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Sample records for hyalinized collagen bundles

  1. Quantification of collagen distributions in rat hyaline and fibro cartilages based on second harmonic generation imaging

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    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Liao, Chenxi; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Liu, Wenge; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    Hyaline cartilage is a semitransparent tissue composed of proteoglycan and thicker type II collagen fibers, while fibro cartilage large bundles of type I collagen besides other territorial matrix and chondrocytes. It is reported that the meniscus (fibro cartilage) has a greater capacity to regenerate and close a wound compared to articular cartilage (hyaline cartilage). And fibro cartilage often replaces the type II collagen-rich hyaline following trauma, leading to scar tissue that is composed of rigid type I collagen. The visualization and quantification of the collagen fibrillar meshwork is important for understanding the role of fibril reorganization during the healing process and how different types of cartilage contribute to wound closure. In this study, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscope was applied to image the articular and meniscus cartilage, and textural analysis were developed to quantify the collagen distribution. High-resolution images were achieved based on the SHG signal from collagen within fresh specimens, and detailed observations of tissue morphology and microstructural distribution were obtained without shrinkage or distortion. Textural analysis of SHG images was performed to confirm that collagen in fibrocartilage showed significantly coarser compared to collagen in hyaline cartilage (p imaging degenerative tissues or assessing wound repair following cartilage injury.

  2. Similar hyaline-like cartilage repair of osteochondral defects in rabbits using isotropic and anisotropic collagen scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, E.L.W. de; Hannink, G.J.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Daamen, W.F.; Buma, P.

    2014-01-01

    Lesions in knee joint articular cartilage (AC) have limited repair capacity. Many clinically available treatments induce a fibrous-like cartilage repair instead of hyaline cartilage. To induce hyaline cartilage repair, we hypothesized that type I collagen scaffolds with fibers aligned perpendicular

  3. Similar hyaline-like cartilage repair of osteochondral defects in rabbits using isotropic and anisotropic collagen scaffolds.

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    de Mulder, Eric L W; Hannink, Gerjon; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Daamen, Willeke F; Buma, Pieter

    2014-02-01

    Lesions in knee joint articular cartilage (AC) have limited repair capacity. Many clinically available treatments induce a fibrous-like cartilage repair instead of hyaline cartilage. To induce hyaline cartilage repair, we hypothesized that type I collagen scaffolds with fibers aligned perpendicular to the AC surface would result in qualitatively better tissue repair due to a guided cellular influx from the subchondral bone. By specific freezing protocols, type I collagen scaffolds with isotropic and anisotropic fiber architectures were produced. Rabbits were operated on bilaterally and two full thickness defects were created in each knee joint. The defects were filled with (1) an isotropic scaffold, (2) an anisotropic scaffold with pores parallel to the cartilage surface, and (3) an anisotropic scaffold with pores perpendicular to the cartilage surface. Empty defects served as controls. After 4 (n=13) and 12 (n=13) weeks, regeneration was scored qualitatively and quantitatively using histological analysis and a modified O'Driscoll score. After 4 weeks, all defects were completely filled with partially differentiated hyaline cartilage tissue. No differences in O'Driscoll scores were measured between empty defects and scaffold types. After 12 weeks, all treatments led to hyaline cartilage repair visualized by increased glycosaminoglycan staining. Total scores were significantly increased for parallel anisotropic and empty defects over time (phyaline-like cartilage repair. Fiber architecture had no effect on cartilage repair.

  4. Microstructural and compositional features of the fibrous and hyaline cartilage on the medial tibial plateau imply a unique role for the hopping locomotion of kangaroo.

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    Bo He

    Full Text Available Hopping provides efficient and energy saving locomotion for kangaroos, but it results in great forces in the knee joints. A previous study has suggested that a unique fibrous cartilage in the central region of the tibial cartilage could serve to decrease the peak stresses generated within kangaroo tibiofemoral joints. However, the influences of the microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of the central fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage on the function of the knee joints are still to be defined. The present study showed that the fibrous cartilage was thicker and had a lower chondrocyte density than the hyaline cartilage. Despite having a higher PG content in the middle and deep zones, the fibrous cartilage had an inferior compressive strength compared to the peripheral hyaline cartilage. The fibrous cartilage had a complex three dimensional collagen meshwork with collagen bundles parallel to the surface in the superficial zone, and with collagen bundles both parallel and perpendicular to the surface in the middle and deep zones. The collagen in the hyaline cartilage displayed a typical Benninghoff structure, with collagen fibres parallel to the surface in the superficial zone and collagen fibres perpendicular to the surface in the deep zone. Elastin fibres were found throughout the entire tissue depth of the fibrous cartilage and displayed a similar alignment to the adjacent collagen bundles. In comparison, the elastin fibres in the hyaline cartilage were confined within the superficial zone. This study examined for the first time the fibrillary structure, PG content and compressive properties of the central fibrous cartilage pad and peripheral hyaline cartilage within the kangaroo medial tibial plateau. It provided insights into the microstructure and composition of the fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage in relation to the unique mechanical properties of the tissues to provide for the normal activities of kangaroos.

  5. Microstructural and compositional features of the fibrous and hyaline cartilage on the medial tibial plateau imply a unique role for the hopping locomotion of kangaroo.

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    He, Bo; Wu, Jian Ping; Xu, Jiake; Day, Robert E; Kirk, Thomas Brett

    2013-01-01

    Hopping provides efficient and energy saving locomotion for kangaroos, but it results in great forces in the knee joints. A previous study has suggested that a unique fibrous cartilage in the central region of the tibial cartilage could serve to decrease the peak stresses generated within kangaroo tibiofemoral joints. However, the influences of the microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of the central fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage on the function of the knee joints are still to be defined. The present study showed that the fibrous cartilage was thicker and had a lower chondrocyte density than the hyaline cartilage. Despite having a higher PG content in the middle and deep zones, the fibrous cartilage had an inferior compressive strength compared to the peripheral hyaline cartilage. The fibrous cartilage had a complex three dimensional collagen meshwork with collagen bundles parallel to the surface in the superficial zone, and with collagen bundles both parallel and perpendicular to the surface in the middle and deep zones. The collagen in the hyaline cartilage displayed a typical Benninghoff structure, with collagen fibres parallel to the surface in the superficial zone and collagen fibres perpendicular to the surface in the deep zone. Elastin fibres were found throughout the entire tissue depth of the fibrous cartilage and displayed a similar alignment to the adjacent collagen bundles. In comparison, the elastin fibres in the hyaline cartilage were confined within the superficial zone. This study examined for the first time the fibrillary structure, PG content and compressive properties of the central fibrous cartilage pad and peripheral hyaline cartilage within the kangaroo medial tibial plateau. It provided insights into the microstructure and composition of the fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage in relation to the unique mechanical properties of the tissues to provide for the normal activities of kangaroos.

  6. Enhanced hyaline cartilage matrix synthesis in collagen sponge scaffolds by using siRNA to stabilize chondrocytes phenotype cultured with bone morphogenetic protein-2 under hypoxia.

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    Legendre, Florence; Ollitrault, David; Hervieu, Magalie; Baugé, Catherine; Maneix, Laure; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Galera, Philippe; Demoor, Magali

    2013-07-01

    Cartilage healing by tissue engineering is an alternative strategy to reconstitute functional tissue after trauma or age-related degeneration. However, chondrocytes, the major player in cartilage homeostasis, do not self-regenerate efficiently and lose their phenotype during osteoarthritis. This process is called dedifferentiation and also occurs during the first expansion step of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). To ensure successful ACI therapy, chondrocytes must be differentiated and capable of synthesizing hyaline cartilage matrix molecules. We therefore developed a safe procedure for redifferentiating human chondrocytes by combining appropriate physicochemical factors: hypoxic conditions, collagen scaffolds, chondrogenic factors (bone morphogenetic protein-2 [BMP-2], and insulin-like growth factor I [IGF-I]) and RNA interference targeting the COL1A1 gene. Redifferentiation of dedifferentiated chondrocytes was evaluated using gene/protein analyses to identify the chondrocyte phenotypic profile. In our conditions, under BMP-2 treatment, redifferentiated and metabolically active chondrocytes synthesized a hyaline-like cartilage matrix characterized by type IIB collagen and aggrecan molecules without any sign of hypertrophy or osteogenesis. In contrast, IGF-I increased both specific and noncharacteristic markers (collagens I and X) of chondrocytes. The specific increase in COL2A1 gene expression observed in the BMP-2 treatment was shown to involve the specific enhancer region of COL2A1 that binds the trans-activators Sox9/L-Sox5/Sox6 and Sp1, which are associated with a decrease in the trans-inhibitors of COL2A1, c-Krox, and p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. Our procedure in which BMP-2 treatment under hypoxia is associated with a COL1A1 siRNA, significantly increased the differentiation index of chondrocytes, and should offer the opportunity to develop new ACI-based therapies in humans.

  7. A case report of spindle cell myoepithelioma with extensive lipomatous metaplasia and thick collagen bundles in the submandibular gland.

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    Kwon, Mi Jung; Kim, Hye Jeong; Park, Bumjung; Cho, Seong Jin; Shin, Hyung Sik; Park, Hye-Rim; Min, Soo Kee; Seo, Jinwon; Min, Kyueng-Whan; Nam, Eun Sook

    2016-09-01

    Spindle cell myoepithelioma with extensive lipomatous metaplasia and thick collagen bundles has not yet been described, and there are no published reports on its cytological appearance in fine-needle aspiration (FNA). A 49-year-old man presented with a painless mass in the right submandibular area that had been gradually enlarging for a period of 5 years. The cytologic smears showed fascicles of cohesive spindle cells as well as individual bland cells with bipolar naked nuclei in a fibrillary background. Brightly eosinophilic bundles were intermingled with spindle cells and fat-like vacuoles. The FNA results were suggestive of neurogenic tumor. Patient underwent submandibular gland resection. Grossly, the cut surface showed a well-encapsulated, yellowish-white, soft, elastic mass, measuring 2.8 × 1.9 × 1.5 cm. The tumor consisted of uniform bland spindle cells arranged in short fascicles admixed with adipocyte-like cells and transversing thick collagen bundles, which demonstrated immunoreactivity for myoepithelial markers and ultrastructural features characteristic of myoepithelial cells, suggesting the presence of lipomatous metaplasia. The FNA cytology of spindle cell myoepithelioma with extensive lipometaplasia mimicked that of neurogenic tumor or lipomatous mesenchymal tumor. This case represents the first description of submandibular gland myoepithelioma with lipometaplasia, which is characterized by the coexistence of spindle cells, collagen bundles, and fat-like vacuoles in a fibrillary background. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:764-769. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A novel nano-structured porous polycaprolactone scaffold improves hyaline cartilage repair in a rabbit model compared to a collagen type I/III scaffold: in vitro and in vivo studies.

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    Christensen, Bjørn Borsøe; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Hansen, Ole Møller; Kristiansen, Asger Albæk; Le, Dang Quang Svend; Nielsen, Agnete Desirée; Nygaard, Jens Vinge; Bünger, Cody Erik; Lind, Martin

    2012-06-01

    To develop a nano-structured porous polycaprolactone (NSP-PCL) scaffold and compare the articular cartilage repair potential with that of a commercially available collagen type I/III (Chondro-Gide) scaffold. By combining rapid prototyping and thermally induced phase separation, the NSP-PCL scaffold was produced for matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation. Lyophilizing a water-dioxane-PCL solution created micro and nano-pores. In vitro: The scaffolds were seeded with rabbit chondrocytes and cultured in hypoxia for 6 days. qRT-PCR was performed using primers for sox9, aggrecan, collagen type 1 and 2. In vivo: 15 New Zealand White Rabbits received bilateral osteochondral defects in the femoral intercondylar grooves. Autologous chondrocytes were harvested 4 weeks prior to surgery. There were 3 treatment groups: (1) NSP-PCL scaffold without cells. (2) The Chondro-Gide scaffold with autologous chondrocytes and (3) NSP-PCL scaffold with autologous chondrocytes. Observation period was 13 weeks. Histological evaluation was made using the O'Driscoll score. In vitro: The expressions of sox9 and aggrecan were higher in the NSP-PCL scaffold, while expression of collagen 1 was lower compared to the Chondro-Gide scaffold. In vivo: Both NSP-PCL scaffolds with and without cells scored significantly higher than the Chondro-Gide scaffold when looking at the structural integrity and the surface regularity of the repair tissue. No differences were found between the NSP-PCL scaffold with and without cells. The NSP-PCL scaffold demonstrated higher in vitro expression of chondrogenic markers and had higher in vivo histological scores compared to the Chondro-Gide scaffold. The improved chondrocytic differentiation can potentially produce more hyaline cartilage during clinical cartilage repair. It appears to be a suitable cell-free implant for hyaline cartilage repair and could provide a less costly and more effective treatment option than the Chondro-Gide scaffold with cells.

  9. Increased dermal collagen bundle alignment in systemic sclerosis is associated with a cell migration signature and role of Arhgdib in directed fibroblast migration on aligned ECMs.

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    Cao, Lizhi; Lafyatis, Robert; Burkly, Linda C

    2017-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a devastating disease affecting the skin and internal organs. Dermal fibrosis manifests early and Modified Rodnan Skin Scores (MRSS) correlate with disease progression. Transcriptomics of SSc skin biopsies suggest the role of the in vivo microenvironment in maintaining the pathological myofibroblasts. Therefore, defining the structural changes in dermal collagen in SSc patients could inform our understanding of fibrosis pathogenesis. Here, we report a method for quantitative whole-slide image analysis of dermal collagen from SSc patients, and our findings of more aligned dermal collagen bundles in diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc) patients. Using the bleomycin-induced mouse model of SSc, we identified a distinct high dermal collagen bundle alignment gene signature, characterized by a concerted upregulation in cell migration, adhesion, and guidance pathways, and downregulation of spindle, replication, and cytokinesis pathways. Furthermore, increased bundle alignment induced a cell migration gene signature in fibroblasts in vitro, and these cells demonstrated increased directed migration on aligned ECM fibers that is dependent on expression of Arhgdib (Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 2). Our results indicate that increased cell migration is a cellular response to the increased collagen bundle alignment featured in fibrotic skin. Moreover, many of the cell migration genes identified in our study are shared with human SSc skin and may be new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  10. The response of periodontal ligament collagen fibres and the thickness of inserting periodontal ligament fibre bundles at cementum pressure sites of fixed orthodontic appliances

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    Noengki Prameswari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has indicated that there were several reactions in cellular activity and periodontal ligament collagen fibre as a response after orthodontic force application. Cementum has function to give attachment to collagen fibres of the periodontal ligament, maintaining the integrity of the root, helping to maintain the tooth in its functional position in the mouth, and being involved in tooth repair and regeneration so in the orthodontic tooth movement can induce changes in the cementum. The aim of this research is to investigate that fixed orthodontic appliance can change the amount of periodontal ligament collagen fibre and the thickness of inserting periodontal ligament fibre bundles at pressure site of cementum. This experimental study was held in laboratory with post test only control group design. Twenty two (22 premolar sample from 11 patient were divided into 2 groups. K group as control group (without treatment and P group as treatment group (with using fixed orthodontic appliance. The amount of periodontal ligament collagen fibre and thickness of inserting periodontal ligament fibre bundles was examined by light microscopy and measured by image tool program. In the summary, there are increasing amount of periodontal ligament collagen fibre and the thickness of inserting periodontal ligament fibre bundles at cementum pressure sites as a normal response to remodeling and regenerating to orthodontic appliance and have function for strengthen adhering tooth cementum to the periodontal ligament.

  11. Structural Alteration in Dermal Vessels and Collagen Bundles following Exposure of Skin Wound to Zeolite–Bentonite Compound

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    Paydar, Shahram; Noorafshan, Ali; Jahanabadi, Shahram; Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Yahyavi, Seyedeh-Saeedeh; Khoshmohabat, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study examines the impact of one-time direct application of haemostatic agent zeolite–bentonite powder to wounded skin on the healing process in rats. Materials and Methods. 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into two groups (n = 12): (1) the rats whose wounds were washed only with sterile normal saline (NS-treated) and (2) those treated with zeolite–bentonite compound (ZEO-treated). The wound was circular, full-thickness, and 2 cm in diameter. At the end of the 12th day, six animals from each group were randomly selected and terminated. The remaining rats were terminated after 21 days. Just after scarification, skin samples were excised and sent for stereological evaluation. Results. The results showed a significant difference between the two groups regarding the length density of the blood vessels and diameter of the large and small vessels on the 12th day after the wound was inflicted. Besides, volume density of both the dermis and collagen bundles was reduced by 25% in the ZEO-treated rats in comparison to the NS-treated animals after 21 days. Conclusions. One-time topical usage of zeolite–bentonite haemostatic powder on an animal skin wound might negatively affect the healing process through vasoconstriction and inhibition of neoangiogenesis. PMID:28116221

  12. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma presenting with dysphagia: a rare presentation.

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    Khan, Fazal; Hamid, Arsalan; Fatima, Benish; Hashmi, Shiraz; Fatimi, Saulat

    2017-01-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of dysphagia and past history of pulmonary and intestinal tuberculosis. A barium swallow showed a point of constriction 42 mm above the gastroesophageal junction. Computed tomography revealed large opacities in bilateral lung fields, encroaching more on the esophagus. The lesion progressively compressed the esophagus as it moved inferiorly. A right posterolateral thoracotomy was performed for sub-anatomical resection of the mass. A biopsy revealed homogenous whirling hyalinized collagen fibers, highly suggestive of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma, with no evidence of malignancy. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of longstanding dysphagia.

  13. Comparative measurement of collagen bundle orientation by Fourier analysis and semiquantitative evaluation: reliability and agreement in Masson's trichrome, Picrosirius red and confocal microscopy techniques.

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    Marcos-Garcés, V; Harvat, M; Molina Aguilar, P; Ferrández Izquierdo, A; Ruiz-Saurí, A

    2017-03-20

    Measurement of collagen bundle orientation in histopathological samples is a widely used and useful technique in many research and clinical scenarios. Fourier analysis is the preferred method for performing this measurement, but the most appropriate staining and microscopy technique remains unclear. Some authors advocate the use of Haematoxylin-Eosin (H&E) and confocal microscopy, but there are no studies comparing this technique with other classical collagen stainings. In our study, 46 human skin samples were collected, processed for histological analysis and stained with Masson's trichrome, Picrosirius red and H&E. Five microphotographs of the reticular dermis were taken with a 200× magnification with light microscopy, polarized microscopy and confocal microscopy, respectively. Two independent observers measured collagen bundle orientation with semiautomated Fourier analysis with the Image-Pro Plus 7.0 software and three independent observers performed a semiquantitative evaluation of the same parameter. The average orientation for each case was calculated with the values of the five pictures. We analyzed the interrater reliability, the consistency between Fourier analysis and average semiquantitative evaluation and the consistency between measurements in Masson's trichrome, Picrosirius red and H&E-confocal. Statistical analysis for reliability and agreement was performed with the SPSS 22.0 software and consisted of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland-Altman plots and limits of agreement and coefficient of variation. Interrater reliability was almost perfect (ICC > 0.8) with all three histological and microscopy techniques and always superior in Fourier analysis than in average semiquantitative evaluation. Measurements were consistent between Fourier analysis by one observer and average semiquantitative evaluation by three observers, with an almost perfect agreement with Masson's trichrome and Picrosirius red techniques (ICC > 0.8) and a strong

  14. Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis.

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    Larralde, M; Santos-Muñoz, A; Calb, I; Magariños, C

    2001-01-01

    Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease with onset in infancy or early childhood. It is characterized by papulonodular skin lesions, soft tissue masses, gingival hypertrophy, and flexion contractures of the large joints. The light and electron microscopic features are very distinctive. Here we report an 8-month-old boy with characteristic stiffness of the knees and elbows and pink confluent papules on the paranasal folds, and periauricular and perianal regions. He also had hard nodules all over the scalp and around the mouth, and severe gingival hypertrophy. Histologic and ultrastructural features were typical of JHF. Clinical features, pathology, and physiology are discussed.

  15. Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome: cutaneous manifestations*

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    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Stolf, Hamilton Ometto; Polizel, Juliana Ocanha; Munhoz, Tânia; Brandão, Marcela Calixto; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome is the current name for clinical manifestations of diseases previously known as “infantile systemic hyalinosis” and “juvenile hyaline fibromatosis”. The authors report representative clinical cases of each one of the above subtypes with emphasis on cutaneous manifestations and difficulties for early diagnosis in this syndrome, essentially of multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27192526

  16. Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis

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    Jayashree Krishnamurthy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis is a rare, autosomal-recessive disease characterized by papular and nodular skin lesions, gingival hyperplasia, joint contractures and bone involvement in variable degrees. It is a connective tissue disorder with aberrant synthesis of glycosaminoglycans by fibroblasts. We report a 5-year-old female born of first-degree consanguineous marriage who presented with multiple, recurrent, painless, variable-sized nodules. Fine needle aspiration cytology smears and the subsequent histopathological examination from the nodules showed benign spindle cells in a Periodic acid Schiff-positive myxoid background. The disease has a relentlessly progressive course, with most patients surviving only up to the 4 th decade. As of now, there is no specific treatment for this disorder. Genetic counseling is essential to explain to parents about a 25% chance of having a diseased baby in any pregnancy. With the gene being mapped recently, techniques for antenatal diagnosis are likely to be established.

  17. Joint immobilization inhibits spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration induced by a novel double-network gel implantation.

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    Arakaki, Kazunobu; Kitamura, Nobuto; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Onodera, Shin; Kanaya, Fuminori; Gong, Jian-Ping; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2011-02-01

    We have recently discovered that spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect in the rabbit, when we implant a novel double-network (DN) gel plug at the bottom of the defect. To clarify whether joint immobilization inhibits the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration, we conducted this study with 20 rabbits. At 4 or 12 weeks after surgery, the defect in the mobile knees was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type-2 collagen, while no cartilage tissues were observed in the defect in the immobilized knees. Type-2 collagen, Aggrecan, and SOX9 mRNAs were expressed only in the mobile knees at each period. This study demonstrated that joint immobilization significantly inhibits the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration induced by the DN gel implantation. This fact suggested that the mechanical environment is one of the significant factors to induce this phenomenon.

  18. Collagen-based mechanical anisotropy of the tectorial membrane: implications for inter-row coupling of outer hair cell bundles.

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    Núria Gavara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The tectorial membrane (TM in the mammalian cochlea displays anisotropy, where mechanical or structural properties differ along varying directions. The anisotropy arises from the presence of collagen fibrils organized in fibers of approximately 1 microm diameter that run radially across the TM. Mechanical coupling between the TM and the sensory epithelia is required for normal hearing. However, the lack of a suitable technique to measure mechanical anisotropy at the microscale level has hindered understanding of the TM's precise role. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report values of the three elastic moduli that characterize the anisotropic mechanical properties of the TM. Our novel technique combined Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, modeling, and optical tracking of microspheres to determine the elastic moduli. We found that the TM's large mechanical anisotropy results in a marked transmission of deformations along the direction that maximizes sensory cell excitation, whereas in the perpendicular direction the transmission is greatly reduced. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Computational results, based on our values of elastic moduli, suggest that the TM facilitates the directional cooperativity of sensory cells in the cochlea, and that mechanical properties of the TM are tuned to guarantee that the magnitude of sound-induced tip-link stretching remains similar along the length of the cochlea. Furthermore, we anticipate our assay to be a starting point for other studies of biological tissues that require directional functionality.

  19. Hyaline cartilage cells outperform mandibular condylar cartilage cells in a TMJ fibrocartilage tissue engineering application.

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    Wang, L; Lazebnik, M; Detamore, M S

    2009-03-01

    To compare temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar cartilage cells in vitro to hyaline cartilage cells cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) environment for tissue engineering of mandibular condylar cartilage. Mandibular condylar cartilage and hyaline cartilage cells were harvested from pigs and cultured for 6 weeks in polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds. Both types of cells were treated with glucosamine sulfate (0.4 mM), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) (100 ng/ml) and their combination. At weeks 0 and 6, cell number, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen content were determined, types I and II collagen were visualized by immunohistochemistry and GAGs were visualized by histology. Hyaline cartilage cells produced from half an order to a full order of magnitude more GAGs and collagen than mandibular condylar cartilage cells in 3D culture. IGF-I was a highly effective signal for biosynthesis with hyaline cartilage cells, while glucosamine sulfate decreased cell proliferation and biosynthesis with both types of cells. In vitro culture of TMJ condylar cartilage cells produced a fibrous tissue with predominantly type I collagen, while hyaline cartilage cells formed a fibrocartilage-like tissue with types I and II collagen. The combination of IGF and glucosamine had a synergistic effect on maintaining the phenotype of TMJ condylar cells to generate both types I and II collagen. Given the superior biosynthetic activity by hyaline cartilage cells and the practical surgical limitations of harvesting cells from the TMJ of a patient requiring TMJ reconstruction, cartilage cells from elsewhere in the body may be a potentially better alternative to cells harvested from the TMJ for TMJ tissue engineering. This finding may also apply to other fibrocartilages such as the intervertebral disc and knee meniscus in applications where a mature cartilage cell source is desired.

  20. Generation of hyaline cartilaginous tissue from mouse adult dermal fibroblast culture by defined factors

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    Hiramatsu, Kunihiko; Sasagawa, Satoru; Outani, Hidetatsu; Nakagawa, Kanako; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2011-01-01

    Repair of cartilage injury with hyaline cartilage continues to be a challenging clinical problem. Because of the limited number of chondrocytes in vivo, coupled with in vitro de-differentiation of chondrocytes into fibrochondrocytes, which secrete type I collagen and have an altered matrix architecture and mechanical function, there is a need for a novel cell source that produces hyaline cartilage. The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has provided a tool for reprogramming dermal fibroblasts to an undifferentiated state by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors. Here, we show that retroviral expression of two reprogramming factors (c-Myc and Klf4) and one chondrogenic factor (SOX9) induces polygonal chondrogenic cells directly from adult dermal fibroblast cultures. Induced cells expressed marker genes for chondrocytes but not fibroblasts, i.e., the promoters of type I collagen genes were extensively methylated. Although some induced cell lines formed tumors when subcutaneously injected into nude mice, other induced cell lines generated stable homogenous hyaline cartilage–like tissue. Further, the doxycycline-inducible induction system demonstrated that induced cells are able to respond to chondrogenic medium by expressing endogenous Sox9 and maintain chondrogenic potential after substantial reduction of transgene expression. Thus, this approach could lead to the preparation of hyaline cartilage directly from skin, without generating iPS cells. PMID:21293062

  1. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile hyaline fibromatosis

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    ... Antaya RJ, Cajaiba MM, Madri J, Lopez MA, Ramirez MC, Martignetti JA, Reyes-Múgica M. Juvenile hyaline ... 103. Citation on PubMed Dowling O, Difeo A, Ramirez MC, Tukel T, Narla G, Bonafe L, Kayserili ...

  2. A case of juvenile hyaline fibromatosis.

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    Yayli, Savaş; Uncu, Sibel; Alpay, Köksal; Yildiz, Kadriye; Cimşit, Gülseren; Bahadir, Sevgi

    2006-04-01

    Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) is a rare, autosomally-recessive disease characterized by papulonodular skin lesions, soft tissue masses, joint contractures, gingival hypertrophy and osteolytic bone lesions. Its onset is in infancy or early childhood. The most commonly affected sites are the nose, chin, ears, scalp, back and knees. The accumulation of an amorphous, hyaline material is typical in the skin and the other organs. Herein, we report a 14-month-old boy who presented with confluent pink papules on the paranasal folds and the chin, and nodular lesions on the periauricular and perianal regions. He had gingival hypertrophy and contractures of the shoulders, knees and elbows. He also had third-degree consanguineous parents. Histopathological studies confirmed the diagnosis of JHF with the presence of increased numbers of fibroblasts embedded in a hyalinized connective tissue stroma.

  3. Uninduced adipose-derived stem cells repair the defect of full-thickness hyaline cartilage.

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    Zhang, Hai-Ning; Li, Lei; Leng, Ping; Wang, Ying-Zhen; Lv, Cheng-Yu

    2009-04-01

    To testify the effect of the stem cells derived from the widely distributed fat tissue on repairing full-thickness hyaline cartilage defects. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were derived from adipose tissue and cultured in vitro. Twenty-seven New Zealand white rabbits were divided into three groups randomly. The cultured ADSCs mixed with calcium alginate gel were used to fill the full-thickness hyaline cartilage defects created at the patellafemoral joint, and the defects repaired with gel or without treatment served as control groups. After 4, 8 and 12 weeks, the reconstructed tissue was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. Histological analysis and qualitative scoring were also performed to detect the outcome. Full thickness hyaline cartilage defects were repaired completely with ADSCs-derived tissue. The result was better in ADSCs group than the control ones. The microstructure of reconstructed tissue with ADSCs was similar to that of hyaline cartilage and contained more cells and regular matrix fibers, being better than other groups. Plenty of collagen fibers around cells could be seen under transmission electron microscopy. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in comparison with other groups at each time point (t equal to 4.360, P less than 0.01). These results indicate that stem cells derived from mature adipose without induction possess the ability to repair cartilage defects.

  4. Study of the collagen structure in the superficial zone and physiological state of articular cartilage using a 3D confocal imaging technique

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    Zheng Ming H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The collagen structure in the superficial zone of articular cartilage is critical to the tissue's durability. Early osteoarthritis is often characterized with fissures on the articular surface. This is closely related to the disruption of the collagen network. However, the traditional histology can not offer visualization of the collagen structure in articular cartilage because it uses conventional optical microscopy that does not have insufficient imaging resolution to resolve collagen from proteoglycans in hyaline articular cartilage. This study examines the 3D collagen network of articular cartilage scored from 0 to 2 in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society, and aims to develop a 3D histology for assessing early osteoarthritis. Methods Articular cartilage was visually classified into five physiological groups: normal cartilage, aged cartilage, cartilage with artificial and natural surface disruption, and fibrillated. The 3D collagen matrix of the cartilage was acquired using a 3D imaging technique developed previously. Traditional histology was followed to grade the physiological status of the cartilage in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society. Results Normal articular cartilage contains interwoven collagen bundles near the articular surface, approximately within the lamina splendens. However, its collagen fibres in the superficial zone orient predominantly in a direction spatially oblique to the articular surface. With age and disruption of the articular surface, the interwoven collagen bundles are gradually disappeared, and obliquely oriented collagen fibres change to align predominantly in a direction spatially perpendicular to the articular surface. Disruption of the articular surface is well related to the disappearance of the interwoven collagen bundles. Conclusion A 3D histology has been developed to supplement the traditional histology and study the subtle changes in

  5. A Unique Case of Pulmonary Hyalinizing Granuloma Associated With FDG-avid PET Scan and Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Imran; Stone, Chad; Kvale, Paul

    2009-04-01

    An 83-year-old obese woman with a 60-pack-year smoking history was referred for evaluation of an abnormal chest radiograph [chest x-ray (CXR)]. Her past medical history was significant for recurrent deep venous thrombosis without any predisposing factors. CXR showed a large mass in the right mid lung and another nodule at the right apex, highly suspicious for a neoplastic process. These were not present on a CXR from 2 years earlier. An fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scan revealed that all lesions were strongly FDG-avid. Six CT-guided core-needle lung biopsy specimens were obtained from the lung mass and all contained dense, lamellar, or "ropy" keloid-like collagen bundles arranged in a haphazard pattern. The biopsy specimens lacked significant necrosis and granulomas. Congo red stain with polarization was also negative for amyloid. The diagnosis of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) was made. A complete hypercoagulable workup was performed but no underlying abnormalities were found, including a negative lupus anticoagulant and malignancy workup. The patient was maintained on warfarin and followed with serial CT scans for 1 year, with spontaneous regression in the lung mass. The case is unique as it is the first case that reports an association of PHG with recurrent deep venous thrombosis in the absence of autoimmune or procoagulant factors and emphasizes the need for life-long anticoagulation in such scenarios. Also, we report the FDG-avid PET scan findings here that are novel for this disease in adults and add PHG to the list of diseases causing false-positive PET scans when malignancy is suspected.

  6. Calcifying fibrous pseudotumor in association with hyaline vascular type Castleman′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Muhammad

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying fibrous pseudotumor is a recently described rare entity. It is considered as sclerosing end stage of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. An association with hyaline vascular type Castleman′s disease has also been described. We report a case of a 13-year-old boy who presented with pain in epigastrium. Computed tomography scan of abdomen revealed a circumscribed mass arising from the gastric wall along the greater curvature. Histology revealed a tumor composed of spindle cells present within the dense hyalinized collagenous tissue. Lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate was seen along with lymphoid follicles, dystrophic and ossifying calcification. Tumor cells were focally positive for alpha smooth muscle actin and negative for anaplastic lymphoma kinase protein.

  7. Distinction between the extracellular matrix of the nucleus pulposus and hyaline cartilage: a requisite for tissue engineering of intervertebral disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwale F.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering of intervertebral discs (IVD using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs induced to differentiate into a disc-cell phenotype has been considered as an alternative treatment for disc degeneration. However, since there is no unique marker characteristic of discs and since hyaline cartilage and immature nucleus pulposus (NP possess similar macromolecules in their extracellular matrix, it is currently difficult to recognize MSC conversion to a disc cell. This study was performed to compare the proteoglycan to collagen ratio (measured as GAG to hydroxyproline ratio in the NP of normal disc to that of the hyaline cartilage of the endplate within the same group of individuals and test the hypothesis that this ratio can be used for in vivo studies to distinguish between a normal NP and hyaline cartilage phenotype. Whole human lumbar spine specimens from fresh cadavers, ranging in age from 12 weeks to 79 years, were used to harvest the IVDs and adjacent endplates. The GAG to hydroxyproline ratio within the NP of young adults is approximately 27:1, whereas the ratio within the hyaline cartilage endplate of the same aged individuals is about 2:1. The production of an extracellular matrix with a high proteoglycan to collagen ratio can be used in vivo to distinguish NP cells from chondrocytes, and could help in identifying a NP-like phenotype in vivo as opposed to a chondrocyte when MSCs are induced to differentiate for tissue engineering of a disc.

  8. Hyaline Articular Matrix Formed by Dynamic Self-Regenerating Cartilage and Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meppelink, Amanda M; Zhao, Xing; Griffin, Darvin J; Erali, Richard; Gill, Thomas J; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Redmond, Robert W; Randolph, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    Injuries to the articular cartilage surface are challenging to repair because cartilage possesses a limited capacity for self-repair. The outcomes of current clinical procedures aimed to address these injuries are inconsistent and unsatisfactory. We have developed a novel method for generating hyaline articular cartilage to improve the outcome of joint surface repair. A suspension of 10(7) swine chondrocytes was cultured under reciprocating motion for 14 days. The resulting dynamic self-regenerating cartilage (dSRC) was placed in a cartilage ring and capped with fibrin and collagen gel. A control group consisted of chondrocytes encapsulated in fibrin gel. Constructs were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice and harvested after 6 weeks. Gross, histological, immunohistochemical, biochemical, and biomechanical analyses were performed. In swine patellar groove, dSRC was implanted into osteochondral defects capped with collagen gel and compared to defects filled with osteochondral plugs, collagen gel, or left empty after 6 weeks. In mice, the fibrin- and collagen-capped dSRC constructs showed enhanced contiguous cartilage matrix formation over the control of cells encapsulated in fibrin gel. Biochemically, the fibrin and collagen gel dSRC groups were statistically improved in glycosaminoglycan and hydroxyproline content compared to the control. There was no statistical difference in the biomechanical data between the dSRC groups and the control. The swine model also showed contiguous cartilage matrix in the dSRC group but not in the collagen gel and empty defects. These data demonstrate the survivability and successful matrix formation of dSRC under the mechanical forces experienced by normal hyaline cartilage in the knee joint. The results from this study demonstrate that dSRC capped with hydrogels successfully engineers contiguous articular cartilage matrix in both nonload-bearing and load-bearing environments.

  9. Uninduced adipose-derived stem cells repair the defect of full-thickness hyaline cartilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-ning; LI Lei; LENG Ping; WANG Ying-zhen; Lü Cheng-yu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To testify the effect of the stem cells derived from the widely distributed fat tissue on repairing full-thickness hyaline cartilage defects.Methods: Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were derived from adipose tissue and cultured in vitro.Twentyseven New Zealand white rabbits were divided into three groups randomly.The cultured ADSCs mixed with calcium alginate gel were used to fill the full-thickness hyaline cartilage defects created at the patellafemoral joint,and the defects repaired with gel or without treatment served as control groups.After 4,8 and 12 weeks,the reconstructed tissue was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically.Histological analysis and qualitative scoring were also performed to detect the outcome.Results: Full thickness hyaline cartilage defects were repaired completely with ADSCs-derived dssue.The result was better in ADSCs group than the control ones.The microstructure of reconstructed tissue with ADSCs was similar to that of hvaline cartilage and contained more cells and regular matrix fibers,being better than other groups.Plenty of collagen fibers around cells could be seen under transmission electron microscopy.Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in comparison with other groups at each time point(t=4.360,P<0.01).Conclusion: Thcse results indicate that stem cells derived from mature adipose without induction possess the ability to repair cartilage defects

  10. Can one generate stable hyaline cartilage from adult mesenchymal stem cells? A developmental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellingman, Catharine A; Koevoet, Wendy; van Osch, Gerjo J V M

    2012-11-01

    Chondrogenically differentiating bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) display signs of chondrocyte hypertrophy, such as production of collagen type X, MMP13 and alkaline phosphatase (ALPL). For cartilage reconstructions this is undesirable, as terminally differentiated cartilage produced by BMSCs mineralizes when implanted in vivo. Terminal differentiation is not restricted to BMSCs but is also encountered in chondrogenic differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as well as embryonic stem cells, which by definition should be able to generate all types of tissues, including stable cartilage. Therefore, we propose that the currently used culture conditions may drive the cells towards terminal differentiation. In this manuscript we aim to review the literature, supplemented by our own data to answer the question, is it possible to generate stable hyaline cartilage from adult MSCs? We demonstrate that recently published methods for inhibiting terminal differentiation (through PTHrP, MMP13 or blocking phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8) result in cartilage formation with reduction of hypertrophic markers, although this does not reach the low level of stable chondrocytes. A set of hypertrophy markers should be included in future studies to characterize the phenotype more precisely. Finally, we used what is currently known in developmental biology about the differential development of hyaline and terminally differentiated cartilage to provide thought and insights to change current culture models for creating hyaline cartilage. Inhibiting terminal differentiation may not result in stable hyaline cartilage if the right balance of signals has not been created from the start of culture onwards. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Castleman′s disease: Hyaline vascular type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth Shastry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman′s disease is a rare disease of lymph node with two identified forms, the hyaline vascular type and plasma cell type. It presents as localized or systemic lymphadenopathy or even as extranodal mass and may give rise to several differential diagnoses. Castleman′s disease represents a morphologically distinct form of lymph node hyperplasia rather than a neoplasm or a hamartoma. It occurs most commonly in adults but it can also affect children. Here we present a case of Castleman′s disease in a 22 year male patient involving right cervical lymphnode.

  12. Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaçal, Naci; Gülçelik, Nevzat; Yildiz, Kadriye; Mungan, Sevdegül; Kutlu, Necmettin

    2005-07-01

    Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis ( JHF ) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by papulonodular skin lesions, gingival hyperplasia, joint contractures, and bone lesions. The skin lesions may consist of multiple large tumors, commonly on the scalp and around the neck, and small pearly, pink papules and plaques on the trunk, chin, ears, and around the nostrils. Here, we report a 2-year-old boy with characteristic stiffness of the knees and elbows and pink confluent papules on the paranasal folds, and periauricular and perianal regions. He also had hard nodules all over the scalp and around the mouth, and severe gingival hyperplasia. The lesions were totally excised and clinicopathological diagnosis was JHF.

  13. Hyaline cartilage degenerates after autologous osteochondral transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibesku, C O; Szuwart, T; Kleffner, T O; Schlegel, P M; Jahn, U R; Van Aken, H; Fuchs, S

    2004-11-01

    Autologous osteochondral grafting is a well-established clinical procedure to treat focal cartilage defects in patients, although basic research on this topic remains sparse. The aim of the current study was to evaluate (1) histological changes of transplanted hyaline cartilage of osteochondral grafts and (2) the tissue that connects the transplanted cartilage with the adjacent cartilage in a sheep model. Both knee joints of four sheep were opened surgically and osteochondral grafts were harvested and simultaneously transplanted to the contralateral femoral condyle. The animals were sacrificed after three months and the received knee joints were evaluated histologically. Histological evaluation showed a complete ingrowth of the osseous part of the osteochondral grafts. A healing or ingrowth at the level of the cartilage could not be observed. Histological evaluation of the transplanted grafts according to Mankin revealed significantly more and more severe signs of degeneration than the adjacent cartilage, such as cloning of chondrocytes and irregularities of the articular surface. We found no connecting tissue between the transplanted and the adjacent cartilage and histological signs of degeneration of the transplanted hyaline cartilage. In the light of these findings, long-term results of autologous osteochondral grafts in human beings have to be followed critically.

  14. Regeneration of hyaline-like cartilage in situ with SOX9 stimulation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Wu, Shili; Naccarato, Ty; Prakash-Damani, Manan; Chou, Yuan; Chu, Cong-Qiu; Zhu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Microfracture, a common procedure for treatment of cartilage injury, induces fibrocartilage repair by recruiting bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to the site of cartilage injury. However, fibrocartilage is inferior biomechanically to hyaline cartilage. SRY-type high-mobility group box-9 (SOX9) is a master regulator of chondrogenesis by promoting proliferation and differentiation of MSC into chondrocytes. In this study we aimed to test the therapeutic potential of cell penetrating recombinant SOX9 protein in regeneration of hyaline cartilage in situ at the site of cartilage injury. We generated a recombinant SOX9 protein which was fused with super positively charged green fluorescence protein (GFP) (scSOX9) to facilitate cell penetration. scSOX9 was able to induce chondrogenesis of bone marrow derived MSC in vitro. In a rabbit cartilage injury model, scSOX9 in combination with microfracture significantly improved quality of repaired cartilage as shown by macroscopic appearance. Histological analysis revealed that the reparative tissue induced by microfracture with scSOX9 had features of hyaline cartilage; and collagen type II to type I ratio was similar to that in normal cartilage. This short term in vivo study demonstrated that when administered at the site of microfracture, scSOX9 was able to induce reparative tissue with features of hyaline cartilage.

  15. Autologous chondrocyte implantation: superior biologic properties of hyaline cartilage repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Ian; Lavigne, Patrick; Valenzuela, Herminio; Oakes, Barry

    2007-02-01

    Information regarding the quality of autologous chondrocyte implantation repair is needed to determine whether the current autologous chondrocyte implantation surgical technology and the subsequent biologic repair processes are capable of reliably forming durable hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage in vivo. We report and analyze the properties and qualities of autologous chondrocyte implantation repairs. We evaluated 66 autologous chondrocyte implantation repairs in 57 patients, 55 of whom had histology, indentometry, and International Cartilage Repair Society repair scoring at reoperation for mechanical symptoms or pain. International Knee Documentation Committee scores were used to address clinical outcome. Maximum stiffness, normalized stiffness, and International Cartilage Repair Society repair scoring were higher for hyaline articular cartilage repairs compared with fibrocartilage, with no difference in clinical outcome. Reoperations revealed 32 macroscopically abnormal repairs (Group B) and 23 knees with normal-looking repairs in which symptoms leading to arthroscopy were accounted for by other joint disorders (Group A). In Group A, 65% of repairs were either hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage compared with 28% in Group B. Autologous chondrocyte repairs composed of fibrocartilage showed more morphologic abnormalities and became symptomatic earlier than hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage repairs. The hyaline articular cartilage repairs had biomechanical properties comparable to surrounding cartilage and superior to those associated with fibrocartilage repairs.

  16. A comparison of different bioinks for 3D bioprinting of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Andrew C; Critchley, Susan E; Rencsok, Emily M; Kelly, Daniel J

    2016-10-07

    Cartilage is a dense connective tissue with limited self-repair capabilities. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) laden hydrogels are commonly used for fibrocartilage and articular cartilage tissue engineering, however they typically lack the mechanical integrity for implantation into high load bearing environments. This has led to increased interested in 3D bioprinting of cell laden hydrogel bioinks reinforced with stiffer polymer fibres. The objective of this study was to compare a range of commonly used hydrogel bioinks (agarose, alginate, GelMA and BioINK™) for their printing properties and capacity to support the development of either hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage in vitro. Each hydrogel was seeded with MSCs, cultured for 28 days in the presence of TGF-β3 and then analysed for markers indicative of differentiation towards either a fibrocartilaginous or hyaline cartilage-like phenotype. Alginate and agarose hydrogels best supported the development of hyaline-like cartilage, as evident by the development of a tissue staining predominantly for type II collagen. In contrast, GelMA and BioINK(™) (a PEGMA based hydrogel) supported the development of a more fibrocartilage-like tissue, as evident by the development of a tissue containing both type I and type II collagen. GelMA demonstrated superior printability, generating structures with greater fidelity, followed by the alginate and agarose bioinks. High levels of MSC viability were observed in all bioinks post-printing (∼80%). Finally we demonstrate that it is possible to engineer mechanically reinforced hydrogels with high cell viability by co-depositing a hydrogel bioink with polycaprolactone filaments, generating composites with bulk compressive moduli comparable to articular cartilage. This study demonstrates the importance of the choice of bioink when bioprinting different cartilaginous tissues for musculoskeletal applications.

  17. Generation of Scaffoldless Hyaline Cartilaginous Tissue from Human iPSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Yamashita

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Defects in articular cartilage ultimately result in loss of joint function. Repairing cartilage defects requires cell sources. We developed an approach to generate scaffoldless hyaline cartilage from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs. We initially generated an hiPSC line that specifically expressed GFP in cartilage when teratoma was formed. We optimized the culture conditions and found BMP2, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1, and GDF5 critical for GFP expression and thus chondrogenic differentiation of the hiPSCs. The subsequent use of scaffoldless suspension culture contributed to purification, producing homogenous cartilaginous particles. Subcutaneous transplantation of the hiPSC-derived particles generated hyaline cartilage that expressed type II collagen, but not type I collagen, in immunodeficiency mice. Transplantation of the particles into joint surface defects in immunodeficiency rats and immunosuppressed mini-pigs indicated that neocartilage survived and had potential for integration into native cartilage. The immunodeficiency mice and rats suffered from neither tumors nor ectopic tissue formation. The hiPSC-derived cartilaginous particles constitute a viable cell source for regenerating cartilage defects.

  18. Sprifermin (rhFGF18) enables proliferation of chondrocytes producing a hyaline cartilage matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigout, A; Guehring, H; Froemel, D; Meurer, A; Ladel, C; Reker, D; Bay-Jensen, A C; Karsdal, M A; Lindemann, S

    2017-08-18

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 18 has been shown to increase cartilage volume when injected intra-articularly in animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) and in patients with knee OA (during clinical development of the recombinant human FGF18, sprifermin). However, the exact nature of this effect is still unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of sprifermin at the cellular level. A combination of different chondrocyte culture systems was used and the effects of sprifermin on proliferation, the phenotype and matrix production were evaluated. The involvement of MAPKs in sprifermin signalling was also studied. In monolayer, we observed that sprifermin promoted a round cell morphology and stimulated both cellular proliferation and Sox9 expression while strongly decreasing type I collagen expression. In 3D culture, sprifermin increased the number of matrix-producing chondrocytes, improved the type II:I collagen ratio and enabled human OA chondrocytes to produce a hyaline extracellular matrix (ECM). Furthermore, we found that sprifermin displayed a 'hit and run' mode of action, with intermittent exposure required for the compound to fully exert its anabolic effect. Finally, sprifermin appeared to signal through activation of ERK. Our results indicate that intermittent exposure to sprifermin leads to expansion of hyaline cartilage-producing chondrocytes. These in vitro findings are consistent with the increased cartilage volume observed in the knees of OA patients after intra-articular injection with sprifermin in clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Generation of scaffoldless hyaline cartilaginous tissue from human iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Morioka, Miho; Yahara, Yasuhito; Okada, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tomohito; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Matsuda, Shuichi; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2015-03-10

    Defects in articular cartilage ultimately result in loss of joint function. Repairing cartilage defects requires cell sources. We developed an approach to generate scaffoldless hyaline cartilage from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). We initially generated an hiPSC line that specifically expressed GFP in cartilage when teratoma was formed. We optimized the culture conditions and found BMP2, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), and GDF5 critical for GFP expression and thus chondrogenic differentiation of the hiPSCs. The subsequent use of scaffoldless suspension culture contributed to purification, producing homogenous cartilaginous particles. Subcutaneous transplantation of the hiPSC-derived particles generated hyaline cartilage that expressed type II collagen, but not type I collagen, in immunodeficiency mice. Transplantation of the particles into joint surface defects in immunodeficiency rats and immunosuppressed mini-pigs indicated that neocartilage survived and had potential for integration into native cartilage. The immunodeficiency mice and rats suffered from neither tumors nor ectopic tissue formation. The hiPSC-derived cartilaginous particles constitute a viable cell source for regenerating cartilage defects. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of growth factors and glucosamine on porcine mandibular condylar cartilage cells and hyaline cartilage cells for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limin; Detamore, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar cartilage is a distinct cartilage that has both fibrocartilaginous and hyaline-like character, with a thin proliferative zone that separates the fibrocartilaginous fibrous zone at the surface from the hyaline-like mature and hypertrophic zones below. In this study, we compared the effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), and glucosamine sulphate on porcine TMJ condylar cartilage and ankle cartilage cells in monolayer culture. In general, TMJ condylar cartilage cells proliferated faster than ankle cartilage cells, while ankle cells produced significantly greater amounts of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen than TMJ condylar cartilage cells. IGF-I and bFGF were potent stimulators of TMJ cell proliferation, while no signals statistically outperformed controls for ankle cell proliferation. IGF-I was the most effective signal for GAG production with ankle cells, and the most potent upregulator of collagen synthesis for both cell types. Glucosamine sulphate promoted cell proliferation and biosynthesis at specific concentrations and outperformed growth factors in certain instances. In conclusion, hyaline cartilage cells had lower cell numbers and superior biosynthesis compared to TMJ condylar cartilage cells, and we have found IGF-I at 100 ng/mL and glucosamine sulphate at 100 microg/mL to be the most effective signals for these cells under the prescribed conditions.

  1. On Double Vector Bundles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuo CHEN; Zhang Ju LIU; Yun He SHENG

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we construct a category of short exact sequences of vector bundles and prove that it is equivalent to the category of double vector bundles. Moreover, operations on double vector bundles can be transferred to operations on the corresponding short exact sequences. In particular, we study the duality theory of double vector bundles in term of the corresponding short exact sequences. Examples including the jet bundle and the Atiyah algebroid are discussed.

  2. On Double Vector Bundles

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhuo; Liu, Zhangju; Sheng, Yunhe

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we construct a category of short exact sequences of vector bundles and prove that it is equivalent to the category of double vector bundles. Moreover, operations on double vector bundles can be transferred to operations on the corresponding short exact sequences. In particular, we study the duality theory of double vector bundles in term of the corresponding short exact sequences. Examples including the jet bundle and the Atiyah algebroid are discussed.

  3. Effect of supramolecular organization of a cartilaginous tissue on thermal stability of collagen II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat'eva, N. Yu.; Averkiev, S. V.; Lunin, V. V.; Grokhovskaya, T. E.; Obrezkova, M. V.

    2006-08-01

    The thermal stability of collagen II in various cartilaginous tissues was studied. It was found that heating a tissue of nucleus pulposus results in collagen II melting within a temperature range of 60-70°C; an intact tissue of hyaline cartilage (of nasal septum and cartilage endplates) is a thermally stable system, where collagen II is not denatured completely up to 100°C. It was found that partial destruction of glycosaminoglycans in hyaline cartilage leads to an increase in the degree of denaturation of collagen II upon heating, although a significant fraction remains unchanged. It was shown that electrostatic interactions of proteoglycans and collagen only slightly affect the thermal stability of collagen II in the tissues. Evidently, proteoglycan aggregates play a key role: they create topological hindrances for moving polypeptide chains, thereby reducing the configurational entropy of collagen macromolecules in the state of a random coil.

  4. Principal noncommutative torus bundles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Echterhoff, Siegfried; Nest, Ryszard; Oyono-Oyono, Herve

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we study continuous bundles of C*-algebras which are non-commutative analogues of principal torus bundles. We show that all such bundles, although in general being very far away from being locally trivial bundles, are at least locally trivial with respect to a suitable bundle version...... of bivariant K-theory (denoted RKK-theory) due to Kasparov. Using earlier results of Echterhoff and Williams, we shall give a complete classification of principal non-commutative torus bundles up to equivariant Morita equivalence. We then study these bundles as topological fibrations (forgetting the group...... action) and give necessary and sufficient conditions for any non-commutative principal torus bundle being RKK-equivalent to a commutative one. As an application of our methods we shall also give a K-theoretic characterization of those principal torus-bundles with H-flux, as studied by Mathai...

  5. Surgical correction of joint deformities and hyaline cartilage regeneration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vinokurov, Vyacheslav Alexandrovich; Norkin, Igor Alekseevich

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To determine a method of extra-articular osteochondral fragment formation for the improvement of surgical correction results of joint deformities and optimization of regenerative conditions for hyaline cartilage...

  6. Production of hyaline-like cartilage by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in a self-assembly model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Steven H; Cooley, Avery J; Borazjani, Ali; Sowell, Brittany L; To, Harrison; Tran, Scott C

    2009-10-01

    A scaffoldless or self-assembly approach to cartilage tissue engineering has been used to produce hyaline cartilage from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bMSCs), but the mechanical properties of such engineered cartilage and the effects the transforming growth factor (TGF) isoform have not been fully explored. This study employs a cell culture insert model to produce tissue-engineered cartilage using bMSCs. Neonatal pig bMSCs were isolated by plastic adherence and expanded in monolayer before being seeded into porous transwell inserts and cultured for 4 or 8 weeks in defined chondrogenic media containing either TGF-beta1 or TGF-beta3. Following biomechanical evaluation in confined compression, colorimetric dimethyl methylene blue and Sircol dye-binding assays were used to analyze glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen contents, respectively. Histological sections were stained with toluidine blue for proteoglycans and with picrosirius red to reveal collagen orientation, and immunostained for detection of collagen types I and II. Neocartilage increased in thickness, collagen, and GAG content between 4 and 8 weeks. Proteoglycan concentration increased with depth from the top surface. The tissue contained much more collagen type II than type I, and there was a consistent pattern of collagen alignment. TGF-beta1-treated and TGF-beta3-treated constructs were similar at 4 weeks, but 8-week TGF-beta1 constructs had a higher aggregate modulus and GAG content compared to TGF-beta3. These results demonstrate that bMSCs can generate functional hyaline-like cartilage through a self-assembling process.

  7. Precision of hyaline cartilage thickness measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, K.; Buckwalter, K.; Helvie, M.; Niklason, L.; Martel, W. (Univ. of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiology)

    1992-05-01

    Measurement of cartilage thickness in vivo is an important indicator of the status of a joint as the various degenerative and inflammatory arthritides directly affect the condition of the cartilage. In order to assess the precision of thickness measurements of hyaline articular cartilage, we undertook a pilot study using MR imaging, plain radiography, and ultrasonography (US). We measured the cartilage of the hip and knee joints in 10 persons (4 healthy volunteers and 6 patients). The joints in each patient were examined on two separate occasions using each modality. In the hips a swell as the knee joints, the most precise measuring method was plain film radiography. For radiographs of the knees obtained in the standing position, the coefficient of variation was 6.5%; in the hips this figure was 6.34%. US of the knees and MR imaging of the hips were the second best modalities in the measurement of cartilage thickness. In addition, MR imaging enabled the most complete visualization of the joint cartilage. (orig.).

  8. Rotating three-dimensional dynamic culture of adult human bone marrow-derived cells for tissue engineering of hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shinsuke; Mishima, Hajime; Ishii, Tomoo; Akaogi, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Chang, Fei; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2009-04-01

    The method of constructing cartilage tissue from bone marrow-derived cells in vitro is considered a valuable technique for hyaline cartilage regenerative medicine. Using a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor developed in a NASA space experiment, we attempted to efficiently construct hyaline cartilage tissue from human bone marrow-derived cells without using a scaffold. Bone marrow aspirates were obtained from the iliac crest of nine patients during orthopedic operation. After their proliferation in monolayer culture, the adherent cells were cultured in the RWV bioreactor with chondrogenic medium for 2 weeks. Cells from the same source were cultured in pellet culture as controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluations (collagen type I and II) and quantification of glycosaminoglycan were performed on formed tissues and compared. The engineered constructs obtained using the RWV bioreactor showed strong features of hyaline cartilage in terms of their morphology as determined by histological and immunohistological evaluations. The glycosaminoglycan contents per microg DNA of the tissues were 10.01 +/- 3.49 microg/microg DNA in the case of the RWV bioreactor and 6.27 +/- 3.41 microg/microg DNA in the case of the pellet culture, and their difference was significant. The RWV bioreactor could provide an excellent environment for three-dimensional cartilage tissue architecture that can promote the chondrogenic differentiation of adult human bone marrow-derived cells.

  9. Hyaline cartilage regeneration by combined therapy of microfracture and long-term bone morphogenetic protein-2 delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee Seok; La, Wan-Geun; Bhang, Suk Ho; Kim, Hak-Jun; Im, Gun-Il; Lee, Haeshin; Park, Jung-Ho; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2011-07-01

    Microfracture of cartilage induces migration of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. However, this treatment often results in fibrocartilage regeneration. Growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 induce the differentiation of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes, which can be used for hyaline cartilage regeneration. Here, we tested the hypothesis that long-term delivery of BMP-2 to cartilage defects subjected to microfracture results in regeneration of high-quality hyaline-like cartilage, as opposed to short-term delivery of BMP-2 or no BMP-2 delivery. Heparin-conjugated fibrin (HCF) and normal fibrin were used as carriers for the long- and short-term delivery of BMP-2, respectively. Rabbit articular cartilage defects were treated with microfracture combined with one of the following: no treatment, fibrin, short-term delivery of BMP-2, HCF, or long-term delivery of BMP-2. Eight weeks after treatment, histological analysis revealed that the long-term delivery of BMP-2 group (microfracture + HCF + BMP-2) showed the most staining with alcian blue. A biochemical assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction assay and Western blot analysis all revealed that the long-term delivery of BMP-2 group had the highest glucosaminoglycan content as well as the highest expression level of collagen type II. Taken together, the long-term delivery of BMP-2 to cartilage defects subjected to microfracture resulted in regeneration of hyaline-like cartilage, as opposed to short-term delivery or no BMP-2 delivery. Therefore, this method could be more convenient for hyaline cartilage regeneration than autologous chondrocyte implantation due to its less invasive nature and lack of cell implantation.

  10. Hyaline fibromatosis of Hoffa's fat pad in a patient with a mild type of hyaline fibromatosis syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raak, Sjoerd M. van [Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dordrecht (Netherlands); Meuffels, Duncan E. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Leenders, Geert J.L.H. van [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Oei, Edwin H.G. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-04-15

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome (HFS) is a rare, homozygous, autosomal recessive disease, characterized by deposition of hyaline material in skin and other organs, resulting in esthetic problems, disability, and potential life-threatening complications. Most patients become clinically apparent in the first few years of life, and the disorder typically progresses with the appearance of new lesions. We describe a rare case of a 20-year-old patient with juvenile-onset mild HFS who presented with a history of progressive anterior knee pain. Detailed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings with histopathological correlation are presented of hyaline fibromatosis of Hoffa's fat pad, including differential diagnosis. The diagnosis of HFS is generally made on basis of clinical and histopathological findings. Imaging findings, however, may contribute to the correct diagnosis in patients who present with a less typical clinical course of HFS. (orig.)

  11. Parabolic k-ample bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Indranil

    2011-01-01

    We construct projectivization of a parabolic vector bundle and a tautological line bundle over it. It is shown that a parabolic vector bundle is ample if and only if the tautological line bundle is ample. This allows us to generalize the notion of a k-ample bundle, introduced by Sommese, to the context of parabolic bundles. A parabolic vector bundle $E_*$ is defined to be k-ample if the tautological line bundle ${\\mathcal O}_{{\\mathbb P}(E_*)}(1)$ is $k$--ample. We establish some properties of parabolic k-ample bundles.

  12. Platelet-rich plasma loaded in situ-formed hydrogel enhances hyaline cartilage regeneration by CB1 upregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Rim; Park, Kyung Min; Joung, Yoon Ki; Park, Ki Dong; Do, Sun Hee

    2012-11-01

    The efficacy of three-dimensional (3D) culture on the proliferation and maturation of chondrocytes seeded into a hydrogel scaffold was assessed. Three types of hydrogel were prepared for the 3D culture of primary isolated chondrocytes. Chondrocyte proliferation was assessed using a live/dead viability/cytotoxicity assay and semiquantitative RT-PCR after 3D culture in hydrogel. Cylindrical defects in the center of rat xyphoids were used for the implantation of platelet-rich plasma (PRP)/hydrogel composites. Rats were killed at day 7 postoperatively and evaluated histochemically and immunohistologically. Xyphoid chondrocytes proliferated well with time in hydrogels. In the PRP-containing hydrogels, xyphoid defects displayed early formation of chondroid matrix with massive peripheral infiltration of spindle cells. These results were consistent with Safranin-O staining for proteoglycans and immunohistochemistry for type II collagen. Gene expression analyses in vitro revealed aggrecan, type II collagen, and ChM-1 and CB1 upregulation by PRP/hydrogel. PRP/hydrogel provided a suitable environment for hyaline cartilaginous regeneration, leading to anti-inflammation by significant increase of CB1 and inhibiting vascular ingrowth via considerable upregulation of ChM-1. The results provide a valuable reference for the clinical application of hydrogel scaffolds for hyaline cartilage regeneration, as well as the use of autologous PRP to improve cellular proliferation and maturation of xyphoid repair. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Collagenous spherulosis: An interesting cytological finding in breast lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailja Puri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Collagenous spherulosis (CS is a rare and interesting entity associated with benign breast lesions. CS is an incidental finding picked up only on 0.2% of cytology specimen. Typically cytologically of CS of breast consists of central spherical hyaline spherule surrounded by myoepithelial cells. The central hyaline spherule has been found to be basement membrane material histochemically and immunohistochemically. The importance of recognizing CS of breast lies in the fact that similar hyaline globules can occur in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast (ACCB. The two lesions need to be differentiated on cytology failing which inappropriate treatment can be given for either of the two lesions. We present here a case of CS associated with benign breast lesion and a case of ACCB to describe their cytological features and key points to differentiate them cytologically.

  14. Deciphering chondrocyte behaviour in matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation to undergo accurate cartilage repair with hyaline matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoor, M; Maneix, L; Ollitrault, D; Legendre, F; Duval, E; Claus, S; Mallein-Gerin, F; Moslemi, S; Boumediene, K; Galera, P

    2012-06-01

    Since the emergence in the 1990s of the autologous chondrocytes transplantation (ACT) in the treatment of cartilage defects, the technique, corresponding initially to implantation of chondrocytes, previously isolated and amplified in vitro, under a periosteal membrane, has greatly evolved. Indeed, the first generations of ACT showed their limits, with in particular the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during the monolayer culture, inducing the synthesis of fibroblastic collagens, notably type I collagen to the detriment of type II collagen. Beyond the clinical aspect with its encouraging results, new biological substitutes must be tested to obtain a hyaline neocartilage. Therefore, the use of differentiated chondrocytes phenotypically stabilized is essential for the success of ACT at medium and long-term. That is why researchers try now to develop more reliable culture techniques, using among others, new types of biomaterials and molecules known for their chondrogenic activity, giving rise to the 4th generation of ACT. Other sources of cells, being able to follow chondrogenesis program, are also studied. The success of the cartilage regenerative medicine is based on the phenotypic status of the chondrocyte and on one of its essential component of the cartilage, type II collagen, the expression of which should be supported without induction of type I collagen. The knowledge accumulated by the scientific community and the experience of the clinicians will certainly allow to relief this technological challenge, which influence besides, the validation of such biological substitutes by the sanitary authorities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Cytological diagnosis of collagenous spherulosis of breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday A Gokhale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Collagenous spherulosis is a rare entity usually seen in association with benign breast lesions. It is often picked up incidentally with a reported incidence of about 0.2% in cytological material. There are very few reports describing cytomorphological features of collagenous spherulosis. To the best of our knowledge this is the only case reported from the middle-east region. The presence of hyaline spherules surrounded by a single layer of benign myoepithelial cells is the hallmark of collagenous spherulosis on FNA. However, due to close cytological resemblance, it can be misdiagnosed as adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast. A 40-year-old woman presented with a history of a painless lump in the infraareolar region of left breast for a year. Fine needle aspiration was performed. The smears showed scanty cellularity comprising of cohesive clusters and a few branching fragments of benign ductal epithelial cells closely intermingled with many spherical, acellular homogenous hyaline globules. Few bare bipolar nuclei were noted in the background. A diagnosis of collagenous spherulosis associated with benign proliferative breast disease was made. Cytopathologists need to be aware of this entity in order to differentiate it from adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast which requires radical treatment.

  16. Hydrogels as a Replacement Material for Damaged Articular Hyaline Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte M. Beddoes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyaline cartilage is a strong durable material that lubricates joint movement. Due to its avascular structure, cartilage has a poor self-healing ability, thus, a challenge in joint recovery. When severely damaged, cartilage may need to be replaced. However, currently we are unable to replicate the hyaline cartilage, and as such, alternative materials with considerably different properties are used. This results in undesirable side effects, including inadequate lubrication, wear debris, wear of the opposing articular cartilage, and weakening of the surrounding tissue. With the number of surgeries for cartilage repair increasing, a need for materials that can better mimic cartilage, and support the surrounding material in its typical function, is becoming evident. Here, we present a brief overview of the structure and properties of the hyaline cartilage and the current methods for cartilage repair. We then highlight some of the alternative materials under development as potential methods of repair; this is followed by an overview of the development of tough hydrogels. In particular, double network (DN hydrogels are a promising replacement material, with continually improving physical properties. These hydrogels are coming closer to replicating the strength and toughness of the hyaline cartilage, while offering excellent lubrication. We conclude by highlighting several different methods of integrating replacement materials with the native joint to ensure stability and optimal behaviour.

  17. Collagenous gastroduodenitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rai, Mridula; Scholes, John V

    2011-10-01

    Collagenous gastroduodenitis is a rare histopathologic entity characterized by marked subepithelial collagen deposition with associated mucosal inflammatory infiltrate. Only 4 cases have been reported, of which 3 had associated collagenous colitis. Collagenous gastroduodenitis without colonic involvement is exceptionally rare with only 1 case reported so far in the literature. We present a case of a 68-year-old woman with dyspepsia and mild anemia, who was found to have nodular gastric and duodenal mucosa on endoscopic examination. Histopathology showed collagenous gastroduodenitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second (and first in English literature) reported case of isolated collagenous gastroduodenitis.

  18. Uniform spatial distribution of collagen fibril radii within tendon implies local activation of pC-collagen at individual fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutenberg, Andrew D.; Brown, Aidan I.; Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Collagen fibril cross-sectional radii show no systematic variation between the interior and the periphery of fibril bundles, indicating an effectively constant rate of collagen incorporation into fibrils throughout the bundle. Such spatially homogeneous incorporation constrains the extracellular diffusion of collagen precursors from sources at the bundle boundary to sinks at the growing fibrils. With a coarse-grained diffusion equation we determine stringent bounds, using parameters extracted from published experimental measurements of tendon development. From the lack of new fibril formation after birth, we further require that the concentration of diffusing precursors stays below the critical concentration for fibril nucleation. We find that the combination of the diffusive bound, which requires larger concentrations to ensure homogeneous fibril radii, and lack of nucleation, which requires lower concentrations, is only marginally consistent with fully processed collagen using conservative bounds. More realistic bounds may leave no consistent concentrations. Therefore, we propose that unprocessed pC-collagen diffuses from the bundle periphery followed by local C-proteinase activity and subsequent collagen incorporation at each fibril. We suggest that C-proteinase is localized within bundles, at fibril surfaces, during radial fibrillar growth. The much greater critical concentration of pC-collagen, as compared to fully processed collagen, then provides broad consistency between homogeneous fibril radii and the lack of fibril nucleation during fibril growth.

  19. Collagenous sprue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soendergaard, Christoffer; Riis, Lene Buhl; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2014-01-01

    Collagenous sprue is a rare clinicopathological condition of the small bowel. It is characterised by abnormal subepithelial collagen deposition and is typically associated with malabsorption, diarrhoea and weight loss. The clinical features of collagenous sprue often resemble those of coeliac dis...... disease and together with frequent histological findings like mucosal thinning and intraepithelial lymphocytosis the diagnosis may be hard to reach without awareness of this condition. While coeliac disease is treated using gluten restriction, collagenous sprue is, however, not improved...

  20. The ABCDEF Implementation Bundle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annachiara Marra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Long-term morbidity, long-term cognitive impairment and hospitalization-associated disability are common occurrence in the survivors of critical illness, with significant consequences for patients and for the caregivers. The ABCDEF bundle represents an evidence-based guide for clinicians to approach the organizational changes needed for optimizing ICU patient recovery and outcomes. The ABCDEF bundle includes: Assess, Prevent, and Manage Pain, Both Spontaneous Awakening Trials (SAT and Spontaneous Breathing Trials (SBT, Choice of analgesia and sedation, Delirium: Assess, Prevent, and Manage, Early mobility and Exercise, and Family engagement. The purpose of this review is to describe the core features of the ABCDEF bundle.

  1. Absence of hyaline cartilage in the tongue of 'Caspian miniature horse'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaian, M

    2006-08-01

    Histology of the tongue, including apex, root and body, in four adult Caspian miniature horses was examined. Serial sections with 6 mum thickness were stained with haematoxylin-eosin and Masson trichrome and studied under light microscope. The tongue was covered by stratified squamous epithelium. It was thick and keratinized bearing numerous lingual papillae on the dorsum, mostly filiform with a very fine keratinized thread projecting above the surface and bending backward. The fungiform papillae were sparsely scattered among the filiform papillae and covered with keratinized squamous epithelium. Few taste buds were detected on it. The two very large vallate papillae were detected on the dorsum, just rostral to the root, which were covered with stratified squamous epithelium with relatively high amounts of taste buds in the epithelium of the surrounding grooves. The foliate papillae were present near the palatoglossal arch and had a few taste buds. The epithelium covering the ventral surface of the tongue was thin and keratinized. The lingual muscle core consisted of transverse, longitudinal and perpendicular bundles of skeletal muscle fibres. Clusters of minor salivary glands were present between the muscle fibres and lamia propria. Most of the lingual glands were mucous and most of the gustatory ones were serous type. The mid-dorsal special structure of the tongue (dorsal lingual cartilage) contained sparse skeletal muscle fibres and was rich in white adipose tissue. Hyaline cartilage, routinely observed in this structure in the horses, was not detected in Caspian miniature horse.

  2. Crosslinked type II collagen matrices: preparation, characterization, and potential for cartilage engineering.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, J.S.; Kraan, P.M. van der; Hafmans, T.G.M.; Kamp, J.; Buma, P.; Susante, J.L.C. van; Berg, W.B. van den; Veerkamp, J.H.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van

    2002-01-01

    The limited intrinsic repair capacity of articular cartilage has stimulated continuing efforts to develop tissue engineered analogues. Matrices composed of type II collagen and chondroitin sulfate (CS), the major constituents of hyaline cartilage, may create an appropriate environment for the genera

  3. Chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood implants elicit hyaline cartilage repair integrated with porous subchondral bone in microdrilled rabbit defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoemann, C D; Sun, J; McKee, M D; Chevrier, A; Rossomacha, E; Rivard, G-E; Hurtig, M; Buschmann, M D

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that microfractured ovine defects are repaired with more hyaline cartilage when the defect is treated with in situ-solidified implants of chitosan-glycerol phosphate (chitosan-GP) mixed with autologous whole blood. The objectives of this study were (1) to characterize chitosan-GP/blood clots in vitro, and (2) to develop a rabbit marrow stimulation model in order to determine the effects of the chitosan-GP/blood implant and of debridement on the formation of incipient cartilage repair tissue. Blood clots were characterized by histology and in vitro clot retraction tests. Bilateral 3.5 x 4 mm trochlear defects debrided into the calcified layer were pierced with four microdrill holes and filled with a chitosan-GP/blood implant or allowed to bleed freely as a control. At 1 day post-surgery, initial defects were characterized by histomorphometry (n=3). After 8 weeks of repair, osteochondral repair tissues between or through the drill holes were evaluated by histology, histomorphometry, collagen type II expression, and stereology (n=16). Chitosan-GP solutions structurally stabilized the blood clots by inhibiting clot retraction. Treatment of drilled defects with chitosan-GP/blood clots led to the formation of a more integrated and hyaline repair tissue above a more porous and vascularized subchondral bone plate compared to drilling alone. Correlation analysis of repair tissue between the drill holes revealed that the absence of calcified cartilage and the presence of a porous subchondral bone plate were predictors of greater repair tissue integration with subchondral bone (Phyaline and integrated repair tissue associated with a porous subchondral bone replete with blood vessels. Concomitant regeneration of a vascularized bone plate during cartilage repair could provide progenitors, anabolic factors and nutrients that aid in the formation of hyaline cartilage.

  4. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma and retroperitoneal fibrosis in an adolescent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Adam S.; Binkovitz, Larry A.; Adler, Brent H. [Columbus Children' s Hospital, Children' s Radiological Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Nicol, Kathleen K. [Columbus Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, Columbus, OH (United States); Rennebohm, Robert M. [Columbus Children' s Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2007-01-15

    We describe a 15-year-old boy who developed pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) and retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF). His PHG and RPF were not associated with histoplasmosis or tuberculosis and appeared to represent idiopathic autoimmune phenomena. This is the first reported case of PHG in a pediatric patient and the fourth reported co-occurrence of PHG and RPF. The use of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the diagnostic and follow-up evaluation of PHG is reported. (orig.)

  5. Subtleties Concerning Conformal Tractor Bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, C Robin

    2012-01-01

    The realization of tractor bundles as associated bundles in conformal geometry is studied. It is shown that different natural choices of principal bundle with normal Cartan connection corresponding to a given conformal manifold can give rise to topologically distinct associated tractor bundles for the same inducing representation. Consequences for homogeneous models and conformal holonomy are described. A careful presentation is made of background material concerning standard tractor bundles and equivalence between parabolic geometries and underlying structures.

  6. OUTCOME OF VENTILATION IN HYALINE MEMBRANE DISEASE: THE INDIAN EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayana Prabha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To study the short-term outcome of both preterm and term babies requiring assisted ventilation for hyaline membrane disease and report the complications contributing to morbidity and mortality of these patients from a regional medical college with limited resources. DESIGN Retrospective file review. SETTING Regional Medical College. PARTICIPANTS All babies ventilated for HMD over a 6-year period from June 2008 to June 2014. OUTCOME MEASURES Outcome of ventilation and factors contributing to mortality. RESULTS Out of 100 babies with hyaline membrane disease who were ventilated, 82% survived. Increasing gestational age and birth weight was associated with survival. The commonest complication was shock (77% and the commonest cause of mortality was septicaemia (77%. Septicaemia, Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC and pulmonary haemorrhage were significantly more common complications babies who died (p<0.05. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that DIC (Odds ratio 5.2 [Confidence intervals (C.I. 1.1-27.1] and pulmonary haemorrhage (OR 18 [1.72-45.2] to be predictors of mortality. The incidence of intraventricular haemorrhage was 1% and that of pneumothorax was 2%. The initial peak inspiratory pressure administered was significantly lower (p=0.033 and maximum peak end expiratory pressure was significantly higher in those who expired (p=0.027. CONCLUSION Outcome of ventilation for hyaline membrane disease improves with increasing gestational age and birth weight. The commonest cause of mortality and morbidity were septicaemia and shock respectively.

  7. Three new species of Trichoderma with hyaline ascospores from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z X; Zhuang, W Y

    2015-01-01

    Collections of Trichoderma having hyaline ascospores from different areas of China were examined. Using combined analyses of morphological data, culture characters and phylogenetic information based on rDNA sequences of partial nuc translation elongation factor 1-α encoding gene (TEF1-α) and the gene encoding the second largest nuc RNA polymerase subunit (RPB2), three new species, Trichoderma applanatum, T. oligosporum and T. sinoluteum, were discovered and are described. Trichoderma applanatum produces continuous flat to pulvinate, white to cream stromata with dense orange or pale brown ostioles, and simple acremonium-like to verticillium-like conidiophores, belongs to the Hypocreanum clade and is closely related to T. decipiens. Trichoderma oligosporum forms reddish brown stromata with a downy surface, hyaline conidia and gliocladium-like conidiophores, and is closely related to but distinct from T. crystalligenum in the Psychrophila clade. Trichoderma sinoluteum, as a member of the Polysporum clade, is characterized by pale yellow stromata, white pustulate conidiomata, pachybasium-like conidiophores, and hyaline conidia. Differences between the new species and their close relatives are discussed.

  8. Pulmonary Hyalinizing Granuloma Associated with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Coleman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG is a rare, benign lung disease of unknown etiology. It manifests as discrete, rounded nodules within the lung parenchyma. A 39-year-old woman presented for investigation after pulmonary nodules were found incidentally. Chest computed tomography showed multiple, discrete, non-enhancing pulmonary nodules bilaterally. Positron emission tomography (PET was negative. Biopsy demonstrated a non-specific lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Open resection yielded two nodules consistent with hyalinizing granulomas. The differential for multiple pulmonary nodules is broad. PET scan can help rule out metastatic disease, although some cancers are not hypermetabolic on PET. Furthermore, some non-malignant conditions, including hyalinizing granuloma, can show increased activity on PET. PHG should be included in the differential of multiple pulmonary nodules, especially if nodule stability can be demonstrated and/or needle biopsies are non-diagnostic. Associated immune-mediated conditions, such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP in our patient, may also favor HG. In this case report we find an association between PHG and ITP.

  9. Surgical correction of joint deformities and hyaline cartilage regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вячеслав Александрович Винокуров

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine a method of extra-articular osteochondral fragment formation for the improvement of surgical correction results of joint deformities and optimization of regenerative conditions for hyaline cartilage. Materials and Methods. The method of formation of an articular osteochondral fragment without penetration into the joint cavity was devised experimentally. More than 30 patients with joint deformities underwent the surgery. Results. During the experiments, we postulated that there may potentially be a complete recovery of joint defects because of hyaline cartilage regeneration. By destructing the osteochondral fragment and reforming it extra-articularally, joint defects were recovered in all patients. The results were evaluated as excellent and good in majority of the patients. Conclusion. These findings indicate a novel method in which the complete recovery of joint defects due to dysplastic genesis or osteochondral defects as a result of injuries can be obtained. The devised method can be used in future experiments for objectification and regenerative potential of hyaline cartilage (e.g., rate and volume of the reformed joints that regenerate, detection of cartilage elements, and the regeneration process.

  10. Multicentric hyaline-vascular Castleman's disease in the retroperitoneum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ying Wang; Tian-An Jiang; Xiao-Dong Teng; Qi-Yu Zhao; Fen Chen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Castleman's disease is a rare lymphopro-liferative disease of unknown cause. Most multicentric cases described have been of the plasma-cell variety. This article presents a case of multicentric hyaline-vascular Castleman's disease in the retroperitoneum with the ultrasonographic and computed tomography (CT) imaging manifestations. METHODS: During routine physical examination, a mass was detected in the left abdomen of a 53-year-old man with no signs or symptoms. The patient underwent ultrasound-guided aspiration biopsy and operative excision after laboratory examination, ultrasonography, and CT. RESULTS: Ultrasonography demonstrated a dominant hypoechogenic mass with hypervascularity in the retroperitoneum. CT detected a relatively homogenous enhanced lesion and several satellite nodules. After the mass and several lymph nodes were resected, histopathologic examination demonstrated a lymphocyte-predominant infiltrate surrounding the germinal centres and extensive capillary proliferation, consistent with the hyaline-vascular type of Castleman's disease. The patient received postoperative chemotherapy and remained free of recurrence 3 months later. CONCLUSION: Ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced CT can provide a positive differential diagnosis of hyaline-vascular Castleman's disease which is a kind of giant lymph node hyperplasia with hypervascularity.

  11. Positive effects of cell-free porous PLGA implants and early loading exercise on hyaline cartilage regeneration in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nai-Jen; Lin, Chih-Chan; Shie, Ming-You; Yeh, Ming-Long; Li, Chien-Feng; Liang, Peir-In; Lee, Kuan-Wei; Shen, Pei-Hsun; Chu, Chih-Jou

    2015-12-01

    The regeneration of hyaline cartilage remains clinically challenging. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of using cell-free porous poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) graft implants (PGIs) along with early loading exercise to repair a full-thickness osteochondral defect. Rabbits were randomly allocated to a treadmill exercise (TRE) group or a sedentary (SED) group and were prepared as either a PGI model or an empty defect (ED) model. TRE was performed as a short-term loading exercise; SED was physical inactivity in a free cage. The knees were evaluated at 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. At the end of testing, none of the knees developed synovitis, formed osteophytes, or became infected. Macroscopically, the PGI-TRE group regenerated a smooth articular surface, with transparent new hyaline-like tissue soundly integrated with the neighboring cartilage, but the other groups remained distinct at the margins with fibrous or opaque tissues. In a micro-CT analysis, the synthesized bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV) was significantly higher in the PGI-TRE group, which also had integrating architecture in the regeneration site. The thickness of the trabecular (subchondral) bone was improved in all groups from 6 to 12 weeks. Histologically, remarkable differences in the cartilage regeneration were visible. At week 6, compared with SED groups, the TRE groups manifested modest inflammatory cells with pro-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., TNF-α and IL-6), improved collagen alignment and higher glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, particularly in the PGI-TRE group. At week 12, the PGI-TRE group had the best regeneration outcomes, showing the formation of hyaline-like cartilage, the development of columnar rounded chondrocytes that expressed enriched levels of collagen type II and GAG, and functionalized trabecular bone with osteocytes. In summary, the combination of implanting cell-free PLGA and performing an early loading exercise can significantly promote the full

  12. Right bundle branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bussink, Barbara E; Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Jespersen, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    AimsTo determine the prevalence, predictors of newly acquired, and the prognostic value of right bundle branch block (RBBB) and incomplete RBBB (IRBBB) on a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram in men and women from the general population.Methods and resultsWe followed 18 441 participants included.......5%/2.3% in women, P Right bundle branch block was associated with significantly...... increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in both genders with age-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of 1.31 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-1.54] and 1.87 (95% CI, 1.48-2.36) in the gender pooled analysis with little attenuation after multiple adjustment. Right bundle branch block was associated...

  13. Cartilage T2 assessment: differentiation of normal hyaline cartilage and reparative tissue after arthroscopic cartilage repair in equine subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lawrence M; Sussman, Marshall S; Hurtig, Mark; Probyn, Linda; Tomlinson, George; Kandel, Rita

    2006-11-01

    To prospectively assess T2 mapping characteristics of normal articular cartilage and of cartilage at sites of arthroscopic repair, including comparison with histologic results and collagen organization assessed at polarized light microscopy (PLM). Study protocol was compliant with the Canadian Council on Animal Care Guidelines and approved by the institutional animal care committee. Arthroscopic osteochondral autograft transplantation (OAT) and microfracture arthroplasty (MFx) were performed in knees of 10 equine subjects (seven female, three male; age range, 3-5 years). A site of arthroscopically normal cartilage was documented in each joint as a control site. Joints were harvested at 12 (n = 5) and 24 (n = 5) weeks postoperatively and were imaged at 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) with a 10-echo sagittal fast spin-echo acquisition. T2 maps of each site (21 OAT harvest, 10 MFx, 12 OAT plug, and 10 control sites) were calculated with linear least-squares curve fitting. Cartilage T2 maps were qualitatively graded as "organized" (normal transition of low-to-high T2 signal from deep to superficial cartilage zones) or "disorganized." Quantitative mean T2 values were calculated for deep, middle, and superficial cartilage at each location. Results were compared with histologic and PLM assessments by using kappa analysis. T2 maps were qualitatively graded as organized at 20 of 53 sites and as disorganized at 33 sites. Perfect agreement was seen between organized T2 and histologic findings of hyaline cartilage and between disorganized T2 and histologic findings of fibrous reparative tissue (kappa = 1.0). Strong agreement was seen between organized T2 and normal PLM findings and between disorganized T2 and abnormal PLM findings (kappa = .92). Quantitative assessment of the deep, middle, and superficial cartilage, respectively, showed mean T2 values of 53.3, 58.6, and 54.9 msec at reparative fibrous tissue sites and 40.7, 53.6, and 61.6 msec at hyaline cartilage sites. A

  14. Bundles of Banach algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Kitchen

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available We study bundles of Banach algebras π:A→X, where each fiber Ax=π−1({x} is a Banach algebra and X is a compact Hausdorff space. In the case where all fibers are commutative, we investigate how the Gelfand representation of the section space algebra Γ(π relates to the Gelfand representation of the fibers. In the general case, we investigate how adjoining an identity to the bundle π:A→X relates to the standard adjunction of identities to the fibers.

  15. Principal -bundles on Nodal Curves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Usha N Bhosle

    2001-08-01

    Let be a connected semisimple affine algebraic group defined over . We study the relation between stable, semistable -bundles on a nodal curve and representations of the fundamental group of . This study is done by extending the notion of (generalized) parabolic vector bundles to principal -bundles on the desingularization of and using the correspondence between them and principal -bundles on . We give an isomorphism of the stack of generalized parabolic bundles on with a quotient stack associated to loop groups. We show that if is simple and simply connected then the Picard group of the stack of principal -bundles on is isomorphic to ⊕ , being the number of components of .

  16. Hyalinizing cholecystitis with features of immunoglobulin G4-related disease-coincidence or an unrecognized association? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajib K; Patton, Kurt T

    2015-04-01

    Hyalinizing cholecystitis (HC) is a recently described rare subtype of chronic cholecystitis characterized by dense, paucicellular collagenous transmural fibrosis, which usually replaces the mucosa and muscularis propria. Immunoglobulin (Ig)G4-associated cholecystitis is also a newly described cholecystitis variant characterized by transmural or extramural lymphoplasmacytic inflammation, lymphoid follicles, storiform fibrosis, phlebitis, and increased tissue IgG4-positive plasma cells. We describe a case of cholecystitis in an elderly white man who harbored features of both HC and IgG4-associated cholecystitis. In retrospect, the patient also had a significantly elevated serum IgG4 level. To the best of our knowledge, an association between HC and IgG4-related disease has not been previously described in the literature. Although not entirely conclusive, our observations raise the possibility that some cases of HC represent the end stage of IgG4-related disease.

  17. On projective space bundle with nef normalized tautological line bundle

    CERN Document Server

    Yasutake, Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the structure of projective space bundles whose relative anti-canonical line bundle is nef. As an application, we get a characterization of abelian varieties up to finite etale covering.

  18. Injectable glycosaminoglycan-protein nano-complex in semi-interpenetrating networks: A biphasic hydrogel for hyaline cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Janani; Subramanian, Anuradha; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2017-11-01

    Articular hyaline cartilage regeneration remains challenging due to its less intrinsic reparability. The study develops injectable biphasic semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (SIPN) hydrogel impregnated with chondroitin sulfate (ChS) nanoparticles for functional cartilage restoration. ChS loaded zein nanoparticles (∼150nm) prepared by polyelectrolyte-protein complexation were interspersed into injectable SIPNs developed by blending alginate with poly(vinyl alcohol) and calcium crosslinking. The hydrogel exhibited interconnected porous microstructure (39.9±5.8μm pore diameter, 57.7±5.9% porosity), 92% swellability and >350Pa elastic modulus. Primary chondrocytes compatibility, chondrocyte-matrix interaction with cell-cell clustering and spheroidal morphology was demonstrated in ChS loaded hydrogel and long-term (42days) proliferation was also determined. Higher fold expression of cartilage-specific genes sox9, aggrecan and collagen-II was observed in ChS loaded hydrogel while exhibiting poor expression of collagen-I. Immunoblotting of aggregan and collagen II demonstrate favorable positive influence of ChS on chondrocytes. Thus, the injectable biphasic SIPNs could be promising composition-mimetic substitute for cartilage restoration at irregular defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bioengineered collagens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramshaw, John AM; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  20. Uniform spatial distribution of collagen fibril radii within tendon implies local activation of pC-collagen at individual fibrils

    CERN Document Server

    Rutenberg, Andrew D; Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Collagen fibril cross-sectional radii show no systematic variation between the interior and the periphery of fibril bundles, indicating an effectively constant rate of collagen incorporation into fibrils throughout the bundle. Such spatially homogeneous incorporation constrains the extracellular diffusion of collagen precursors from sources at the bundle boundary to sinks at the growing fibrils. With a coarse-grained diffusion equation we determine stringent bounds, using parameters extracted from published experimental measurements of tendon development. From the lack of new fibril formation after birth, we further require that the concentration of diffusing precursors stays below the critical concentration for fibril nucleation. We find that the combination of the diffusive bound, which requires larger concentrations to ensure homogeneous fibril radii, and lack of nucleation, which requires lower concentrations, is only marginally consistent with fully-processed collagen using conservative bounds. More real...

  1. Engineering of hyaline cartilage with a calcified zone using bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W D; Hurtig, M B; Pilliar, R M; Stanford, W L; Kandel, R A

    2015-08-01

    In healthy joints, a zone of calcified cartilage (ZCC) provides the mechanical integration between articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Recapitulation of this architectural feature should serve to resist the constant shear force from the movement of the joint and prevent the delamination of tissue-engineered cartilage. Previous approaches to create the ZCC at the cartilage-substrate interface have relied on strategic use of exogenous scaffolds and adhesives, which are susceptible to failure by degradation and wear. In contrast, we report a successful scaffold-free engineering of ZCC to integrate tissue-engineered cartilage and a porous biodegradable bone substitute, using sheep bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as the cell source for both cartilaginous zones. BMSCs were predifferentiated to chondrocytes, harvested and then grown on a porous calcium polyphosphate substrate in the presence of triiodothyronine (T3). T3 was withdrawn, and additional predifferentiated chondrocytes were placed on top of the construct and grown for 21 days. This protocol yielded two distinct zones: hyaline cartilage that accumulated proteoglycans and collagen type II, and calcified cartilage adjacent to the substrate that additionally accumulated mineral and collagen type X. Constructs with the calcified interface had comparable compressive strength to native sheep osteochondral tissue and higher interfacial shear strength compared to control without a calcified zone. This protocol improves on the existing scaffold-free approaches to cartilage tissue engineering by incorporating a calcified zone. Since this protocol employs no xenogeneic material, it will be appropriate for use in preclinical large-animal studies. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Kernel bundle EPDiff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Stefan Horst; Lauze, Francois Bernard; Nielsen, Mads

    2011-01-01

    In the LDDMM framework, optimal warps for image registration are found as end-points of critical paths for an energy functional, and the EPDiff equations describe the evolution along such paths. The Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Kernel Bundle Mapping (LDDKBM) extension of LDDMM allows scale space...

  3. Universal Lagrangian bundles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sepe, D.

    2013-01-01

    The obstruction to construct a Lagrangian bundle over a fixed integral affine manifold was constructed by Dazord and Delzant (J Differ Geom 26:223–251, 1987) and shown to be given by ‘twisted’ cup products in Sepe (Differ GeomAppl 29(6): 787–800, 2011). This paper uses the topology of universal Lagr

  4. ALUMINUM BOX BUNDLING PRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosif DUMITRESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In municipal solid waste, aluminum is the main nonferrous metal, approximately 80- 85% of the total nonferrous metals. The income per ton gained from aluminum recuperation is 20 times higher than from glass, steel boxes or paper recuperation. The object of this paper is the design of a 300 kN press for aluminum box bundling.

  5. Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis. Radiological diagnosis. Fibromatosis hialina juvenil. Diagnostico radiologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, R.; Sar, V.; Cabrera, J.J.; Diaz, L.; Hernandez, B.; Valeron, P.; Baez, O.; Rodriguez, M.

    1993-10-01

    Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) is a rare disorder of unknown etiology, very few cases of which have been reported in the literature. It presents similarities to other fibromatosys, but has its particular radiological features which differentiate it from them. The clinical findings consist of several, slow growing, subcutaneous nodules, flexion contractures of the joints which can lead to disability, gingival hypertrophy and muscular atrophy. The suspected radiological diagnosis is confirmed by electron microscopy study of the nodules, although light microscopy can also reveal suggestive images. Author (9 refs.)

  6. Hyalinizing trabecular tumor and papillary carcinoma of the thyroid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Hong; QI Ji-ping; WANG Ying-wei; SONG Yue-jia; ZHANG Zhi-yi

    2010-01-01

    Background Hyalinizing trabecular tumor (HTT) is a rare thyroid neoplasm, which shares some histologic features with thyroid papillary carcinoma (TPC). Clinically, it is frequently misdiagnosed as papillary carcinoma, even for some experienced pathologists. The aim of this study was to investigate whether HTT is variant of TPC or HTT is an independent entity of thyroid neoplasm.Methods The expression of CK19, galectin-3, HBME-1 and MIB-1 was detected by immunohistochemical staining in 12 cases of hyalinizing trabecular tumor and 20 cases of thyroid papillary carcinoma.Results Two of the 12 HTT samples were positive or focally positive for CK19. Four of the 12 samples of HTT presented positive to galectin-3; 3 were stained strongly and the other one was focally positive. None of the 12 samples of HTT was positive for HBME-1. Five in 12 HTT samples were stained in nucleus for MIB-1. Almost all the 20 cases of thyroid papillary carcinoma were intensely stained for CK19, galectin-3 and HBME-1. Fifteen in 20 cases of thyroid papillary carcinoma showed nuclear staining for MIB-1.Conclusions HTT is an independent thyroid neoplasm, not a variant of TPC. This study could help in the differential diagnosis of HTT from TPC. CK19, galectin-3 and HBME-1 are adequate to identify HTT and TPC, but MIB-1 does not play an important role in discrimination between HTT and TPC.

  7. Quasi-static elastography comparison of hyaline cartilage structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCredie, A J; Stride, E; Saffari, N [Mechanical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-01

    Joint cartilage, a load bearing structure in mammals, has only limited ability for regeneration after damage. For tissue engineers to design functional constructs, better understanding of the properties of healthy tissue is required. Joint cartilage is a specialised structure of hyaline cartilage; a poroviscoelastic solid containing fibril matrix reinforcements. Healthy joint cartilage is layered, which is thought to be important for correct tissue function. However, the behaviour of each layer during loading is poorly understood. Ultrasound elastography provides access to depth-dependent information in real-time for a sample during loading. A 15 MHz focussed transducer provided details from scatterers within a small fixed region in each sample. Quasi-static loading was applied to cartilage samples while ultrasonic signals before and during compressions were recorded. Ultrasonic signals were processed to provide time-shift profiles using a sum-squared difference method and cross-correlation. Two structures of hyaline cartilage have been tested ultrasonically and mechanically to determine method suitability for monitoring internal deformation differences under load and the effect of the layers on the global mechanical material behaviour. Results show differences in both the global mechanical properties and the ultrasonically tested strain distributions between the two structures tested. It was concluded that these differences are caused primarily by the fibril orientations.

  8. The junction between hyaline cartilage and engineered cartilage in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Makoto; Komura, Hiroko; Otani, Yushi; Kanamori, Yutaka; Iwanaka, Tadashi; Hoshi, Kazuto; Tsuyoshi, Takato; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2013-06-01

    Tracheoplasty using costal cartilage grafts to enlarge the tracheal lumen was performed to treat congenital tracheal stenosis. Fibrotic granulomatous tissue was observed at the edge of grafted costal cartilage. We investigated the junction between the native hyaline cartilage and the engineered cartilage plates that were generated by auricular chondrocytes for fabricating the airway. Controlled, prospecive study. In group 1, costal cartilage from New Zealand white rabbits was collected and implanted into a space created in the cervical trachea. In group 2, chondrocytes from auricular cartilages were seeded on absorbable scaffolds. These constructs were implanted in the subcutaneous space. Engineered cartilage plates were then implanted into the trachea after 3 weeks of implantation of the constructs. The grafts in group 1 and 2 were retrieved after 4 weeks. In group 1, histological studies of the junction between the native hyaline cartilage and the implanted costal cartilage demonstrated chondrogenic tissue in four anastomoses sides out of the 10 examined. In group 2, the junction between the native trachea and the engineered cartilage showed neocartilage tissue in nine anastomoses sides out of 10. Engineered cartilage may be beneficial for engineered airways, based on the findings of the junction between the native and engineered grafts. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Mechanical properties of hyaline and repair cartilage studied by nanoindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, O; Durst, K; Maier, V; Göken, M; Birkholz, T; Schneider, H; Hennig, F; Gelse, K

    2007-11-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly organized tissue that is well adapted to the functional demands in joints but difficult to replicate via tissue engineering or regeneration. Its viscoelastic properties allow cartilage to adapt to both slow and rapid mechanical loading. Several cartilage repair strategies that aim to restore tissue and protect it from further degeneration have been introduced. The key to their success is the quality of the newly formed tissue. In this study, periosteal cells loaded on a scaffold were used to repair large partial-thickness cartilage defects in the knee joint of miniature pigs. The repair cartilage was analyzed 26 weeks after surgery and compared both morphologically and mechanically with healthy hyaline cartilage. Contact stiffness, reduced modulus and hardness as key mechanical properties were examined in vitro by nanoindentation in phosphate-buffered saline at room temperature. In addition, the influence of tissue fixation with paraformaldehyde on the biomechanical properties was investigated. Although the repair process resulted in the formation of a stable fibrocartilaginous tissue, its contact stiffness was lower than that of hyaline cartilage by a factor of 10. Fixation with paraformaldehyde significantly increased the stiffness of cartilaginous tissue by one order of magnitude, and therefore, should not be used when studying biomechanical properties of cartilage. Our study suggests a sensitive method for measuring the contact stiffness of articular cartilage and demonstrates the importance of mechanical analysis for proper evaluation of the success of cartilage repair strategies.

  10. [Collagenous colitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, C G

    1991-05-01

    Collagenous colitis is now regarded by an overwhelming majority of authors as a clinicopathological entity and has been taken up as a such in many text-books and diagnostic atlases (Morson & Dawson, 1990, Fenoglio-Preiser et al., 1989, Whitehead 1985, Whitehead 1989). A good, detailed review of cases of collagenous colitis published up to 1988 was performed by Perri et al. Collagenous colitis was also presented to a wider medical public through a clinicopathological conference case at Massachusetts General Hospital (Case 29-1988). Finally it may be added that collagenous colitis has been included in the new fourth edition of Robbins Pathologic Basis of Disease (Cotran, Kumar, Robbins, 1989), where the possibility of an autoimmune disease is stressed.

  11. Deformation quantization of principal bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Aschieri, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We outline how Drinfeld twist deformation techniques can be applied to the deformation quantization of principal bundles into noncommutative principal bundles, and more in general to the deformation of Hopf-Galois extensions. First we twist deform the structure group in a quantum group, and this leads to a deformation of the fibers of the principal bundle. Next we twist deform a subgroup of the group of authomorphisms of the principal bundle, and this leads to a noncommutative base space. Considering both deformations we obtain noncommutative principal bundles with noncommutative fiber and base space as well.

  12. Helices and vector bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Rudakov, A N

    1990-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the use of helices as a method for studying exceptional vector bundles, an important and natural concept in algebraic geometry. The work arises out of a series of seminars organised in Moscow by A. N. Rudakov. The first article sets up the general machinery, and later ones explore its use in various contexts. As to be expected, the approach is concrete; the theory is considered for quadrics, ruled surfaces, K3 surfaces and P3(C).

  13. Bundling harvester; Nippukorjausharvesteri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koponen, K. [Eko-Log Oy, Kuopio (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The staring point of the project was to design and construct, by taking the silvicultural point of view into account, a harvesting and processing system especially for energy-wood, containing manually driven bundling harvester, automatizing of the harvester, and automatized loading. The equipment forms an ideal method for entrepreneur`s-line harvesting. The target is to apply the system also for owner`s-line harvesting. The profitability of the system promotes the utilization of the system in both cases. The objectives of the project were: to construct a test equipment and prototypes for all the project stages, to carry out terrain and strain tests in order to examine the usability and durability, as well as the capacity of the machine, to test the applicability of the Eko-Log system in simultaneous harvesting of energy and pulp woods, and to start the marketing and manufacturing of the products. The basic problems of the construction of the bundling harvester have been solved using terrain-tests. The prototype machine has been shown to be operable. Loading of the bundles to form sufficiently economically transportable loads has been studied, and simultaneously, the branch-biomass has been tried to be utilized without loosing the profitability of transportation. The results have been promising, and will promote the profitable utilization of wood-energy

  14. Lack of BRAF mutations in hyalinizing trabecular neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brose Marcia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hyalinizing trabecular neoplasm (HTN of the thyroid is an unusual and controversial lesion. Some consider it a peculiar type of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC because of its nuclear features and presence of psammoma bodies. Others consider it an adenoma. Molecular studies have found RET/PTC translocations in some examples, supporting HTN as a PTC; however mutations in BRAF (another marker for PTC have not been found. We report two cases of classic HTN and a case of trabecular PTC and show BRAF mutations in the latter and not in HTN. Trabecular growth pattern is insufficient for a diagnosis of HTN and lesions with such a pattern and nuclear features of PTC are cancers. Morphologically classic HTN are not associated with metastatic potential and should be considered adenomas.

  15. Managing bundled payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Andrew

    2011-04-01

    Results of Medicare's ACE demonstration project and Geisinger Health System's ProvenCare initiative provide insight into the challenges hospitals will face as bundled payment proliferates. An early analysis of these results suggests that hospitals would benefit from bringing full automation using clinical IT tools to bear in their efforts to meet these challenges. Other important factors contributing to success include board and physician leadership, organizational structure, pricing methodology for bidding, evidence-based medical practice guidelines, supply cost management, process efficiency management, proactive and aggressive case management, business development and marketing strategy, and the financial management system.

  16. Brief report: reconstruction of joint hyaline cartilage by autologous progenitor cells derived from ear elastic cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Shinji; Takebe, Takanori; Kan, Hiroomi; Yabuki, Yuichiro; Matsuzaki, Takahisa; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Ik, Lee Jeong; Maegawa, Jiro; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    In healthy joints, hyaline cartilage covering the joint surfaces of bones provides cushioning due to its unique mechanical properties. However, because of its limited regenerative capacity, age- and sports-related injuries to this tissue may lead to degenerative arthropathies, prompting researchers to investigate a variety of cell sources. We recently succeeded in isolating human cartilage progenitor cells from ear elastic cartilage. Human cartilage progenitor cells have high chondrogenic and proliferative potential to form elastic cartilage with long-term tissue maintenance. However, it is unknown whether ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells can be used to reconstruct hyaline cartilage, which has different mechanical and histological properties from elastic cartilage. In our efforts to develop foundational technologies for joint hyaline cartilage repair and reconstruction, we conducted this study to obtain an answer to this question. We created an experimental canine model of knee joint cartilage damage, transplanted ear-derived autologous cartilage progenitor cells. The reconstructed cartilage was rich in proteoglycans and showed unique histological characteristics similar to joint hyaline cartilage. In addition, mechanical properties of the reconstructed tissues were higher than those of ear cartilage and equal to those of joint hyaline cartilage. This study suggested that joint hyaline cartilage was reconstructed from ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells. It also demonstrated that ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells, which can be harvested by a minimally invasive method, would be useful for reconstructing joint hyaline cartilage in patients with degenerative arthropathies.

  17. The biomechanical behaviour of the hyalinized periodontal ligament in dogs during experimental orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónsdóttir, S H; Giesen, E B W; Maltha, J C

    2012-10-01

    During orthodontic tooth movement, the mechanical behaviour of the extracellular matrix of the periodontal ligament (PDL) determines the cellular processes involved in turnover of the PDL and alveolar bone. This mechanical behaviour is the basis for finite element (FE) models and FE analyses. Five young adult male beagle dogs were used to test the null hypothesis that the mechanical behaviour of the PDL is identical in normal and hyalinized PDL. Therefore, tooth transposition was measured after standardized force application by super-elastic nickel titanium (NiTi) coil springs, exerting a constant force of 100 cN for 5 hours in both conditions. A rapid transposition during the first few seconds was found. However, it was significantly less for hyalinized than for non-hyalinized PDL. Subsequently, a short-lived creep movement was found for hyalinized PDL, while creep persisted at the non-hyalinized sides (analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple comparisons post hoc tests). The results showed substantial biomechanical differences between hyalinized and non-hyalinized PDL at different time points (Mann-Whitney). This indicates that FE models in the study of long-term orthodontic tooth movement, which are based solely on the characteristics of normal PDL should be reconsidered.

  18. Differential calculi on noncommutative bundles

    OpenAIRE

    Pflaum, Markus J.; Schauenburg, Peter

    1996-01-01

    We introduce a category of noncommutative bundles. To establish geometry in this category we construct suitable noncommutative differential calculi on these bundles and study their basic properties. Furthermore we define the notion of a connection with respect to a differential calculus and consider questions of existence and uniqueness. At the end these constructions are applied to basic examples of noncommutative bundles over a coquasitriangular Hopf algebra.

  19. The effect of high-energy extracorporeal shock waves on hyaline cartilage of adult rats in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Ernst, Judith; Maier, Markus; Chiquet, Matthias; Joos, Helga; Müller, Peter E; Jansson, Volkmar; Sievers, Birte; Hausdorf, Jörg

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in vivo affects the structural integrity of articular cartilage. A single bout of ESWT (1500 shock waves of 0.5 mJ/mm(2)) was applied to femoral heads of 18 adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Two sham-treated animals served as controls. Cartilage of each femoral head was harvested at 1, 4, or 10 weeks after ESWT (n = 6 per treatment group) and scored on safranin-O-stained sections. Expression of tenascin-C and chitinase 3-like protein 1 (Chi3L1) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to examine collagen (II)alpha(1) (COL2A1) expression and chondrocyte morphology was investigated by transmission electron microscopy no changes in Mankin scores were observed after ESWT. Positive immunostaining for tenascin-C and Chi3L1 was found up to 10 weeks after ESWT in experimental but not in control cartilage. COL2A1 mRNA was increased in samples 1 and 4 weeks after ESWT. Alterations found on the ultrastructural level showed expansion of the rough-surfaced endoplasmatic reticulum, detachment of the cell membrane and necrotic chondrocytes. Extracorporeal shock waves caused alterations of hyaline cartilage on a molecular and ultrastructural level that were distinctly different from control. Similar changes were described before in the very early phase of osteoarthritis (OA). High-energy ESWT might therefore cause degenerative changes in hyaline cartilage as they are found in initial OA. Copyright 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. 1. 5 MRT of the hyaline articular cartilage of the knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, G.; Bohndorf, K.; Krasny, R.; Guenther, R.W.; Prescher, A.

    1988-06-01

    MRI is a new method for imaging the knee joint. There is still some uncertainty regarding the extent and the signal from hyaline articular cartilage. MRI images were therefore compared with anatomical and histological preparations of the knee joint and the difference between MRI and the anatomical sections have been determined. It was shown that demonstration of hyaline cartilage was obscured by an artifact. Further investigations are required to determine the cause of this artifact and to achieve accurate imaging of hyaline cartilage by MRI.

  1. Collagenous gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaoyi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Chiba, Takashi; Kondo, Yutaka; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Iijima, Katsunori; Imatani, Akira; Watanabe, Mika; Shirane, Akio; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-09-01

    In the present paper, we report a case of rare collagenous gastritis. The patient was a 25-year-old man who had experienced nausea, abdominal distention and epigastralgia since 2005. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) carried out at initial examination by the patient's local doctor revealed an extensively discolored depression from the upper gastric body to the lower gastric body, mainly including the greater curvature, accompanied by residual mucosa with multiple islands and nodularity with a cobblestone appearance. Initial biopsies sampled from the nodules and accompanying atrophic mucosa were diagnosed as chronic gastritis. In August, 2011, the patient was referred to Tohoku University Hospital for observation and treatment. EGD at our hospital showed the same findings as those by the patient's local doctor. Pathological findings included a membranous collagen band in the superficial layer area of the gastric mucosa, which led to a diagnosis of collagenous gastritis. Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, but it is important to recognize its characteristic endoscopic findings to make a diagnosis. © 2012 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2012 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  2. Nefness of adjoint bundles for ample vector bundles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Maeda

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available Let E be an ample vector bundle of rank >1 on a smooth complex projective variety X of dimension n. This paper gives a classification of pairs (X,E whose adjoint bundles K_X+det E are not nef in the case when  r=n-2.

  3. Bundle Security Protocol for ION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, Scott C.; Birrane, Edward J.; Krupiarz, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This software implements bundle authentication, conforming to the Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) Internet Draft on Bundle Security Protocol (BSP), for the Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) implementation of DTN. This is the only implementation of BSP that is integrated with ION.

  4. Vector Bundles And F Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, R; Witten, Edward

    1997-01-01

    To understand in detail duality between heterotic string and F theory compactifications, it is important to understand the construction of holomorphic G bundles over elliptic Calabi-Yau manifolds, for various groups G. In this paper, we develop techniques to describe these bundles, and make several detailed comparisons between the heterotic string and F theory.

  5. Vector Bundles And F Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Robert; Morgan, John; Witten, Edward

    1997-01-01

    To understand in detail duality between heterotic string and F theory compactifications, it is important to understand the construction of holomorphic G bundles over elliptic Calabi-Yau manifolds, for various groups G. In this paper, we develop techniques to describe the bundles, and make several detailed comparisons between the heterotic string and F theory.

  6. Bundle Formation in Biomimetic Hydrogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, Maarten; Pape, A C H; Voets, Ilja K; Rowan, Alan E; Portale, Giuseppe; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2016-01-01

    Bundling of single polymer chains is a crucial process in the formation of biopolymer network gels that make up the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. This bundled architecture leads to gels with distinctive properties, including a large-pore-size gel formation at very low concentrations and

  7. Fiber bundle phase conjugate mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Benjamin G.

    2012-05-01

    An improved method and apparatus for passively conjugating the phases of a distorted wavefronts resulting from optical phase mismatch between elements of a fiber laser array are disclosed. A method for passively conjugating a distorted wavefront comprises the steps of: multiplexing a plurality of probe fibers and a bundle pump fiber in a fiber bundle array; passing the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle array through a collimating lens and into one portion of a non-linear medium; passing the output from a pump collection fiber through a focusing lens and into another portion of the non-linear medium so that the output from the pump collection fiber mixes with the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle; adjusting one or more degrees of freedom of one or more of the fiber bundle array, the collimating lens, the focusing lens, the non-linear medium, or the pump collection fiber to produce a standing wave in the non-linear medium.

  8. Hyaline membrane disease (HMD: the role of the perinatal pathologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Locci

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyaline membrane disease (HMD, the pathologic correlate of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS of the newborn, is an acute lung disease of premature infant caused by inadequate amounts of surfactant. Decreased surfactant results in insufficient surface tension in the alveolus during expiration, leading to atelectasis, decreased gas exchange, severe hypoxia and acidosis. HMD predominantly occurs in infants younger than 32 weeks of gestation and weighing less than 1,200 g. In the interpretation of perinatal lung pathology, it is necessary to consider the development of the immature lung, particulary in the third trimester. Microscopically HMD is characterized by the occurrence of dilated terminal and respiratory bronchioles and of alveolar ducts lined by acellular eosinophilic hyaline membranes. The membranes are composed of necrotic alveolar lining cells, amniotic fluid constituents and fibrin. Retinopathy of prematurity and bronchopulmonary dysplasia are late complications of RDS that usually occur in infants who weigh less than 1,500 g and were maintained on a mechanical respiration more than 6 days. Here a pratical approach to a microscopic analysis of the lung in newborns died with the clinical setting of RDS is presented. The most important pathological findings for a complete clinical pathological diagnosis are: the evaluation of the architectural lung development; the endothelial cell lesions; the interstitial edema; the occurrence of disseminated intravascular coagulation; the presence of associated inflammatory lesions. The usefulness of some immunohistochemical stains is also underlined, including anti-surfactant, anti-smooth muscle actin and anti-CD31 to better evaluate surfactant production, pulmonary artery maturation and endothelial cell damage, respectively. Finally, the prevalent role of endothelial dysfunction and endothelial barrier loss is underlined, representing a major pathological event in the deposition of HMD

  9. Twisted Vector Bundles on Pointed Nodal Curves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ivan Kausz

    2005-05-01

    Motivated by the quest for a good compactification of the moduli space of -bundles on a nodal curve we establish a striking relationship between Abramovich’s and Vistoli’s twisted bundles and Gieseker vector bundles.

  10. Two-photon fluorescence and second-harmonic generation imaging of collagen in human tissue based on multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xingshan; Zhong, Jiazhao; Liu, Yuchun; Yu, Haibo; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopic imaging of collagen plays an important role in noninvasive diagnoses of human tissue. In this study, two-photon fluorescence and second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of collagen in human skin dermis and submucosa of colon and stomach tissues were investigated based on multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Our results show that multiphoton microscopic image of collagen bundles exhibits apparently different pattern in human tissues. The collagen bundles can simultaneously reveal its SHG and two-photon excited fluorescence images in the submucosa of colon and stomach, whereas it solely emit SHG signal in skin dermis. The intensity spectral information from tissues further demonstrated the above results. This indicates that collagen bundles have completely different space arrangement in these tissues. Our experimental results bring more detailed information of collagen for the application of MPM in human noninvasive imaging. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Intra-articular administration of hyaluronic acid increases the volume of the hyaline cartilage regenerated in a large osteochondral defect by implantation of a double-network gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Takaaki; Kitamura, Nobuto; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Yokota, Masashi; Kondo, Eiji; Gong, Jian Ping; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2014-04-01

    Implantation of PAMPS/PDMAAm double-network (DN) gel can induce hyaline cartilage regeneration in the osteochondral defect. However, it is a problem that the volume of the regenerated cartilage tissue is gradually reduced at 12 weeks. This study investigated whether intra-articular administration of hyaluronic acid (HA) increases the volume of the cartilage regenerated with the DN gel at 12 weeks. A total of 48 rabbits were used in this study. A cylindrical osteochondral defect created in the bilateral femoral trochlea was treated with DN gel (Group DN) or left without any implantation (Group C). In both Groups, we injected 1.0 mL of HA in the left knee, and 1.0 mL of saline solution in the right knee. Quantitative histological evaluations were performed at 2, 4, and 12 weeks, and PCR analysis was performed at 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. In Group DN, the proteoglycan-rich area was significantly greater in the HA-injected knees than in the saline-injected knees at 12 weeks (P = 0.0247), and expression of type 2 collagen, aggrecan, and Sox9 mRNAs was significantly greater in the HA-injected knees than in the saline-injected knees at 2 weeks (P = 0.0475, P = 0.0257, P = 0.0222, respectively). The intra-articular administration of HA significantly enhanced these gene expression at 2 weeks and significantly increased the volume of the hyaline cartilage regenerated by implantation of a DN gel at 12 weeks. This information is important to develop an additional method to increase the volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue in a potential cartilage regeneration strategy using the DN gel.

  12. Spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle using a novel double-network hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Masashi; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kitamura, Nobuto; Arakaki, Kazunobu; Onodera, Shin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2011-02-22

    Functional repair of articular osteochondral defects remains a major challenge not only in the field of knee surgery but also in tissue regeneration medicine. The purpose is to clarify whether the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in a large osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting a novel double-network (DN) gel at the bottom of the defect. Twenty-five mature rabbits were used in this study. In the bilateral knees of each animal, we created an osteochondral defect having a diameter of 2.4-mm in the medial condyle. Then, in 21 rabbits, we implanted a DN gel plug into a right knee defect so that a vacant space of 1.5-mm depth (in Group I), 2.5-mm depth (in Group II), or 3.5-mm depth (in Group III) was left. In the left knee, we did not apply any treatment to the defect to obtain the control data. All the rabbits were sacrificed at 4 weeks, and the gross and histological evaluations were performed. The remaining 4 rabbits underwent the same treatment as used in Group II, and real-time PCR analysis was performed at 4 weeks. The defect in Group II was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type-2 collagen. The Wayne's gross appearance and histology scores showed that Group II was significantly greater than Group I, III, and Control (p hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in vivo in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect so that an approximately 2-mm deep vacant space was intentionally left in the defect. This fact has prompted us to propose an innovative strategy without cell culture to repair osteochondral lesions in the femoral condyle.

  13. Spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle using a novel double-network hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onodera Shin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional repair of articular osteochondral defects remains a major challenge not only in the field of knee surgery but also in tissue regeneration medicine. The purpose is to clarify whether the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in a large osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting a novel double-network (DN gel at the bottom of the defect. Methods Twenty-five mature rabbits were used in this study. In the bilateral knees of each animal, we created an osteochondral defect having a diameter of 2.4-mm in the medial condyle. Then, in 21 rabbits, we implanted a DN gel plug into a right knee defect so that a vacant space of 1.5-mm depth (in Group I, 2.5-mm depth (in Group II, or 3.5-mm depth (in Group III was left. In the left knee, we did not apply any treatment to the defect to obtain the control data. All the rabbits were sacrificed at 4 weeks, and the gross and histological evaluations were performed. The remaining 4 rabbits underwent the same treatment as used in Group II, and real-time PCR analysis was performed at 4 weeks. Results The defect in Group II was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type-2 collagen. The Wayne's gross appearance and histology scores showed that Group II was significantly greater than Group I, III, and Control (p Conclusions This study demonstrated that spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in vivo in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect so that an approximately 2-mm deep vacant space was intentionally left in the defect. This fact has prompted us to propose an innovative strategy without cell culture to repair osteochondral lesions in the femoral condyle.

  14. Mechano growth factor (MGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 functionalized silk scaffolds enhance articular hyaline cartilage regeneration in rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ziwei; Jiang, Li; Xu, Yan; Li, Haibin; Xu, Wei; Wu, Shuangchi; Wang, Yuanliang; Tang, Zhenyu; Lv, Yonggang; Yang, Li

    2015-06-01

    Damaged cartilage has poor self-healing ability and usually progresses to scar or fibrocartilaginous tissue, and finally degenerates to osteoarthritis (OA). Here we demonstrated that one of alternative isoforms of IGF-1, mechano growth factor (MGF) acted synergistically with transforming growth factor β3 (TGF-β3) embedded in silk fibroin scaffolds to induce chemotactic homing and chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Combination of MGF and TGF-β3 significantly increased cell recruitment up to 1.8 times and 2 times higher than TGF-β3 did in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, MGF increased Collagen II and aggrecan secretion of TGF-β3 induced hMSCs chondrogenesis, but decreased Collagen I in vitro. Silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds have been widely used for tissue engineering, and we showed that methanol treated pured SF scaffolds were porous, similar to compressive module of native cartilage, slow degradation rate and excellent drug released curves. At 7 days after subcutaneous implantation, TGF-β3 and MGF functionalized silk fibroin scaffolds (STM) recruited more CD29+/CD44+cells (Pcartilage-like extracellular matrix and less fibrillar collagen were detected in STM scaffolds than that in TGF-β3 modified scaffolds (ST) at 2 months after subcutaneous implantation. When implanted into articular joints in a rabbit osteochondral defect model, STM scaffolds showed the best integration into host tissues, similar architecture and collagen organization to native hyaline cartilage, as evidenced by immunostaining of aggrecan, collagen II and collagen I, as well as Safranin O and Masson's trichrome staining, and histological evalution based on the modified O'Driscoll histological scoring system (Pcartilage regeneration. This study demonstrated that TGF-β3 and MGF functionalized silk fibroin scaffolds enhanced endogenous stem cell recruitment and facilitated in situ articular cartilage regeneration, thus providing a novel strategy for cartilage repair

  15. An elastic model for bioinspired design of carbon nanotube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Zuoqi; Xu, Yuanjie; Zhang, Yongwei

    2015-04-01

    Collagen fibers provide a good example of making strong micro- or mesoscale fibers from nanoscale tropocollagen molecules through a staggered and cross-linked organization in a bottom-up manner. Mimicking the architectural features of collagen fibers has been shown to be a promising approach to develop carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers of high performance. In the present work, an elastic model is developed to describe the load transfer and failure propagation within the bioinspired CNT bundles, and to establish the relations of the mechanical properties of the bundles with a number of geometrical and physical parameters such as the CNT aspect ratio and longitudinal gap, interface cross-link density, and the functionalization-induced degradation in CNTs, etc. With the model, the stress distributions along the CNT-CNT interface as well as in every individual CNT are well captured, and the failure propagation along the interface and its effects on the mechanical properties of the CNT bundles are predicted. The work may provide useful guidelines for the design of novel CNT fibers in practice.

  16. Cartilage turnover reflected by metabolic processing of type II collagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmann, Karoline Natasja Stæhr; Wang, Jianxia; Hoielt, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    ). This is expected to originate primarily from remodeling of hyaline cartilage. A mouse monoclonal antibody (Mab) was raised in mouse, targeting specifically PIIBNP (QDVRQPG) and used in development of the assay. The specificity, sensitivity, 4-parameter fit and stability of the assay were tested. Levels of PIIBNP......The aim of this study was to enable measurement of cartilage formation by a novel biomarker of type II collagen formation. The competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) Pro-C2 was developed and characterized for assessment of the beta splice variant of type II procollagen (PIIBNP...

  17. Development and utilization of a bovine type I collagen microfibril model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The structure of fibrous collagen, a long triple helix that self-associates in a staggered array to form a matrix of fibrils, fibers and fiber bundles, makes it uniquely suitable as a scaffold for biomaterial engineering. A major challenge for this application is to stabilize collagen structure by m...

  18. Semiflexible Biopolymers in Bundled Arrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Schnauß

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bundles and networks of semiflexible biopolymers are key elements in cells, lending them mechanical integrity while also enabling dynamic functions. Networks have been the subject of many studies, revealing a variety of fundamental characteristics often determined via bulk measurements. Although bundles are equally important in biological systems, they have garnered much less scientific attention since they have to be probed on the mesoscopic scale. Here, we review theoretical as well as experimental approaches, which mainly employ the naturally occurring biopolymer actin, to highlight the principles behind these structures on the single bundle level.

  19. Evaluating big deal journal bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Theodore C; Courant, Paul N; McAfee, R Preston; Williams, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    Large commercial publishers sell bundled online subscriptions to their entire list of academic journals at prices significantly lower than the sum of their á la carte prices. Bundle prices differ drastically between institutions, but they are not publicly posted. The data that we have collected enable us to compare the bundle prices charged by commercial publishers with those of nonprofit societies and to examine the types of price discrimination practiced by commercial and nonprofit journal publishers. This information is of interest to economists who study monopolist pricing, librarians interested in making efficient use of library budgets, and scholars who are interested in the availability of the work that they publish.

  20. Stable extensions by line bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Teixidor-i-Bigas, M

    1997-01-01

    Let C be an algebraic curve of genus g. Consider extensions E of a vector bundle F'' of rank n'' by a vector bundle F' of rank n'. The following statement was conjectured by Lange: If 0bundle. Our method uses a degeneration argument to a reducible curve.

  1. The Atiyah Bundle and Connections on a Principal Bundle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indranil Biswas

    2010-06-01

    Let be a ∞ manifold and a Lie a group. Let $E_G$ be a ∞ principal -bundle over . There is a fiber bundle $\\mathcal{C}(E_G)$ over whose smooth sections correspond to the connections on $E_G$. The pull back of $E_G$ to $\\mathcal{C}(E_G)$ has a tautological connection. We investigate the curvature of this tautological connection.

  2. Type XI Collagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yunyun

    2016-01-01

    Type XI collagen is a fibrillary collagen. Type XI collagen is broadly distributed in articular cartilage, testis, trachea, tendons, trabecular bone, skeletal muscle, placenta, lung, and the neoepithelium of the brain. Type XI collagen is able to regulate fibrillogenesis by maintaining the spacing...... and diameter of type II collagen fibrils, and a nucleator for the fibrillogenesis of collagen types I and II. Mutations in type XI collagen are associated with Stickler syndrome, Marshall syndrome, fibrochondrogenesis, otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia deafness, and Weissenbacher–Zweymüller syndrome. Type XI...... collagen binds heparin, heparan sulfate, and dermatan sulfate. Currently there are no biomarkers for type XI collagen....

  3. Left bundle-branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Strauss, David; Sogaard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between myocardial electrical activation by electrocardiogram (ECG) and mechanical contraction by echocardiography in left bundle-branch block (LBBB) has never been clearly demonstrated. New strict criteria for LBBB based on a fundamental understanding of physiology have recently...

  4. Bundling ecosystem services in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, Katrine Grace; Odgaard, Mette Vestergaard; Bøcher, Peder Klith;

    2014-01-01

    We made a spatial analysis of 11 ecosystem services at a 10 km × 10 km grid scale covering most of Denmark. Our objective was to describe their spatial distribution and interactions and also to analyze whether they formed specific bundle types on a regional scale in the Danish cultural landscape....... We found clustered distribution patterns of ecosystem services across the country. There was a significant tendency for trade-offs between on the one hand cultural and regulating services and on the other provisioning services, and we also found the potential of regulating and cultural services...... to form synergies. We identified six distinct ecosystem service bundle types, indicating multiple interactions at a landscape level. The bundle types showed specialized areas of agricultural production, high provision of cultural services at the coasts, multifunctional mixed-use bundle types around urban...

  5. Left bundle-branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Strauss, David; Sogaard, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between myocardial electrical activation by electrocardiogram (ECG) and mechanical contraction by echocardiography in left bundle-branch block (LBBB) has never been clearly demonstrated. New strict criteria for LBBB based on a fundamental understanding of physiology have recently...

  6. Vector bundles on toric varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Gharib, Saman

    2011-01-01

    Following Sam Payne's work, we study the existence problem of nontrivial vector bundles on toric varieties. The first result we prove is that every complete fan admits a nontrivial conewise linear multivalued function. Such functions could potentially be the Chern classes of toric vector bundles. Then we use the results of Corti\\~nas, Haesemeyer, Walker and Weibel to show that the (non-equivariant) Grothendieck group of the toric 3-fold studied by Payne is large, so the variety has a nontrivial vector bundle. Using the same computation, we show that every toric 3-fold X either has a nontrivial line bundle, or there is a finite surjective toric morphism from Y to X, such that Y has a large Grothendieck group.

  7. Fabrication of electrospun nanofibers bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Junjun; Sun, Daoheng

    2007-12-01

    Aligned nanofibers, filament bundle composed of large number of nanofibers have potential applications such as bio-material, composite material etc. A series of electrospinning experiments have been conducted to investigate the electrospinning process,in which some parameters such as polymer solution concentration, bias voltage, distance between spinneret and collector, solution flow rate etc have been setup to do the experiment of nanofibers bundles construction. This work firstly reports electrospun nanofiber bundle through non-uniform electrical field, and nanofibers distributed in different density on electrodes from that between them. Thinner nanofibers bundle with a few numbers of nanofiber is collected for 3 seconds; therefore it's also possible that the addressable single nanofiber could be collected to bridge two electrodes.

  8. Collagen in Human Tissues: Structure, Function, and Biomedical Implications from a Tissue Engineering Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Preethi; Prabhakaran, Molamma P.; Sireesha, Merum; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    The extracellular matrix is a complex biological structure encoded with various proteins, among which the collagen family is the most significant and abundant of all, contributing 30-35% of the whole-body protein. "Collagen" is a generic term for proteins that forms a triple-helical structure with three polypeptide chains, and around 29 types of collagen have been identified up to now. Although most of the members of the collagen family form such supramolecular structures, extensive diversity exists between each type of collagen. The diversity is not only based on the molecular assembly and supramolecular structures of collagen types but is also observed within its tissue distribution, function, and pathology. Collagens possess complex hierarchical structures and are present in various forms such as collagen fibrils (1.5-3.5 nm wide), collagen fibers (50-70 nm wide), and collagen bundles (150-250 nm wide), with distinct properties characteristic of each tissue providing elasticity to skin, softness of the cartilage, stiffness of the bone and tendon, transparency of the cornea, opaqueness of the sclera, etc. There exists an exclusive relation between the structural features of collagen in human tissues (such as the collagen composition, collagen fibril length and diameter, collagen distribution, and collagen fiber orientation) and its tissue-specific mechanical properties. In bone, a transverse collagen fiber orientation prevails in regions of higher compressive stress whereas longitudinally oriented collagen fibers correlate to higher tensile stress. The immense versatility of collagen compels a thorough understanding of the collagen types and this review discusses the major types of collagen found in different human tissues, highlighting their tissue-specific uniqueness based on their structure and mechanical function. The changes in collagen during a specific tissue damage or injury are discussed further, focusing on the many tissue engineering applications for

  9. Study of differential properties of fibrochondrocytes and hyaline chondrocytes in growing rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L; Li, M; Li, H; Yang, C; Cai, X

    2015-02-01

    We aimed to build a culture model of chondrocytes in vitro, and to study the differential properties between fibrochondrocytes and hyaline chondrocytes. Histological sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin so that we could analyse the histological structure of the fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. Condylar fibrochondrocytes and femoral hyaline chondrocytes were cultured from four, 4-week-old, New Zealand white rabbits. The production of COL2A1, COL1OA1, SOX9 and aggrecan was detected by real time-q polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunoblotting and the differences between them were compared statistically. Histological structures obviously differed between fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. COL2A1 and SOX9 were highly expressed within cell passage 2 (P2) of both fibrochondrocytes and hyaline chondrocytes, and reduced significantly after cell passage 4 (P4). The mRNA expressions of COL2A1 (p=0.05), COL10A1 (p=0.04), SOX9 (p=0.03), and aggrecan (p=0.04) were significantly higher in hyaline chondrocytes than in fibrochondrocytes, whereas the expression of COL1A1 (p=0.02) was the opposite. Immunoblotting showed similar results. We have built a simple and effective culture model of chondrocytes in vitro, and the P2 of chondrocytes is recommended for further studies. Condylar fibrocartilage and femoral hyaline cartilage have unique biological properties, and the regulatory mechanisms of endochondral ossification for the condyle should be studied independently in the future. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adapting collagen/CNT matrix in directing hESC differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Sridharan, Indumathi; Kim, Taeyoung; Wang, Rong

    2009-01-01

    The lineage selection in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) differentiation relies on both the growth factors and small molecules in the media and the physical characteristics of the micro-environment. In this work, we utilized various materials, including the collagen-carbon nanotube (collagen/CNT) composite material, as cell culture matrices to examine the impact of matrix properties on hESC differentiation. Our AFM analysis indicated that the collagen/CNT formed rigid fibril bundles, which p...

  11. Reconnection of superfluid vortex bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Sultan Z; Youd, Anthony J; Barenghi, Carlo F

    2008-11-21

    Using the vortex filament model and the Gross-Pitaevskii nonlinear Schroedinger equation, we show that bundles of quantized vortex lines in He II are structurally robust and can reconnect with each other maintaining their identity. We discuss vortex stretching in superfluid turbulence and show that, during the bundle reconnection process, kelvin waves of large amplitude are generated, in agreement with the finding that helicity is produced by nearly singular vortex interactions in classical Euler flows.

  12. Assessment of hyaline cartilage matrix composition using near infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukuru, Uday P; McGoverin, Cushla M; Pleshko, Nancy

    2014-09-01

    Changes in the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are characteristic of injury or disease in cartilage tissue. Various imaging modalities and biochemical techniques have been used to assess the changes in cartilage tissue but lack adequate sensitivity, or in the case of biochemical techniques, result in destruction of the sample. Fourier transform near infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy has shown promise for the study of cartilage composition. In the current study NIR spectroscopy was used to identify the contributions of individual components of cartilage in the NIR spectra by assessment of the major cartilage components, collagen and chondroitin sulfate, in pure component mixtures. The NIR spectra were obtained using homogenous pellets made by dilution with potassium bromide. A partial least squares (PLS) model was calculated to predict composition in bovine cartilage samples. Characteristic absorbance peaks between 4000 and 5000 cm(-1) could be attributed to components of cartilage, i.e. collagen and chondroitin sulfate. Prediction of the amount of collagen and chondroitin sulfate in tissues was possible within 8% (w/dw) of values obtained by gold standard biochemical assessment. These results support the use of NIR spectroscopy for in vitro and in vivo applications to assess matrix composition of cartilage tissues, especially when tissue destruction should be avoided. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. BMP-2, hypoxia, and COL1A1/HtrA1 siRNAs favor neo-cartilage hyaline matrix formation in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollitrault, David; Legendre, Florence; Drougard, Carole; Briand, Mélanie; Benateau, Hervé; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Poulain, Laurent; Hartmann, Daniel; Vivien, Denis; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Baldi, Alfonso; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Demoor, Magali; Galera, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an irreversible pathology that causes a decrease in articular cartilage thickness, leading finally to the complete degradation of the affected joint. The low spontaneous repair capacity of cartilage prevents any restoration of the joint surface, making OA a major public health issue. Here, we developed an innovative combination of treatment conditions to improve the human chondrocyte phenotype before autologous chondrocyte implantation. First, we seeded human dedifferentiated chondrocytes into a collagen sponge as a scaffold, cultured them in hypoxia in the presence of a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), BMP-2, and transfected them with small interfering RNAs targeting two markers overexpressed in OA dedifferentiated chondrocytes, that is, type I collagen and/or HtrA1 serine protease. This strategy significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression of type I collagen and HtrA1, and led to an improvement in the chondrocyte phenotype index of differentiation. The effectiveness of our in vitro culture process was also demonstrated in the nude mouse model in vivo after subcutaneous implantation. We, thus, provide here a new protocol able to favor human hyaline chondrocyte phenotype in primarily dedifferentiated cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Our study also offers an innovative strategy for chondrocyte redifferentiation and opens new opportunities for developing therapeutic targets.

  14. Distribution of Basement Membrane Molecules, Laminin and Collagen Type IV, in Normal and Degenerated Cartilage Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Wei Seong; Gomoll, Andreas H.; Olsen, Bjørn Reino; Spector, Myron

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence and distribution of 2 basement membrane (BM) molecules, laminin and collagen type IV, in healthy and degenerative cartilage tissues. Design: Normal and degenerated tissues were obtained from goats and humans, including articular knee cartilage, the intervertebral disc, and meniscus. Normal tissue was also obtained from patella-tibial enthesis in goats. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using anti-laminin and anti–collagen type IV antibodies. Human and goat skin were used as positive controls. The percentage of cells displaying the pericellular presence of the protein was graded semiquantitatively. Results: When present, laminin and collagen type IV were exclusively found in the pericellular matrix, and in a discrete layer on the articulating surface of normal articular cartilage. In normal articular (hyaline) cartilage in the human and goat, the proteins were found co-localized pericellularly. In contrast, in human osteoarthritic articular cartilage, collagen type IV but not laminin was found in the pericellular region. Nonpathological fibrocartilaginous tissues from the goat, including the menisci and the enthesis, were also positive for both laminin and collagen type IV pericellularly. In degenerated fibrocartilage, including intervertebral disc, as in degenerated hyaline cartilage only collagen type IV was found pericellularly around chondrocytes but with less intense staining than in non-degenerated tissue. In calcified cartilage, some cells were positive for laminin but not type IV collagen. Conclusions: We report differences in expression of the BM molecules, laminin and collagen type IV, in normal and degenerative cartilaginous tissues from adult humans and goats. In degenerative tissues laminin is depleted from the pericellular matrix before collagen type IV. The findings may inform future studies of the processes underlying cartilage degeneration and the functional

  15. Prevalence and factors associated with scleral hyaline plaque: clinical study of older adults in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horowitz S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Soraya Horowitz,1 Nadyr Damasceno,1 Eduardo Damasceno21Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Naval Marcilio Dias, Rio de Janeiro, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, BrazilPurpose: To investigate the prevalence of scleral hyaline plaque among older adults in the city of Niterói in southeastern Brazil. A second goal was to assess the correlation between scleral hyaline plaque and several age-related diseases, including eye diseases and systemic diseases.Methods: The study sample comprised 667 participants who were followed for 15 months. The study had a prospective, longitudinal, observational design that established inclusion and exclusion criteria. The following variables were selected for correlation with scleral hyaline plaque: sex, age, age range, iris color, ethnicity, presence of cataract, moderate to high myopia, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, diabetes mellitus, systemic arterial hypertension, degenerative arthritis, and osteoporosis. These correlations were assessed by means of the χ2 test and Student’s t-test. Multivariate analysis was performed to exclude factors that were potentially associated with aging exclusively but that did not have a direct relationship with hyaline plaque. Binary logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios, significance, and confidence intervals.Results: Scleral hyaline plaques were found in 177 patients (17.54%. There was a statistically significant association between the presence of hyaline plaques and sex (female, age range (≥70 years old, ethnicity (Caucasian, cataract, moderate to high myopia, systemic arterial hypertension, degenerative arthritis, and osteoporosis (P<0.05. On multivariate binary logistic regression analysis, only female sex, age range (≥70 years, moderate to high myopia, and degenerative arthritis exhibited significant correlation.Conclusion: The prevalence of scleral hyaline plaque in the present study was higher than in

  16. Reconstruction of Hyaline Cartilage Deep Layer Properties in 3-Dimensional Cultures of Human Articular Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, Vibudha; Tattikota, Surendra Mohan; T, Avinash Raj; Sriramagiri, Vijaya Rama Rao; Kantipudi, Suma; Pande, Gopal

    2014-06-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) injuries and malformations are commonly noticed because of trauma or age-related degeneration. Many methods have been adopted for replacing or repairing the damaged tissue. Currently available AC repair methods, in several cases, fail to yield good-quality long-lasting results, perhaps because the reconstructed tissue lacks the cellular and matrix properties seen in hyaline cartilage (HC). To reconstruct HC tissue from 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) cultures of AC-derived human chondrocytes that would specifically exhibit the cellular and biochemical properties of the deep layer of HC. Descriptive laboratory study. Two-dimensional cultures of human AC-derived chondrocytes were established in classical medium (CM) and newly defined medium (NDM) and maintained for a period of 6 weeks. These cells were suspended in 2 mm-thick collagen I gels, placed in 24-well culture inserts, and further cultured up to 30 days. Properties of chondrocytes, grown in 2D cultures and the reconstructed 3D cartilage tissue, were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopic techniques, immunohistochemistry, and cartilage-specific gene expression profiling by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and were compared with those of the deep layer of native human AC. Two-dimensional chondrocyte cultures grown in NDM, in comparison with those grown in CM, showed more chondrocyte-specific gene activity and matrix properties. The NDM-grown chondrocytes in 3D cultures also showed better reproduction of deep layer properties of HC, as confirmed by microscopic and gene expression analysis. The method used in this study can yield cartilage tissue up to approximately 1.6 cm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness that satisfies the very low cell density and matrix composition properties present in the deep layer of normal HC. This study presents a novel and reproducible method for long-term culture of AC-derived chondrocytes and reconstruction of cartilage

  17. The value of MDCT in diagnosis of hyaline-vascular Castleman's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiaoli [Department of Radiology, Beijing Shijitan Hospital affiliated to Capital University of Medical Sciences, Yangfangdian Tieyiyuan, Road No. 10, Haidian District, Beijing, 100038 China (China); Liu, Cheng [CT Department, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute (China); Wang, Rengui, E-mail: 490150302@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Shijitan Hospital affiliated to Capital University of Medical Sciences, Yangfangdian Tieyiyuan, Road No. 10, Haidian District, Beijing, 100038 China (China); Zhu, Xuejun [Dermatology Department, Beijing University First Hospital (China); Gao, Li [Department of Radiology, Beijing University First Hospital (China); Chen, Jiuhong [Healthcare, Siemens Ltd. (China)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Castleman's disease (CD) is an uncommon entity characterized by a massive growth of lymphoid tissue. There are two types: the hyaline-vascular (HV) type and the plasma cell (PC) type. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of multiple detector computed tomography (MDCT) in the diagnosis and planning of treatment for hyaline-vascular CD. Materials and methods: Fifty-two cases of confirmed hyaline-vascular CD were retrospectively reviewed. Unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MDCT scans had been performed in all patients, followed by surgery and pathological analysis of the lesion. Original MDCT transverse and reconstructed images were used for image interpretation. Features of the lesion and its adjacent structures were identified. Results: The lesion was present in the thorax of 24 patients and the abdomen in 28. Obvious features of hyaline-vascular CD (especially feeding vessels and draining veins) and its adjacent structures were demonstrated on 52 patients. Conclusion: On MDCT imaging, original MDCT transverse and reconstructed images provide an excellent tool for diagnosis of hyaline-vascular CD and have high value in the determination of a treatment plan.

  18. HYALINIZING TRABECULAR ADENOMA FEIGNING PAPILLARY CARCINOMA THYROID: CASE REPORT WITH REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandukuri Mahesh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hyalinizing Trabecular Adenoma (HTA of the thyroid is a rare neoplasm that was first described by Carney in 1987. It is a tumor of follicular derivation with peculiar nuclear, architectural, histochemical, and immunohistochemical features. We report a case of Hyalinizing trabecular adenoma in a 36-year-old woman with enlarged thyroid lobe. Ultrasonographic features and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC of the enlarged thyroid was performed and the diagnosis given was Papillary carcinoma of the thyroid. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy, with a histopathological diagnosis of hyalinizing trabecular Adenoma (HTA. We present this case in view of its rarity and to discuss the clinical and diagnostic approach, including the role of FNAC, and the pathologic features of HTA with special reference to the possible differential diagnosis and also review of literature. Although rare cases of malignant Hyalinizing trabecular adenoma (HTA have been documented, this tumor should be considered a benign neoplasm or at most, a neoplasm of extremely low malignant potential, however invasion of the capsule should be considered on histopathology. An awareness of hyalinizing trabecular adenomas and their characteristic features is valuable for their recognition and management as well as for the possible prevention of over diagnosis and over treatment for benign disease

  19. Formation of Hyaline Cartilage Tissue by Passaged Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Vanessa J; Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D; Backstein, David; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    When serially passaged in standard monolayer culture to expand cell number, articular chondrocytes lose their phenotype. This results in the formation of fibrocartilage when they are used clinically, thus limiting their use for cartilage repair therapies. Identifying a way to redifferentiate these cells in vitro is critical if they are to be used successfully. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) family members are known to be crucial for regulating differentiation of fetal limb mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal stromal cells to chondrocytes. As passaged chondrocytes acquire a progenitor-like phenotype, the hypothesis of this study was that TGFβ supplementation will stimulate chondrocyte redifferentiation in vitro in serum-free three-dimensional (3D) culture. Human articular chondrocytes were serially passaged twice (P2) in monolayer culture. P2 cells were then placed in high-density (3D) culture on top of membranes (Millipore) and cultured for up to 6 weeks in chemically defined serum-free redifferentiation media (SFRM) in the presence or absence of TGFβ. The tissues were evaluated histologically, biochemically, by immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanically. Passaged human chondrocytes cultured in SFRM supplemented with 10 ng/mL TGFβ3 consistently formed a continuous layer of articular-like cartilage tissue rich in collagen type 2 and aggrecan and lacking collagen type 1 and X in the absence of a scaffold. The tissue developed a superficial zone characterized by expression of lubricin and clusterin with horizontally aligned collagen fibers. This study suggests that passaged human chondrocytes can be used to bioengineer a continuous layer of articular cartilage-like tissue in vitro scaffold free. Further study is required to evaluate their ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of hyaline cartilage regeneration in neocartilage graft implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C F; Ng, K K; Ng, S H; Cheung, Y C

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the regenerative potential of hyaline cartilage in a neocartilage graft implant with the aid of MR cartilage imaging using a rabbit model. Surgical osteochondral defects were created in the femoral condyles of 30 mature New Zealand rabbits. The findings of neocartilage in autologous cartilage grafts packed into osteochondral defects were compared with control group of no implant to the osteochondral defect. The outcome of the implantations was correlated with histologic and MR cartilage imaging findings over a 3-month interval. Neocartilage grafts packed into osteochondral defects showed regeneration of hyaline cartilage at the outer layer of the implant using MR cartilage imaging. Fibrosis of fibrocartilage developed at the outer layer of the autologous cartilage graft together with an inflammatory reaction within the osteochondral defect. This animal study provides evidence of the regenerative ability of hyaline cartilage in neocartilage transplants to repair articular cartilage.

  1. Oral pulse or hyaline ring granuloma: A case report and a brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Acharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulse or hyaline ring granulomas are rare but are well-defined oral and extraoral lesions due to implantation of the cellulose moiety of plant foods in contrast starch components. A unique form as reactive gingival growth showing histologic features of oral pulse or hyaline ring granuloma (OPHRG which had resulted from implantation of food particles of plant or vegetable origin into the periodontium has been illustrated. Such a presentation is attributable to compromised periodontal health and poor oral hygiene favoring the implantation of food particles has been described here along with a literature update on OPHRG.

  2. Hyalinizing trabecular tumor of the thyroid gland: characteristic features on ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kaoru; Hirokawa, Mitsuyoshi; Jikuzono, Tomoo; Fukata, Shuji; Amino, Nobuyuki; Miyauchi, Akira; Nakamura, Yasushi

    2007-03-01

    We report a case of hyalinizing trabecular tumor of the thyroid gland and describe the characteristic ultrasonographic features of this tumor. This was a rare tumor of follicular cell origin with a trabecular pattern of growth and marked intratrabecular hyalinization. The tumor had an irregular shape, a delicately jagged border, and hypoechoic and heterogeneous internal echoes on B-mode ultrasonography. Very rich intratumoral blood flow, the so-called "tumor inferno" was evident on power Doppler ultrasonography. In the clinical management of thyroid nodules, clinicians should be aware of this peculiar type of thyroid tumor and its characteristic ultrasonographic findings.

  3. Quantitative assessment of hyaline cartilage elasticity during optical clearing using optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Singh, Manmohan; Li, Jiasong; Han, Zhaolong; Wu, Chen; Wang, Shang; Idugboe, Rita; Raghunathan, Raksha; Zakharov, Valery P.; Sobol, Emil N.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Twa, Michael; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    We report the first study on using optical coherence elastography (OCE) to quantitatively monitor the elasticity change of the hyaline cartilage during the optical clearing administrated by glucose solution. The measurement of the elasticity is verified using uniaxial compression test, demonstrating the feasibility of using OCE to quantify the Young's modulus of the cartilage tissue. As the results, we found that the stiffness of the hyaline cartilage increases during the optical clearing of the tissue. This study might be potentially useful for the early detection of osteoarthritis disease.

  4. Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis and infantile systemic hyalinosis: Divergent expressions of the same genetic defect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhingra Mandeep

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a three year-old girl with classic clinical and histological features of juvenile hyaline fibromatosis. We found a history of similar skin findings in her eldest sister, in whom the disorder took a rapidly progressive and fatal course in the second year of life, suggesting either a very severe form of juvenile hyaline fibromatosis, or the possibility of infantile systemic hyalinosis. The similarities and differences between these two described types of hyalinoses have been reviewed in reference to the present report.

  5. Bundle Formation in Biomimetic Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Maarten; Pape, A C H; Voets, Ilja K; Rowan, Alan E; Portale, Giuseppe; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2016-08-08

    Bundling of single polymer chains is a crucial process in the formation of biopolymer network gels that make up the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. This bundled architecture leads to gels with distinctive properties, including a large-pore-size gel formation at very low concentrations and mechanical responsiveness through nonlinear mechanics, properties that are rarely observed in synthetic hydrogels. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we study the bundle formation and hydrogelation process of polyisocyanide gels, a synthetic material that uniquely mimics the structure and mechanics of biogels. We show how the structure of the material changes at the (thermally induced) gelation point and how factors such as concentration and polymer length determine the architecture, and with that, the mechanical properties. The correlation of the gel mechanics and the structural parameters obtained from SAXS experiments is essential in the design of future (synthetic) mimics of biopolymer networks.

  6. Principal bundles the classical case

    CERN Document Server

    Sontz, Stephen Bruce

    2015-01-01

    This introductory graduate level text provides a relatively quick path to a special topic in classical differential geometry: principal bundles.  While the topic of principal bundles in differential geometry has become classic, even standard, material in the modern graduate mathematics curriculum, the unique approach taken in this text presents the material in a way that is intuitive for both students of mathematics and of physics. The goal of this book is to present important, modern geometric ideas in a form readily accessible to students and researchers in both the physics and mathematics communities, providing each with an understanding and appreciation of the language and ideas of the other.

  7. Collagenous fibril texture of the human knee joint menisci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, W; Tillmann, B

    1998-04-01

    Anatomical and clinical literature describes the arrangement of collagen fibrils in the human meniscus as being "arcade-like". The "arcade-like" orientation, mainly running in a radial direction in the internal circumference and in a circular direction in the external circumference, was found in polarization light microscopic studies. This, however, does not provide a mechanical explanation for the direction of meniscus tears. In view of this contradiction collagen fibrils in the menisci of adults aged from 18 to 85 years were exposed layer-by-layer to study their arrangement by scanning electron microscopy. The results obtained by this procedure were compared to the path of the split lines. Scanning electron microscopy reveals three distinct layers in the meniscus cross section: (1) The tibial and femoral sides of the meniscus surfaces are covered by a meshwork of thin fibrils with a diameter of approximately 30 nm. (2) Beneath the superficial network there is a layer of lamellalike collagen fibril bundles on the tibial and femoral surface. In the area of the external circumference of the anterior and posterior segments the bundles of collagen fibrils are arranged in a radial direction. In all other parts the collagen fibril bundles intersect at various angles. (3) The main portion of the meniscus collagen fibrils are located in the central region between the femoral and the tibial surface layers. Everywhere in the central main portion of the meniscus the bundles of collagen fibrils are orientated in a circular manner. The split lines in the region of the internal circumference of the menisci are arranged in a circular manner, generally running in a radial direction in the portions adjacent to the base. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that the direction of the split lines depends on the orientation of the collagen fibrils in the superficial lamellar layer. The arcade-like path of the collagen fibrils described in the literature can not be confirmed either by

  8. Magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) of the knee joint: Meniscus, cruciate ligaments and hyaline cartilage. Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) des Kniegelenks: Meniskus, Kreuzbaender und hyaliner Gelenkknorpel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodler, J. (Radiologie, Universitaetsspital, Zurich (Switzerland) Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland). Radiologische Abt.); Buess, E. (Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland)); Rodriguez, M. (Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland)); Imhoff, A. (Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland))

    1993-08-01

    The use of MRT for diagnosing injury to the meniscus, the cruciate ligaments and hyaline cartilage was evaluated retrospectively in 82 knee joints without any knowledge of operative findings. In 49 cases the results were verified by arthroscopy and in 33 cases by arthrotomy. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of MRT for meniscus lesions was 73.9%, 96.9%, and 94.6%. Corresponding values for lesions of the anterior cruciate ligament were 88.9%, 96.6%, and 94.7%, and for lesions of the hyaline cartilage 62.6%, 96.1%, and 87.9%, respectively. In addition to its high specificity, MRT proved accurate in excluding lesions of the meniscus (97.1%) of the anterior cruciate ligament (96.6%) and of hyaline cartilage (88.8%). A negative finding on MRT therefore makes the presence of a lesion of the meniscus, cruciate ligaments of cartilage unlikely. In such cases one is justified in delaying the use of arthroscopy or arthrotomy. (orig.)

  9. A model for the anisotropic response of fibrous soft tissues using six discrete fibre bundles

    KAUST Repository

    Flynn, Cormac

    2011-06-30

    The development of constitutive models of fibrous soft-tissues is a challenging problem. Many consider the tissue to be a collection of fibres with a continuous distribution function representing their orientations. A discrete fibre model is presented consisting of six weighted fibre-bundles. Each bundle is oriented such that it passes through opposing vertices of a regular icosahedron. A novel aspect is the use of simple analytical distribution functions to simulate undulated collagen fibres. This approach yields closed-form analytical expressions for the strain energy of the collagen fibre-bundle that avoids the sometimes costly numerical integration of some statistical distribution functions. The elastin fibres are characterized by a modified neo-Hookean type strain energy function which does not allow for fibre compression. The model accurately simulates biaxial stretching of rabbit-skin (error-of-fit 8.7), uniaxial stretching of pig-skin (error-of-fit 7.6), equibiaxial loading of aortic valve cusp (error-of-fit 0.8), and simple shear of rat septal myocardium (error-of-fit 8.9). It compares favourably with previous soft-tissue models and alternative methods of representing undulated collagen fibres. Predicted collagen fibre stiffnesses range from 8.0thinspaceMPa to 930MPa. Elastin fibre stiffnesses range from 2.0 kPa to 154.4 kPa. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Collagen Type I Single Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutov, Pavel; Antipova, Olga; Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    Collagen fibers are the main components of the extra cellular matrix and the primary contributors to the mechanical properties of tissues. Here we report a novel approach to measure the longitudinal component of the elastic moduli of biological fibers under conditions close to those found in vivo and apply it to type I collagen from rat tail tendon. This approach combines optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and exploits Euler-Bernoulli elasticity theory for data analysis. This approach also avoids drying for measurements or visualization, since samples are freshly extracted. Importantly, strains are kept below 0.5%, which appear consistent with the linear elastic regime. We find, surprisingly, that the longitudinal elastic modulus of type I collagen cannot be represented by a single quantity but rather is a distribution that is broader than the uncertainty of our experimental technique. The longitudinal component of the single-fiber elastic modulus is between 100 MPa and 360 MPa for samples extracted from different rats and/or different parts of a single tail. Variations are also observed in the fibril-bundle/fibril diameter with an average of 325±40 nm. Since bending forces depend on the diameter to the fourth power, this variation in diameter is important for estimating the range of elastic moduli. The remaining variations in the modulus may be due to differences in composition of the fibril-bundles, or the extent of the proteoglycans constituting fibril-bundles, or that some single fibrils may be of fibril-bundle size.

  11. Evaluation of nanostructural, mechanical, and biological properties of collagen-nanotube composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei; Twomey, John; Guo, Dongjie; Madhavan, Krishna; Li, Min

    2010-06-01

    Collagen I is an essential structural and mechanical building block of various tissues, and it is often used as tissue-engineering scaffolds. However, collagen-based constructs reconstituted in vitro often lacks robust fiber structure, mechanical stability, and molecule binding capability. To enhance these performances, the present study developed 3-D collagen-nanotube composite constructs with two types of functionalized carbon nanotubes, carboxylated nanotubes and covalently functionalized nanotubes (CFNTs). The influences of nanotube functionalization and loading concentration on the collagen fiber structure, mechanical property, biocompatibility, and molecule binding were examined. Results revealed that surface modification and loading concentration of nanotubes determined the interactions between nanotubes and collagen fibrils, thus altering the structure and property of nanotube-collagen composites. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy revealed that the incorporation of CFNT in collagen-based constructs was an effective means of restructuring collagen fibrils because CFNT strongly bound to collagen molecules inducing the formation of larger fibril bundles. However, increased nanotube loading concentration caused the formation of denser fibril network and larger aggregates. Static stress-strain tests under compression showed that the addition of nanotube into collagen-based constructs did not significantly increase static compressive moduli. Creep/recovery testing under compression revealed that CFNT-collagen constructs showed improved mechanical stability under continuous loading. Testing with endothelial cells showed that biocompatibility was highly dependent on nanotube loading concentration. At a low loading level, CFNT-collagen showed higher endothelial coverage than the other tested constructs or materials. Additionally, CFNT-collagen showed capability of binding to other biomolecules to enhance the construct functionality. In conclusion

  12. Computed tomography findings in patients with pulmonary hyalinizing granulomas: a case report; Granulomas hialinizantes pulmonares: aspectos na tomografia computadorizada - relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: edmarchiori@zipmail.com.br; Valiante, Paulo Marcos [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Patologia; Correia, Ana Helena Pereira; Carneiro, Leonardo Hoehl; Caldas, Carolina Rodrigues [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Anatomia Patologica; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia

    2003-12-01

    Hyalinizing granulomas are benign fibrotic lesions that generally present multiple nodules seen on radiological examinations, which are frequently cavitary and/or calcified lesions. We report a case of a 28 year-old-woman with hyalinizing granulomas probably secondary to a previous tuberculosis infection. Hyalinizing granulomas should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with multiple pulmonary nodules. (author)

  13. Creep rupture of fiber bundles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linga, G.; Ballone, P.; Hansen, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The creep deformation and eventual breaking of polymeric samples under a constant tensile load F is investigated by molecular dynamics based on a particle representation of the fiber bundle model. The results of the virtual testing of fibrous samples consisting of 40000 particles arranged on Nc=4...

  14. Line bundles and flat connections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    INDRANIL BISWAS; GEORG SCHUMACHER

    2017-06-01

    We prove that there are cocompact lattices $\\Gamma$ in $\\rm SL(2,\\mathbb C)$ with the property that there are holomorphic line bundles $L$ on $\\rm SL(2,\\mathbb C)/ \\Gamma$ with $c_{1}(L) = 0$ such that $L$ does not admit any unitary flat connection.

  15. Vector Bundles over Elliptic Fibrations

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, R; Witten, Edward; Friedman, Robert; Morgan, John W.; Witten, Edward

    1997-01-01

    This paper gives various methods for constructing vector bundles over elliptic curves and more generally over families of elliptic curves. We construct universal families over generalized elliptic curves via spectral cover methods and also by extensions, and then give a relative version of the construction in families. We give various examples and make Chern class computations.

  16. Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis and infantile systemic hyalinosis: a unifying term and a proposed grading system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofal, Ahmad; Sanad, Mohammad; Assaf, Magda; Nofal, Eman; Nassar, Amani; Almokadem, Sahar; Attwa, Enayat; Elmosalamy, Khaled

    2009-10-01

    It has been suggested that juvenile hyaline fibromatosis and infantile systemic hyalinosis represent different severities of the same disease. We sought to redefine these disorders clearly to establish a common inclusive terminology. The study included two children with early onset of similar pink papulonodular skin lesions and marked gingival hyperplasia. The first case was characterized by flexion contractures of the large joints, fractures, persistent diarrhea, recurrent chest infections, and retarded physical growth. The second patient had large swellings on the scalp and knees without systemic involvement. Radiologic examination revealed fractures and osteolytic bone lesions in the first case, and soft tissue masses in the second case. Laboratory tests showed anemia in both cases, and hypogammaglobulinemia, hypoalbuminemia, and electrolyte imbalance in the first case. Histopathological and ultrastructural evaluation demonstrated hyalinized fibrous tissue in the dermis in both cases. Genetic studies were unavailable. Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis and infantile systemic hyalinosis share many common features that strongly support consideration of these conditions as different expressions of the same disorder. We propose a common term, "hyaline fibromatosis syndrome," which can be divided into mild, moderate, and severe subtypes.

  17. Pulmonary Changes in Preterm Neonates with Hyaline Membrane Disease (a Clinicomorphological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Golubev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal lung morphological changes in preterm neonatal infants with hyaline membrane disease (HMD in the use of exogenous surfactants and artificial ventilation. Materials and methods. Case histories and autopsy protocols were analyzed in 90 preterm neonates who had died from severe respiratory failure. All the neonates were divided into 4 groups: 1 20 (22.2% infants who had received the exogenous surfactant Curosurf in the combined therapy of HMD; 2 19 (21.1% babies with HMD who had taken Surfactant BL; 3 25 (27.8% surfactant-untreated infants who had died from HMD; 4 26 (28.9% very preterm neonates with extremely low birth weight who had died within the first hour of life. The lungs were histologically and morphometrically examined. Results. The study demonstrated the specific course of HMD when exogenous surfactants and artificial ventilation were used. The contributors to the development of the disease are intranatal amniotic fluid aspiration and intranatal fetal hypoxia. Conclusion. Artificial ventilation and the use of exogenous surfactants do not block the generation of hyaline membranes. The latter differ in formation time, form, and location. The differences in a cell response to hyaline membranes were found in the neonatal infants receiving exogenous surfactants. The characteristic morphological signs of the disease for all the neonates enrolled in the study are alveolar and bronchial epithelial damages and microcirculatory disorders. Key words: preterm neonatal infants, hyaline membrane disease, exogenous surfactants, artificial ventilation, histology, morphometry.

  18. MORPHOGENESIS OF KNEE HYALINE CARTILAGE DURING INTRAARTICULAR INJECTION OF PLATELET-RICH AUTOLOGOUS PLASMA AND/OR HYALURONIC ACID PREPARATION IN RATS WITH EXPERIMENTAL OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Demkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to current concepts, the influence of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP and high molecular hyaluronates (HA on the repair of hyaline cartilage during its inflammatory and degenerative changes has been insufficiently studied yet. The objective of the work was to evaluate the morphological changes in the structure of hyaline cartilage in experimental osteoarthritis after intra-articular injection of PRP and/or HA. Material and methods. The authors used 50 adult rats of Wistar line, weighing 250±2,2 g., distributed into five groups of 10 animals (two control and three experimental groups. An experimental gonarthosis was simulated on four groups of animals. Animals of the first experimental group received intra-articular injection of PRP, the second group – HA, the third – both PRP and HA. Results. No morphological signs of degenerative and inflammatory changes in the first control group were identified. Following osteoarthritis simulation the articular cartilage thinned to 121±20,4 microns (p<0,05 and the volume fraction of chondrocyte decreased to 1,2±0,6% (p<0,05. The authors observed an uneven coloration of collagen fibers with severe tinctorial properties disorder of the articular cartilage matrix. After the RPR introduction the authors observed tickening of the articular cartilage up to 275±18,9 micron (p<0,05 and the volume fraction of chondrocytes up to 18,4±2,0% (p<0,05. The contour of the cartilage surface became smoother with the formation of a cell-free zone. Collagen fibers demonstrated a uniform distribution, tinctorial properties of cartilage matrix in all areas were preserved, no signs of inflammation were noted. After HA introduction the authors observed thickening of the cartilage plate up to 264±21,3 microns (p<0,05 and the volume fraction of chondrocytes up to 11,6±1,2% (p<0,05. The surface of the cartilage featured uneven contours due to multiple areas of pulping. Uneven tinctorial properties of cartilage

  19. Quantum principal bundles and corresponding gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Durdevic, M

    1995-01-01

    A generalization of classical gauge theory is presented, in the framework of a noncommutative-geometric formalism of quantum principal bundles over smooth manifolds. Quantum counterparts of classical gauge bundles, and classical gauge transformations, are introduced and investigated. A natural differential calculus on quantum gauge bundles is constructed and analyzed. Kinematical and dynamical properties of corresponding gauge theories are discussed.

  20. Strategic and welfare implications of bundling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    A standard oligopoly model of bundling shows that bundling by a firm with a monopoly over one product has a strategic effect because it changes the substitution relationships between the goods among which consumers choose. Bundling in appropriate proportions is privately profitable, reduces rival......' profits and overall welfare, and may drive rivals from the market...

  1. Higher order jet prolongations type gauge natural bundles over vector bundles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kurek

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Let $rgeq 3$ and $mgeq 2$ be natural numbers and $E$ be a vector bundle with $m$-dimensional basis. We find all gauge natural bundles ``similar" to the $r$-jet prolongation bundle $J^rE$ of $E$. We also find all gauge natural bundles ``similar" to the vector $r$-tangent bundle $(J^r_{fl}(E,R_0^*$ of $E$.

  2. Multipath packet switch using packet bundling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Michael Stubert

    2002-01-01

    The basic concept of packet bundling is to group smaller packets into larger packets based on, e.g., quality of service or destination within the packet switch. This paper presents novel applications of bundling in packet switching. The larger packets created by bundling are utilized to extend...... switching capacity by use of parallel switch planes. During the bundling operation, packets will experience a delay that depends on the actual implementation of the bundling and scheduling scheme. Analytical results for delay bounds and buffer size requirements are presented for a specific scheduling...

  3. Biomedical applications of collagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramshaw, John A M

    2016-05-01

    Collagen-based biomedical materials have developed into important, clinically effective materials used in a range of devices that have gained wide acceptance. These devices come with collagen in various formats, including those based on stabilized natural tissues, those that are based on extracted and purified collagens, and designed composite, biosynthetic materials. Further knowledge on the structure and function of collagens has led to on-going developments and improvements. Among these developments has been the production of recombinant collagen materials that are well defined and are disease free. Most recently, a group of bacterial, non-animal collagens has emerged that may provide an excellent, novel source of collagen for use in biomaterials and other applications. These newer collagens are discussed in detail. They can be modified to direct their function, and they can be fabricated into various formats, including films and sponges, while solutions can also be adapted for use in surface coating technologies.

  4. Collagen vascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on this ... previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many specific ...

  5. Is the T1ρ MRI profile of hyaline cartilage in the normal hip uniform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhra, Kawan S; Cárdenas-Blanco, Arturo; Melkus, Gerd; Schweitzer, Mark E; Cameron, Ian G; Beaulé, Paul E

    2015-04-01

    T1ρ MRI is an imaging technique sensitive to proteoglycan (PG) content of hyaline cartilage. However, normative T1ρ values have not been established for the weightbearing cartilage of the hip, and it is not known whether it is uniform or whether there is topographic variation. Knowledge of the T1ρ profile of hyaline cartilage in the normal hip is important for establishing a baseline against which comparisons can be made to experimental and clinical arthritic subjects. In this diagnostic study, we determined (1) the T1ρ MRI values of hyaline cartilage of the normal hip; and (2) whether the T1ρ MRI profile of the normal hip hyaline cartilage is uniform. Fourteen asymptomatic volunteers (11 men, three women; mean age, 35 years) prospectively underwent 1.5-T T1ρ MRI of a single hip. The weightbearing hyaline cartilage bilayer of the acetabulum and femoral head was evaluated on sagittal images and segmented into four zones: (1) anterior; (2) anterosuperior; (3) posterosuperior; and (4) and posterior. For the full region of interest and within each zone and each sagittal slice, we calculated the mean T1ρ relaxation value, a parameter that indirectly quantifies PG content, where T1ρ is inversely related to PG concentration. There was variation in the T1ρ relaxation values depending on zone (anterior to posterior) and slice (medial to lateral). When combining the most anterior quadrants (Zones 1 and 2), the T1ρ relaxation values were lower than those in the combined posterior quadrants (Zones 3 and 4) (30.4 msec versus 32.2 msec, respectively; p = 0.002), reflecting higher PG concentration. There was a difference between the T1ρ relaxation values of the sagittal slices (p = 0.038), most pronounced anteriorly in Zone 1 (26.6 msec, p = 0.001). With a selective combination of zones and slices, there were lower mean T1ρ values in the anterolateral-most region compared with the remainder of the weightbearing portion of the hip (28.6 msec versus 32.2 msec

  6. Dimensional Measurements of Fresh CANDU Fuel Bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Ji Su; Jo, Chang Keun; Jung, Jong Yeob; Koo, Dae Seo; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    This paper intends to provide the dimensional measurements of fresh CANDU fuel (37-element) bundle for the estimation of deformation of post-irradiated (PI) bundle. It is expensive and difficult to measure the fretting wear of bearing pad, the element bowing and the waviness of endplate at the two-phase high flow condition (above 24 kg/s) of out-of-reactor test. So, it is recommended to compare the geometry of fresh bundle with that of PI bundle to estimate the integrity of fuel bundle in the CANDU-6 fuel channel with two-phase flow condition. The measurement system has been developed to provide the visual inspection and the dimensional measurements within the accuracy of 10 {mu}m. It is applicable in-air and underwater to the CANDU bundle as well as the CANFLEX bundle. The in-air measurements of the 36 fresh CANDU bundles (S/N: B400892 {approx} B400927) are done by this system from February 2004 to March 2004 in the PHWR fresh fuel storage building of KNFC. These bundles are produced by KNFC manufacturing procedure and are waiting for the delivery to the Wolsong-3 plant, and are planned to load into the proposed test channels. The detail measurements contain the outer rod profile (including the bearing pad), the diameter of bundle, the bowing of bundle, the rod length and the surface profile of end plate (waviness)

  7. Mathematical modelling for nanotube bundle oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamwattana, Ngamta; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2009-07-01

    This paper investigates the mechanics of a gigahertz oscillator comprising a nanotube oscillating within the centre of a uniform concentric ring or bundle of nanotubes. The study is also extended to the oscillation of a fullerene inside a nanotube bundle. In particular, certain fullerene-nanotube bundle oscillators are studied, namely C60-carbon nanotube bundle, C60-boron nitride nanotube bundle, B36N36-carbon nanotube bundle and B36N36-boron nitride nanotube bundle. Using the Lennard-Jones potential and the continuum approach, we obtain a relation between the bundle radius and the radii of the nanotubes forming the bundle, as well as the optimum bundle size which gives rise to the maximum oscillatory frequency for both the fullerene and the nanotube bundle oscillators. While previous studies in this area have been undertaken through molecular dynamics simulations, this paper emphasizes the use of applied mathematical modelling techniques which provides considerable insight into the underlying mechanisms. The paper presents a synopsis of the major results derived in detail by the present authors in [1, 2].

  8. Photonic bandgap fiber bundle spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Hang, Qu; Syed, Imran; Guo, Ning; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an all-fiber spectrometer consisting of a photonic bandgap fiber bundle and a black and white CCD camera. Photonic crystal fibers used in this work are the large solid core all-plastic Bragg fibers designed for operation in the visible spectral range and featuring bandgaps of 60nm - 180nm-wide. 100 Bragg fibers were chosen to have complimentary and partially overlapping bandgaps covering a 400nm-840nm spectral range. The fiber bundle used in our work is equivalent in its function to a set of 100 optical filters densely packed in the area of ~1cm2. Black and white CCD camera is then used to capture spectrally "binned" image of the incoming light at the output facet of a fiber bundle. To reconstruct the test spectrum from a single CCD image we developed an algorithm based on pseudo-inversion of the spectrometer transmission matrix. We then study resolution limit of this spectroscopic system by testing its performance using spectrally narrow test peaks (FWHM 5nm-25nm) centered at va...

  9. Postnatal expression in hyaline cartilage of constitutively active human collagenase-3 (MMP-13) induces osteoarthritis in mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neuhold, L A; Killar, L; Zhao, W; Sung, M L; Warner, L; Kulik, J; Turner, J; Wu, W; Billinghurst, C; Meijers, T; Poole, A R; Babij, P; DeGennaro, L J

    2001-01-01

    ...). We have used tetracycline-regulated transcription in conjunction with a cartilage-specific promoter to target a constitutively active human MMP-13 to the hyaline cartilages and joints of transgenic mice...

  10. Endocytic collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H.; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Ingvarsen, Signe;

    2012-01-01

    it crucially important to understand both the collagen synthesis and turnover mechanisms in this condition. Here we show that the endocytic collagen receptor, uPARAP/Endo180, is a major determinant in governing the balance between collagen deposition and degradation. Cirrhotic human livers displayed a marked......Fibrosis of the liver and its end-stage, cirrhosis, represent major health problems worldwide. In these fibrotic conditions, activated fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells display a net deposition of collagen. This collagen deposition is a major factor leading to liver dysfunction, thus making...... up-regulation of uPARAP/Endo180 in activated fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells located close to the collagen deposits. In a hepatic stellate cell line, uPARAP/Endo180 was shown to be active in, and required for, the uptake and intracellular degradation of collagen. To evaluate the functional...

  11. Complications of collagenous colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Microscopic forms of colitis have been described, including collagenous colitis. This disorder generally has an apparently benign clinical course. However, a number of gastric and intestinal complications, possibly coincidental, may develop with collagenous colitis. Distinctive inflammatory disorders of the gastric mucosa have been described, including lymphocytic gastritis and collagenous gastritis. Celiac disease and collagenous sprue (or collagenous enteritis) may occur. Colonic ulceration has been associated with use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, may evolve from collagenous colitis. Submucosal "dissection", colonic fractures or mucosal tears and perforation from air insufflation during colonoscopy may occur and has been hypothesized to be due to compromise of the colonic wall from submucosal collagen deposition. Similar changes may result from increased intraluminal pressure during barium enema contrast studies. Finally, malignant disorders have also been reported, including carcinoma and lymphoproliferative disease.

  12. Hyaline cartilage formation and tumorigenesis of implanted tissues derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Taku; Yano, Fumiko; Mori, Daisuke; Kawata, Manabu; Hoshi, Kazuto; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Masaki, Hideki; Otsu, Makoto; Eto, Koji; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Chung, Ung-il; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a promising cell source for cartilage regenerative medicine. Meanwhile, the risk of tumorigenesis should be considered in the clinical application of human iPSCs (hiPSCs). Here, we report in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of hiPSCs and maturation of the differentiated hiPSCs through transplantation into mouse knee joints. Three hiPSC clones showed efficient chondrogenic differentiation using an established protocol for human embryonic stem cells. The differentiated hiPSCs formed hyaline cartilage tissues at 8 weeks after transplantation into the articular cartilage of NOD/SCID mouse knee joints. Although tumors were not observed during the 8 weeks after transplantation, an immature teratoma had developed in one mouse at 16 weeks. In conclusion, hiPSCs are a potent cell source for regeneration of hyaline articular cartilage. However, the risk of tumorigenesis should be managed for clinical application in the future.

  13. Visualization of the macroscopic structure of hyaline cartilage with MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, D W

    2001-12-01

    The extracellular matrix of any tissue, including hyaline cartilage, has a structure that allows it to meet the physical demands placed upon that tissue. Accordingly, the structure of hyaline cartilage is not uniform. There is considerable variation from one joint to the next and even within a particular joint surface, probably reflecting a joint-specific architecture. This structure has a strong influence on T(2) relaxation. The relationship between T2 and matrix curvature relative to the main magnetic field (B(0)) provides tissue contrast. Images obtained with adequate resolution can exploit this contrast and demonstrate the structure of cartilage. Magnetic resonance imaging is thus capable of providing a detailed description of the structure of joint surfaces, information that is difficult to obtain even with histologic techniques.

  14. MIXED HYALINE VASCULAR AND PLASMA CELL TYPE CASTLEMAN’S DISEASE: REPORT OF A CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Asgarani

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Castleman’s disease (angiofollicular lymphoid hyperplasia includes a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders. The cause of this disease remains uncertain. There are two types of localized Castleman’s disease: the more common hyaline vascular and the plasma cell types. Mixed variant is an uncommon localized lesion in general population. The lesions can occur in any part of the body that contains lymphoid tissue, although seventy percent are found in the anterior mediastinum. We report a thirty years old boy with Castleman’s disease who presented with fever, anorexia, weight loss,sweating, anemia and abdominal mass. The histologic examination of the biopsy specimens revealed a mixed hyaline vascular and plasma cell type of Castleman’s disease.

  15. Differences in collagen architecture between keloid, hypertrophic scar, normotrophic scar, and normal skin: An objective histopathological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaegen, Pauline D H M; van Zuijlen, Paul P M; Pennings, Noor M; van Marle, Jan; Niessen, Frank B; van der Horst, Chantal M A M; Middelkoop, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Normotrophic, hypertrophic, and keloidal scars are different types of scar formation, which all need a different approach in treatment. Therefore, it is important to differentiate between these types of scar, not only clinically but also histopathologically. Differences were explored for collagen orientation and bundle thickness in 25 normal skin, 57 normotrophic scar, 56 hypertrophic scar, and 56 keloid biopsies, which were selected on clinical diagnosis. Image analysis was performed by fast fourier transformation. The calculated collagen orientation index ranged from 0 (random orientation) to 1 (parallel orientation). The bundle distance was calculated by the average distance between the centers of the collagen bundles. The results showed that compared with all three types of scars, the collagen orientation index was significantly lower in normal skin, which indicates that scars are organized in a more parallel manner. No differences were found between the different scars. Secondly, compared with normal skin, normotrophic scar, and hypertrophic scar, the bundle distance was significantly larger in keloidal scar, which suggests that thicker collagen bundles are present in keloidal scar. This first extensive histological study showed objective differences between normal skin, normotrophic, hypertrophic, and keloidal scar.

  16. Castleman Disease of Hyaline Vascular Type in the Infrathyroidal Region: A Masquerader of Parathyroid Adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Kwon; Kwon, Sun Young [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Castleman disease of the infrathyroidal region is extremely rare. We report both CT and sonographic findings of a case of infrathyroidal paratracheal Castleman disease of hyaline vascular type, which masquerades parathyroid adenoma, in a 48-year-old woman. We further provide its histological findings at sonographically guided core-needle biopsy (US-CNB) and excisional biopsy. The lesion was ovoid with homogeneous intense enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT (CECT), and was homogeneous, markedly hypoechoic, and hypervascular on ultrasonography (US). Histological findings of the specimen obtained by US-CNB suggested lymphoproliferative lesion, and thus was inconclusive; those obtained by excisional biopsy were characteristics of Castleman disease of hyaline vascular type. Hyaline vascular type Castleman's disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of a mass of the infrathyroidal region with homogeneous intense enhancement on CECT, as well as with marked hypoechogenicity and hypervascularity on US. US-CNB may be of limited value in the histological diagnosis of this entity.

  17. Elastic cartilage reconstruction by transplantation of cultured hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, M; Takebe, T; Kobayashi, S; Kimura, S; Masutani, M; Lee, S; Jo, Y H; Lee, J I; Taniguchi, H

    2014-05-01

    Current surgical intervention of craniofacial defects caused by injuries or abnormalities uses reconstructive materials, such as autologous cartilage grafts. Transplantation of autologous tissues, however, places a significant invasiveness on patients, and many efforts have been made for establishing an alternative graft. Recently, we and others have shown the potential use of reconstructed elastic cartilage from ear-derived chondrocytes or progenitors with the unique elastic properties. Here, we examined the differentiation potential of canine joint cartilage-derived chondrocytes into elastic cartilage for expanding the cell sources, such as hyaline cartilage. Articular chondrocytes are isolated from canine joint, cultivated, and compared regarding characteristic differences with auricular chondrocytes, including proliferation rates, gene expression, extracellular matrix production, and cartilage reconstruction capability after transplantation. Canine articular chondrocytes proliferated less robustly than auricular chondrocytes, but there was no significant difference in the amount of sulfated glycosaminoglycan produced from redifferentiated chondrocytes. Furthermore, in vitro expanded and redifferentiated articular chondrocytes have been shown to reconstruct elastic cartilage on transplantation that has histologic characteristics distinct from hyaline cartilage. Taken together, cultured hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes are a possible cell source for elastic cartilage reconstruction. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hyalinizing trabecular tumor of the thyroid gland: A puzzling entity on fine needle aspiration cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Nasit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyalinizing trabecular tumor (HTT is a rare unique but controversial thyroid neoplasm, characterized by prominent trabecular growth pattern and stromal hyalinization. Whether HTT is a benign tumor or a variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC is still unclear. Cytology findings of HTT have been described in few reports. Cytological features of HTT frequently overlap with those of PTC and medullary thyroid carcinoma, which can lead to frequent misdiagnosis. In order to avoid overtreatment like total thyroidectomy, pathologist should be aware of cytological features of HTT. We present a case of 35-year-old female with a right-side thyroid swelling for three years. Fine needle aspiration cytology was performed. According to The Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology, cytological diagnosis of benign thyroid neoplasm was made. Histopathology of the right thyroidectomy specimen showed HTT. Accurate preoperative diagnosis of HTT requires a very meticulous and cautious approach in the evaluation of cytological features. Trabecular pattern of cells, vague curved nuclear palisading, radiating arrangement of cells around hyaline material, spindled to elongated cells, filamentous cytoplasmic processes with ill-defined cell border and yellow bodies are important diagnostic features of HTT. Nuclear features alone are insufficient for the diagnosis of HTT. Any suspicious cytology of thyroid lesion should follow hemithyroidectomy and histopathological evaluation.

  19. General frame structures on quantum principal bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Durdevic, M

    1996-01-01

    A noncommutative-geometric generalization of the classical formalism of frame bundles is developed, incorporating into the theory of quantum principal bundles the concept of the Levi-Civita connection. The construction of a natural differential calculus on quantum principal frame bundles is presented, including the construction of the associated differential calculus on the structure group. General torsion operators are defined and analyzed. Illustrative examples are presented.

  20. ACM Bundles on Del Pezzo surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Pons-Llopis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available ACM rank 1 bundles on del Pezzo surfaces are classified in terms of the rational normal curves that they contain. A complete list of ACM line bundles is provided. Moreover, for any del Pezzo surface X of degree less or equal than six and for any n ≥ 2 we construct a family of dimension ≥ n − 1 of non-isomorphic simple ACM bundles of rank n on X.

  1. Fourier transform infrared imaging and infrared fiber optic probe spectroscopy identify collagen type in connective tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Hanifi

    Full Text Available Hyaline cartilage and mechanically inferior fibrocartilage consisting of mixed collagen types are frequently found together in repairing articular cartilage. The present study seeks to develop methodology to identify collagen type and other tissue components using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectral evaluation of matrix composition in combination with multivariate analyses. FTIR spectra of the primary molecular components of repair cartilage, types I and II collagen, and aggrecan, were used to develop multivariate spectral models for discrimination of the matrix components of the tissues of interest. Infrared imaging data were collected from bovine bone, tendon, normal cartilage, meniscus and human repair cartilage tissues, and composition predicted using partial least squares analyses. Histology and immunohistochemistry results were used as standards for validation. Infrared fiber optic probe spectral data were also obtained from meniscus (a tissue with mixed collagen types to evaluate the potential of this method for identification of collagen type in a minimally-invasive clinical application. Concentration profiles of the tissue components obtained from multivariate analysis were in excellent agreement with histology and immunohistochemistry results. Bone and tendon showed a uniform distribution of predominantly type I collagen through the tissue. Normal cartilage showed a distribution of type II collagen and proteoglycan similar to the known composition, while in repair cartilage, the spectral distribution of both types I and II collagen were similar to that observed via immunohistochemistry. Using the probe, the outer and inner regions of the meniscus were shown to be primarily composed of type I and II collagen, respectively, in accordance with immunohistochemistry data. In summary, multivariate analysis of infrared spectra can indeed be used to differentiate collagen type I and type II, even in the presence of proteoglycan, in

  2. Entropy for frame bundle systems and Grassmann bundle systems induced by a diffeomorphism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Weniang(孙文祥)

    2002-01-01

    ALiao hyperbolic diffeomorphism has equal measure entropy and topological entropy to that ofits induced systems on frame bundles and Grassmann bundles. This solves a problem Liao posed in 1996 forLiao hyperbolic diffeomorphisms.

  3. Hydraulic characteristics of HANARO fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S.; Chung, H. J.; Chun, S. Y.; Yang, S. K.; Chung, M. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents the hydraulic characteristics measured by using LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry) in subchannels of HANARO, KAERI research reactor, fuel bundle. The fuel bundle consists of 18 axially finned rods with 3 spacer grids, which are arranged in cylindrical configuration. The effects of the spacer grids on the turbulent flow were investigated by the experimental results. Pressure drops for each component of the fuel bundle were measured, and the friction factors of fuel bundle and loss coefficients for the spacer grids were estimated from the measured pressure drops. Implications regarding the turbulent thermal mixing were discussed. Vibration test results measured by using laser vibrometer were presented. 9 refs., 12 figs. (Author)

  4. Thermal Hydraulic Performance of Tight Lattice Bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Akiba, Miyuki; Morooka, Shinichi; Shirakawa, Kenetsu; Abe, Nobuaki

    Recently, the reduced moderation spectrum BWR has been studied. The fast neutron spectrum is obtained through triangular tight lattice fuel. However, there are few thermal hydraulic test data and thermal hydraulic correlation applicable to critical power prediction in such a tight lattice bundle. This study aims to enhance the database of the thermal hydraulic performance of the tight lattice bundle whose rod gap is about 1mm. Therefore, thermal hydraulic performance measurement tests of tight lattice bundles for the critical power, the pressure drop and the counter current flow limiting were performed. Moreover, the correlations to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic performance of the tight lattice bundle were developed.

  5. Principal $G$-bundles over elliptic curves

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, R; Witten, Edward; Friedman, Robert; Morgan, John W.; Witten, Edward

    1997-01-01

    Let $G$ be a simple and simply connected complex Lie group. We discuss the moduli space of holomorphic semistable principal $G$-bundles over an elliptic curve $E$. In particular, we give a new proof of a theorem of Looijenga and Bernshtein-Shvartsman, that the moduli space is a weighted projective space. The method of proof is to study the deformations of certain unstable bundles coming from special maximal parabolic subgroups of $G$. We also discuss the associated automorphism sheaves and universal bundles, as well as the relation between various universal bundles and spectral covers.

  6. Statistical Constitutive Equation of Aramid Fiber Bundles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊杰; 顾伯洪; 王善元

    2003-01-01

    Tensile impact tests of aramid (Twaron) fiber bundles were carried om under high strain rates with a wide range of 0. 01/s~1000/s by using MTS and bar-bar tensile impact apparatus. Based on the statistical constitutive model of fiber bundles, statistical constitutive equations of aramid fiber bundles are derived from statistical analysis of test data at different strain rates. Comparison between the theoretical predictions and experimental data indicates statistical constitutive equations fit well with the experimental data, and statistical constitutive equations of fiber bundles at different strain rates are valid.

  7. Effect of fiber crosslinking on collagen-fiber reinforced collagen-chondroitin-6-sulfate materials for regenerating load-bearing soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J H; Ghose, S; Kew, S J; Moavenian, A; Best, S M; Cameron, R E

    2013-01-01

    Porous collagen-glycosaminoglycan structures are bioactive and exhibit a pore architecture favorable for both cellular infiltration and attachment; however, their inferior mechanical properties limit use, particularly in load-bearing situations. Reinforcement with collagen fibers may be a feasible route for enhancing the mechanical characteristics of these materials, providing potential for composites used for the repair and regeneration of soft tissue such as tendon, ligaments, and cartilage. Therefore, this study investigates the reinforcement of collagen-chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S) porous structures with bundles of extruded, reconstituted type I collagen fibers. Fiber bundles were produced through extrusion and then, where applicable, crosslinked using a solution of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide. Fibers were then submerged in the collagen-C6S matrix slurry before being lyophilized. A second 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide crosslinking process was then applied to the composite material before a secondary lyophilization cycle. Where bundles had been previously crosslinked, composites withstood a load of approximately 60 N before failure, the reinforcing fibers remained dense and a favorable matrix pore structure resulted, with good interaction between fiber and matrix. Fibers that had not been crosslinked before lyophilization showed significant internal porosity and a channel existed between them and the matrix. Mechanical properties were significantly reduced, but the additional porosity could prove favorable for cell migration and has potential for directing aligned tissue growth.

  8. Jacobi Structures on Affine Bundles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. GRABOWSKI; D. IGLESIAS; J. C. MARRERO; E. PADR(O)N; P. URBA(N)SKI

    2007-01-01

    We study affine Jacobi structures (brackets) on an affine bundle π: A→M, i.e. Jacobi brackets that close on affine functions. We prove that if the rank of A is non-zero, there is a one-to- one correspondence between affine Jacobi structures on A and Lie algebroid structures on the vector bundle A+=∪p∈M Aff(Ap, R) of affine functionals. In the case rank A = 0, it is shown that there is a one-to-one correspondence between affins Jacobi structures on A and local Lie algebras on A+. Some examples and applications, also for the linear case, are discussed. For a special type of affine Jacobi structures which are canonically exhibited (strongly-affine or affine-homogeneous Jacobi structures) over a real vector space of finite dimension, we describe the leaves of its characteristic foliation as the orbits of an affine representation. These afline Jacobi structures can be viewed as an analog of the Kostant-Arnold-LiouviUe linear Poisson structure on the dual space of a real finite-dimensional Lie algebra.

  9. Pseudomembranous collagenous colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shan; Reyes, Victoria; Bronner, Mary P

    2003-10-01

    The classic clinical and histologic features of collagenous colitis are well characterized; however, the acute or neutrophilic inflammatory changes that may accompany this entity are less well established. In this report of 10 patients, we describe the first series of pseudomembranous collagenous colitis. Because superimposed Clostridium difficile infection was only demonstrated in one patient and no other causes of pseudomembranous colitis were evident in the remaining nine patients, we conclude that pseudomembranes are part of the spectrum of collagenous colitis itself. This case series illustrates the importance of searching for collagenous colitis in the evaluation of pseudomembranous colitis. At the same time, superimposed infectious or ischemic etiologies need to be excluded clinically in any patient with superimposed pseudomembranes. The existence of pseudomembranes in collagenous colitis also lends support to the hypothesis that toxin- and/or ischemia-mediated injury may be involved in the pathogenesis of collagenous colitis.

  10. Characterization of fibrillar collagens and extracellular matrix of glandular benign prostatic hyperplasia nodules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler M Bauman

    Full Text Available Recent studies have associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS in men with prostatic fibrosis, but a definitive link between collagen deposition and LUTS has yet to be demonstrated. The objective of this study was to evaluate ECM and collagen content within normal glandular prostate tissue and glandular BPH, and to evaluate the association of clinical parameters of LUTS with collagen content.Fibrillar collagen and ECM content was assessed in normal prostate (48 patients and glandular BPH nodules (24 patients using Masson's trichrome stain and Picrosirius red stain. Second harmonic generation (SHG imaging was used to evaluate collagen content. Additional BPH tissues (n = 47 were stained with Picrosirius red and the association between clinical parameters of BPH/LUTS and collagen content was assessed.ECM was similar in normal prostate and BPH (p = 0.44. Total collagen content between normal prostate and glandular BPH was similar (p = 0.27, but a significant increase in thicker collagen bundles was observed in BPH (p = 0.045. Using SHG imaging, collagen content in BPH (mean intensity = 62.52; SEM = 2.74 was significantly higher than in normal prostate (51.77±3.49; p = 0.02. Total collagen content was not associated with treatment with finasteride (p = 0.47 or α-blockers (p = 0.52, pre-TURP AUA symptom index (p = 0.90, prostate-specific antigen (p = 0.86, post-void residual (PVR; p = 0.32, prostate size (p = 0.21, or post-TURP PVR (p = 0.51. Collagen content was not associated with patient age in patients with BPH, however as men aged normal prostatic tissue had a decreased proportion of thick collagen bundles.The proportion of larger bundles of collagen, but not total collagen, is increased in BPH nodules, suggesting that these large fibers may play a role in BPH/LUTS. Total collagen content is independent of clinical parameters of BPH and LUTS. If fibrosis and overall ECM deposition are

  11. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrutal Narendra Deshmukh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen.

  12. Principal Bundles on the Projective Line

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V B Mehta; S Subramanian

    2002-08-01

    We classify principal -bundles on the projective line over an arbitrary field of characteristic ≠ 2 or 3, where is a reductive group. If such a bundle is trivial at a -rational point, then the structure group can be reduced to a maximal torus.

  13. Anatomic Double-bundle ACL Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.M. Schreiber; C.F. van Eck; F.H. Fu

    2010-01-01

    Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most frequent forms of knee trauma. The traditional surgical treatment for ACL rupture is single-bundle reconstruction. However, during the past few years there has been a shift in interest toward double-bundle reconstruction to closely r

  14. The Verlinde formula for Higgs bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Pei, Du

    2016-01-01

    We propose and prove the Verlinde formula for the quantization of the Higgs bundle moduli spaces and stacks for any simple and simply-connected group. This generalizes the equivariant Verlinde formula for the case of $SU(n)$ proposed previously by the second and third author. We further establish a Verlinde formula for the quantization of parabolic Higgs bundle moduli spaces and stacks.

  15. Quantitative analysis on collagen morphology in aging skin based on multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shulian; Li, Hui; Yang, Hongqin; Zhang, Xiaoman; Li, Zhifang; Xu, Shufei

    2011-04-01

    Multiphoton microscopy was employed for monitoring the structure changes of mouse dermis collagen in the intrinsic- or the extrinsic-age-related processes in vivo. The characteristics of textures in different aging skins were uncovered by fast Fourier transform in which the orientation index and bundle packing of collagen were quantitatively analyzed. Some significant differences in collagen-related changes are found in different aging skins, which can be good indicators for the statuses of aging skins. The results are valuable to the study of aging skin and also of interest to biomedical photonics.

  16. Line bundle embeddings for heterotic theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot Nibbelink, Stefan [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Ruehle, Fabian [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    In heterotic string theories consistency requires the introduction of a non-trivial vector bundle. This bundle breaks the original ten-dimensional gauge groups E{sub 8} x E{sub 8} or SO(32) for the supersymmetric heterotic string theories and SO(16) x SO(16) for the non-supersymmetric tachyon-free theory to smaller subgroups. A vast number of MSSM-like models have been constructed up to now, most of which describe the vector bundle as a sum of line bundles. However, there are several different ways of describing these line bundles and their embedding in the ten-dimensional gauge group. We recall and extend these different descriptions and explain how they can be translated into each other.

  17. Requirements for disordered actomyosin bundle contractility

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Actomyosin contractility is essential for biological force generation, and is well understood in highly ordered structures such as striated muscle. In vitro experiments have shown that non-sarcomeric bundles comprised only of F-actin and myosin thick filaments can also display contractile behavior, which cannot be described by standard muscle models. Here we investigate the microscopic symmetries underlying this process in large non-sarcomeric bundles with long actin filaments. We prove that contractile behavior requires non-identical motors that generate large enough forces to probe the nonlinear elastic behavior of F-actin. A simple disordered bundle model demonstrates a contraction mechanism based on these assumptions and predicts realistic bundle deformations. Recent experimental observations of F-actin buckling in in vitro contractile bundles support our model.

  18. Line bundle embeddings for heterotic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Nibbelink, Stefan Groot

    2016-01-01

    In heterotic theories consistency requires the introduction of a non-trivial vector bundle. This bundle breaks the original ten-dimensional gauge groups E_8 x E_8 or SO(32) for the supersymmetric heterotic theories and SO(16) x SO(16) for the non-supersymmetric tachyon-free theory to smaller subgroups. A vast number of MSSM-like models have been constructed up to now, most of which describe the vector bundle as a sum of line bundles. However, there are several different ways of describing these line bundles and their embedding in the ten-dimensional gauge group. We recall and extend these different descriptions and explain how they can be translated into each other.

  19. Line bundle embeddings for heterotic theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibbelin, Stefan Groot; Ruehle, Fabian

    2016-04-01

    In heterotic string theories consistency requires the introduction of a non-trivial vector bundle. This bundle breaks the original ten-dimensional gauge groups E8 × E8 or SO(32) for the supersymmetric heterotic string theories and SO(16) × SO(16) for the non-supersymmetric tachyon-free theory to smaller subgroups. A vast number of MSSM-like models have been constructed up to now, most of which describe the vector bundle as a sum of line bundles. However, there are several different ways of describing these line bundles and their embedding in the ten-dimensional gauge group. We recall and extend these different descriptions and explain how they can be translated into each other.

  20. Composite spinor bundles in gravitation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sardanashvily, G

    1995-01-01

    In gravitation theory, the realistic fermion matter is described by spinor bundles associated with the cotangent bundle of a world manifold X. In this case, the Dirac operator can be introduced. There is the 1:1 correspondence between these spinor bundles and the tetrad gravitational fields represented by sections of the quotient \\Si of the linear frame bundle over X by the Lorentz group. The key point lies in the fact that different tetrad fields imply nonequivalent representations of cotangent vectors to X by the Dirac's matrices. It follows that a fermion field must be regarded only in a pair with a certain tetrad field. These pairs can be represented by sections of the composite spinor bundle S\\to\\Si\\to X where values of tetrad fields play the role of parameter coordinates, besides the familiar world coordinates.

  1. Double Fell bundles and Spectral triples

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, Rachel A D

    2007-01-01

    As a natural and canonical extension of Kumjian's Fell bundles over groupoids \\cite{fbg}, we give a definition for a double Fell bundle (a double category) over a double groupoid. We show that finite dimensional double category Fell line bundles tensored with their dual with $S^o$-reality satisfy the finite real spectral triples axioms but not necessarily orientability. This means that these product bundles with noncommutative algebras can be regarded as noncommutative compact manifolds more general than real spectral triples as they are not necessarily orientable. By construction, they unify the noncommutative geometry axioms and hence provide an algebraic enveloping structure for finite spectral triples to give the Dirac operator $D$ new algebraic and geometric structures that are otherwise missing in the transition from Fredholm operator to Dirac operator. The Dirac operator in physical applications as a result becomes less ad hoc. The new noncommutative space we present is a complex line bundle over a dou...

  2. On Harder–Narasimhan Reductions for Higgs Principal Bundles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arijit Dey; R Parthasarathi

    2005-05-01

    The existence and uniqueness of – reduction for the Higgs principal bundles over nonsingular projective variety is shown. We also extend the notion of – reduction for (, )-bundles and ramified -bundles over a smooth curve.

  3. Functional bundles of the medial patellofemoral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hui Jun; Wang, Fei; Chen, Bai Cheng; Su, Yan Ling; Zhang, Zhan Chi; Yan, Chang Bao

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the anatomy and evaluate the function of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL). Anatomical dissection was performed on 12 fresh-frozen knee specimens. The MPFL is a condensation of capsular fibers, which originates at the medial femoral condyle. It runs transversely and inserts to the medial edge of the patella. With the landmark of the medial femur epicondyle (MFE), the femoral origination was located: just 8.90 ± 3.27 mm proximally and 13.47 ± 3.68 mm posteriorly to the MFE. The most interesting finding in present study was functional bundles of its patellar insertion. Approximately from the femoral origination point, fibers of the MPFL form two relatively concentrated fiber bundles: the inferior-straight bundle and the superior-oblique bundle. The whole length of each was 71.78 ± 5.51 and 73.67 ± 5.40 mm, respectively. The included angle between bundles was 15.1° ± 2.1°. Although the superior-oblique bundle and the inferior-straight bundle run on the patellar MPFL inferiorly and superiorly, respectively, as their name indicates, the two bundles are not entirely separated, which make MPFL one intact structure. The inferior-straight bundle is the main static soft tissue restraints where the superior-oblique bundle associated with vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) is to serve as the main dynamic soft tissue restraints. So this finding may provide the theoretical foundation for the anatomical reconstruction of the MPFL and shed lights on the future researchers.

  4. The process of EDC-NHS cross-linking of reconstituted collagen fibres increases collagen fibrillar order and alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Shepherd

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the production of collagen fibre bundles through a multi-strand, semi-continuous extrusion process. Cross-linking using an EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropylcarbodiimide, NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide combination was considered. Atomic Force Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy focused on how cross-linking affected the collagen fibrillar structure. In the cross-linked fibres, a clear fibrillar structure comparable to native collagen was observed which was not observed in the non-cross-linked fibre. The amide III doublet in the Raman spectra provided additional evidence of alignment in the cross-linked fibres. Raman spectroscopy also indicated no residual polyethylene glycol (from the fibre forming buffer or water in any of the fibres.

  5. The process of EDC-NHS cross-linking of reconstituted collagen fibres increases collagen fibrillar order and alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, D. V.; Shepherd, J. H.; Ghose, S.; Kew, S. J.; Cameron, R. E.; Best, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the production of collagen fibre bundles through a multi-strand, semi-continuous extrusion process. Cross-linking using an EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide), NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide) combination was considered. Atomic Force Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy focused on how cross-linking affected the collagen fibrillar structure. In the cross-linked fibres, a clear fibrillar structure comparable to native collagen was observed which was not observed in the non-cross-linked fibre. The amide III doublet in the Raman spectra provided additional evidence of alignment in the cross-linked fibres. Raman spectroscopy also indicated no residual polyethylene glycol (from the fibre forming buffer) or water in any of the fibres.

  6. Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Collagen Type I Single Fiber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Dutov

    Full Text Available Collagen fibers are the main components of the extra cellular matrix and the primary contributors to the mechanical properties of tissues. Here we report a novel approach to measure the longitudinal component of the elastic moduli of biological fibers under conditions close to those found in vivo and apply it to type I collagen from rat tail tendon. This approach combines optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and exploits Euler-Bernoulli elasticity theory for data analysis. This approach also avoids drying for measurements or visualization, since samples are freshly extracted. Importantly, strains are kept below 0.5%, which appear consistent with the linear elastic regime. We find, surprisingly, that the longitudinal elastic modulus of type I collagen cannot be represented by a single quantity but rather is a distribution that is broader than the uncertainty of our experimental technique. The longitudinal component of the single-fiber elastic modulus is between 100 MPa and 360 MPa for samples extracted from different rats and/or different parts of a single tail. Variations are also observed in the fibril-bundle/fibril diameter with an average of 325±40 nm. Since bending forces depend on the diameter to the fourth power, this variation in diameter is important for estimating the range of elastic moduli. The remaining variations in the modulus may be due to differences in composition of the fibril-bundles, or the extent of the proteoglycans constituting fibril-bundles, or that some single fibrils may be of fibril-bundle size.

  7. Developments in dynamic MR elastography for in vitro biomechanical assessment of hyaline cartilage under high-frequency cyclical shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Orlando; Amrami, Kimberly K; Manduca, Armando; Rossman, Phillip J; Ehman, Richard L

    2007-02-01

    The design, construction, and evaluation of a customized dynamic magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) technique for biomechanical assessment of hyaline cartilage in vitro are described. For quantification of the dynamic shear properties of hyaline cartilage by dynamic MRE, mechanical excitation and motion sensitization were performed at frequencies in the kilohertz range. A custom electromechanical actuator and a z-axis gradient coil were used to generate and image shear waves throughout cartilage at 1000-10,000 Hz. A radiofrequency (RF) coil was also constructed for high-resolution imaging. The technique was validated at 4000 and 6000 Hz by quantifying differences in shear stiffness between soft ( approximately 200 kPa) and stiff ( approximately 300 kPa) layers of 5-mm-thick bilayered phantoms. The technique was then used to quantify the dynamic shear properties of bovine and shark hyaline cartilage samples at frequencies up to 9000 Hz. The results demonstrate that one can obtain high-resolution shear stiffness measurements of hyaline cartilage and small, stiff, multilayered phantoms at high frequencies by generating robust mechanical excitations and using large magnetic field gradients. Dynamic MRE can potentially be used to directly quantify the dynamic shear properties of hyaline and articular cartilage, as well as other cartilaginous materials and engineered constructs. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Collagen fibrillogenesis in the development of the annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Anthony J; Isaacs, Marc D; Hughes, C; Caterson, B; Ralphs, J R

    2011-10-11

    The annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc is a complex, radial-ply connective tissue consisting of concentric lamellae of oriented collagen. Whilst much is known of the structure of the mature annulus, less is known of how its complex collagenous architecture becomes established; an understanding of which could inform future repair/regenerative strategies. Here, using a rat disc developmental series, we describe events in the establishment of the collagenous framework of the annulus at light and electron microscopic levels and examine the involvement of class I and II small leucine rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) in the matrix assembly process. We show that a period of sustained, ordered matrix deposition follows the initial cellular differentiation/orientation phase within the foetal disc. Fibrillar matrix is deposited from recesses within the plasma membrane into compartments of interstitial space within the outer annulus - the orientation of the secreted collagen reflecting the initial cellular orientation of the laminae. Medially, we demonstrate the development of a reinforcing 'cage' of collagen fibre bundles around the foetal nucleus pulpous. This derives from the fusion of collagen bundles between presumptive end-plate and inner annulus. By birth, the distinct collagenous architectures are established and the disc undergoes considerable enlargement to maturity. We show that fibromodulin plays a prominent role in foetal development of the annulus and its attachment to vertebral bodies. With the exception of keratocan, the other SLRPs appear associated more with cartilage development within the vertebral column, but all become more prominent within the disc during its growth and differentiation.

  9. 核心蛋白多糖调控真皮胶原纤维装配研究进展%Advances in the research of modulation of dermal collagen fibrin assembly by decorin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐德清; 周跃; 张选奋

    2015-01-01

    Formation of dermal collagen fiber is a complicated and sequential process with the progressive assembly of collagen.Collagen monomers form stepped and orderly protofibrils through longitudinal displacement.Subsequently,protofibrils or protofibrils and collagen are bonded by covalent bonds to form orderly lamellar structure of collagen fibers.Then collagen fibers are tightly wound into coarse collagen fiber bundles by covalent crosslinking.Decorin is a multifunctional small leucinerich proteoglycan.It can prevent the aggregation of protofibrils by binding to the specific site of collagen with its core protein,and adjusting the spacing between the protofibrils with its glycosaminoglycan chain.Thus,by effecting the formation of collagen fibers with regulation of collagen assembly,decorin may help prevent scar formation and even promote regeneration.

  10. Hyaline membrane disease or respiratory distress syndrome? A new approach for an old disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Grappone

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The term “hyaline membrane disease” refers to the histological aspect of the most frequent pulmonary pathology in preterm newborn patients. The lung of the preterm baby is morphologically and functionally immature. Surfactant deficiency in the immature lungs causes alveolar instability and collapse, capillary edema and the formation of hyaline membrane. Thus, the hyaline membranes are epiphenomena and are not the cause of respiratory failure in infants with immature lungs. This definition is presently used to indicate surfactant deficit alone and should not be used for other causes of respiratory distress. Clinicians prefer to talk of “respiratory distress syndrome” (RDS. Improvement in neonatal treatment has changed the natural course of the illness, its clinical and radiological features and has enabled extremely low birth weight newborns (ELBW to survive. Alveoli paucity and pulmonary interstitial thickness in ELBW impair gas exchange and may necessitate prolonged ventilation treatment, increasing the risk of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD. RDS, therefore, is a complex illness where pulmonary immaturity and surfactant deficit play a role together with other pathological conditions that determine the course of the illness and both short and long-term results. Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  11. Higgs bundles and the real symplectic group

    CERN Document Server

    Gothen, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    We give an overview of the work of Corlette, Donaldson, Hitchin and Simpson leading to the non-abelian Hodge theory correspondence between representations of the fundamental group of a surface and the moduli space of Higgs bundles. We then explain how this can be generalized to a correspondence between character varieties for representations of surface groups in real Lie groups G and the moduli space of G-Higgs bundles. Finally we survey recent joint work with Bradlow, Garc\\'ia-Prada and Mundet i Riera on the moduli space of maximal Sp(2n,R)-Higgs bundles.

  12. Microdrilled cartilage defects treated with thrombin-solidified chitosan/blood implant regenerate a more hyaline, stable, and structurally integrated osteochondral unit compared to drilled controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Catherine; Chen, Gaoping; Tran-Khanh, Nicolas; Sun, Jun; Chen, Hongmei; Buschmann, Michael D; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2012-03-01

    This study analyzed the long-term cartilage and subchondral bone repair of microdrilled defects treated with chitosan glycerol-phosphate/blood implant, using thrombin (Factor IIa) to accelerate in situ solidification. We also evaluated the cartilage repair response to six smaller microdrill holes compared with two larger holes. Bilateral knee trochlear cartilage defects were created in n=8 skeletally mature rabbits, drilled with six proximal 0.5 mm and two distal 0.9 mm holes, then covered with in situ-solidified IIa-implants (treated) or with IIa-alone (control). After 6.5 months of repair, cartilage repair tissues were analyzed by histological scoring and histomorphometry for hyaline matrix characteristics and osseous integration. Subchondral repair bone was analyzed by 3D microcomputed tomography and compared to acute defects (n=6) and intact trochlea (n=8). Implant-treated cartilage repair tissues had higher structural integrity through the entire defect (p=0.02), twofold higher percent staining for glycosaminoglycan (p=0.0004), and ~24% more collagen type II staining over the smaller drill holes (p=0.008) compared with controls. Otherwise, hole diameter had no specific effect on cartilage repair. The subchondral bone plate was partially restored in treated and control defects but less dense than intact trochlea, with evidence of incomplete regeneration of the calcified cartilage layer. More residual drill holes (p=0.054) were detected in control versus treated defects, and control defects with more than 40% residual holes presented abnormally thicker trabeculae compared with treated defects. Low osteoclast numbers after 6.5 months repair suggested that bone was no longer remodeling. The subchondral bone plate surrounding the defects exhibited a significant thickening compared with age-matched intact trochlea. These data suggest that debridement and drilling can lead to long-term subchondral bone changes outside the cartilage defect. Compared with drilled

  13. Proximal collagenous gastroenteritides:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Riis, Lene Buhl; Danese, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    a systematic review of collagenous gastritis, collagenous sprue, and a combination thereof. METHOD: The search yielded 117 studies which were suitable for inclusion in the systematic review. Excluding repeated cases, 89 case reports and 28 case series were reported, whereas no prospective studies...... of these disorders is presented. The prognosis of both collagenous gastritis and sprue seems not to be as dismal as considered previously. Data point to involvement of immune or autoimmune mechanisms potentially driven by luminal antigens initiating the fibroinflammatory condition. CONCLUSIONS: To reach...

  14. Two new hyaline-ascospored species of Trichoderma and their phylogenetic positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, W T; Zhuang, W Y

    2016-01-01

    Collections of hypocrealean fungi found on decaying wood in subtropical regions of China were examined. Two new species, Trichoderma confluens and T. hubeiense, were discovered and are described. Trichoderma confluens is characterized by its widely effuse to rarely pulvinate, yellow stromata with densely disposed yellowish brown ostioles, simple acremonium- to verticillium-like conidiophores, hyaline conidia and multiform chlamydospores. Trichoderma hubeiense has pulvinate, grayish yellow stromata with brownish ostioles, trichoderma- to verticillium-like conidiophores and hyaline conidia. The phylogenetic positions of the two fungi were investigated based on sequence analyses of RNA polymerase II subunit b and translation elongation factor 1-α genes. The results indicate that T. confluens belongs to the Hypocreanum clade and is associated with but clearly separated from T. applanatum and T. decipiens. Trichoderma hubeiense belongs to the Polysporum clade and related to T. bavaricum but obviously differs from other members of the clade in sequence data. Morphological distinctions between the new species and their close relatives are noted and discussed.

  15. Granular cell tumor of the cecum with extensive hyalinization and calcification: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran Hong; Sung-Chul Lim

    2009-01-01

    A granular cell tumor (GCT) is a benign neoplasm of unclear histogenesis that is generally believed to be of nerve sheath origin. GCT is not common and most often affects the tongue, skin and soft tissue, although it may occur anywhere in the body. We experienced a case of GCT that arose in the cecum of a 55-yearold man. The GCT was removed by laparoscopic resection. In addition to the tumor, endoscopic examination revealed the presence of a 5-mm-polyp in the descending colon and multiple tiny polyps in the sigmoid colon and rectum. Histological examination with a hard consistency; in cut sections, mixed cells with yellowish and whitish portions were seen. The tumor was located between the mucosa and subserosa,and was composed of plump histiocyte-like tumor cells with abundant granular eosinophilic cytoplasm, which were immunoreactive for S-100 protein, vimentin,neuron-specific enolase, inhibin-a and calretinin.The tumor showed extensive hyalinization and focal dystrophic calcification. Immunohistochemical profiles did not confirm any particular cell type for the histogenetic origin of the GCT, including a nerve sheath origin. Extensive hyalinization and calcification showing involution of tumor cells suggest benign clinical behavior of GCT.

  16. Radiologic and histologic features of hyaline membrane diseases of the newbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Seung Yon; Choi, Kyung Hee; Suh, Jeong Soo; Rhee, Chung Sik; Kim, Hee Seup [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-12-15

    This study represents the radiologic, histologic features and clinical analysis of hyaline membrane diseases in 47 newbone infants who were delivered in Ewha Womans Univ. Hospital and expired caused by respiratory distress and confirmed by autopsy, during Jan. 1981 to June. 1984. The results were as follows: 1. Classification of radiographic stage (by Wolfson's criteria); Stage III (34.1%) was the most frequent. 2. Male to female ratio was 2.4 : 1. 3. Method of delivery; Cesarean section (44.7%) was the highest frequency, compared with percent of cesarean section to total delivery (29.0%) 4. Distribution of birth weight; 1.0-2.0 kg (48.9%) was the most frequent. 5. Distribution of gestational period; 32-36 weeks (29.8%) was the most frequent. 6. Complication; pulmonary hemorrhage (31.9%) was the most frequent, in order, subarachnoid hemorrhage and pneumothorax were followed. 7. Final diagnosis of hyaline membrane diseases was based on histo-pathologic diagnosis.

  17. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma%肺玻璃样变肉芽肿病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-lin XU; Drew BETHUNE; Daria MANOS; Annette FOYLE; Harry HENTELEFF; Michael JOHNS-TON; Yannick CARTIER

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To present clinical and pathologic features of pulmonary hyalnizing granuloma through analyzing three cases found in our institution and reviewing cases reported in the English language literature. Methods and Results: Three eases of pulmonary hyalnizing granuloma identified at our institu-tion during the past ten years were reviewed. In the first case, the patient presented with concurrent pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma and histoplasmosis. In the second case, the patient presented with a 5.5 cm lung mass and a separate smaller lesion radiologically resembling bronchogenic carcinoma. There was very prominent polyclonal lymphocytic proliferation at the periphery especially of the smaller lesion likely representing an early stage of the disease process. In the third case, the patient presented with multiple subpleural plaque-like lesions in addition to nodular lesions of the lung. All cases also demonstrated various degrees of lymphocytic infiltration within the lesions. The English literature has been reviewed through searching the PubMed. Conclusion: Since patients with pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma demonstrated a spectrum of clinical presentations, radiologic changes and histologic features with a variety of associated clinical disorders, pulmonary hyalnizing granuloma is more in keeping with a clinicopathologic entity rather than a specific pathologic disease.

  18. Hyaline cartilage involvement in patients with gout and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. An ultrasound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippucci, E; Riveros, M Gutierrez; Georgescu, D; Salaffi, F; Grassi, W

    2009-02-01

    The main aim of the present study was to determine the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasonography (US) in detecting monosodium urate and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals deposits at knee cartilage level using clinical definite diagnosis as standard reference. A total of 32 patients with a diagnosis of gout and 48 patients with pyrophosphate arthropathy were included in the study. Fifty-two patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis or osteoarthritis (OA) were recruited as disease controls. All diagnoses were made using an international clinical criterion. US examinations were performed by an experienced sonographer, blind to clinical and laboratory data. Hyaline cartilage was assessed to detect two US findings recently indicated as indicative of crystal deposits: hyperechoic enhancement of the superficial margin of the hyaline cartilage and hyperechoic spots within the cartilage layer not generating a posterior acoustic shadow. Hyperechoic enhancement of the chondrosynovial margin was found in at least one knee of 14 out of 32 (43.7%) patients with gout and in a single knee of only one patient affected by pyrophosphate arthropathy (specificity=99%). Intra-cartilaginous hyperechoic spots were detected in at least one knee of 33 out of 48 (68.7%) patients with pyrophosphate arthropathy and in two disease controls one with OA and the second with RA (specificity=97.6%). The results of the present study indicate that US may play a relevant role in distinguishing cartilage involvement in patients with crystal-related arthropathy. The selected US findings were found to be highly specific.

  19. Changes of rabbit meniscus influenced by hyaline cartilage injury of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiajun; Huang, Suizhu; Zheng, Jia; Zhong, Chunan; Tang, Chao; Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease in the elderly population. Most of the previous OA-related researches focused on articular cartilage degeneration, osteophyte formation and synovitis etc. However, the role of the meniscus in these pathological changes has not been given enough attention. The goal of our study was to find the pathological changes of the meniscus in OA knee and determine their relationship. 20 months old female Chinese rabbits received either knee damaging operations with articular cartilage scratch method or sham operation randomly on one of their knees. They were sacrificed after 1-6 weeks post-operation. Medial Displacement Index (MDI) for meniscus dislocation, hematoxylin and eosin (HE) for routine histological evaluation, Toluidine blue (TB) stains for evaluating proteoglycans were carried out. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was performed with a two-step detection kit. Histological analysis showed chondrocyte clusters around cartilage lesions and moderate loss of proteoglycans in the operation model, as well as MDI increase and all characteristics of OA. High expression of MMP-3 and TIMP-1 also were found in both hyaline cartilage and meniscus. Biomechanical and biochemistry environment around the meniscus is altered when OA occur. If meniscus showed degeneration, subluxation and dysfunction, OA would be more severe. Prompt repair or reconstruction of hyaline cartilage in weight bearing area when it injured could prevent meniscus degeneration and subluxation, then prevent the development of OA.

  20. Talocalcaneal Joint Middle Facet Coalition Resection With Interposition of a Juvenile Hyaline Cartilage Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Dyane E; Wood, Ryan W; Vaardahl, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition is the most common tarsal coalition, occurring in ≤2% of the population. Fewer than 50% of involved feet obtain lasting relief of symptoms after nonoperative treatment, and surgical intervention is commonly used to relieve symptoms, increase the range of motion, improve function, reconstruct concomitant pes planovalgus, and prevent future arthrosis from occurring at the surrounding joints. Several approaches to surgical intervention are available for patients with middle facet coalitions, ranging from resection to hindfoot arthrodesis. We present a series of 4 cases, in 3 adolescent patients, of talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition resection with interposition of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft (DeNovo(®) NT Natural Tissue Graft, Zimmer, Inc., Warsaw, IN). With a mean follow-up period of 42.8 ± 2.9 (range 41 to 47) months, the 3 adolescent patients in the present series were doing well with improved subtalar joint motion and decreased pain, and 1 foot showed no bony regrowth on a follow-up computed tomography scan. The use of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft as interposition material after talocalcaneal middle facet coalition resection combined with adjunct procedures to address concomitant pes planovalgus resulted in good short-term outcomes in 4 feet in 3 adolescent patients. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mobility of Taxol in Microtubule Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J.

    2003-06-01

    Mobility of taxol inside microtubules was investigated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) on flow-aligned bundles. Bundles were made of microtubules with either GMPCPP or GTP at the exchangeable site on the tubulin dimer. Recovery times were sensitive to bundle thickness and packing, indicating that taxol molecules are able to move laterally through the bundle. The density of open binding sites along a microtubule was varied by controlling the concentration of taxol in solution for GMPCPP samples. With > 63% sites occupied, recovery times were independent of taxol concentration and, therefore, inversely proportional to the microscopic dissociation rate, k_{off}. It was found that 10*k_{off} (GMPCPP) ~ k_{off} (GTP), consistent with, but not fully accounting for, the difference in equilibrium constants for taxol on GMPCPP and GTP microtubules. With taxol along the microtubule interior is hindered by rebinding events when open sites are within ~7 nm of each other.

  2. Noncommutative principal bundles through twist deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Aschieri, Paolo; Pagani, Chiara; Schenkel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We construct noncommutative principal bundles deforming principal bundles with a Drinfeld twist (2-cocycle). If the twist is associated with the structure group then we have a deformation of the fibers. If the twist is associated with the automorphism group of the principal bundle, then we obtain noncommutative deformations of the base space as well. Combining the two twist deformations we obtain noncommutative principal bundles with both noncommutative fibers and base space. More in general, the natural isomorphisms proving the equivalence of a closed monoidal category of modules and its twist related one are used to obtain new Hopf-Galois extensions as twists of Hopf-Galois extensions. A sheaf approach is also considered, and examples presented.

  3. Design requirements of ACR-1000 fuel bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gossain, D.; Reid, P. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The design process for ACR-1000 fuel bundle is being undertaken in accordance with the CSA standard N286.2. As an element of the process, the design requirements were established early in the design phase and compiled in the ACR-1000 Fuel Design Requirements (DR) document. The ACR-1000 fuel bundle design is being developed to meet these requirements. This paper discusses the sources for the requirements such as the ACR project requirements, the plant specifications and regulatory requirements. It also discusses considerations of reactor design decisions and operational decisions in establishing functional, performance, safety and other design requirements for the fuel bundle. The design requirements for the ACR-1000 fuel bundle are summarized and the relationship of the requirements to the plant states of Normal Operation, Anticipated Operational Occurrences (AOOs) and Design Basis Accidents (DBAs) are discussed. Structure of the document to capture all the requirements in addition to functional, performance and safety requirements is presented. (author)

  4. Bundled Hybrid Offset Riser Global Strength Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William C.Webster; Zhuang Kang; Wenzhou Liang; Youwei Kang; Liping Sun

    2011-01-01

    Bundled hybrid offset riser(BHOR)global strength analysis,which is more complex than single line offset riser global strength analysis,was carried out in this paper.At first,the equivalent theory is used to deal with BHOR,and then its global strength in manifold cases was analyzed,along with the use of a three-dimensional nonlinear time domain finite element program.So the max bending stress,max circumferential stress,and max axial stress in the BHOR bundle main section(BMS)were obtained,and the values of these three stresses in each riser were obtained through the "stress distribution method".Finally,the Max Von Mises stress in each riser was given and a check was made whether or not they met the demand.This paper provides a reference for strength analysis of the bundled hybrid offset riser and some other bundled pipelines.

  5. Liquid Flow in Shaped Fiber Bundle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan; WANG Hua-ping; CHEN Yue-hua

    2006-01-01

    By computation and comparison of the critical spreading coefficient parameter, it was found that shaped fiber bundle is better for wetting. Liquid-air interface tension of liquid arising the shaped fiber bundle body is considered as one critical factor besides liquid viscosity, inertia force and liquid-fiber interface tension. Experimental result simulation demonstrated that the liquid-air interface tension is correlated with the geometric size of the liquid arising in body, φ0 (x) and which is affected by the cross sectional shape of fiber and the radius of single fiber. The shaped fiber bundle model is introduced to investigate liquid flow in fiber assembly. The model is generated based on a random function for stochastic forming of fibers in bundle and it is necessary to combine this fundamental model with physical explanation for investigation of liquid flow in fiber assembly.

  6. Dynamic bi-product bundle pricing problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiei Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses bundle pricing problem of two products in a stochastic environment so as to maximize net profit of a retailer. In the considered problem, it is assumed that customers are received upon a Poisson distribution and their demands follow a bi-variant distribution function. Also, it is assumed that products are sold individually or in the form of a bundle, which are offered from an initial stock of the products. To tackle the problem, a stochastic dynamic program is developed in which optimum values of the initial stock and order quantities of every planning period are determined. Moreover, prices of the individual products and their bundle are optimized. Also, the proposed dynamic program tackles bundling/ unbundling decisions taken in every planning period. A numerical example of a two planning period horizon is considered to validate the proposed model.

  7. Effect of Testing Conditions on Fibre-Bundle Tensile Properties Part Ⅰ: Sample Preparation, Bundle Mass and Fibre Alignment of Wool Bundles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Wei-dong; YAN Hao-jing; Ron Postle; Yang Shouren

    2002-01-01

    Due to the effects of samples and testing conditions on fibre-bundle tensile behaviour, it is necessary to investigate the relationships between experimental factors and tensile properties for the fibre-bumdle tensile tester (TENSOR). The effects of bundle sample preparation, fibre bundle mass and fibre alignment have been tested. The experimental results indicated that (1) the low damage in combing and no free-end fibres in the cut bundle are most important for the sample preparation; (2) the reasonable bundle mass is 400- 700tex, but the tensile properties measured should bemodified with the bundle mass because a small amount of bundle mass causes the scatter results, while the larger is the bundle mass, the more difficult to comb fibres parallel and to clamp fibre evenly; and (3) the fibre irregular arrangement forms a slack bundle resulting in interaction between fibres, which will affect the reproducibility and accuracy of the tensile testing.

  8. A Geometric Approach to Noncommutative Principal Bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    From a geometrical point of view it is, so far, not sufficiently well understood what should be a "noncommutative principal bundle". Still, there is a well-developed abstract algebraic approach using the theory of Hopf algebras. An important handicap of this approach is the ignorance of topological and geometrical aspects. The aim of this thesis is to develop a geometrically oriented approach to the noncommutative geometry of principal bundles based on dynamical systems and the representation theory of the corresponding transformation group.

  9. Supporting the Secure Deployment of OSGi Bundles

    OpenAIRE

    Parrend, Pierre; Frénot, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The OSGi platform is a lightweight management layer over a Java virtual machine that makes runtime extensi- bility and multi-application support possible in mobile and constraint environments. This powerfull capability opens a particular attack vector against mobile platforms: the in- stallation of malicious OSGi bundles. The first countermea- sure is the digital signature of the bundles. We developed a tool suite that supports the signature, the publication and the va...

  10. Interstitial Perfusion Culture with Specific Soluble Factors Inhibits Type I Collagen Production from Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes in Clinical-Grade Collagen Sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talò, Giuseppe; Lovati, Arianna B.; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Riboldi, Stefania A.; Moretti, Matteo; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor healing ability and cartilage injuries often evolve to osteoarthritis. Cell-based strategies aiming to engineer cartilaginous tissue through the combination of biocompatible scaffolds and articular chondrocytes represent an alternative to standard surgical techniques. In this context, perfusion bioreactors have been introduced to enhance cellular access to oxygen and nutrients, hence overcoming the limitations of static culture and improving matrix deposition. Here, we combined an optimized cocktail of soluble factors, the BIT (BMP-2, Insulin, Thyroxin), and clinical-grade collagen sponges with a bidirectional perfusion bioreactor, namely the oscillating perfusion bioreactor (OPB), to engineer in vitro articular cartilage by human articular chondrocytes (HACs) obtained from osteoarthritic patients. After amplification, HACs were seeded and cultivated in collagen sponges either in static or dynamic conditions. Chondrocyte phenotype and the nature of the matrix synthesized by HACs were assessed using western blotting and immunohistochemistry analyses. Finally, the stability of the cartilaginous tissue produced by HACs was evaluated in vivo by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice. Our results showed that perfusion improved the distribution and quality of cartilaginous matrix deposited within the sponges, compared to static conditions. Specifically, dynamic culture in the OPB, in combination with the BIT cocktail, resulted in the homogeneous production of extracellular matrix rich in type II collagen. Remarkably, the production of type I collagen, a marker of fibrous tissues, was also inhibited, indicating that the association of the OPB with the BIT cocktail limits fibrocartilage formation, favoring the reconstruction of hyaline cartilage. PMID:27584727

  11. Is It Complete Left Bundle Branch Block? Just Ablate the Right Bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hussam; Lupo, Pierpaolo; Foresti, Sara; De Ambroggi, Guido; Epicoco, Gianluca; Fundaliotis, Angelica; Cappato, Riccardo

    2017-03-01

    Complete left bundle branch block (LBBB) is established according to standard electrocardiographic criteria. However, functional LBBB may be rate-dependent or can perpetuate during tachycardia due to repetitive concealed retrograde penetration of impulses through the contralateral bundle "linking phenomenon." In this brief article, we present two patients with basal complete LBBB in whom ablating the right bundle unmasked the actual antegrade conduction capabilities of the left bundle. These cases highlight intriguing overlap between electrophysiological concepts of complete block, linking, extremely slow, and concealed conduction.

  12. Collagenous gastritis: Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenya Kamimura; Masaaki Kobayashi; Yuichi Sato; Yutaka Aoyagi; Shuji Terai

    2015-01-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease characterizedby the subepithelial deposition of collagen bandsthicker than 10 μm and the infiltration of inflammatorymononuclear cells in the lamina propria. Collagenouscolitis and collagenous sprue have similar histologicalcharacteristics to collagenous gastritis and are thoughtto be part of the same disease entity. However, whilecollagenous colitis has become more common inthe field of gastroenterology, presenting with clinicalsymptoms of chronic diarrhea in older patients,collagenous gastritis is rare. Since the disease was firstreported in 1989, only 60 cases have been documentedin the English literature. No safe and effective treatmentshave been identified from randomized, controlled trials.Therefore, better understanding of the disease and thereporting of more cases will help to establish diagnosticcriteria and to develop therapeutic strategies. Therefore,here we review the clinical characteristics, endoscopicand histological findings, treatment, and clinical outcomesfrom case reports and case series published to date,and provide a summary of the latest information on thedisease. This information will contribute to improvedknowledge of collagenous gastritis so physicians canrecognize and correctly diagnose the disease, and willhelp to develop a standard therapeutic strategy forfuture clinical trials.

  13. Mechanical properties of collagen fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Wenger, M. P. E.; Bozec, L.; Horton, M. A.; Mesquida, P

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collagen fibers from staggered subfibrils still lacks a universally accepted model. Determining the mechanical properties of single collagen fibrils ( diameter 50 - 200 nm) provides new insights into collagen structure. In this work, the reduced modulus of collagen was measured by nanoindentation using atomic force microscopy. For individual type 1 collagen fibrils from rat tail, the modulus was found to be in the range from 5 GPa to 11.5 GPa ( in air and at room temperature)...

  14. Multiphoton microscopy study of the morphological and quantity changes of collagen and elastic fiber components in keloid disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianxin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Jiang, Xingshan; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zheng, Liqin; Xie, Shusen; Lin, Bifang; Zeng, Haishan

    2011-05-01

    Multiphoton microscopy was used to study the extracellular matrix of keloid at the molecular level without tissue fixation and staining. Direct imaging of collagen and elastin was achieved by second harmonic generation and two-photon excited fluorescence, respectively. The morphology and quantity of collagen and elastin in keloid were characterized and quantitatively analyzed in comparison to normal skin. The study demonstrated that in keloid, collagen content increased in both the upper dermis and the deep dermis, while elastin mostly showed up in the deep dermis and its quantity is higher compared to normal skin. This suggests the possibility that abnormal fibroblasts synthesized an excessive amount of collagen and elastin at the beginning of keloid formation, corresponding to the observed deep dermis, while after a certain time point, the abnormal fibroblast produced mostly collagen, corresponding to the observed upper dermis. The morphology of collagen and elastin in keloid was disrupted and presented different variations. In the deep dermis, elastic fibers showed node structure, while collagen showed obviously regular gaps between adjacent bundles. In the upper dermis, collagen bundles aligned in a preferred direction, while elastin showed as sparse irregular granules. This new molecular information provided fresh insight about the development process of keloid.

  15. Twisted Bundle on Noncommutative Space and U(1) Instanton

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, P M

    2000-01-01

    We study the notion of twisted bundles on noncommutative space. Due to theexistence of projective operators in the algebra of functions on thenoncommutative space, there are twisted bundles with non-constant dimension.The U(1) instanton solution of Nekrasov and Schwarz is such an example. As amathematical motivation for not excluding such bundles, we find gaugetransformations by which a bundle with constant dimension can be equivalent toa bundle with non-constant dimension.

  16. Osseous oral hyaline ring granuloma mimicking a mandible tumor in a child with congenital agenesis of the corpus callosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves-Silva, Rodrigo; Ferreira-Gomes, Camilla-Borges; Palmier, Natalia; Brum-Corrêa, Marcelo; Paes-Almeida, Oslei; Ajudarte-Lopes, Marcio; Agustin-Vargas, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Background Hyaline ring granuloma (HRG) of the oral cavity is an uncommon disorder considered to be a foreign-body reaction resulting from implantation of food vegetable particles. Microscopically, it is characterized by the presence of structures of hyaline rings in an inflamed fibrous tissue background, which contains multinucleated giant cells. Material and Methods We present the case of a 4-year-old boy diagnosed with a mandible osseous HRG, which showed clinical and tomographic aspects suggestive of an aggressive bone tumor. Results The patient underwent surgical exploration and histopathologic analysis showed fragments composed predominantly of widespread dense connective tissue with an acute and chronic inflammatory infiltrate containing multinucleated giant cells and scattered areas of eosinophilic material associated with hyaline rings, strongly suggestive of vegetable particles. The eosinophilic material was positive for periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and resistant to diastase digestion. These features led to diagnosis of osseous HRG. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed for illustrative purposes and the multiple structures resembling vegetable particles were characterized in more detail. Conclusions Although rare, this case highlights the importance of the clinician’s awareness regarding the existence of an osseous counterpart of HRG. Key words:Agenesis of the corpus callosum, child, hyaline ring granuloma, intraosseous, mandible, pulse granuloma. PMID:28210458

  17. Fibrous cartilage of human menisci is less shock-absorbing and energy-dissipating than hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaugler, Mario; Wirz, Dieter; Ronken, Sarah; Hafner, Mirjam; Göpfert, Beat; Friederich, Niklaus F; Elke, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    To test meniscal mechanical properties such as the dynamic modulus of elasticity E* and the loss angle δ at two loading frequencies ω at different locations of the menisci and compare it to E* and δ of hyaline cartilage in indentation mode with spherical indenters. On nine pairs of human menisci, the dynamic E*-modulus and loss angle δ (as a measure of the energy dissipation) were determined. The measurements were performed at two different strain rates (slow sinusoidal and fast single impact) to show the strain rate dependence of the material. The measurements were compared to previous similar measurements with the same equipment on human hyaline cartilage. The resultant E* at fast indentation (median 1.16 MPa) was significantly higher, and the loss angle was significantly lower (median 10.2°) compared to slow-loading mode's E* and δ (median 0.18 MPa and 16.9°, respectively). Further, significant differences for different locations are shown. On the medial meniscus, the anterior horn shows the highest resultant dynamic modulus. In dynamic measurements with a spherical indenter, the menisci are much softer and less energy-dissipating than hyaline cartilage. Further, the menisci are stiffer and less energy-dissipating in the middle, intermediate part compared to the meniscal base. In compression, the energy dissipation of meniscus cartilage plays a minor role compared to hyaline cartilage. At high impacts, energy dissipation is less than on low impacts, similar to cartilage.

  18. Heterogeneous force network in 3D cellularized collagen networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher; Chen, Shaohua; Sun, Bo; Jiao, Yang

    2016-12-01

    Collagen networks play an important role in coordinating and regulating collective cellular dynamics via a number of signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the transmission of forces generated by contractile cells in 3D collagen-I networks. Specifically, the graph (bond-node) representations of collagen networks with collagen concentrations of 1, 2 and 4 mg ml-1 are derived from confocal microscopy data and used to model the network microstructure. Cell contraction is modeled by applying correlated displacements at specific nodes of the network, representing the focal adhesion sites. A nonlinear elastic model is employed to characterize the mechanical behavior of individual fiber bundles including strain hardening during stretching and buckling under compression. A force-based relaxation method is employed to obtain equilibrium network configurations under cell contraction. We find that for all collagen concentrations, the majority of the forces are carried by a small number of heterogeneous force chains emitted from the contracting cells, which is qualitatively consistent with our experimental observations. The force chains consist of fiber segments that either possess a high degree of alignment before cell contraction or are aligned due to fiber reorientation induced by cell contraction. The decay of the forces along the force chains is significantly slower than the decay of radially averaged forces in the system, suggesting that the fibreous nature of biopolymer network structure can support long-range force transmission. The force chains emerge even at very small cell contractions, and the number of force chains increases with increasing cell contraction. At large cell contractions, the fibers close to the cell surface are in the nonlinear regime, and the nonlinear region is localized in a small neighborhood of the cell. In addition, the number of force chains increases with increasing collagen concentration, due to the larger number of focal adhesion sites

  19. LWR nuclear fuel bundle data for use in fuel bundle handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weihermiller, W.B.; Allison, G.S.

    1979-09-01

    Although increasing numbers of spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel bundles are moved into storage, no handling equipment is set up to manipulate all of the various types of fuel bundles. This report summarizes fuel bundle information of interest to the designer of such handling equipment. Dimensional descriptions are included with discussions of assembly procedure and manufacturer provisions for handling equipment. No attempt is made to make a complete compilation of dimensional information; the number of fuel bundle designs and design revisions makes it impractical. Because the fuel bundle designs are so varied, any equipment intended for handling all types of bundles will have to be designed with flexibility in mind. Besides the ability to manipulate fuel bundles in space, handling equipment may be required to locate an external surface or to position a cutting operation to avoid breaking a fuel rod pressure boundary. Even with the most sophisticated and flexible handling equipment, some situations will require use of the manufacturers' as-built descriptions of individual fuel bundles.

  20. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN DIFFERENT EXPRESSION ANDORGANIZATION OF COLLAGEN IN SKIN WOUNDS OFADULT AND FETAL RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To observe the spatial and temporal distribution of collagen in fetal and adult rats wounds. Methods The organization of collagen deposition in fetal and adult rats skin wounds were observed by using van Gieson stain. The methods of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were applied to examine collagen type I and Ⅲ peptide and mRNA localization at serial time point during wound healing. Results Collagen type I and III were present in wounds of both fetal and adult rats, but the timing and pattern of collagen deposition varied. In the fetus, collagen was detected by 48h postwounding (PW), but was not present in the adult wounds until 5d PW. By in situ hybridization, signals in the area of the fetal wound were clearly greater and with increased number of cells as compared to that in the adjacent unwounded tissue. Adult rat wounds had evidence in increased signals of procollagen type Ⅰ and Ⅲ production by wound fibroblasts on day 5. Collagen deposited and was arranged in reticular pattern as that of the normal in fetal wounds. While in the adult wounds, collagen de posited in the fashion of coarse bundles. Conclusion Fetal rat wounds appeared to produce collagen mainly by an increased number of fibroblasts in the area of the wound. In contrast, adult rat wounds underwent fibroblast migration and induction of procollagen mRNA synthesis. Our results suggest that the deposition of collagen type Ⅰ and Ⅲ is regulated by their gene expres sion. Collagen type Ⅲ plays an important role in the arrangement of collagen deposition.

  1. Hyaline Tintinnina (Protozoa-Ciliophora-Oligotrichida from northeast Brazilian coastal reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Sassi

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven species of hyaline Tintinnina were obtained from plankton samples collected near the coastal reefs of Ponta do Seixas (Lat. 7º09'16"S, Long. 34º4735"W, Northeastern Brazil, from April 1981 to May 1982 and from April 1983 to May 1984: Amphorellopsis acuta (Schmidt, 1901, Dadayiella ganymedes (Entz Sr., 1884, Epiplocyloides reticulata (Ostenfeld & Schmidt, 1901, Eutintinnus tubulosus (Ostenfeld, 1899, Favella ehrenbergi (Claparède & Lachmann, 1858, Metacylis mereschkowskyi Kofoid & Campbell, 1929 and M. perspicax (Hada, 1938. The most frequent and abundant species were M. mereschkowskyi and F. ehrenbergi. Except/.ganymedes, E. reticulata and F. ehrenbergi all species are new records from Brazil. Metacylis perspicax is also the seventh world register. For all species we provide description, drawings, measurements, seasonal occurrence, world distribution and some systematic comments.

  2. The histology of retinal nerve fiber layer bundles and bundle defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1979-05-01

    The fiber bundle striations recognized clinically in normal monkey eyes appear to be bundles of axons compartmentalized within glial tunnels formed by Müller's-cell processes, when viewed histologically. The dark boundaries that separate individual bundles are the broadened foot endings of these cells near the inner surface of the retina. Within one week after focal retinal photocoagulation, characteristic fundus changes could be seen in experimental eyes. In histologic sections of the involved retina, there was marked cystic degeneration of the retinal nerve fiber layer. Within one month, atrophy of distal axon segments was complete. With the drop-out of damaged axons and thinning of individual fiber bundles, retinal striations became less prominent. The resulting fundus picture in these experimental eyes is similar to fiber bundle defects that can be seen clinically in various neuro-ophthalmic disorders.

  3. Changes of cerebral hemodynamics following the administration of surfactant in the hyaline membrane disease of prematurity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kyung Hee [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-15

    To evaluate the changes of cerebral blood flow velocity according to the time, before and after surfactant administration in hyaline membrane disease using Doppler ultrasonography. The patients were 15 premature babies who were clinically and radiologically diagnosed HMD. The ratio of male : female was 11:4, the mean gestational age was 30.1 {+-} 2.5 wks, mean body weight was 1.4 {+-} 0.6 kg,mean Apgar score at 5 min was 6.28, and type of delivery was C-section : vaginal delivery 9.6. Before and after, 10 mm, 30 min, 1 hr, 6 hr, 12 hr, 1 day, 3 day, 5 day and 7 day after surfactant administration, peak systolic and end-diastolic cerebral blood flow velocity (PSFV, EDFV) and resistive index (RI) were estimated by Doppler ultrasonography measuring MCA flow velocity using temporal window. The averages of all data according to the time were obtained and analyzed statistical significance. For the evaluation of the clinical status systemic BP, FiO2, pH, and respiratory rate were also checked according to the same time. The clinical status of FiO2, metabolic acidosis, and tachypnea was significantly improved after surfactant administration. There was no significant change of cerebral blood flow velocity (PSFV, EDFV) after the surfactant administration. The change of RI was nor statistically significant. The changes of the systemic BP had no significant changes. In spite of clinical improvement, there were no significant increases of cerebral blood flow velocity and changes of RI after surfactant administration in hyaline membrane disease.

  4. [Biomechanical properties (compressive strength and compressive pressure at break) of hyaline cartilage under axial load].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, G; Wittig, R

    2003-01-01

    Explanations concerning the physical properties of hyaline cartilage are different. It was the intention of this study to determine the material parameters of hyaline cartilage under axial load (elasticity, plasticity, elasticity and module pressure stress to break). Specimens from the medial femoral condyle (chondro-cortical ships) from adult female domestic pigs (n=28) were used for the experiments. The specimens were completely embedded in plaster to minimize shearing. Axial load was carried out by an universal mechanical testing machine (Zwick Z2.5/TS1S, Ulm, Germany) to determine elastic and plastic deformation and pressure stress to break. Axial load up to 5 MPa produces an almost elastic deformation, an increasing axial load results in a plastic deformation. In the range of 3 to 5 MPa the principle of Hooke is valid. The elasticity module amounted to 39.2 +/- 11.9 N/mm(2), determined under 3.8 MPa axial load. An axial load of 25.8 +/- 5.2 MPa (sigma max ) causes a break of cartilage. A strong correlation between break resistance and thickness of the chondral slice (r=0.71; p .05) was observed. The low module of chondral elasticity characterizes this tissue as "soft". Moderate axial load causes an ideal elastic, higher axial load a plastic deformation. The medium pressure to break to amounted 25.8 MPa. The medium pressure to break of 25.8 MPa is comparable with the forces produced by an unrestrained limited downfall from a height of 4.3 m. It must be concluded that isolated chondral fractures are rare consequences of a trauma as long as accompanying ligamentous or osseous damages are not found.

  5. Ultrasonography shows disappearance of monosodium urate crystal deposition on hyaline cartilage after sustained normouricemia is achieved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Ralf G; Schlesinger, Naomi

    2010-02-01

    This study aimed at determining whether lowering serum urate (SU) to less than 6 mg/dl in patients with gout affects ultrasonographic findings. Seven joints in five patients with monosodium urate (MSU) crystal proven gout and hyperuricemia were examined over time with serial ultrasonography. Four of the five patients were treated with urate lowering drugs (ULDs) (allopurinol, n = 3; probenecid, n = 1). One patient was treated with colchicine alone. Attention was given to changes in a hyperechoic, irregular coating of the hyaline cartilage in the examined joints (double contour sign or "urate icing"). This coating was considered to represent precipitate of MSU crystals. Index joints included metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints (n = 2), knee joints (n = 3), and first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints (n = 2). The interval between baseline and follow-up images ranged from 7 to 18 months. Serial SU levels were obtained during the follow-up period. During the follow-up period, three patients treated with ULD (allopurinol, n = 2; probenecid, n = 1) achieved a SU level of or =7 mg/dl. In one patient treated with allopurinol, SU levels improved from 13 to 7 mg/dl during the follow-up period. Decrease, but not resolution of the hyperechoic coating was seen in this patient. In the patient treated with colchicine alone, SU levels remained >8 mg/dl, and no sonographic change was observed. In our patients, sonographic signs of deposition of MSU crystals on the surface of hyaline cartilage disappeared completely if sustained normouricemia was achieved. This is the first report showing that characteristic sonographic changes are influenced by ULDs once SU levels remain < or =6 mg/dl for 7 months or more. Sonographic changes of gout correlate with SU levels and may be a non-invasive means to track changes in the uric acid pool. Larger prospective studies are needed to further assess these potentially important findings.

  6. Diversity in the organization of elastin bundles and intramembranous muscles in bat wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Jorn A; Allen, Justine J; Swartz, Sharon M

    2017-04-01

    Unlike birds and insects, bats fly with wings composed of thin skin that envelops the bones of the forelimb and spans the area between the limbs, digits, and sometimes the tail. This skin is complex and unusual; it is thinner than typical mammalian skin and contains organized bundles of elastin and embedded skeletal muscles. These elements are likely responsible for controlling the shape of the wing during flight and contributing to the aerodynamic capabilities of bats. We examined the arrangement of two macroscopic architectural elements in bat wings, elastin bundles and wing membrane muscles, to assess the diversity in bat wing skin morphology. We characterized the plagiopatagium and dactylopatagium of 130 species from 17 families of bats using cross-polarized light imaging. This method revealed structures with distinctive relative birefringence, heterogeneity of birefringence, variation in size, and degree of branching. We used previously published anatomical studies and tissue histology to identify birefringent structures, and we analyzed their architecture across taxa. Elastin bundles, muscles, neurovasculature, and collagenous fibers are present in all species. Elastin bundles are oriented in a predominantly spanwise or proximodistal direction, and there are five characteristic muscle arrays that occur within the plagiopatagium, far more muscle than typically recognized. These results inform recent functional studies of wing membrane architecture, support the functional hypothesis that elastin bundles aid wing folding and unfolding, and further suggest that all bats may use these architectural elements for flight. All species also possess numerous muscles within the wing membrane, but the architecture of muscle arrays within the plagiopatagium varies among families. To facilitate present and future discussion of these muscle arrays, we refine wing membrane muscle nomenclature in a manner that reflects this morphological diversity. The architecture of the

  7. Versatile wedge-based system for the construction of unidirectional collagen scaffolds by directional freezing: practical and theoretical considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot, M.W.; Faraj, K.A.; Adawy, A.; Enckevort, W.J.P. van; Moerkerk, H.T. van; Vlieg, E.; Daamen, W.F.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van

    2015-01-01

    Aligned unidirectional collagen scaffolds may aid regeneration of those tissues where alignment of cells and extracellular matrix is essential, as for instance in cartilage, nerve bundles, and skeletal muscle. Pores can be introduced by ice crystal formation followed by freeze-drying, the pore archi

  8. Collagen metabolism in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M H; Jensen, L T; Andersen, T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of obesity, fat distribution and weight loss on collagen turnover using serum concentrations of the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (S-PICP) and the aminoterminal propeptide of type III pro-collagen (S-PIIINP) as markers for collagen turnover...... (r = 0.37; P = 0.004), height (r = 0.27; P = 0.04), waist circumference (r = 0.35; P = 0.007), as well as with WHR (r = 0.33; P = 0.01) and was inversely correlated to age (r = -0.40; P = 0.002). Compared with randomly selected controls from a large pool of healthy volunteers, the obese patients had...... restriction (P obesity and associated with body fat distribution, suggesting...

  9. Cells that emerge from embryonic explants produce fibers of type IV collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J M; Little, C D

    1985-10-01

    Double immunofluorescence staining experiments designed to examine the synthesis and deposition of collagen types I and IV in cultured explants of embryonic mouse lung revealed the presence of connective tissue-like fibers that were immunoreactive with anti-type IV collagen antibodies. This observation is contrary to the widely accepted belief that type IV collagen is found only in sheet-like arrangements beneath epithelia or as a sheath-like layer enveloping bundles of nerve or muscle cells. The extracellular matrix produced by cells that migrate from embryonic mouse lung rudiments in vitro was examined by double indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Affinity-purified monospecific polyclonal antibodies were used to examine cells after growth on glass or native collagen substrata. The data show that embryonic mesenchymal cells can produce organized fibers of type IV collagen that are not contained within a basement membrane, and that embryonic epithelial cells deposit fibers and strands of type IV collagen beneath their basal surface when grown on glass; however, when grown on a rat tail collagen substratum the epithelial cells produce a fine meshwork. To our knowledge this work represents the first report that type IV collagen can be organized by cells into a fibrous extracellular matrix that is not a basement membrane.

  10. Collagen Homeostasis and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, S Peter; Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system and its collagen rich tissue is important for ensuring architecture of skeletal muscle, energy storage in tendon and ligaments, joint surface protection, and for ensuring the transfer of muscular forces into resulting limb movement. Structure of tendon is stable...... inactivity or immobilization of the human body will conversely result in a dramatic loss in tendon stiffness and collagen synthesis. This illustrates the importance of regular mechanical load in order to preserve the stabilizing role of the connective tissue for the overall function of the musculoskeletal...

  11. Transplantation of autologous endothelial progenitor cells in porous PLGA scaffolds create a microenvironment for the regeneration of hyaline cartilage in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, N-J; Lam, C-F; Lin, C-C; Chen, W-L; Li, C-F; Lin, Y-T; Yeh, M-L

    2013-10-01

    Repairing articular cartilage is clinically challenging. We investigated a simple, effective and clinically feasible cell-based therapeutic approach using a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffold seeded with autologous endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to repair a full-thickness osteochondral defect in rabbits using a one-step surgery. EPC obtained by purifying a small amount of peripheral blood from rabbits were seeded into a highly porous, biocompatible PLGA scaffold, namely, EPC-PLGA, and implanted into the osteochondral defect in the medial femoral condyle. Twenty two rabbits were randomized into one of three groups: the empty defect group (ED), the PLGA-only group or the EPC-PLGA group. The defect sites were evaluated 4 and 12 weeks after implantation. At the end of testing, only the EPC-PLGA group showed the development of new cartilage tissue with a smooth, transparent and integrated articular surface. Moreover, histological analysis showed obvious differences in cartilage regeneration. At week 4, the EPC-PLGA group showed considerably higher TGF-β2 and TGF-β3 expression, a greater amount of synthesized glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, and a higher degree of osteochondral angiogenesis in repaired tissues. At week 12, the EPC-PLGA group showed enhanced hyaline cartilage regeneration with a normal columnar chondrocyte arrangement, higher SOX9 expression, and greater GAG and collagen type II (COLII) content. Moreover, the EPC-PLGA group showed organized osteochondral integration, the formation of vessel-rich tubercular bone and significantly higher bone volume per tissue volume and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th). The present EPC-PLGA cell delivery system generates a suitable in situ microenvironment for osteochondral regeneration without the supplement of exogenous growth factors. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Induction of spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration using a double-network gel: efficacy of a novel therapeutic strategy for an articular cartilage defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Nobuto; Yasuda, Kazunori; Ogawa, Munehiro; Arakaki, Kazunobu; Kai, Shuken; Onodera, Shin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Gong, Jian Ping

    2011-06-01

    A double-network (DN) gel, which was composed of poly-(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) and poly-(N,N'-dimetyl acrylamide) (PAMPS/PDMAAm), has the potential to induce chondrogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. To establish the efficacy of a therapeutic strategy for an articular cartilage defect using a DN gel. Controlled laboratory study. A 4.3-mm-diameter osteochondral defect was created in rabbit trochlea. A DN gel plug was implanted into the defect of the right knee so that a defect 2 mm in depth remained after surgery. An untreated defect of the left knee provided control data. The osteochondral defects created were examined by histological and immunohistochemical evaluations, surface assessment using confocal laser scanning microscopy, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis at 4 and 12 weeks. Samples were quantitatively evaluated with 2 scoring systems reported by Wayne et al and O'Driscoll et al. The DN gel-implanted defect was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type 2 collagen. Quantitative evaluation using the grading scales revealed a significantly higher score in the DN gel-implanted defects compared with the untreated control at each period (P cartilage at 12 weeks (P = .0106), while there was no statistical difference between the DN gel-implanted and normal knees. This study using the mature rabbit femoral trochlea osteochondral defect model demonstrated that DN gel implantation is an effective treatment to induce cartilage regeneration in vivo without any cultured cells or mammalian-derived scaffolds. This study has prompted us to develop a potential innovative strategy to repair cartilage lesions in the field of joint surgery.

  13. Tangent bundle formulation of a charged gas

    CERN Document Server

    Sarbach, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the relativistic kinetic theory for a simple, collisionless, charged gas propagating on an arbitrary curved spacetime geometry. Our general relativistic treatment is formulated on the tangent bundle of the spacetime manifold and takes advantage of its rich geometric structure. In particular, we point out the existence of a natural metric on the tangent bundle and illustrate its role for the development of the relativistic kinetic theory. This metric, combined with the electromagnetic field of the spacetime, yields an appropriate symplectic form on the tangent bundle. The Liouville vector field arises as the Hamiltonian vector field of a natural Hamiltonian. The latter also defines natural energy surfaces, called mass shells, which turn out to be smooth Lorentzian submanifolds. A simple, collisionless, charged gas is described by a distribution function which is defined on the mass shell and satisfies the Liouville equation. Suitable fibre integrals of the distribution function define observable fie...

  14. In silico modeling of the rheological properties of covalently crosslinked collagen triple helices

    CERN Document Server

    Head, David A; Russell, Stephen J; Wood, David J

    2016-01-01

    Biomimetic hydrogels based on natural polymers are a promising class of biomaterial, mimicking the natural extra-cellular matrix of biological tissues and providing cues for cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. With a view to providing an upstream method to guide subsequent experimental design, the aim of this study was to introduce a mathematical model that described the rheological properties of a hydrogel system based on covalently crosslinked collagen triple helices. In light of their organization, such gels exhibit limited collagen bundling that cannot be described by existing fibril network models. The model presented here treats collagen triple helices as discrete semi-flexible polymers, permits full access to metrics for network microstructure, and should provide a comprehensive understanding of the parameter space associated with the development of such multi-functional materials. Triple helical hydrogel networks were experimentally obtained via reaction of type I collagen with both ar...

  15. Use of Mueller matrix colposcopy in the characterization of cervical collagen anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montejo, Karla A.; Chue-Sang, Joseph; Bai, Yuqiang; Stoff, Susan; Holness, Nola; Gonzalez, Mariacarla; Gomes, Jefferson; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Chernomordik, Viktor V.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2017-02-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) presents a serious medical heath concern in both economically developed and developing nations, with incidence rate from 15%-11% respectively. Changes in cervical collagen bundle orientation and distribution may prove to be a predictor of PTB. Polarization imaging is an effective means to measure optical anisotropy in birefringent biological tissue such as those rich in collagen. Non-invasive, full-field Mueller Matrix polarimetry (MMP) imaging methodologies, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy were used to assess cervical collagen content and structure in non-pregnant cervices. In vivo studies using a Mueller Matrix colposcope are underway. Further studies of cervical collagen orientation throughout pregnancy are needed to understand if Mueller matrix polarimetry can effectively identify at-risk conditions for PTB.

  16. Classical Higgs fields on gauge gluon bundles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palese Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical Higgs fields and related canonical conserved quantities are defined by invariant variational problems on suitably defined gauge gluon bundles. We consider Lagrangian field theories which are assumed to be invariant with respect to the action of a gauge-natural group. As an illustrative example we exploit the ‘gluon Lagrangian’, i.e. a Yang-Mills Lagrangian on the (1, 1-order gauge-natural bundle of SU(3-principal connections. The kernel of the gauge-natural Jacobi morphism for such a Lagrangian, by inducing a reductive split structure, canonically defines a ‘gluon classical Higgs field’.

  17. Abelian conformal field theory and determinant bundles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Ueno, K.

    2007-01-01

    Following [10], we study a so-called bc-ghost system of zero conformal dimension from the viewpoint of [14, 16]. We show that the ghost vacua construction results in holomorphic line bundles with connections over holomorphic families of curves. We prove that the curvature of these connections...... are up to a scale the same as the curvature of the connections constructed in [14, 16]. We study the sewing construction for nodal curves and its explicit relation to the constructed connections. Finally we construct preferred holomorphic sections of these line bundles and analyze their behaviour near...

  18. [The genetics of collagen diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, J; Maroteaux, P; Frezal, J

    1986-01-01

    Heritable disorders of collagen include Ehler-Danlos syndromes (11 types are actually known), Larsen syndrome and osteogenesis imperfecta. Their clinical, genetic and biochemical features are reviewed. Marfan syndrome is closely related to heritable disorders of collagen.

  19. Collagen turnover after tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joerring, S; Krogsgaard, M; Wilbek, H

    1994-01-01

    Collagen turnover after tibial fractures was examined in 16 patients with fracture of the tibial diaphysis and in 8 patients with fracture in the tibial condyle area by measuring sequential changes in serological markers of turnover of types I and III collagen for up to 26 weeks after fracture...... collagen. A group comparison showed characteristic sequential changes in the turnover of types I and III collagen in fractures of the tibial diaphysis and tibial condyles. The turnover of type III collagen reached a maximum after 2 weeks in both groups. The synthesis of type I collagen reached a maximum...... after 2 weeks in the diaphyseal fractures and after 6 weeks in the condylar fractures. The degradation of type I collagen increased after 4 days and reached a maximum at 2 weeks in both groups. The interindividual variation was wide. On a group basis, the turnover of types I and III collagen had...

  20. Balance Ability and Proprioception after Single-Bundle, Single-Bundle Augmentation, and Double-Bundle ACL Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubao Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The present study sought to determine the influences of single-bundle (SB, single-bundle augmentation (SBA, and double-bundle (DB reconstructions on balance ability and proprioceptive function. Methods. 67 patients who underwent a single- or double-bundle ACL reconstruction or a SBA using multistranded autologous hamstring tendons were included in this study with a 1-year follow-up. Body sway and knee kinesthesia (using the threshold to detect passive motion test (TTDPM were measured to indicate balance ability and proprioceptive function, respectively. Additionally, within-subject differences in anterior-posterior stability of the tibia and lower extremity muscle strength were evaluated before and after surgery. Results. At 6 and 12 months after surgery, DB reconstruction resulted in better balance and proprioceptive function than SB reconstruction (P<0.05. Although no significant difference was observed in balance ability or proprioceptive function between the SBA and DB reconstructions, knee stability was significantly better with SBA and DB reconstructions than SB reconstruction (P<0.05. No significant differences were found in quadriceps and hamstrings strength among the three reconstruction techniques. Conclusions. Our findings consider that joint stability, proprioceptive function, and balance ability were superior with SBA and DB reconstructions compared to SB reconstruction at 6 and 12 months after surgery.

  1. Influence of chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid on structure, mechanical properties, and glioma invasion of collagen I gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-li; Sun, Charles; Wilhelm, Matthew E; Fox, Laura J; Zhu, Jieling; Kaufman, Laura J

    2011-11-01

    To mimic the extracellular matrix surrounding high grade gliomas, composite matrices composed of either acid-solubilized (AS) or pepsin-treated (PT) collagen and the glycosaminoglycans chondroitin sulfate (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA) are prepared and characterized. The structure and mechanical properties of collagen/CS and collagen/HA gels are studied via confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) and rheology. CRM reveals that CS induces fibril bundling and increased mesh size in AS collagen but not PT collagen networks. The presence of CS also induces more substantial changes in the storage and loss moduli of AS gels than of PT gels, in accordance with expectation based on network structural parameters. The presence of HA significantly reduces mesh size in AS collagen but has a smaller effect on PT collagen networks. However, both AS and PT collagen network viscoelasticity is strongly affected by the presence of HA. The effects of CS and HA on glioma invasion is then studied in collagen/GAG matrices with network structure both similar to (PT collagen-based gels) and disparate from (AS collagen-based gels) those of the corresponding pure collagen matrices. It is shown that CS inhibits and HA has no significant effect on glioma invasion in 1.0 mg/ml collagen matrices over 3 days. The inhibitory effect of CS on glioma invasion is more apparent in AS than in PT collagen gels, suggesting invasive behavior in these environments is affected by both biochemical and network morphological changes induced by GAGs. This study is among the few efforts to differentiate structural, mechanical and biochemical effects of changes to matrix composition on cell motility in 3D.

  2. Collagen hydrolysate based collagen/hydroxyapatite composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficai, Anton; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Birsan, Mihaela; Sonmez, Maria; Ficai, Denisa; Trandafir, Viorica; Andronescu, Ecaterina

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to study the influence of collagen hydrolysate (HAS) on the formation of ternary collagen-hydrolysate/hydroxyapatite composite materials (COLL-HAS/HA). During the precipitation process of HA, a large amount of brushite is resulted at pH = 7 but, practically pure HA is obtained at pH ⩾ 8. The FTIR data reveal the duplication of the most important collagen absorption bands due to the presence of the collagen hydrolysate. The presence of collagen hydrolysate is beneficial for the management of bone and joint disorders such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis.

  3. Computations in intersection rings of flag bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Grayson, Daniel R; Stillman, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Intersection rings of flag varieties and of isotropic flag varieties are generated by Chern classes of the tautological bundles modulo the relations coming from multiplicativity of total Chern classes. In this paper we describe the Groebner bases of the ideals of relations and give applications to computation of intersections, as implemented in Macaulay2.

  4. Capacity efficiency of recovery request bundling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Dittmann, Lars; Berger, Michael Stübert

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of recovery methods in terms of capacity efficiency. In particular, a method where recovery requests are bundled towards the destination (Shortcut Span Protection) is evaluated against traditional recovery methods. Our simulation results show that Shortcut Span...... Protection uses more capacity than the unbundled related methods, but this is compensated by easier control and management of the recovery actions....

  5. η-Invariant and Flat Vector Bundles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We present an alternate definition of the mod Z component of the AtiyahPatodi-Singer η invariant associated to (not necessary unitary) fiat vector bundles, which identifies explicitly its real and imaginary parts. This is done by combining a deformation of flat connections introduced in a previous paper with the analytic continuation procedure appearing in the original article of Atiyah, Parodi and Singer.

  6. Lazarsfeld-Mukai bundles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Aprodu, Marian

    2012-01-01

    We survey the development of the notion of Lazarsfeld-Mukai bundles together with various applications, from the classification of Mukai manifolds to Brill-Noether theory and syzygies of $K3$ sections. To see these techniques at work, we present a short proof of a result of M. Reid on the existence of elliptic pencils.

  7. Meromorphic Higgs bundles And Related Geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Dalakov, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The present note is mostly a survey on the generalised Hitchin integrable system and moduli spaces of meromorphic Higgs bundles. We also fill minor gaps in the existing literature, outline a calculation of the infinitesimal period map and review briefly some related geometries.

  8. Meromorphic Higgs bundles and related geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakov, Peter

    2016-11-01

    The present note is mostly a survey on the generalised Hitchin integrable system and moduli spaces of meromorphic G-Higgs bundles. We also fill minor gaps in the existing literature, outline a calculation of the infinitesimal period map and review some related geometries.

  9. The Hodge bundle on Hurwitz spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geer, G.; Kouvidakis, A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009 Kokotov, Korotkin and Zograf gave in [7] a formula for the class of the Hodge bundle on the Hurwitz space of admissible covers of genus g and degree d of the projective line. They gave an analytic proof of it. In this note we give an algebraic proof and an extension of the result.

  10. Capacity efficiency of recovery request bundling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Dittmann, Lars; Berger, Michael Stübert

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of recovery methods in terms of capacity efficiency. In particular, a method where recovery requests are bundled towards the destination (Shortcut Span Protection) is evaluated against traditional recovery methods. Our simulation results show that Shortcut Span...

  11. Active Hair-Bundle Motility by the Vertebrate Hair Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinevez, J.-Y.; Martin, P.; Jülicher, F.

    2009-02-01

    The hair bundle is both a mechano-sensory antenna and a force generator that might help the vertebrate hair cell from the inner ear to amplify its responsiveness to small stimuli. To study active hair-bundle motility, we combined calcium iontophoresis with mechanical stimulation of single hair bundles from the bullfrog's sacculus. A hair bundle could oscillate spontaneously, or be quiescent but display non-monotonic movements in response to abrupt force steps. Extracellular calcium changes or static biases to the bundle's position at rest could affect the kinetics of bundle motion and evoke transitions between the different classes of motility. The calcium-dependent location of a bundle's operating point within its nonlinear force-displacement relation controlled the type of movements observed. A unified theoretical description, in which mechanical activity stems from myosin-based adaptation and electro-mechanical feedback by Ca2+, could account for the fast and slow manifestations of active hair-bundle motility.

  12. Influence of Structure and Composition on Dynamic Viscoelastic Property of Cartilaginous Tissue: Criteria for Classification between Hyaline Cartilage and Fibrocartilage Based on Mechanical Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Shogo; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Furukawa, Katsuko; Ushida, Takashi

    Recently, many types of methodologies have been developed to regenerate articular cartilage. It is important to assess whether the reconstructed cartilaginous tissue has the appropriate mechanical functions to qualify as hyaline (articular) cartilage. In some cases, the reconstructed tissue may become fibrocartilage and not hyaline cartilage. In this study, we determined the dynamic viscoelastic properties of these two types of cartilage by using compression and shear tests, respectively. Hyaline cartilage specimens were harvested from the articular surface of bovine knee joints and fibrocartilage specimens were harvested from the meniscus tissue of the same. The results of this study revealed that the compressive energy dissipation of hyaline cartilage showed a strong dependence on testing frequency at low frequencies, while that of fibrocartilage did not. Therefore, the compressive energy dissipation that is indicated by the loss tangent could become the criterion for the in vitro assessment of the mechanical function of regenerated cartilage.

  13. Spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle using a novel double-network hydrogel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yokota, Masashi; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kitamura, Nobuto; Arakaki, Kazunobu; Onodera, Shin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2011-01-01

    .... The purpose is to clarify whether the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in a large osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting a novel double-network (DN...

  14. Microstructural and compositional features of the fibrous and hyaline cartilage on the medial tibial plateau imply a unique role for the hopping locomotion of kangaroo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    He, Bo; Wu, Jian Ping; Xu, Jiake; Day, Robert E; Kirk, Thomas Brett

    2013-01-01

    .... However, the influences of the microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of the central fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage on the function of the knee joints are still to be defined...

  15. Species-Independent Modeling of High-Frequency Ultrasound Backscatter in Hyaline Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Männicke, Nils; Schöne, Martin; Liukkonen, Jukka; Fachet, Dominik; Inkinen, Satu; Malo, Markus K; Oelze, Michael L; Töyräs, Juha; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Raum, Kay

    2016-06-01

    Apparent integrated backscatter (AIB) is a common ultrasound parameter used to assess cartilage matrix degeneration. However, the specific contributions of chondrocytes, proteoglycan and collagen to AIB remain unknown. To reveal these relationships, this work examined biopsies and cross sections of human, ovine and bovine cartilage with 40-MHz ultrasound biomicroscopy. Site-matched estimates of collagen concentration, proteoglycan concentration, collagen orientation and cell number density were employed in quasi-least-squares linear regression analyses to model AIB. A positive correlation (R(2) = 0.51, p 70°) to the sound beam direction. These findings indicate causal relationships between AIB and cartilage structural parameters and could aid in more sophisticated future interpretations of ultrasound backscatter. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. LUSTERNIK-S CHNIRELMANN CATEGORY AND EMBEDDING FINITE COVERING MAPS, PRINCIPAL G-BUNDLES INTO BUNDLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIULUOFEI

    1996-01-01

    The author proves several embedding theorems for finite covering maps,principal G-bundies into bundles.The main results are 1. Let π:E→X be a finite covering map, and X a connected locally path-connected paracompact space. If cat X≤k, then the finite covering space π:E→X can be embedded into the trivial real k-plane bundle. 2. Let π:E→X be a principal G-bundle over a paracompact space. If there exists a linera action of Gon F(F=R or C)and cat X≤k ,then π:E→X can be embedded into ξ1 … ξn for any F-vector bundles ξi,i=1,…k.

  17. Adipose stem cells can secrete angiogenic factors that inhibit hyaline cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher Sd; Burnsed, Olivia A; Raghuram, Vineeth; Kalisvaart, Jonathan; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2012-08-24

    Adipose stem cells (ASCs) secrete many trophic factors that can stimulate tissue repair, including angiogenic factors, but little is known about how ASCs and their secreted factors influence cartilage regeneration. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects ASC-secreted factors have in repairing chondral defects. ASCs isolated from male Sprague Dawley rats were cultured in monolayer or alginate microbeads supplemented with growth (GM) or chondrogenic medium (CM). Subsequent co-culture, conditioned media, and in vivo cartilage defect studies were performed. ASC monolayers and microbeads cultured in CM had decreased FGF-2 gene expression and VEGF-A secretion compared to ASCs cultured in GM. Chondrocytes co-cultured with GM-cultured ASCs for 7 days had decreased mRNAs for col2, comp, and runx2. Chondrocytes treated for 12 or 24 hours with conditioned medium from GM-cultured ASCs had reduced sox9, acan, and col2 mRNAs; reduced proliferation and proteoglycan synthesis; and increased apoptosis. ASC-conditioned medium also increased endothelial cell tube lengthening whereas conditioned medium from CM-cultured ASCs had no effect. Treating ASCs with CM reduced or abolished these deleterious effects while adding a neutralizing antibody for VEGF-A eliminated ASC-conditioned medium induced chondrocyte apoptosis and restored proteoglycan synthesis. FGF-2 also mitigated the deleterious effects VEGF-A had on chondrocyte apoptosis and phenotype. When GM-grown ASC pellets were implanted in 1 mm non-critical hyaline cartilage defects in vivo, cartilage regeneration was inhibited as evaluated by radiographic and equilibrium partitioning of an ionic contrast agent via microCT imaging. Histology revealed that defects with GM-cultured ASCs had no tissue ingrowth from the edges of the defect whereas empty defects and defects with CM-grown ASCs had similar amounts of neocartilage formation. ASCs must be treated to reduce the secretion of VEGF-A and other factors that

  18. Interplanetary Overlay Network Bundle Protocol Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) system's BP package, an implementation of the Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) Bundle Protocol (BP) and supporting services, has been specifically designed to be suitable for use on deep-space robotic vehicles. Although the ION BP implementation is unique in its use of zero-copy objects for high performance, and in its use of resource-sensitive rate control, it is fully interoperable with other implementations of the BP specification (Internet RFC 5050). The ION BP implementation is built using the same software infrastructure that underlies the implementation of the CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) File Delivery Protocol (CFDP) built into the flight software of Deep Impact. It is designed to minimize resource consumption, while maximizing operational robustness. For example, no dynamic allocation of system memory is required. Like all the other ION packages, ION's BP implementation is designed to port readily between Linux and Solaris (for easy development and for ground system operations) and VxWorks (for flight systems operations). The exact same source code is exercised in both environments. Initially included in the ION BP implementations are the following: libraries of functions used in constructing bundle forwarders and convergence-layer (CL) input and output adapters; a simple prototype bundle forwarder and associated CL adapters designed to run over an IPbased local area network; administrative tools for managing a simple DTN infrastructure built from these components; a background daemon process that silently destroys bundles whose time-to-live intervals have expired; a library of functions exposed to applications, enabling them to issue and receive data encapsulated in DTN bundles; and some simple applications that can be used for system checkout and benchmarking.

  19. Bundling Revisited: Substitute Products and Inter-Firm Discounts

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper extends the standard model of bundling to allow products to be substitutes and for products to be supplied by separate sellers. Whether integrated or separate, firms have an incentive to introduce bundling discounts when demand for the bundle is elastic relative to demand for stand-alone products. When products are partial substitutes, this typically gives an integrated firm a greater incentive to offer a bundle discount (relative to the standard model with additive preferences), w...

  20. Holomorphic Vector Bundle on Hopf Manifolds with Abelian Fundamental Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Yu ZHOU; Wei Ming LIU

    2004-01-01

    Let X be a Hopf manifolds with an Abelian fundamental group. E is a holomorphic vector bundle of rank r with trivial pull-back to W = Cn - {0}. We prove the existence of a non-vanishing section of L(×) E for some line bundle on X and study the vector bundles filtration structure of E. These generalize the results of D. Mall about structure theorem of such a vector bundle E.

  1. A cell-free scaffold-based cartilage repair provides improved function hyaline-like repair at one year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siclari, Alberto; Mascaro, Gennaro; Gentili, Chiara; Cancedda, Ranieri; Boux, Eugenio

    2012-03-01

    Bone marrow stimulation techniques in cartilage repair such as drilling are limited by the formation of fibrous to hyaline-like repair tissue. It has been suggested such techniques can be enhanced by covering the defect with scaffolds. We present an innovative approach using a polyglycolic acid (PGA)-hyaluronan scaffold with platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) in drilling. We asked whether (1) PRP immersed in a cell-free PGA-hyaluronan scaffold improves patient-reported 1-year outcomes for the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Score (KOOS), and (2) implantation of the scaffold in combination with bone marrow stimulation leads to the formation of hyaline-like cartilage repair tissue. We reviewed 52 patients who had arthroscopic implantation of the PGA-hyaluronan scaffold immersed with PRP in articular cartilage defects of the knee pretreated with Pridie drilling. Patients were assessed by KOOS. At 9 months followup, histologic staining was performed in specimens obtained from five patients to assess the repair tissue quality. The KOOS subscores improved for pain (55 to 91), symptoms (57 to 88), activities of daily living (69 to 86), sports and recreation (36 to 70), and quality of life (38 to 73). The histologic evaluation showed a homogeneous hyaline-like cartilage repair tissue. The cell-free PGA-hyaluronan scaffold combined with PRP leads to cartilage repair and improved patient-reported outcomes (KOOS) during 12 months of followup. Histologic sections showed morphologic features of hyaline-like repair tissue. Long-term followup is needed to determine if the cartilage repair tissue is durable. Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  2. A Comparison between Clinical Results of Selective Bundle and Double Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yon-Sik; Song, Si Young; Yang, Cheol Jung; Ha, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Sang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic anatomical double bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with either selective anteromedial (AM) or posterolateral (PL) bundle reconstruction while preserving a relatively healthy ACL bundle. Materials and Methods The authors evaluated 98 patients with a mean follow-up of 30.8±4.0 months who had undergone DB or selective bundle ACL reconstructions. Of these, 34 cases underwent DB ACL reconstruction (group A), 34 underwent selective AM bundle reconstruction (group B), and 30 underwent selective PL bundle reconstructions (group C). These groups were compared with respect to Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, side-to-side differences of anterior laxity measured by KT-2000 arthrometer at 30 lbs, and stress radiography and Lachman and pivot shift test results. Pre- and post-operative data were objectively evaluated using a statistical approach. Results The preoperative anterior instability measured by manual stress radiography at 90° of knee flexion in group A was significantly greater than that in groups B and C (all pACL tears offers comparable clinical results to DB reconstruction in complete ACL tears. PMID:27401652

  3. VECTOR BUNDLE, KILLING VECTOR FIELD AND PONTRYAGIN NUMBERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周建伟

    1991-01-01

    Let E be a vector bundle over a compact Riemannian manifold M. We construct a natural metric on the bundle space E and discuss the relationship between the killing vector fields of E and M. Then we give a proof of the Bott-Baum-Cheeger Theorem for vector bundle E.

  4. Heat exchanger with helical bundles of finned tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyking, H.J.

    1975-01-23

    The invention applies to a heat exchanger with helical bundles of tubes consisting of finned tubes separated by spacers. The spacers are designed as closed holding cylinders with holding devices for the tube bundles, each ot which surrounds a bundle of tubes. This construction serves to simplify the production process and to enable the use of the heat exchanger at higher loads.

  5. Gauge bundles and Born-Infeld on the noncommutative torus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, C.; Verlinde, E.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we describe non-abelian gauge bundles with magnetic and electric uxes on higher dimensional noncomm utative tori. We give an explicit construction of a large class of bundles with nonzero magnetic 't Hooft uxes. W e discuss Morita equiv alence between these bundles. The action of

  6. QTLs analysis of rice peduncle vascular bundle and panicle traits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@The vascular bundle in plants plays an important role in transportation of photosynthetic products, mineral nutrients, water, and so on. Significant positive correlations were found between grain yield, panicle traits and the No. Of peduncle vascular bundles. So, it is very important to study the inheritance of peduncle vascular bundle, which is a quantitative trait.

  7. Stability of Picard Bundle Over Moduli Space of Stable Vector Bundles of Rank Two Over a Curve

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indranil Biswas; Tomás L Gómez

    2001-08-01

    Answering a question of [BV] it is proved that the Picard bundle on the moduli space of stable vector bundles of rank two, on a Riemann surface of genus at least three, with fixed determinant of odd degree is stable.

  8. Automatic Evaluation of Collagen Fiber Directions from Polarized Light Microscopy Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Kamil; Polzer, Stanislav; Tichy, Michal; Bursa, Jiri

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical properties of the arterial wall depend largely on orientation and density of collagen fiber bundles. Several methods have been developed for observation of collagen orientation and density; the most frequently applied collagen-specific manual approach is based on polarized light (PL). However, it is very time consuming and the results are operator dependent. We have proposed a new automated method for evaluation of collagen fiber direction from two-dimensional polarized light microscopy images (2D PLM). The algorithm has been verified against artificial images and validated against manual measurements. Finally the collagen content has been estimated. The proposed algorithm was capable of estimating orientation of some 35 k points in 15 min when applied to aortic tissue and over 500 k points in 35 min for Achilles tendon. The average angular disagreement between each operator and the algorithm was -9.3±8.6° and -3.8±8.6° in the case of aortic tissue and -1.6±6.4° and 2.6±7.8° for Achilles tendon. Estimated mean collagen content was 30.3±5.8% and 94.3±2.7% for aortic media and Achilles tendon, respectively. The proposed automated approach is operator independent and several orders faster than manual measurements and therefore has the potential to replace manual measurements of collagen orientation via PLM.

  9. The Augmentation of a Collagen/Glycosaminoglycan Biphasic Osteochondral Scaffold with Platelet-Rich Plasma and Concentrated Bone Marrow Aspirate for Osteochondral Defect Repair in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Frances; Skelton, Carrie; Herrera, Emilio; Brooks, Roger; Fortier, Lisa A.; Rushton, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study investigates the combination of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or concentrated bone marrow aspirate (CBMA) with a biphasic collagen/glycosaminoglycan (GAG) osteochondral scaffold for the treatment of osteochondral defects in sheep. Design: Acute osteochondral defects were created in the medial femoral condyle (MFC) and the lateral trochlea sulcus (LTS) of 24 sheep (n = 6). Defects were left empty or filled with a 6 × 6-mm scaffold, either on its own or in combination with PRP or CBMA. Outcome measures at 6 months included mechanical testing, International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) repair score, modified O’Driscoll histology score, qualitative histology, and immunohistochemistry for type I, II, and VI collagen. Results: No differences in mechanical properties, ICRS repair score, or modified O’Driscoll score were detected between the 4 groups. However, qualitative assessments of the histological architecture, Safranin O content, and collagen immunohistochemistry indicated that in the PRP/scaffold groups, there was a more hyaline cartilage–like tissue repair. In addition, the addition of CBMA and PRP to the scaffold reduced cyst formation in the subchondral bone of healed lesions. Conclusion: There was more hyaline cartilage–like tissue formed in the PRP/scaffold group and less subchondral cystic lesion formation in the CBMA and PRP/scaffold groups, although there were no quantitative differences in the repair tissue formed. PMID:26069645

  10. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1 is present in hyaline membranes and modulates surface tension of surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griese Matthias

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1 is a secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein that binds various bacteria and is thought to participate in innate pulmonary host defense. We hypothesized that pulmonary DMBT1 could contribute to respiratory distress syndrome in neonates by modulating surfactant function. Methods DMBT1 expression was studied by immunohistochemistry and mRNA in situ hybridization in post-mortem lungs of preterm and full-term neonates with pulmonary hyaline membranes. The effect of human recombinant DMBT1 on the function of bovine and porcine surfactant was measured by a capillary surfactometer. DMBT1-levels in tracheal aspirates of ventilated preterm and term infants were determined by ELISA. Results Pulmonary DMBT1 was localized in hyaline membranes during respiratory distress syndrome. In vitro addition of human recombinant DMBT1 to the surfactants increased surface tension in a dose-dependent manner. The DMBT1-mediated effect was reverted by the addition of calcium depending on the surfactant preparation. Conclusion Our data showed pulmonary DMBT1 expression in hyaline membranes during respiratory distress syndrome and demonstrated that DMBT1 increases lung surface tension in vitro. This raises the possibility that DMBT1 could antagonize surfactant supplementation in respiratory distress syndrome and could represent a candidate target molecule for therapeutic intervention in neonatal lung disease.

  11. Regeneration of hyaline cartilage by cell-mediated gene therapy using transforming growth factor beta 1-producing fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K H; Song, S U; Hwang, T S; Yi, Y; Oh, I S; Lee, J Y; Choi, K B; Choi, M S; Kim, S J

    2001-09-20

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) has been considered as a candidate for gene therapy of orthopedic diseases. The possible application of cell-mediated TGF-beta gene therapy as a new treatment regimen for degenerative arthritis was investigated. In this study, fibroblasts expressing active TGF-beta 1 were injected into the knee joints of rabbits with artificially made cartilage defects to evaluate the feasibility of this therapy for orthopedic diseases. Two to 3 weeks after the injection there was evidence of cartilage regeneration, and at 4 to 6 weeks the cartilage defect was completely filled with newly grown hyaline cartilage. Histological analyses of the regenerated cartilage suggested that it was well integrated with the adjacent normal cartilage at the sides of the defect and that the newly formed tissue was indeed hyaline cartilage. Our findings suggest that cell-mediated TGF-beta 1 gene therapy may be a novel treatment for orthopedic diseases in which hyaline cartilage damage has occurred.

  12. Castleman′s disease - hyaline vascular type - clinical, cytological and histological features with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Arnab

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Castleman′s disease (CD is a rare disease of lymph node with two identified forms - the hyaline vascular (HV type or angiofollicular type and plasma cell (PC type. It usually presents as localized or systemic lymphadenopathy or even as extra nodal mass and may give rise to several differential diagnoses. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC, as the initial investigation, may be misleading. Excision biopsy usually gives the diagnosis. This study analyzes the clinical, cytological and histological features of CD of HV type Materials and Methods: All the cases of CD reported between 2001 and March 2008 have been reviewed. Cytology and histopathology slides of all cases were reviewed by two reporting pathologists independently and the clinical records were analyzed. Result: We had five cases of CD all of which presented as cervical lymphadenopathy of 1 to 5 cms in young patients. Patients were mostly asymptomatic with all relevant investigations within normal limits. The cytology findings mostly showed a predominance of small lymphocytes with capillary fragments. On excision biopsy, all cases were diagnosed as CD of HV type. Conclusion: CD should be kept as a differential of lymphadenopathy, especially in asymptomatic and young patients.

  13. Roentgenographic findings in hyaline membrane disease treated with exogenous surfactant: comparison with control group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lim, Chae Ha; Lim, Woo Young; Kim, Young Sook; Byen, Ju Nam; Oh, Jae Hee; Kim, Young Chul [Chosun Univ. College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-01-01

    To compare, with the use of chest radiographic findings, improvement and complications in newborns treated with exogenous surfactant for hyaline membrane disease (HMD), and an untreated control group. Thirty-six patients with HMD were randomly assigned to a control group (n=18) or surfactant treated group (n=18). As part of an initial evaluation of their pulmonary status, we then performed a retrospective statistical analysis of chest radiographic findings obtained in exogenous surfactant treated and untreated infants within the first 90 minutes of life. Subsequent examinations were performed at less than 24 hours of age. Chest radiograph before treatment showed no significant differences between the two groups, but significant improvement was noted in the surfactant treated group, in contrast to the control group. The most common chest radiographic finding after surfactant administration was uniform (n=15) or disproportionate (n=2) improvement of pulmonary aeration. Patent ductus arteriosus developed in three treated neonates and in four cases in the control group. Air leak occurred in three cases in the treated group and in five cases in the control group. In one treated patient pulmonary hemorrhage developed and intracranial hemorrhage occurred in three treated neonates and in four cases in the control group. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia was developed in 6 cases of treated group and 3 cases of control group. A chest radiograph is considered to be helpful in the evaluation of improvement and complications of HMD in infants treated with surfactant.

  14. [Quantitative analysis of chondrocyte distribution patterns in hyaline cartilage tissue--a comparison of different models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranke, T P; Ranke, I; Schwandtke, A; Rother, P

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of our investigations were aging changes in hyaline cartilage of the trachea and of the larynx. 42 samples of carina tracheae and 29 samples of arytenoid cartilage were used in both organs from the newborn age up to the age of 91 a. We have examined patterns of cell distribution with the help of the computer programme "Dichte" ("density") using the following methods of stochastic geometry: product density, L function, and others. Product density allows for a reliable destination between a regular pattern of cells (hard-core distribution), a random pattern (soft-core distribution), and a typical clustering of chondrocytes. 2 examples of arytenoid cartilage have been selected to demonstrate the possibilities of interpretation of product density supported by the L function. Soft-core and in few cases hard-core distribution have been found both with the carina tracheae and the cartilago arytaenoidea in the 1st decade of life. Beginning with the 2nd decade of life, the typical clustering of chondrocytes have been confirmed with both organs.

  15. A micro-anatomical model of the distribution of myocardial endomysial collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchiarelli, G; Ohtani, O; Nottola, S A; Stallone, T; Camboni, A; Prado, I M; Motta, P M

    2002-01-01

    Myocardial connective tissue probably provides passive support for regulating heart tensile strength and stiffness and ultimately for controlling heart mechanics through its endomysial part. However, endomysial collagen micro-arrangement is still a matter of debate. In order to define the fine distribution of left ventricle endomysial collagen, we applied the NaOH-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) maceration method (one of the techniques of choice for studying collagen micro-arrangement) to rabbit heart. Gomori-reticulum staining was used for correlated light microscopy (LM) observations. The SEM-NaOH method allowed isolation of collagen by removing other extracellular matrix components and cells and preserved collagen structure and position. Endomysial collagen appeared arranged in laminae that delimited the lacunae that were left empty by macerated myocytes and small vessels (mostly capillaries). These laminae were formed by reticular fibers, as confirmed by LM observations of Gomorireticulum-stained samples, and were organized in irregularly meshed networks made of thin (single) and thick (composed) filaments. In longitudinal views, collagen laminae extended the entire length of lacunae. In transversal views, the cut surface of the laminae appeared to be made of collagen bundles. These observations provide an updated microanatomical view of endomysial collagen distribution, which integrates previous studies. This model is based on the evidence that collagen laminae enveloped the surface of small vessels and myocytes. Thus, a type of myocyte-myocyte or capillary-myocyte "laminar connection" anchored to the entire cell length here is emphasized, rather than a type of "strut connection" anchored to defined loci, as usually described. This structure explains better how endomysium may provide the necessary support for heart compliance and protection against overstretch.

  16. Productivity and costs of slash bundling in Nordic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerhae, K.; Vartiamaeki, T. [Metsaeteho Oy, P.O. Box 101, FI-00171 Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-12-15

    The number of slash bundlers and the volume of slash bundling have been rapidly increasing during the last few years in Finland. However, no comprehensive time or follow-up studies have been carried out on slash bundling technology in Finland or in any other country. Metsateho Oy carried out studies on the productivity and costs of slash bundling in different Nordic recovering conditions. The study methods included both time and follow-up studies. Data were collected during the summer and winter period primarily in Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) dominated clear cutting sites. The bundling techniques performed by different types of bundler (Fiberpac 370, Timberjack 1490D, Pika RS 2000, Valmet WoodPac) were studied. The average productivity of slash bundling was 18.1 bundles per operating (E{sub 15}, including delays shorter than 15min) hour with the Timberjack 1490D and Fiberpac 370 bundlers in the follow-up study. The operator of the slash bundler had the greatest effect on the productivity of bundling. The prerequisite for increased bundling volumes is a reduction in the costs of the most expensive sub-stage of the bundling supply chain, i.e. bundling itself. This requires improved recovery conditions at bundling sites, increased bundling productivity, larger sized bundles, and the execution of bundling operations in two work shifts using an efficient bundler and effective operator working methods. Implementation of these development measures will bring the bundling supply chain up to a speed that makes it the most competitive supply chain for forest chips in terms of total supply costs for long-distance transportation distances of more than 60km. (author)

  17. Collagen fibrillogenesis in the development of the annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJ Hayes

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc is a complex, radial-ply connective tissue consisting of concentric lamellae of oriented collagen. Whilst much is known of the structure of the mature annulus, less is known of how its complex collagenous architecture becomes established; an understanding of which could inform future repair/regenerative strategies. Here, using a rat disc developmental series, we describe events in the establishment of the collagenous framework of the annulus at light and electron microscopic levels and examine the involvement of class I and II small leucine rich proteoglycans (SLRPs in the matrix assembly process. We show that a period of sustained, ordered matrix deposition follows the initial cellular differentiation/orientation phase within the foetal disc. Fibrillar matrix is deposited from recesses within the plasma membrane into compartments of interstitial space within the outer annulus – the orientation of the secreted collagen reflecting the initial cellular orientation of the laminae. Medially, we demonstrate the development of a reinforcing ‘cage’ of collagen fibre bundles around the foetal nucleus pulpous. This derives from the fusion of collagen bundles between presumptive end-plate and inner annulus. By birth, the distinct collagenous architectures are established and the disc undergoes considerable enlargement to maturity. We show that fibromodulin plays a prominent role in foetal development of the annulus and its attachment to vertebral bodies. With the exception of keratocan, the other SLRPs appear associated more with cartilage development within the vertebral column, but all become more prominent within the disc during its growth and differentiation.

  18. Bundling of harvesting residues and whole-trees and the treatment of bundles; Hakkuutaehteiden ja kokopuiden niputus ja nippujen kaesittely

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaipainen, H.; Seppaenen, V.; Rinne, S.

    1996-12-31

    The conditions on which the bundling of the harvesting residues from spruce regeneration fellings would become profitable were studied. The calculations showed that one of the most important features was sufficient compaction of the bundle, so that the portion of the wood in the unit volume of the bundle has to be more than 40 %. The tests showed that the timber grab loader of farm tractor was insufficient for production of dense bundles. The feeding and compression device of the prototype bundler was constructed in the research and with this device the required density was obtained.The rate of compaction of the dry spruce felling residues was about 40 % and that of the fresh residues was more than 50 %. The comparison between the bundles showed that the calorific value of the fresh bundle per unit volume was nearly 30 % higher than that of the dry bundle. This means that the treatment of the bundles should be done of fresh felling residues. Drying of the bundles succeeded well, and the crushing and chipping tests showed that the processing of the bundles at the plant is possible. The treatability of the bundles was also excellent. By using the prototype, developed in the research, it was possible to produce a bundle of the fresh spruce harvesting residues, the diameter of which was about 50 cm and the length about 3 m, and the rate of compaction over 50 %. By these values the reduction target of the costs is obtainable

  19. Primary hepatocyte culture in collagen gel mixture and collagen sandwich

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Jie Wang; Hong-Ling Liu; Hai-Tao Guo; Hong-Wei Wen; Jun Liu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the methods of hepatocytes culture in a collagen gel mixture or between double layers of collagen sandwich configuration and to examine the functional and cytomorphological characteristics of cultured hepatocytes.METHODS: A two-step collagenase perfusion technique was used to isolate the hepatocytes from Wistar rats or newborn Chinese experimental piglets. The isolated hepatocytes were cultured in a collagen gel mixture or between double layers of collagen sandwich configuration respectively. The former was that rat hepatocytes were mixed with type I rat tail collagen solution till gelled, and the medium was added onto the gel. The latter was that swine hepatocytes were seeded on a plate precoated with collagen gel for 24 h, then another layer of collagen gel was overlaid, resulting in a sandwich configuration. The cytomorphological characteristics, albumin secretion, and LDH-release of the hepatocytes cultured in these two models were examined.RESULTS: Freshly isolated rat hepatocytes were successfully mixed and fixed in collagen gel, and cultured in the gel condition. During the culture period, the urea synthesized and secreted by rat hepatocytes was detected throughout the period. Likewise, newborn experimental piglet hepatocytes were successfully fixed between the double layers of collagen gel, forming a sandwich configuration.Within a week of culture, the albumin secreted by swine hepatocytes was detected by SDS/PAGE analysis. The typical cytomorphological characteristics of the hepatocytes cultured by the above two culture models were found under a phasecontrast microscope. There was little LDH-release during the culture period.CONCLUSION: Both collagen gel mixture and double layers of collagen sandwich configuration can provide cultural conditions much closer to in vivoenvironment, and are helpful for maintaining specific hepatic fiJnctions and cytomorphological characteristics. A collagen gel mixture culture may be more eligible for the

  20. Phase Slips in Oscillatory Hair Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Shlomovitz, Roie; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear contain an active amplifier that allows them to detect extremely weak signals. As one of the manifestations of an active process, spontaneous oscillations arise in fluid immersed hair bundles of in vitro preparations of selected auditory and vestibular organs. We measure the phase-locking dynamics of oscillatory bundles exposed to low-amplitude sinusoidal signals, a transition that can be described by a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle. The transition is characterized by the occurrence of phase slips, at a rate that is dependent on the amplitude and detuning of the applied drive. The resultant staircase structure in the phase of the oscillation can be described by the stochastic Adler equation, which reproduces the statistics of phase slip production. PMID:25167040

  1. Care bundles reduce readmissions for COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Healther; Tooley, Cathy; Nicholls, Carol; Lindsey-Halls, Anna

    In 2011, the respiratory nursing team at the James Paget University Hospital Foundation Trust were considering introducing a discharge care bundle for patients admitted with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. At the same time, the trust was asking for applications for Commissioning for Quality and Innovation schemes (CQUINs). These are locally agreed packages of quality improvement goals and indicators, which, if achieved in total, enable the provider to earn its full CQUIN payment. A CQUIN scheme should address the three domains of quality, safety and effectiveness, patient experience and also show innovation. This article discusses how the care bundle was introduced and how, over a 12-month period, it showed tangible results in improving the care pathway for COPD patients as well as reducing readmissions and saving a significant amount of money.

  2. Emitters of N-photon bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, C Sánchez; Del Valle, E; Tudela, A González; Müller, K; Lichtmannecker, S; Kaniber, M; Tejedor, C; Finley, J J; Laussy, F P

    2014-07-01

    Controlling the ouput of a light emitter is one of the basic tasks of photonics, with landmarks such as the laser and single-photon sources. The development of quantum applications makes it increasingly important to diversify the available quantum sources. Here, we propose a cavity QED scheme to realize emitters that release their energy in groups, or "bundles" of N photons, for integer N. Close to 100% of two-photon emission and 90% of three-photon emission is shown to be within reach of state of the art samples. The emission can be tuned with system parameters so that the device behaves as a laser or as a N-photon gun. The theoretical formalism to characterize such emitters is developed, with the bundle statistics arising as an extension of the fundamental correlation functions of quantum optics. These emitters will be useful for quantum information processing and for medical applications.

  3. Client Provider Collaboration for Service Bundling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LETIA, I. A.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The key requirement for a service industry organization to reach competitive advantages through product diversification is the existence of a well defined method for building service bundles. Based on the idea that the quality of a service or its value is given by the difference between expectations and perceptions, we draw the main components of a frame that aims to support the client and the provider agent in an active collaboration meant to co-create service bundles. Following e3-value model, we structure the supporting knowledge around the relation between needs and satisfying services. We deal with different perspectives about quality through an ontological extension of Value Based Argumentation. The dialog between the client and the provider takes the form of a persuasion whose dynamic object is the current best configuration. Our approach for building service packages is a demand driven approach, allowing progressive disclosure of private knowledge.

  4. UV damage of collagen: insights from model collagen peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariashvili, Ketevan; Madhan, Balaraman; Brodsky, Barbara; Kuchava, Ana; Namicheishvili, Louisa; Metreveli, Nunu

    2012-03-01

    Fibrils of Type I collagen in the skin are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light and there have been claims that collagen photo-degradation leads to wrinkles and may contribute to skin cancers. To understand the effects of UV radiation on collagen, Type I collagen solutions were exposed to the UV-C wavelength of 254 nm for defined lengths of time at 4°C. Circular dichroism (CD) experiments show that irradiation of collagen leads to high loss of triple helical content with a new lower thermal stability peak and SDS-gel electrophoresis indicates breakdown of collagen chains. To better define the effects of UV radiation on the collagen triple-helix, the studies were extended to peptides which model the collagen sequence and conformation. CD studies showed irradiation for days led to lower magnitudes of the triple-helix maximum at 225 nm and lower thermal stabilities for two peptides containing multiple Gly-Pro-Hyp triplets. In contrast, the highest radiation exposure led to little change in the T(m) values of (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10) and (Ala-Hyp-Gly)(10) , although (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10) did show a significant decrease in triple helix intensity. Mass spectroscopy indicated preferential cleavage sites within the peptides, and identification of some of the most susceptible sites of cleavage. The effect of radiation on these well defined peptides gives insight into the sequence and conformational specificity of photo-degradation of collagen.

  5. Shining light on collagen: expressing collagen in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Barbara; Kaplan, David L

    2013-07-01

    Collagens are a remarkable group of proteins that are critical from a physiological perspective due to their diverse and versatile functions in vivo. However, collagens are challenging to generate ex vivo for biomaterials or regenerative medicine due to their complex processing and assembly into functional materials. Therefore, collagen availability remains a major unmet need for biomaterials, as relatively limited supplies of the protein in pure form are available mainly through harvesting bovine tissues. This animal source, subsequent to purification, remains associated with significant safety concerns due to the potential carryover of animal-derived diseases. Other more limited sources of animal collagens are also commercially available, as well as collagens generated in heterologous hosts; however, the challenge to these sources remains both economic and structural. The need for new safe sources of collagens remains high, with a significant potential impact in areas of medicine when considering the opportunity to mimic native collagen features. The articles in this issue of the journal focus on plant-derived collagens to address some of these needs. Progress toward plant production of collagens, the ability to self-assemble these recombinant proteins into higher-order structures, and the utility of these materials in various medical applications suggest an important path forward for the field.

  6. Non-abelian higher gauge theory and categorical bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viennot, David

    2016-12-01

    A gauge theory is associated with a principal bundle endowed with a connection permitting to define horizontal lifts of paths. The horizontal lifts of surfaces cannot be defined into a principal bundle structure. An higher gauge theory is an attempt to generalize the bundle structure in order to describe horizontal lifts of surfaces. A such attempt is particularly difficult for the non-abelian case. Some structures have been proposed to realize this goal (twisted bundle, gerbes with connection, bundle gerbe, 2-bundle). Each of them uses a category in place of the total space manifold of the usual principal bundle structure. Some of them replace also the structure group by a category (more precisely a Lie crossed module viewed as a category). But the base space remains still a simple manifold (possibly viewed as a trivial category with only identity arrows). We propose a new principal categorical bundle structure, with a Lie crossed module as structure groupoid, but with a base space belonging to a bigger class of categories (which includes non-trivial categories), that we called affine 2-spaces. We study the geometric structure of the categorical bundles built on these categories (which are a more complicated structure than the 2-bundles) and the connective structures on these bundles. Finally we treat an example interesting for quantum dynamics which is associated with the Bloch wave operator theory.

  7. Quantum principal bundles and their characteristic classes

    CERN Document Server

    Durdevic, M

    1996-01-01

    A brief exposition of the general theory of characteristic classes of quantum principal bundles is given. The theory of quantum characteristic classes incorporates ideas of classical Weil theory into the conceptual framework of non-commutative differential geometry. A purely cohomological interpretation of the Weil homomorphism is given, together with a standard geometrical interpretation via quantum invariant polynomials. A natural spectral sequence is described. Some quantum phenomena appearing in the formalism are discussed.

  8. Uncovering ecosystem service bundles through social preferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Martín-López

    Full Text Available Ecosystem service assessments have increasingly been used to support environmental management policies, mainly based on biophysical and economic indicators. However, few studies have coped with the social-cultural dimension of ecosystem services, despite being considered a research priority. We examined how ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs emerge from diverging social preferences toward ecosystem services delivered by various types of ecosystems in Spain. We conducted 3,379 direct face-to-face questionnaires in eight different case study sites from 2007 to 2011. Overall, 90.5% of the sampled population recognized the ecosystem's capacity to deliver services. Formal studies, environmental behavior, and gender variables influenced the probability of people recognizing the ecosystem's capacity to provide services. The ecosystem services most frequently perceived by people were regulating services; of those, air purification held the greatest importance. However, statistical analysis showed that socio-cultural factors and the conservation management strategy of ecosystems (i.e., National Park, Natural Park, or a non-protected area have an effect on social preferences toward ecosystem services. Ecosystem service trade-offs and bundles were identified by analyzing social preferences through multivariate analysis (redundancy analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis. We found a clear trade-off among provisioning services (and recreational hunting versus regulating services and almost all cultural services. We identified three ecosystem service bundles associated with the conservation management strategy and the rural-urban gradient. We conclude that socio-cultural preferences toward ecosystem services can serve as a tool to identify relevant services for people, the factors underlying these social preferences, and emerging ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs.

  9. Uncontrolled inexact information within bundle methods

    OpenAIRE

    Malick, Jérôme; Welington De Oliveira, ·; Zaourar-Michel, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    International audience; We consider convex nonsmooth optimization problems where additional information with uncontrolled accuracy is readily available. It is often the case when the objective function is itself the output of an optimization solver, as for large-scale energy optimization problems tackled by decomposition. In this paper, we study how to incorporate the uncontrolled linearizations into (proximal and level) bundle algorithms in view of generating better iterates and possibly acc...

  10. On Complex Supermanifolds with Trivial Canonical Bundle

    CERN Document Server

    Groeger, Josua

    2016-01-01

    We give an algebraic characterisation for the triviality of the canonical bundle of a complex supermanifold in terms of a certain Batalin-Vilkovisky superalgebra structure. As an application, we study the Calabi-Yau case, in which an explicit formula in terms of the Levi-Civita connection is achieved. Our methods include the use of complex integral forms and the recently developed theory of superholonomy.

  11. Uncovering Ecosystem Service Bundles through Social Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-López, Berta; Iniesta-Arandia, Irene; García-Llorente, Marina; Palomo, Ignacio; Casado-Arzuaga, Izaskun; Amo, David García Del; Gómez-Baggethun, Erik; Oteros-Rozas, Elisa; Palacios-Agundez, Igone; Willaarts, Bárbara; González, José A.; Santos-Martín, Fernando; Onaindia, Miren; López-Santiago, Cesar; Montes, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Ecosystem service assessments have increasingly been used to support environmental management policies, mainly based on biophysical and economic indicators. However, few studies have coped with the social-cultural dimension of ecosystem services, despite being considered a research priority. We examined how ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs emerge from diverging social preferences toward ecosystem services delivered by various types of ecosystems in Spain. We conducted 3,379 direct face-to-face questionnaires in eight different case study sites from 2007 to 2011. Overall, 90.5% of the sampled population recognized the ecosystem’s capacity to deliver services. Formal studies, environmental behavior, and gender variables influenced the probability of people recognizing the ecosystem’s capacity to provide services. The ecosystem services most frequently perceived by people were regulating services; of those, air purification held the greatest importance. However, statistical analysis showed that socio-cultural factors and the conservation management strategy of ecosystems (i.e., National Park, Natural Park, or a non-protected area) have an effect on social preferences toward ecosystem services. Ecosystem service trade-offs and bundles were identified by analyzing social preferences through multivariate analysis (redundancy analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis). We found a clear trade-off among provisioning services (and recreational hunting) versus regulating services and almost all cultural services. We identified three ecosystem service bundles associated with the conservation management strategy and the rural-urban gradient. We conclude that socio-cultural preferences toward ecosystem services can serve as a tool to identify relevant services for people, the factors underlying these social preferences, and emerging ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs. PMID:22720006

  12. Uncovering ecosystem service bundles through social preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Berta Martín-López; Irene Iniesta-Arandia; Marina García-Llorente; Ignacio Palomo; Izaskun Casado-Arzuaga; David García Del Amo; Erik Gómez-Baggethun; Elisa Oteros-Rozas; Igone Palacios-Agundez; Bárbara Willaarts; González, José A.; Fernando Santos-Martín; Miren Onaindia; Cesar López-Santiago; Carlos Montes

    2012-01-01

    11 p. Ecosystem service assessments have increasingly been used to support environmental management policies, mainly based on biophysical and economic indicators. However, few studies have coped with the social-cultural dimension of ecosystem services, despite being considered a research priority. We examined how ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs emerge from diverging social preferences toward ecosystem services delivered by various types of ecosystems in Spain. We conducted 3,379 d...

  13. Deformations of Fell bundles and twisted graph algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeburn, Iain

    2016-11-01

    We consider Fell bundles over discrete groups, and the C*-algebra which is universal for representations of the bundle. We define deformations of Fell bundles, which are new Fell bundles with the same underlying Banach bundle but with the multiplication deformed by a two-cocycle on the group. Every graph algebra can be viewed as the C*-algebra of a Fell bundle, and there are are many cocycles of interest with which to deform them. We thus obtain many of the twisted graph algebras of Kumjian, Pask and Sims. We demonstate the utility of our approach to these twisted graph algebras by proving that the deformations associated to different cocycles can be assembled as the fibres of a C*-bundle.

  14. Bundling harvester; Harvennuspuun automaattisen nippukorjausharvesterin kehittaeminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koponen, K. [Eko-Log Oy, Kuopio (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    The starting point of the project was to design and construct, by taking the silvicultural point of view into account, a harvesting and processing system especially for energy-wood, containing manually driven bundling harvester, automating of the harvester, and automated loading. The equipment forms an ideal method for entrepreneur`s-line harvesting. The target is to apply the system also for owner`s-line harvesting. The profitability of the system promotes the utilisation of the system in both cases. The objectives of the project were: to construct a test equipment and prototypes for all the project stages, to carry out terrain and strain tests in order to examine the usability and durability, as well as the capacity of the machine, to test the applicability of the Eko-Log system in simultaneous harvesting of energy and pulp woods, and to start the marketing and manufacturing of the products. The basic problems of the construction of the bundling harvester have been solved using terrain-tests. The prototype machine has been shown to be operable. Loading of the bundles to form sufficiently economically transportable loads has been studied, and simultaneously, the branch-biomass has been tried to be utilised without loosing the profitability of transportation. The results have been promising, and will promote the profitable utilisation of wood-energy. (orig.)

  15. Development of Strengthened Bundle High Temperature Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lue, J.W.; Lubell, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Demko, J.A. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Tomsic, M. [Plastronic, Inc., Troy, OH (United States); Sinha, U. [Southwire Company, Carollton, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In the process of developing high temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cables, it was found that mechanical strength of the superconducting tape is the most crucial property that needs to be improved. It is also desirable to increase the current carrying capacity of the conductor so that fewer layers are needed to make the kilo-amp class cables required for electric utility usage. A process has been developed by encapsulating a stack of Bi-2223/Ag tapes with a silver or non-silver sheath to form a strengthened bundle superconductor. This process was applied to HTS tapes made by the Continuous Tube Forming and Filling (CTFF) technique pursued by Plastronic Inc. and HTS tapes obtained from other manufacturers. Conductors with a bundle of 2 to 6 HTS tapes have been made. The bundled conductor is greatly strengthened by the non-silver sheath. No superconductor degradation as compared to the sum of the original critical currents of the individual tapes was seen on the finished conductors.

  16. Tridimensional architecture of the collagen element in the arachnoid granulations in humans: a study on scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conegero Celso Ivan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The arachnoid granulations of adult individual of both sexes were studied through scanning electron microscopy. The dura mater and arachnoid meninges of individuals were collected at the Service of Death Verification of São Paulo - USP and fixed in Karnovsky solution. After this period the material was prepared for analysis in electron microscope. Our results demonstrated that the arachnoid granulations are formed by a pedicle, body and apex, being surrounded by a capsule of connective tissue, which in turn is composed of, basically, bundles of collagen fibers that line pores of different shapes and sizes. The smaller pores are lined by tiny bundles and are located at the apical region of the granulation and the larger are lined by thicker bundles and are located at the lateral regions. In the body we verified that the bundles of collagen fibers compose a fibrous meshwork and in some regions these bundles have circular orientation, forming pores similar to those found at the region of the capsule.

  17. An analytical fiber bundle model for pullout mechanics of root bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D.; Schwarz, M.; Or, D.

    2011-09-01

    Roots in soil contribute to the mechanical stability of slopes. Estimation of root reinforcement is challenging because roots form complex biological networks whose geometrical and mechanical characteristics are difficult to characterize. Here we describe an analytical model that builds on simple root descriptors to estimate root reinforcement. Root bundles are modeled as bundles of heterogeneous fibers pulled along their long axes neglecting root-soil friction. Analytical expressions for the pullout force as a function of displacement are derived. The maximum pullout force and corresponding critical displacement are either derived analytically or computed numerically. Key model inputs are a root diameter distribution (uniform, Weibull, or lognormal) and three empirical power law relations describing tensile strength, elastic modulus, and length of roots as functions of root diameter. When a root bundle with root tips anchored in the soil matrix is pulled by a rigid plate, a unique parameter, ?, that depends only on the exponents of the power law relations, dictates the order in which roots of different diameters break. If ? 1, large roots break first. When ? = 1, all fibers break simultaneously, and the maximum tensile force is simply the roots' mean force times the number of roots in the bundle. Based on measurements of root geometry and mechanical properties, the value of ? is less than 1, usually ranging between 0 and 0.7. Thus, small roots always fail first. The model shows how geometrical and mechanical characteristics of roots and root diameter distribution affect the pullout force, its maximum and corresponding displacement. Comparing bundles of roots that have similar mean diameters, a bundle with a narrow variance in root diameter will result in a larger maximum force and a smaller displacement at maximum force than a bundle with a wide diameter distribution. Increasing the mean root diameter of a bundle without changing the distribution's shape increases

  18. Modelling packing interactions in parallel helix bundles: pentameric bundles of nicotinic receptor M2 helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankararamakrishnan, R; Sansom, M S

    1995-11-01

    The transbilayer pore of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is formed by a pentameric bundle of M2 helices. Models of pentameric bundles of M2 helices have been generated using simulated annealing via restrained molecular dynamics. The influence of: (a) the initial C alpha template; and (b) screening of sidechain electrostatic interactions on the geometry of the resultant M2 helix bundles is explored. Parallel M2 helices, in the absence of sidechain electrostatic interactions, pack in accordance with simple ridges-in-grooves considerations. This results in a helix crossing angle of ca. +12 degrees, corresponding to a left-handed coiled coil structure for the bundle as a whole. Tilting of M2 helices away from the central pore axis at their C-termini and/or inclusion of sidechain electrostatic interactions may perturb such ridges-in-grooves packing. In the most extreme cases right-handed coiled coils are formed. An interplay between inter-helix H-bonding and helix bundle geometry is revealed. The effects of changes in electrostatic screening on the dimensions of the pore mouth are described and the significance of these changes in the context of models for the nAChR pore domain is discussed.

  19. Tensile properties, collagen content, and crosslinks in connective tissues of the immature knee joint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram V Eleswarapu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The major connective tissues of the knee joint act in concert during locomotion to provide joint stability, smooth articulation, shock absorption, and distribution of mechanical stresses. These functions are largely conferred by the intrinsic material properties of the tissues, which are in turn determined by biochemical composition. A thorough understanding of the structure-function relationships of the connective tissues of the knee joint is needed to provide design parameters for efforts in tissue engineering. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The objective of this study was to perform a comprehensive characterization of the tensile properties, collagen content, and pyridinoline crosslink abundance of condylar cartilage, patellar cartilage, medial and lateral menisci, cranial and caudal cruciate ligaments (analogous to anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments in humans, respectively, medial and lateral collateral ligaments, and patellar ligament from immature bovine calves. Tensile stiffness and strength were greatest in the menisci and patellar ligament, and lowest in the hyaline cartilages and cruciate ligaments; these tensile results reflected trends in collagen content. Pyridinoline crosslinks were found in every tissue despite the relative immaturity of the joints, and significant differences were observed among tissues. Notably, for the cruciate ligaments and patellar ligament, crosslink density appeared more important in determining tensile stiffness than collagen content. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine tensile properties, collagen content, and pyridinoline crosslink abundance in a direct head-to-head comparison among all of the major connective tissues of the knee. This is also the first study to report results for pyridinoline crosslink density that suggest its preferential role over collagen in determining tensile stiffness for certain tissues.

  20. Arterial calcification: Conscripted by collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jordan D.

    2016-03-01

    In atherosclerotic plaques, patterns of calcification -- which have profound implications for plaque stability and vulnerability to rupture -- are determined by the collagen's content and patterning throughout the plaque.

  1. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) of cadaveric shoulders: comparison of contrast dynamics in hyaline and fibrous cartilage after intraarticular gadolinium injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, E; Hodler, J; Pfirrmann, C W A

    2009-01-01

    Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a novel method to investigate cartilaginous and fibrocartilaginous structures. To investigate the contrast dynamics in hyaline and fibrous cartilage of the glenohumeral joint after intraarticular injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine. Transverse T(1) maps were acquired on a 1.5T scanner before and after intraarticular injection of 2.0 mmol/l gadopentetate dimeglumine in five cadaveric shoulders using a dual flip angle three-dimensional gradient echo (3D-GRE) sequence. The acquisition time for the T(1) maps was 5 min 5 s for the whole shoulder. Measurements were repeated every 15 min over 2.5 hours. Regions of interest (ROIs) covering the glenoid cartilage and the labrum were drawn to assess the temporal evolution of the relaxation parameters. T(1) of unenhanced hyaline cartilage of the glenoid was 568+/-34 ms. T(1) of unenhanced fibrous cartilage of the labrum was 552+/-38 ms. Significant differences (P=0.002 and 0.03) in the relaxation parameters were already measurable after 15 min. After 2 to 2.5 hours, hyaline and fibrous cartilage still demonstrated decreasing relaxation parameters, with a larger range of the T(1)(Gd) values in fibrous cartilage. T(1) and triangle Delta R(1) values of hyaline and fibrous cartilage after 2.5 hours were 351+/-16 ms and 1.1+/-0.09 s(-1), and 332+/-31 ms and 1.2+/-0.1 s(-1), respectively. A significant decrease in T(1)(Gd) was found 15 min after intraarticular contrast injection. Contrast accumulation was faster in hyaline than in fibrous cartilage. After 2.5 hours, contrast accumulation showed a higher rate of decrease in hyaline cartilage, but neither hyaline nor fibrous cartilage had reached equilibrium.

  2. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) of Cadaveric Shoulders: Comparison of Contrast Dynamics in Hyaline and Fibrous Cartilage after Intraarticular Gadolinium Injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, E. (Dept. of Radiology, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany)); Hodler, J.; Pfirrmann, C.W.A. (Dept. of Radiology, Orthopedic Univ. Hospital Balgrist, Zuerich (Switzerland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a novel method to investigate cartilaginous and fibrocartilaginous structures. Purpose: To investigate the contrast dynamics in hyaline and fibrous cartilage of the glenohumeral joint after intraarticular injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine. Material and Methods: Transverse T1 maps were acquired on a 1.5T scanner before and after intraarticular injection of 2.0 mmol/l gadopentetate dimeglumine in five cadaveric shoulders using a dual flip angle three-dimensional gradient echo (3D-GRE) sequence. The acquisition time for the T1 maps was 5 min 5 s for the whole shoulder. Measurements were repeated every 15 min over 2.5 hours. Regions of interest (ROIs) covering the glenoid cartilage and the labrum were drawn to assess the temporal evolution of the relaxation parameters. Results: T1 of unenhanced hyaline cartilage of the glenoid was 568+-34 ms. T1 of unenhanced fibrous cartilage of the labrum was 552+-38 ms. Significant differences (P=0.002 and 0.03) in the relaxation parameters were already measurable after 15 min. After 2 to 2.5 hours, hyaline and fibrous cartilage still demonstrated decreasing relaxation parameters, with a larger range of the T1(Gd) values in fibrous cartilage. T1 and ?R1 values of hyaline and fibrous cartilage after 2.5 hours were 351+-16 ms and 1.1+-0.09/s, and 332+-31 ms and 1.2+-0.1/s, respectively. Conclusion: A significant decrease in T1(Gd) was found 15 min after intraarticular contrast injection. Contrast accumulation was faster in hyaline than in fibrous cartilage. After 2.5 hours, contrast accumulation showed a higher rate of decrease in hyaline cartilage, but neither hyaline nor fibrous cartilage had reached equilibrium

  3. Control of dense collagen gel scaffolds for tissue engineering through measurement and modelling of hydraulic permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpooshan, Vahid

    Among various natural biopolymers, type I collagen gels have demonstrated the highest potential as biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering (TE). However, the successful application of collagen gels requires a greater understanding of the relationship between their microstructure and physical-mechanical properties. Therefore, a precise method to modulate collagen gel microstructure in order to attain optimal scaffold properties for diverse biomedical applications is necessary. This dissertation describes a new approach to produce collagen gels with defined microstructures, quantified by hydraulic permeability ( k), in order to optimize scaffold properties for TE applications. It was hypothesized that the measurement of k can be used to study the role of microstructure in collagen gel properties, as well as cell function and cell-scaffold interactions. Applying increasing levels of plastic compression (PC) to the highly hydrated collagen gels resulted in an increase in collagen fibrillar density, reduced Happel model derived k values, increased gel stiffness, promoted MSC metabolic activity, osteogenic differentiation, and mineral deposition, while cell-induced gel contraction diminished. Thus, collagen gels with lower k and higher stiffness values exhibited greater potential for bone tissue engineering. Correlating between collagen gel microstructure, k, and fibroblast function within collagen gels indicated that increasing the level of PC yielded a reduction in pore size and an increase in fibril bundle diameter. Decrease in k values resulted in a decrease in gel contraction and an increase in cell metabolic activity. An increase in cell density accelerated contraction. Therefore, fibroblast function within collagen gels can be optimised by a balance between the microstructure, k, and cell seeding density. Developing a micromechanical model to measure experimental k of collagen gels during confined compression revealed the formation of a dense collagen lamella

  4. Hyaline cartilage thickness in radiographically normal cadaveric hips: comparison of spiral CT arthrographic and macroscopic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyler, Annabelle; Bousson, Valérie; Bergot, Catherine; Polivka, Marc; Leveque, Eric; Vicaut, Eric; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2007-02-01

    To assess spiral multidetector computed tomographic (CT) arthrography for the depiction of cartilage thickness in hips without cartilage loss, with evaluation of anatomic slices as the reference standard. Permission to perform imaging studies in cadaveric specimens of individuals who had willed their bodies to science was obtained from the institutional review board. Two independent observers measured the femoral and acetabular hyaline cartilage thickness of 12 radiographically normal cadaveric hips (from six women and five men; age range at death, 52-98 years; mean, 76.5 years) on spiral multidetector CT arthrographic reformations and on coronal anatomic slices. Regions of cartilage loss at gross or histologic examination were excluded. CT arthrographic and anatomic measurements in the coronal plane were compared by using Bland-Altman representation and a paired t test. Differences between mean cartilage thicknesses at the points of measurement were tested by means of analysis of variance. Interobserver and intraobserver reproducibilities were determined. At CT arthrography, mean cartilage thickness ranged from 0.32 to 2.53 mm on the femoral head and from 0.95 to 3.13 mm on the acetabulum. Observers underestimated cartilage thickness in the coronal plane by 0.30 mm +/- 0.52 (mean +/- standard error) at CT arthrography (P cartilage thicknesses at the different measurement points was significant for coronal spiral multidetector CT arthrography and anatomic measurement of the femoral head and acetabulum and for sagittal and transverse CT arthrography of the femoral head (P cartilage thickness from the periphery to the center of the joint ("gradients") were found by means of spiral multidetector CT arthrography and anatomic measurement. Spiral multidetector CT arthrography depicts cartilage thickness gradients in radiographically normal cadaveric hips. (c) RSNA, 2007.

  5. A constitutive model of soft tissue: From nanoscale collagen to tissue continuum

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Huang

    2009-04-08

    Soft collagenous tissue features many hierarchies of structure, starting from tropocollagen molecules that form fibrils, and proceeding to a bundle of fibrils that form fibers. Here we report the development of an atomistically informed continuum model of collagenous tissue. Results from full atomistic and molecular modeling are linked with a continuum theory of a fiber-reinforced composite, handshaking the fibril scale to the fiber and continuum scale in a hierarchical multi-scale simulation approach. Our model enables us to study the continuum-level response of the tissue as a function of cross-link density, making a link between nanoscale collagen features and material properties at larger tissue scales. The results illustrate a strong dependence of the continuum response as a function of nanoscopic structural features, providing evidence for the notion that the molecular basis for protein materials is important in defining their larger-scale mechanical properties. © 2009 Biomedical Engineering Society.

  6. Enhanced osteoprogenitor elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by bioactive glass ionic silicon dependent on Sp7 (osterix) transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanasi, Venu G; Odatsu, Tetsurou; Bishop, Timothy; Chang, Joyce; Owyoung, Jeremy; Loomer, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive glasses release ions, those enhance osteoblast collagen matrix synthesis and osteogenic marker expression during bone healing. Collagen matrix density and osteogenic marker expression depend on osteogenic transcription factors, (e.g., Osterix (OSX)). We hypothesize that enhanced expression and formation of collagen by Si(4+) depends on enhanced expression of OSX transcription. Experimental bioactive glass (6P53-b) and commercial Bioglass(TM) (45S5) were dissolved in basal medium to make glass conditioned medium (GCM). ICP-MS analysis was used to measure bioactive glass ion release rates. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured for 20 days, and gene expression and extracellular matrix collagen formation was analyzed. In a separate study, siRNA was used to determine the effect of OSX knockdown on impacting the effect of Si(4+) on osteogenic markers and matrix collagen formation. Each bioactive glass exhibited similar ion release rates for all ions, except Mg(2+) released by 6P53-b. Gene expression results showed that GCM markedly enhanced many osteogenic markers, and 45S5 GCM showed higher levels of expression and collagen matrix fiber bundle density than 6P53-b GCM. Upon knockdown of OSX transcription, collagen type 5, alkaline phosphatase, and matrix density were not enhanced as compared to wild type cells. This study illustrates that the enhancement of elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by Si(±) depends on OSX transcription. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2604-2615, 2016.

  7. An Alternative Bundle-to-Bundle Suturing Technique for Repairing Fresh Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingjing; Yu, Bin; Xie, Ming; Huang, Ruokun; Xiao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The main concern about conventional Achilles tendon repair surgical techniques is how to maintain the initial strength of the ruptured Achilles tendon through complicated suturing methods. The primary surgical problem lies in the properties of the soft tissue; the deterioration of the Achilles tendon, especially in its elasticity; and the surface lubricity of the local tissues. In the present study, we describe an innovative bundle-to-bundle suturing method that addresses these potential problems. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluorescent nanonetworks: A novel bioalley for collagen scaffolds and Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidhin, Marimuthu; Vedhanayagam, Mohan; Sangeetha, Selvam; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Nazeer, Shaiju S.; Jayasree, Ramapurath S.; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2014-08-01

    Native collagen is arranged in bundles of aligned fibrils to withstand in vivo mechanical loads. Reproducing such a process under in vitro conditions has not met with major success. Our approach has been to induce nanolinks, during the self-assembly process, leading to delayed rather than inhibited fibrillogenesis. For this, a designed synthesis of nanoparticles - using starch as a template and a reflux process, which would provide a highly anisotropic (star shaped) nanoparticle, with large surface area was adopted. Anisotropy associated decrease in Morin temperature and superparamagnetic behavior was observed. Polysaccharide on the nanoparticle surface provided aqueous stability and low cytotoxicity. Starch coated nanoparticles was utilized to build polysaccharide - collagen crosslinks, which supplemented natural crosslinks in collagen, without disturbing the conformation of collagen. The resulting fibrillar lamellae showed a striking resemblance to native lamellae, but had a melting and denaturation temperature higher than native collagen. The biocompatibility and superparamagnetism of the nanoparticles also come handy in the development of stable collagen constructs for various biomedical applications, including that of MRI contrast agents.

  9. Fluorescent nanonetworks: a novel bioalley for collagen scaffolds and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidhin, Marimuthu; Vedhanayagam, Mohan; Sangeetha, Selvam; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Nazeer, Shaiju S; Jayasree, Ramapurath S; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2014-08-06

    Native collagen is arranged in bundles of aligned fibrils to withstand in vivo mechanical loads. Reproducing such a process under in vitro conditions has not met with major success. Our approach has been to induce nanolinks, during the self-assembly process, leading to delayed rather than inhibited fibrillogenesis. For this, a designed synthesis of nanoparticles - using starch as a template and a reflux process, which would provide a highly anisotropic (star shaped) nanoparticle, with large surface area was adopted. Anisotropy associated decrease in Morin temperature and superparamagnetic behavior was observed. Polysaccharide on the nanoparticle surface provided aqueous stability and low cytotoxicity. Starch coated nanoparticles was utilized to build polysaccharide - collagen crosslinks, which supplemented natural crosslinks in collagen, without disturbing the conformation of collagen. The resulting fibrillar lamellae showed a striking resemblance to native lamellae, but had a melting and denaturation temperature higher than native collagen. The biocompatibility and superparamagnetism of the nanoparticles also come handy in the development of stable collagen constructs for various biomedical applications, including that of MRI contrast agents.

  10. Characterization and use of Equine Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Equine Cartilage Engineering. Study of their Hyaline Cartilage Forming Potential when Cultured under Hypoxia within a Biomaterial in the Presence of BMP-2 and TGF-ß1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branly, Thomas; Bertoni, Lélia; Contentin, Romain; Rakic, Rodolphe; Gomez-Leduc, Tangni; Desancé, Mélanie; Hervieu, Magalie; Legendre, Florence; Jacquet, Sandrine; Audigié, Fabrice; Denoix, Jean-Marie; Demoor, Magali; Galéra, Philippe

    2017-06-09

    Articular cartilage presents a poor capacity for self-repair. Its structure-function are frequently disrupted or damaged upon physical trauma or osteoarthritis in humans. Similar musculoskeletal disorders also affect horses and are the leading cause of poor performance or early retirement of sport- and racehorses. To develop a therapeutic solution for horses, we tested the autologous chondrocyte implantation technique developed on human bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on horse BM-MSCs. This technique involves BM-MSC chondrogenesis using a combinatory approach based on the association of 3D-culture in collagen sponges, under hypoxia in the presence of chondrogenic factors (BMP-2 + TGF-β1) and siRNA to knockdown collagen I and HtrA1. Horse BM-MSCs were characterized before being cultured in chondrogenic conditions to find the best combination to enhance, stabilize, the chondrocyte phenotype. Our results show a very high proliferation of MSCs and these cells satisfy the criteria defining stem cells (pluripotency-surface markers expression). The combination of BMP-2 + TGF-β1 strongly induces the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs and prevents HtrA1 expression. siRNAs targeting Col1a1 and Htra1 were functionally validated. Ultimately, the combined use of specific culture conditions defined here with specific growth factors and a Col1a1 siRNAs (50 nM) association leads to the in vitro synthesis of a hyaline-type neocartilage whose chondrocytes present an optimal phenotypic index similar to that of healthy, differentiated chondrocytes. Our results lead the way to setting up pre-clinical trials in horses to better understand the reaction of neocartilage substitute and to carry out a proof-of-concept of this therapeutic strategy on a large animal model.

  11. Collagen Conduit Versus Microsurgical Neurorrhaphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel; Sørensen, Allan Ibsen; Viñeta, Joaquin Fores

    2013-01-01

    To compare repair of acute lacerations of mixed sensory-motor nerves in humans using a collagen tube versus conventional repair.......To compare repair of acute lacerations of mixed sensory-motor nerves in humans using a collagen tube versus conventional repair....

  12. Collagen for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ana Marina; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Chiono, Valeria; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2012-09-01

    In the last decades, increased knowledge about the organization, structure and properties of collagen (particularly concerning interactions between cells and collagen-based materials) has inspired scientists and engineers to design innovative collagen-based biomaterials and to develop novel tissue-engineering products. The design of resorbable collagen-based medical implants requires understanding the tissue/organ anatomy and biological function as well as the role of collagen's physicochemical properties and structure in tissue/organ regeneration. Bone is a complex tissue that plays a critical role in diverse metabolic processes mediated by calcium delivery as well as in hematopoiesis whilst maintaining skeleton strength. A wide variety of collagen-based scaffolds have been proposed for different tissue engineering applications. These scaffolds are designed to promote a biological response, such as cell interaction, and to work as artificial biomimetic extracellular matrices that guide tissue regeneration. This paper critically reviews the current understanding of the complex hierarchical structure and properties of native collagen molecules, and describes the scientific challenge of manufacturing collagen-based materials with suitable properties and shapes for specific biomedical applications, with special emphasis on bone tissue engineering. The analysis of the state of the art in the field reveals the presence of innovative techniques for scaffold and material manufacturing that are currently opening the way to the preparation of biomimetic substrates that modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, retention or enhancement of bone tissue function.

  13. 新生儿肺透明膜病的护理%Nursing care for neonates with hyaline membrane disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎婷; 彭间英; 罗冰贤

    2013-01-01

    目的 总结讨论新生儿肺透明膜病的护理体会,加强护理意识与方法.方法 对我院收治的82例新生儿肺透明膜病患儿进行系统的回顾性分析,对其护理方法进行总结.结果 经过采取综合护理后大部分患儿康复出院,少数患儿发生并发症,其中4例因肺出血合并弥漫性血管内凝血(DIC)死亡.结论 在积极治疗新生儿肺透明膜病的过程中,采取行之有效的综合护理可显著降低其病死率,提高生存率.%Objective To summarize the nursing experience on neonates with hyaline membrane disease,and to strengthen nursing consciousness and measures.Methods The data on 82 neonates with hyaline membrane disease who had been treated in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed.The nursing methods were summarized.Results After receiving comprehensive nursing care,most of the infants were discharged with rehabilitation.Complications occurred in a few of patients,4 of whom were dead due to pulmonary hemorrhage complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).Conclusions Effective nursing care can significantly reduce the mortality rate and improve the survival rate in the treatment of neonates with hyaline membrane disease.

  14. Amplitude death of coupled hair bundles with stochastic channel noise

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyung-Joong

    2014-01-01

    Hair cells conduct auditory transduction in vertebrates. In lower vertebrates such as frogs and turtles, due to the active mechanism in hair cells, hair bundles(stereocilia) can be spontaneously oscillating or quiescent. Recently, the amplitude death phenomenon has been proposed [K.-H. Ahn, J. R. Soc. Interface, {\\bf 10}, 20130525 (2013)] as a mechanism for auditory transduction in frog hair-cell bundles, where sudden cessation of the oscillations arises due to the coupling between non-identical hair bundles. The gating of the ion channel is intrinsically stochastic due to the stochastic nature of the configuration change of the channel. The strength of the noise due to the channel gating can be comparable to the thermal Brownian noise of hair bundles. Thus, we perform stochastic simulations of the elastically coupled hair bundles. In spite of stray noisy fluctuations due to its stochastic dynamics, our simulation shows the transition from collective oscillation to amplitude death as inter-bundle coupling str...

  15. Monopoles and Modifications of Bundles over Elliptic Curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey M. Levin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Modifications of bundles over complex curves is an operation that allows one to construct a new bundle from a given one. Modifications can change a topological type of bundle. We describe the topological type in terms of the characteristic classes of the bundle. Being applied to the Higgs bundles modifications establish an equivalence between different classical integrable systems. Following Kapustin and Witten we define the modifications in terms of monopole solutions of the Bogomolny equation. We find the Dirac monopole solution in the case R × (elliptic curve. This solution is a three-dimensional generalization of the Kronecker series. We give two representations for this solution and derive a functional equation for it generalizing the Kronecker results. We use it to define Abelian modifications for bundles of arbitrary rank. We also describe non-Abelian modifications in terms of theta-functions with characteristic.

  16. A Tannakian approach to dimensional reduction of principal bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Álvarez-Cónsul, Luis; García-Prada, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Let $P$ be a parabolic subgroup of a connected simply connected complex semisimple Lie group $G$. Given a compact K\\"ahler manifold $X$, the dimensional reduction of $G$-equivariant holomorphic vector bundles over $X\\times G/P$ was carried out by the first and third authors. This raises the question of dimensional reduction of holomorphic principal bundles over $X\\times G/P$. The method used for equivariant vector bundles does not generalize to principal bundles. In this paper, we adapt to equivariant principal bundles the Tannakian approach of Nori, to describe the dimensional reduction of $G$-equivariant principal bundles over $X\\times G/P$, and to establish a Hitchin--Kobayashi type correspondence. In order to be able to apply the Tannakian theory, we need to assume that $X$ is a complex projective manifold.

  17. The avalanche process of the fiber bundle model with defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da-Peng; Tang, Gang; Xia, Hui; Xun, Zhi-Peng; Han, Kui

    2017-04-01

    In order to explore the impacts of defect on the tensile fracture process of materials, the fiber bundle model with defect is constructed based on the classical fiber bundle model. In the fiber bundle model with defect, the two key parameters are the mean size and the density of defects. In both uniform and Weibull threshold distributions, the mean size and density all bring impacts on the threshold distribution of fibers. By means of analytical approximation and numerical simulation, we show that the two key parameters of the model have substantial effects on the failure process of the bundle. From macroscopic view, the defect described by the altering of threshold distribution of fibers will has a significant impact on the mechanical properties of the bundle. While in microscopic scale, the statistical properties of the model are still harmonious with the classical fiber bundle model.

  18. Cosmic multimuon bundles detected by DELPHI

    CERN Document Server

    Rídky, J

    2004-01-01

    The DELPHI detector located at LEP accelerator has been used also to measure multimuon bundles originated from cosmic ray interactions. Two subdetectors-hadron calorimeter and time projection chamber, are used for this purpose. The 1999 and 2000 data are analyzed over wide range of multiplicities. The multiplicity distribution is compared with prediction of Monte Carlo simulation based on CORSIKA/QGSJET. The Monte-Carlo does not describe the large multiplicity part of data. Even the extreme assumption on the cosmic ray composition (pure iron nuclei) hardly predicts comparable number of high-multiplicity events.

  19. Differential geometry of complex vector bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Shoshichi

    2014-01-01

    Holomorphic vector bundles have become objects of interest not only to algebraic and differential geometers and complex analysts but also to low dimensional topologists and mathematical physicists working on gauge theory. This book, which grew out of the author's lectures and seminars in Berkeley and Japan, is written for researchers and graduate students in these various fields of mathematics. Originally published in 1987. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeto

  20. Higher order mechanics on graded bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Andrew James; Grabowska, Katarzyna; Grabowski, Janusz

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we develop a geometric approach to higher order mechanics on graded bundles in both, the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalism, via the recently discovered weighted algebroids. We present the corresponding Tulczyjew triple for this higher order situation and derive in this framework the phase equations from an arbitrary (also singular) Lagrangian or Hamiltonian, as well as the Euler-Lagrange equations. As important examples, we geometrically derive the classical higher order Euler-Lagrange equations and analogous reduced equations for invariant higher order Lagrangians on Lie groupoids.

  1. Bundling Products and Services Through Modularization Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bask, Anu; Hsuan, Juliana; Rajahonka, Mervi;

    2012-01-01

    Modularity has been recognized as a powerful tool in improving the efficiency and management of product design and manufacturing. However, the integrated view on covering both, product and service modularity for product-service systems (PSS), is under researched. Therefore, in this paper our...... objective is to contribute to the PSS modularity. Thus, we describe configurations of PSSs and the bundling of products and services through modularization strategies. So far there have not been tools to analyze and determine the correct combinations of degrees of product and service modularities....

  2. Compression of a bundle of light rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuse, D

    1971-03-01

    The performance of ray compression devices is discussed on the basis of a phase space treatment using Liouville's theorem. It is concluded that the area in phase space of the input bundle of rays is determined solely by the required compression ratio and possible limitations on the maximum ray angle at the output of the device. The efficiency of tapers and lenses as ray compressors is approximately equal. For linear tapers and lenses the input angle of the useful rays must not exceed the compression ratio. The performance of linear tapers and lenses is compared to a particular ray compressor using a graded refractive index distribution.

  3. Vector bundles on complex projective spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Okonek, Christian; Spindler, Heinz

    1980-01-01

    This expository treatment is based on a survey given by one of the authors at the Séminaire Bourbaki in November 1978 and on a subsequent course held at the University of Göttingen. It is intended to serve as an introduction to the topical question of classification of holomorphic vector bundles on complex projective spaces, and can easily be read by students with a basic knowledge of analytic or algebraic geometry. Short supplementary sections describe more advanced topics, further results, and unsolved problems.

  4. Heat transfer in bundles of finned tubes in crossflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stasiulevicius, J.; Skrinska, A.; Zukauskas, A.; Hewitt, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides correlations of heat transfer and hydraulic data for bundles of finned tubes in crossflow at high Reynolds numbers. Results of studies of the effectiveness of the fin, local, and mean heat transfer coefficients are presented. The effect of geometric parameters of the fins and of the location of tubes in the bundle on heat transfer and hydraulic drag are described. The resistance of the finned tube bundles under study and other factors are examined.

  5. Coolability of ballooned VVER bundles with pellet relocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hozer, Z.; Nagy, I.; Windberg, P.; Vimi, A. [AEKI, P.O.box 49, Budapest, H-1525 (Hungary)

    2009-06-15

    During a LOCA incident the high pressure in the fuel rods can lead to clad ballooning and the debris of fuel pellets can fill the enlarged volume. The evaluation of the role of these two effects on the coolability of VVER type fuel bundles was the main objective of the experimental series. The tests were carried out in the modified configuration of the CODEX facility. 19-rod electrically heated VVER type bundle was used. The test section was heated up to 600 deg. C in steam atmosphere and the bundle was quenched from the bottom by cold water. Three series of tests were performed: 1. Reference bundle with fuel rods without ballooning, with uniform power profile. 2. Bundle with 86% blockage rate and with uniform power profile. The blockage rate was reached by superimposing hollow sleeves on all 19 fuel rods. 3. Bundle with 86% blockage rate and with local power peak in the ballooned area. The local power peak was produced by the local reduction the cross section of the internal heater bar inside of the fuel rods. In all three bundle configurations three different cooling water flow-rates were applied. The experimental results confirmed that a VVER bundle with even 86% blockage rate remains coolable after a LOCA event. The ballooned section creates some obstacles for the cooling water during reflood of the bundle, but this effect causes only a short delay in the cooling down of the hot fuel rods. Earlier tests on the coolability of ballooned bundles were performed only with Western type bundles with square fuel lattice. The present test series was the first confirmation of the coolability of VVER type bundles with triangular lattice. The accumulation of fuel pellet debris in the ballooned volume results in a local power peak, which leads to further slowing down of quench front. The first tests indicated that the effect of local power peak was less significant on the delay of cooling down than the effect of ballooning. (authors)

  6. Heat Transfer Analysis in Wire Bundles for Aerospace Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, S. L.; Iamello, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Design of wiring for aerospace vehicles relies on an understanding of "ampacity" which refers to the current carrying capacity of wires, either, individually or in wire bundles. Designers rely on standards to derate allowable current flow to prevent exceedance of wire temperature limits due to resistive heat dissipation within the wires or wire bundles. These standards often add considerable margin and are based on empirical data. Commercial providers are taking an aggressive approach to wire sizing which challenges the conventional wisdom of the established standards. Thermal modelling of wire bundles may offer significant mass reduction in a system if the technique can be generalized to produce reliable temperature predictions for arbitrary bundle configurations. Thermal analysis has been applied to the problem of wire bundles wherein any or all of the wires within the bundle may carry current. Wire bundles present analytical challenges because the heat transfer path from conductors internal to the bundle is tortuous, relying on internal radiation and thermal interface conductance to move the heat from within the bundle to the external jacket where it can be carried away by convective and radiative heat transfer. The problem is further complicated by the dependence of wire electrical resistivity on temperature. Reduced heat transfer out of the bundle leads to higher conductor temperatures and, hence, increased resistive heat dissipation. Development of a generalized wire bundle thermal model is presented and compared with test data. The steady state heat balance for a single wire is derived and extended to the bundle configuration. The generalized model includes the effects of temperature varying resistance, internal radiation and thermal interface conductance, external radiation and temperature varying convective relief from the free surface. The sensitivity of the response to uncertainties in key model parameters is explored using Monte Carlo analysis.

  7. Breast epithelial tissue morphology is affected in 3D cultures by species-specific collagen-based extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhimolea, Eugen; Soto, Ana M; Sonnenschein, Carlos

    2012-11-01

    Collagen-based gels have been widely used to determine the factors that regulate branching morphogenesis in the mammary gland. The patterns of biomechanical gradients and collagen reorganization influence the shape and orientation of epithelial structures in three-dimensional (3D) conditions. We explored in greater detail whether collagen type I fibers with distinct biomechanical and fiber-assembling properties, isolated from either bovine or rat tail tendon, differentially affected the epithelial phenotype in a tissue culture model of the human breast. Rat tail collagen fibers were densely packed into significantly longer and thicker bundles compared to those of the bovine type (average fascicle length 7.35 and 2.29 μm, respectively; p = 0.0001), indicating increased fiber alignment and biomechanical enablement in the former. MCF10A epithelial cells formed elaborated branched tubular structures in bovine but only nonbranched ducts and acini in rat tail collagen matrices. Ductal branching in bovine collagen was associated with interactions between neighboring structures mediated through packed collagen fibers; these fiber-mediated interactions were absent in rat tail collagen gels. Normal breast fibroblasts increased the final size and number of ducts only in rat tail collagen gels while not affecting branching. Our results suggest that the species of origin of collagen used in organotypic cultures may influence epithelial differentiation into alveolar or ductal structures and the patterns of epithelial branching. These observations underscore the importance of considering the species of origin and fiber alignment properties of collagen when engineering branching organs in 3D matrices and interpreting their role in the tissue phenotype.

  8. Isothermal microcalorimetry, a tool for probing SWNT bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Renaud; Greco, Carla; Schultz, Patrick; Meunier, Stéphane; Mioskowski, Charles

    2009-11-01

    The bundling state of several dry single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) samples is compared using isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC). So as to get different dry samples with various bundling states, the pristine SWNTs were pretreated with a solution of an aromatic amphiphile with or without sonication, washed and dried before being studied by IMC. The bundling state of the different SWNT samples, which was first analyzed by TEM, was then correlated to the obtained IMC data thanks to the interpretation of the observed energy transfer phenomena. From our results, IMC appears to be an interesting technique for the surface probing of dry SWNT samples, and herein for the evaluation of the bundling state.

  9. Restriction Theorem for Principal bundles in Arbitrary Characteristic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurjar, Sudarshan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to prove two basic restriction theorem for principal bundles on smooth projective varieties in arbitrary characteristic generalizing the analogues theorems of Mehta-Ramanathan for vector bundles. More precisely, let G be a reductive algebraic group over an algebraically...... closed field k and let X be a smooth, projective variety over k together with a very ample line bundle O(1). The main result of the paper is that if E is a semistable (resp. stable) principal G-bundle on X w.r.t O(1), then the restriction of E to a general, high multi-degree, complete-intersection curve...

  10. Enthalpy and void distributions in subchannels of PHWR fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. W.; Choi, H.; Rhee, B. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    Two different types of the CANDU fuel bundles have been modeled for the ASSERT-IV code subchannel analysis. From calculated values of mixture enthalpy and void fraction distribution in the fuel bundles, it is found that net buoyancy effect is pronounced in the central region of the DUPIC fuel bundle when compared with the standard CANDU fuel bundle. It is also found that the central region of the DUPIC fuel bundle can be cooled more efficiently than that of the standard fuel bundle. From the calculated mixture enthalpy distribution at the exit of the fuel channel, it is found that the mixture enthalpy and void fraction can be highest in the peripheral region of the DUPIC fuel bundle. On the other hand, the enthalpy and the void fraction were found to be highest in the central region of the standard CANDU fuel bundle at the exit of the fuel channel. This study shows that the subchannel analysis is very useful in assessing thermal behavior of the fuel bundle that could be used in CANDU reactors. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  11. Chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood implants improve hyaline cartilage repair in ovine microfracture defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoemann, Caroline D; Hurtig, Mark; Rossomacha, Evgeny; Sun, Jun; Chevrier, Anik; Shive, Matthew S; Buschmann, Michael D

    2005-12-01

    one hour postoperatively, chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood clots showed increased adhesion to the walls of the defects as compared with the blood clots in the untreated microfracture defects. After histological processing, all blood clots in the control microfracture defects had been lost, whereas chitosanglycerol phosphate/blood clot adhered to and was partly retained on the surfaces of the defect. At six months, defects that had been treated with chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood were filled with significantly more hyaline repair tissue (p cartilage repair compared with microfracture alone by increasing the amount of tissue and improving its biochemical composition and cellular organization.

  12. Granuloma hialinizante de pulmão recidivante Recurrent pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme D'Andréa Saba Arruda

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos o caso de um paciente de 61 anos, masculino, internado com objetivo de exérese de massa pulmonar para estudo anatomopatológico. O paciente apresentara anteriormente um quadro de febre, tosse seca e dor torácica, associado à presença de massas pulmonares detectadas por radiografia de tórax, tendo sido submetido em duas ocasiões (1976 e 1981 a toracotomia para a investigação diagnóstica, sem diagnóstico anatomopatológico conclusivo. A TC de tórax revelou volumosas massas com áreas de calcificação em ambos os campos pulmonares. O material do estudo anatomopatológico foi compatível com granuloma hialinizante de pulmão. No pós-operatório, o paciente apresentou vários episódios de broncoespasmo que foram revertidos com medicação sintomática. Foi mantido com prednisona na dose de 40 mg/dia com boa evolução clínica até o envio deste relato.We report the case of a 61-year-old male patient who underwent surgical excision of a lung mass for anatomopathological study. The patient had previously presented with fever, dry cough, and chest pain, together with lung masses detected by chest X-ray, and had undergone thoracotomy for diagnostic investigation on two occasions (1976 and 1981, although a conclusive diagnosis had not been made. A CT scan of the chest revealed large masses with areas of calcification in both lung fields. The anatomopathological study was consistent with pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma. In the postoperative period, the patient experienced several episodes of bronchospasm, which was reversible with the use of symptomatic medication. At this writing, the patient was receiving maintenance therapy with prednisone (40 mg/day and had shown clinical improvement.

  13. Chirality and helicity of poly-benzyl-L-glutamate in liquid crystals and a wave structure that mimics collagen helicity in crimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal Benedicto de Campos

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ideal biocompatible polymers must show a mimetic superstructure with biological supra-organization. Collagen-rich structures like tendons and ligaments are materials with various levels of order, from molecules to bundles of fibers, which affect their biomechanical properties and cellular interactions. Poly-benzyl-L-glutamate (PBLG displaying helicity was used here to test the development of wave-like structures as those occurring in collagen fibers. Birefringence of PBLG under various crystallization conditions was studied with a lambda/4 compensator according to Sénarmont. Qualitative observations were plainly sufficient to conclude that the PBLG fibrils were supra-organized helically as a chiral object. During crystallization stretched PBLG formed a helical superstructure with characteristic striation resembling waves (crimp. Supported by optical anisotropy findings, a twisted grain boundary liquid crystal type is proposed as a transition phase in the formation of the PBLG chiral object. A similarity with the wavy organization (crimp of collagen bundles is proposed.

  14. Bundled capillary electrophoresis using microstructured fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Benjamin; Gibson, Graham T T; Oleschuk, Richard D

    2011-01-01

    Joule heating, arising from the electric current passing through the capillary, causes many undesired effects in CE that ultimately result in band broadening. The use of narrow-bore capillaries helps to solve this problem as smaller cross-sectional area results in decreased Joule heating and the rate of heat dissipation is increased by the larger surface-to-volume ratio. Issues arising from such small capillaries, such as poor detection sensitivity, low loading capacity and high flow-induced backpressure (complicating capillary loading) can be avoided by using a bundle of small capillaries operating simultaneously that share buffer reservoirs. Microstructured fibres, originally designed as waveguides in the telecommunication industry, are essentially a bundle of parallel ∼5 μm id channels that extend the length of a fibre having otherwise similar dimensions to conventional CE capillaries. This work presents the use of microstructured fibres for CZE, taking advantage of their relatively high surface-to-volume ratio and the small individual size of each channel to effect highly efficient separations, particularly for dye-labelled peptides.

  15. Development boiling to sprinkled tube bundle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kracík Petr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of a studied heat transfer coefficient at the surface of a sprinkled tube bundle where boiling occurs. Research in the area of sprinkled exchangers can be divided into two major parts. The first part is research on heat transfer and determination of the heat transfer coefficient at sprinkled tube bundles for various liquids, whether boiling or not. The second part is testing of sprinkle modes for various tube diameters, tube pitches and tube materials and determination of individual modes’ interface. All results published so far for water as the falling film liquid apply to one to three tubes for which the mentioned relations studied are determined in rigid laboratory conditions defined strictly in advance. The sprinkled tubes were not viewed from the operational perspective where there are more tubes and various modes may occur in different parts with various heat transfer values. The article focuses on these processes. The tube is located in a low-pressure chamber where vacuum is generated using an exhauster via ejector. The tube consists of smooth copper tubes of 12 mm diameter placed horizontally one above another.

  16. Development boiling to sprinkled tube bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracík, Petr; Pospíšil, Jiří

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents results of a studied heat transfer coefficient at the surface of a sprinkled tube bundle where boiling occurs. Research in the area of sprinkled exchangers can be divided into two major parts. The first part is research on heat transfer and determination of the heat transfer coefficient at sprinkled tube bundles for various liquids, whether boiling or not. The second part is testing of sprinkle modes for various tube diameters, tube pitches and tube materials and determination of individual modes' interface. All results published so far for water as the falling film liquid apply to one to three tubes for which the mentioned relations studied are determined in rigid laboratory conditions defined strictly in advance. The sprinkled tubes were not viewed from the operational perspective where there are more tubes and various modes may occur in different parts with various heat transfer values. The article focuses on these processes. The tube is located in a low-pressure chamber where vacuum is generated using an exhauster via ejector. The tube consists of smooth copper tubes of 12 mm diameter placed horizontally one above another.

  17. Molybdenum-99-producing 37-element fuel bundle neutronically and thermal-hydraulically equivalent to a standard CANDU fuel bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichita, E., E-mail: Eleodor.Nichita@uoit.ca; Haroon, J., E-mail: Jawad.Haroon@uoit.ca

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • A 37-element fuel bundle modified for {sup 99}Mo production in CANDU reactors is presented. • The modified bundle is neutronically and thermal-hydraulically equivalent to the standard bundle. • The modified bundle satisfies all safety criteria satisfied by the standard bundle. - Abstract: {sup 99m}Tc, the most commonly used radioisotope in diagnostic nuclear medicine, results from the radioactive decay of {sup 99}Mo which is currently being produced at various research reactors around the globe. In this study, the potential use of CANDU power reactors for the production of {sup 99}Mo is investigated. A modified 37-element fuel bundle, suitable for the production of {sup 99}Mo in existing CANDU-type reactors is proposed. The new bundle is specifically designed to be neutronically and thermal-hydraulically equivalent to the standard 37-element CANDU fuel bundle in normal, steady-state operation and, at the same time, be able to produce significant quantities of {sup 99}Mo when irradiated in a CANDU reactor. The proposed bundle design uses fuel pins consisting of a depleted-uranium centre surrounded by a thin layer of low-enriched uranium. The new molybdenum-producing bundle is analyzed using the lattice transport code DRAGON and the diffusion code DONJON. The proposed design is shown to produce 4081 six-day Curies of {sup 99}Mo activity per bundle when irradiated in the peak-power channel of a CANDU core, while maintaining the necessary reactivity and power rating limits. The calculated {sup 99}Mo yield corresponds to approximately one third of the world weekly demand. A production rate of ∼3 bundles per week can meet the global demand of {sup 99}Mo.

  18. Collagenous Gastritis: A Rare Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Limaiem

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Collagenous gastritis is a rare entity of unknown etiology characterized histologically by the presence of a thick subepithelial collagen band associated with an inflammatory infiltrate of gastric mucosa. A 40-year-old male presented with a history of chronic intermittent abdominal pain for about 6 months. Physical examination was unremarkable, and biological tests were within normal range. The patient underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy which showed a nodular mucosa of the stomach. Biopsies of the duodenum and colon were unremarkable. However, biopsies of the gastric fundus revealed a mild chronic gastritis characterized by lymphocytic and plasma cell infiltration of deep mucosa, without lymphoid follicle formation or active inflammation. No microorganisms were identified on routine hematoxylin and eosin or Giemsa-stained sections. Subepithelial collagen in the gastric biopsies was thickened and showed entrapped capillaries. Subepithelial collagen was highlighted by Masson's trichrome staining and was negative for amyloid by Congo Red. In the areas containing thickened collagen, there were no intraepithelial lymphocytes. The final pathological diagnosis was collagenous gastritis. Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, but it is important to recognize its characteristic endoscopic and pathologic findings to make a correct diagnosis. Specific therapy for this rare entity has not yet been established. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2015; 3(2.000: 68-70

  19. [Relation of intramyocardial collagen remodeling to the changes of myocardial systolic property and angiotensin II on the overtraining rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen-Jun

    2002-02-01

    To investigate the relation of intramyocardial collagen (IMC) remodeling to the changes of myocardial systolic property (MSP) and angiotensin II (Ang II) on the overtraining rats. Morphologic remodeling of IMC and changes of contents of IMC and Ang II in myocardium local and circulation, and MSP in SD rat overtraining models were observed and determined by RM-6200 polygraph, Beckman-42 automatic biochemistry analyser, and gamma automatic radio-immunity analyzer and S-570 scanning electron microscope under the conditions. IMC forms a spatial three-dimensional network structure, consisting of collagenous fiber connection among myocardial bundles, cardiac muscle cell group, cardiac muscle cells, endocardium and capillary. There are some regularities in its interlacing. Overtraining could lead to over hyperplasia of IMC in myocardial bundles, cardiac muscle cell group, cardiac muscle cell, endocardium and capillary, and serious injury of MLSP. The relation closes to remodeling of IMC and MSP and Ang II on the overtraining.

  20. Structural changes in cartilage and collagen studied by high temperature Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Mark; Spencer, Nicholas; Dudhia, Jayesh; McMillan, Paul F

    2017-02-22

    Understanding the high temperature behavior of collagen and collagenous tissue is important for surgical procedures and biomaterials processing for the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. One primary event for proteins is thermal denaturation that involves unfolding the polypeptide chains while maintaining the primary structure intact. Collagen in the extracellular matrix of cartilage and other connective tissue is a hierarchical material containing bundles of triple-helical fibers associated with water and proteoglycan components. Thermal analysis of dehydrated collagen indicates irreversible denaturation at high temperature between 135-200°C, with another reversible event at ∼60-80°C for hydrated samples. We report high temperature Raman spectra for freeze-dried cartilage samples that show an increase in laser-excited fluorescence interpreted as conformational changes associated with denaturation above 140°C. Spectra for separated collagen and proteoglycan fractions extracted from cartilage indicate the changes are associated with collagen. The Raman data also show appearance of new features indicating peptide bond hydrolysis at high temperature implying that molecular H2 O is retained within the freeze-dried tissue. This is confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis that show 5-7 wt% H2 O remaining within freeze-dried cartilage that is released progressively upon heating up to 200°C. Spectra obtained after exposure to high temperature and re-hydration following recovery indicate that the capacity of the denatured collagen to re-absorb water is reduced. Our results are important for revealing the presence of bound H2 O within the collagen component of connective tissue even after freeze-drying and its role in denaturation that is accompanied by or perhaps preceded by breakdown of the primary polypeptide structure. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of Single-Bundle versus Double-Bundle PCL Reconstructions with More Than 10-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Deie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL injuries are not rare in acute knee injuries, and several recent anatomical studies of the PCL and reconstructive surgical techniques have generated improved patient results. Now, we have evaluated PCL reconstructions performed by either the single-bundle or double-bundle technique in a patient group followed up retrospectively for more than 10 years. Methods. PCL reconstructions were conducted using the single-bundle (27 cases or double-bundle (13 cases method from 1999 to 2002. The mean age at surgery was 34 years in the single-bundle group and 32 years in the double-bundle group. The mean follow-up period was 12.5 years. Patients were evaluated by Lysholm scoring, the gravity sag view, and knee arthrometry. Results. The Lysholm score after surgery was 89.1±5.6 points for the single-bundle group and 91.9±4.5 points for the double-bundle group. There was no significant difference between the methods in the side-to-side differences by gravity sag view or knee arthrometer evaluation, although several cases in both groups showed a side-to-side difference exceeding 5 mm by the latter evaluation method. Conclusions. We found no significant difference between single- and double-bundle PCL reconstructions during more than 10 years of follow-up.

  2. Safety assessment for the CANFLEX-NU fuel bundles with respect to the 37-element fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk, H. C.; Lim, H. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-11-01

    The KAERI and AECL have jointly developed an advanced CANDU fuel, called CANFLEX-NU fuel bundle. CANFLEX 43-element bundle has some improved features of increased operating margin and enhanced safety compared to the existing 37-element bundle. Since CANFLEX fuel bundle is designed to be compatible with the CANDU-6 reactor design, the behaviour in the thermalhydraulic system will be nearly identical with 37-element bundle. But due to different element design and linear element power distribution between the two bundles, it is expected that CANFLEX fuel behaviour would be different from the behaviour of the 37-element fuel. Therefore, safety assessments on the design basis accidents which result if fuel failures are performed. For all accidents selected, it is observed that the loading of CANFLEX bundle in an existing CANDU-6 reactor would not worsen the reactor safety. It is also predicted that fission product release for CANFLEX fuel bundle generally is lower than that for 37-element bundle. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  3. Annulus Fibrosus Can Strip Hyaline Cartilage End Plate from Subchondral Bone: A Study of the Intervertebral Disk in Tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkovec, Christian; Adams, Michael A; Dolan, Patricia; McGill, Stuart M

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Biomechanical study on cadaveric spines. Objective Spinal bending causes the annulus to pull vertically (axially) on the end plate, but failure mechanisms in response to this type of loading are poorly understood. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify the weak point of the intervertebral disk in tension. Methods Cadaveric motion segments (aged 79 to 88 years) were dissected to create midsagittal blocks of tissue, with ∼10 mm of bone superior and inferior to the disk. From these blocks, 14 bone-disk-bone slices (average 4.8 mm thick) were cut in the frontal plane. Each slice was gripped by its bony ends and stretched to failure at 1 mm/s. Mode of failure was recorded using a digital camera. Results Of the 14 slices, 10 failed by the hyaline cartilage being peeled off the subchondral bone, with the failure starting opposite the lateral annulus and proceeding medially. Two slices failed by rupturing of the trabecular bone, and a further two failed in the annulus. Conclusions The hyaline cartilage-bone junction is the disk's weak link in tension. These findings provide a plausible mechanism for the appearance of bone and cartilage fragments in herniated material. Stripping cartilage from the bony end plate would result in the herniated mass containing relatively stiff cartilage that does not easily resorb.

  4. Effect of exercise on thicknesses of mature hyaline cartilage, calcified cartilage, and subchondral bone of equine tarsi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquille, Carolyne A; Blunden, Antony S; Dyson, Sue J; Parkin, Tim D H; Goodship, Allen E; Murray, Rachel C

    2009-12-01

    OBJECTIVE-To investigate effects of exercise on hyaline cartilage (HC), calcified cartilage (CC), and subchondral bone (SCB) thickness patterns of equine tarsi. SAMPLE POPULATION-30 tarsi from cadavers of horses with known exercise history. PROCEDURES-Tarsi were assigned to 3 groups according to known exercise history as follows: pasture exercise only (PE tarsi), low-intensity general-purpose riding exercise (LE tarsi), and high-intensity elite competition riding exercise (EE tarsi). Osteochondral tissue from distal tarsal joints underwent histologic preparation. Hyaline cartilage, CC, and SCB thickness were measured at standard sites at medial, midline, and lateral locations across joints with a histomorphometric technique. RESULTS-HC, CC, and SCB thickness were significantly greater at all sites in EE tarsi, compared with PE tarsi; this was also true when LE tarsi were compared with PE tarsi. At specific sites, HC, CC, and SCB were significantly thicker in EE tarsi, compared with LE tarsi. Along the articular surface of the proximal aspect of the third metatarsal bone, SCB was thickest in EE tarsi and thinnest in LE tarsi; increases were greatest at sites previously reported to undergo peak strains and osteochondral damage. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE-Increased exercise was associated with increased HC, CC, and SCB thickness in mature horses. At sites that undergo high compressive strains, with a reported predisposition to osteoarthritic change, there was increased CC and SCB thickness. These results may provide insight into the interaction between adaptive response to exercise and pathological change.

  5. Regeneration of hyaline cartilage promoted by xenogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells embedded within elastin-like recombinamer-based bioactive hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescador, David; Ibáñez-Fonseca, Arturo; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; Briñón, Jesús G; Arias, Francisco Javier; Muntión, Sandra; Hernández, Cristina; Girotti, Alessandra; Alonso, Matilde; Del Cañizo, María Consuelo; Rodríguez-Cabello, José Carlos; Blanco, Juan Francisco

    2017-08-01

    Over the last decades, novel therapeutic tools for osteochondral regeneration have arisen from the combination of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and highly specialized smart biomaterials, such as hydrogel-forming elastin-like recombinamers (ELRs), which could serve as cell-carriers. Herein, we evaluate the delivery of xenogeneic human MSCs (hMSCs) within an injectable ELR-based hydrogel carrier for osteochondral regeneration in rabbits. First, a critical-size osteochondral defect was created in the femora of the animals and subsequently filled with the ELR-based hydrogel alone or with embedded hMSCs. Regeneration outcomes were evaluated after three months by gross assessment, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, showing complete filling of the defect and the de novo formation of hyaline-like cartilage and subchondral bone in the hMSC-treated knees. Furthermore, histological sectioning and staining of every sample confirmed regeneration of the full cartilage thickness and early subchondral bone repair, which was more similar to the native cartilage in the case of the cell-loaded ELR-based hydrogel. Overall histological differences between the two groups were assessed semi-quantitatively using the Wakitani scale and found to be statistically significant (p hyaline cartilage in osteochondral lesions.

  6. Effect of low-dose irradiation on structural and mechanical properties of hyaline cartilage-like fibrocartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öncan, Tevfik; Demirağ, Burak; Ermutlu, Cenk; Yalçinkaya, Ulviye; Özkan, Lütfü

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of low-dose irradiation on fibrous cartilage and to obtain a hyaline cartilage-like fibrocartilage (HCLF) with similar structural and mechanical properties to hyaline cartilage. An osteochondral defect was created in 40 knees of 20 rabbits. At the 7th postoperative day, a single knee of each rabbit was irradiated with a total dose of 5.0 Gy in 1.0 Gy fractions for 5 days (radiotherapy group), while the other knee was not irradiated (control group). Rabbits were then divided into four groups of 5 rabbits each. The first three groups were sacrificed at the 4th, 8th and the 12th postoperative weeks and cartilage defects were macroscopically and microscopically evaluated. The remaining group of 5 rabbits was sacrificed at the 12th week and biomechanical compression tests were performed on the cartilage defects. There was no significant biomechanical difference between the radiotherapy and the control group (p=0.686). There was no significant macroscopic and microscopic difference between groups (p=0.300). Chondrocyte clustering was observed in the irradiated group. Low-dose irradiation does not affect the mechanical properties of HCLF in vivo. However, structural changes such as chondrocyte clustering were observed.

  7. A preclinical evaluation of an autologous living hyaline-like cartilaginous graft for articular cartilage repair: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Yvonne; He, Pengfei; Chilla, Geetha Soujanya V N; Poh, Chueh Loo; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-11-09

    In this pilot study, an autologous synthetic scaffold-free construct with hyaline quality, termed living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), was applied for treating cartilage lesions. Implantation of autologous LhCG was done at load-bearing regions of the knees in skeletally mature mini-pigs for 6 months. Over the course of this study, significant radiographical improvement in LhCG treated sites was observed via magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, macroscopic repair was effected by LhCG at endpoint. Microscopic inspection revealed that LhCG engraftment restored cartilage thickness, promoted integration with surrounding native cartilage, produced abundant cartilage-specific matrix molecules, and re-established an intact superficial tangential zone. Importantly, the repair efficacy of LhCG was quantitatively shown to be comparable to native, unaffected cartilage in terms of biochemical composition and biomechanical properties. There were no complications related to the donor site of cartilage biopsy. Collectively, these results imply that LhCG engraftment may be a viable approach for articular cartilage repair.

  8. Which cartilage is regenerated, hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage? Non-invasive ultrasonic evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, K; Takakura, Y; Ohgushi, H; Habata, T; Uematsu, K; Takenaka, M; Ikeuchi, K

    2004-09-01

    To investigate ultrasonic evaluation methods for detecting whether the repair tissue is hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage in new cartilage regeneration therapy. We examined four experimental rabbit models: a spontaneous repair model (group S), a large cartilage defect model (group L), a periosteal graft model (group P) and a tissue-engineered cartilage regeneration model (group T). From the resulting ultrasonic evaluation, we used %MM (the maximum magnitude of the measurement area divided by that of the intact cartilage) as a quantitative index of cartilage regeneration. The results of the ultrasonic evaluation were compared with the histological findings and histological score. The %MM values were 61.1 +/- 16.5% in group S, 29.8 +/- 15.1% in group L, 36.3 +/- 18.3% in group P and 76.5 +/- 18.7% in group T. The results showed a strong similarity to the histological scoring. The ultrasonic examination showed that all the hyaline-like cartilage in groups S and T had a high %MM (more than 60%). Therefore, we could define the borderline between the two types of regenerated cartilage by the %MM.

  9. Biochemical characterisation of navicular hyaline cartilage, navicular fibrocartilage and the deep digital flexor tendon in horses with navicular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, M; Bird, J; Smith, R; Tulamo, R-M; May, S A

    2003-10-01

    The study hypothesis was that navicular disease is a process analogous to degenerative joint disease, which leads to changes in navicular fibrocartilage and in deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) matrix composition and that the process extends to the adjacent distal interphalangeal joint. The objectives were to compare the biochemical composition of the navicular articular and palmar cartilages from 18 horses with navicular disease with 49 horses with no history of front limb lameness, and to compare navicular fibrocartilage with medial meniscus of the stifle and collateral cartilage of the hoof. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), total glycosaminoglycan (GAG), metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 and water content in tissues were measured. Hyaline cartilage had the highest content of COMP and COMP content in hyaline cartilage and tendon was higher in lame horses than in sound horses (phyaline cartilage was higher in lame horses than in sound horses. The MMP-2 amounts were significantly higher in tendons compared to other tissue types. Overall, 79% of the lame horses with lesions had MMP-9 in their tendons and the amount was higher than in sound horses (phyaline and fibrocartilage as well as the DDFT with potential implications for the pathogenesis and management of the condition.

  10. Electrostatic effects in collagen fibrillization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Svetlana; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2014-03-01

    Using light scattering and AFM techniques, we have measured the kinetics of fibrillization of collagen (pertinent to the vitreous of human eye) as a function of pH and ionic strength. At higher and lower pH, collagen triple-peptides remain stable in solution without fibrillization. At neutral pH, the fibrillization occurs and its growth kinetics is slowed upon either an increase in ionic strength or a decrease in temperature. We present a model, based on polymer crystallization theory, to describe the observed electrostatic nature of collagen assembly.

  11. Sterile Keratitis following Collagen Crosslinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Mohammad-Ali; Feizi, Sepehr

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report a keratoconic eye that developed severe sterile keratitis and corneal scar after collagen crosslinking necessitating corneal transplantation. Case Report: A 26-year-old man with progressive keratoconus underwent collagen crosslinking and presented with severe keratitis 72 hours after the procedure. The initial impression was infectious corneal ulcer and a fortified antibiotic regimen was administered. However, the clinical course and confocal microscopy results prompted a diagnosis of sterile keratitis. The eye developed severe corneal scars leading to reduced visual acuity and necessitating corneal transplantation. Conclusion: Sterile keratitis may develop after collagen crosslinking resulting in profound visual loss leading to corneal transplantation. PMID:25709779

  12. Stability of collagen during denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, R; Goshev, I; Gorinstein, S; Nedkov, P

    1999-05-01

    The stability of calf skin collagen (CSC) type I during thermal and chemical denaturation in the presence of glycerol was investigated. Thermal denaturation of type I collagen was performed in the presence of glycerol or in combination with urea and sodium chloride. The denaturation curves obtained in the presence of urea or sodium chloride retained their original shape without glycerol. These curves were shifted upward proportionally to the glycerol concentration in the reaction medium. This means that glycerol and the denaturants act independently. The explanation is based on the difference in the mechanism of their action on the collagen molecule.

  13. Coherent hollow-core waveguide bundles for thermal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Udi; Harrington, James; Ben-David, Moshe; Bledt, Carlos; Syzonenko, Nicholas; Gannot, Israel

    2010-09-01

    There has been very little work done in the past to extend the wavelength range of fiber image bundles to the IR range. This is due, in part, to the lack of IR transmissive fibers with optical and mechanical properties analogous to the oxide glass fibers currently employed in the visible fiber bundles. Our research is aimed at developing high-resolution hollow-core coherent IR fiber bundles for transendoscopic infrared imaging. We employ the hollow glass waveguide (HGW) technology that was used successfully to make single-HGWs with Ag/AgI thin film coatings to form coherent bundles for IR imaging. We examine the possibility of developing endoscopic systems to capture thermal images using hollow waveguide fiber bundles adjusted to the 8-10?mum spectral range and investigate the applicability of such systems. We carried out a series of measurements in order to characterize the optical properties of the fiber bundles. These included the attenuation, resolution, and temperature response. We developed theoretical models and simulation tools that calculate the light propagation through HGW bundles, and which can be used to calculate the optical properties of the fiber bundles. Finally, the HGW fiber bundles were used to transmit thermal images of various heated objects; the results were compared with simulation results. The experimental results are encouraging, show an improvement in the resolution and thermal response of the HGW fiber bundles, and are consistent with the theoretical results. Nonetheless, additional improvements in the attenuation of the bundles are required in order to be able to use this technology for medical applications.

  14. Control del colapso del colágeno: desproteinización Control of the collagen network collapse: collagen remoral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Osario Ruiz

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available La penetración de la resina y su reacción con los componentes de los tejidos dentales desmineralizados es el mecanismo micromecánico con el cual los materiales restauradores de resina se unen al diente. Los monómeros penetran en la dentina acondicionada y se concentran en la región superficial contribuyendo a la unión. El refuerzo de esta zona con resina se conoce como hibridación, e implica la impregnación de la red de colágeno y el encapsulamiento de los cristales de hidroxiapatita. Han surgido dudas en cuanto a la contribución de la red de colágeno en el ensamblaje de la unión y en la fuerza interfacial, ya que el aumento del grosor de la red de colágeno no aumenta dicha fuerza y la remoción del colágeno con hipoclorito sódico al 5% en solución acuosa da valores similares de fuerza a los que se obtienen cuando la red de colágeno está presenteResin penetration into and its reaction with the components of conditioned, mineralised dental tissues is known to be the fundamental micromechanical mechanism by which restorative materials can be successfully bonded to teeth. Monomers penetrated into conditioned dentin and concentrated in a superficial region of resin-reinforced dentin contributing significantly to the bond. The reinforcement, known as hybridization, involved impregnation, co-mingling and envelopment of collagen bundles and encapsulation of hydroxyapatite crystallites. A doubt raised concerning the quantitative contribution which the collagen network made to interfacial bond strength. lncreasing the thickness of the collagen network did not influence the assembly strength, and removal of the collagen with 5% sodium hypochlorite provided similar values to those recorded when the network was present.

  15. Collagen mimetic peptide discs promote assembly of a broad range of natural protein fibers through hydrophobic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Kenneth; Nanda, Vikas

    2017-07-19

    Collagen mimetic peptides that alone formed two-dimensional nanoscale discs driven by hydrophobic interactions were shown in electron microscopy studies to also co-assemble with natural fibrous proteins to produce discs-on-a-string (DoS) nanostructures. In most cases, peptide discs also facilitated bundling of the protein fibers. This provides insight into how synthetic and natural proteins may be combined to develop multicomponent, multi-dimensional architectures at the nanoscale.

  16. Non-abelian higher gauge theory and categorical bundle

    CERN Document Server

    Viennot, David

    2012-01-01

    A gauge theory is associated with a principal bundle endowed with a connection permitting to define horizontal lifts of paths. The horizontal lifts of surfaces cannot be defined into a principal bundle structure. An higher gauge theory is an attempt to generalize the bundle structure in order to describe horizontal lifts of surfaces. A such attempt is particularly difficult for the non-abelian case. Some structures have been proposed to realize this goal (twisted bundle, gerbes with connection, bundle gerbe, 2-bundle). Each of them uses a category in place of the total space manifold of the usual principal bundle structure. Some of them replace also the structure group by a category (more precisely a Lie crossed module viewed as a category). But the base space remains still a simple manifold (possibly viewed as a trivial category with only identity arrows). We propose a new principal categorical bundle structure, with a Lie crossed module as structure groupoid, but with a base space belonging to a bigger clas...

  17. Presenting Lexical Bundles for Explicit Noticing with Schematic Linguistic Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Haidee Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Lexical bundles are essential for fluency, but their incompleteness is a stumbling block for learners. In this study, two presentation methods to increase awareness of lexical bundles through explicit noticing are explored and compared with incidental exposure. The three conditions in this study were as follows: noticing with schematic linguistic…

  18. Smooth Bundling of Large Streaming and Sequence Graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurter, C.; Ersoy, O.; Telea, A.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic graphs are increasingly pervasive in modern information systems. However, understanding how a graph changes in time is difficult. We present here two techniques for simplified visualization of dynamic graphs using edge bundles. The first technique uses a recent image-based graph bundling met

  19. Helical twist controls the thickness of F-actin bundles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, M.M.A.E.; Semmrich, C.; Ramos, L.; Bausch, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    In the presence of condensing agents such as nonadsorbing polymer, multivalent counter ions, and specific bundling proteins, chiral biopolymers typically form bundles with a finite thickness, rather than phase-separating into a polymer-rich phase. Although short-range repulsive interactions or geome

  20. Lexical Bundles in L1 and L2 Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hua; Baker, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This paper adopts an automated frequency-driven approach to identify frequently-used word combinations (i.e., "lexical bundles") in academic writing. Lexical bundles retrieved from one corpus of published academic texts and two corpora of student academic writing (one L1, the other L2), were investigated both quantitatively and qualitatively.…

  1. Lexical Bundles: Facilitating University "Talk" in Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Chan Swee; Kashiha, Hadi; Tan, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Group discussion forms an integral language experience for most language learners, providing them with an opportunity to express themselves in a naturalistic setting. Multi-word expressions are commonly used and one of them is lexical bundles. Lexical bundles are types of extended collocations that occur more commonly than we expect; they are…

  2. Vector bundles of rank 2 computing Clifford indices

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, H

    2010-01-01

    Clifford indices of vector bundles on algebraic curves were introduced in a previous paper of the authors. In this paper we study bundles of rank 2 which compute these Clifford indices. This is of particular interest in the light of recently discovered counterexamples to a conjecture of Mercat.

  3. On the general elephant conjecture for Mori conic bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Prokhorov, Yu G

    1996-01-01

    Let $f:X\\to S$ be an extremal contraction from a threefolds with terminal singularities onto a surface (so called Mori conic bundle). We study some particular cases of such contractions: quotients of usual conic bundles and index two contractions. Assuming Reid's general elephants conjecture we also obtain a rough classification. We present many examples.

  4. Subanalytic Bundles and Tubular Neighbourhoods of Zero-Loci

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vishwambhar Pati

    2003-08-01

    We introduce the natural and fairly general notion of a subanalytic bundle (with a finite dimensional vector space of sections) on a subanalytic subset of a real analytic manifold , and prove that when is compact, there is a Baire subset of sections in whose zero-loci in have tubular neighbourhoods, homeomorphic to the restriction of the given bundle to these zero-loci.

  5. Computational imaging through a fiber-optic bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, Muhammad A.; Dumas, John Paul; Pierce, Mark C.; Bajwa, Waheed U.

    2017-05-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) has proven to be a viable method for reconstructing high-resolution signals using low-resolution measurements. Integrating CS principles into an optical system allows for higher-resolution imaging using lower-resolution sensor arrays. In contrast to prior works on CS-based imaging, our focus in this paper is on imaging through fiber-optic bundles, in which manufacturing constraints limit individual fiber spacing to around 2 μm. This limitation essentially renders fiber-optic bundles as low-resolution sensors with relatively few resolvable points per unit area. These fiber bundles are often used in minimally invasive medical instruments for viewing tissue at macro and microscopic levels. While the compact nature and flexibility of fiber bundles allow for excellent tissue access in-vivo, imaging through fiber bundles does not provide the fine details of tissue features that is demanded in some medical situations. Our hypothesis is that adapting existing CS principles to fiber bundle-based optical systems will overcome the resolution limitation inherent in fiber-bundle imaging. In a previous paper we examined the practical challenges involved in implementing a highly parallel version of the single-pixel camera while focusing on synthetic objects. This paper extends the same architecture for fiber-bundle imaging under incoherent illumination and addresses some practical issues associated with imaging physical objects. Additionally, we model the optical non-idealities in the system to get lower modelling errors.

  6. Parabolic stable Higgs bundles over complete noncompact Riemann surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李嘉禹; 王友德

    1999-01-01

    Let M be an open Riemann surface with a finite set of punctures, a complete Poincar(?)-like metric is introduced near the punctures and the equivalence between the stability of an indecomposable parabolic Higgs bundle, and the existence of a Hermitian-Einstein metric on the bundle is established.

  7. Lexical Bundles in L1 and L2 Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hua; Baker, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This paper adopts an automated frequency-driven approach to identify frequently-used word combinations (i.e., "lexical bundles") in academic writing. Lexical bundles retrieved from one corpus of published academic texts and two corpora of student academic writing (one L1, the other L2), were investigated both quantitatively and qualitatively.…

  8. An integral Riemann-Roch theorem for surface bundles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ib Henning

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a response to a conjecture by T. Akita about an integral Riemann–Roch theorem for surface bundles.......This paper is a response to a conjecture by T. Akita about an integral Riemann–Roch theorem for surface bundles....

  9. On the Classification of Complex Vector Bundles of Stable Rank

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Constantin Bǎnicǎ; Mihai Putinar

    2006-08-01

    One describes, using a detailed analysis of Atiyah–Hirzebruch spectral sequence, the tuples of cohomology classes on a compact, complex manifold, corresponding to the Chern classes of a complex vector bundle of stable rank. This classification becomes more effective on generalized flag manifolds, where the Lie algebra formalism and concrete integrability conditions describe in constructive terms the Chern classes of a vector bundle.

  10. Bundled automobile insurance coverage and accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chu-Shiu; Liu, Chwen-Chi; Peng, Sheng-Chang

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the characteristics of automobile accidents by taking into account two types of automobile insurance coverage: comprehensive vehicle physical damage insurance and voluntary third-party liability insurance. By using a unique data set in the Taiwanese automobile insurance market, we explore the bundled automobile insurance coverage and the occurrence of claims. It is shown that vehicle physical damage insurance is the major automobile coverage and affects the decision to purchase voluntary liability insurance coverage as a complement. Moreover, policyholders with high vehicle physical damage insurance coverage have a significantly higher probability of filing vehicle damage claims, and if they additionally purchase low voluntary liability insurance coverage, their accident claims probability is higher than those who purchase high voluntary liability insurance coverage. Our empirical results reveal that additional automobile insurance coverage information can capture more driver characteristics and driving behaviors to provide useful information for insurers' underwriting policies and to help analyze the occurrence of automobile accidents.

  11. On The Motive of G-bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Habibi, Somayeh

    2011-01-01

    Let $G$ be a reductive algebraic group over a perfect field $k$ and $\\mathcal{G}$ a $G$-bundle over a scheme $X/k$. The main aim of this article is to study the motive associated with $\\mathcal{G}$, inside the Veovodsky Motivic categories. We consider the case that $\\charakt k=0$ (resp. $\\charakt k\\geq 0$), the motive associated to $X$ is geometrically mixed Tate (resp. geometrically cellular) and $\\mathcal{G}$ is locally trivial for the Zariski (resp. \\'etale) topology on $X$ and show that the motive of $\\mathcal{G}$ is a geometrically mixed Tate motive. Moreover for a general $X$ we construct a filtration on the motive associated to $\\mathcal{G}$ in terms of weight polytopes. Along the way we give some applications and examples.

  12. Fiber bundle model under fluid pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitrano, David; Girard, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    Internal fluid pressure often plays an important role in the rupture of brittle materials. This is a major concern for many engineering applications and for natural hazards. More specifically, the mechanisms through which fluid pressure, applied at a microscale, can enhance the failure at a macroscale and accelerate damage dynamics leading to failure remains unclear. Here we revisit the fiber bundle model by accounting for the effect of fluid under pressure that contributes to the global load supported by the fiber bundle. Fluid pressure is applied on the broken fibers, following Biot's theory. The statistical properties of damage avalanches and their evolution toward macrofailure are analyzed for a wide range of fluid pressures. The macroscopic strength of the new model appears to be strongly controlled by the action of the fluid, particularly when the fluid pressure becomes comparable with the fiber strength. The behavior remains consistent with continuous transition, i.e., second order, including for large pressure. The main change concerns the damage acceleration toward the failure that is well modeled by the concept of sweeping of an instability. When pressure is increased, the exponent β characterizing the power-law distribution avalanche sizes significantly decreases and the exponent γ characterizing the cutoff divergence when failure is approached significantly increases. This proves that fluid pressure plays a key role in failure process acting as destabilization factor. This indicates that macrofailure occurs more readily under fluid pressure, with a behavior that becomes progressively unstable as fluid pressure increases. This may have considerable consequences on our ability to forecast failure when fluid pressure is acting.

  13. Artificial ciliary bundles with nano fiber tip links

    CERN Document Server

    Asadnia, Mohsen; Miao, Jianmin; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensory ciliary bundles in fishes are the inspiration for carefully engineered artificial flow sensors. We report the development of a new class of ultrasensitive MEMS flow sensors that mimic the intricate morphology of the ciliary bundles, including the stereocilia, tip links, and the cupula, and thereby achieve threshold detection limits that match the biological example. An artificial ciliary bundle is achieved by fabricating closely-spaced arrays of polymer micro-pillars with gradiating heights. Tip links that form the fundamental sensing elements are realized through electrospinning aligned PVDF piezoelectric nano-fibers that link the distal tips of the polymer cilia. An optimized synthesis of hyaluronic acid-methacrylic anhydride hydrogel that results in properties close to the biological cupula, together with drop-casting method are used to form the artificial cupula that encapsulates the ciliary bundle. In testing, fluid drag force causes the ciliary bundle to slide, stretching the flexible nan...

  14. HORIZONTAL LAPLACE OPERATOR IN REAL FINSLER VECTOR BUNDLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A vector bundle F over the tangent bundle TM of a manifold M is said to be a Finsler vector bundle if it is isomorphic to the pull-back π*E of a vector bundle E over M([1]). In this article the authors study the h-Laplace operator in Finsler vector bundles.An h-Laplace operator is defined, first for functions and then for horizontal Finsler forms on E. Using the h-Laplace operator, the authors define the h-harmonic function and h-harmonic horizontal Finsler vector fields, and furthermore prove some integral formulas for the h-Laplace operator, horizontal Finsler vector fields, and scalar fields on E.

  15. The 2-Hilbert Space of a Prequantum Bundle Gerbe

    CERN Document Server

    Bunk, Severin; Szabo, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    We construct a prequantum 2-Hilbert space for any line bundle gerbe whose Dixmier-Douady class is torsion. Analogously to usual prequantisation, this 2-Hilbert space has the category of sections of the line bundle gerbe as its underlying 2-vector space. These sections are obtained as certain morphism categories in Waldorf's version of the 2-category of line bundle gerbes. We show that these morphism categories carry a monoidal structure under which they are semisimple and abelian. We introduce a dual functor on the sections, which yields a closed structure on the morphisms between bundle gerbes and turns the category of sections into a 2-Hilbert space. We discuss how these 2-Hilbert spaces fit various expectations from higher prequantisation. We then extend the transgression functor to the full 2-category of bundle gerbes and demonstrate its compatibility with the additional structures introduced. We discuss various aspects of Kostant-Souriau prequantisation in this setting, including its dimensional reductio...

  16. Bundles over Quantum RealWeighted Projective Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Brzeziński

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The algebraic approach to bundles in non-commutative geometry and the definition of quantum real weighted projective spaces are reviewed. Principal U(1-bundles over quantum real weighted projective spaces are constructed. As the spaces in question fall into two separate classes, the negative or odd class that generalises quantum real projective planes and the positive or even class that generalises the quantum disc, so do the constructed principal bundles. In the negative case the principal bundle is proven to be non-trivial and associated projective modules are described. In the positive case the principal bundles turn out to be trivial, and so all the associated modules are free. It is also shown that the circle (coactions on the quantum Seifert manifold that define quantum real weighted projective spaces are almost free.

  17. A geometric approach to noncommutative principal torus bundles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    for noncommutative algebras and say that a dynamical system (A, 핋n,α) is called a noncommutative principal 핋n-bundle, if localization leads to a trivial noncommutative principal 핋n-bundle. We prove that this approach extends the classical theory of principal torus bundles and present a bunch of (nontrivial......A (smooth) dynamical system with transformation group 핋n is a triple (A, 핋n,α), consisting of a unital locally convex algebra A, the n-torus 핋n and a group homomorphism α:핋n→Aut(A), which induces a (smooth) continuous action of 핋n on A. In this paper, we present a new, geometrically oriented...... approach to the noncommutative geometry of principal torus bundles based on such dynamical systems. Our approach is inspired by the classical setting: In fact, after recalling the definition of a trivial noncommutative principal torus bundle, we introduce a convenient (smooth) localization method...

  18. Morse theory for the space of Higgs G-bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Indranil

    2010-01-01

    Fix a $C^\\infty$ principal $G$--bundle $E^0_G$ on a compact connected Riemann surface $X$, where $G$ is a connected complex reductive linear algebraic group. We consider the gradient flow of the Yang--Mills--Higgs functional on the cotangent bundle of the space of all smooth connections on $E^0_G$. We prove that this flow preserves the subset of Higgs $G$--bundles, and, furthermore, the flow emanating from any point of this subset has a limit. Given a Higgs $G$--bundle, we identify the limit point of the integral curve passing through it. These generalize the results of the second named author on Higgs vector bundles.

  19. [Bundle-branch block depending on the heart rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolov, L

    1975-01-01

    Five patients are reported, admitted to the hospital, with diseases predominantly of the cardio-vascular system. During the electrocardiographic examinations bundle branch block was established, depending on heart rate. It fluctuated within the physiological limits from 50 to 90/min. In three of the patients, the bundle branch block appeared with the quickening of the heart rate (tachycardia-depending bundle branch block) and in two of the patients--the bundle branch block appeared during the slowing down of the heart action and disappeared with its quickening (bradicardia-depending bundle branch block). A brief literature review is presented and attention is paid to the possible diagnostic errors and the treatment mode of those patients with cardiac tonic and antiarrhythmic medicaments.

  20. Voltage- and calcium-dependent motility of saccular hair bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones, Patricia M.; Meenderink, Sebastiaan W. F.; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-12-01

    Active bundle motility, which is hypothesized to supply feedback for mechanical amplification of signals, is thought to enhance sensitivity and sharpen tuning in vestibular and auditory organs. To study active hair bundle motility, we combined high-speed camera recordings of bullfrog sacculi, which were mounted in a two-compartment chamber, and voltage-clamp of the hair cell membrane potential. Using this paradigm, we measured three types of bundle motions: 1) spontaneous oscillations which can be analyzed to measure the physiological operating range of the transduction channel; 2) a sustained quasi-static movement of the bundle that depends on membrane potential; and 3) a fast, transient and asymmetric movement that resets the bundle position and depends on changes in the membrane potential. These data support a role for both calcium and voltage in the transduction-channel function.

  1. Superconductivity in an Inhomogeneous Bundle of Metallic and Semiconducting Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Grigorenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Bogoliubov-de Gennes formalism for inhomogeneous systems, we have studied superconducting properties of a bundle of packed carbon nanotubes, making a triangular lattice in the bundle's transverse cross-section. The bundle consists of a mixture of metallic and doped semiconducting nanotubes, which have different critical transition temperatures. We investigate how a spatially averaged superconducting order parameter and the critical transition temperature depend on the fraction of the doped semiconducting carbon nanotubes in the bundle. Our simulations suggest that the superconductivity in the bundle will be suppressed when the fraction of the doped semiconducting carbon nanotubes will be less than 0.5, which is the percolation threshold for a two-dimensional triangular lattice.

  2. The structural and optical properties of type III human collagen biosynthetic corneal substitutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Sally; Lewis, Phillip; Islam, M. Mirazul; Doutch, James; Sorensen, Thomas; White, Tomas; Griffith, May; Meek, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of clinically biocompatible, cell-free hydrogels comprised of synthetically cross-linked and moulded recombinant human collagen type III (RHCIII) with and without the incorporation of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) were assessed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray scattering, spectroscopy and refractometry. These findings were examined alongside similarly obtained data from 21 human donor corneas. TEM demonstrated the presence of loosely bundled aggregates of fine collagen filaments within both RHCIII and RHCIII-MPC implants, which X-ray scattering showed to lack D-banding and be preferentially aligned in a uniaxial orientation throughout. This arrangement differs from the predominantly biaxial alignment of collagen fibrils that exists in the human cornea. By virtue of their high water content (90%), very fine collagen filaments (2–9 nm) and lack of cells, the collagen hydrogels were found to transmit almost all incident light in the visible spectrum. They also transmitted a large proportion of UV light compared to the cornea which acts as an effective UV filter. Patients implanted with these hydrogels should be cautious about UV exposure prior to regrowth of the epithelium and in-growth of corneal cells into the implants. PMID:26159106

  3. Human collagen produced in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2014-01-01

    Consequential to its essential role as a mechanical support and affinity regulator in extracellular matrices, collagen constitutes a highly sought after scaffolding material for regeneration and healing applications. However, substantiated concerns have been raised with regard to quality and safety of animal tissue-extracted collagen, particularly in relation to its immunogenicity, risk of disease transmission and overall quality and consistency. In parallel, contamination with undesirable cellular factors can significantly impair its bioactivity, vis-a-vis its impact on cell recruitment, proliferation and differentiation. High-scale production of recombinant human collagen Type I (rhCOL1) in the tobacco plant provides a source of an homogenic, heterotrimeric, thermally stable “virgin” collagen which self assembles to fine homogenous fibrils displaying intact binding sites and has been applied to form numerous functional scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In addition, rhCOL1 can form liquid crystal structures, yielding a well-organized and mechanically strong membrane, two properties indispensable to extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicry. Overall, the shortcomings of animal- and cadaver-derived collagens arising from their source diversity and recycled nature are fully overcome in the plant setting, constituting a collagen source ideal for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23941988

  4. CHF Enhancement of Advanced 37-Element Fuel Bundles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Hwan Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A standard 37-element fuel bundle (37S fuel bundle has been used in commercial CANDU reactors for over 40 years as a reference fuel bundle. Most CHF of a 37S fuel bundle have occurred at the elements arranged in the inner pitch circle for high flows and at the elements arranged in the outer pitch circle for low flows. It should be noted that a 37S fuel bundle has a relatively small flow area and high flow resistance at the peripheral subchannels of its center element compared to the other subchannels. The configuration of a fuel bundle is one of the important factors affecting the local CHF occurrence. Considering the CHF characteristics of a 37S fuel bundle in terms of CHF enhancement, there can be two approaches to enlarge the flow areas of the peripheral subchannels of a center element in order to enhance CHF of a 37S fuel bundle. To increase the center subchannel areas, one approach is the reduction of the diameter of a center element, and the other is an increase of the inner pitch circle. The former can increase the total flow area of a fuel bundle and redistributes the power density of all fuel elements as well as the CHF. On the other hand, the latter can reduce the gap between the elements located in the middle and inner pitch circles owing to the increasing inner pitch circle. This can also affect the enthalpy redistribution of the fuel bundle and finally enhance CHF or dry-out power. In this study, the above two approaches, which are proposed to enlarge the flow areas of the center subchannels, were considered to investigate the impact of the flow area changes of the center subchannels on the CHF enhancement as well as the thermal characteristics by applying a subchannel analysis method.

  5. Modern Collagen Wound Dressings: Function and Purpose

    OpenAIRE

    Fleck, Cynthia Ann; Simman, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Collagen, which is produced by fibroblasts, is the most abundant protein in the human body. A natural structural protein, collagen is involved in all 3 phases of the wound-healing cascade. It stimulates cellular migration and contributes to new tissue development. Because of their chemotactic properties on wound fibroblasts, collagen dressings encourage the deposition and organization of newly formed collagen, creating an environment that fosters healing. Collagen-based biomaterials stimulate...

  6. Modern Collagen Wound Dressings: Function and Purpose

    OpenAIRE

    Fleck, Cynthia Ann; Simman, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Collagen, which is produced by fibroblasts, is the most abundant protein in the human body. A natural structural protein, collagen is involved in all 3 phases of the wound-healing cascade. It stimulates cellular migration and contributes to new tissue development. Because of their chemotactic properties on wound fibroblasts, collagen dressings encourage the deposition and organization of newly formed collagen, creating an environment that fosters healing. Collagen-based biomaterials stimulate...

  7. Restriction of Preferences to the Set of Consumption Bundles, In a Model with Production and Consumption Bundles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, S.

    1999-01-01

    In contrast to the neo-classical theory of Arrow and Debreu, a model of a private ownership economy is presented, in which production and consumption bundles are treated separately. Each of the two types of bundles is assumed to establish a con- vex cone. Production technologies can convert producti

  8. Restriction of Preferences to the Set of Consumption Bundles, In a Model with Production and Consumption Bundles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, S.

    1999-01-01

    In contrast to the neo-classical theory of Arrow and Debreu, a model of a private ownership economy is presented, in which production and consumption bundles are treated separately. Each of the two types of bundles is assumed to establish a con- vex cone. Production technologies can convert

  9. Tumor fusocelular hialinizante con rosetas gigantes: Reporte de un caso Hyalinizing spindle cell tumor with giant rosettes: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto García Ayala

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El tumor fusocelular hialinizante con rosetas gigantes es una neoplasia constituida por dos componentes histológicos, uno celular con elementos fusiformes, y el segundo representado por islas bien delimitadas casi acelulares, llenas de material hialino, rodeadas de células redondas u ovales, las cuales muestran un perfil inmunohistoquímico inusual, e histogénesis incierta. Objetivo: Instruir a los patólogos y clínicos sobre este tumor, su forma de presentación y diagnósticos diferenciales. Metodología y resultados: Se presenta el caso de una mujer de 42 años con masa ubicada en región inguinal, de crecimiento progresivo (1 año, que se reseca quirúrgicamente anatomía patológica informó un tumor fusocelular hialinizante con rosetas gigantes, según hallazgos morfológicos e inmuno histoquímicos, en correlación con su localización y cuadro clínico. Conclusión: Se hace necesario ampliar el conocimiento sobre esta entidad y de esta forma obtener una adecuada evaluación de sus criterios pronósticos histológicos, comportamiento clínico y tratamiento. Salud UIS 2010; 42: 282-286Introduction: The hyalinizing spindle cell tumor with giant rosettes is a neoplasia characterized by both histologic components, one of which is cellular, with spindle-shaped elements and the second represented by well defined almost acellular islands filled with hyaline material surrounded by round to oval cells, which shows an unusual immunohistochemical profile and uncertain histogenesis. Objective: Educate pathologists and clinicians about this tumor, its presentation and differential diagnosis. Methods and results: A case of a 42 year old woman with a mass located in the inguinal region, with progressive growth (1 year, surgically resected and histopathology reported as Hyalinizing spindle cell tumor with giant rosettes according to morphological, immunohistochemical findings correlates with its location and clinical. Conclusion: It is

  10. The development of hyaline-cell cartilage in the head of the black molly, Poecilia sphenops. Evidence for secondary cartilage in a teleost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, M

    1989-01-01

    The development of hyaline-cell cartilage attached to membrane (dentary, maxilla, nasal, lacrimal and cleithrum) and cartilage (basioccipital) bones has been studied in the viviparous black molly, Poecilia sphenops. Intramembranous ossification commences before the first appearance of hyaline cells. As hyaline-cell cartilage is densely cellular and as that attached to the dentary, maxilla and cleithrum develops from the periosteum of these membrane bones, it must be regarded as secondary cartilage according to current concepts. It is also argued that the hyaline-cell cartilage attached to the perichondral bone of the basioccipital (a cartilage bone), could also be viewed as secondary. The status of the cartilage on the nasal and lacrimal bones is less clear, for it develops, at least in part, from mucochondroid (mucous connective) tissue. This is the first definitive report of secondary cartilage in any lower vertebrate. The tissue is therefore not restricted to birds and mammals as hitherto believed, and a multipotential periosteum must have arisen early in vertebrate evolution. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:2481666

  11. Collagen type XII and versican are present in the early stages of cartilage tissue formation by both redifferentating passaged and primary chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Drew W; Ahmed, Nazish; Parreno, Justin; Lunstrum, Gregory P; Gross, Allan E; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Kandel, Rita A

    2015-02-01

    Current approaches to cartilage tissue engineering require a large number of chondrocytes. Although chondrocyte numbers can be expanded in monolayer culture, the cells dedifferentiate and unless they can be redifferentiated are not optimal to use for cartilage repair. We took advantage of the differential effect of culture conditions on the ability of passaged and primary chondrocytes to form cartilage tissue to dissect out the extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules produced and accumulated in the early stages of passaged cell cartilage tissue formation as we hypothesized that passaged bovine cells that form cartilage accumulate a pericellular matrix that differs from cells that do not form cartilage. Twice passaged bovine chondrocytes (P2) (cartilage forming), or as a control primary chondrocytes (P0) (which do not generate cartilage), were cultured on three-dimensional membrane inserts in serum-free media. P2 redifferentiation was occurring during the first 8 days as indicated by increased expression of the chondrogenic genes Sox9, collagen type II, aggrecan, and COMP, suggesting that this is an appropriate time period to examine the ECM. Mass spectrometry showed that the P2 secretome (molecules released into the media) at 1 week had higher levels of collagen types I, III, and XII, and versican while type II collagen and COMP were found at higher levels in the P0 secretome. There was increased collagen synthesis and retention by P2 cells compared to P0 cells as early as 3 days of culture. Confocal microscopy showed that types XII, III, and II collagen, aggrecan, versican, and decorin were present in the ECM of P2 cells. In contrast, collagen types I, II, and III, aggrecan, and decorin were present in the ECM of P0 cells. As primary chondrocytes grown in serum-containing media, a condition that allows for the generation of cartilage tissue in vitro, also accumulate versican and collagen XII, this study suggests that these molecules may be necessary to provide a

  12. Reappraisal of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma: novel morphologic observations of the hyaline cartilage and endochondral ossification and beta-catenin, Sox9, and osteocalcin immunostaining of 22 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanburg-Smith, Julie C; Auerbach, Aaron; Marwaha, Jayson S; Wang, Zengfeng; Rushing, Elisabeth J

    2010-05-01

    Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, a rare malignant round cell and hyaline cartilage tumor, is most commonly intraosseous but can occur in extraskeletal sites. We intensively observed the morphology and applied Sox9 (master regulator of chondrogenesis), beta-catenin (involved in bone formation, thought to inhibit chondrogenesis in a Sox9-dependent manner), and osteocalcin (a marker for osteoblastic phenotype) to 22 central nervous system and musculoskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. Cases of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma were retrieved and reviewed from our files. Immunohistochemistry and follow-up were obtained on mesenchymal chondrosarcoma and tumor controls. Twenty-two mesenchymal chondrosarcomas included 5 central nervous system (all female; mean age, 30.2; mean size, 7.8 cm; in frontal lobe [n = 4] and spinal cord [n = 1]) and 17 musculoskeletal (female-male ratio, 11:6; mean age, 31.1; mean size, 6.2 cm; 3 each of humerus and vertebrae; 2 each of pelvis, rib, tibia, neck soft tissue; one each of femur, unspecified bone, and elbow soft tissue). The hyaline cartilage in most tumors revealed a consistent linear progression of chondrocyte morphology, from resting to proliferating to hypertrophic chondrocytes. Sixty-seven percent of cases demonstrated cell death and acquired osteoblastic phenotype, cells positive for osteocalcin at the site of endochondral ossification. Small round cells of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma were negative for osteocalcin. SOX9 was positive in both components of 21 of 22 cases of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. beta-Catenin highlighted rare nuclei at the interface between round cells and hyaline cartilage in 35% cases. Control skull and central nervous system cases were compared, including chondrosarcomas and small cell osteosarcoma, the latter positive for osteocalcin in small cells. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma demonstrates centrally located hyaline cartilage with a linear progression of chondrocytes from resting to proliferative to hypertrophic

  13. Monitoring the effect of magnetically aligned collagen scaffolds on tendon tissue engineering by PSOCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Ahearne, Mark; Wimpenny, Ian; Torbet, Jim

    2009-02-01

    As the repair of injured or degenerated tendon is often compromised by the shortage of suitable donor tissue, other procedures need to be developed. The application of a functional tissue engineered tendon could prove to be a promising alternative therapy. Due to their good biocompatibility, collagen hydrogel based scaffolds have been considered to be potentially suitable for engineering tendon tissue in vitro. One of the major limitations of collagen hydrogels for engineering tissues is the difficulty in controlling their architecture and collagen concentration which results in poor mechanical strength. This study aims to overcome these limitations by creating a highly biocompatible scaffold that is both mechanically robust and aligned. Collagen fibers were pre-aligned under a high magnetic field then concentrated using plastic compression. Primary tenocytes cultured from rats were seeded on the aligned scaffolds. Following a protocol in public domain, thick cultured collagen constructs were rolled up into a spiral after undergoing plastic compressed. Both a light microscopy and a polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) with central beam at 1300 nm were used to monitor the birefringence in the constructs. Conventional light microscopy showed that the tenocytes aligned along the pre-organized collagen bundles in contrast to the random distributed observed on unaligned scaffolds. PSOCT only revealed weak birefringence from aligned but uncompressed constructs. However, PSOCT images showed contrast band structures in the spiral constructs which suggests that the birefringence signal depends on the density of aligned collagen fibers. The effect of aligned cells, neo-formed matrix and the plastic compression on the birefringence signals are discussed in this paper briefly.

  14. Bundling Actin Filaments From Membranes: Some Novel Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément eThomas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Progress in live-cell imaging of the cytoskeleton has significantly extended our knowledge about the organization and dynamics of actin filaments near the plasma membrane of plant cells. Noticeably, two populations of filamentous structures can be distinguished. On the one hand, fine actin filaments which exhibit an extremely dynamic behavior basically characterized by fast polymerization and prolific severing events, a process referred to as actin stochastic dynamics. On the other hand, thick actin bundles which are composed of several filaments and which are comparatively more stable although they constantly remodel as well. There is evidence that the actin cytoskeleton plays critical roles in trafficking and signaling at both the cell cortex and organelle periphery but the exact contribution of actin bundles remains unclear. A common view is that actin bundles provide the long-distance tracks used by myosin motors to deliver their cargo to growing regions and accordingly play a particularly important role in cell polarization. However, several studies support that actin bundles are more than simple passive highways and display multiple and dynamic roles in the regulation of many processes, such as cell elongation, polar auxin transport, stomatal and chloroplast movement, and defense against pathogens. The list of identified plant actin-bundling proteins is ever expanding, supporting that plant cells shape structurally and functionally different actin bundles. Here I review the most recently characterized actin-bundling proteins, with a particular focus on those potentially relevant to membrane trafficking and/or signaling.

  15. Lineage plasticity and cell biology of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage: Its significance in cartilage repair and replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemont, Anthony J. [Regenerative Medicine Research Group, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Tony.freemont@man.ac.uk; Hoyland, Judith [Regenerative Medicine Research Group, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-15

    Cartilage repair is a major goal of modern tissue engineering. To produce novel engineered implants requires a knowledge of the basic biology of the tissues that are to be replaced or reproduced. Hyaline articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage are two tissues that have excited attention because of the frequency with which they are damaged. A basic strategy is to re-engineer these tissues ex vivo by stimulating stem cells to differentiate into the cells of the mature tissue capable of producing an intact functional matrix. In this brief review, the sources of cells for tissue engineering cartilage and the culture conditions that have promoted differentiation are discussed within the context of natural cartilage repair. In particular, the role of cell density, cytokines, load, matrices and oxygen tension are discussed.

  16. Use of Interim Scaffolding and Neotissue Development to Produce a Scaffold-Free Living Hyaline Cartilage Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ting Ting; Leong, Wenyan; Peck, Yvonne; Su, Kai; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) constructs relies heavily on the use of biomaterial-based scaffolds. These are required as mechanical supports as well as to translate two-dimensional cultures to 3D cultures for clinical applications. Regardless of the choice of scaffold, timely degradation of scaffolds is difficult to achieve and undegraded scaffold material can lead to interference in further tissue development or morphogenesis. In cartilage tissue engineering, hydrogel is the highly preferred scaffold material as it shares many similar characteristics with native cartilaginous matrix. Hence, we employed gelatin microspheres as porogens to create a microcavitary alginate hydrogel as an interim scaffold to facilitate initial chondrocyte 3D culture and to establish a final scaffold-free living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG) for cartilage tissue engineering.

  17. Release of transgenic progranulin from a living hyaline cartilage graft model: An in vitro evaluation on anti-inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ting Ting; Zhang, Feng; Tang, Wei; Wang, Dong-An

    2016-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent condition that compromises and even jeopardizes the life quality of millions of people. Common symptoms in OA includes joint stiffness and soreness, and they are often associated with inflammations to various extend. Due to the avascular and aneural nature of articular hyaline cartilage, it has limited self-repair capabilities; especially under inflammatory conditions, damages inflicted on cartilage are often irreversible. Hence, treatment approaches focus on anti-inflammation or articular cartilage replacement. In this study, an engineered, dual-functional living hyaline cartilage graft (LhCG), capable of releasing transgenic anti-inflammatory cytokine-progranulin (PGRN) is developed and envisioned to simultaneously fulfil both requirements. The therapeutic functionality of PGRN releasing LhCG is evaluated by co-culturing the constructs with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) secreting THP-1 cells to simulate the inflammatory condition in arthritis. Non-transgenic LhCG constructs and non-coculture sample groups were set up as controls. Gene expression and ECM composition changes across samples were assessed to understand the effects of PGRN as well as inflammatory environment on the cartilage graft. Collectively, the results in this study suggest that in situ release of transgenic recombinant PGRN protects LhCG from induced inflammation in vitro; contrastively, in the absence of PGRN, cartilage grafts are at risk of being degraded and mineralized under exposure to TNFα signaling. This shows that cartilage graft itself can be at risk of degradation or calcification when implanted in arthritic microenvironment. Hence, the inflammatory microenvironment has to be considered in cartilage replacement therapy to increase chances of successful joint mobility restoration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2968-2977, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Bondage Numbers of C4 Bundles over a Cycle Cn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo Young Sohn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Graph bundles generalize the notion of covering graphs and graph products. Graph bundles have been applied in computer architecture and communication networks. The bondage number is an important parameter for measuring the vulnerability and stability of the network domination under link failure. The bondage number b(G of a graph G is the minimum number of edges whose removal enlarges the domination number. In this paper, we show that the bondage number of every C4 bundles over a cycle Cn  (n≥4 is equal to 4.

  19. The Born rule as structure of spectral bundles (extended abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertfried Fauser

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Topos approaches to quantum foundations are described in a unified way by means of spectral bundles, where the base space is a space of contexts and each fibre is its spectrum. Differences in variance are due to the bundle being a fibration or opfibration. Relative to this structure, the probabilistic predictions of the Born rule in finite dimensional settings are then described as a section of a bundle of valuations. The construction uses in an essential way the geometric nature of the valuation locale monad.

  20. —Impact of Customer Knowledge Heterogeneity on Bundling Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Amiya Basu; Padmal Vitharana

    2009-01-01

    We consider a marketer of components who can select one of three alternative pricing strategies: (1) a pure component strategy (i.e., the customer can only buy the components individually), (2) a pure bundling strategy (i.e., the components must be purchased together), or (3) a mixed bundling strategy (i.e., the customer may buy a component individually, or buy the bundle). We consider a market where customer knowledge of components varies and propose that a high-knowledge customer can determ...

  1. Systematic evaluation of bundled SPC water for biomolecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Srinivasa M; Kuhn, Alexander B; Schäfer, Lars V

    2015-04-07

    In bundled SPC water models, the relative motion of groups of four water molecules is restrained by distance-dependent potentials. Bundled SPC models have been used in hybrid all-atom/coarse-grained (AA/CG) multiscale simulations, since they enable to couple atomistic SPC water with supra-molecular CG water models that effectively represent more than a single water molecule. In the present work, we systematically validated and critically tested bundled SPC water models as solvent for biomolecular simulations. To that aim, we investigated both thermodynamic and structural properties of various biomolecular systems through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Potentials of mean force of dimerization of pairs of amino acid side chains as well as hydration free energies of single side chains obtained with bundled SPC and standard (unrestrained) SPC water agree closely with each other and with experimental data. Decomposition of the hydration free energies into enthalpic and entropic contributions reveals that in bundled SPC, this favorable agreement of the free energies is due to a larger degree of error compensation between hydration enthalpy and entropy. The Ramachandran maps of Ala3, Ala5, and Ala7 peptides are similar in bundled and unrestrained SPC, whereas for the (GS)2 peptide, bundled water leads to a slight overpopulation of extended conformations. Analysis of the end-to-end distance autocorrelation times of the Ala5 and (GS)2 peptides shows that sampling in more viscous bundled SPC water is about two times slower. Pronounced differences between the water models were found for the structure of a coiled-coil dimer, which is instable in bundled SPC but not in standard SPC. In addition, the hydration of the active site of the serine protease α-chymotrypsin depends on the water model. Bundled SPC leads to an increased hydration of the active site region, more hydrogen bonds between water and catalytic triad residues, and a significantly slower exchange of water

  2. Effects of microcurrent stimulation on Hyaline cartilage repair in immature male rats (Rattus norvegicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Campos Ciccone Carla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we investigate the effects of microcurrent stimulation on the repair process of xiphoid cartilage in 45-days-old rats. Methods Twenty male rats were divided into a control group and a treated group. A 3-mm defect was then created with a punch in anesthetized animals. In the treated group, animals were submitted to daily applications of a biphasic square pulse microgalvanic continuous electrical current during 5 min. In each application, it was used a frequency of 0.3 Hz and intensity of 20 μA. The animals were sacrificed at 7, 21 and 35 days after injury for structural analysis. Results Basophilia increased gradually in control animals during the experimental period. In treated animals, newly formed cartilage was observed on days 21 and 35. No statistically significant differences in birefringent collagen fibers were seen between groups at any of the time points. Treated animals presented a statistically larger number of chondroblasts. Calcification points were observed in treated animals on day 35. Ultrastructural analysis revealed differences in cell and matrix characteristics between the two groups. Chondrocyte-like cells were seen in control animals only after 35 days, whereas they were present in treated animals as early as by day 21. The number of cuprolinic blue-stained proteoglycans was statistically higher in treated animals on days 21 and 35. Conclusion We conclude that microcurrent stimulation accelerates the cartilage repair in non-articular site from prepuberal animals.

  3. Effects of microcurrent stimulation on hyaline cartilage repair in immature male rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos Ciccone, Carla; Zuzzi, Denise Cristina; Neves, Lia Mara Grosso; Mendonça, Josué Sampaio; Joazeiro, Paulo Pinto; Esquisatto, Marcelo Augusto Marretto

    2013-01-19

    In this study, we investigate the effects of microcurrent stimulation on the repair process of xiphoid cartilage in 45-days-old rats. Twenty male rats were divided into a control group and a treated group. A 3-mm defect was then created with a punch in anesthetized animals. In the treated group, animals were submitted to daily applications of a biphasic square pulse microgalvanic continuous electrical current during 5 min. In each application, it was used a frequency of 0.3 Hz and intensity of 20 μA. The animals were sacrificed at 7, 21 and 35 days after injury for structural analysis. Basophilia increased gradually in control animals during the experimental period. In treated animals, newly formed cartilage was observed on days 21 and 35. No statistically significant differences in birefringent collagen fibers were seen between groups at any of the time points. Treated animals presented a statistically larger number of chondroblasts. Calcification points were observed in treated animals on day 35. Ultrastructural analysis revealed differences in cell and matrix characteristics between the two groups. Chondrocyte-like cells were seen in control animals only after 35 days, whereas they were present in treated animals as early as by day 21. The number of cuprolinic blue-stained proteoglycans was statistically higher in treated animals on days 21 and 35. We conclude that microcurrent stimulation accelerates the cartilage repair in non-articular site from prepuberal animals.

  4. Oriented Collagen Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohta Kodama

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Oriented collagen scaffolds were developed in the form of sheet, mesh and tube by arraying flow-oriented collagen string gels and dehydrating the arrayed gels. The developed collagen scaffolds can be any practical size with any direction of orientation for tissue engineering applications. The birefringence of the collagen scaffolds was quantitatively analyzed by parallel Nicols method. Since native collagen in the human body has orientations such as bone, cartilage, tendon and cornea, and the orientation has a special role for the function of human organs, the developed various types of three-dimensional oriented collagen scaffolds are expected to be useful biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicines.

  5. The effect of hair bundle shape on hair bundle hydrodynamics of inner ear hair cells at low and high frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatz, L F

    2000-03-01

    The relationship between size and shape of the hair bundle of a hair cell in the inner ear and its sensitivity at asymptotically high and low frequencies was determined, thereby extending the results of an analysis of hair bundle hydrodynamics in two dimensions (Freeman and Weiss, 1990. Hydrodynamic analysis of a two-dimensional model for micromechanical resonance of free-standing hair bundles. Hear. Res. 48, 37-68) to three dimensions. A hemispheroid was used to represent the hair bundle. The hemispheroid had a number of advantages: it could represent shapes that range from thin, pencil-like shapes, to wide, flat, disk-like shapes. Also analytic methods could be used in the high frequency range to obtain an exact solution to the equations of motion. In the low frequency range, where an approximate solution was found using boundary element methods, the sensitivity of the responses of hair cells was mainly proportional to the cube of the heights of their hair bundles, and at high frequencies, the sensitivity of the hair cells was mainly proportional to the inverse of their heights. An excellent match was obtained between measurements of sensitivity curves in the basillar papilla of the alligator and bobtail lizards and the model's predictions. These results also suggest why hair bundles of hair cells in vestibular organs which are sensitive to low frequencies have ranges of heights that are an order of magnitude larger than the range of heights of hair bundles of hair cells found in auditory organs.

  6. A study of bacterial flagellar bundling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Heather; Lobaton, Edgar; Méndez-Diez, Stefan; Tlupova, Svetlana; Cortez, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    Certain bacteria, such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium), use multiple flagella often concentrated at one end of their bodies to induce locomotion. Each flagellum is formed in a left-handed helix and has a motor at the base that rotates the flagellum in a corkscrew motion. We present a computational model of the flagellar motion and their hydrodynamic interaction. The model is based on the equations of Stokes flow to describe the fluid motion. The elasticity of the flagella is modeled with a network of elastic springs while the motor is represented by a torque at the base of each flagellum. The fluid velocity due to the forces is described by regularized Stokeslets and the velocity due to the torques by the associated regularized rotlets. Their expressions are derived. The model is used to analyze the swimming motion of a single flagellum and of a group of three flagella in close proximity to one another. When all flagellar motors rotate counterclockwise, the hydrodynamic interaction can lead to bundling. We present an analysis of the flow surrounding the flagella. When at least one of the motors changes its direction of rotation, the same initial conditions lead to a tumbling behavior characterized by the separation of the flagella, changes in their orientation, and no net swimming motion. The analysis of the flow provides some intuition for these processes.

  7. Nursing Care Management: Influence on Bundled Payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Shaynie; Luther, Brenda

    Fragmented and uncoordinated care is the third highest driver of U.S. healthcare costs. Although less than 10% of patients experience uncoordinated care, these patients represent 36% of total healthcare costs; care management interaction makes a significant impact on the utilization of healthcare dollars. A literature search was conducted to construct a model of care coordination for elective surgical procedures by collecting best practices for acute, transitions, and post-acute care periods. A case study was used to demonstrate the model developed. Care management defines care coordination as a model of care to address improving patient and caregiver engagement, communication across settings of care, and ultimately improved patient outcomes of care. Nurse-led care coordination in the presurgical, inpatient, and post-acute care settings requires systems change and administrative support to effectively meet the goals of the Affordable Care Act of reducing redundancy and costs while improving the patient experience. Nursing is the lynchpin of care management processes in all settings of care; thus, this model of care coordination for elective surgical admissions can provide nursing care management leaders a comprehensive view of coordinating care for these patient across settings of care during the predetermined time period of care. As bundled payment structures increasingly affect hospital systems, nursing leaders need to be ready to create or improve their care management processes; care coordination is one such process requiring immediate attention.

  8. LVRF fuel bundle manufacture for Bruce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pant, A. [Zircatec Precision Industries, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-12-15

    In response to the Power Uprate program at Bruce Power, Zircatec has committed to introduce, by Spring 2006 a new manufacturing line for the production of 43 element Bruce LVRF bundles containing Slightly Enriched Uranium (SEU) with a centre pin of blended dysprosia/urania (BDU). This is a new fuel design and is the first change in fuel design since the introduction of the current 37-element fuel over 20 years ago. Introduction of this new line has involved the introduction of significant changes to an environment that is not used to rapid changes with significant impact. At ZPI we have been able to build on our innovative capabilities in new fuel manufacturing, the strength and experience of our core team, and on our prevailing management philosophy of 'support the doer'. The presentation will discuss some of the novel aspects of this fuel introduction and the mix of innovative and classical project management methods that are being used to ensure that project deliveries are being met. Supporting presentations will highlight some of the issues in more detail. (author)

  9. Zeta Functions for Elliptic Curves I. Counting Bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Weng, Lin

    2012-01-01

    To count bundles on curves, we study zetas of elliptic curves and their zeros. There are two types, i.e., the pure non-abelian zetas defined using moduli spaces of semi-stable bundles, and the group zetas defined for special linear groups. In lower ranks, we show that these two types of zetas coincide and satisfy the Riemann Hypothesis. For general cases, exposed is an intrinsic relation on automorphism groups of semi-stable bundles over elliptic curves, the so-called counting miracle. All this, together with Harder-Narasimhan, Desale-Ramanan and Zagier's result, gives an effective way to count semi-stable bundles on elliptic curves not only in terms of automorphism groups but more essentially in terms of their $h^0$'s. Distributions of zeros of high rank zetas are also discussed.

  10. Bundles of Norms About Teen Sex and Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollborn, Stefanie; Sennott, Christie

    2015-09-01

    Teen pregnancy is a cultural battleground in struggles over morality, education, and family. At its heart are norms about teen sex, contraception, pregnancy, and abortion. Analyzing 57 interviews with college students, we found that "bundles" of related norms shaped the messages teens hear. Teens did not think their communities encouraged teen sex or pregnancy, but normative messages differed greatly, with either moral or practical rationalizations. Teens readily identified multiple norms intended to regulate teen sex, contraception, abortion, childbearing, and the sanctioning of teen parents. Beyond influencing teens' behavior, norms shaped teenagers' public portrayals and post hoc justifications of their behavior. Although norm bundles are complex to measure, participants could summarize them succinctly. These bundles and their conflicting behavioral prescriptions create space for human agency in negotiating normative pressures. The norm bundles concept has implications for teen pregnancy prevention policies and can help revitalize social norms for understanding health behaviors.

  11. Design and synthesis of DNA four-helix bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangnekar, Abhijit; Gothelf, Kurt V [Department of Chemistry, Centre for DNA Nanotechnology (CDNA) and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); LaBean, Thomas H, E-mail: kvg@chem.au.dk, E-mail: thl@cs.duke.edu [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2011-06-10

    The field of DNA nanotechnology has evolved significantly in the past decade. Researchers have succeeded in synthesizing tile-based structures and using them to form periodic lattices in one, two and three dimensions. Origami-based structures have also been used to create nanoscale structures in two and three dimensions. Design and construction of DNA bundles with fixed circumference has added a new dimension to the field. Here we report the design and synthesis of a DNA four-helix bundle. It was found to be extremely rigid and stable. When several such bundles were assembled using appropriate sticky-ends, they formed micrometre-long filaments. However, when creation of two-dimensional sheet-like arrays of the four-helix bundles was attempted, nanoscale rings were observed instead. The exact reason behind the nanoring formation is yet to be ascertained, but it provides an exciting prospect for making programmable circular nanostructures using DNA.

  12. CANFLEX fuel bundle cross-flow endurance test (test report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Deok; Chung, C. H.; Chang, S. K.; Kim, B. D.

    1997-04-01

    As part of the normal refuelling sequence of CANDU nuclear reactor, both new and irradiated bundles can be parked in the cross-flow region of the liner tubes. This situation occurs normally for a few minutes. The fuel bundle which is subjected to the cross-flow should be capable of withstanding the consequences of cross flow for normal periods, and maintain its mechanical integrity. The cross-flow endurance test was conducted for CANFLEX bundle, latest developed nuclear fuel, at CANDU-Hot Test Loop. The test was carried out during 4 hours at the inlet cross-flow region. After the test, the bundle successfully met all acceptance criteria after the 4 hours cross-flow test. (author). 2 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. On exact triangles consisting of stable vector bundles on tori

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Kazushi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the exact triangles consisting of stable holomorphic vector bundles on one-dimensional complex tori, and discuss their relations with the corresponding Fukaya category via the homological mirror symmetry.

  14. Steric effects induce geometric remodeling of actin bundles in filopodia

    CERN Document Server

    Dobramysl, Ulrich; Erban, Radek

    2016-01-01

    Filopodia are ubiquitous fingerlike protrusions, spawned by many eukaryotic cells, to probe and interact with their environments. Polymerization dynamics of actin filaments, comprising the structural core of filopodia, largely determine their instantaneous lengths and overall lifetimes. The polymerization reactions at the filopodial tip require transport of G-actin, which enter the filopodial tube from the filopodial base and diffuse toward the filament barbed ends near the tip. Actin filaments are mechanically coupled into a tight bundle by cross-linker proteins. Interestingly, many of these proteins are relatively short, restricting the free diffusion of cytosolic G-actin throughout the bundle and, in particular, its penetration into the bundle core. To investigate the effect of steric restrictions on G-actin diffusion by the porous structure of filopodial actin filament bundle, we used a particle-based stochastic simulation approach. We discovered that excluded volume interactions result in partial and the...

  15. Mechanical Models of Microtubule Bundle Collapse in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendek, Austin; Singh, Rajiv; Cox, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid-beta aggregates initiate Alzheimer's disease, and downstream trigger degradation of tau proteins that act as microtubule bundle stabilizers and mechanical spacers. Currently it is unclear which of tau cutting by proteases, tau phosphorylation, or tau aggregation are responsible for cytoskeleton degradation., We construct a percolation simulation of the microtubule bundle using a molecular spring model for the taus and including depletion force attraction between microtubules and membrane/actin cytoskeletal surface tension. The simulation uses a fictive molecular dynamics to model the motion of the individual microtubules within the bundle as a result of random tau removal, and calculates the elastic modulus of the bundle as the tau concentration falls. We link the tau removal steps to kinetic tau steps in various models of tau degradation. Supported by US NSF Grant DMR 1207624

  16. Introductory lectures on fibre bundles and topology for physicists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.H.

    1978-05-01

    These lectures may provide useful background material for understanding gauge theories, particularly the nonperturbative effects such as instantons and monopoles. The mathematical language of topology and fibre bundles is introduced.

  17. Improved Conjugate Gradient Bundle Adjustment of Dunhuang Wall Painting Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, K.; Huang, X.; You, H.

    2017-09-01

    Bundle adjustment with additional parameters is identified as a critical step for precise orthoimage generation and 3D reconstruction of Dunhuang wall paintings. Due to the introduction of self-calibration parameters and quasi-planar constraints, the structure of coefficient matrix of the reduced normal equation is banded-bordered, making the solving process of bundle adjustment complex. In this paper, Conjugate Gradient Bundle Adjustment (CGBA) method is deduced by calculus of variations. A preconditioning method based on improved incomplete Cholesky factorization is adopt to reduce the condition number of coefficient matrix, as well as to accelerate the iteration rate of CGBA. Both theoretical analysis and experimental results comparison with conventional method indicate that, the proposed method can effectively conquer the ill-conditioned problem of normal equation and improve the calculation efficiency of bundle adjustment with additional parameters considerably, while maintaining the actual accuracy.

  18. IMPROVED CONJUGATE GRADIENT BUNDLE ADJUSTMENT OF DUNHUANG WALL PAINTING IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bundle adjustment with additional parameters is identified as a critical step for precise orthoimage generation and 3D reconstruction of Dunhuang wall paintings. Due to the introduction of self-calibration parameters and quasi-planar constraints, the structure of coefficient matrix of the reduced normal equation is banded-bordered, making the solving process of bundle adjustment complex. In this paper, Conjugate Gradient Bundle Adjustment (CGBA method is deduced by calculus of variations. A preconditioning method based on improved incomplete Cholesky factorization is adopt to reduce the condition number of coefficient matrix, as well as to accelerate the iteration rate of CGBA. Both theoretical analysis and experimental results comparison with conventional method indicate that, the proposed method can effectively conquer the ill-conditioned problem of normal equation and improve the calculation efficiency of bundle adjustment with additional parameters considerably, while maintaining the actual accuracy.

  19. Vertical, Bubbly, Cross-Flow Characteristics over Tube Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, C.; Cheong, K. H.; Monji, H.; Matsui, G.

    2005-12-01

    Two-phase flow over tube bundles is commonly observed in shell and tube-type heat exchangers. However, only limited amount of data concerning flow pattern and void fraction exists due to the flow complexity and the difficulties in measurement. The detailed flow structure in tube bundles needs to be understood for reliable and effective design. Therefore, the objective of this study was to clarify the two-phase structure of cross-flow in tube bundles by PIV. Experiments were conducted using two types of models, namely in-line and staggered arrays with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.5. Each test section contains 20 rows of five 15 mm O.D. tubes in each row. The experiment’s data were obtained under very low void fraction (αtube bundles were described in terms of the velocity vector field, turbulence intensity and void fraction.

  20. National Partnership for Maternal Safety: Consensus Bundle on Obstetric Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Elliott K; Goffman, Dena; Scavone, Barbara M; Low, Lisa Kane; Bingham, Debra; Fontaine, Patricia L; Gorlin, Jed B; Lagrew, David C; Levy, Barbara S

    2015-07-01

    Hemorrhage is the most frequent cause of severe maternal morbidity and preventable maternal mortality and therefore is an ideal topic for the initial national maternity patient safety bundle. These safety bundles outline critical clinical practices that should be implemented in every maternity unit. They are developed by multidisciplinary work groups of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety under the guidance of the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care. The safety bundle is organized into four domains: Readiness, Recognition and Prevention, Response, and Reporting and System Learning. Although the bundle components may be adapted to meet the resources available in individual facilities, standardization within an institution is strongly encouraged. References contain sample resources and "Potential Best Practices" to assist with implementation.

  1. National Partnership for Maternal Safety Consensus Bundle on Obstetric Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Elliott K; Goffman, Dena; Scavone, Barbara M; Low, Lisa Kane; Bingham, Debra; Fontaine, Patricia L; Gorlin, Jed B; Lagrew, David C; Levy, Barbara S

    2015-01-01

    Hemorrhage is the most frequent cause of severe maternal morbidity and preventable maternal mortality and therefore is an ideal topic for the initial national maternity patient safety bundle. These safety bundles outline critical clinical practices that should be implemented in every maternity unit. They are developed by multidisciplinary work groups of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety under the guidance of the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care. The safety bundle is organized into 4 domains: Readiness, Recognition and Prevention, Response, and Reporting and Systems Learning. Although the bundle components may be adapted to meet the resources available in individual facilities, standardization within an institution is strongly encouraged. References contain sample resources and "Potential Best Practices" to assist with implementation.

  2. Performance-based bundled payments: potential benefits and burdens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satin, David J; Miles, Justin

    2009-10-01

    Performance-based bundled payments have emerged as the most recent iteration of pay for performance. These are programs in which providers are paid a single fee for a set of evidenced-based services related to a diagnosis. The payments are typically linked to outcomes as well as other quality measures. This paper reviews two prominent bundled payment programs--PROMETHEUS and ProvenCare--and discusses the potential pitfalls of these approaches.

  3. Identity-Based Cryptosystems for Enhanced Deployment of OSGi Bundles

    OpenAIRE

    Parrend, Pierre; Galice, Samuel; Frénot, Stéphane; Ubéda, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The OSGi platform is designed to make Java soft- ware extensible at runtime. This undeniably presents a great interest in several domains like embedded plat- forms or enterprise application servers. However, se- curing the deployment of the OSGi components, or bundles, proves to be a major challenge. The current approach consists in digitally signing the bundles and certifying the signature through a Public Key Infras- tructure. We propose to replace this technology wi...

  4. Codimension-Three Bundle Singularities in F-Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Candelas, Philip; Florea, B; Morrison, Douglas Robert Ogston; Rajesh, G; Candelas, Philip; Diaconescu, Duiliu-Emanuel; Florea, Bogdan; Morrison, David R.; Rajesh, Govindan

    2002-01-01

    We study new nonperturbative phenomena in N=1 heterotic string vacua corresponding to pointlike bundle singularities in codimension three. These degenerations result in new four-dimensional infrared physics characterized by light solitonic states whose origin is explained in the dual F-theory model. We also show that such phenomena appear generically in $E_7 \\to E_6$ Higgsing and describe in detail the corresponding bundle transition.

  5. Generalized holomorphic bundles and the B-field action

    CERN Document Server

    Hitchin, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    On a generalized complex manifold there is an associated definition of a generalized holomorphic bundle, introduced by Gualtieri. This notion in the case of an ordinary complex structure yields an object which we call a co-Higgs bundle and we consider the B-field action of a closed form of type (1,1), both local and global. The effect makes contact with both Nahm's equations and holomorphic gerbes.

  6. Generalized holomorphic bundles and the B-field action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchin, Nigel

    2011-01-01

    On a generalized complex manifold, there is an associated definition of a generalized holomorphic bundle, introduced by Gualtieri. In the case of an ordinary complex structure, this notion yields an object which we call a co-Higgs bundle, and we consider the B-field action of a closed form of type (1,1), both local and global. The effect makes contact with both Nahm's equations and holomorphic gerbes.

  7. Simplified modeling of EM field coupling to complex cable bundles

    OpenAIRE

    Schetelig, B.; J. Keghie; Kanyou Nana, R.; Fichte, L.-O.; S. Potthast; Dickmann, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution, the procedure "Equivalent Cable Bundle Method" is used for the simplification of large cable bundles, and it is extended to the application on differential signal lines. The main focus is on the reduction of twisted-pair cables. Furthermore, the process presented here allows to take into account cables with wires that are situated quite close to each other. The procedure is based on a new approach to calculate the geometry of the simplified cable and us...

  8. Dunkl Operators as Covariant Derivatives in a Quantum Principal Bundle

    OpenAIRE

    Micho Đurđevich; Stephen Bruce Sontz

    2011-01-01

    A quantum principal bundle is constructed for every Coxeter group acting on a finite-dimensional Euclidean space $E$, and then a connection is also defined on this bundle. The covariant derivatives associated to this connection are the Dunkl operators, originally introduced as part of a program to generalize harmonic analysis in Euclidean spaces. This gives us a new, geometric way of viewing the Dunkl operators. In particular, we present a new proof of the commutativity of these operators amo...

  9. Articular cartilage collagen: an irreplaceable framework?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D R Eyre

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult articular cartilage by dry weight is two-thirds collagen. The collagen has a unique molecular phenotype. The nascent type II collagen fibril is a heteropolymer, with collagen IX molecules covalently linked to the surface and collagen XI forming the filamentous template of the fibril as a whole. The functions of collagens IX and XI in the heteropolymer are far from clear but, evidently, they are critically important since mutations in COLIX and COLXI genes can result in chondrodysplasia syndromes. Here we review what is known of the collagen assembly and present new evidence that collagen type III becomes covalently added to the polymeric fabric of adult human articular cartilage, perhaps as part of a matrix repair or remodelling process.

  10. Collagen crosslinks in chondromalacia of the patella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väätäinen, U; Kiviranta, I; Jaroma, H; Arokosi, J; Tammi, M; Kovanen, V

    1998-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine collagen concentration and collagen crosslinks in cartilage samples from chondromalacia of the patella. To study the extracellular matrix alterations associated to chondromalacia, we determined the concentration of collagen (hydroxyproline) and its hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline crosslinks from chondromalacia foci of the patellae in 12 patients and 7 controls from apparently normal cadavers. The structure of the collagen network in 8 samples of grades II-IV chondromalacia was examined under polarized light microscopy. The full-thickness cartilage samples taken with a surgical knife from chondromalacia lesions did not show changes in collagen, hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline concentration as compared with the controls. Polarized light microscopy showed decreased birefringence in the superficial cartilage of chondromalacia lesions, indicating disorganization or disappearance of collagen fibers in this zone. It is concluded that the collagen network shows gradual disorganization with the severity of chondromalacia lesion of the patella without changes in the concentration or crosslinks of collagen.

  11. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (pcollagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications.

  12. [Disc electrophoresis of collagen protein (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitmayr, P; Verzár, F

    1975-01-01

    The composition of proteins extracted from tendon collagen is investigated by disc electrophoresis. No qualitative differences can be demonstrated between young and old collagen. The action of formaldehyde and methionine on the tendons has no effect on the electrophoretic picture.

  13. BiSet: Semantic Edge Bundling with Biclusters for Sensemaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Maoyuan; Mi, Peng; North, Chris; Ramakrishnan, Naren

    2016-01-01

    Identifying coordinated relationships is an important task in data analytics. For example, an intelligence analyst might want to discover three suspicious people who all visited the same four cities. Existing techniques that display individual relationships, such as between lists of entities, require repetitious manual selection and significant mental aggregation in cluttered visualizations to find coordinated relationships. In this paper, we present BiSet, a visual analytics technique to support interactive exploration of coordinated relationships. In BiSet, we model coordinated relationships as biclusters and algorithmically mine them from a dataset. Then, we visualize the biclusters in context as bundled edges between sets of related entities. Thus, bundles enable analysts to infer task-oriented semantic insights about potentially coordinated activities. We make bundles as first class objects and add a new layer, "in-between", to contain these bundle objects. Based on this, bundles serve to organize entities represented in lists and visually reveal their membership. Users can interact with edge bundles to organize related entities, and vice versa, for sensemaking purposes. With a usage scenario, we demonstrate how BiSet supports the exploration of coordinated relationships in text analytics.

  14. Experimental investigation of the coolability of blocked hexagonal bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hózer, Zoltán, E-mail: zoltan.hozer@energia.mta.hu; Nagy, Imre; Kunstár, Mihály; Szabó, Péter; Vér, Nóra; Farkas, Róbert; Trosztel, István; Vimi, András

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Experiments were performed with electrically heated hexagonal fuel bundles. • Coolability of ballooned VVER-440 type bundle was confirmed up to high blockage rate. • Pellet relocation effect causes delay in the cool-down of the bundle. • The bypass line does not prevent the reflood of ballooned fuel rods. - Abstract: The CODEX-COOL experimental series was carried out in order to evaluate the effect of ballooning and pellet relocation in hexagonal bundles on the coolability of fuel rods after a LOCA event. The effects of blockage geometry, coolant flowrate, initial temperature and axial profile were investigated. The experimental results confirmed that a VVER bundle up to 80% blockage rate remains coolable after a LOCA event under design basis conditions. The ballooned section creates some obstacles for the cooling water during reflood of the bundle, but this effect causes only a short delay in the cooling down of the hot fuel rods. The accumulation of fuel pellet debris in the ballooned volume results in a local power peak, which leads to further slowing down of quench front.

  15. Oscillation of carbon molecules inside carbon nanotube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamwattana, Ngamta; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the mechanics of a nanoscaled gigahertz oscillator comprising a carbon molecule oscillating within the centre of a uniform concentric ring or bundle of carbon nanotubes. Two kinds of oscillating molecules are considered, which are a carbon nanotube and a C60 fullerene. Using the Lennard-Jones potential and the continuum approach, we obtain a relation between the bundle radius and the radii of the nanotubes forming the bundle, as well as the optimum bundle size which gives rise to the maximum oscillatory frequency for both the nanotube-bundle and the C60-bundle oscillators. While previous studies in this area have been undertaken through molecular dynamics simulations, this paper emphasizes the use of applied mathematical modelling techniques, which provides considerable insight into the underlying mechanisms of the nanoscaled oscillators. The paper presents a synopsis of the major results derived in detail by the present authors (Cox et al 2007 Proc. R. Soc. A 464 691-710 and Cox et al 2007 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 40 13197-208).

  16. Collagen Mimetic Peptides: Progress Towards Functional Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, S. Michael; Li, Yang; Kim, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, collagen mimetic peptides (CMPs) have been used for elucidating the structure of the collagen triple helix and the factors responsible for its stabilization. The wealth of fundamental knowledge on collagen structure and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions accumulated over the past decades has led to a recent burst of research exploring the potential of CMPs to recreate the higher order assembly and biological function of natural collagens for biomedical applications. A...

  17. Biology, chemistry and pathology of collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischmajer, R.; Olsen, B.R.; Kuhn, K.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of five parts and a section of poster papers. Some of the articles are: Structure of the Type II Collagen Gene; Structural and Functional Analysis of the Genes for ..cap alpha..2(1) and ..cap alpha..1(III) collagens; Structure and Expression of the Collagen Genes of C. Elegans; Molecular Basis of Clinical Heterogeneity in the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; and Normal and Mutant Human Collagen Genes.

  18. Synthesis of reduced collagen crosslinks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwendijk, A.M.C.H. van den; Benningshof, J.C.J.; Wegmann, V.; Bank, R.A.; Koppele, J.M. te; Brussee, J.; Gen, A. van der

    1999-01-01

    A new synthetic route to reduced collagen crosslinks (LNL and HLNL) is described in this report. It enables an enantioselective synthesis of LNL. HLNL was obtained as a mixture of two diastereoisomers. This method also provides the possibility to introduce radio-labels during the synthesis.

  19. Fracture mechanics of collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene B; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within...

  20. Synthesis of reduced collagen crosslinks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwendijk, A.M.C.H. van den; Benningshof, J.C.J.; Wegmann, V.; Bank, R.A.; Koppele, J.M. te; Brussee, J.; Gen, A. van der

    1999-01-01

    A new synthetic route to reduced collagen crosslinks (LNL and HLNL) is described in this report. It enables an enantioselective synthesis of LNL. HLNL was obtained as a mixture of two diastereoisomers. This method also provides the possibility to introduce radio-labels during the synthesis.

  1. A collagen defect in homocystinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, A H; Trelstad, R L

    1973-10-01

    The biochemical mechanism accounting for the connective tissue abnormalities in homocystinuria was explored by examining the effects of various amino acids known to accumulate in the plasma of patients with this disease on cross-link formation in collagen. Neutral salt solutions of purified, rat skin collagen, rich in cross-link precursor aldehydes, were polymerized to native type fibrils by incubating at 37 degrees C in the presence of homocysteine, homocystine, or methionine. After the polymerization was completed, each sample was examined for the formation of covalent intermolecular cross-links, assessed indirectly by solubility tests and directly by measuring the cross-link compounds after reduction with tritiated sodium borohydride and hydrolysis. Collagen solutions containing homocysteine (0.01 M-0.1 M) failed to form insoluble fibrils. Furthermore, much less of the reducible cross-links, Delta(6,7) dehydrohydroxylysinonorleucine, Delta(6,7) dehydrohydroxylysinohydroxynorleucine, and histidino-dehydrohydroxymerodesmosine were formed in the preparations containing homocysteine as compared with the control and the samples containing methionine or homocystine. The content of the precursor aldehydes, alpha-aminoadipic-delta-semialdehyde (allysine) and the aldol condensation product, was also markedly diminished in tropocollagen incubated with homocysteine. It is concluded that homocysteine interferes with the formation of intermolecular cross-links that help stabilize the collagen macromolecular network via its reversible binding to the aldehydic functional groups. Analysis of the collagen cross-links in skin biopsy samples obtained from three patients with documented homocystinuria showed that the cross-links were significantly decreased as compared with the age-matched controls, supporting the tentative conclusions reached from the in vitro model studies. In addition, the solubility of dermal collagen in non-denaturing solvents was significantly increased in

  2. Adapting collagen/CNT matrix in directing hESC differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Indumathi; Kim, Taeyoung; Wang, Rong

    2009-04-17

    The lineage selection in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) differentiation relies on both the growth factors and small molecules in the media and the physical characteristics of the micro-environment. In this work, we utilized various materials, including the collagen-carbon nanotube (collagen/CNT) composite material, as cell culture matrices to examine the impact of matrix properties on hESC differentiation. Our AFM analysis indicated that the collagen/CNT formed rigid fibril bundles, which polarized the growth and differentiation of hESCs, resulting in more than 90% of the cells to the ectodermal lineage in Day 3 in the media commonly used for spontaneous differentiation. We also observed the differentiated cells followed the coarse alignment of the collagen/CNT matrix. The research not only revealed the responsiveness of hESCs to matrix properties, but also provided a simple yet efficient way to direct the hESC differentiation, and imposed the potential of forming neural-cell based bio-devices for further applications.

  3. Imaging analysis of collagen fiber networks in cusps of porcine aortic valves: effect of their local distribution and alignment on valve functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Mor; Marom, Gil; Halevi, Rotem; Hamdan, Ashraf; Bluestein, Danny; Haj-Ali, Rami

    2016-01-01

    The cusps of native aortic valve (AV) are composed of collagen bundles embedded in soft tissue, creating a heterogenic tissue with asymmetric alignment in each cusp. This study compares native collagen fiber networks (CFNs) with a goal to better understand their influence on stress distribution and valve kinematics. Images of CFNs from five porcine tricuspid AVs are analyzed and fluid-structure interaction models are generated based on them. Although the valves had similar overall kinematics, the CFNs had distinctive influence on local mechanics. The regions with dilute CFN are more prone to damage since they are subjected to higher stress magnitudes.

  4. Combustor having mixing tube bundle with baffle arrangement for directing fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Michael John; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin

    2016-08-23

    A combustor includes a tube bundle that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor. The tube bundle includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface, and a plurality of tubes extend from the upstream surface through the downstream surface to provide fluid communication through the tube bundle. A barrier extends radially inside the tube bundle between the upstream and downstream surfaces, and a baffle extends axially inside the tube bundle between the upstream surface and the barrier.

  5. MRI of the hyaline knee joint cartilage. Animal experimental and clinical studies; MRT des hyalinen Kniegelenkknorpels. Tierexperimentelle und klinische Untersuchungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, G. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Prescher, A. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie; Nolte-Ernsting, C. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Buehne, M. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Scherer, K. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Versuchstierkunde; Kuepper, W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Versuchstierkunde; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    1994-02-01

    The value of MR imaging for the detection of hyaline cartilage lesions using 2-D spin-echo and 3-D gradient-echo imaging was evaluated in an animal experiment in 10 dogs and in a clinical study in 30 patients. MR imaging findings were compared with histopathological and arthroscopy findings, respectively. Using MRI neither grade I nor grade II hyaline cartilage lesions were detectable. In the animal experiments 77% of grade III lesions and all the grade IV lesions were seen. However, in the clinical study only about the half of grade III and IV lesions were detected. 3-D gradient-echo MR imaging was superior to 2-D spin-echo imaging (p<0.001), while 3-D FLASH and 3-D FISP did not differ significantly in the detection rate (p<0.34). 3-D gradient-echo MR imaging seems to be the best method for the delineation of high grade cartilage lesions. However, early stages of cartilage degeneration are invisible even with this imaging modality. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Wertigkeit der MRT in der Erfassung von Knorpellaesionen mit 2-D-Spin-Echo- und 3-D-Grafienten-Echo-Sequenzen wurde in einer tierexperimentellen Untersuchung an 10 Hunden sowie in einer klinischen Studie an 30 Patienten ueberprueft. Die kernspintomographischen Ergebnisse wurden mit dem pathologisch-anatomischen Befund bzw. der Arthroskopie verglichen. MR-tomographisch konnten weder Grad-I- noch Grad-II-Knorpellaesionen erfasst werden. Die Erkennbarkeitsrate der Grad-III- und -IV-Laesionen lag fuer die tierexperimentellen Untersuchungen bei 77 bzw. 100%, waehrend klinisch nur etwa 50% dieser Veraenderungen erkannt werden konnten. Dabei waren die 3-D-Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen den 2-D-Spin-Echo-Sequenzen signifikant ueberlegen (p<0,001), waehrend sich die 3-D-Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen FISP und FLASH nicht voneinander unterschieden (p<0,34). Derzeit muessen die 3-D-Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen als die beste Methode zur Erfassung hoehergradiger Knorpellaesionen angesehen werden. Fruehe Stadien der Knorpelschaedigung sind

  6. Histones bundle F-actin filaments and affect actin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotnick, Edna; Sol, Asaf; Muhlrad, Andras

    2017-01-01

    Histones are small polycationic proteins complexed with DNA located in the cell nucleus. Upon apoptosis they are secreted from the cells and react with extracellular polyanionic compounds. Actin which is a polyanionic protein, is also secreted from necrotic cells and interacts with histones. We showed that both histone mixture (histone type III) and the recombinant H2A histone bundles F-actin, increases the viscosity of the F-actin containing solution and polymerizes G-actin. The histone-actin bundles are relatively insensitive to increase of ionic strength, unlike other polycation, histatin, lysozyme, spermine and LL-37 induced F-actin bundles. The histone-actin bundles dissociate completely only in the presence of 300-400 mM NaCl. DNA, which competes with F-actin for histones, disassembles histone induced actin bundles. DNase1, which depolymerizes F- to G-actin, actively unbundles the H2A histone induced but slightly affects the histone mixture induced actin bundles. Cofilin decreases the amount of F-actin sedimented by low speed centrifugation, increases light scattering and viscosity of F-actin-histone mixture containing solutions and forms star like superstructures by copolymerizing G-actin with H2A histone. The results indicate that histones are tightly attached to F-actin by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. Since both histones and F-actin are present in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, therefore, the formation of the stable histone-actin bundles can contribute to the pathology of this disease by increasing the viscosity of the sputum. The actin-histone interaction in the nucleus might affect gene expression.

  7. Investigations into the visualisation of osseous and hyaline cartilaginous surface structures of the femural head using X-ray computed tomography. Untersuchung der Visualisierbarkeit knoecherner und hyalin knorpeliger Oberflaechenstrukturen des caput femoris mit Roentgen-Computertomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laemmermann, G.

    1989-03-06

    This study investigates into the extent to which fine osseous structures in the head of the femur and hyaline cartilaginous surfaces of the hip joint are accessible to X-ray computed tomography as a method of diagnosis. At first, a true model of the femural head (post-mortem preparation embedded in methylacrylate) was tomographed to compare the sectional displays thus obtained with hard-microtome sections of similar thickness made at the same levels. This permitted preliminary evaluations to be carried out and confirmed that those structures can be visualised by high-resolution CT (1 mm sections). Methods using high-resolution sectional imaging have a role in examinations of congruence in the the hip joint. Particularly useful here are three-dimensional displays of osseous and cartilaginous surfaces of the joint parts examined. Further research is needed until a more refined method of reconstruction can be made available, the usefulness of which in actual practice will depend on the degree of geometrical congruence achieved between a patient's joint and its display on the screen. (orig./GDG).

  8. Molecular Packing in Network-Forming Collagens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Knupp

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Collagen is the most abundant protein among vertebrates and occurs in virtually all multicellular animals. Collagen molecules are classified into 21 different types and differ in their sequence, weight, structure, and function, but they can be broadly subdivided into families. Type IV, VI, VIII, X, and dogfish egg case collagens belong to the network-forming family. Here, we summarise what is known about the way these collagen molecules pack to form networks. In addition the main structural characteristics of the network-forming collagens are compared and discussed.

  9. Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy: a new case series with clinicopathologic and ultrastructural correlation, literature review, and insight into the pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Samih S

    2015-05-01

    Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy (CCV) is a rare distinct idiopathic microangiopathy of the superficial cutaneous vasculature. Seven new cases are reported (6 females and 1 male) ranging in age from 42 to 85 years, with some showing unusual clinical and histopathological findings. All presented with macular telangiectases starting on the lower extremities and spreading progressively in 5 cases and were suspected to have generalized essential telangiectasia. Two cases had a history of over 20 years. One case had lesions in the abdominal striae, and 1 was markedly ecchymotic. All skin biopsies showed the characteristic features of CCV with dilatation and marked thickening of the walls of superficial dermal blood vessels displaying reduplication of the basement membrane on periodic acid-Schiff-diastase stain and deposition of hyaline collagenous material immunostaining as collagen type IV, and showing decreased or absent actin staining. However, the changes were subtle and only seen focally in some biopsies. Few lymphoid cells were present around occasional vessels. Electron microscopy showed increased basement membrane lamellae with marked deposition of normal and some abnormal collagen (Luse-like bodies) and focal endothelial damage, suggesting reparative perivascular fibrosis resulting from repeated endothelial injury. These cases (and all 18 previously reported ones) are of a wide age range and no gender predilection. This disorder is underdiagnosed, and it is likely that some cases clinically suspected to be generalized essential telangiectasia may actually represent CCV. Better recognition by dermatologists may lead to more biopsies from patients with generalized telangiectasia and a further understanding of the pathogenesis of CCV and its relationship to other cutaneous vascular disorders.

  10. Biosynthesis of collagen I, II, RUNX2 and lubricin at different time points of chondrogenic differentiation in a 3D in vitro model of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Mobasheri, Ali; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Graziano, Adriana Carol Eleonora; Lo Furno, Debora; Avola, Rosanna; Mangano, Sebastiano; Giuffrida, Rosario; Cardile, Venera

    2014-10-01

    The first aim of the study was to identify the most appropriate time for differentiation of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to chondrocytes, through the self-assembly process. For this purpose, the expression of some chondrocyte markers, such as collagen type I, collagen type II, RUNX2 and lubricin was investigated at different times (7, 14, 21 and 28 days) of chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, by using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The second aim of the study was to demonstrate that the expression of lubricin, such as the expression of collagen type II, could be a possible biomarker for the detection of chondrocytes well-being and viability in the natural self-assembling constructs, called 'cell pellets'. Histology (hematoxylin and eosin) and histochemistry (alcian blue staining) methods were used to assess the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. The results showed that after 21 days the differentiated chondrocytes, when compared with MSCs cultured without chondrogenic medium (CD44, CD90 and CD105 positive; CD45, CD14 and CD34 negative), were able to produce significant quantities of collagen type I, collagen type II, and lubricin, suggesting hyaline cartilage formation. During the differentiation phase, the cells showed a reduced expression of RUNX2, a protein expressed by osteoblasts. Our studies demonstrated that 21 days is the optimum time for the implantation of chondrocytes differentiated from adipose tissue-derived MSCs. This information could be useful for the future development of cell-based repair therapies for degenerative diseases of articular cartilage.

  11. Subchondral chitosan/blood implant-guided bone plate resorption and woven bone repair is coupled to hyaline cartilage regeneration from microdrill holes in aged rabbit knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Morales, J; Lafantaisie-Favreau, C-H; Chen, G; Hoemann, C D

    2014-02-01

    Little is known of how to routinely elicit hyaline cartilage repair tissue in middle-aged patients. We tested the hypothesis that in skeletally aged rabbit knees, microdrill holes can be stimulated to remodel the bone plate and induce a more integrated, voluminous and hyaline cartilage repair tissue when treated by subchondral chitosan/blood implants. New Zealand White rabbits (13 or 32 months old, N = 7) received two 1.5 mm diameter, 2 mm depth drill holes in each knee, either left to bleed as surgical controls or press-fit with a 10 kDa (distal hole: 10K) or 40 kDa (proximal hole: 40K) chitosan/blood implant with fluorescent chitosan tracer. Post-operative knee effusion was documented. Repair tissues at day 0 (N = 1) and day 70 post-surgery (N = 6) were analyzed by micro-computed tomography, and by histological scoring and histomorphometry (SafO, Col-2, and Col-1) at day 70. All chitosan implants were completely cleared after 70 days, without increasing transient post-operative knee effusion compared to controls. Proximal control holes had worse osteochondral repair than distal holes. Both implant formulations induced bone remodeling and improved lateral integration of the bone plate at the hole edge. The 40K implant inhibited further bone repair inside 50% of the proximal holes, while the 10K implant specifically induced a "wound bloom" reaction, characterized by decreased bone plate density in a limited zone beyond the initial hole edge, and increased woven bone (WB) plate repair inside the initial hole (P = 0.016), which was accompanied by a more voluminous and hyaline cartilage repair (P hyaline cartilage repair can be promoted by treating acute drill holes with a biodegradable subchondral implant that elicits bone plate resorption followed by anabolic WB repair within a 70-day repair period. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. External Verification of the Bundle Adjustment in Photogrammetric Software Using the Damped Bundle Adjustment Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börlin, Niclas; Grussenmeyer, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate whether the Matlab-based Damped Bundle Adjustment Toolbox (DBAT) can be used to provide independent verification of the BA computation of two popular software—PhotoModeler (PM) and PhotoScan (PS). For frame camera data sets with lens distortion, DBAT is able to reprocess and replicate subsets of PM results with high accuracy. For lens-distortion-free data sets, DBAT can furthermore provide comparative results between PM and PS. Data sets for the discussed projects are available from the authors. The use of an external verification tool such as DBAT will enable users to get an independent verification of the computations of their software. In addition, DBAT can provide computation of quality parameters such as estimated standard deviations, correlation between parameters, etc., something that should be part of best practice for any photogrammetric software. Finally, as the code is free and open-source, users can add computations of their own.

  13. [Effects of in vitro continuous passaging on the phenotype of mouse hyaline chondrocytes and the balance of the extra- cellular matrix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linyi, Cai; Xiangli, Kong; Jing, Xie

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of in vitro continuous passaging on the morphological phenotype and differentiation characteristics of mouse hyaline chondrocytes, as well as on the balance of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Enzymatic digestion was conducted to isolate mouse hyaline chondrocytes, which expanded over five passages in vitro. Hematoxylin-eosin stain was used to show the changes in chondrocyte morphology. Semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to analyze the mRNA changes in the marker genes, routine genes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs) in chondrocytes. Zymography was carried out to elucidate changes in gelatinase activities. After continuous expansion in vitro, the morphology of round or polygonal chondrocytes changed to elongated and spindled shape. The expression of marker genes significantly decreased (P 0.05). Meanwhile, the ratio of MMPs/TIMPs was altered. At the protein level, the activities of gelatinases decreased after passaging, especially for P4 and P5 chondrocytes (P cartilage ECM became uncontrollable and led to the imbalance of ECM homeostasis. When hyaline chondrocytes are applied in research on relevant diseases or cartilage tissue engineering, P0-P2 chondrocytes should be used.

  14. An in vitro biomechanical comparison of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: single bundle versus anatomical double bundle techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Umeda Sasaki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Anterior cruciate ligament ruptures are frequent, especially in sports. Surgical reconstruction with autologous grafts is widely employed in the international literature. Controversies remain with respect to technique variations as continuous research for improvement takes place. One of these variations is the anatomical double bundle technique, which is performed instead of the conventional single bundle technique. More recently, there has been a tendency towards positioning the two bundles through double bone tunnels in the femur and tibia (anatomical reconstruction. OBJECTIVES: To compare, through biomechanical tests, the practice of anatomical double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a patellar graft to conventional single bundle reconstruction with the same amount of patellar graft in a paired experimental cadaver study. METHODS: Nine pairs of male cadaver knees ranging in age from 44 to 63 years were randomized into two groups: group A (single bundle and group B (anatomical reconstruction. Each knee was biomechanically tested under three conditions: intact anterior cruciate ligament, reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament, and injured anterior cruciate ligament. Maximum anterior dislocation, rigidity, and passive internal tibia rotation were recorded with knees submitted to a 100 N horizontal anterior dislocation force applied to the tibia with the knees at 30, 60 and 90 degrees of flexion. RESULTS: There were no differences between the two techniques for any of the measurements by ANOVA tests. CONCLUSION: The technique of anatomical double bundle reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with bone-patellar tendon-bone graft has a similar biomechanical behavior with regard to anterior tibial dislocation, rigidity, and passive internal tibial rotation.

  15. Improvements to Wire Bundle Thermal Modeling for Ampacity Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, Steve L.; Iannello, Christopher J.; Shariff, Khadijah

    2017-01-01

    Determining current carrying capacity (ampacity) of wire bundles in aerospace vehicles is critical not only to safety but also to efficient design. Published standards provide guidance on determining wire bundle ampacity but offer little flexibility for configurations where wire bundles of mixed gauges and currents are employed with varying external insulation jacket surface properties. Thermal modeling has been employed in an attempt to develop techniques to assist in ampacity determination for these complex configurations. Previous developments allowed analysis of wire bundle configurations but was constrained to configurations comprised of less than 50 elements. Additionally, for vacuum analyses, configurations with very low emittance external jackets suffered from numerical instability in the solution. A new thermal modeler is presented allowing for larger configurations and is not constrained for low bundle infrared emissivity calculations. Formulation of key internal radiation and interface conductance parameters is discussed including the effects of temperature and air pressure on wire to wire thermal conductance. Test cases comparing model-predicted ampacity and that calculated from standards documents are presented.

  16. Variable recruitment in bundles of miniature pneumatic artificial muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaHunt, Sylvie A; Pillsbury, Thomas E; Wereley, Norman M

    2016-09-13

    The natural compliance and force generation properties of pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs) allow them to operate like human muscles in anthropomorphic robotic manipulators. Traditionally, manipulators use a single PAM or multiple PAMs actuated in unison in place of a human muscle. However, these standard manipulators can experience significant efficiency losses when operated outside their target performance ranges at low actuation pressures. This study considers the application of a variable recruitment control strategy to a parallel bundle of miniature PAMs as an attempt to mimic the selective recruitment of motor units in a human muscle. Bundles of miniature PAMs are experimentally characterized, their actuation behavior is modeled, and the efficiency gains and losses associated with the application of a variable recruitment control strategy are assessed. This bio-inspired control strategy allows muscle bundles to operate the fewest miniature PAMs necessary to achieve a desired performance objective, improving the muscle bundle's operating efficiency over larger ranges of force generation and displacement. The study also highlights the need for improved PAM fabrication techniques to facilitate the production of identical miniature PAMs for inclusion in muscle bundles.

  17. Thermal hydraulics of rod bundles: The effect of eccentricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Amit K., E-mail: amit_fmlab@yahoo.co.in [Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Prasad, B.V.S.S.S., E-mail: prasad@iitm.ac.in [Thermal Turbomachines Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Patnaik, B.S.V., E-mail: bsvp@iitm.ac.in [Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Present CFD investigation explores, whole bundle eccentricity for the first time. • Fluid flow and thermal characteristics in various subchannels are analyzed. • Mass flux distribution is particularly analyzed to study eccentricity effect. • Higher eccentricity resulted in a shoot up in rod surface temperature distribution. • Both tangential and radial flow in rod bundles has resulted due to eccentricity. -- Abstract: The effect of eccentricity on the fluid flow and heat transfer through a 19-rod bundle is numerically carried out. When the whole bundle shifts downwards with respect to the outer (pressure) tube, flow redistribution happens. This in turn is responsible for changes in mass flux, pressure and differential flow development in various subchannels. The heat flux imposed on the surface of the fuel rods and the mass flux through the subchannels determines the coolant outlet temperatures. The simulations are performed for a coolant flow Reynolds number of 4 × 10{sup 5}. For an eccentricity value of 0.7, the mass flux in the bottom most subchannel (l) was found to decrease by 10%, while the surface temperature of the fuel rod in the vicinity of this subchannel increased by 250% at the outlet section. Parameters of engineering interest including skin friction coefficient, Nusselt number, etc., have been systematically explored to study the effect of eccentricity on the rod bundle.

  18. Dynamic response of fiber bundle under transverse impact.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo

    2010-03-01

    There has been a very high demand in developing efficient soft body armors to protect the military and law enforcement personnel from ballistic or explosive attack. As a basic component in the soft body armor, fibers or fiber bundles play a key role in the performance against ballistic impact. In order to study the ballistic-resistant mechanism of the soft body armor, it is desirable to understand the dynamic response of the fiber bundle under transverse impact. Transverse wave speed is one important parameter because a faster transverse wave speed can make the impact energy dissipate more quickly. In this study, we employed split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) to generate constant high-speed impact on a Kevlar fiber bundle in the transverse direction. The deformation of the fiber bundle was photographed with high-speed digital cameras. The transverse wave speeds were experimentally measured at various transverse impact velocities. The experimental results can also be used to quantitatively verify the current analytical models or to develop new models to describe the dynamic response of fiber bundle under transverse impact.

  19. Pressure Loss across Tube Bundles in Two-phase Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Woo Gun; Banzragch, Dagdan [Hannam Univ., Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    An analytical model was developed by Sim to estimate the two-phase damping ratio for upward two-phase flow perpendicular to horizontal tube bundles. The parameters of two-phase flow, such as void fraction and pressure loss evaluated in the model, were calculated based on existing experimental formulations. However, it is necessary to implement a few improvements in the formulations for the case of tube bundles. For the purpose of the improved formulation, we need more information about the two-phase parameters, which can be found through experimental test. An experiment is performed with a typical normal square array of cylinders subjected to the two-phase flow of air-water in the tube bundles, to calculate the two-phase Euler number and the two-phase friction multiplier. The pitch-to-diameter ratio is 1.35 and the diameter of cylinder is 18mm. Pressure loss along the flow direction in the tube bundles is measured with a pressure transducer and data acquisition system to calculate the two-phase Euler number and the two-phase friction multiplier. The void fraction model by Feenstra et al. is used to estimate the void fraction of the two-phase flow in tube bundles. The experimental results of the two phase friction multiplier and two-phase Euler number for homogeneous and non-homogeneous two-phase flows are compared and evaluated against the analytical results given by Sim's model.

  20. Ecosystem service bundles for analyzing tradeoffs in diverse landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudsepp-Hearne, C.; Peterson, G. D.; Bennett, E. M.

    2010-01-01

    A key challenge of ecosystem management is determining how to manage multiple ecosystem services across landscapes. Enhancing important provisioning ecosystem services, such as food and timber, often leads to tradeoffs between regulating and cultural ecosystem services, such as nutrient cycling, flood protection, and tourism. We developed a framework for analyzing the provision of multiple ecosystem services across landscapes and present an empirical demonstration of ecosystem service bundles, sets of services that appear together repeatedly. Ecosystem service bundles were identified by analyzing the spatial patterns of 12 ecosystem services in a mixed-use landscape consisting of 137 municipalities in Quebec, Canada. We identified six types of ecosystem service bundles and were able to link these bundles to areas on the landscape characterized by distinct social–ecological dynamics. Our results show landscape-scale tradeoffs between provisioning and almost all regulating and cultural ecosystem services, and they show that a greater diversity of ecosystem services is positively correlated with the provision of regulating ecosystem services. Ecosystem service-bundle analysis can identify areas on a landscape where ecosystem management has produced exceptionally desirable or undesirable sets of ecosystem services. PMID:20194739

  1. Colonization of a Central Venous Catheter by the Hyaline Fungus Fusarium solani Species Complex: A Case Report and SEM Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Colombo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of opportunistic infections by filamentous fungi is increasing partly due to the widespread use of central venous catheters (CVC, indwelling medical devices, and antineoplastic/immunosuppressive drugs. The case of a 13-year-old boy under treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia is presented. The boy was readmitted to the Pediatric Ward for intermittent fever of unknown origin. Results of blood cultures drawn from peripheral venous sites or through the CVC were compared. CVC-derived bottles (but not those from peripheral veins yielded hyaline fungi that, based on morphology, were identified as belonging to the Fusarium solani species complex. Gene amplification and direct sequencing of the fungal ITS1 rRNA region and the EF-1alpha gene confirmed the isolate as belonging to the Fusarium solani species complex. Portions of the CVC were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Fungi mycelia with long protruding hyphae were seen into the lumen. The firm adhesion of the fungal formation to the inner surface of the catheter was evident. In the absence of systemic infection, catheter removal and prophylactic voriconazole therapy were followed by disappearance of febrile events and recovery. Thus, indwelling catheters are prone to contamination by environmental fungi.

  2. Laparoscopic treatment for retroperitoneal hyaline-vascular type localized Castleman's disease (LCD) in the iliac vessel region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Aiwen; Shan, Lili; Wang, Zhonghai; Dai, Xiaoyun; Xiao, Tianhui; Zhuo, Rong; Yuan, Rui

    2015-01-01

    To improve the understanding, diagnostic levels, and therapeutic levels of retroperitoneal hyaline vascular type LCD in the iliac vessel region. Diagnostic and therapeutic processes of 4 patients with retroperitoneal LCD in the iliac vessel region were retrospectively analyzed. The median ages of the research patients was 31.3 years old, Pelvic vascular dual-source computed tomography (CT) indicated an abnormal pelvic irregular cloddy intensity shadow with heterogeneous densities and punctate calcified lesions. The enhanced scanning showed significantly enhanced lesions and multiple tortuous vascular images inside and around the lesions. Patients' preoperative diagnoses were all "pelvic mass with unknown characteristics", and retroperitoneal masses were successfully stripped off after the laparoscopic surgery. Intra operative findings indicated 1 mass located at the left obturator nerve, 1 at the left internal iliac artery, and 2 at the right external iliac artery. The postoperative pathological reports suggest a diagnosis of Castleman's disease. Retroperitoneal LCD in the iliac vessel region is generally asymptomatic. Preoperative imaging data may help with the diagnosis, but a confirmed diagnosis depends on the results of the pathological examination. Iliac artery embolization is performed prior to laparoscopic mass stripping if the masses have abundant blood supply, while lymphadenectomy is also applied to those with enlarged lymph nodes.

  3. Biostable scaffolds of polyacrylate polymers implanted in the articular cartilage induce hyaline-like cartilage regeneration in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho-Tello, María; Forriol, Francisco; Martín de Llano, José J; Antolinos-Turpin, Carmen; Gómez-Tejedor, José A; Gómez Ribelles, José L; Carda, Carmen

    2017-07-05

    To study the influence of scaffold properties on the organization of in vivo cartilage regeneration. Our hypothesis was that stress transmission to the cells seeded inside the pores of the scaffold or surrounding it, which is highly dependent on the scaffold properties, determines the differentiation of both mesenchymal cells and dedifferentiated autologous chondrocytes. 4 series of porous scaffolds made of different polyacrylate polymers, previously seeded with cultured rabbit chondrocytes or without cells, were implanted in cartilage defects in rabbits. Subchondral bone was injured during the surgery to allow blood to reach the implantation site and fill the scaffold pores. At 3 months after implantation, excellent tissue regeneration was obtained, with a well-organized layer of hyaline-like cartilage at the condylar surface in most cases of the hydrophobic or slightly hydrophilic series. The most hydrophilic material induced the poorest regeneration. However, no statistically significant difference was observed between preseeded and non-preseeded scaffolds. All of the materials used were biocompatible, biostable polymers, so, in contrast to some other studies, our results were not perturbed by possible effects attributable to material degradation products or to the loss of scaffold mechanical properties over time due to degradation. Cartilage regeneration depends mainly on the properties of the scaffold, such as stiffness and hydrophilicity, whereas little difference was observed between preseeded and non-preseeded scaffolds.

  4. Hyaline articular cartilage: relaxation times, pulse-sequence parameters and MR appearance at 1.5 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalkias, S.M. [Dept. of Radiology, A.H.E.P.A. General Hospital of the Aristotelian Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece); Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste (Italy); Pozzi-Mucelli, M. [Orthopaedic Clinic, Univ. of Trieste (Italy); Frezza, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste (Italy); Longo, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste (Italy)

    1994-08-01

    In order to optimize the parameters for the best visualization of the internal architecture of the hyaline articular cartilage a study both ex vivo and in vivo was performed. Accurate T1 and T2 relaxation times of articular cartilage were obtained with a particular mixed sequence and then used for the creation of isocontrast intensity graphs. These graphs subsequently allowed in all pulse sequences (spin echo, SE and gradient echo, GRE) the best combination of repetition time (TR), echo time (TE) and flip angle (FA) for optimization of signal differences between MR cartilage zones. For SE sequences maximum contrast between cartilage zones can be obtained by using a long TR (> 1,500 ms) with a short TE (< 30 ms), whereas for GRE sequences maximum contrast is obtained with the shortest TE (< 15 ms) combined with a relatively long TR (> 400 ms) and an FA greater than 40 . A trilaminar appearance was demonstrated with a superficial and deep hypointense zone in all sequences and an intermediate zone that was moderately hyperintense on SE T1-weighted images, slightly more hyperintense on proton density Rho and SE T2-weighted images and even more hyperintense on GRE images. (orig.)

  5. Collagen cross linking: Current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas K Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus is a common ectatic disorder occurring in more than 1 in 1,000 individuals. The condition typically starts in adolescence and early adulthood. It is a disease with an uncertain cause and its progression is unpredictable, but in extreme cases, vision deteriorates and can require corneal transplant surgery. Corneal collagen cross-linking (CCL with riboflavin (C3R is a recent treatment option that can enhance the rigidity of the cornea and prevent disease progression. Since its inception, the procedure has evolved with newer instrumentation, surgical techniques, and is also now performed for expanded indications other than keratoconus. With increasing experience, newer guidelines regarding optimization of patient selection, the spectrum of complications and their management, and combination procedures are being described. This article in conjunction with the others in this issue, will try and explore the uses of collagen cross-linking (CXL in its current form.

  6. Type VII Collagen is Enriched in the Enamel Organic Matrix Associated with the Dentin-Enamel Junction of Mature Human Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Jacob D.; Walker, Mary P.; Mousa, Ahmad; Wang, Yong; Gorski, Jeff P.

    2014-01-01

    The inner enamel region of erupted teeth is known to exhibit higher fracture toughness and crack growth resistance than bulk phase enamel. However, an explanation for this behavior has been hampered by the lack of compositional information for the residual enamel organic matrix. Since enamel-forming ameloblasts are known to express type VII collagen and type VII collagen null mice display abnormal amelogenesis, the aim of this study was to determine whether type VII collagen is a component of the enamel organic matrix at the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) of mature human teeth. Immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of demineralized tooth sections localized type VII collagen to the organic matrix surrounding individual enamel rods near the DEJ. Morphologically, immunoreactive type VII collagen helical-bundles resembled the gnarled-pattern of enamel rods detected by Coomassie Blue staining. Western blotting of whole crown or enamel matrix extracts also identified characteristic Mr=280 and 230 kDa type VII dimeric forms, which resolved into 75 and 25 kDa bands upon reduction. As expected, the collagenous domain of type VII collagen was resistant to pepsin digestion, but was susceptible to purified bacterial collagenase. These results demonstrate the inner enamel organic matrix in mature teeth contains macromolecular type VII collagen. Based on its physical association with the DEJ and its well-appreciated capacity to complex with other collagens, we hypothesize that enamel embedded type VII collagen fibrils may contribute not only to the structural resilience of enamel, but may also play a role in bonding enamel to dentin. PMID:24594343

  7. Collagen telopeptides (cross-linking sites) play a role in collagen gel lattice contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, D. T.; Yamauchi, M.; Wynn, K. C.; Mechanic, G.; Briggaman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized interstitial collagens will form a fibrillar, gel-like lattice when brought to physiologic conditions. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts the collagen lattice will contract. The rate of contraction can be determined by computer-assisted planemetry. The mechanisms involved in contraction are as yet unknown. Using this system it was found that the rate of contraction was markedly decreased when collagen lacking telopeptides was substituted for native collagen. Histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) is a major stable trifunctional collagen cross-link in mature skin that involves a carboxyl terminal, telopeptide site 16c, the sixteenth amino acid residue from the carboxy terminal of the telopeptide region of alpha 1 (I) in type I collagen. Little, if any, HHL was present in native, purified, reconstituted, soluble collagen fibrils from 1% acetic acid-extracted 2-year-old bovine skin. In contrast, HHL cross-links were present (0.22 moles of cross-link per mole of collagen) in lattices of the same collagen contracted by fibroblasts. However, rat tail tendon does not contain HHL cross-links, and collagen lattices made of rat tail tendon collagen are capable of contraction. This suggests that telopeptide sites, and not mature HHL cross-links per se, are essential for fibroblasts to contract collagen lattices. Beta-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN), a potent lathyrogen that perturbs collagen cross-linking by inhibition of lysyl oxidase, also inhibited the rate of lattice cell contraction in lattices composed of native collagen. However, the concentrations of BAPN that were necessary to inhibit the contraction of collagen lattices also inhibited fibroblast growth suggestive of cellular toxicity. In accordance with other studies, we found no inhibition of the rate of lattice contraction when fibronectin-depleted serum was used. Electron microscopy of contracted gels revealed typical collagen fibers with a characteristic axial periodicity. The data

  8. Versatile wedge-based system for the construction of unidirectional collagen scaffolds by directional freezing: practical and theoretical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pot, Michiel W; Faraj, Kaeuis A; Adawy, Alaa; van Enckevort, Willem J P; van Moerkerk, Herman T B; Vlieg, Elias; Daamen, Willeke F; van Kuppevelt, Toin H

    2015-04-29

    Aligned unidirectional collagen scaffolds may aid regeneration of those tissues where alignment of cells and extracellular matrix is essential, as for instance in cartilage, nerve bundles, and skeletal muscle. Pores can be introduced by ice crystal formation followed by freeze-drying, the pore architecture reflecting the ice crystal morphology. In this study we developed a wedge-based system allowing the production of a wide range of collagen scaffolds with unidirectional pores by directional freezing. Insoluble type I collagen suspensions were frozen using a custom-made wedge system, facilitating the formation of a horizontal as well as a vertical temperature gradient and providing a controlled solidification area for ice dendrites. The system permitted the growth of aligned unidirectional ice crystals over a large distance (>2.5 cm), an insulator prolonging the freezing process and facilitating the construction of crack-free scaffolds. Unidirectional collagen scaffolds with tunable pore sizes and pore morphologies were constructed by varying freezing rates and suspension media. The versatility of the system was indicated by the construction of unidirectional scaffolds from albumin, poly(vinyl alcohol) (a synthetic polymer), and collagen-polymer blends producing hybrid scaffolds. Macroscopic observations, temperature measurements, and scanning electron microscopy indicated that directed horizontal ice dendrite formation, vertical ice crystal nucleation, and evolutionary selection were the basis of the aligned unidirectional ice crystal growth and, hence, the aligned unidirectional pore structure. In conclusion, a simple, highly adjustable freezing system has been developed allowing the construction of large (hybrid) bioscaffolds with tunable unidirectional pore architecture.

  9. Failure of a MEA reclaimer tube bundle due to corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaban, H.; Abdo, M.S.E.; Lal, D.P.

    1988-08-01

    The removal of sulphur compounds from natural gas used in ammonia production is carried out by scrubbing with monoethanol amine (MEA). To avoid build up of corrosion and degradation products, a portion of the circulating MEA solution is passed through a reclaimer. This is essentially a kettle-type reboiler with a tube bundle made of 316L stainless steel. Occasional failures of the tube bundle due to pitting corrosion have been reported. It is suggested that the excessive pitting corrosion observed on the upper rows of the tube bundle could be partly due to high steam temperature but mainly due to the liquid level falling below the tubes leaving an accumulation of corrosive degradation products on the exposed surfaces, normally these corrosive products remain diluted in the MEA solution and cause little corrosion of the covered tubes. Their concentration on the dry upper layers of the hot metal tubes, however, leads to excessive corrosion. (U.K.).

  10. On the motives of moduli of chains and Higgs bundles

    CERN Document Server

    García-Prada, Oscar; Schmitt, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    We take another approach to Hitchin's strategy of computing the cohomology of moduli spaces of Higgs bundles by localization with respect to the circle-action. Our computation is done in the dimensional completion of the Grothendieck ring of varieties and starts by describing the classes of moduli stacks of chains rather than their coarse moduli spaces. As an application we show that the n-torsion of the Jacobian acts trivially on the middle dimensional cohomology of the moduli space of twisted SL_n-Higgs-bundles of degree coprime to n and we give an explicit formula for the motive of the moduli space of Higgs bundles of rank 4 and odd degree. This provides new evidence for a conjecture of Hausel and Rodr\\'iguez-Villegas. Along the way we find explicit recursion formulas for the motives of several types of moduli spaces of stable chains.

  11. Rheology of semiflexible bundle networks with transient linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Kei W; Bruinsma, Robijn F; Lieleg, Oliver; Bausch, Andreas R; Wall, Wolfgang A; Levine, Alex J

    2014-06-13

    We present a theoretical and computational analysis of the rheology of networks made up of bundles of semiflexible filaments bound by transient cross-linkers. Such systems are ubiquitous in the cytoskeleton and can be formed in vitro using filamentous actin and various cross-linkers. We find that their high-frequency rheology is characterized by a scaling behavior that is quite distinct from that of networks of the well-studied single semiflexible filaments. This regime can be understood theoretically in terms of a length-scale-dependent bending modulus for bundles. Next, we observe new dissipative dynamics associated with the shear-induced disruption of the network at intermediate frequencies. Finally, at low frequencies, we encounter a region of non-Newtonian rheology characterized by power-law scaling. This regime is dominated by bundle dissolution and large-scale rearrangements of the network driven by equilibrium thermal fluctuations.

  12. DTI Image Registration under Probabilistic Fiber Bundles Tractography Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Tao; Fan, Yangyu; Zhang, Xiuwei

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) image registration is an essential step for diffusion tensor image analysis. Most of the fiber bundle based registration algorithms use deterministic fiber tracking technique to get the white matter fiber bundles, which will be affected by the noise and volume. In order to overcome the above problem, we proposed a Diffusion Tensor Imaging image registration method under probabilistic fiber bundles tractography learning. Probabilistic tractography technique can more reasonably trace to the structure of the nerve fibers. The residual error estimation step in active sample selection learning is improved by modifying the residual error model using finite sample set. The calculated deformation field is then registered on the DTI images. The results of our proposed registration method are compared with 6 state-of-the-art DTI image registration methods under visualization and 3 quantitative evaluation standards. The experimental results show that our proposed method has a good comprehensive performance.

  13. Narrow muon bundles from muon pair production in rock

    CERN Document Server

    Kudryavtsev, V A; Spooner, N J C

    1999-01-01

    We revise the process of muon pair production by high-energy muons in rock using the recently published cross-section. The three- dimensional Monte Carlo code MUSIC has been used to obtain the characteristics of the muon bundles initiated via this process. We have compared them with those of conventional muon bundles initiated in the atmosphere and shown that large underground detectors, capable of collecting hundreds of thousands of multiple muon events, can discriminate statistically muon induced bundles from conventional ones. However, we find that the enhancement of the measured muon decoherence function over that predicted at small distances, recently reported by the MACRO experiment, cannot be explained by the effect of muon pair production alone, unless its cross-section is underestimated by a factor of 3. (20 refs).

  14. Narrow muon bundles from muon pair production in rock

    CERN Document Server

    Kudryavtsev, V A; Spooner, N J C; 10.1016/S0370-2693(99)01378-7

    2009-01-01

    We revise the process of muon pair production by high-energy muons in rock using the recently published cross-section. The three-dimensional Monte Carlo code MUSIC has been used to obtain the characteristics of the muon bundles initiated via this process. We have compared them with those of conventional muon bundles initiated in the atmosphere and shown that large underground detectors, capable of collecting hundreds of thousands of multiple muon events, can discriminate statistically muon induced bundles from conventional ones. However, we find that the enhancement of the measured muon decoherence function over that predicted at small distances, recently reported by the MACRO experiment, cannot be explained by the effect of muon pair production alone, unless its cross-section is underestimated by a factor of 3.

  15. High-order synchronization of hair cell bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michael; Molzon, Adrian; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Wook; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2016-12-01

    Auditory and vestibular hair cell bundles exhibit active mechanical oscillations at natural frequencies that are typically lower than the detection range of the corresponding end organs. We explore how these noisy nonlinear oscillators mode-lock to frequencies higher than their internal clocks. A nanomagnetic technique is used to stimulate the bundles without an imposed mechanical load. The evoked response shows regimes of high-order mode-locking. Exploring a broad range of stimulus frequencies and intensities, we observe regions of high-order synchronization, analogous to Arnold Tongues in dynamical systems literature. Significant areas of overlap occur between synchronization regimes, with the bundle intermittently flickering between different winding numbers. We demonstrate how an ensemble of these noisy spontaneous oscillators could be entrained to efficiently detect signals significantly above the characteristic frequencies of the individual cells.

  16. Symposium on Singularities, Representation of Algebras, and Vector Bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Trautmann, Günther

    1987-01-01

    It is well known that there are close relations between classes of singularities and representation theory via the McKay correspondence and between representation theory and vector bundles on projective spaces via the Bernstein-Gelfand-Gelfand construction. These relations however cannot be considered to be either completely understood or fully exploited. These proceedings document recent developments in the area. The questions and methods of representation theory have applications to singularities and to vector bundles. Representation theory itself, which had primarily developed its methods for Artinian algebras, starts to investigate algebras of higher dimension partly because of these applications. Future research in representation theory may be spurred by the classification of singularities and the highly developed theory of moduli for vector bundles. The volume contains 3 survey articles on the 3 main topics mentioned, stressing their interrelationships, as well as original research papers.

  17. 4d SCFTs from negative-degree line bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Nardoni, Emily

    2016-01-01

    We construct 4d $\\mathcal{N}=1$ quantum field theories by compactifying the (2,0) theories on a Riemann surface with genus $g$ and $n$ punctures, where the normal bundle decomposes into a sum of two line bundles with possibly negative degrees $p$ and $q$. Until recently, the only available field-theoretic constructions required the line bundle degrees to be nonnegative, although supergravity solutions were constructed in the literature for the zero-puncture case for all $p$ and $q$. Here, we provide field-theoretic constructions and computations of the central charges of 4d $\\mathcal{N}=1$ SCFTs that are the IR limit of M5-branes wrapping a surface with general $p$ or $q$ negative, for general genus $g$ and number of maximal punctures $n$.

  18. Simulation of bundle test Quench-12 with integral code MELCOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duspiva, J. [Nuclear Research Inst., Rez plc (Czech Republic)

    2011-07-01

    The past NRI analyses cover the Quench-01, Quench-03 and Quench-06 with version MELCOR 1.8.5 (including reflood model), and Quench-01 and Quench-11 tests with the latest version MELCOR 1.8.6. The Quench-12 test is specific, because it has different bundle configuration related to the VVER bundle configuration with hexagonal grid of pins and also used E110 cladding material. Specificity of Quench-12 test is also in the used material of fuel rod cladding - E110. The test specificities are a reason for the highest concern, because the VVER reactors are operated in the Czech Republic. The new input model was developed with the taking into account all experience from previous simulations of the Quench bundle tests. The recent version MELCOR 1.8.6 YU{sub 2}911 was used for the simulation with slightly modified ELHEAT package. Sensitivity studies on input parameters and oxidation kinetics were performed. (author)

  19. Lesson Eleven Transient and intermittent left bundle branch block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁端; 王劲

    2004-01-01

    @@ In transient left bundle branch block,normal intraventricular conduction subsequently returns,if only1temporarily.The condition has also been called paroxysmal,unstable,or temporary left bundle branch block. Its etiology is similar to that of the stable variety2, with the great majority of the patients having ischemic or hypertensive heart disease or both. Transient bundle branch block may complicate acute myocardial infarction or may occur during attacks of angina. It may appear during an episode of congestive heart failure and disappear with improvement of the cardiac status. Most patients eventually develop permanent block. Occasionally,however, the patient may revert to normal conduction even years after consistently demonstrating the block.

  20. Multi-scale strain-stiffening of semiflexible bundle networks

    CERN Document Server

    Piechocka, I K; Broedersz, C P; Kurniawan, N A; MacKintosh, F C; Koenderink, G H

    2015-01-01

    Bundles of polymer filaments are responsible for the rich and unique mechanical behaviors of many biomaterials, including cells and extracellular matrices. In fibrin biopolymers, whose nonlinear elastic properties are crucial for normal blood clotting, protofibrils self-assemble and bundle to form networks of semiflexible fibers. Here we show that the extraordinary strain-stiffening response of fibrin networks is a direct reflection of the hierarchical architecture of the fibrin fibers. We measure the rheology of networks of unbundled protofibrils and find excellent agreement with an affine model of extensible wormlike polymers. By direct comparison with these data, we show that physiological fibrin networks composed of thick fibers can be modeled as networks of tight protofibril bundles. We demonstrate that the tightness of coupling between protofibrils in the fibers can be tuned by the degree of enzymatic intermolecular crosslinking by the coagulation Factor XIII. Furthermore, at high stress, the protofibri...