [Unité Matériaux et Transformations, Université Lille1, 59655 Villeneuve-d’Ascq (France); Ambat, Rajan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Microstructure of friction stir processed Al–TiO{sub 2} surface composites after anodising. • Effect of sulphuric acid anodising parameters on optical appearance of anodised layer. • Partial to complete amorphization of TiO{sub 2} particles with increasing anodising voltage. • Unoxidized metallic Al “shadow region” below TiO{sub 2} particles at low anodising voltage. • Presence of coloured Ti{sub n}O{sub 2n−1} and light absorbing unoxidized metallic Al cause darkening of anodised layer. - Abstract: Multiple-pass friction stir processing (FSP) was employed to impregnate TiO{sub 2} (rutile) particles into the surface of an aluminium alloy. The surface composites of Al–TiO{sub 2} were then anodised in a sulphuric acid electrolyte. The effect of anodising parameters on the resulting optical appearance was investigated. Microstructural and morphological characterization was performed using scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface appearance was analysed using an integrating sphere-spectrophotometer setup which measures the diffuse and total reflectance of light from the surface. Compared to samples without TiO{sub 2}, surface appearance after anodising of samples with TiO{sub 2} changed from dark to greyish white upon increasing the anodising voltage. This is attributed to the localized microstructural and morphological differences around the TiO{sub 2} powder particles incorporated into the anodic alumina matrix. The TiO{sub 2} powder particles in the FSP zone were partially or completely amorphized during the anodising process, and also electrochemically shadowed the anodising of underlying Al matrix.

  15. Finite element modelling and updating of friction stir welding (FSW joint for vibration analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahari Siti Norazila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding of aluminium alloys widely used in automotive and aerospace application due to its advanced and lightweight properties. The behaviour of FSW joints plays a significant role in the dynamic characteristic of the structure due to its complexities and uncertainties therefore the representation of an accurate finite element model of these joints become a research issue. In this paper, various finite elements (FE modelling technique for prediction of dynamic properties of sheet metal jointed by friction stir welding will be presented. Firstly, nine set of flat plate with different series of aluminium alloy; AA7075 and AA6061 joined by FSW are used. Nine set of specimen was fabricated using various types of welding parameters. In order to find the most optimum set of FSW plate, the finite element model using equivalence technique was developed and the model validated using experimental modal analysis (EMA on nine set of specimen and finite element analysis (FEA. Three types of modelling were engaged in this study; rigid body element Type 2 (RBE2, bar element (CBAR and spot weld element connector (CWELD. CBAR element was chosen to represent weld model for FSW joints due to its accurate prediction of mode shapes and contains an updating parameter for weld modelling compare to other weld modelling. Model updating was performed to improve correlation between EMA and FEA and before proceeds to updating, sensitivity analysis was done to select the most sensitive updating parameter. After perform model updating, total error of the natural frequencies for CBAR model is improved significantly. Therefore, CBAR element was selected as the most reliable element in FE to represent FSW weld joint.

  16. Optimized process parameters for fabricating metal particles reinforced 5083 Al composite by friction stir processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauri, Ranjit; Yadav, Devinder; Shyam Kumar, C N; Janaki Ram, G D

    2015-12-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) exhibit improved strength but suffer from low ductility. Metal particles reinforcement can be an alternative to retain the ductility in MMCs (Bauri and Yadav, 2010; Thakur and Gupta, 2007) [1,2]. However, processing such composites by conventional routes is difficult. The data presented here relates to friction stir processing (FSP) that was used to process metal particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites. The data is the processing parameters, rotation and traverse speeds, which were optimized to incorporate Ni particles. A wide range of parameters covering tool rotation speeds from 1000 rpm to 1800 rpm and a range of traverse speeds from 6 mm/min to 24 mm/min were explored in order to get a defect free stir zone and uniform distribution of particles. The right combination of rotation and traverse speed was found from these experiments. Both as-received coarse particles (70 μm) and ball-milled finer particles (10 μm) were incorporated in the Al matrix using the optimized parameters.

  17. Optimized process parameters for fabricating metal particles reinforced 5083 Al composite by friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjit Bauri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composites (MMCs exhibit improved strength but suffer from low ductility. Metal particles reinforcement can be an alternative to retain the ductility in MMCs (Bauri and Yadav, 2010; Thakur and Gupta, 2007 [1,2]. However, processing such composites by conventional routes is difficult. The data presented here relates to friction stir processing (FSP that was used to process metal particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites. The data is the processing parameters, rotation and traverse speeds, which were optimized to incorporate Ni particles. A wide range of parameters covering tool rotation speeds from 1000 rpm to 1800 rpm and a range of traverse speeds from 6 mm/min to 24 mm/min were explored in order to get a defect free stir zone and uniform distribution of particles. The right combination of rotation and traverse speed was found from these experiments. Both as-received coarse particles (70 μm and ball-milled finer particles (10 μm were incorporated in the Al matrix using the optimized parameters.

  18. Development of quartz particulate reinforced AA6063 aluminum matrix composites via friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Joyson Abraham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP has been accepted as a potential method to produce aluminum matrix composites (AMCs without the drawbacks of liquid metallurgy methods. The present work focuses on the development of AMCs reinforced with quartz (SiO2 particles using FSP. Grooves with various dimensions were machined on AA6063 plates and compacted with quartz particles. A single pass FSP was carried out using a combination of optimized process parameters. The volume fraction of quartz particles in the AMCs was varied from 0 to 18 vol.% in steps of 6 vol.%. The developed AA6063/Quartz AMCs were characterized using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The quartz particles were distributed uniformly in the aluminum matrix irrespective of the location within the stir zone. The grains of the AA6063 were extensively refined by the combination of thermomechanical effect of FSP and the pinning effect of quartz particles. The dispersion of the quartz particles improved the microhardness and wear resistance of the AMCs. The role of quartz particles on the worn surface and wear debris is reported.

  19. Processing and Optimization of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welding of AA 2219 and AA 7039 Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswarlu, D.; Nageswara rao, P.; Mahapatra, M. M.; Harsha, S. P.; Mandal, N. R.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper discusses the optimization of dissimilar friction stir welding of AA 2219 and AA 7039 alloys with respect to tool design issues including microstructural study of weld. The optimized ultimate tensile strength was ~280 MPa, and % elongation was ~11.5. It was observed that the extent of tool shoulder flat surface and tool rotational speed influenced the weld quality significantly. A mathematical model was also developed using response surface regression analysis to predict the effects of tool geometry and process variables on dissimilar AA 2219 and AA 7039 alloys welds. The microstructure evolution and mechanical properties were investigated by employing electron backscatter diffraction technique, Vickers microhardness, and tensile testing, respectively. The microstructural observations indicated that the grain size obtained at advancing side (AA 2219 alloy side) was much finer compared to the retreating side (AA 7039 alloy side). Hardness distribution in the stir zone was inhomogeneous, which might be due to inadequate mixing of weld zone material. The hardness values observed at the weld zone were lower than that in the base materials.

  20. Generated forces and heat during the critical stages of friction stir welding and processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, Sadiq Aziz; Tahir, Abd Salam Md; Izamshah, R. [University Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Malacca (Malaysia)

    2015-10-15

    The solid-state behavior of friction stir welding process results in violent mechanical forces that should be mitigated, if not eliminated. Plunging and dwell time are the two critical stages of this welding process in terms of the generated forces and the related heat. In this study, several combinations of pre-decided penetration speeds, rotational speeds, tool designs, and dwell time periods were used to investigate these two critical stages. Moreover, a coupled-field thermal-structural finite element model was developed to validate the experimental results and the induced stresses. The experimental results revealed the relatively large changes in force and temperature during the first two stages compared with those during the translational tool movement stage. An important procedure to mitigate the undesired forces was then suggested. The model prediction of temperature values and their distribution were in good agreement with the experimental prediction. Therefore, the thermal history of this non-uniform heat distribution was used to estimate the induced thermal stresses. Despite the 37% increase in these stresses when 40 s dwell time was used instead of 5 s, these stresses showed no effect on the axial force values because of the soft material incidence and stir effects.

  1. Microstructural and Mechanical Evolution of a Low Carbon Steel by Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekban, Dursun Murat; Aktarer, Semih Mahmut; Zhang, Hao; Xue, Peng; Ma, Zongyi; Purcek, Gencaga

    2017-08-01

    A low carbon steel (Grade A) was subjected to friction stir processing (FSP), and the effect of FSP on the microstructure and mechanical properties was investigated systematically. It was found that two distinct zones called stir zone (SZ) and heat-effected zone (HAZ) were formed during FSP. The SZ and HAZ consist mainly of ferrite, widmanstatten ferrite, ferrite+cementite aggregates, and martensite. FSP considerably refined the microstructure of the steel by means of dynamic recrystallization mechanism and formed a volumetric defect-free basin-like processed region. The ferritic grain size of the steel decreased from 25 µm in the coarse-grained state to about 3 µm in the fine-grained state, and the grains formed were separated mostly by high angle of misorientation with low density of dislocations. This microstructural evolution brought about a considerable increase in both hardness and strength values without a considerable decrease in ductility. Ultrafine-grained microstructure formed around and just beneath the pin increased the hardness of the steel from 140 Hv0.3 to about 245 Hv0.3. However, no hardness uniformity was formed throughout the processed zone due to the changes in deformation- and temperature-induced microstructure. Both yield and tensile strength values of processed zone increased from 256 and 435 MPa to about 334 and 525 MPa, respectively.

  2. Computer Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In friction stir welding, a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. This solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld such as aluminum alloys. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and thus tracks the aluminum deformation flow paths in a unique 3-dimensional manner. CT scanning is a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  3. Computed Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and is carried with the macro-flow of the weld metal. By using CT images, a 3-dimensional (3D) image of the lead flow pattern can be reconstructed. CT imaging was found to be a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  4. Effect of process parameters on optimum welding condition of DP590 steel by friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Gon; Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, In Ju [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In the automotive industry, vehicle weight reduction techniques have been actively studied to improve the rate of fuel consumption and to cope with the regulation restricting exhaust gas. For this reason, advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is preferred in the automobile industry as its tensile strength is 590 MPa and over. In this study, to obtain the optimum welding condition, the friction stir welding (FSW) process applied to AHSS was considered. The FSW experiment was performed on a stir plate using a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} tool and a 1.4-mm thick DP590 steel sheet manufactured by cold rolling. In addition, to investigate the temperature distribution of the advancing and retreating sides in the welding state, the tool rotation speed of 800 rpm, and the welding speed of 180 mm/min, a K-type thermocouple was inserted in the backing plate, and the peak temperature was evaluated at each point. Especially, the correlation between the heat input per unit length and the formation of the FSW zone was minutely analyzed.

  5. Microstructural Evolution and Fracture Behavior of Friction-Stir-Welded Al-Cu Laminated Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beygi, R.; Kazeminezhad, Mohsen; Kokabi, A. H.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we attempt to characterize the microstructural evolution during friction stir butt welding of Al-Cu-laminated composites and its effect on the fracture behavior of the joint. Emphasis is on the material flow and particle distribution in the stir zone. For this purpose, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, energy-dispersive spectroscopy EDS and XRD analyses, hardness measurements, and tensile tests are carried out on the joints. It is shown that intermetallic compounds exist in lamellas of banding structure formed in the advancing side of the welds. In samples welded from the Cu side, the banding structure in the advancing side and the hook formation in the retreating side determine the fracture behavior of the joint. In samples welded from the Al side, a defect is formed in the advancing side of the weld, which is attributed to insufficient material flow. It is concluded that the contact surface of the laminate (Al or Cu) with the shoulder of the FSW tool influences the material flow and microstructure of welds.

  6. An integrated multiphysics model for friction stir welding of 6061 Aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nourani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a new, combined ‘integrated’- ‘multiphysics’ model of friction stir welding (FSW where a set of governing equations from non-Newtonian incompressible fluid dynamics, conductive and convective heat transfer, and plain stress solid mechanics have been coupled for calculating the process variables and material behaviour both during and after welding. More specifically, regarding the multiphysics feature, the model is capable of simultaneously predicting the local distribution, location and magnitude of maximum temperature, strain, and strain rate fields around the tool pin during the process; while for the integrated (post-analysis part, the above predictions have been used to study the microstructure and residual stress field of welded parts within the same developed code. A slip/stick condition between the tool and workpiece, friction and deformation heat source, convection and conduction heat transfer in the workpiece, a solid mechanics-based viscosity definition, and the Zener-Hollomon- based rigid-viscoplastic material properties with solidus cut-off temperature and empirical softening regime have been employed. In order to validate all the predicted variables collectively, the model has been compared to a series of published case studies on individual/limited set of variables, as well as in-house experiments on FSW of aluminum 6061.

  7. Error Estimation And Accurate Mapping Based ALE Formulation For 3D Simulation Of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerdoux, Simon; Fourment, Lionel

    2007-05-01

    An Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation is developed to simulate the different stages of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process with the FORGE3® F.E. software. A splitting method is utilized: a) the material velocity/pressure and temperature fields are calculated, b) the mesh velocity is derived from the domain boundary evolution and an adaptive refinement criterion provided by error estimation, c) P1 and P0 variables are remapped. Different velocity computation and remap techniques have been investigated, providing significant improvement with respect to more standard approaches. The proposed ALE formulation is applied to FSW simulation. Steady state welding, but also transient phases are simulated, showing good robustness and accuracy of the developed formulation. Friction parameters are identified for an Eulerian steady state simulation by comparison with experimental results. Void formation can be simulated. Simulations of the transient plunge and welding phases help to better understand the deposition process that occurs at the trailing edge of the probe. Flexibility and robustness of the model finally allows investigating the influence of new tooling designs on the deposition process.

  8. Emission of nanoparticles during friction stir welding (FSW) of aluminium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J F; Miranda, R M; Santos, T J; Carvalho, P A

    2014-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is now well established as a welding process capable of joining some different types of metallic materials, as it was (1) found to be a reliable and economical way of producing high quality welds, and (2) considered a "clean" welding process that does not involve fusion of metal, as is the case with other traditional welding processes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the emission of particles during FSW in the nanorange of the most commonly used aluminum (Al) alloys, AA 5083 and AA 6082, originated from the Al alloy itself due to friction of the welding tool against the item that was being welded. Another goal was to measure Al alloys in the alveolar deposited surface area during FSW. Nanoparticles dimensions were predominantly in the 40- and 70-nm range. This study demonstrated that microparticles were also emitted during FSW but due to tool wear. However, the biological relevance and toxic manifestations of these microparticles remain to be determined.

  9. Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program In Pennsylvania Potential Applications of Friction Stir Welding to the Hydrogen Economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendlinger, Jennifer [Concurrent Technologies Corporation, Johnstown, PA (United States)

    2009-07-17

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state welding technique developed by The Welding Institute (TWI) of Cambridge, UK in the early 1990’s. The process uses a non-consumable rotating tool to develop frictional heat and plastically deform workpieces to be joined, resulting in a solid-state weld on the trailing side of the advancing tool. Since the materials to be joined are not melted, FSW results in a finer grain structure and therefore enhanced properties, relative to fusion welds. And unlike fusion welding, a relatively small number of key process parameters exist for FSW: tool rotational speed, linear weld velocity and force perpendicular to the joining surface. FSW is more energy efficient than fusion welding and can be accomplished in one or two passes, versus many more passes required of fusion welding thicker workpieces. Reduced post-weld workpiece distortion is another factor that helps to reduce the cost of FSW relative to fusion welding. Two primary areas have been identified for potential impact on the hydrogen economy: FSW of metallic pipes for hydrogen transmission and FSW of aluminum pressure vessels for hydrogen storage. Both areas have been under active development and are explored in this paper.

  10. Tribological Behavior of A356/Al2O3 Surface Nanocomposite Prepared by Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Y.; Karimzadeh, F.; Enayati, M. H.

    2014-04-01

    Surface A356 aluminum alloy matrix composites containing micro and nanosized Al2O3 are prepared by a new approach utilizing high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying and friction stir processing (FSP). Optical and scanning electron microscopy, microhardness, and wear tests were used to characterize the surface composites. Results indicated that, the presence of Al2O3 in matrix can improve the mechanical properties of specimens. The microhardness of surface composites containing micro and nanosized Al2O3 were 89.8 ± 2.6 HV and 109.7 ± 2.5 HV, respectively, which were higher than those for the as-received (79.6 ± 1.1 HV) and the FSPed A356-T6 with no alumina powder (66.8 ± 0.9 HV). Surface composites revealed low friction coefficients and wear rates, which were significantly lower than those obtained for substrate. The wear mass losses of the as-received, the FSPed, and surface micro and nanocomposite specimens after 500-m sliding distance were 50.5, 55.6, 31, and 17.2 mg, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy tests revealed different wear mechanisms on the surface of the wear test specimens.

  11. The effect of friction stir processing on the microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture behavior of investment cast titanium aluminum vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilchak, Adam L.

    The use of investment cast titanium components is becoming increasingly common in the aerospace industry due to the ability to produce large, one-piece components with complex geometries that were previously fabricated by mechanically fastening or welding multiple smaller parts together. However, the coarse, fully lamellar microstructure typical of investment cast alpha + beta titanium alloys results in relatively poor fatigue strength compared to forged titanium products. As a result, investment castings are not considered for use in fatigue limited structures. In recent years, friction stir processing has emerged as a solid state metalworking technique capable of substantial microstructure refinement in aluminum and nickel-aluminum-bronze alloys. The purpose of the present study is to determine the feasibility of friction stir processing and assess its effect on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the most widely used alpha + beta titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V. Depending on processing parameters, including tool travel speed, rotation rate and geometry, the peak temperature in the stir zone was either above or below the beta transus. The resulting microstructures consisted of either ˜1 mum equiaxed a grains, ˜25 mum prior beta grains containing a colony alpha + beta microstructure or a combination of 1 mum equiaxed alpha and fine, acicular alpha + beta. The changes in microstructure were characterized with scanning and transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The texture in the stir zone was nearly random for all processing conditions, however, several components of ideal simple shear textures were observed in both the hexagonal close packed alpha and the body centered cubic beta phases which provided insight into the operative grain refinement mechanisms. Due to the relatively small volume of material affected by friction stir processing, conventionally sized test specimens were unable to be machined from the stir zone

  12. Effect of Friction Stir Welding Parameters on the Mechanical and Microstructure Properties of the Al-Cu Butt Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sare Celik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a solid-state welding process used for welding similar and dissimilar materials. FSW is especially suitable to join sheet Al alloys, and this technique allows different material couples to be welded continuously. In this study, 1050 Al alloys and commercially pure Cu were produced at three different tool rotation speeds (630, 1330, 2440 rpm and three different tool traverse speeds (20, 30, 50 mm/min with four different tool position (0, 1, 1.5, 2 mm by friction stir welding. The influence of the welding parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints was investigated. Tensile and bending tests and microhardness measurements were used to determine the mechanical properties. The microstructures of the weld zone were investigated by optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM and were analyzed in an energy dispersed spectrometer (EDS. Intermetallic phases were detected based on the X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis results that evaluated the formation of phases in the weld zone. When the welding performance of the friction stir welded butt joints was evaluated, the maximum value obtained was 89.55% with a 1330 rpm tool rotational speed, 20 mm/min traverse speed and a 1 mm tool position configuration. The higher tensile strength is attributed to the dispersion strengthening of the fine Cu particles distributed over the Al material in the stir zone region.

  13. A Study Into Effects of Different Parameters on Mechanical Properties in Friction Stir Welding of AA 2024 Aluminium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydın ŞIK

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study AA2024 alloy, which is used especially in aircraft body, wings and automotive industry due to its lightness, workable aspect, high corrosion resistance and durability, was welded with stir friction method, and fatigue, hardness, bending and tension experiments of the joints obtained were conducted. Welding progress speed of the 4 mm thick sheets and stir tool rotation were determined to be the variable parameters. These parameters were taken as 20 mm shoulder width, 1000 rpm traverse speed, 1500 rpm, 2500 rpm and the progress speed was taken as 120 mm/min and 200 mm/min.

  14. Effect of Initial Microstructure on the Microstructural Evolution and Joint Efficiency of a WE43 Alloy During Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    A FEI Nova NanoSEM 230 (20 kV, 3.1 mA, tilting 70o, 0.3 μm step size) was used to record the EBSD patterns for stir zone. The Vickers microhardness ... Microhardness data for as processed and PWHT samples. 4. Conclusions The effect of processing conditions on the joint efficiency of a T5 temper WE43 alloy...texture on fracture location in friction stir weld of Mg alloy AZ61 during tensile test ,” Scripta Materialia 49 (2003), 161–166. 8. Z.Y. Ma, A.L

  15. Exploring material flow in friction stir welding using stacked structure of 2024 and 606 1 aluminum alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马正斌; 董春林; 李继忠; 陈巍; 栾国红

    2014-01-01

    An experimental technique based on stacked structures was developed to observe the material flow behavior ofthe friction stir welding (FSW)process.Analysis ofsection views along different directions revealed important new details ofthe material flow in FSW process.In this work,a general flow model ofFSW was constructed based on the analysis ofdifferent static section views ofstacked structure weld.The formation ofonion rings was found to be a geometric effect due to layered deposition and the extrusion occurred at the interface between flow arm (FA)and stirring zone (SZ).

  16. Friction Stir Welding of Zr_(55)Al_(10)Ni_5Cu_(30) Bulk Metallic Glass to Crystalline Aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuoxiang Qin; Cuihong Li; Haifeng Zhang; Zhongguang Wang; Zhuangqi Hu; Zhiqiang Liu

    2009-01-01

    The Zr_(55)Al_(10)Ni_5Cu_(30) bulk metallic glass plate were successfully welded to crystalline aluminum plates by using a friction stir welding (FSW) method. The welded zone was examined. No defects, cracks or pores were observed and no other crystalline phases except for aluminum were found in the welded joint. The strength of the joint is higher than that of aluminum. The glassy phase in the stir zone keeps the amorphous state, showing a successful welding. The storage modulus softens over the glass transition. And the weldability was discussed according to this phenomena.

  17. Development of a Robust and Cost-Effective Friction Stir Welding Process for Use in Advanced Military Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    245influences the FSW joint profile as well as the weld material 246microstructure and properties. Initially, one-piece steel tools 247were used with both the pin...885Fracture Locations of Friction-Stir Welded Joints of 6061-T6 Alumin - 886ium Alloy, J. Mater. Sci. Lett., 2003, 22, p 1061–1063 8878. W.B. Lee, C.Y. Lee...Stir Welding of Stainless Steel , 915 Mater. Sci. Eng. A, 2005, 398, p 146–163 916 18. M. Grujicic, G. Arakere, C.-F.Yen, and B.A. Cheeseman, Computa- 917

  18. Effect of Intermetallic Compound Phases on the Mechanical Properties of the Dissimilar Al/Cu Friction Stir Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodir, S. A.; Ahmed, M. M. Z.; Ahmed, Essam; Mohamed, Shaymaa M. R.; Abdel-Aleem, H.

    2016-11-01

    Types and distribution of intermetallic compound phases and their effects on the mechanical properties of dissimilar Al/Cu friction stir welded joints were investigated. Three different rotation speeds of 1000, 1200 and 1400 rpm were used with two welding speeds of 20 and 50 mm/min. The results show that the microstructures inside the stir zone were greatly affected by the rotation speed. Complex layered structures that containing intermetallic compound phases such as CuAl2, Al4Cu9 were formed in the stir zone. Their amount found to be increased with increasing rotation speed. However, the increasing of the rotation speed slightly lowered the hardness of the stir zone. Many sharp hardness peaks in the stir zones were found as a result of the intermetallic compounds formed, and the highest peaks of 420 Hv were observed at a rotation speed of 1400 rpm. The joints ultimate tensile strength reached a maximum value of 105 MPa at the rotation speed of 1200 rpm and travel speed of 20 mm/min with the joint efficiency ranged between 88 and 96% of the aluminum base metal. At the travel speed of 50 mm/min, the maximum value of the ultimate tensile strength was 96 MPa at rotation speed of 1400 rpm with the joint efficiency ranged between 79 and 90%. The fracture surfaces of tensile test specimens showed no evidence for the effect of the brittle intermetallic compounds in the stir zones on the tensile strength of the joints.

  19. The Evolution of Friction Stir Welding Theory at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C.

    2012-01-01

    From 1995 to the present the friction stir welding (FSW) process has been under study at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This is an account of the progressive emergence of a set of conceptual tools beginning with the discovery of the shear surface, wiping metal transfer, and the invention of a kinematic model and making possible a treatment of both metallurgical structure formation and process dynamics in friction stir welding from a unified point of view. It is generally observed that the bulk of the deformation of weld metal around the FSW pin takes place in a very narrow, almost discontinuous zone with high deformation rates characteristic of metal cutting. By 1999 it was realized that this zone could be treated as a shear surface like that in simple metal cutting models. At the shear surface the seam is drawn out and compressed and pressure and flow conditions determine whether or not a sound weld is produced. The discovery of the shear surface was followed by the synthesis of a simple 3- flow kinematic model of the FSW process. Relative to the tool the flow components are: (1) an approaching translational flow at weld speed V, (2) a rotating cylindrical plug flow with the angular velocity of the tool , and (3) a relatively slow ring vortex flow (like a smoke ring) encircling the tool and driven by shoulder scrolls and pin threads. The rotating plug flow picks up an element of weld metal, rotates it around with the tool, and deposits it behind the tool ( wiping metal transfer ); it forms plan section loops in tracers cut through by the tool. Radially inward flow from the ring vortex component retains metal longer in the rotating plug and outward flow expels metal earlier; this interaction forms the looping weld seam trace and the tongue and groove bimetallic weld contour. The radial components of the translational and ring vortex flows introduce parent metal intrusions into the small grained nugget material close to the tool shoulder; if this feature is

  20. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2002-01-01

    The improvement in weld quality by the friction stir welding (FSW) process invented by TWI of Cambridge, England, patented in 1991, has prompted investigation of this process for advanced structural materials including Al metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) materials. Such materials can have high specific stiffness and other potential beneficial properties for the extreme environments in space. Developments of discontinuous reinforced Al-MMCs have found potential space applications and the future for such applications is quite promising. The space industry has recognized advantages of the FSW process over conventional welding processes such as the absence of a melt zone, reduced distortion, elimination of the need for shielding gases, and ease of automation. The process has been well proven for aluminum alloys, and work is being carried out for ferrous materials, magnesium alloys and copper alloys. Development work in the FSW welding process for joining of Al-MMCs is relatively recent and some of this and related work can be found in referenced research publications. NASA engineers have undertaken to spear head this research development work for FSW process investigation of Al-MMCs. Some of the reported related work has pointed out the difficulty in fusion welding of particulate reinforced MMCs where liquid Al will react with SiC to precipitate aluminum carbide (Al4C3). Advantages of no such reaction and no need for joint preparation for the FSW process is anticipated in the welding of Al-MMCs. The FSW process has been best described as a combination of extrusion and forging of metals. This is carried out as the pin tool rotates and is slowly plunged into the bond line of the joint as the pin tool's shoulder is in intimate contact with the work piece. The material is friction-stirred into a quality weld. Al-MMCs, 4 in. x 12 in. plates of 0.25 in. (6.35mm) thickness, procured from MMCC, Inc. were butt welded using FSW process at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using

  1. Influence of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) on Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of AW-7020M and Aw-7020 Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Dudzik Krzysztof; Jurczak Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Friction welding associated with mixing the weld material (FSW - Friction Stir Welding ) is an alternative to MIG and TIG welding techniques for Al-alloys. This paper presents experimental results obtained from static tension tests on specimens made of AW-7020M and AW-7020 alloys and their joints welded by using FSW method carried out on flat specimens, according to Polish standards : PN-EN ISO 4136:2011 and PN-EN ISO 6892-1:2010. Results of corrosion resistance tests are also presented. The ...

  2. Wear and Friction Behavior of Stir Cast Al-TiB2 Metal Matrix Composites with Various Lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Poria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Al- TiB2 metal matrix composites are fabricated using stir cast method and its tribological characterization is done using three different lubricants. Tribological studies are performed in a multi-tribotester using block-on-roller configuration under 25-75 N loads and 400-600 rpm rotational speeds. Four different weight percentages of TiB2 are considered in this study. Comparison between dry condition and lubricated conditions is gleaned to differentiate wear and friction characteristics and SEM images are taken to fortify them. Lubricated conditions yield large reduction in wear and friction compared to dry condition.

  3. Effect of welding speed on the material flow patterns in friction stir welding of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hua; Wu Huiqiang; Huang Jihua; LIN Sanbao; WU Lin

    2007-01-01

    The clear zigzag-line pattern on transverse cross sections can be used to explain the formation mechanism of the weld nugget when friction stir welded AZ31 magnesium alloy without any other insert material is used as mark. It provides a simple and useful method to research the joining mechanism of friction stir welding. The rotation speed is kept at 1000 r/min and the welding speed changes from 120 mm/min to 600 mm/min. The macrostructure on the transverse cross section was divided into several parts by faying surface. The results show that the shape and formation procedure of the weld nugget change with the welding speed. There are two main material flows in the weld nugget: one is from the advancing side and the other is from the retreating side. A simple model on the weld nugget formation of FSW is presented in this article.

  4. Effect of Microstructural changes on Mechanical properties of Friction stir welded Nano SiC reinforced AA6061composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GOVIND.NANDIPATI

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum alloys used in aircrafts generally exhibit low weldability on fusion welding techniques. Friction stir welding (FSW has got a lot of attention as a solid state joining technique and provided an improved way of producing aluminum joints in a faster way. In the present work, nano Silicon carbide(SiC particles reinforced aluminum AA6061metal matrix composites which find applications in aircrafts are casted and friction stir welded. FSW resulted in significant grain refinement and homogeneous distribution of nano SiC particles. The Microstructural analysis is carried out using optical microscopy(OM and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM.The joint strength is increased compared to the conventional fusion welding techniques. The relationship between mechanical properties [hardness, UTS, Y.S] and microstructure of the welded region are studied.

  5. Physical Simulation of Deformation and Microstructure Evolution During Friction Stir Processing of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, S. S.; Livingston, J.; Lippold, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    The feasibility of using high-strain rate (1.475 to 3.942 s-1) hot-torsion testing with a Gleeble® thermomechanical simulator was demonstrated for simulating microstructures consistent with friction stir processing (FSP) of Ti-6Al-4V. The tests were performed on α/β-processed base material at temperatures both above and below the β-transus. Various phenomena including the refinement of α- and β-grains, deformation-induced heating, and deformation instabilities were observed. These tests reproduced the range of microstructures that are observed under FSP processing conditions. The testing methodology can be used for generating constitutive material property equations relevant to computational FSP/friction stir welding models.

  6. Comparison of RSM with ANN in predicting tensile strength of friction stir welded AA7039 aluminium alloy joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. K. LAKSHMINARAYANAN; V. BALASUBRAMANIAN

    2009-01-01

    Friction stir welding(FSW) is an innovative solid state joining technique and has been employed in aerospace, rail, automotive and marine industries for joining aluminium, magnesium, zinc and copper alloys. The FSW process parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial force, play a major role in deciding the weld quality. Two methods, response surface methodology and artificial neural network were used to predict the tensile strength of friction stir welded AA7039 aluminium alloy. The experiments were conducted based on three factors, three-level, and central composite face centered design with full replications technique, and mathematical model was developed. Sensitivity analysis was carried out to identify critical parameters. The results obtained through response surface methodology were compared with those through artificial neural networks.

  7. Effect of welding parameters on the mechanical and microstructural properties of friction stir welded AA- 2014 joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, R.; Bhatty, M. B.; Iqbal, F.; Zaigham, H.; Salam, I.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the effect of processing parameters on the mechanical and microstructural properties of aluminum AA2014-T6 joints produced by friction stir welding was analyzed. Friction stir welding was carried out on a milling machine. Different samples were produced by varying the tool rotational rates (700, 1000 rpm) and travel speeds (45-105 mm/min). Tensile tests performed at room temperature were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the joints. In order to analyze the microstructural evolution of the material, the welds’ cross-sections were observed under optical microscope. The results shows that the resulting microstructure is free of defects and tensile strength of the welded joints is upto 75% of the base metal strength.

  8. Effect of tool shape and welding parameters on mechanical properties and microstructure of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Aneja

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present experimental study, dissimilar aluminum alloy AA5083 and AA6082 were friction stir welded by varying tool shape, welding speed and rotary speed of the tool in order to investigate the effect of varying tool shape and welding parameters on the mechanical properties as well as microstructure. The friction stir welding (FSW process parameters have great influence on heat input per unit length of weld. The outcomes of experimental study prove that mechanical properties increases with decreasing welding speed. Furthermore mechanical properties were also found to improve as the rotary speed increases and the same phenomenon was found to happen while using straight cylindrical threaded pin profile tool. The microstructure of the dissimilar joints revealed that at low welding speeds, the improved material mixing was observed. The similar phenomenon was found to happen at higher rotational speeds using straight cylindrical threaded tool.

  9. Effect of Specimen Orientation on Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior in Friction Stir Welded Al7075-T651 Joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yeui Han; Kim, Seon Jin [Pukyoung National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of crack orientation on fatigue crack growth behavior in friction stir welded (FSWed) Al 7075-T651. Fatigue crack growth testing was conducted on compact tension (CT) specimens machined from the friction stir welds and the base metal under constant stress intensity factor range control. Tests were performed with the crack propagating nominally perpendicular to the weld line (termed the TL specimen) and the crack propagating in a parallel direction of the weld line (termed the LT specimen), and with three different constant stress intensity factor ranges. Both these specimen orientations were found to have a considerable effect on the fatigue crack growth behavior. Paris’s law was adopted for the analysis of experimental results; the exponent m of the WM-LT specimen was determined to be 3.56, which was the largest value in this experimental conditions.

  10. Corrosion behavior of the friction-stir-welded joints of 2A14-T6 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hai-long; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Da-tong; Zhuang, Qian-yu

    2015-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of friction-stir-welded 2A14-T6 aluminum alloy was investigated by immersion testing in immersion exfoliation corrosion (EXCO) solution. Electrochemical measurements (open circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization curves, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy), scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy were employed for analyzing the corrosion mechanism. The results show that, compared to the base material, the corrosion resistance of the friction-stir welds is greatly improved, and the weld nugget has the highest corrosion resistance. The pitting susceptibility originates from the edge of Al-Cu-Fe-Mn-Si phase particles as the cathode compared to the matrix due to their high self-corrosion potential. No corrosion activity is observed around the θ phase (Al2Cu) after 2 h of immersion in EXCO solution.

  11. Effect of Nano-Particle Addition on Grain Structure Evolution of Friction Stir-Processed Al 6061 During Postweld Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junfeng; Lee, Bing Yang; Du, Zhenglin; Bi, Guijun; Tan, Ming Jen; Wei, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The fabrication of nano-composites is challenging because uniform dispersion of nano-sized reinforcements in metallic substrate is difficult to achieve using powder metallurgy or liquid processing methods. In the present study, Al-based nano-composites reinforced with Al2O3 particles have been successfully fabricated using friction stir processing. The effects of nano-Al2O3 particle addition on grain structure evolution of friction stir-processed Al matrix during post-weld annealing were investigated. It was revealed that the pinning effect of Al2O3 particles retarded grain growth and completely prevented abnormal grain growth during postweld annealing at 470°C. However, abnormal grain growth can still occur when the composite material was annealed at 530°C. The mechanism involved in the grain structure evolution and the effect of nano-sized particle addition on the mechanical properties were discussed therein.

  12. Surface Residual Stresses in Ti-6Al-4V Friction Stir Welds: Pre- and Post-Thermal Stress Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, P.; Ramulu, M.

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the residual stresses present in titanium friction stir welds and if a post-weld thermal stress relief cycle would be effective in minimizing those weld-induced residual stresses. Surface residual stresses in titanium 6Al-4V alloy friction stir welds were measured in butt joint thicknesses ranging from 3 to 12 mm. The residual stress states were also evaluated after the welds were subjected to a post-weld thermal stress relief cycle of 760 °C for 45 min. High (300-400 MPa) tensile residual stresses were observed in the longitudinal direction prior to stress relief and compressive residual stresses were measured in the transverse direction. After stress relief, the residual stresses were decreased by an order of magnitude to negligible levels.

  13. PengaruhBentuk Probe Pada Tool Shoulder TerhadapMetalurgiAluminium Seri 5083 Dengan Proses Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkifli Edward

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Penyambungan Aluminium dengan GTAW dan GMAW menghasilkan suhu yang sangat tinggi pada saat proses pengelasansehinggamenghasilkandistorsi yang besar. Untuk mengatasi kekurangan tersebut dilakukan pengelasan yang suhu pengelasannya berada di bawah titik leleh Aluminium yaitu Friction Stir Welding. Padatugasakhirinidilakukanmodifikasitool dari K-100 BohlerdanmenggunakanmesinfraissebagaipenggantimesinFriction Stir Weldingpada Aluminiumpaduan 5083 dengantebal 4 mm denganukuran 30 mm x 15 mm menggunakantigavariasi pin yaitulingkaran (straight cylindrical, segitiga (triangle dansegiempat (square dengantravel speedsebesar 0.33 mm/detik serta sudut inklinasi 20. Kemudiandilakukananalisaterhadapperubahanmetalurgi, dandefect yang terjadi. Dari hasilpercobaandengan uji Makro etsa, fotoMikro serta Radiografi diketahui bahwa variasi pin berbentuksegiempat (squaremenimbulkansuhu yang paling besardarivariasi pin lingkaran (straight cylindrical dansegitiga (triangle menyebabkan bentuk butir semakin besar, surface irragulariti semakin pendek, tidakditemukantunnel defect, kekerasan material bertambah serta diskontinuitas berupa weld flash semakin besar.

  14. Interfacial and Mechanical Behavior of AA5456 Filling Friction-Stir-Welded Lap Joints Using Similar and Dissimilar Pins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behmand, Saleh Alaei; Mirsalehi, Seyyed Ehsan; Omidvar, Hamid; Safarkhanian, Mohammad Ali

    2016-10-01

    In this article, filling friction stir welding (FFSW) of the remaining exit holes of AA5456 alloy friction-stir-welded lap joints was studied. For this purpose, the influences of different rotating speeds, holding times, and pin materials, AA5456 and AA2024, on the metallurgical structure and joint strength were investigated. The observations showed that defect-free lap joints are successfully obtainable by this method using similar and dissimilar consumable pins. The results indicated that the higher rotating speed and holding time adversely affect the weld performance. The best result was achieved for 30 seconds holding time, 500 rpm rotating speed, and AA2024 consumable pin. In this condition, a lap shear strength of 10 pct higher than that of the nonfilled joint, equivalent to about 94 pct of the original defect-free FSW joint, was obtained, whereas the GTAW filled joint showed only approximately 87 pct of the continuous FSW joint strength.

  15. Friction Stir Welding of Tapered Thickness Welds Using an Adjustable Pin Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Glynn; Venable, Richard; Lawless, Kirby

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) can be used for joining weld lands that vary in thickness along the length of the weld. An adjustable pin tool mechanism can be used to accomplish this in a single-pass, full-penetration weld by providing for precise changes in the pin length relative to the shoulder face during the weld process. The difficulty with this approach is in accurately adjusting the pin length to provide a consistent penetration ligament throughout the weld. The weld technique, control system, and instrumentation must account for mechanical and thermal compliances of the tooling system to conduct tapered welds successfully. In this study, a combination of static and in-situ measurements, as well as active control, is used to locate the pin accurately and maintain the desired penetration ligament. Frictional forces at the pin/shoulder interface were a source of error that affected accurate pin position. A traditional FSW pin tool design that requires a lead angle was used to join butt weld configurations that included both constant thickness and tapered sections. The pitch axis of the tooling was fixed throughout the weld; therefore, the effective lead angle in the tapered sections was restricted to within the tolerances allowed by the pin tool design. The sensitivity of the FSW process to factors such as thickness offset, joint gap, centerline offset, and taper transition offset were also studied. The joint gap and the thickness offset demonstrated the most adverse affects on the weld quality. Two separate tooling configurations were used to conduct tapered thickness welds successfully. The weld configurations included sections in which the thickness decreased along the weld, as well as sections in which the thickness increased along the weld. The data presented here include weld metallography, strength data, and process load data.

  16. Enhancement of wear and ballistic resistance of armour grade AA7075 aluminium alloy using friction stir processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I. SUDHAKAR; V. MADHU; G. MADHUSUDHAN REDDY; K. SRINIVASA RAO

    2015-01-01

    Industrial applications of aluminium and its alloys are restricted because of their poor tribological properties. Thermal spraying, laser surfacing, electron beam welding are the most widely used techniques to alter the surface morphology of base metal. Preliminary studies reveal that the coating and layering of aluminium alloys with ceramic particles enhance the ballistic resistance. Furthermore, among aluminium alloys, 7075 aluminium alloy exhibits high strength which can be compared to that of steels and has profound applications in the designing of lightweight fortification structures and integrated protection systems. Having limitations such as poor bond integrity, formation of detrimental phases and interfacial reaction between reinforcement and substrate using fusion route to deposit hard particles paves the way to adopt friction stir processing for fabricating surface composites using different sizes of boron carbide particles as reinforcement on armour grade 7075 aluminium alloy as matrix in the present investigation. Wear and ballistic tests were carried out to assess the performance of friction stir processed AA7075 alloy. Significant improvement in wear resistance of friction stir processed surface composites is attributed to the change in wear mechanism from abrasion to adhesion. It has also been observed that the surface metal matrix composites have shown better ballistic resistance compared to the substrate AA7075 alloy. Addition of solid lubricant MoS2 has reduced the depth of penetration of the projectile to half that of base metal AA7075 alloy. For the first time, the friction stir processing technique was successfully used to improve the wear and ballistic resistances of armour grade high strength AA7075 alloy.

  17. Friction stir surfacing of cast A356 aluminium–silicon alloy with boron carbide and molybdenum disulphide powders

    OpenAIRE

    R. Srinivasu; A.Sambasiva Rao; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2015-01-01

    Good castability and high strength properties of Al–Si alloys are useful in defence applications like torpedoes, manufacture of Missile bodies, and parts of automobile such as engine cylinders and pistons. Poor wear resistance of the alloys is major limitation for their use. Friction stir processing (FSP) is a recognized surfacing technique as it overcomes the problems of fusion route surface modification methods. Keeping in view of the requirement of improving wear resistance of cast alumini...

  18. Addressing the Limit of Detectability of Residual Oxide Discontinuities in Friction Stir Butt Welds of Aluminum using Phased Array Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, P. H.

    2008-01-01

    This activity seeks to estimate a theoretical upper bound of detectability for a layer of oxide embedded in a friction stir weld in aluminum. The oxide is theoretically modeled as an ideal planar layer of aluminum oxide, oriented normal to an interrogating ultrasound beam. Experimentally-measured grain scattering level is used to represent the practical noise floor. Echoes from naturally-occurring oxides will necessarily fall below this theoretical limit, and must be above the measurement noise to be potentially detectable.

  19. Numerical simulation of friction stir welding (FSW): Prediction of the heat affect zone using a softening model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, R. M. F.; Carlone, P.; Valente, R. A. F.; Teixeira-Dias, F.; Palazzo, G. S.

    2016-10-01

    In this work a numerical model is proposed to simulate Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process in AA2024-T3 plates. This model included a softening model that account for the temperature history and the hardness distribution on a welded plate can thus be predicted. The validation of the model was performed using experimental measurements of the hardness in the plate cross-section. There is an acceptable prediction of the material softening in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) using the adopted model.

  20. Enhancement of wear and ballistic resistance of armour grade AA7075 aluminium alloy using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sudhakar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Industrial applications of aluminium and its alloys are restricted because of their poor tribological properties. Thermal spraying, laser surfacing, electron beam welding are the most widely used techniques to alter the surface morphology of base metal. Preliminary studies reveal that the coating and layering of aluminium alloys with ceramic particles enhance the ballistic resistance. Furthermore, among aluminium alloys, 7075 aluminium alloy exhibits high strength which can be compared to that of steels and has profound applications in the designing of lightweight fortification structures and integrated protection systems. Having limitations such as poor bond integrity, formation of detrimental phases and interfacial reaction between reinforcement and substrate using fusion route to deposit hard particles paves the way to adopt friction stir processing for fabricating surface composites using different sizes of boron carbide particles as reinforcement on armour grade 7075 aluminium alloy as matrix in the present investigation. Wear and ballistic tests were carried out to assess the performance of friction stir processed AA7075 alloy. Significant improvement in wear resistance of friction stir processed surface composites is attributed to the change in wear mechanism from abrasion to adhesion. It has also been observed that the surface metal matrix composites have shown better ballistic resistance compared to the substrate AA7075 alloy. Addition of solid lubricant MoS2 has reduced the depth of penetration of the projectile to half that of base metal AA7075 alloy. For the first time, the friction stir processing technique was successfully used to improve the wear and ballistic resistances of armour grade high strength AA7075 alloy.

  1. Microstructure and mechanical property of nano-SiCp reinforced high strength Mg bulk composites produced by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, K., E-mail: greatsunkai@sina.com [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shi, Q.Y.; Sun, Y.J.; Chen, G.Q. [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultimate tensile strength of the bulk composite improved significantly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles dispersed uniformly in the composites after friction stir process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strengthening mechanism of the composites has been studied. - Abstract: Friction stir processing has been applied to fabricate SiC-Mg bulk composites in this study. AZ63 magnesium alloy, a kind of commercial engineering materials, was selected as base metal. SiC nanoparticles with average size of 40 nm were selected as reinforced particles. After being ultrasonic dispersed in ethanol and friction stir processed with base metal, the SiC particles were uniformly dispersed. Friction stir processing without filling any particles was also applied to base metal as a comparison group. Microstructure evolution was observed by optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. Fine and uniform nugget zone were found both in comparison group and composite. The phases of the material were determined by X-ray diffraction. Transmission electron microscopy observation was conducted to study the condition of SiC nanoparticles. SiC particles were found both inside the grain and at the grain boundary. No micro-sized particle agglomeration was observed in the composite. Vicker hardness and tensile test were carried out to study the mechanical properties of the composite. The average Vicker hardness of the base metal, comparison group and composite were 80 Hv, 85 Hv and 109 Hv respectively. The ultimate tensile strength of the composite reached 312 MPa. Compared with 160 MPa of the as-casted Mg alloy, 263 MPa of the comparison group, the effect of nanoparticles on strength increase was significant.

  2. Inhibition of the formation of intermetallic compounds in aluminum-steel welded joints by friction stir welding

    OpenAIRE

    Torres López, Edwar A.; Ramirez, Antonio J

    2015-01-01

    Formation of deleterious phases during welding of aluminum and steel is a challenge of the welding processes, for decades. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has been used in an attempt to reduce formation of intermetallic compounds trough reducing the heat input. In this research, dissimilar joint of 6063-T5 aluminum alloy and AISI-SAE 1020 steel were welded using this technique. The temperature of welded joints was measured during the process. The interface of the welded joints was characterized u...

  3. X-ray and neutron diffraction measurements of dislocation density and subgrain size in a friction stir welded aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claussen, Bjorn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Woo, Wanchuck [ORNL; Zhili, Feng [ORNL; Edward, Kenik [ORNL; Ungar, Tamas [EOTVOS UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    The dislocation density and subgrain size were determined in the base material and friction-stir welds of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction measurement was performed in the base material. The result of the line profile analysis of the X-ray diffraction peak shows that the dislocation density is about 4.5 x 10{sup 14} m{sup 02} and the subgrain size is about 200 nm. Meanwhile, neutron diffraction measurements have been performed to observe the diffraction peaks during friction-stir welding (FSW). The deep penetration capability of the neutron enables us to measure the peaks from the midplane of the Al plate underneath the tool shoulder of the friction-stir welds. The peak broadening analysis result using the Williamson-Hall method shows the dislocation density of about 3.2 x 10{sup 15} m{sup -2} and subgrain size of about 160 nm. The significant increase of the dislocation density is likely due to the severe plastic deformation during FSW. This study provides an insight into understanding the transient behavior of the microstructure under severe thermomechanical deformation.

  4. Optimization of process parameters of aluminum alloy AA 2014-T6 friction stir welds by response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanjaneyulu Kadaganchi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The heat treatable aluminum–copper alloy AA2014 finds wide application in the aerospace and defence industry due to its high strength-to-weight ratio and good ductility. Friction stir welding (FSW process, an emerging solid state joining process, is suitable for joining this alloy compared to fusion welding processes. This work presents the formulation of a mathematical model with process parameters and tool geometry to predict the responses of friction stir welds of AA 2014-T6 aluminum alloy, viz yield strength, tensile strength and ductility. The most influential process parameters considered are spindle speed, welding speed, tilt angle and tool pin profile. A four-factor, five-level central composite design was used and a response surface methodology (RSM was employed to develop the regression models to predict the responses. The mechanical properties, such as yield strength (YS, ultimate tensile strength (UTS and percentage elongation (%El, are considered as responses. Method of analysis of variance was used to determine the important process parameters that affect the responses. Validation trials were carried out to validate these results. These results indicate that the friction stir welds of AA 2014-T6 aluminum alloy welded with hexagonal tool pin profile have the highest tensile strength and elongation, whereas the joints fabricated with conical tool pin profile have the lowest tensile strength and elongation.

  5. Comparative study on fatigue properties of friction stir and MIG-pulse welded joints in 5083 Al-Mg alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Cai-zhi; YANG Xin-qi; LUAN Guo-hong

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to compare the fatigue properties of friction stir welds with those of MIG-pulse welds. The 5083 Al-Mg alloy was welded by single pass friction stir welding(FSW) and double-sided MIG-pulse welding. The results show that friction stir(FS) welds have a better appearance than MIG-pulse welds for the lack of voids, cracks and distortions. Compared with the parent plate, FSW welds exhibit similar fine grains, while MIG-pulse welds display a different cast microstructure due to the high heat input and the addition of welding wire. The S-N curves of FSW and MIG-pulse joints show that the fatigue life of FS welds is 18 - 26 times longer than that of MIG-pulse welds under the stress ratio of 0.1 and the calculated fatigue characteristic values of each weld increase from 38.67 MPa for MIG-pulse welds to 53.59 MPa for FSW welds.

  6. Friction stir surfacing of cast A356 aluminium–silicon alloy with boron carbide and molybdenum disulphide powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Srinivasu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Good castability and high strength properties of Al–Si alloys are useful in defence applications like torpedoes, manufacture of Missile bodies, and parts of automobile such as engine cylinders and pistons. Poor wear resistance of the alloys is major limitation for their use. Friction stir processing (FSP is a recognized surfacing technique as it overcomes the problems of fusion route surface modification methods. Keeping in view of the requirement of improving wear resistance of cast aluminium–silicon alloy, friction stir processing was attempted for surface modification with boron carbide (B4C and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 powders. Metallography, micro compositional analysis, hardness and pin-on-disc wear testing were used for characterizing the surface composite coating. Microscopic study revealed breaking of coarse silicon needles and uniformly distributed carbides in the A356 alloy matrix after FSP. Improvement and uniformity in hardness was obtained in surface composite layer. Higher wear resistance was achieved in friction stir processed coating with carbide powders. Addition of solid lubricant MoS2 powder was found to improve wear resistance of the base metal significantly.

  7. A Finite Element Model to Simulate Defect Formation during Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a 3D coupled thermo-mechanical finite element model is developed to predict and analyze the defect formation during friction stir welding based on coupled Eulerian Lagrangian method. The model is validated by comparing the estimated welding temperature, processed zone shape and void size with those obtained experimentally. The results compared indicate that the simulated temperature and the data measured are in good agreement with each other. In addition, the model can predict the plasticized zone shape and the presence of a void in the weld quite accurately. However, the void size is overestimated. The effects of welding parameters and tool pin profile are also analyzed. The results reveal that welding at low welding speed or high tool rotational speed could produce a smaller void. Moreover, compared to a smooth tool pin, a featured tool pin can enhance plastic flow in the weld and achieve defect-free weldment. The results are helpful for the optimization of the welding process and the design of welding tools.

  8. Characterization of Residual Stress Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth of a Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Seshadri, Banavara R.; James, Mark A.; Brazill, Richard L.; Schultz, Robert W.; Donald, J. Keith; Blair, Amy

    2015-01-01

    An on-line compliance-based method to account for residual stress effects in stress-intensity factor and fatigue crack growth property determinations has been evaluated. Residual stress intensity factor results determined from specimens containing friction stir weld induced residual stresses are presented, and the on-line method results were found to be in excellent agreement with residual stress-intensity factor data obtained using the cut compliance method. Variable stress-intensity factor tests were designed to demonstrate that a simple superposition model, summing the applied stress-intensity factor with the residual stress-intensity factor, can be used to determine the total crack-tip stress-intensity factor. Finite element, VCCT (virtual crack closure technique), and J-integral analysis methods have been used to characterize weld-induced residual stress using thermal expansion/contraction in the form of an equivalent delta T (change in local temperature during welding) to simulate the welding process. This equivalent delta T was established and applied to analyze different specimen configurations to predict residual stress distributions and associated residual stress-intensity factor values. The predictions were found to agree well with experimental results obtained using the crack- and cut-compliance methods.

  9. A Concurrent Product-Development Approach for Friction-Stir Welded Vehicle-Underbody Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, G.; Hariharan, A.; Pandurangan, B.

    2012-04-01

    High-strength aluminum and titanium alloys with superior blast/ballistic resistance against armor piercing (AP) threats and with high vehicle light-weighing potential are being increasingly used as military-vehicle armor. Due to the complex structure of these vehicles, they are commonly constructed through joining (mainly welding) of the individual components. Unfortunately, these alloys are not very amenable to conventional fusion-based welding technologies [e.g., gas metal arc welding (GMAW)] and to obtain high-quality welds, solid-state joining technologies such as friction-stir welding (FSW) have to be employed. However, since FSW is a relatively new and fairly complex joining technology, its introduction into advanced military-vehicle-underbody structures is not straight forward and entails a comprehensive multi-prong approach which addresses concurrently and interactively all the aspects associated with the components/vehicle-underbody design, fabrication, and testing. One such approach is developed and applied in this study. The approach consists of a number of well-defined steps taking place concurrently and relies on two-way interactions between various steps. The approach is critically assessed using a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis.

  10. Vertical Compensation Friction Stir Welding of 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shude; Meng, Xiangchen; Xing, Jingwei; Ma, Lin; Gao, Shuangsheng

    2016-09-01

    Vertical compensation friction stir welding (VCFSW) was proposed in order to solve the adverse effect caused by a big gap at the interface between two welded workpieces. VCFSW was successfully applied to weld 6061-T6 aluminum alloy with the thickness of 4 mm, while 2024-T4 aluminum alloy was selected as a rational compensation material. The results show that VCFSW is difficult to get a sound joint when the width of strip is no less than 1.5 mm. Decreasing the welding speed is beneficial to break compensation strip into pieces and then get higher quality joint. When the width of strip is 1 mm, the tensile strength and elongation of joint at the welding speed of 50 mm/min and rotational velocity of 1,800 rpm reach the maximum values of 203 MPa and 5.2%, respectively. Moreover, the addition of 2024-T4 alloy plays a strengthening effect on weld zone (WZ) of VCFSW joint. The fracture surface morphology of joint consisting of amounts of dimples exhibits ductile fracture.

  11. Synthesize of AZ31/TiC magnesium matrix composites using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Balakrishnan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP is a novel solid state technique to synthesize metal matrix composites. In the present work, an attempt has been made to synthesize AZ31/TiC magnesium matrix composites using FSP and to analyze the microstructure using scanning electron microscopy. A groove was prepared on 6 mm thick AZ31 magnesium alloy plates and compacted with TiC particles. The width of the groove was varied to result in four different volume fraction of TiC particles (0, 6, 12 and 18 vol.%. A single pass FSP was carried out using a tool rotational speed of 1200 rpm, traverse speed of 40 mm/min and an axial force of 10 kN. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to study the microstructure of the synthesized composites. The results indicated that TiC particles were distributed uniformly in the magnesium matrix without the formation of clusters. There was no interfacial reaction between the magnesium matrix and the TiC particle. TiC particles were properly bonded to the magnesium matrix.

  12. Texture evolution and deformation mechanism in friction stir welding of 2219Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S., E-mail: sjchen@bjut.edu.cn; Jiang, X.

    2014-08-26

    Texture evolution and deformation mechanism in the weld zones of friction stir welded 2219Al alloy have been investigated by the electron backscatter diffraction method. The weld zones are characterized by elongated structure in the base material, the heat affected zone and the thermo-mechanically affected zone and rotated elongated structure in the nugget zone. Four main texture components, Cube {001}〈100〉, Goss {011}〈100〉, Brass {011}〈211〉 and Cube ND {001}〈110〉 close to Cube component, were developed in the TMAZ, the HAZ and the nugget zone; S {123}〈634〉 was developed in the nugget zone only with Cube component orientated as their next neighbour and the nugget zone is dominated by Cube, Goss and S texture components. Cube grains in the nugget zone were formed by strain induced boundary migration mechanism (SIBM). Both variants of the texture components have two slip systems with the highest Schmid factors 0.42. Both Cube and Goss components slip on two planes (111) and (1{sup ¯}11). Relatively larger fractions of Σ3, Σ9 twin boundaries and Σ11, Σ29a boundaries have been found in the centre of the weld zone. Materials in the TMAZ have undergone dynamic recovery; geometric dynamic recrystallization (GDRX) occurred in the nugget zone.

  13. Corrosion behavior of Al6061 alloy weldment produced by friction stir welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Gharavi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the corrosion behavior of welded lap joints of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy produced by friction stir welding process has been investigated. Corrosion properties of welded lap joints were studied by cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. All tests were performed in an aerated 0.6 mol L−1 NaCl aqueous solution with pH = 6.5 at a temperature of 30 °C to characterize corrosion morphology and realize corrosion features of weld regions as opposed to the parent alloy. The microstructure of weld nugget (WN, heated affected zone (HAZ, and parent alloy were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The experimental results indicated that the welding process has a major effect on the corrosion resistance, which possibly associated to the break-down and dissolution of intermetallic particles. It is supposed that an increasing in intermetallic distributed throughout the matrix of weld regions increases the galvanic corrosion couples. Furthermore, by decreasing the grain size in the weld regions, the susceptibility to corrosion is enhanced. The pitting corrosion and intergranular attack are the dominant corrosion types in the weld regions and the parent alloy.

  14. Development of Fatigue Life Improvement Technology of Butt Joints Using Friction Stir Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Ung Park

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Burr grinding, tungsten inert gas (TIG dressing, ultrasonic impact treatment, and peening are used to improve fatigue life in steel structures. These methods improve the fatigue life of weld joints by hardening the weld toe, improving the bead shape, or causing compressive residual stress. This study proposes a new postweld treatment method improving the weld bead shape and metal structure at the welding zone using friction stir processing (FSP to enhance fatigue life. For that, a pin-shaped tool and processing condition employing FSP has been established through experiment. Experimental results revealed that fatigue life improves by around 42% compared to as-welded fatigue specimens by reducing the stress concentration at the weld toe and generating a metal structure finer than that of flux-cored arc welding (FCAW. Hot-spot stress, structural stress, and simplified calculation methods cannot predict the accurate stress at the weld toe in case the weld toe has a smooth curvature as in the case of the FSP specimen. On the contrary, a finite element calculation could reasonably predict the stress concentration factor for the FSP specimen because it considers not only the bead profile but also the weld toe profile.

  15. Effect of friction stir welding on microstructure and corrosion behavior of LF6 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghauri, Faizan Ali; Farooq, A.; Ahmad, A.; Deen, K. M.

    2017-03-01

    The LF6 aluminum alloy plates were joined by friction stir welding method. The tool rotational (1180 rpm) and transverse speed (0.56 mm s‑1) were kept constant during welding of 4 mm thick plates. The microstructural features, hardness and tensile properties of the welded samples were determined to evaluate the structural integrity in comparison with the base metal. The electrochemical behavior of base metal (BM), thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) and weld nugget zone (WNZ) was also investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 3.5% NaCl solution. The microstructural study revealed significant grain refinement and agglomeration of β (Mg2Al3) intermetallic precipitates in the WNZ. The relatively higher hardness and a decrease in the ductility (3%) also assured the formation of precipitates β precipitates in the WNZ welded samples. The fracture surface of welded sample also revealed the existence of β precipitates within the elongated dimples which may be considered as the crack initiation sites. The relatively lower corrosion rate (23.68 mpy) and higher charge transfer resistance (403 Ω cm2) of BM compared to WNZ could be associated with the galvanic dissolution of Al-matrix through competitive charge transfer and relaxation (adsorption/desorption of intermediate species) processes specifically at the vicinity of the β precipitates.

  16. Multi-Track Friction Stir Lap Welding of 2024 Aluminum Alloy: Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengke Zou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir lap welding (FSLW raises the possibility of fabricating high-performance aluminum components at low cost and high efficiency. In this study, we mainly applied FSLW to fabricate multi-track 2024 aluminum alloy without using tool tilt angle, which is important for obtaining defect-free joint but significantly increases equipment cost. Firstly, systematic single-track FSLW experiments were conducted to attain appropriate processing parameters, and we found that defect-free single-track could also be obtained by the application of two-pass processing at a rotation speed of 1000 rpm and a traverse speed of 300 mm/min. Then, multi-track FSLW experiments were conducted and full density multi-track samples were fabricated at an overlapping rate of 20%. Finally, the microstructure and mechanical properties of the full density multi-track samples were investigated. The results indicated that ultrafine equiaxed grains with the grain diameter about 9.4 μm could be obtained in FSLW samples due to the dynamic recrystallization during FSLW, which leads to a yield strength of 117.2 MPa (17.55% higher than the rolled 2024-O alloy substrate and an elongation rate of 31.05% (113.84% higher than the substrate.

  17. High Rotation Speed Friction Stir Welding for 2014 Aluminum Alloy Thin Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shujin; Zhou, Yang; Xue, Junrong; Ni, Ruiyang; Guo, Yue; Dong, Jianghui

    2017-03-01

    In this study, 2014 aluminum alloy sheets with 1 mm thickness are welded successfully by friction stir welding (FSW) robot under the condition of high rotation speed. When the high rotation speed of 10,000-16,500 rpm is applied, the lower axial pressure (less than 200 N) is obtained, which reduces stiffness requirements for equipment. Welding deformation is inevitable because high rotation speed can easily result in rapid heating rate and uneven heat input. The welding distortion caused by two cooling methods is measured, respectively, by laser range finder. The experimental results show that the welding distortion is smaller under the condition of water cooling. When the rotation speed is up to 15,000 rpm and welding speed 50-170 mm/min, the whole welding process is controllable. Under the higher rotation speed condition, the welding defects disappear gradually and more stable mechanical properties can be obtained up to 75% of base metal (ω = 16,000 rpm, ν = 110 mm/min). The results of different welding parameters demonstrate that the high rotation speed can increase material mixing and reduce the axial force (z force), and it can benefit lightweight sheet welding by using FSW robot.

  18. Microstructure and microhardness of AA1050/TiC surface composite fabricated using friction stir processing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Thangarasu; N Murugan; I Dinaharan; S J Vijay

    2012-10-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) has been developed by several researchersto produce an upper surface modification of metallic materials. The fabrication of TiC particulate $(\\sim 2 \\mu m)$ reinforced aluminum matrix composite (AMC) using FSP is studied in this paper. The measured content of TiC powders were compacted into a groove of 0.5 mm × 5.5 mm. A single pass FSP was carried out using a tool rotational speed of 1600 rpm, processing speed of 60 mm/min and axial force of 10 kN. A tool made of HCHCr steel, oil hardened to 62 HRC, having a cylindrical profile was used in this study. The microstructure and microhardness of the fabricated AMC were analysed. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) micrographs revealed a uniform distribution of TiC particles which were well-bonded to the matrix alloy. The hardness of the AMC increased by 45% higher than that of the matrix alloy.

  19. A Numerical Simulation for Dissimilar Aluminum Alloys Joined by Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Carter; Kopyściański, Mateusz; Węglowska, Aleksandra; Dymek, Stanisław; Pietras, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Dissimilar aluminum alloy sheets of 2017A-T451 and 7075-T651 (6 mm thickness) were friction stir welded in a butt weld configuration. A numerical simulation of the joining process was developed to visualize the material flow patterns and temperature distribution and to correlate the microstructure to the hardness behavior. Due to the complementary downward flow of surface material into the workpiece thickness and upward flow of mid-plane and bottom-plane material, the weld nugget is composed of alternating layers of 7075 and 2017A. These layers have unique temperature histories depending on the material's initial location within the cross section; therefore, they also have distinctive precipitate distributions. Supersaturated surface material flows into the process zone and forms a core in which GP zones reprecipitate upon cooling. Mid-plane and bottom-plane material flow toward the workpiece surface and encompass the surface material core. Within this region, the weld temperatures overage the equilibrium θ phase in 2017A, decreasing the hardness, and at the same time, dissolve the equilibrium η/ T phase in the 7075, leading to reprecipitation of GP zones upon cooling and a hardness recovery.

  20. The microstructure of aluminum A5083 butt joint by friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasri, M. A. H. M.; Afendi, M. [School of Mechatronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Pauh, 02600, Arau, Perlis (Malaysia); Ismail, A. [UniKL MIMET, JalanPantaiRemis, 32200, Lumut, Perak (Malaysia); Ishak, M. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, 02600, Pekan, Pahang (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    This study presents the microstructure of the aluminum A5083 butt joint surface after it has been joined by friction stir welding (FSW) process. The FSW process is a unique welding method because it will not change the chemical properties of the welded metals. In this study, MILKO 37 milling machine was modified to run FSW process on 4 mm plate of aluminum A5083 butt joint. For the experiment, variables of travel speed and tool rotational speed based on capability of machine were used to run FSW process. The concentrated heat from the tool to the aluminum plate changes the plate form from solid to plastic state. Two aluminum plates is merged to become one plate during plastic state and return to solid when concentrated heat is gradually further away. After that, the surface and cross section of the welded aluminum were investigated with a microscope by 400 x multiplication zoom. The welding defect in the FSW aluminum was identified. Then, the result was compared to the American Welding Society (AWS) FSW standard to decide whether the plate can be accepted or rejected.

  1. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Formed Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Simulated service testing (SST) development was required to help qualify a new 2195 aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloy spin forming dome fabrication process for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Development Technology Program. The application for the technology is to produce high strength low weight tank components for NASA s next generation launch vehicles. Since plate material is not currently manufactured large enough to fabricate these domes, two plates are joined by means of friction stir welding. The plates are then pre-contour machined to near final thicknesses allowing for a thicker weld land and anticipating the level of stretch induced by the spin forming process. The welded plates are then placed in a spin forming tool and hot stretched using a trace method producing incremental contours. Finally the dome receives a room temperature contour stretch to final dimensions, heat treatment, quenching, and artificial aging to emulate a T-8 condition of temper. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were also performed by alternate immersion in a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using the typical double beam assembly and with 4-point loaded specimens and use of bent-beam stress-corrosion test specimens under alternate immersion conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted to determine the threshold stress intensity factor for SCC (K(sub ISCC)) which to our knowledge has not been determined previously for Al-Li 2195 alloy. The successful simulated service and stress corrosion testing helped to provide confidence to continue to Ares 1 scale dome fabrication

  2. Fabrication of Surface Level Cu/SiCp Nanocomposites by Friction Stir Processing Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cartigueyen Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP technique has been successfully employed as low energy consumption route to prepare copper based surface level nanocomposites reinforced with nanosized silicon carbide particles (SiCp. The effect of FSP parameters such as tool rotational speed, processing speed, and tool tilt angle on microstructure and microhardness was investigated. Single pass FSP was performed based on Box-Behnken design at three factors in three levels. A cluster of blind holes 2 mm in diameter and 3 mm in depth was used as particulate deposition technique in order to reduce the agglomeration problem during composite fabrication. K-type thermocouples were used to measure temperature histories during FSP. The results suggest that the heat generation during FSP plays a significant role in deciding the microstructure and microhardness of the surface composites. Microstructural observations revealed a uniform dispersion of nanosized SiCp without any agglomeration problem and well bonded with copper matrix at different process parameter combinations. X-ray diffraction study shows that no intermetallic compound was produced after processing. The microhardness of nanocomposites was remarkably enhanced and about 95% more than that of copper matrix.

  3. Joining of AZ31 and AZ91 Mg alloys by friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ratna Sunil

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two dissimilar magnesium (Mg alloy sheets, one with low aluminium (AZ31 and another with high aluminium (AZ91 content, were successfully joined by friction stir welding (FSW. The effect of process parameters on the formation of hot cracks was investigated. A sound metallurgical joint was obtained at optimized process parameters (1400 rpm with 25 mm/min feed which contained fine grains and distributed β (Mg17Al12 phase within the nugget zone. An increasing trend in the hardness measurements has also confirmed more amount of dissolution of aluminium within the nugget zone. A sharp interface between nugget zone and thermo mechanical affected zone (TMAZ was clearly noticed at the AZ31 Mg alloy side (advancing but not on the AZ91 Mg alloy side (retreating. From the results it can be concluded that FSW can be effectively used to join dissimilar metals, particularly difficult to process metals such as Mg alloys, and hot cracking can be completely eliminated by choosing appropriate process parameters to achieve sound joint.

  4. A 3D numerical simulation of different phases of friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerdoux, S.; Fourment, L.

    2009-10-01

    An adaptive arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is developed to compute the material flow and the temperature evolution during the three phases of the friction stir welding (FSW) process. It follows a splitting approach: after the calculations of the velocity/pressure and temperature fields, the mesh velocity is derived from the domain boundary evolution and from an adaptive refinement criterion provided by error estimation, and finally state variables are remapped. In this way, the unilateral contact conditions between the plate and the tool are accurately taken into account, so allowing one to model various instabilities that may occur during the process, such as the role played by the plunge depth of the tool on the formations of flashes, the possible appearance of non-steady voids or tunnel holes and the influence of the threads on the material flow, the temperature field and the welding efforts. This formulation is implemented in the 3D Forge3 FE software with automatic remeshing. The non-steady phases of FSW can so be simulated, as well as the steady welding phase. The study of different process conditions shows that the main phenomena taking place during FSW can be simulated with the right sensitivities.

  5. Temperature distribution study during the friction stir welding process of Al2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Y. H.; Hussain, A.; Lalwani, R. K.; Chan, H. K.; Hakimi, N.

    2013-08-01

    Heat flux characteristics are critical to good quality welding obtained in the important engineering alloy Al2024-T3 by the friction stir welding (FSW) process. In the present study, thermocouples in three different configurations were affixed on the welding samples to measure the temperatures: in the first configuration, four thermocouples were placed at equivalent positions along one side of the welding direction; the second configuration involved two equivalent thermocouple locations on either side of the welding path; while the third configuration had all the thermocouples on one side of the layout but with unequal gaps from the welding line. A three-dimensional, non-linear ANSYS computational model, based on an approach applied to Al2024-T3 for the first time, was used to simulate the welding temperature profiles obtained experimentally. The experimental thermal profiles on the whole were found to be in agreement with those calculated by the ANSYS model. The broad agreement between the two kinds of profiles validates the basis for derivation of the simulation model and provides an approach for the FSW simulation in Al2024-T3 and is potentially more useful than models derived previously.

  6. Influence of friction stir welding parameters on properties of 2024 T3 aluminium alloy joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eramah Abdsalam M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to analyse the process of friction stir welding (FSW of 3mm thick aluminium plates made of high strength aluminium alloy - 2024 T3, as well as to assess the mechanical properties of the produced joints. FSW is a modern procedure which enables joining of similar and dissimilar materials in the solid state, by the combined action of heat and mechanical work. This paper presents an analysis of the experimental results obtained by testing the butt welded joints. Tensile strength of the produced joints is assessed, as well as the distribution of hardness, micro-and macrostructure through the joints (in the base material, nugget, heat affected zone and thermo-mechanically affected zone. Different combinations of the tool rotation speed and the welding speed are used, and the dependence of the properties of the joints on these parameters of welding technology is determined. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34018 i br. TR 35006

  7. Experimental Study of Stationary Shoulder Friction Stir Welded 7N01-T4 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, S. D.; Meng, X. C.; Li, Z. W.; Ma, L.; Gao, S. S.

    2016-03-01

    Stationary shoulder friction stir welding (SSFSW) was successfully used to weld 7N01-T4 aluminum alloy with the thickness of 4 mm. Effects of welding speed on formations, microstructures, and mechanical properties of SSFSW joint were investigated in detail. Under a constant rotational velocity of 2000 rpm, defect-free joints with smooth surface and small flashes are attained using welding speeds of 20 and 30 mm/min. Macrostructure of nugget zone in cross section presents kettle shape. For 7N01-T4 aluminum alloy with low thermal conductivity, decreasing welding speed is beneficial to surface formation of joint. With the increase of welding speed, mechanical properties of joints firstly increase and then decrease. When the welding speed is 30 mm/min, the tensile strength and elongation of joint reach the maximum values of 379 MPa and 7.9%, equivalent to 84.2 and 52% of base material, respectively. Fracture surface morphology exhibits typical ductile fracture. In addition, the minimum hardness value of joint appears in the heat affected zone.

  8. Numerical modelling of thermal phenomenon in friction stir welding of aluminum plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaira Vignesh, R.; Padmanaban, R.; Arivarasu, M.; Thirumalini, S.; Gokulachandran, J.; Sai Ram, Mutyala Sesha Satya

    2016-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential to join materials that are non weldable by conventional fusion welding techniques. The study of heat transfer in FSW aids in the identification of defects like flash, inadequate heat input, poor material flow and mixing etc. In this paper, transient temperature distribution during FSW of aluminum alloy AA6061-T6 was simulated using finite element modelling. The model was used to predict the peak temperature and analyse the thermal history during FSW. The effect of process parameters namely tool rotation speed, tool traverse speed (welding speed), shoulder diameter and pin diameter of tool on the temperature distribution was investigated using two level factorial design. The model results were validated using the experimental results from the published literature. It was found that peak temperature was directly proportional to tool rotation speed and shoulder diameter and inversely proportional to tool traverse speed. The effect of pin diameter on peak temperature was found to be trivial.

  9. Tensile Fracture Location Characterizations of Friction Stir Welded Joints of Different Aluminum Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huijie LIU; Hidetoshi FUJII; Masakatsu MAEDA; Kiyoshi NOGI

    2004-01-01

    The tensile fracture location characterizations of the friction stir welded joints of the AA1050-H24 and AA6061-T6Al alloys were evaluated in this study. The experimental results show that the fracture locations of the joints are different for the different Al alloys, and they are affected by the FSW parameters. When the joints are free of welding defects, the AA1050-H24 joints are fractured in the HAZ and TMAZ on the AS and the fracture parts undergo a large amount of plastic deformation, while the AA6061-T6 joints are fractured in the HAZ on the RS and the fracture surfaces are inclined a certain degree to the bottom surfaces of the joints. When some welding defects exist in the joints, the AA1050-H24 joints are fractured on the RS or AS, the AA6061-T6 joints are fractured on the RS, and all the fracture locations are near to the weld center. The fracture locations of the joints are dependent on the internal structures of the joints and can be explained by the microhardness profiles and defect morphologies of the joints.

  10. Application of laser ultrasonic method for on-line monitoring of friction stir spot welding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuanshuang; Zhou, Zhenggan; Zhou, Jianghua

    2015-09-01

    Application of a laser ultrasonic method is developed for on-line monitoring of the friction stir spot welding (FSSW) process. Based on the technology of FSSW, laser-generated ultrasonic waves in a good weld and nonweld area are simulated by a finite element method. The reflected and transmitted waves are analyzed to disclose the properties of the welded interface. The noncontact-laser ultrasonic-inspection system was established to verify the numerical results. The reflected waves in the good-weld and nonweld area can be distinguished by time-of-flight. The transmitted waves evidently attenuate in the nonweld area in contrast to signal amplitude in the good weld area because of interfacial impedance difference. Laser ultrasonic C-scan images can sufficiently evaluate the intrinsic character of the weld area in comparison with traditional water-immersion ultrasonic testing results. The research results confirm that laser ultrasonics would be an effective method to realize the characterization of FSSW defects.

  11. Microstructural Evolution in Friction Stir Welding of Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubisoff, H.; Querin, J.; Magee, D.; Schneider, J.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a thermo-mechanical process that utilizes a nonconsumable rotating pin tool to consolidate a weld joint. In the conventional FSW process, the pin tool is responsible for generating both the heat required to soften the material and the forces necessary to deform and combine the weld seam. As such, the geometry of the pin tool is important to the quality of the weld and the process parameters required to produce the weld. Because the geometry of the pin tool is limitless, a reduced set of pin tools was formed to systematically study their effect on the weldment with respect to mechanical properties and resultant microstructure. In this study 0deg, 15deg, 30deg, 45deg, and 60deg tapered, microwave sintered, tungsten carbide (WC) pin tools were used to FSW Ti-6Al-4V. Transverse sections of the weld were used to test for mechanical properties and to document the microstructure using optical microscopy. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was also used to characterize the microstructure in the welds. FSW results for the 45deg and 60deg pin tools are reported in this paper.

  12. Microstructure evolution and tensile properties of friction-stir-welded AM50 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) technique was utilized to weld cast AM50 magnesium alloy plates. The mierostructures in the base metal (BM) and the weld joint were observed by optical microscopy. The mechanical properties were investigated by using hardness measurement and tensile test, and the fractographs were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the microstructure of the base material was characterized by bulk primary α phase, α-matrix and intermetallic compound β (orMg17Al12), and the weld nugget exhibiting recrystallized microstructure consists of α-matrix and β phase. The grain size in the weld is smaller than that in the base metal. The hardness of the weld joint is improved but the tensile strength and yield strength, as well as the elongation to failure of the base material decline. The fracture of BM has a rougher surface with more dimples, which is a characteristic of the ductile fracture, whereas the fracture on the nugget reveals a quasi-cleavage feature. The ultimate tensile strength and yield strength of the FSWed AM50 are 86.2% and 94.0% of those of the base metal, respectively.

  13. A cellular automaton model for microstructural simulation of friction stir welded AZ91 magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mostafa; Asadi, Parviz; Besharati Givi, MohammadKazem; Zolghadr, Parisa

    2016-03-01

    To predict the grain size and microstructure evolution during friction stir welding (FSW) of AZ91 magnesium alloy, a finite element model (FEM) is developed based on the combination of a cellular automaton model and the Kocks  -  Mecking and Laasraoui-Jonas models. First, according to the flow stress curves and using the Kocks  -  Mecking model, the hardening and recovery parameters and the strain rate sensitivity were calculated. Next, an FEM model was established in Deform-3D software to simulate the FSW of AZ91 magnesium alloy. The results of the FEM model are used in microstructure evolution models to predict the grain size and microstructure of the weld zone. There is a good agreement between the simulated and experimental microstructures, and the proposed model can simulate the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) process during FSW of AZ91 alloy. Moreover, microstructural properties of different points in the SZ as well as the effect of the w/v parameter on the grain size and microstructure are considered.

  14. Constitutive model of friction stir weld with consideration of its inhomogeneous mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Min, Junying; Wang, Bin; Lin, Jianping; Li, Fangfang; Liu, Jing

    2016-03-01

    In practical engineering, finite element(FE) modeling for weld seam is commonly simplified by neglecting its inhomogeneous mechanical properties. This will cause a significant loss in accuracy of FE forming analysis, in particular, for friction stir welded(FSW) blanks due to the large width and good formability of its weld seam. The inhomogeneous mechanical properties across weld seam need to be well characterized for an accurate FE analysis. Based on a similar AA5182 FSW blank, the metallographic observation and micro-Vickers hardness analysis upon the weld cross-section are performed to identify the interfaces of different sub-zones, i.e., heat affected zone(HAZ), thermal-mechanically affected zone(TMAZ) and weld nugget(WN). Based on the rule of mixture and hardness distribution, a constitutive model is established for each sub-zone to characterize the inhomogeneous mechanical properties across the weld seam. Uniaxial tensile tests of the AA5182 FSW blank are performed with the aid of digital image correlation(DIC) techniques. Experimental local stress-strain curves are obtained for different weld sub-zones. The experimental results show good agreement with those derived from the constitutive models, which demonstrates the feasibility and accuracy of these models. The proposed research gives an accurate characterization of inhomogeneous mechanical properties across the weld seam produced by FSW, which provides solutions for improving the FE simulation accuracy of FSW sheet forming.

  15. Influential Parameters and Numerical Simulation of Heat Generated in the Process of Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilija KOVACEVIC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the problem of friction stir welding (FSW technology. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical process of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established. Presented are the basic analytical formulations for the definition of temperature fields. Analysis of influential parameters of welding FSW technology at the zone of the weld material and mechanical properties of the realized joint was performed. Influential welding parameters were defined based on tool geometry, technological parameters of processing and the axial load of tool. Specific problems with the FSW process are related to gaps (holes left behind by a tool at the end of the process and inflexibility of welding regarding the degree of variation of material thickness. Numerical simulation of process welding FSW proceeding was carried out on the example of Aluminum Alloy (AA 2219 using the ANSYS Mechanical ADPL (Transient Thermal software package. The defined was the temperature field in the welding process at specified time intervals.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.10022

  16. Examination of mechanical properties of magnesium plates joined by friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydın Şık

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of magnesium, which is the latest metal of our age, is increasing in parallel with the advances in industry and technology. Due to its lightness, durability and long life, its usage is increasing in the automotive and space-craft industries. As a result of the advances in magnesium use, there are innovations in welding methods as well. The desired mechanical properties can't be obtained after welding. While there are some difficulties in fusion welding of magnesium material and its alloys, some of them can't be joined by fusion welding at all. Weldability of a material is the property that plays an important role in enabling its wider use and determines the method of producing products out of this material. Magnesium plates were joined successfully by friction stir welding method. Welded joints are exposed to various mechanic stresses and especially to dynamic loads. Cracks are observed to occur due to dynamic loads. Plates were joined in butt position and the mechanical properties of the occurring joint are examined.

  17. Effect of Pin Tool Shape on Metal Flow During Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, J. C.; Coronado, E.; Aloor, S.; Nowak, B.; Murr, L. M.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown that metal moves behind the rotating Friction Stir Pin Tool in two separate currents or streams. One current, mostly on the advancing side, enters a zone of material that rotates with the pin tool for one or more revolutions and eventually is abandoned behind the pin tool in crescent-shaped pieces. The other current, largely on the retreating side of the pin tool is moved by a wiping process to the back of the pin tool and fills in between the pieces of the rotational zone that have been shed by the rotational zone. This process was studied by using a faying surface copper trace to clarify the metal flow. Welds were made with pin tools having various thread pitches. Decreasing the thread pitch causes the large scale top-to-bottorn flow to break up into multiple vortices along the pin and an unthreaded pin tool provides insufficient vertical motion for there to be a stable rotational zone and flow of material via the rotational zone is not possible leading to porosity on the advancing side of the weld.

  18. Friction Stir Welding of Al Alloy 2219-T8: Part II-Mechanical and Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ju; Feng, Zhi-Cao; Li, Ji-Chao; Frankel, G. S.; Wang, Guo-Qing; Wu, Ai-Ping

    2016-09-01

    In Part I of this series, abnormal agglomerations of θ particles with size of about 100 to 1000 µm were observed in friction stir welded AA2219-T8 joints. In this work, the effects of these agglomerated θ particles on the mechanical and corrosion properties of the joints are studied. Tensile testing with in situ SEM imaging was utilized to monitor crack initiation and propagation in base metal and weld nugget zone (WNZ) samples. These tests showed that cracks initiated in the θ particles and at the θ/matrix interfaces, but not in the matrix. The WNZ samples containing abnormal agglomerated θ particles had a similar ultimate tensile stress but 3 pct less elongation than other WNZ samples with only normal θ particles. Measurements using the microcell technique indicated that the agglomerated θ particles acted as a cathode causing the dissolution of adjacent matrix. The abnormal θ particle agglomerations led to more severe localized attack due to the large cathode/anode ratio. Al preferential dissolution occurred in the abnormal θ particle agglomerations, which was different from the corrosion behavior of normal size θ particles.

  19. High Rotation Speed Friction Stir Welding for 2014 Aluminum Alloy Thin Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shujin; Zhou, Yang; Xue, Junrong; Ni, Ruiyang; Guo, Yue; Dong, Jianghui

    2017-02-01

    In this study, 2014 aluminum alloy sheets with 1 mm thickness are welded successfully by friction stir welding (FSW) robot under the condition of high rotation speed. When the high rotation speed of 10,000-16,500 rpm is applied, the lower axial pressure (less than 200 N) is obtained, which reduces stiffness requirements for equipment. Welding deformation is inevitable because high rotation speed can easily result in rapid heating rate and uneven heat input. The welding distortion caused by two cooling methods is measured, respectively, by laser range finder. The experimental results show that the welding distortion is smaller under the condition of water cooling. When the rotation speed is up to 15,000 rpm and welding speed 50-170 mm/min, the whole welding process is controllable. Under the higher rotation speed condition, the welding defects disappear gradually and more stable mechanical properties can be obtained up to 75% of base metal (ω = 16,000 rpm, ν = 110 mm/min). The results of different welding parameters demonstrate that the high rotation speed can increase material mixing and reduce the axial force (z force), and it can benefit lightweight sheet welding by using FSW robot.

  20. Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Pan, Tsung-Yu

    2012-04-16

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is applied to join advanced high strength steels (AHSS): galvannealed dual phase 780 MPa steel (DP780GA), transformation induced plasticity 780 MPa steel (TRIP780), and hot-stamped boron steel (HSBS). A low-cost Si3N4 ceramic tool was developed and used for making welds in this study instead of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) material used in earlier studies. FSSW has the advantages of solid-state, low-temperature process, and the ability of joining dissimilar grade of steels and thicknesses. Two different tool shoulder geometries, concave with smooth surface and convex with spiral pattern, were used in the study. Welds were made by a 2-step displacement control process with weld time of 4, 6, and 10 seconds. Static tensile lap-shear strength achieved 16.4 kN for DP780GA-HSBS and 13.2kN for TRIP780-HSBS, above the spot weld strength requirements by AWS. Nugget pull-out was the failure mode of the joint. The joining mechanism was illustrated from the cross-section micrographs. Microhardness measurement showed hardening in the upper sheet steel (DP780GA or TRIP780) in the weld, but softening of HSBS in the heat-affect zone (HAZ). The study demonstrated the feasibility of making high-strength AHSS spot welds with low-cost tools.