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Sample records for hyaline membrane formation

  1. Pulmonary Changes in Preterm Neonates with Hyaline Membrane Disease (a Clinicomorphological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Golubev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal lung morphological changes in preterm neonatal infants with hyaline membrane disease (HMD in the use of exogenous surfactants and artificial ventilation. Materials and methods. Case histories and autopsy protocols were analyzed in 90 preterm neonates who had died from severe respiratory failure. All the neonates were divided into 4 groups: 1 20 (22.2% infants who had received the exogenous surfactant Curosurf in the combined therapy of HMD; 2 19 (21.1% babies with HMD who had taken Surfactant BL; 3 25 (27.8% surfactant-untreated infants who had died from HMD; 4 26 (28.9% very preterm neonates with extremely low birth weight who had died within the first hour of life. The lungs were histologically and morphometrically examined. Results. The study demonstrated the specific course of HMD when exogenous surfactants and artificial ventilation were used. The contributors to the development of the disease are intranatal amniotic fluid aspiration and intranatal fetal hypoxia. Conclusion. Artificial ventilation and the use of exogenous surfactants do not block the generation of hyaline membranes. The latter differ in formation time, form, and location. The differences in a cell response to hyaline membranes were found in the neonatal infants receiving exogenous surfactants. The characteristic morphological signs of the disease for all the neonates enrolled in the study are alveolar and bronchial epithelial damages and microcirculatory disorders. Key words: preterm neonatal infants, hyaline membrane disease, exogenous surfactants, artificial ventilation, histology, morphometry.

  2. Formation of Hyaline Cartilage Tissue by Passaged Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Vanessa J; Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D; Backstein, David; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    When serially passaged in standard monolayer culture to expand cell number, articular chondrocytes lose their phenotype. This results in the formation of fibrocartilage when they are used clinically, thus limiting their use for cartilage repair therapies. Identifying a way to redifferentiate these cells in vitro is critical if they are to be used successfully. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) family members are known to be crucial for regulating differentiation of fetal limb mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal stromal cells to chondrocytes. As passaged chondrocytes acquire a progenitor-like phenotype, the hypothesis of this study was that TGFβ supplementation will stimulate chondrocyte redifferentiation in vitro in serum-free three-dimensional (3D) culture. Human articular chondrocytes were serially passaged twice (P2) in monolayer culture. P2 cells were then placed in high-density (3D) culture on top of membranes (Millipore) and cultured for up to 6 weeks in chemically defined serum-free redifferentiation media (SFRM) in the presence or absence of TGFβ. The tissues were evaluated histologically, biochemically, by immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanically. Passaged human chondrocytes cultured in SFRM supplemented with 10 ng/mL TGFβ3 consistently formed a continuous layer of articular-like cartilage tissue rich in collagen type 2 and aggrecan and lacking collagen type 1 and X in the absence of a scaffold. The tissue developed a superficial zone characterized by expression of lubricin and clusterin with horizontally aligned collagen fibers. This study suggests that passaged human chondrocytes can be used to bioengineer a continuous layer of articular cartilage-like tissue in vitro scaffold free. Further study is required to evaluate their ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo.

  3. Radiologic and histologic features of hyaline membrane diseases of the newbone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung Yon; Choi, Kyung Hee; Suh, Jeong Soo; Rhee, Chung Sik; Kim, Hee Seup

    1984-01-01

    This study represents the radiologic, histologic features and clinical analysis of hyaline membrane diseases in 47 newbone infants who were delivered in Ewha Womans Univ. Hospital and expired caused by respiratory distress and confirmed by autopsy, during Jan. 1981 to June. 1984. The results were as follows: 1. Classification of radiographic stage (by Wolfson's criteria); Stage III (34.1%) was the most frequent. 2. Male to female ratio was 2.4 : 1. 3. Method of delivery; Cesarean section (44.7%) was the highest frequency, compared with percent of cesarean section to total delivery (29.0%) 4. Distribution of birth weight; 1.0-2.0 kg (48.9%) was the most frequent. 5. Distribution of gestational period; 32-36 weeks (29.8%) was the most frequent. 6. Complication; pulmonary hemorrhage (31.9%) was the most frequent, in order, subarachnoid hemorrhage and pneumothorax were followed. 7. Final diagnosis of hyaline membrane diseases was based on histo-pathologic diagnosis.

  4. Radiologic and histologic features of hyaline membrane diseases of the newbone

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    Baek, Seung Yon; Choi, Kyung Hee; Suh, Jeong Soo; Rhee, Chung Sik; Kim, Hee Seup [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-12-15

    This study represents the radiologic, histologic features and clinical analysis of hyaline membrane diseases in 47 newbone infants who were delivered in Ewha Womans Univ. Hospital and expired caused by respiratory distress and confirmed by autopsy, during Jan. 1981 to June. 1984. The results were as follows: 1. Classification of radiographic stage (by Wolfson's criteria); Stage III (34.1%) was the most frequent. 2. Male to female ratio was 2.4 : 1. 3. Method of delivery; Cesarean section (44.7%) was the highest frequency, compared with percent of cesarean section to total delivery (29.0%) 4. Distribution of birth weight; 1.0-2.0 kg (48.9%) was the most frequent. 5. Distribution of gestational period; 32-36 weeks (29.8%) was the most frequent. 6. Complication; pulmonary hemorrhage (31.9%) was the most frequent, in order, subarachnoid hemorrhage and pneumothorax were followed. 7. Final diagnosis of hyaline membrane diseases was based on histo-pathologic diagnosis.

  5. Changes of cerebral hemodynamics following the administration of surfactant in the hyaline membrane disease of prematurity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kyung Hee [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-15

    To evaluate the changes of cerebral blood flow velocity according to the time, before and after surfactant administration in hyaline membrane disease using Doppler ultrasonography. The patients were 15 premature babies who were clinically and radiologically diagnosed HMD. The ratio of male : female was 11:4, the mean gestational age was 30.1 {+-} 2.5 wks, mean body weight was 1.4 {+-} 0.6 kg,mean Apgar score at 5 min was 6.28, and type of delivery was C-section : vaginal delivery 9.6. Before and after, 10 mm, 30 min, 1 hr, 6 hr, 12 hr, 1 day, 3 day, 5 day and 7 day after surfactant administration, peak systolic and end-diastolic cerebral blood flow velocity (PSFV, EDFV) and resistive index (RI) were estimated by Doppler ultrasonography measuring MCA flow velocity using temporal window. The averages of all data according to the time were obtained and analyzed statistical significance. For the evaluation of the clinical status systemic BP, FiO2, pH, and respiratory rate were also checked according to the same time. The clinical status of FiO2, metabolic acidosis, and tachypnea was significantly improved after surfactant administration. There was no significant change of cerebral blood flow velocity (PSFV, EDFV) after the surfactant administration. The change of RI was nor statistically significant. The changes of the systemic BP had no significant changes. In spite of clinical improvement, there were no significant increases of cerebral blood flow velocity and changes of RI after surfactant administration in hyaline membrane disease.

  6. Changes of cerebral hemodynamics following the administration of surfactant in the hyaline membrane disease of prematurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kyung Hee

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the changes of cerebral blood flow velocity according to the time, before and after surfactant administration in hyaline membrane disease using Doppler ultrasonography. The patients were 15 premature babies who were clinically and radiologically diagnosed HMD. The ratio of male : female was 11:4, the mean gestational age was 30.1 ± 2.5 wks, mean body weight was 1.4 ± 0.6 kg,mean Apgar score at 5 min was 6.28, and type of delivery was C-section : vaginal delivery 9.6. Before and after, 10 mm, 30 min, 1 hr, 6 hr, 12 hr, 1 day, 3 day, 5 day and 7 day after surfactant administration, peak systolic and end-diastolic cerebral blood flow velocity (PSFV, EDFV) and resistive index (RI) were estimated by Doppler ultrasonography measuring MCA flow velocity using temporal window. The averages of all data according to the time were obtained and analyzed statistical significance. For the evaluation of the clinical status systemic BP, FiO2, pH, and respiratory rate were also checked according to the same time. The clinical status of FiO2, metabolic acidosis, and tachypnea was significantly improved after surfactant administration. There was no significant change of cerebral blood flow velocity (PSFV, EDFV) after the surfactant administration. The change of RI was nor statistically significant. The changes of the systemic BP had no significant changes. In spite of clinical improvement, there were no significant increases of cerebral blood flow velocity and changes of RI after surfactant administration in hyaline membrane disease.

  7. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1 is present in hyaline membranes and modulates surface tension of surfactant

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    Griese Matthias

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1 is a secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein that binds various bacteria and is thought to participate in innate pulmonary host defense. We hypothesized that pulmonary DMBT1 could contribute to respiratory distress syndrome in neonates by modulating surfactant function. Methods DMBT1 expression was studied by immunohistochemistry and mRNA in situ hybridization in post-mortem lungs of preterm and full-term neonates with pulmonary hyaline membranes. The effect of human recombinant DMBT1 on the function of bovine and porcine surfactant was measured by a capillary surfactometer. DMBT1-levels in tracheal aspirates of ventilated preterm and term infants were determined by ELISA. Results Pulmonary DMBT1 was localized in hyaline membranes during respiratory distress syndrome. In vitro addition of human recombinant DMBT1 to the surfactants increased surface tension in a dose-dependent manner. The DMBT1-mediated effect was reverted by the addition of calcium depending on the surfactant preparation. Conclusion Our data showed pulmonary DMBT1 expression in hyaline membranes during respiratory distress syndrome and demonstrated that DMBT1 increases lung surface tension in vitro. This raises the possibility that DMBT1 could antagonize surfactant supplementation in respiratory distress syndrome and could represent a candidate target molecule for therapeutic intervention in neonatal lung disease.

  8. Roentgenographic findings in hyaline membrane disease treated with exogenous surfactant: comparison with control group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lim, Chae Ha; Lim, Woo Young; Kim, Young Sook; Byen, Ju Nam; Oh, Jae Hee; Kim, Young Chul

    1997-01-01

    To compare, with the use of chest radiographic findings, improvement and complications in newborns treated with exogenous surfactant for hyaline membrane disease (HMD), and an untreated control group. Thirty-six patients with HMD were randomly assigned to a control group (n=18) or surfactant treated group (n=18). As part of an initial evaluation of their pulmonary status, we then performed a retrospective statistical analysis of chest radiographic findings obtained in exogenous surfactant treated and untreated infants within the first 90 minutes of life. Subsequent examinations were performed at less than 24 hours of age. Chest radiograph before treatment showed no significant differences between the two groups, but significant improvement was noted in the surfactant treated group, in contrast to the control group. The most common chest radiographic finding after surfactant administration was uniform (n=15) or disproportionate (n=2) improvement of pulmonary aeration. Patent ductus arteriosus developed in three treated neonates and in four cases in the control group. Air leak occurred in three cases in the treated group and in five cases in the control group. In one treated patient pulmonary hemorrhage developed and intracranial hemorrhage occurred in three treated neonates and in four cases in the control group. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia was developed in 6 cases of treated group and 3 cases of control group. A chest radiograph is considered to be helpful in the evaluation of improvement and complications of HMD in infants treated with surfactant

  9. Hyaline cartilage formation and tumorigenesis of implanted tissues derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Saito, Taku; Yano, Fumiko; Mori, Daisuke; Kawata, Manabu; Hoshi, Kazuto; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Masaki, Hideki; Otsu, Makoto; Eto, Koji; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Chung, Ung-il; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a promising cell source for cartilage regenerative medicine. Meanwhile, the risk of tumorigenesis should be considered in the clinical application of human iPSCs (hiPSCs). Here, we report in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of hiPSCs and maturation of the differentiated hiPSCs through transplantation into mouse knee joints. Three hiPSC clones showed efficient chondrogenic differentiation using an established protocol for human embryonic stem cells. The differentiated hiPSCs formed hyaline cartilage tissues at 8 weeks after transplantation into the articular cartilage of NOD/SCID mouse knee joints. Although tumors were not observed during the 8 weeks after transplantation, an immature teratoma had developed in one mouse at 16 weeks. In conclusion, hiPSCs are a potent cell source for regeneration of hyaline articular cartilage. However, the risk of tumorigenesis should be managed for clinical application in the future.

  10. The effect of polymer size and charge of molecules on permeation through synovial membrane and accumulation in hyaline articular cartilage.

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    Sterner, B; Harms, M; Wöll, S; Weigandt, M; Windbergs, M; Lehr, C M

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of joint related diseases often involves direct intra-articular injections. For rational development of novel delivery systems with extended residence time in the joint, detailed understanding of transport and retention phenomena within the joint is mandatory. This work presents a systematic study on the in vitro permeation, penetration and accumulation of model polymers with differing charges and molecular weights in bovine joint tissue. Permeation experiments with bovine synovial membrane were performed with PEG polymers (6-200 kDa) and methylene blue in customized diffusion chambers. For polyethylene glycol, 2-fold (PEG 6 kDa), 3-fold (PEG 10 kDa) and 13-fold (PEG 35 kDa) retention by the synovial membrane in reference to the small molecule methylene blue was demonstrated. No PEG 200 kDa was found in the acceptor in detectable amounts after 48 h. This showed the potential for a distinct extension of joint residence times by increasing molecular weights. In addition, experiments with bovine cartilage tissue were conducted. The ability for positively charged, high molecular weight chitosans and HEMA-Co-TMAP (HCT) polymers (up to 233 kDa) to distribute throughout the entire cartilage matrix was demonstrated. In contrast, a distribution into cartilage was not observed for neutral PEG polymers (6-200 kDa). Furthermore, the positive charge density of different compounds (chitosan, HEMA-Co-TMAP, methylene blue, MSC C1 (neutral NCE) and MSC D1 (positively charged NCE) was found to correlate with their accumulation in bovine cartilage tissue. In summary, the results offer pre-clinical in vitro data, indicating that the modification of molecular size and charge of a substance has the potential to decelerate its clearance through the synovial membrane and to promote accumulation inside the cartilage matrix. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nanoscale Membrane Domain Formation Driven by Cholesterol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javanainen, Matti; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2017-01-01

    Biological membranes generate specific functions through compartmentalized regions such as cholesterol-enriched membrane nanodomains that host selected proteins. Despite the biological significance of nanodomains, details on their structure remain elusive. They cannot be observed via microscopic...... dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol - the "minimal standard" for nanodomain formation. The simulations reveal how cholesterol drives the formation of fluid cholesterol-rich nanodomains hosting hexagonally packed cholesterol-poor lipid nanoclusters, both of which show registration between the membrane leaflets....... The complex nanodomain substructure forms when cholesterol positions itself in the domain boundary region. Here cholesterol can also readily flip-flop across the membrane. Most importantly, replacing cholesterol with a sterol characterized by a less asymmetric ring region impairs the emergence of nanodomains...

  12. Gel layer formation on membranes in Membrane Bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Brink, P.F.H.

    2014-01-01

    The widespread application of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for municipal wastewater treatment is hampered by membrane fouling. Fouling increases energy demand, reduces process performance and creates the need for more frequent (chemical) membrane cleaning or replacement. Membrane fouling in MBRs is

  13. Fusarium and other opportunistic hyaline fungi

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    This chapter focuses on those fungi that grow in tissue in the form of hyaline or lightly colored septate hyphae. These fungi include Fusarium and other hyaline fungi. Disease caused by hyaline fungi is referred to as hyalohyphomycosis. Hyaline fungi described in this chapter include the anamorphic,...

  14. BMP-2, hypoxia, and COL1A1/HtrA1 siRNAs favor neo-cartilage hyaline matrix formation in chondrocytes.

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    Ollitrault, David; Legendre, Florence; Drougard, Carole; Briand, Mélanie; Benateau, Hervé; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Poulain, Laurent; Hartmann, Daniel; Vivien, Denis; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Baldi, Alfonso; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Demoor, Magali; Galera, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an irreversible pathology that causes a decrease in articular cartilage thickness, leading finally to the complete degradation of the affected joint. The low spontaneous repair capacity of cartilage prevents any restoration of the joint surface, making OA a major public health issue. Here, we developed an innovative combination of treatment conditions to improve the human chondrocyte phenotype before autologous chondrocyte implantation. First, we seeded human dedifferentiated chondrocytes into a collagen sponge as a scaffold, cultured them in hypoxia in the presence of a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), BMP-2, and transfected them with small interfering RNAs targeting two markers overexpressed in OA dedifferentiated chondrocytes, that is, type I collagen and/or HtrA1 serine protease. This strategy significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression of type I collagen and HtrA1, and led to an improvement in the chondrocyte phenotype index of differentiation. The effectiveness of our in vitro culture process was also demonstrated in the nude mouse model in vivo after subcutaneous implantation. We, thus, provide here a new protocol able to favor human hyaline chondrocyte phenotype in primarily dedifferentiated cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Our study also offers an innovative strategy for chondrocyte redifferentiation and opens new opportunities for developing therapeutic targets.

  15. The development of hyaline-cell cartilage in the head of the black molly, Poecilia sphenops. Evidence for secondary cartilage in a teleost.

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    Benjamin, M

    1989-01-01

    The development of hyaline-cell cartilage attached to membrane (dentary, maxilla, nasal, lacrimal and cleithrum) and cartilage (basioccipital) bones has been studied in the viviparous black molly, Poecilia sphenops. Intramembranous ossification commences before the first appearance of hyaline cells. As hyaline-cell cartilage is densely cellular and as that attached to the dentary, maxilla and cleithrum develops from the periosteum of these membrane bones, it must be regarded as secondary cart...

  16. Latest development on the membrane formation for gas separation

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    Ahmad Fausi Ismail

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The first scientific observation related to gas separation was encountered by J.K Mitchell in 1831. However, the most remarkable and influential contribution to membrane gas separation technology was the systematic study by Thomas Graham in 1860. However only in 1979, membrane based gas separation technology was available and recognized as one of the most recent and advanced unit operations for gas separation processes. Membrane is fabricated by various methods and the parameters involved to a certain extent are very complicated. The phase inversion technique that is normally employed to produce membranes are dry/wet, wet, dry and thermal induced phase separation. Other techniques used to produce membrane are also reviewed. This paper reports the latest development in membrane formation for gas separation. The route to produce defect-free and ultrathin-skinned asymmetric membrane is also presented that represents the cutting edge technology in membrane gas separation process

  17. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

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    Laila Cigana Schenkel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases.

  18. A Hyalinized Trichilemmoma of the Eyelid in a Teenager.

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    Jakobiec, Frederick A; Stagner, Anna M; Sassoon, Jodi; Goldstein, Scott; Mihm, Martin C

    2016-01-01

    A 16-year-old African American male, the youngest patient to date, presented with a well-circumscribed upper eyelid lesion. On excision, the dermal nodule was contiguous with the epidermis, displayed trichohyalin-like bodies in an expanded outer root sheath, and was composed chiefly of small cellular clusters separated by a prominent network of periodic acid Schiff -positive hyaline bands of basement membrane material. The tumor cells were positive for high molecular weight cytokeratins (CK) 5/6, CK14, and CK34βE12 and were negative for CK7, carcinoembryonic antigen and epithelial membrane antigen. Negative S100, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and smooth muscle actin immunoreactions ruled out a myoepithelial lesion. The Ki-67 proliferation index was <10%. The diagnosis was a hyalinized trichilemmoma, contrasting with the more common lobular type. As an isolated lesion, trichilemmoma does not portend Cowden syndrome.

  19. Macroscopic domain formation in the platelet plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bali, Rachna; Savino, Laura; Ramirez, Diego A.

    2009-01-01

    There has been ample debate on whether cell membranes can present macroscopic lipid domains as predicted by three-component phase diagrams obtained by fluorescence microscopy. Several groups have argued that membrane proteins and interactions with the cytoskeleton inhibit the formation of large d...

  20. Two-Step Mechanism of Membrane Disruption by Aβ through Membrane Fragmentation and Pore Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacca, Michele F.M.; Kotler, Samuel A.; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Chen, Jennifer; Lee, Dong-kuk; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of cell membranes by Aβ is believed to be one of the key components of Aβ toxicity. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that membrane disruption by Aβ occurs by a two-step process, with the initial formation of ion-selective pores followed by nonspecific fragmentation of the lipid membrane during amyloid fiber formation. Immediately after the addition of freshly dissolved Aβ1–40, defects form on the membrane that share many of the properties of Aβ channels originally reported from single-channel electrical recording, such as cation selectivity and the ability to be blockaded by zinc. By contrast, subsequent amyloid fiber formation on the surface of the membrane fragments the membrane in a way that is not cation selective and cannot be stopped by zinc ions. Moreover, we observed that the presence of ganglioside enhances both the initial pore formation and the fiber-dependent membrane fragmentation process. Whereas pore formation by freshly dissolved Aβ1–40 is weakly observed in the absence of gangliosides, fiber-dependent membrane fragmentation can only be observed in their presence. These results provide insights into the toxicity of Aβ and may aid in the design of specific compounds to alleviate the neurodegeneration of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:22947931

  1. Nanoscale Membrane Domain Formation Driven by Cholesterol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javanainen, M.; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Vattulainen, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, Apr 25 (2017), č. článku 1143. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular dynamics simulations * differential scanning calorimetry * pulmonary surfactant membranes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016 https://www.nature.com/ articles /s41598-017-01247-9

  2. Biofilm formation on membranes used for membrane aerated biological reactors, under different stress conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade-Molinar, C.; Ballinas-Casarrubias, M. L.; Solis-Martinez, F. J.; Rivera-Chavira, B. E.; Cuevas-Rodirguez, G.; Nevarez-Moorillon, G. V.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm play an important role in wastewater treatment processes, and have been optimized in the membrane aerated biofilm reactors (MABR). In MABR, a hydrophobic membrane is used as support for the formation of biofilm, and supplements enough aeration to assure an aerobic process. (Author)

  3. Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis. Radiological diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, R.; Sar, V.; Cabrera, J.J.; Diaz, L.; Hernandez, B.; Valeron, P.; Baez, O.; Rodriguez, M.

    1993-01-01

    Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) is a rare disorder of unknown etiology, very few cases of which have been reported in the literature. It presents similarities to other fibromatosys, but has its particular radiological features which differentiate it from them. The clinical findings consist of several, slow growing, subcutaneous nodules, flexion contractures of the joints which can lead to disability, gingival hypertrophy and muscular atrophy. The suspected radiological diagnosis is confirmed by electron microscopy study of the nodules, although light microscopy can also reveal suggestive images. Author (9 refs.)

  4. Membrane formation : diffusion induced demixing processes in ternary polymeric systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuvers, Albertus Johannes

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis the mechanism of membrane formation by means of immersion precipitation is studied. Immersion of a concentrated polymer solution film into a nonsolvent bath induces an exchange of solvent and nonsolvent in the film by means of diffusion. This process results in an asymmetric polymer

  5. Surgical correction of joint deformities and hyaline cartilage regeneration

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    Vyacheslav Alexandrovich Vinokurov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine a method of extra-articular osteochondral fragment formation for the improvement of surgical correction results of joint deformities and optimization of regenerative conditions for hyaline cartilage. Materials and Methods. The method of formation of an articular osteochondral fragment without penetration into the joint cavity was devised experimentally. More than 30 patients with joint deformities underwent the surgery. Results. During the experiments, we postulated that there may potentially be a complete recovery of joint defects because of hyaline cartilage regeneration. By destructing the osteochondral fragment and reforming it extra-articularally, joint defects were recovered in all patients. The results were evaluated as excellent and good in majority of the patients. Conclusion. These findings indicate a novel method in which the complete recovery of joint defects due to dysplastic genesis or osteochondral defects as a result of injuries can be obtained. The devised method can be used in future experiments for objectification and regenerative potential of hyaline cartilage (e.g., rate and volume of the reformed joints that regenerate, detection of cartilage elements, and the regeneration process.

  6. Dynamic Membrane Formation in Anaerobic Dynamic Membrane Bioreactors: Role of Extracellular Polymeric Substances.

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    Hongguang Yu

    Full Text Available Dynamic membrane (DM formation in dynamic membrane bioreactors plays an important role in achieving efficient solid-liquid separation. In order to study the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS to DM formation in anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR processes, EPS extraction from and re-addition to bulk sludge were carried out in short-term filtration tests. DM formation behaviors could be well simulated by cake filtration model, and sludge with EPS re-addition showed the highest resistance coefficient, followed by sludge after EPS extraction. The DM layers exhibited a higher resistance and a lower porosity for the sludge sample after EPS extraction and for the sludge with EPS re-addition. Particle size of sludge flocs decreased after EPS extraction, and changed little with EPS re-addition, which was confirmed by interaction energy analysis. Further investigations by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM analysis and batch tests suggested that the removal of in-situ EPS stimulated release of soluble EPS, and re-added EPS were present as soluble EPS rather than bound EPS, which thus improved the formation of DM. The present work revealed the role of EPS in anaerobic DM formation, and could facilitate the operation of AnDMBR processes.

  7. Mechanical properties of hyaline and repair cartilage studied by nanoindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, O; Durst, K; Maier, V; Göken, M; Birkholz, T; Schneider, H; Hennig, F; Gelse, K

    2007-11-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly organized tissue that is well adapted to the functional demands in joints but difficult to replicate via tissue engineering or regeneration. Its viscoelastic properties allow cartilage to adapt to both slow and rapid mechanical loading. Several cartilage repair strategies that aim to restore tissue and protect it from further degeneration have been introduced. The key to their success is the quality of the newly formed tissue. In this study, periosteal cells loaded on a scaffold were used to repair large partial-thickness cartilage defects in the knee joint of miniature pigs. The repair cartilage was analyzed 26 weeks after surgery and compared both morphologically and mechanically with healthy hyaline cartilage. Contact stiffness, reduced modulus and hardness as key mechanical properties were examined in vitro by nanoindentation in phosphate-buffered saline at room temperature. In addition, the influence of tissue fixation with paraformaldehyde on the biomechanical properties was investigated. Although the repair process resulted in the formation of a stable fibrocartilaginous tissue, its contact stiffness was lower than that of hyaline cartilage by a factor of 10. Fixation with paraformaldehyde significantly increased the stiffness of cartilaginous tissue by one order of magnitude, and therefore, should not be used when studying biomechanical properties of cartilage. Our study suggests a sensitive method for measuring the contact stiffness of articular cartilage and demonstrates the importance of mechanical analysis for proper evaluation of the success of cartilage repair strategies.

  8. Protein shape and crowding drive domain formation and curvature in biological membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frese, R.N.; Pamies, Josep C.; Olsen, John D.; Bahatyrova, S.; van der Weij-de Wit, Chantal D.; Aartsma, Thijs J.; Otto, Cornelis; Hunter, C. Neil; Frenkel, Daan; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2007-01-01

    Folding, curvature, and domain formation are characteristics of many biological membranes. Yet the mechanisms that drive both curvature and the formation of specialized domains enriched in particular protein complexes are unknown. For this reason, studies in membranes whose shape and organization

  9. Mechanism of voltage-gated channel formation in lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidelli, Rolando; Becucci, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    Although several molecular models for voltage-gated ion channels in lipid membranes have been proposed, a detailed mechanism accounting for the salient features of experimental data is lacking. A general treatment accounting for peptide dipole orientation in the electric field and their nucleation and growth kinetics with ion channel formation is provided. This is the first treatment that explains all the main features of the experimental current-voltage curves of peptides forming voltage-gated channels available in the literature. It predicts a regime of weakly voltage-dependent conductance, followed by one of strong voltage-dependent conductance at higher voltages. It also predicts values of the parameters expressing the exponential dependence of conductance upon voltage and peptide bulk concentration for both regimes, in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Most importantly, the only two adjustable parameters involved in the kinetics of nucleation and growth of ion channels can be varied over broad ranges without affecting the above predictions to a significant extent. Thus, the fitting of experimental current-voltage curves stems naturally from the treatment and depends only slightly upon the choice of the kinetic parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Microscopic and histochemical manifestations of hyaline cartilage dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinin, G I; Malinin, T I

    1999-01-01

    Structure and function of hyaline cartilages has been the focus of many correlative studies for over a hundred years. Much of what is known regarding dynamics and function of cartilage constituents has been derived or inferred from biochemical and electron microscopic investigations. Here we show that in conjunction with ultrastructural, and high-magnification transmission light and polarization microscopy, the well-developed histochemical methods are indispensable for the analysis of cartilage dynamics. Microscopically demonstrable aspects of cartilage dynamics include, but are not limited to, formation of the intracellular liquid crystals, phase transitions of the extracellular matrix and tubular connections between chondrocytes. The role of the interchondrocytic liquid crystals is considered in terms of the tensegrity hypothesis and non-apoptotic cell death. Phase transitions of the extracellular matrix are discussed in terms of self-alignment of chondrons, matrix guidance pathways and cartilage growth in the absence of mitosis. The possible role of nonenzymatic glycation reactions in cartilage dynamics is also reviewed.

  11. Formation of carrageenan-CaCO{sub 3} bioactive membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Lucas F.B.; Maniglia, Bianca C.; Pereira, Lourivaldo S.; Tapia-Blácido, Delia R.; Ramos, Ana P., E-mail: anapr@ffclrp.usp.br

    2016-01-01

    The high biocompatibility and resorbability of polymeric membranes have encouraged their use to manufacture medical devices. Here, we report on the preparation of membranes consisting of carrageenan, a naturally occurring sulfated polysaccharide that forms helical structures in the presence of calcium ions. We incorporated CaCO{sub 3} particles into the membranes to enhance their bioactivity and mechanical properties. Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction data confirmed CaCO{sub 3} incorporation into the polymeric matrix. We tested the bioactivity of the samples by immersing them in a solution that mimics the ionic composition and pH of the human body fluid. The hybrid membranes generated hydroxyapatite, as attested by X-ray diffraction data. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopies aided investigation of membrane topography before and after CaCO{sub 3} deposition. The wettability and surface free energy, evaluated by contact angle measures, increased in the presence of CaCO{sub 3} particles. These parameters are important for membrane implantation in the body. Moreover, membrane stiffness was up to 110% higher in the presence of the inorganic particles, as revealed by Young's modulus. - Highlights: • Hybrid kappa and iota carrageenan-CaCO{sub 3} membranes were formed. • The hybrid membrane's origin hydroxyapatite after exposure to simulated body fluid • The carrageenan's specificity to bind Ca{sup 2+} ions tailors the surface properties.

  12. Ice formation in model biological membranes in the presence of cryoprotectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiselev, M.A. E-mail: kiselev@nf.jinr.ru; Lesieur, P.; Kisselev, A.M.; Ollivon, M

    2000-06-21

    Ice formation in model biological membranes is studied by SAXS and WAXS in the presence of cryoprotectors: dimethyl sulfoxide and glycerol. Three types of phospholipid membranes: DPPC, DMPC, DSPC are chosen for the investigation as well-studied model biological membranes. A special cryostat is used for sample cooling from 14.1 deg. C to -55.4 deg. C. The ice formation is detected only by WAXS in binary phospholipid/water and ternary phospholipid/cryoprotector/water systems in the condition of excess solvent. Ice formation in a binary phospholipid/water system creates an abrupt decrease of the membrane repeat distance by {delta}d, the so-called ice-induced dehydration of intermembrane space. The value of {delta}d decreases as the cryoprotector concentration increases. The formation of ice does not influence the membrane structure ({delta}d=0) for cryoprotector mole fractions higher than 0.05.

  13. Nonhomogeneous immunostaining of hyaline membranes in different manifestations of diffuse alveolar damage Imunomarcação não homogênea das membranas hialinas na sindrome da angustia respiratório do adulto pulmonar, extrapulmonar e idiopática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Peres e Serra

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine the nature of hyaline membranes in different manifestations of diffuse alveolar damage, [pulmonary and extrapulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome], and idiopathic [acute interstitial pneumonia]. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pulmonary specimens were obtained from 17 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome and 9 patients with acute interstitial pneumonia. They were separated into 3 different groups: (a pulmonary diffuse alveolar damage (pDAD (n = 8, consisting only of pneumonia cases; (b extrapulmonary diffuse alveolar damage (expDAI (n = 9, consisting of sepsis and septic shock cases; and (c idiopathic diffuse alveolar damage (iDAD (n = 9, consisting of idiopathic cases (acute interstitial pneumonia. Hyaline membranes, the hallmark of the diffuse alveolar damage histological pattern, were examined using various kinds of antibodies. The antibodies used were against surfactant apoprotein-A (SP-A, cytokeratin 7 (CK7, cytokeratin 8 (CK8, alpha smooth muscle actin (a-SMA, cytokeratin AE1/AE3 (AE1/AE3, and factor VIII-related antigen (factor VIII. RESULTS: Pulmonary diffuse alveolar damage showed the largest quantity of hyaline membranes (12.65% ± 3.24%, while extrapulmonary diffuse alveolar damage (9.52% ± 3.64% and idiopathic diffuse alveolar damage (7.34% ± 2.11% showed intermediate and lower amounts, respectively, with the difference being statistically significant between pulmonary and idiopathic diffuse alveolar damage (P OBJETIVO: Determinar a natureza da membrana hialina nas diferentes manifestações do dano alveolar difuso [pulmonar e extrapulmonar síndrome do desconforto respiratório] e idiopático [pneumonia intersticial aguda]. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Espécimes pulmonares foram obtidos de 17 pacientes com SDRA e 9 pacientes com pneumonia intersticial aguda e separados em três diferentes grupos: (a dano alveolar difuso pulmonar (DADp (n=8 constituído por casos de pneumonia, (b dano alveolar difuso

  14. Autologous chondrocyte implantation: superior biologic properties of hyaline cartilage repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Ian; Lavigne, Patrick; Valenzuela, Herminio; Oakes, Barry

    2007-02-01

    Information regarding the quality of autologous chondrocyte implantation repair is needed to determine whether the current autologous chondrocyte implantation surgical technology and the subsequent biologic repair processes are capable of reliably forming durable hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage in vivo. We report and analyze the properties and qualities of autologous chondrocyte implantation repairs. We evaluated 66 autologous chondrocyte implantation repairs in 57 patients, 55 of whom had histology, indentometry, and International Cartilage Repair Society repair scoring at reoperation for mechanical symptoms or pain. International Knee Documentation Committee scores were used to address clinical outcome. Maximum stiffness, normalized stiffness, and International Cartilage Repair Society repair scoring were higher for hyaline articular cartilage repairs compared with fibrocartilage, with no difference in clinical outcome. Reoperations revealed 32 macroscopically abnormal repairs (Group B) and 23 knees with normal-looking repairs in which symptoms leading to arthroscopy were accounted for by other joint disorders (Group A). In Group A, 65% of repairs were either hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage compared with 28% in Group B. Autologous chondrocyte repairs composed of fibrocartilage showed more morphologic abnormalities and became symptomatic earlier than hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage repairs. The hyaline articular cartilage repairs had biomechanical properties comparable to surrounding cartilage and superior to those associated with fibrocartilage repairs.

  15. Hyaline cartilage degenerates after autologous osteochondral transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibesku, C O; Szuwart, T; Kleffner, T O; Schlegel, P M; Jahn, U R; Van Aken, H; Fuchs, S

    2004-11-01

    Autologous osteochondral grafting is a well-established clinical procedure to treat focal cartilage defects in patients, although basic research on this topic remains sparse. The aim of the current study was to evaluate (1) histological changes of transplanted hyaline cartilage of osteochondral grafts and (2) the tissue that connects the transplanted cartilage with the adjacent cartilage in a sheep model. Both knee joints of four sheep were opened surgically and osteochondral grafts were harvested and simultaneously transplanted to the contralateral femoral condyle. The animals were sacrificed after three months and the received knee joints were evaluated histologically. Histological evaluation showed a complete ingrowth of the osseous part of the osteochondral grafts. A healing or ingrowth at the level of the cartilage could not be observed. Histological evaluation of the transplanted grafts according to Mankin revealed significantly more and more severe signs of degeneration than the adjacent cartilage, such as cloning of chondrocytes and irregularities of the articular surface. We found no connecting tissue between the transplanted and the adjacent cartilage and histological signs of degeneration of the transplanted hyaline cartilage. In the light of these findings, long-term results of autologous osteochondral grafts in human beings have to be followed critically.

  16. MPP1 directly interacts with flotillins in erythrocyte membrane - Possible mechanism of raft domain formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernatowska, Agnieszka; Augoff, Katarzyna; Podkalicka, Joanna; Tabaczar, Sabina; Gajdzik-Nowak, Weronika; Czogalla, Aleksander; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2017-11-01

    Flotillins are prominent, oligomeric protein components of erythrocyte (RBC) membrane raft domains and are considered to play an important structural role in lateral organization of the plasma membrane. In our previous work on erythroid membranes and giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) derived from them we have shown that formation of functional domains (resting state rafts) depends on the presence of membrane palmitoylated protein 1 (MPP1/p55), pointing to its new physiological role. Exploration of the molecular mechanism of MPP1 function in organizing membrane domains described here, through searching for its molecular partners in RBC membrane by using different methods, led to the identification of the raft-marker proteins, flotillin 1 and flotillin 2, as hitherto unreported direct MPP1 binding-partners in the RBC membrane. These proteins are found in high molecular-weight complexes in native RBC membrane and, significantly, their presence was shown to be separate from the well-known protein 4.1-dependent interactions of MPP1 with membrane proteins. Furthermore, FLIM analysis revealed that loss of the endogenous MPP1-flotillins interactions resulted in significant changes in RBC membrane-fluidity, emphasizing the physiological importance of such interactions in vivo. Therefore, our data establish a new perspective on the role of MPP1 in erythroid cells and suggests that direct MPP1-flotillins interactions could be the major driving-force behind the formation of raft domains in RBC. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Formation of purple membranes during salt bacteria cultivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekulaeva, L N; Korolev, Iu N; Telegin, N L; Rikhireva, G T

    1975-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out on cultivation of halophile with probe selection in the interval of 1--2 hours to record the spectra of repeated disturbed completed inner reflection. Periodicity in the changes of spectral characteristics of the culture with the interval of 20--24 hours is revealed. A clearly expressed dichroism of the amid II band of the membrane complex is found, the absence of this dichroism in the protein isolated from the membrane complex is stated. It is suggested that dichroism revealed is a specific feature of the presence of purpuric membranes in the cells. Spontaneous plane orientation of protein macromolecules in purpuric membranes is established. The level of dichroism of amid II band is shown to depend on fermentation conditions of salt bacteria.

  18. The Formation of Porous Membranes by Filtration of Aerosol Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Sune K.; Johannessen, Tue; Mosleh, Majid; Wedel, Stig; Tranto, Janne; Livbjerg, Hans

    2002-01-01

    Flame-generated aerosol particles of Al 2 O 3 were deposited by gas filtration on two types of porous and ceramic tubes of α-Al 2 O 3 with mean pore diameters of 450 and 2700 nm, respectively. The particles were aggregates with average mobility diameters in the range of 30-100 nm and primary particle diameters of 4-8 nm. The particles are characterized by differential mobility analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and by their specific surface area. The deposited membranes are characterized by gas permeability measurements, scanning electron microscopy, and by their pore size distribution from nitrogen capillary condensation. The particles form a distinct, homogeneous membrane layer with a porosity of ∼90% on top of the substrate surface and only penetrate slightly into the substrate structure. The mean pore sizes of the deposited membranes determined by nitrogen condensation agree approximately with those determined by gas permeation and the specific surface area. The mean pore diameter varies in the range of 30-70 nm. The gas permeability of the deposited membranes is related to the specific surface area but influenced by the high porosity. The mean pore size and the permeability of the membranes are almost independent of the substrate structure.The development of a membrane with uniform properties is preceded by a short initial period in which the deposited particles, with an equivalent membrane thickness of roughly 2 μm, have a significantly lower permeability than the ultimately developed uniform membrane layer. This effect is particularly significant for the aerosol particles with the lowest mean size, probably due to particles deposited in the pore mouths of the substrate.The particles and the deposited membranes are X-ray amorphous but retain their specific surface area on heating to even high temperatures. When the membranes are heated to 1473 K for 10 h, X-ray diffraction shows a mixture of θ- and α-alumina, accompanied by a partial

  19. Mechanism of membranous tunnelling nanotube formation in viral genome delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibiana Peralta

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In internal membrane-containing viruses, a lipid vesicle enclosed by the icosahedral capsid protects the genome. It has been postulated that this internal membrane is the genome delivery device of the virus. Viruses built with this architectural principle infect hosts in all three domains of cellular life. Here, using a combination of electron microscopy techniques, we investigate bacteriophage PRD1, the best understood model for such viruses, to unveil the mechanism behind the genome translocation across the cell envelope. To deliver its double-stranded DNA, the icosahedral protein-rich virus membrane transforms into a tubular structure protruding from one of the 12 vertices of the capsid. We suggest that this viral nanotube exits from the same vertex used for DNA packaging, which is biochemically distinct from the other 11. The tube crosses the capsid through an aperture corresponding to the loss of the peripentonal P3 major capsid protein trimers, penton protein P31 and membrane protein P16. The remodeling of the internal viral membrane is nucleated by changes in osmolarity and loss of capsid-membrane interactions as consequence of the de-capping of the vertices. This engages the polymerization of the tail tube, which is structured by membrane-associated proteins. We have observed that the proteo-lipidic tube in vivo can pierce the gram-negative bacterial cell envelope allowing the viral genome to be shuttled to the host cell. The internal diameter of the tube allows one double-stranded DNA chain to be translocated. We conclude that the assembly principles of the viral tunneling nanotube take advantage of proteo-lipid interactions that confer to the tail tube elastic, mechanical and functional properties employed also in other protein-membrane systems.

  20. Formation of oriented membrane multilayers of Na/K-ATPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachence, J.M.; Knott, R.; Edelman, I.S.; Schoenborn, B.P.; Wallace, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    The isolated membrane-bound enzyme retains its ouabain-sensitive ATP hydrolysis activity, and produces ATP-dependent Na + and K + fluxes when incorporated into phospholipid vesicles. The ultimate goal of this work is to determine its low resolution structure using both X-ray and neutron diffraction. A number of methods were used to impart lamellar stacking order to highly purified pig Na/K-ATPase membranes. Upon partial dehydration, x-ray diffraction from Na/K-ATPase membrane multilayers at 98% relative humidity yielded discrete reflections of 118 A periodicity, diffracting to 1/14.8 A -1 , additionally, continuous diffraction to 1/10 A -1 was obtained. Subjecting the membrane multilayers to high magnetic fields improved the quality of the lamellar diffraction dramatically. Neutron diffraction studies of the partially dehydrated Na/K-ATPase membrane multilayers detected a mosaic spread of 2 0 when the samples were subjected to a magnetic field of 5 Tesla perpendicular to the membrane surface; the reflections were narrower than the camera line width; hence, the lattice disorder has also decreased significantly, although only four orders were measured

  1. Irreversible fouling of membrane bioreactors due to formation of a non-biofilm gel layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poorasgari, Eskandar; Larsen, Poul; Zheng, Xing

    2014-01-01

    Extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS), known to contribute to fouling in membrane bio-reactors (MBRs), are generally divided into bound and free EPS. The free EPS are able to form a gel layer on the membrane active surface. The mechanisms involved in formation of such layer and its effects...... on performance of the MBR membranes were studied. The free EPS, extracted by centrifugation and microfiltration, contained a significant amount of humic-like substances. Under static contact to the membrane, adsorption of humic-like substances to the membrane occurred and could be explained by conventional...... adsorption kinetics. Due to static adsorption, surface roughness of the membrane declined significantly, indicating that adsorbed matters to the membranefilled the cavities of the membrane surface. Filtration of the free EPS caused 50% waterflux decline. The fouling resistance linearly increased...

  2. Formation of defect-free 6FDA-DAM asymmetric hollow fiber membranes for gas separations

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Liren; Zhang, Chen; Rungta, Meha; Qiu, Wulin; Liu, Junqiang; Koros, William J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the formation of defect-free 6FDA-DAM asymmetric hollow fiber membranes. 6FDA-polyimides are of great interest for advanced gas separation membranes, and 6FDA-DAM polyimide is a representative polymer in this family

  3. Understanding carbon nanotube channel formation in the lipid membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Moon-ki; Kim, Hyunki; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, Teayeop; Rho, Junsuk; Kim, Moon Ki; Kim, Kyunghoon

    2018-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been considered a prominent nano-channel in cell membranes because of their prominent ion-conductance and ion-selectivity, offering agents for a biomimetic channel platform. Using a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation, we clarify a construction mechanism of vertical CNT nano-channels in a lipid membrane for a long period, which has been difficult to observe in previous CNT-lipid interaction simulations. The result shows that both the lipid coating density and length of CNT affect the suitable fabrication condition for a vertical and stable CNT channel. Also, simulation elucidated that a lipid coating on the surface of the CNT prevents the CNT from burrowing into the lipid membrane and the vertical channel is stabilized by the repulsion force between the lipids in the coating and membrane. Our study provides an essential understanding of how CNTs can form stable and vertical channels in the membrane, which is important for designing new types of artificial channels as biosensors for bio-fluidic studies.

  4. The formation of endosymbiotic membrane compartments: membrane identity markers and the regulation of vesicle trafficking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanov, S.

    2012-01-01

    In symbiosis of plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi as well as in rhizobium-legume symbiosis the microbes are hosted intracellularly, inside specialized membrane compartments of the host. These membrane compartments are morphologically different but similar in function, since they control

  5. Natural organic matter interactions with polyamide and polysulfone membranes: Formation of conditioning film

    KAUST Repository

    Gutierrez, Leonardo

    2015-03-31

    A conditioning film changes the physicochemical properties of the membrane surface and strongly affects subsequent fouling behavior. Results from this Atomic Force Microscopy study indicate that Natural Organic Matter (NOM) characteristics, membrane surface properties, and solution chemistry are fundamental during conditioning film formation. Repulsive forces were observed between HUM (humic-NOM) and Polyamide (PA) or Polysulfone (PS) membranes during approach in Na+ and Ca2+ solutions. However, repulsive and attractive forces were randomly recorded during BIOP (biopolymer-NOM) approach to both membranes, possibly caused by low electrostatic repulsion, hydrogen bonding, and presence of chemically/physically heterogeneous regions on membrane surfaces. During retracting, Ca2+ ions increased HUM adhesion to PA and PS membrane, indicating cation bridging/complexation as dominant interacting mechanism for this isolate. BIOP adsorption on PS and PA membrane was stronger than HUM under similar solution conditions, where hydrogen bonding would play an important role. Additionally, irrespective of solution conditions, higher adhesion energy was recorded on PS than on PA membrane for both NOM isolates, indicating membrane hydrophobicity as an important interacting factor. Results from this research will advance our understanding of conditioning film formation for NOM isolates and membranes of different physicochemical characteristics.

  6. Transmembrane helices can induce domain formation in crowded model membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domanski, Jan; Marrink, Siewert J.; Schäfer, Lars V.

    We studied compositionally heterogeneous multi-component model membranes comprised of saturated lipids, unsaturated lipids, cholesterol, and a-helical TM protein models using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. Reducing the mismatch between the length of the saturated and unsaturated

  7. Fluxes of water through aquaporin 9 weaken membrane-cytoskeleton anchorage and promote formation of membrane protrusions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thommie Karlsson

    Full Text Available All modes of cell migration require rapid rearrangements of cell shape, allowing the cell to navigate within narrow spaces in an extracellular matrix. Thus, a highly flexible membrane and a dynamic cytoskeleton are crucial for rapid cell migration. Cytoskeleton dynamics and tension also play instrumental roles in the formation of different specialized cell membrane protrusions, viz. lamellipodia, filopodia, and membrane blebs. The flux of water through membrane-anchored water channels, known as aquaporins (AQPs has recently been implicated in the regulation of cell motility, and here we provide novel evidence for the role of AQP9 in the development of various forms of membrane protrusion. Using multiple imaging techniques and cellular models we show that: (i AQP9 induced and accumulated in filopodia, (ii AQP9-associated filopodial extensions preceded actin polymerization, which was in turn crucial for their stability and dynamics, and (iii minute, local reductions in osmolarity immediately initiated small dynamic bleb-like protrusions, the size of which correlated with the reduction in osmotic pressure. Based on this, we present a model for AQP9-induced membrane protrusion, where the interplay of water fluxes through AQP9 and actin dynamics regulate the cellular protrusive and motile activity of cells.

  8. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma presenting with dysphagia: a rare presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fazal; Hamid, Arsalan; Fatima, Benish; Hashmi, Shiraz; Fatimi, Saulat

    2017-01-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of dysphagia and past history of pulmonary and intestinal tuberculosis. A barium swallow showed a point of constriction 42 mm above the gastroesophageal junction. Computed tomography revealed large opacities in bilateral lung fields, encroaching more on the esophagus. The lesion progressively compressed the esophagus as it moved inferiorly. A right posterolateral thoracotomy was performed for sub-anatomical resection of the mass. A biopsy revealed homogenous whirling hyalinized collagen fibers, highly suggestive of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma, with no evidence of malignancy. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of longstanding dysphagia.

  9. Axon-glia interaction and membrane traffic in myelin formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin eWhite

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrate nervous systems myelination of neuronal axons has evolved to increase conduction velocity of electrical impulses with minimal space and energy requirements. Myelin is formed by specialised glial cells which ensheath axons with a lipid-rich insulating membrane. Myelination is a multi-step process initiated by axon-glia recognition triggering glial polarisation followed by targeted myelin membrane expansion and compaction. Thereby, a myelin sheath of complex subdomain structure is established. Continuous communication between neurons and glial cells is essential for myelin maintenance and axonal integrity. A diverse group of diseases, from multiple sclerosis to schizophrenia, have been linked to malfunction of myelinating cells reflecting the physiological importance of the axon-glial unit. This review describes the mechanisms of axonal signal integration by oligodendrocytes emphasising the central role of the Src-family kinase Fyn during CNS myelination. Furthermore, we discuss myelin membrane trafficking with particular focus on endocytic recycling and the control of PLP (proteolipid protein transport by SNARE proteins. Finally, PLP mistrafficking is considered in the context of myelin diseases.

  10. Membrane formation in liquids by adding an antagonistic salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadakane, Koichiro; Seto, Hideki

    2018-03-01

    Antagonistic salts are composed of hydrophilic and hydrophobic ions. In a binary mixture, such as water and organic solvent, these ion pairs preferentially dissolve to those phases, respectively, and there is a coupling between the charge density and the composition. The heterogeneous distribution of ions forms a large electric double layer at the interface between these solvents. This reduces the interfacial tension between water and organic solvent, and stabilizes an ordered structure, such as a membrane. These phenomena have been extensively studied from both theoretical and experimental point of view. In addition, the numerical simulations can reproduce such ordered structures.

  11. Membrane Formation in Liquids by Adding an Antagonistic Salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Sadakane

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Antagonistic salts are composed of hydrophilic and hydrophobic ions. In a binary mixture, such as water and organic solvent, these ion pairs preferentially dissolve to those phases, respectively, and there is a coupling between the charge density and the composition. The heterogeneous distribution of ions forms a large electric double layer at the interface between these solvents. This reduces the interfacial tension between water and organic solvent, and stabilizes an ordered structure, such as a membrane. These phenomena have been extensively studied from both theoretical and experimental point of view. In addition, the numerical simulations can reproduce such ordered structures.

  12. Membrane culture and reduced oxygen tension enhances cartilage matrix formation from equine cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co, C; Vickaryous, M K; Koch, T G

    2014-03-01

    Ongoing research is aimed at increasing cartilage tissue yield and quality from multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for the purpose of treating cartilage damage in horses. Low oxygen culture has been shown to enhance chondrogenesis, and novel membrane culture has been proposed to increase tissue yield and homogeneity. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of reduced oxygen and membrane culture during in vitro chondrogenesis of equine cord blood (CB) MSC. CB-MSC (n = 5 foals) were expanded at 21% oxygen prior to 3-week differentiation in membrane or pellet culture at 5% and 21% oxygen. Assessment included histological examination (H&E, toluidine Blue, immunohistochemistry (IHC) for collagen type I and II), protein quantification by hydroxyproline assay and dimethylmethylene assay, and mRNA analysis for collagen IA1, collagen IIA1, collagen XA1, HIF1α and Sox9. Among treatment groups, 5% membrane culture produced neocartilage most closely resembling hyaline cartilage. Membrane culture resulted in increased wet mass, homogenous matrix morphology and an increase in total collagen content, while 5% oxygen culture resulted in higher GAG and type II collagen content. No significant differences were observed for mRNA analysis. Membrane culture at 5% oxygen produces a comparatively larger amount of higher quality neocartilage. Matrix homogeneity is attributed to a uniform diffusion gradient and reduced surface tension. Membrane culture holds promise for scale-up for therapeutic purposes, for cellular preconditioning prior to cytotherapeutic applications, and for modeling system for gas-dependent chondrogenic differentiation studies. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Formation of integral asymmetric membranes of AB diblock and ABC triblock copolymers by phase inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Adina; Filiz, Volkan; Rangou, Sofia; Buhr, Kristian; Merten, Petra; Hahn, Janina; Clodt, Juliana; Abetz, Clarissa; Abetz, Volker

    2013-04-12

    The formation of integral asymmetric membranes from ABC triblock terpolymers by non-solvent-induced phase separation is shown. They are compared with the AB diblock copolymer precursors. Triblock terpolymers of polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO) with two compositions are investigated. The third block supports the formation of a membrane in a case, where the corresponding diblock copolymer does not form a good membrane. In addition, the hydrophilicity is increased by the third block and due to the hydroxyl group the possibility of post-functionalization is given. The morphologies are imaged by scanning electron microscopy. The influence of the PEO on the membrane properties is analyzed by water flux, retention, and dynamic contact angle measurements. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Erythrocyte swelling and membrane hole formation in hypotonic media as studied by conductometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribush, A; Meyerstein, D; Hatskelzon, L; Kozlov, V; Levi, I; Meyerstein, N

    2013-02-01

    Hypoosmotic swelling of erythrocytes and the formation of membrane holes were studied by measuring the dc conductance (G). In accordance with the theoretical predictions, these processes are manifested by a decrease in G followed by its increase. Thus, unlike the conventional osmotic fragility test, the proposed methodological approach allows investigations of both the kinetics of swelling and the erythrocyte fragility. It is shown that the initial rate of swelling and the equilibrium size of the cells are affected by the tonicity of a hypotonic solution and the membrane rheological properties. Because the rupture of biological membranes is a stochastic process, a time-dependent increase in the conductance follows an integral distribution function of the membrane lifetime. The main conclusion which stems from reported results is that information about rheological properties of red blood cell (RBC) membranes and the resistivity of RBCs to a certain osmotic shock may be extracted from conductance signals.

  15. Spontaneous formation of structurally diverse membrane channel architectures from a single antimicrobial peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yukun; Chen, Charles H.; Hu, Dan; Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Ulmschneider, Jakob P.

    2016-11-01

    Many antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) selectively target and form pores in microbial membranes. However, the mechanisms of membrane targeting, pore formation and function remain elusive. Here we report an experimentally guided unbiased simulation methodology that yields the mechanism of spontaneous pore assembly for the AMP maculatin at atomic resolution. Rather than a single pore, maculatin forms an ensemble of structurally diverse temporarily functional low-oligomeric pores, which mimic integral membrane protein channels in structure. These pores continuously form and dissociate in the membrane. Membrane permeabilization is dominated by hexa-, hepta- and octamers, which conduct water, ions and small dyes. Pores form by consecutive addition of individual helices to a transmembrane helix or helix bundle, in contrast to current poration models. The diversity of the pore architectures--formed by a single sequence--may be a key feature in preventing bacterial resistance and could explain why sequence-function relationships in AMPs remain elusive.

  16. Can one generate stable hyaline cartilage from adult mesenchymal stem cells? A developmental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellingman, Catharine A; Koevoet, Wendy; van Osch, Gerjo J V M

    2012-11-01

    Chondrogenically differentiating bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) display signs of chondrocyte hypertrophy, such as production of collagen type X, MMP13 and alkaline phosphatase (ALPL). For cartilage reconstructions this is undesirable, as terminally differentiated cartilage produced by BMSCs mineralizes when implanted in vivo. Terminal differentiation is not restricted to BMSCs but is also encountered in chondrogenic differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as well as embryonic stem cells, which by definition should be able to generate all types of tissues, including stable cartilage. Therefore, we propose that the currently used culture conditions may drive the cells towards terminal differentiation. In this manuscript we aim to review the literature, supplemented by our own data to answer the question, is it possible to generate stable hyaline cartilage from adult MSCs? We demonstrate that recently published methods for inhibiting terminal differentiation (through PTHrP, MMP13 or blocking phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8) result in cartilage formation with reduction of hypertrophic markers, although this does not reach the low level of stable chondrocytes. A set of hypertrophy markers should be included in future studies to characterize the phenotype more precisely. Finally, we used what is currently known in developmental biology about the differential development of hyaline and terminally differentiated cartilage to provide thought and insights to change current culture models for creating hyaline cartilage. Inhibiting terminal differentiation may not result in stable hyaline cartilage if the right balance of signals has not been created from the start of culture onwards. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Pleomorphic Hyalinizing Angiectatic Tumor of Soft Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Chin Peng

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Pleomorphic hyalinizing angiectatic tumor (PHAT of soft parts is a rare, nonmetastasizing tumor of uncertain lineage which was first reported in 1996. Here, we report a case of PHAT and review the literature. A 49-year-old man presented with a soft and progressively enlarging mass over the right buttock for several years. On suspicion that the mass was a right gluteal lipoma, he underwent surgical excision. The excised lesion measured 14 × 6 × 3.5 cm. It had a variegated appearance with a white-tan to yellowish color on the cut surface. Some punctate hemorrhage and vessel thrombosis were seen. Microscopically, the tumor was a PHAT characterized by clusters of ectatic, fibrin-lined, thin-walled vessels, which were surrounded by a mitotically inert, spindled, pleomorphic, neoplastic stroma that contained a variable inflammatory component. Immunohistochemical study showed that the tumor cells were positive for CD34, and negative for S-100, HMB45 and actin. The patient experienced local recurrence 6 months later. The recurrent tumor was widely excised. No evidence of metastasis was found during the 18 months after the second operation. The recurrent lesion had a microscopic appearance that was similar to the initial lesion.

  18. Precision of hyaline cartilage thickness measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, K.; Buckwalter, K.; Helvie, M.; Niklason, L.; Martel, W. (Univ. of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiology)

    1992-05-01

    Measurement of cartilage thickness in vivo is an important indicator of the status of a joint as the various degenerative and inflammatory arthritides directly affect the condition of the cartilage. In order to assess the precision of thickness measurements of hyaline articular cartilage, we undertook a pilot study using MR imaging, plain radiography, and ultrasonography (US). We measured the cartilage of the hip and knee joints in 10 persons (4 healthy volunteers and 6 patients). The joints in each patient were examined on two separate occasions using each modality. In the hips a swell as the knee joints, the most precise measuring method was plain film radiography. For radiographs of the knees obtained in the standing position, the coefficient of variation was 6.5%; in the hips this figure was 6.34%. US of the knees and MR imaging of the hips were the second best modalities in the measurement of cartilage thickness. In addition, MR imaging enabled the most complete visualization of the joint cartilage. (orig.).

  19. Evidence that membrane transduction of oligoarginine does not require vesicle formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaro, Jennica L.; Shen Weichiang

    2005-01-01

    The involvement of vesicular formation processes in the membrane transduction and nuclear transport of oligoarginine is currently a subject of controversy. In this report, a novel quantitative method which allows for the selective measurement of membrane transduction excluding concurrent endocytosis was used to determine the effects of temperature, endosomal acidification, endosomolysis, and several known inhibitors of endocytic pathways on the internalization of oligoarginine. The results show that, unlike endocytosis, transduction of oligoarginine was not affected by incubation at 16 deg. C as compared to the 37 deg. C control, and was only partially inhibited at 4 deg. C incubation. Additionally, membrane transduction was not inhibited to the same extent as endocytosis following treatment with ammonium chloride, hypertonic medium, amiloride, or filipin. The endosomolytic activity of oligoarginine was investigated by examining the leakage of FITC-dextran into the cytosolic compartment, which was not higher in the presence of oligoarginine. Furthermore, ammonium chloride showed no effect on the nuclear transport of oligoarginine. The data presented in this report indicate that membrane transduction is likely to occur at the plasma membrane without the formation of membrane vesicles, and the nuclear localization involves membrane transduction, rather than endocytosis of oligoarginine

  20. Collagen-Coated Polytetrafluoroethane Membrane Inserts Enhances Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Cord Blood Multi-Lineage Progenitor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munir, Samir; Søballe, Kjeld; Ulrich-Vinther, Michael

    culturing resulted in a multicellular layer tissue with formation of more cartilaginous tissue compared to micromass or CPP culture. In the membrane system MLPCs produced pellucid discs, 12 mm in diameter by 1 mm in thickness from 2x10^6 cells. The discs had hyaline-like cartilage extracellular matrix......Background: Articular chondrocytes and bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are the favoured cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Umbilical cord blood has proven an alternative source of MSCs and moreover they may be more potent chondroprogenitor cells than bonemarrow...... with micromass or CPP cultures. Conclusions: In conclusion, we demonstrate that MLPCs possess’ chondrogenic potency, which increased when cultured scaffold-free on membrane inserts resulting in multicellular-layered hyaline-like cartilage tissue. Evaluating the effect of culturing pre-differentiated MLPCs on CPP...

  1. Pore formation mechanism of porous poly(DL-lactic acid) matrix membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai, E-mail: tphaechamud011@yahoo.com; Chitrattha, Sasiprapa, E-mail: sasi_toey@hotmail.com

    2016-04-01

    Porous PLA structure has been widely used in cell transplantation, drug carrier and wound dressing. The porous structure can be controlled depending on the choice of the polymer, solvent, nonsolvent and preparation parameters. In this study, the porous PLA matrix membranes were prepared by adding PEG 400 in PLA solution using dichloromethane (DCM) as solvent prior to casting. The influence of other liquids as co-solvent on pore formation and the structural change during membrane formation were evaluated. The co-solvents affected both porous topography and mechanical properties of PLA membrane. The porous matrix were produced when the non-solvent of PLA was used as co-solvent. Cryo-SEM micrographs revealed that PEG 400 still remained in the PLA porous matrix membrane. From the tracking of the structural change during film formation, the PLA–PEG solution changed into porous structure by liquid liquid phase separation and solidification processes, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that PLA–PEG in DCM solution exhibited the two-step of weight loss, the first step occurred from DCM evaporation and the second step occurred from the degradation of PLA–PEG matrix. The liquid–liquid phase separation and solidification started when the amount of DCM was higher than PEG 400 for 2.67 folds and DCM amount was equal to that of PEG 400, respectively. These results could clarify the pore formation mechanism of porous PLA membrane and will be useful for the further investigation and application. - Highlights: • Pore formation mechanism of PLA matrix membrane inducing by PEG 400 addition was investigated. • Cryo-scanning electron microscopy revealed the embedded PEG 400 in matrix membrane. • Tracking of structural change during membrane formation with stereomicroscope and thermogravimetric analysis could explain the pore formation mechanism. • Liquid-liquid phase separation of PLA-PEG 400 solution started when the amount of dichloromethane remained 2

  2. Pore formation mechanism of porous poly(DL-lactic acid) matrix membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Chitrattha, Sasiprapa

    2016-01-01

    Porous PLA structure has been widely used in cell transplantation, drug carrier and wound dressing. The porous structure can be controlled depending on the choice of the polymer, solvent, nonsolvent and preparation parameters. In this study, the porous PLA matrix membranes were prepared by adding PEG 400 in PLA solution using dichloromethane (DCM) as solvent prior to casting. The influence of other liquids as co-solvent on pore formation and the structural change during membrane formation were evaluated. The co-solvents affected both porous topography and mechanical properties of PLA membrane. The porous matrix were produced when the non-solvent of PLA was used as co-solvent. Cryo-SEM micrographs revealed that PEG 400 still remained in the PLA porous matrix membrane. From the tracking of the structural change during film formation, the PLA–PEG solution changed into porous structure by liquid liquid phase separation and solidification processes, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that PLA–PEG in DCM solution exhibited the two-step of weight loss, the first step occurred from DCM evaporation and the second step occurred from the degradation of PLA–PEG matrix. The liquid–liquid phase separation and solidification started when the amount of DCM was higher than PEG 400 for 2.67 folds and DCM amount was equal to that of PEG 400, respectively. These results could clarify the pore formation mechanism of porous PLA membrane and will be useful for the further investigation and application. - Highlights: • Pore formation mechanism of PLA matrix membrane inducing by PEG 400 addition was investigated. • Cryo-scanning electron microscopy revealed the embedded PEG 400 in matrix membrane. • Tracking of structural change during membrane formation with stereomicroscope and thermogravimetric analysis could explain the pore formation mechanism. • Liquid-liquid phase separation of PLA-PEG 400 solution started when the amount of dichloromethane remained 2

  3. Bromate formation in a hybrid ozonation-ceramic membrane filtration system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslemi, Mohammadreza; Davies, Simon H; Masten, Susan J

    2011-11-01

    The effect of pH, ozone mass injection rate, initial bromide concentration, and membrane molecular weight cut off (MWCO) on bromate formation in a hybrid membrane filtration-ozonation reactor was studied. Decreasing the pH, significantly reduced bromate formation. Bromate formation increased with increasing gaseous ozone mass injection rate, due to increase in dissolved ozone concentrations. Greater initial bromide concentrations resulted in higher bromate concentrations. An increase in the bromate concentration was observed by reducing MWCO, which resulted in a concomitant increase in the retention time in the system. A model to estimate the rate of bromate formation was developed. Good correlation between the model simulation and the experimental data was achieved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Extracellular ultrathin fibers sensitive to intracellular reactive oxygen species: Formation of intercellular membrane bridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Se-Hui; Park, Jin-Young; Joo, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo, E-mail: ksha@kangwon.ac.kr

    2011-07-15

    Membrane bridges are key cellular structures involved in intercellular communication; however, dynamics for their formation are not well understood. We demonstrated the formation and regulation of novel extracellular ultrathin fibers in NIH3T3 cells using confocal and atomic force microscopy. At adjacent regions of neighboring cells, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and glucose oxidase induced ultrathin fiber formation, which was prevented by Trolox, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger. The height of ROS-sensitive ultrathin fibers ranged from 2 to 4 nm. PMA-induced formation of ultrathin fibers was inhibited by cytochalasin D, but not by Taxol or colchicine, indicating that ultrathin fibers mainly comprise microfilaments. PMA-induced ultrathin fibers underwent dynamic structural changes, resulting in formation of intercellular membrane bridges. Thus, these fibers are formed by a mechanism(s) involving ROS and involved in formation of intercellular membrane bridges. Furthermore, ultrastructural imaging of ultrathin fibers may contribute to understanding the diverse mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication and the intercellular transfer of biomolecules, including proteins and cell organelles.

  5. Relating performance of thin-film composite forward osmosis membranes to support layer formation and structure

    KAUST Repository

    Tiraferri, Alberto

    2011-02-01

    Osmotically driven membrane processes have the potential to treat impaired water sources, desalinate sea/brackish waters, and sustainably produce energy. The development of a membrane tailored for these processes is essential to advance the technology to the point that it is commercially viable. Here, a systematic investigation of the influence of thin-film composite membrane support layer structure on forward osmosis performance is conducted. The membranes consist of a selective polyamide active layer formed by interfacial polymerization on top of a polysulfone support layer fabricated by phase separation. By systematically varying the conditions used during the casting of the polysulfone layer, an array of support layers with differing structures was produced. The role that solvent quality, dope polymer concentration, fabric layer wetting, and casting blade gate height play in the support layer structure formation was investigated. Using a 1M NaCl draw solution and a deionized water feed, water fluxes ranging from 4 to 25Lm-2h-1 with consistently high salt rejection (>95.5%) were produced. The relationship between membrane structure and performance was analyzed. This study confirms the hypothesis that the optimal forward osmosis membrane consists of a mixed-structure support layer, where a thin sponge-like layer sits on top of highly porous macrovoids. Both the active layer transport properties and the support layer structural characteristics need to be optimized in order to fabricate a high performance forward osmosis membrane. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Ionic Liquids As Self-Assembly Guide for the Formation of Nanostructured Block Copolymer Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2015-04-30

    Nanostructured block copolymer membranes were manufactured by water induced phase inversion, using ionic liquids (ILs) as cosolvents. The effect of ionic liquids on the morphology was investigated, by using polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinyl pyridine) (PS-b-PV4P) diblock as membrane copolymer matrix and imidazolium and pyridinium based ILs. The effect of IL concentration and chemical composition was evident with particular interaction with P4VP blocks. The order of block copolymer/ILs solutions previous to the membrane casting was confirmed by cryo scanning electron microscopy and the morphologies of the manufactured nanostructured membranes were characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Non-protic ionic liquids facilitate the formation of hexagonal nanoporous block copolymer structure, while protic ILs led to a lamella-structured membrane. The rheology of the IL/block copolymer solutions was investigated, evaluating the storage and loss moduli. Most membranes prepared with ionic liquid had higher water flux than pure block copolymer membranes without additives.

  7. Interleaflet Coupling, Pinning, and Leaflet Asymmetry—Major Players in Plasma Membrane Nanodomain Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Toyoshi; Parmryd, Ingela

    2017-01-01

    The plasma membrane has a highly asymmetric distribution of lipids and contains dynamic nanodomains many of which are liquid entities surrounded by a second, slightly different, liquid environment. Contributing to the dynamics is a continuous repartitioning of components between the two types of liquids and transient links between lipids and proteins, both to extracellular matrix and cytoplasmic components, that temporarily pin membrane constituents. This make plasma membrane nanodomains exceptionally challenging to study and much of what is known about membrane domains has been deduced from studies on model membranes at equilibrium. However, living cells are by definition not at equilibrium and lipids are distributed asymmetrically with inositol phospholipids, phosphatidylethanolamines and phosphatidylserines confined mostly to the inner leaflet and glyco- and sphingolipids to the outer leaflet. Moreover, each phospholipid group encompasses a wealth of species with different acyl chain combinations whose lateral distribution is heterogeneous. It is becoming increasingly clear that asymmetry and pinning play important roles in plasma membrane nanodomain formation and coupling between the two lipid monolayers. How asymmetry, pinning, and interdigitation contribute to the plasma membrane organization is only beginning to be unraveled and here we discuss their roles and interdependence. PMID:28119914

  8. Membrane Incorporation, Channel Formation, and Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis by Alzheimer's β-Amyloid Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oligomerization, conformational changes, and the consequent neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's β-amyloid protein (AβP play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Mounting evidence suggests that oligomeric AβPs cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis, eventually leading to neuronal death. We have demonstrated that oligomeric AβPs directly incorporate into neuronal membranes, form cation-sensitive ion channels (“amyloid channels”, and cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis via the amyloid channels. Other disease-related amyloidogenic proteins, such as prion protein in prion diseases or α-synuclein in dementia with Lewy bodies, exhibit similarities in the incorporation into membranes and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. Here, based on our experimental results and those of numerous other studies, we review the current understanding of the direct binding of AβP into membrane surfaces and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. The implication of composition of membrane lipids and the possible development of new drugs by influencing membrane properties and attenuating amyloid channels for the treatment and prevention of AD is also discussed.

  9. Chiral twist drives raft formation and organization in membranes composed of rod-like particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubensky, Tom C.

    2017-01-01

    Lipid rafts are hypothesized to facilitate protein interaction, tension regulation, and trafficking in biological membranes, but the mechanisms responsible for their formation and maintenance are not clear. Insights into many other condensed matter phenomena have come from colloidal systems, whose micron-scale particles mimic basic properties of atoms and molecules but permit dynamic visualization with single-particle resolution. Recently, experiments showed that bidisperse mixtures of filamentous viruses can self-assemble into colloidal monolayers with thermodynamically stable rafts exhibiting chiral structure and repulsive interactions. We quantitatively explain these observations by modeling the membrane particles as chiral liquid crystals. Chiral twist promotes the formation of finite-sized rafts and mediates a repulsion that distributes them evenly throughout the membrane. Although this system is composed of filamentous viruses whose aggregation is entropically driven by dextran depletants instead of phospholipids and cholesterol with prominent electrostatic interactions, colloidal and biological membranes share many of the same physical symmetries. Chiral twist can contribute to the behavior of both systems and may account for certain stereospecific effects observed in molecular membranes. PMID:27999184

  10. The Role of Membrane Fluidization in the Gel-Assisted Formation of Giant Polymersomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne C Greene

    Full Text Available Polymersomes are being widely explored as synthetic analogs of lipid vesicles based on their enhanced stability and potential uses in a wide variety of applications in (e.g., drug delivery, cell analogs, etc.. Controlled formation of giant polymersomes for use in membrane studies and cell mimetic systems, however, is currently limited by low-yield production methodologies. Here, we describe for the first time, how the size distribution of giant poly(ethylene glycol-poly(butadiene (PEO-PBD polymersomes formed by gel-assisted rehydration may be controlled based on membrane fluidization. We first show that the average diameter and size distribution of PEO-PBD polymersomes may be readily increased by increasing the temperature of the rehydration solution. Further, we describe a correlative relationship between polymersome size and membrane fluidization through the addition of sucrose during rehydration, enabling the formation of PEO-PBD polymersomes with a range of diameters, including giant-sized vesicles (>100 μm. This correlative relationship suggests that sucrose may function as a small molecule fluidizer during rehydration, enhancing polymer diffusivity during formation and increasing polymersome size. Overall the ability to easily regulate the size of PEO-PBD polymersomes based on membrane fluidity, either through temperature or fluidizers, has broadly applicability in areas including targeted therapeutic delivery and synthetic biology.

  11. Hyaline fibromatosis of Hoffa's fat pad in a patient with a mild type of hyaline fibromatosis syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raak, Sjoerd M. van; Meuffels, Duncan E.; Leenders, Geert J.L.H. van; Oei, Edwin H.G.

    2014-01-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome (HFS) is a rare, homozygous, autosomal recessive disease, characterized by deposition of hyaline material in skin and other organs, resulting in esthetic problems, disability, and potential life-threatening complications. Most patients become clinically apparent in the first few years of life, and the disorder typically progresses with the appearance of new lesions. We describe a rare case of a 20-year-old patient with juvenile-onset mild HFS who presented with a history of progressive anterior knee pain. Detailed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings with histopathological correlation are presented of hyaline fibromatosis of Hoffa's fat pad, including differential diagnosis. The diagnosis of HFS is generally made on basis of clinical and histopathological findings. Imaging findings, however, may contribute to the correct diagnosis in patients who present with a less typical clinical course of HFS. (orig.)

  12. Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome (juvenile hyaline fibromatosis). Whole-body MR findings in two siblings with different subcutaneous nodules distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castiglione, Davide; Terranova, Maria Chiara; Picone, Dario; Lo Re, Giuseppe; Salerno, Sergio

    2018-01-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome (juvenile hyaline fibromatosis) is a rare, progressive, autosomal recessive disorder whose main hallmark is the deposition of amorphous hyaline material in soft tissues, with an evolutionary course and health impairment. It may present involvement of subcutaneous or periskeletal soft tissue, or may develop as a visceral infiltration entity with poor prognosis. Very few radiological data about this inherited condition have been reported, due to the extreme rarity of disease. We herein present a case of two siblings, affected by different severity of the disease, with different clinical features. They were examined by whole-body MR (WBMR) in order to assess different lesions localization, to rule out any visceral involvement and any other associated anomalies and to define patients' management. (orig.)

  13. Hyaline fibromatosis of Hoffa's fat pad in a patient with a mild type of hyaline fibromatosis syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raak, Sjoerd M. van [Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dordrecht (Netherlands); Meuffels, Duncan E. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Leenders, Geert J.L.H. van [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Oei, Edwin H.G. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-04-15

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome (HFS) is a rare, homozygous, autosomal recessive disease, characterized by deposition of hyaline material in skin and other organs, resulting in esthetic problems, disability, and potential life-threatening complications. Most patients become clinically apparent in the first few years of life, and the disorder typically progresses with the appearance of new lesions. We describe a rare case of a 20-year-old patient with juvenile-onset mild HFS who presented with a history of progressive anterior knee pain. Detailed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings with histopathological correlation are presented of hyaline fibromatosis of Hoffa's fat pad, including differential diagnosis. The diagnosis of HFS is generally made on basis of clinical and histopathological findings. Imaging findings, however, may contribute to the correct diagnosis in patients who present with a less typical clinical course of HFS. (orig.)

  14. Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome (juvenile hyaline fibromatosis). Whole-body MR findings in two siblings with different subcutaneous nodules distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castiglione, Davide; Terranova, Maria Chiara; Picone, Dario; Lo Re, Giuseppe; Salerno, Sergio [Policlinico, Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Dipartimento di Biopatologia e Biotecnologie Mediche, Palermo (Italy)

    2018-03-15

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome (juvenile hyaline fibromatosis) is a rare, progressive, autosomal recessive disorder whose main hallmark is the deposition of amorphous hyaline material in soft tissues, with an evolutionary course and health impairment. It may present involvement of subcutaneous or periskeletal soft tissue, or may develop as a visceral infiltration entity with poor prognosis. Very few radiological data about this inherited condition have been reported, due to the extreme rarity of disease. We herein present a case of two siblings, affected by different severity of the disease, with different clinical features. They were examined by whole-body MR (WBMR) in order to assess different lesions localization, to rule out any visceral involvement and any other associated anomalies and to define patients' management. (orig.)

  15. Formation of Bimolecular Membranes from Lipid Monolayers and a Study of Their Electrical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montal, M.; Mueller, P.

    1972-01-01

    Bimolecular membranes are formed from two lipid monolayers at an air-water interface by the apposition of their hydrocarbon chains when an aperture in a Teflon partition separating two aqueous phases is lowered through the interface. Formation of the membrane is monitored by an increase of the electrical capacity, as measured with a voltage clamp. Electrical resistance of the unmodified membrane is analogous to that of conventional planar bilayers (black lipid membranes) prepared in the presence of a hydrocarbon solvent, i.e., 106-108 ohm cm2; the resistance can be lowered to values of 103 ohm cm2 by gramicidin, an antibiotic that modifies the conductance only when the membranes are of biomolecular thickness. In contrast to the resistance, there is a significant difference between the capacity of bilayers made from mono-layers and that of hydrocarbon-containing bilayers made by phase transition; the average values are 0.9 and 0.45 μF cm-2, respectively. The value of 0.9 μF cm-2 approximates that of biological membranes. Assuming a dielectric constant of 2.1 for the hydrocarbon region, the dielectric thickness, as calculated from a capacity of 0.9 μF cm-2, is 22 Å. This value is 6-10 Å smaller than the actual thickness of the hydrocarbon region of bilayers and cell membranes, as determined by x-ray diffraction. The difference may be due to a limited penetration of water into the hydrocarbon region near the ester groups that would lower the electrical resistance of this region and reduce the dielectric thickness. Asymmetric membranes have been formed by adjoining two lipid monolayers of different chemical composition. Images PMID:4509315

  16. Computed tomography findings in patients with pulmonary hyalinizing granulomas: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchiori, Edson; Valiante, Paulo Marcos; Correia, Ana Helena Pereira; Carneiro, Leonardo Hoehl; Caldas, Carolina Rodrigues; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares

    2003-01-01

    Hyalinizing granulomas are benign fibrotic lesions that generally present multiple nodules seen on radiological examinations, which are frequently cavitary and/or calcified lesions. We report a case of a 28 year-old-woman with hyalinizing granulomas probably secondary to a previous tuberculosis infection. Hyalinizing granulomas should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with multiple pulmonary nodules. (author)

  17. The development of hyaline-cell cartilage in the head of the black molly, Poecilia sphenops. Evidence for secondary cartilage in a teleost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, M

    1989-01-01

    The development of hyaline-cell cartilage attached to membrane (dentary, maxilla, nasal, lacrimal and cleithrum) and cartilage (basioccipital) bones has been studied in the viviparous black molly, Poecilia sphenops. Intramembranous ossification commences before the first appearance of hyaline cells. As hyaline-cell cartilage is densely cellular and as that attached to the dentary, maxilla and cleithrum develops from the periosteum of these membrane bones, it must be regarded as secondary cartilage according to current concepts. It is also argued that the hyaline-cell cartilage attached to the perichondral bone of the basioccipital (a cartilage bone), could also be viewed as secondary. The status of the cartilage on the nasal and lacrimal bones is less clear, for it develops, at least in part, from mucochondroid (mucous connective) tissue. This is the first definitive report of secondary cartilage in any lower vertebrate. The tissue is therefore not restricted to birds and mammals as hitherto believed, and a multipotential periosteum must have arisen early in vertebrate evolution. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:2481666

  18. Influence of Solutocapillary Convection on Macrovoid Defect Formation in Polymeric Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Alan R.; Krantz, William B.; Todd, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The focus of this research project involved the dry-cast process for polymeric membrane formation, whereby evaporation of solvent from an initially homogeneous polymer/solvent/ nonsolvent solution results in phase separation and the formation of polymer-rich and polymer-lean phases. Under certain conditions the polymer-lean phase gives rise to very large and usually undesirable, tear-drop-shaped pores (size approx. 10 - 50 microns) termed macrovoids (MVs). Although in many cases the presence of MV pores has deleterious effects on membrane performance, there are a number of innovative applications where the presence of such pores is highly desirable. Although researchers have proposed a variety of mechanisms for MV formation over the past three decades, two main hypotheses are currently favored: one asserts that MV growth can be attributed solely to diffusion (the diffusive growth hypothesis), whereas the other states that solutocapillary convection (the SC hypothesis) at the MV interface contributes to growth. The overall goal of this research was to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of the fundamental mechanism of MV growth. This research incorporates a coupled modeling and experimental approach to test a solutocapillary convection hypothesis for the growth of macrovoid pores in polymeric membranes. Specifically, we utilized a modification of the first principles model developed by two of the PIs (ARG and WBK) for dry-cast CA membranes. For the experimental component, two separate and mutually complementary approaches were used to study MV growth. In the first, membranes cast in a zero-g environment aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft were compared with those cast on the ground to assess the effect of the buoyancy force on membrane morphology and MV size and shape. In the second approach, videomicroscopy flow visualization (VMFV) was utilized to observe MV formation and growth in real time and to assess the effect of surface tension on the MV growth dynamics

  19. Biofilm Formation on Reverse Osmosis Membranes Is Initiated and Dominated by Sphingomonas spp.▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereschenko, L. A.; Stams, A. J. M.; Euverink, G. J. W.; van Loosdrecht, M. C. M.

    2010-01-01

    The initial formation and spatiotemporal development of microbial biofilm layers on surfaces of new and clean reverse osmosis (RO) membranes and feed-side spacers were monitored in situ using flow cells placed in parallel with the RO system of a full-scale water treatment plant. The feed water of the RO system had been treated by the sequential application of coagulation, flocculation, sand filtration, ultrafiltration, and cartridge filtration processes. The design of the flow cells permitted the production of permeate under cross-flow conditions similar to those in spiral-wound RO membrane elements of the full-scale system. Membrane autopsies were done after 4, 8, 16, and 32 days of flow-cell operation. A combination of molecular (fluorescence in situ hybridization [FISH], denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis [DGGE], and cloning) and microscopic (field emission scanning electron, epifluorescence, and confocal laser scanning microscopy) techniques was applied to analyze the abundance, composition, architecture, and three-dimensional structure of biofilm communities. The results of the study point out the unique role of Sphingomonas spp. in the initial formation and subsequent maturation of biofilms on the RO membrane and feed-side spacer surfaces. PMID:20190090

  20. The study of membrane formation via phase inversion method by cloud point and light scattering experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arahman, Nasrul; Maimun, Teuku; Mukramah, Syawaliah

    2017-01-01

    The composition of polymer solution and the methods of membrane preparation determine the solidification process of membrane. The formation of membrane structure prepared via non-solvent induced phase separation (NIPS) method is mostly determined by phase separation process between polymer, solvent, and non-solvent. This paper discusses the phase separation process of polymer solution containing Polyethersulfone (PES), N-methylpirrolidone (NMP), and surfactant Tetronic 1307 (Tet). Cloud point experiment is conducted to determine the amount of non-solvent needed on induced phase separation. Amount of water required as a non-solvent decreases by the addition of surfactant Tet. Kinetics of phase separation for such system is studied by the light scattering measurement. With the addition of Tet., the delayed phase separation is observed and the structure growth rate decreases. Moreover, the morphology of fabricated membrane from those polymer systems is analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The images of both systems show the formation of finger-like macrovoids through the cross-section.

  1. Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid - an unusual case of hyalinizing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma is a neoplasm occurring in sporadic and familial patterns. A rare variant of medullary thyroid carcinoma shows microscopic features similar to hyalinizing trabecular adenoma of thyroid. Detection of this variant requires a high index of suspicion and immunohistochemical confirmation by ...

  2. Structure and formation of egg membranes in Aedes aegypti. (L. ) (Diptera:Culicidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, G; Rai, K S

    1975-01-01

    An ultrastructural study of mosquito ovarioles reveals that both the vitelline membrane and the endochorion are secreted by the follicular epithelium. The presecretory phase is characterized by the hypertrophy of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex in the follicle cells. Synthesis of vitelline membrane precursors begins immediately after yolk protein uptake by micropinocytosis. Secretory droplets are budded off Golgi cisternae and released into the follicle cell--oocyte interface by exocytosis. The vitelline membrane first appears as dense plaques which eventually fuse to form a single homogeneous layer. Two types of secretory material are identified in the follicle cells prior to the formation of the endochorion. Golgi cisternae bud off small droplets similar in size and appearance to the precursors of the vitelline membrane. These migrate to the apical surface and accumulate between surface folds in the plasma membrane. The second type is a fibrous material formed in endoplasmic reticulum. When fully secreted, the endochorion is a 2-layered structure. The lower layer is comprised of pillar-like structures alternating with fibrous mesh-like areas. The pillars are formed by the coalescence of droplets released from Golgi, while the mesh-like areas presumably arise from the fibrous material. The outer layer is also fibrous. The follicle cells degenerate once the endochorion is laid down. endochorion is laid down.

  3. Building a patchwork - The yeast plasma membrane as model to study lateral domain formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuberth, Christian; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2015-04-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) has to fulfill a wide range of biological functions including selective uptake of substances, signal transduction and modulation of cell polarity and cell shape. To allow efficient regulation of these processes many resident proteins and lipids of the PM are laterally segregated into different functional domains. A particularly striking example of lateral segregation has been described for the budding yeast PM, where integral membrane proteins as well as lipids exhibit very slow translational mobility and form a patchwork of many overlapping micron-sized domains. Here we discuss the molecular and physical mechanisms contributing to the formation of a multi-domain membrane and review our current understanding of yeast PM organization. Many of the fundamental principles underlying membrane self-assembly and organization identified in yeast are expected to equally hold true in other organisms, even for the more transient and elusive organization of the PM in mammalian cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nanoscale membrane organisation and signalling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Irreversible fouling of membrane bioreactors due to formation of a non-biofilm gel-like layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poorasgari, Eskandar; Larsen, Poul; Zheng, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS), known to contribute to fouling in membrane bio-reactors (MBR)s, are generally divided into bound and free EPS. The free EPS are able to form a gel-like layer on the membrane active surface. The mechanisms involved in formation of such layer and its effects...... on performance of the MBR membranes were studied. The free EPS, extracted by centrifugation and microfiltration, contained a significant amount of humic-like substances. Under static contact to the membrane, adsorption of humic-like substances to the membrane occurred and could be explained by conventional...... adsorption kinetics. Due to static adsorption, surface roughness of the membrane declined significantly indicating that adsorbed matters to the membrane filled the cavities of the membrane surface. Filtration of the free EPS caused 50% water flux decline. The fouling resistance linearly increased...

  5. Membrane complexes of Syntrophomonas wolfei involved in syntrophic butyrate degradation and hydrogen formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Regis Crable

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Syntrophic butyrate metabolism involves the thermodynamically unfavorable production of hydrogen and/or formate from the high potential electron donor, butyryl-CoA. Such redox reactions can occur only with energy input by a process called reverse electron transfer. Previous studies have demonstrated that hydrogen production from butyrate requires the presence of a proton gradient, but the biochemical machinery involved has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the gene and enzyme systems involved in reverse electron transfer by Syntrophomonas wolfei were investigated using proteomic and gene expression approaches. S. wolfei was grown in coculture with Methanospirillum hungatei or Dehalococcoides mccartyi under conditions requiring reverse electron transfer and compared to both axenic S. wolfei cultures and cocultures grown in conditions that do not require reverse electron transfer. Blue native gel analysis of membranes solubilized from syntrophically grown cells revealed the presence of a membrane-bound hydrogenase, Hyd2, which exhibited hydrogenase activity during in gel assays. Bands containing a putative iron-sulfur (FeS oxidoreductase were detected in membranes of crotonate-grown and butyrate grown S. wolfei cells. The genes for the corresponding hydrogenase subunits, hyd2ABC, were differentially expressed at higher levels during syntrophic butyrate growth when compared to growth on crotonate. The expression of the FeS oxidoreductase gene increased when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei. Additional membrane-associated proteins detected included FoF1 ATP synthase subunits and several membrane transporters that may aid syntrophic growth. Furthermore, syntrophic butyrate metabolism can proceed exclusively by interspecies hydrogen transfer, as demonstrated by growth with D. mccartyi, which is unable to use formate. These results argue for the importance of Hyd2 and FeS oxidoreductase in reverse electron transfer during syntrophic

  6. Formation of defect-free 6FDA-DAM asymmetric hollow fiber membranes for gas separations

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Liren

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the formation of defect-free 6FDA-DAM asymmetric hollow fiber membranes. 6FDA-polyimides are of great interest for advanced gas separation membranes, and 6FDA-DAM polyimide is a representative polymer in this family with attractive dense film properties for several potential applications. The work reported here for the 6FDA-DAM polyimide provides insight for the challenging fabrication of defect-free asymmetric hollow fiber membranes for this class of 6FDA-polyimides, which behave rather different from lower free volume polymers. Specifically, the 6FDA based materials show relatively slow phase separation rate in water quench baths, which presents a challenge for fiber spinning. For convenience, we refer to the behavior as more "non-solvent resistant" in comparison to other lower free volume polymers, since the binodal phase boundary is displaced further from the conventional position near the pure polymer-solvent axis on a ternary phase diagram in conventional polymers like Matrimid® and Ultem®. The addition of lithium nitrate to promote phase separation has a useful impact on 6FDA-DAM asymmetric hollow fiber formation. 6FDA-DAM phase diagrams using ethanol and water as non-solvent are reported, and it was found that water is less desirable as a non-solvent dope additive for defect-free fiber spinning. Phase diagrams are also reported for 6FDA-DAM dope formulation with and without the addition of lithium nitrate, and defect-free asymmetric hollow fiber membranes are reported for both cases. The effect of polymer molecular weight on defect-free fiber spinning was also investigated. Gas transport properties and morphology of hollow fibers were characterized. With several thorough case studies, this work provides a systematic guideline for defect-free fiber formation from 6FDA-polymers. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Amino acid residues involved in membrane insertion and pore formation of Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Alexander E; Neumeyer, Tobias; Sun, Jianjun; Collier, R John; Benz, Roland; Aktories, Klaus

    2008-08-12

    The actin-ADP-ribosylating Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin consists of the enzymatic component C2I and the binding component C2II. C2II forms heptameric channels involved in translocation of the enzymatic component into the target cell. On the basis of the heptameric toxin channel, we studied functional consequences of mutagenesis of amino acid residues probably lining the lumen of the toxin channel. Substitution of glutamate-399 of C2II with alanine blocked channel formation and cytotoxicity of the holotoxin. Although cytotoxicity and rounding up of cells by C2I were completely blocked by exchange of phenylalanine-428 with alanine, the mutation increased potassium conductance caused by C2II in artificial membranes by about 2-3-fold over that of wild-type toxin. In contrast to its effects on single-channel potassium conductance in artificial membranes, the F428A mutation delayed the kinetics of pore formation in lipid vesicles and inhibited the activity of C2II in promoting (86)Rb (+) release from preloaded intact cells after pH shift of the medium. Moreover, F428A C2II exhibited delayed and diminished formation of C2II aggregates at low pH, indicating major changes of the biophysical properties of the toxin. The data indicate that phenylalanine-428 of C2II plays a major role in conformational changes occurring during pore formation of the binding component of C2II.

  8. A cell-free scaffold-based cartilage repair provides improved function hyaline-like repair at one year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siclari, Alberto; Mascaro, Gennaro; Gentili, Chiara; Cancedda, Ranieri; Boux, Eugenio

    2012-03-01

    Bone marrow stimulation techniques in cartilage repair such as drilling are limited by the formation of fibrous to hyaline-like repair tissue. It has been suggested such techniques can be enhanced by covering the defect with scaffolds. We present an innovative approach using a polyglycolic acid (PGA)-hyaluronan scaffold with platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) in drilling. We asked whether (1) PRP immersed in a cell-free PGA-hyaluronan scaffold improves patient-reported 1-year outcomes for the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Score (KOOS), and (2) implantation of the scaffold in combination with bone marrow stimulation leads to the formation of hyaline-like cartilage repair tissue. We reviewed 52 patients who had arthroscopic implantation of the PGA-hyaluronan scaffold immersed with PRP in articular cartilage defects of the knee pretreated with Pridie drilling. Patients were assessed by KOOS. At 9 months followup, histologic staining was performed in specimens obtained from five patients to assess the repair tissue quality. The KOOS subscores improved for pain (55 to 91), symptoms (57 to 88), activities of daily living (69 to 86), sports and recreation (36 to 70), and quality of life (38 to 73). The histologic evaluation showed a homogeneous hyaline-like cartilage repair tissue. The cell-free PGA-hyaluronan scaffold combined with PRP leads to cartilage repair and improved patient-reported outcomes (KOOS) during 12 months of followup. Histologic sections showed morphologic features of hyaline-like repair tissue. Long-term followup is needed to determine if the cartilage repair tissue is durable. Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  9. Integrin-based diffusion barrier separates membrane domains enabling the formation of microbiostatic frustrated phagosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxson, Michelle E; Naj, Xenia; O'Meara, Teresa R; Plumb, Jonathan D; Cowen, Leah E

    2018-01-01

    Candida albicans hyphae can reach enormous lengths, precluding their internalization by phagocytes. Nevertheless, macrophages engulf a portion of the hypha, generating incompletely sealed tubular phagosomes. These frustrated phagosomes are stabilized by a thick cuff of F-actin that polymerizes in response to non-canonical activation of integrins by fungal glycan. Despite their continuity, the surface and invaginating phagosomal membranes retain a strikingly distinct lipid composition. PtdIns(4,5)P2 is present at the plasmalemma but is not detectable in the phagosomal membrane, while PtdIns(3)P and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 co-exist in the phagosomes yet are absent from the surface membrane. Moreover, endo-lysosomal proteins are present only in the phagosomal membrane. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed the presence of a diffusion barrier that maintains the identity of the open tubular phagosome separate from the plasmalemma. Formation of this barrier depends on Syk, Pyk2/Fak and formin-dependent actin assembly. Antimicrobial mechanisms can thereby be deployed, limiting the growth of the hyphae. PMID:29553370

  10. Enhancing the formation and shear resistance of nitrifying biofilms on membranes by surface modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lackner, Susanne; Holmberg, Maria; Terada, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP) membranes and polyethylene (PE) surfaces were modified to enhance formation and shear resistance of nitrifying biofilms for wastewater treatment applications. A combination of plasma polymerization and wet chemistry was employed to ultimately introduce poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG......) chains with two different functional groups (-PEG-NH2 and -PEG-CH3). Biofilm growth experiments using a mixed nitrifying bacterial culture revealed that the specific combination of PEG chains with amino groups resulted in most biofilm formation on both PP and PE samples. Detachment experiments showed...... structure might be possible explanations of the superiority of the -PEG-NH2 modification. The success of the-PEG-NH2 modification was independent of the original surface and might, therefore, be used in wastewater treatment bioreactors to improve reactor performance by making biofilm formation more stable...

  11. Generation of Scaffoldless Hyaline Cartilaginous Tissue from Human iPSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Yamashita

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Defects in articular cartilage ultimately result in loss of joint function. Repairing cartilage defects requires cell sources. We developed an approach to generate scaffoldless hyaline cartilage from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs. We initially generated an hiPSC line that specifically expressed GFP in cartilage when teratoma was formed. We optimized the culture conditions and found BMP2, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1, and GDF5 critical for GFP expression and thus chondrogenic differentiation of the hiPSCs. The subsequent use of scaffoldless suspension culture contributed to purification, producing homogenous cartilaginous particles. Subcutaneous transplantation of the hiPSC-derived particles generated hyaline cartilage that expressed type II collagen, but not type I collagen, in immunodeficiency mice. Transplantation of the particles into joint surface defects in immunodeficiency rats and immunosuppressed mini-pigs indicated that neocartilage survived and had potential for integration into native cartilage. The immunodeficiency mice and rats suffered from neither tumors nor ectopic tissue formation. The hiPSC-derived cartilaginous particles constitute a viable cell source for regenerating cartilage defects.

  12. Generation of scaffoldless hyaline cartilaginous tissue from human iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Morioka, Miho; Yahara, Yasuhito; Okada, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tomohito; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Matsuda, Shuichi; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2015-03-10

    Defects in articular cartilage ultimately result in loss of joint function. Repairing cartilage defects requires cell sources. We developed an approach to generate scaffoldless hyaline cartilage from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). We initially generated an hiPSC line that specifically expressed GFP in cartilage when teratoma was formed. We optimized the culture conditions and found BMP2, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), and GDF5 critical for GFP expression and thus chondrogenic differentiation of the hiPSCs. The subsequent use of scaffoldless suspension culture contributed to purification, producing homogenous cartilaginous particles. Subcutaneous transplantation of the hiPSC-derived particles generated hyaline cartilage that expressed type II collagen, but not type I collagen, in immunodeficiency mice. Transplantation of the particles into joint surface defects in immunodeficiency rats and immunosuppressed mini-pigs indicated that neocartilage survived and had potential for integration into native cartilage. The immunodeficiency mice and rats suffered from neither tumors nor ectopic tissue formation. The hiPSC-derived cartilaginous particles constitute a viable cell source for regenerating cartilage defects. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Changes of rabbit meniscus influenced by hyaline cartilage injury of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiajun; Huang, Suizhu; Zheng, Jia; Zhong, Chunan; Tang, Chao; Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease in the elderly population. Most of the previous OA-related researches focused on articular cartilage degeneration, osteophyte formation and synovitis etc. However, the role of the meniscus in these pathological changes has not been given enough attention. The goal of our study was to find the pathological changes of the meniscus in OA knee and determine their relationship. 20 months old female Chinese rabbits received either knee damaging operations with articular cartilage scratch method or sham operation randomly on one of their knees. They were sacrificed after 1-6 weeks post-operation. Medial Displacement Index (MDI) for meniscus dislocation, hematoxylin and eosin (HE) for routine histological evaluation, Toluidine blue (TB) stains for evaluating proteoglycans were carried out. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was performed with a two-step detection kit. Histological analysis showed chondrocyte clusters around cartilage lesions and moderate loss of proteoglycans in the operation model, as well as MDI increase and all characteristics of OA. High expression of MMP-3 and TIMP-1 also were found in both hyaline cartilage and meniscus. Biomechanical and biochemistry environment around the meniscus is altered when OA occur. If meniscus showed degeneration, subluxation and dysfunction, OA would be more severe. Prompt repair or reconstruction of hyaline cartilage in weight bearing area when it injured could prevent meniscus degeneration and subluxation, then prevent the development of OA.

  14. [Multicentric hyaline vascular Castleman's disease. A POEMS type variant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia-Ramos, Abraham Edgar; Cruz-Domínguez, María del Pilar; Vera-Lastra, Olga Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Castleman's disease is an atypical lymphoproliferative disorder which may be compatible with paraneoplastic manifestations of POEMS syndrome. a 53 year old man with a history of type 2 diabetes, hypothyroidism and Addison's disease presented with numbness and weakness in limbs, dyspnea, skin hardening, Raynaud's phenomenon, weight loss and fatigue. A physical exam showed tachypnea, generalized cutaneous hyperpigmentation and skin hardening of extremities, muscle weakness, hypoesthesia and hyporeflexia. Laboratory showed hyperprolactinemia, low testosterone, hypothyroidism and Addison's disease. Electrophoresis of proteins showed polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. Somatosensory evoked potentials reported peripheral neuropathy and severe axonal polyneuropathy by electromyography. Chest X-rays showed bilateral reticular infiltrates and mediastinal widening. An echocardiogram displayed moderate pulmonary hypertension. Skin biopsy had no evidence of scleroderma. CT reported axillar, mediastinal and retroperitoneal nodes. The mediastinal lesion biopsy reported hyaline vascular Castleman's disease, multicentric variety. He was treated with rituximab. the case meet criteria for multicentric hyaline vascular Castleman's disease, POEMS variant, treated with rituximab.

  15. Sonication-induced Ostwald ripening of ZIF-8 nanoparticles and formation of ZIF-8/polymer composite membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Thompson, Joshua A.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of typical membrane processing conditions on the structure, interfacial morphology, and gas separation performance of MOF/polymer nanocomposite membranes is investigated. In particular, the ZIF-8/Matrimid® nanocomposite membrane system is examined, and it is shown that ultrasonication - a commonly employed particle dispersion method - induces significant changes in the shape, size distribution, and structure of ZIF-8 particles suspended in an organic solvent during membrane processing. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy reveal that ZIF-8 nanoparticles undergo substantial Ostwald ripening when subjected to high intensity ultrasonication as often required in the formation of MOF/polymer nanocomposite membranes. Other characterization techniques reveal that the ripened particles exhibit lower pore volumes and lower surface areas compared to the as-made material. ZIF-8/Matrimid® composite membranes fabricated using two sonication methods show significant differences in microstructure. Permeation measurements show significant enhancement in permeability of CO 2 and increased CO 2/CH 4 selectivity in membranes fabricated with high-intensity sonication. In contrast, composite membranes prepared with low-intensity sonication are found to be defective. A careful evaluation of MOF membrane processing conditions, as well as knowledge of the properties of the MOF material after these membrane processing steps, are necessary to develop reliable processing-structure-property relations for MOF-containing membranes. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma and retroperitoneal fibrosis in an adolescent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Adam S.; Binkovitz, Larry A.; Adler, Brent H.; Nicol, Kathleen K.; Rennebohm, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a 15-year-old boy who developed pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) and retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF). His PHG and RPF were not associated with histoplasmosis or tuberculosis and appeared to represent idiopathic autoimmune phenomena. This is the first reported case of PHG in a pediatric patient and the fourth reported co-occurrence of PHG and RPF. The use of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the diagnostic and follow-up evaluation of PHG is reported. (orig.)

  17. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma and retroperitoneal fibrosis in an adolescent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Adam S.; Binkovitz, Larry A.; Adler, Brent H. [Columbus Children' s Hospital, Children' s Radiological Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Nicol, Kathleen K. [Columbus Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, Columbus, OH (United States); Rennebohm, Robert M. [Columbus Children' s Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2007-01-15

    We describe a 15-year-old boy who developed pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) and retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF). His PHG and RPF were not associated with histoplasmosis or tuberculosis and appeared to represent idiopathic autoimmune phenomena. This is the first reported case of PHG in a pediatric patient and the fourth reported co-occurrence of PHG and RPF. The use of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the diagnostic and follow-up evaluation of PHG is reported. (orig.)

  18. Hyalinizing Granuloma: An Unusual Case of a Pulmonary Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Brandão

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma in a 34-year-old asymptomatic man who presented with a pulmonary nodule apparent by chest radiography and computed tomography (CT. He had a history of previous treatment for tuberculosis. His laboratory data were normal. Bronchoscopy and CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic fine needle aspiration cytology were inconclusive. The diagnosis was revealed after the histopathological examination of an open lung biopsy.

  19. Nanoscale domain formation of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate in the plasma and vacuolar membranes of living yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioku, Kan-Na; Shigekuni, Mikiko; Hayashi, Hiroki; Yoshida, Akane; Futagami, Taiki; Tamaki, Hisanori; Tanabe, Kenji; Fujita, Akikazu

    2018-05-01

    In budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, PtdIns(4)P serves as an essential signalling molecule in the Golgi complex, endosomal system, and plasma membrane, where it is involved in the control of multiple cellular functions via direct interactions with PtdIns(4)P-binding proteins. To analyse the distribution of PtdIns(4)P in yeast cells at a nanoscale level, we employed an electron microscopy technique that specifically labels PtdIns(4)P on the freeze-fracture replica of the yeast membrane. This method minimizes the possibility of artificial perturbation, because molecules in the membrane are physically immobilised in situ. We observed that PtdIns(4)P is localised on the cytoplasmic leaflet, but not the exoplasmic leaflet, of the plasma membrane, Golgi body, vacuole, and vesicular structure membranes. PtdIns(4)P labelling was not observed in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum, and in the outer and inner membranes of the nuclear envelope or mitochondria. PtdIns(4)P forms clusters of plasma membrane and vacuolar membrane according to point pattern analysis of immunogold labelling. There are three kinds of compartments in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. In the present study, we showed that PtdIns(4)P is specifically localised in the flat undifferentiated plasma membrane compartment. In the vacuolar membrane, PtdIns(4)P was concentrated in intramembrane particle (IMP)-deficient raft-like domains, which are tightly bound to lipid droplets, but not surrounding IMP-rich non-raft domains in geometrical IMP-distributed patterns in the stationary phase. This is the first report showing microdomain formations of PtdIns(4)P in the plasma membrane and vacuolar membrane of budding yeast cells at a nanoscale level, which will illuminate the functionality of PtdIns(4)P in each membrane. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Pulmonary Hyalinizing Granuloma Associated with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Coleman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG is a rare, benign lung disease of unknown etiology. It manifests as discrete, rounded nodules within the lung parenchyma. A 39-year-old woman presented for investigation after pulmonary nodules were found incidentally. Chest computed tomography showed multiple, discrete, non-enhancing pulmonary nodules bilaterally. Positron emission tomography (PET was negative. Biopsy demonstrated a non-specific lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Open resection yielded two nodules consistent with hyalinizing granulomas. The differential for multiple pulmonary nodules is broad. PET scan can help rule out metastatic disease, although some cancers are not hypermetabolic on PET. Furthermore, some non-malignant conditions, including hyalinizing granuloma, can show increased activity on PET. PHG should be included in the differential of multiple pulmonary nodules, especially if nodule stability can be demonstrated and/or needle biopsies are non-diagnostic. Associated immune-mediated conditions, such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP in our patient, may also favor HG. In this case report we find an association between PHG and ITP.

  1. Three new species of Trichoderma with hyaline ascospores from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z X; Zhuang, W Y

    2015-01-01

    Collections of Trichoderma having hyaline ascospores from different areas of China were examined. Using combined analyses of morphological data, culture characters and phylogenetic information based on rDNA sequences of partial nuc translation elongation factor 1-α encoding gene (TEF1-α) and the gene encoding the second largest nuc RNA polymerase subunit (RPB2), three new species, Trichoderma applanatum, T. oligosporum and T. sinoluteum, were discovered and are described. Trichoderma applanatum produces continuous flat to pulvinate, white to cream stromata with dense orange or pale brown ostioles, and simple acremonium-like to verticillium-like conidiophores, belongs to the Hypocreanum clade and is closely related to T. decipiens. Trichoderma oligosporum forms reddish brown stromata with a downy surface, hyaline conidia and gliocladium-like conidiophores, and is closely related to but distinct from T. crystalligenum in the Psychrophila clade. Trichoderma sinoluteum, as a member of the Polysporum clade, is characterized by pale yellow stromata, white pustulate conidiomata, pachybasium-like conidiophores, and hyaline conidia. Differences between the new species and their close relatives are discussed. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  2. Microbial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation on Microfiltration Membranes: A Detailed Characterization Using Model Organisms with Increasing Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Vanysacker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since many years, membrane biofouling has been described as the Achilles heel of membrane fouling. In the present study, an ecological assay was performed using model systems with increasing complexity: a monospecies assay using Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Escherichia coli separately, a duospecies assay using both microorganisms, and a multispecies assay using activated sludge with or without spiked P. aeruginosa. The microbial adhesion and biofilm formation were evaluated in terms of bacterial cell densities, species richness, and bacterial community composition on polyvinyldifluoride, polyethylene, and polysulfone membranes. The data show that biofouling formation was strongly influenced by the kind of microorganism, the interactions between the organisms, and the changes in environmental conditions whereas the membrane effect was less important. The findings obtained in this study suggest that more knowledge in species composition and microbial interactions is needed in order to understand the complex biofouling process. This is the first report describing the microbial interactions with a membrane during the biofouling development.

  3. Microbial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation on Microfiltration Membranes: A Detailed Characterization Using Model Organisms with Increasing Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanysacker, L.; Denis, C.; Declerck, P.; Piasecka, A.; Vankelecom, I. F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Since many years, membrane biofouling has been described as the Achilles heel of membrane fouling. In the present study, an ecological assay was performed using model systems with increasing complexity: a monospecies assay using Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Escherichia coli separately, a duospecies assay using both microorganisms, and a multispecies assay using activated sludge with or without spiked P. aeruginosa. The microbial adhesion and biofilm formation were evaluated in terms of bacterial cell densities, species richness, and bacterial community composition on polyvinyldifluoride, polyethylene, and polysulfone membranes. The data show that biofouling formation was strongly influenced by the kind of microorganism, the interactions between the organisms, and the changes in environmental conditions whereas the membrane effect was less important. The findings obtained in this study suggest that more knowledge in species composition and microbial interactions is needed in order to understand the complex biofouling process. This is the first report describing the microbial interactions with a membrane during the biofouling development. PMID:23986906

  4. Formation and characterization of nanotubes of La(OH)3 obtained using porous alumina membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Rovira, L; Sanchez-Amaya, J M; Botana, F J; Lopez-Haro, M; Hungria, A B; Boukha, Z; Bernal, S

    2008-01-01

    An electrodeposition process is used to synthesize nanotubes of a lanthanum-containing phase, employing porous alumina membranes as templates. This method should lead to the formation of La(OH) 3 nanowires, according to the previous results presented by Bocchetta et al (2007 Electrochem. Commun. 9 683-8), which can be decomposed to La 2 O 3 , as the latter shows more interest for different applications. The results obtained by means of different electron microscopy techniques indicate that this method leads to the formation of nanotubes of about 200 nm in diameter and 30-40 μm in length, instead of the nanowires proposed in the literature. Additionally, the chemical characterization demonstrates that the material synthesized is composed of lanthanum hydroxycarbonate. The presence of carbonates is found to be crucial in determining the conditions for the preparation of La 2 O 3 from the nanotubes here obtained.

  5. Formation and characterization of nanotubes of La(OH)3 obtained using porous alumina membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rovira, L.; Sánchez-Amaya, J. M.; López-Haro, M.; Hungria, A. B.; Boukha, Z.; Bernal, S.; Botana, F. J.

    2008-12-01

    An electrodeposition process is used to synthesize nanotubes of a lanthanum-containing phase, employing porous alumina membranes as templates. This method should lead to the formation of La(OH)3 nanowires, according to the previous results presented by Bocchetta et al (2007 Electrochem. Commun. 9 683-8), which can be decomposed to La2O3, as the latter shows more interest for different applications. The results obtained by means of different electron microscopy techniques indicate that this method leads to the formation of nanotubes of about 200 nm in diameter and 30-40 µm in length, instead of the nanowires proposed in the literature. Additionally, the chemical characterization demonstrates that the material synthesized is composed of lanthanum hydroxycarbonate. The presence of carbonates is found to be crucial in determining the conditions for the preparation of La2O3 from the nanotubes here obtained.

  6. In situ formation of silver nanoparticles on thin-film composite reverse osmosis membranes for biofouling mitigation

    KAUST Repository

    Ben-Sasson, Moshe

    2014-10-01

    The potential to incorporate silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) as biocides in membranes for water purification has gained much interest in recent years. However, a viable strategy for loading the Ag-NPs on the membrane remains challenging. This paper presents a novel, facile procedure for loading Ag-NPs on thin-film composite (TFC) reverse osmosis membranes. Reaction of silver salt with a reducing agent on the membrane surface resulted in uniform coverage of Ag-NPs, irreversibly bound to the membrane, as confirmed by XPS, TEM, and SEM analyses. Salt selectivity of the membrane as well its surface roughness, hydrophilicity, and zeta potential were not impacted by Ag-NP functionalization, while a slight reduction (up to 17%) in water permeability was observed. The formed Ag-NPs imparted strong antibacterial activity to the membrane, leading to reduction of more than 75% in the number of live bacteria attached to the membrane for three model bacteria strains. In addition, confocal microscopy analyses revealed that Ag-NPs significantly suppressed biofilm formation, with 41% reduction in total biovolume and significant reduction in EPS, dead, and live bacteria on the functionalized membrane. The simplicity of the method, the short reaction time, the ability to load the Ag-NPs on site, and the strong imparted antibacterial activity highlight the potential of this method in real-world RO membrane applications. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. In situ formation of silver nanoparticles on thin-film composite reverse osmosis membranes for biofouling mitigation

    KAUST Repository

    Ben-Sasson, Moshe; Lu, Xinglin; Bar-Zeev, Edo; Zodrow, Katherine R.; Nejati, Siamak; Qi, Genggeng; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-01-01

    The potential to incorporate silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) as biocides in membranes for water purification has gained much interest in recent years. However, a viable strategy for loading the Ag-NPs on the membrane remains challenging. This paper presents a novel, facile procedure for loading Ag-NPs on thin-film composite (TFC) reverse osmosis membranes. Reaction of silver salt with a reducing agent on the membrane surface resulted in uniform coverage of Ag-NPs, irreversibly bound to the membrane, as confirmed by XPS, TEM, and SEM analyses. Salt selectivity of the membrane as well its surface roughness, hydrophilicity, and zeta potential were not impacted by Ag-NP functionalization, while a slight reduction (up to 17%) in water permeability was observed. The formed Ag-NPs imparted strong antibacterial activity to the membrane, leading to reduction of more than 75% in the number of live bacteria attached to the membrane for three model bacteria strains. In addition, confocal microscopy analyses revealed that Ag-NPs significantly suppressed biofilm formation, with 41% reduction in total biovolume and significant reduction in EPS, dead, and live bacteria on the functionalized membrane. The simplicity of the method, the short reaction time, the ability to load the Ag-NPs on site, and the strong imparted antibacterial activity highlight the potential of this method in real-world RO membrane applications. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Saponin Interactions with Model Membrane Systems - Langmuir Monolayer Studies, Hemolysis and Formation of ISCOMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Carolin; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2016-12-01

    Saponins are used in medicine due to their pharmacological and immunological effects. To better understand interactions of saponins with model membranes and natural membranes of, for example, erythrocytes, Langmuir film balance experiments are well established. For most saponins, a strong interaction with cholesterol was demonstrated in dependence of both the aglycone part and the sugar moieties and is suggested to be correlated with a strong hemolytic activity, high toxicity, and high surface activity, as was demonstrated for the steroid saponin digitonin. In general, changes in the sugar chain or in substituents of the aglycone result in a modification of the saponin properties. A promising saponin with regard to fairly low hemolytic activity and high adjuvant effect is α -tomatine, which still shows a high affinity for cholesterol. An interaction with cholesterol and lipids has also been proven for the Quillaja saponin from the bark of Quillaja saponaria Molina. This triterpene saponin was approved in marketed vaccines as an adjuvant due to the formation of immunostimulating complexes. Immunostimulating complexes consist of a Quillaja saponin, cholesterol, phospholipids, and a corresponding antigen. Recently, another saponin from Quillaja brasiliensis was successfully tested in immunostimulating complexes, too. Based on the results of interaction studies, the formation of drug delivery systems such as immunostimulating complexes or similar self-assembled colloids is postulated for a variety of saponins. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Proteomics of plasma membranes from poplar trees reveals tissue distribution of transporters, receptors, and proteins in cell wall formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Robert; Bernfur, Katja; Gustavsson, Niklas; Bygdell, Joakim; Wingsle, Gunnar; Larsson, Christer

    2010-02-01

    By exploiting the abundant tissues available from Populus trees, 3-4 m high, we have been able to isolate plasma membranes of high purity from leaves, xylem, and cambium/phloem at a time (4 weeks after bud break) when photosynthesis in the leaves and wood formation in the xylem should have reached a steady state. More than 40% of the 956 proteins identified were found in the plasma membranes of all three tissues and may be classified as "housekeeping" proteins, a typical example being P-type H(+)-ATPases. Among the 213 proteins predicted to be integral membrane proteins, transporters constitute the largest class (41%) followed by receptors (14%) and proteins involved in cell wall and carbohydrate metabolism (8%) and membrane trafficking (8%). ATP-binding cassette transporters (all members of subfamilies B, C, and G) and receptor-like kinases (four subfamilies) were two of the largest protein families found, and the members of these two families showed pronounced tissue distribution. Leaf plasma membranes were characterized by a very high proportion of transporters, constituting almost half of the integral proteins. Proteins involved in cell wall synthesis (such as cellulose and sucrose synthases) and membrane trafficking were most abundant in xylem plasma membranes in agreement with the role of the xylem in wood formation. Twenty-five integral proteins and 83 soluble proteins were exclusively found in xylem plasma membranes, which identifies new candidates associated with cell wall synthesis and wood formation. Among the proteins uniquely found in xylem plasma membranes were most of the enzymes involved in lignin biosynthesis, which suggests that they may exist as a complex linked to the plasma membrane.

  10. Hyaline Articular Matrix Formed by Dynamic Self-Regenerating Cartilage and Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meppelink, Amanda M; Zhao, Xing; Griffin, Darvin J; Erali, Richard; Gill, Thomas J; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Redmond, Robert W; Randolph, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    Injuries to the articular cartilage surface are challenging to repair because cartilage possesses a limited capacity for self-repair. The outcomes of current clinical procedures aimed to address these injuries are inconsistent and unsatisfactory. We have developed a novel method for generating hyaline articular cartilage to improve the outcome of joint surface repair. A suspension of 10(7) swine chondrocytes was cultured under reciprocating motion for 14 days. The resulting dynamic self-regenerating cartilage (dSRC) was placed in a cartilage ring and capped with fibrin and collagen gel. A control group consisted of chondrocytes encapsulated in fibrin gel. Constructs were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice and harvested after 6 weeks. Gross, histological, immunohistochemical, biochemical, and biomechanical analyses were performed. In swine patellar groove, dSRC was implanted into osteochondral defects capped with collagen gel and compared to defects filled with osteochondral plugs, collagen gel, or left empty after 6 weeks. In mice, the fibrin- and collagen-capped dSRC constructs showed enhanced contiguous cartilage matrix formation over the control of cells encapsulated in fibrin gel. Biochemically, the fibrin and collagen gel dSRC groups were statistically improved in glycosaminoglycan and hydroxyproline content compared to the control. There was no statistical difference in the biomechanical data between the dSRC groups and the control. The swine model also showed contiguous cartilage matrix in the dSRC group but not in the collagen gel and empty defects. These data demonstrate the survivability and successful matrix formation of dSRC under the mechanical forces experienced by normal hyaline cartilage in the knee joint. The results from this study demonstrate that dSRC capped with hydrogels successfully engineers contiguous articular cartilage matrix in both nonload-bearing and load-bearing environments.

  11. Hepatocyte membrane injury and bleb formation following low dose comfrey toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeong, M L; Wakefield, S J; Ford, H C

    1993-04-01

    Comfrey, a popular herbal remedy, contains hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids and has been implicated in recent human toxicity. Although alkaloids from other plant sources have been extensively researched, studies on the hepatotoxic effects of comfrey alkaloids are scant. The effects of high dose comfrey toxicity have been studied and the present investigation was undertaken to identify changes associated with relatively low dose toxicity. Eight young adult rats were dosed weekly for six weeks with 50 mg/kg of comfrey derived alkaloids. The animals were dissected one week after the last dose and the livers examined by light and electron microscopy. Changes at the light microscopic level showed vascular congestion, mild zone 3 necrosis and loss of definition of hepatocyte cellular membranes. Extensive ultrastructural abnormalities were identified in the form of endothelial sloughing and the loss of hepatocyte microvilli. A striking finding was florid bleb formation on the sinusoidal borders of hepatocytes. Many blebs were shed into the space of Disse and extruded to fill, and sometimes occlude, sinusoidal lumina. Platelets were frequently found in areas of bleb formation. There was evidence of late damage in collagenization of Disse's space. Hepatocyte bleb formation is known to occur under a variety of pathological conditions but there is little to no information in the literature on the effects, if any, of bleb formation on fibrogenesis and the microcirculation and its role in the pathogenesis of liver disease. The pyrrolizidine alkaloids of comfrey may serve as an experimental tool to study the process of bleb formation and the intimate relationship between hepatocyte and sinusoidal injury in the liver.

  12. Time-resolved GISAXS and cryo-microscopy characterization of block copolymer membrane formation

    KAUST Repository

    Marques, Debora S.; Dorin, Rachel Mika; Wiesner, Ulrich B.; Smilgies, Detlef Matthias; Behzad, Ali Reza; Vainio, Ulla; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and cryo-microscopy were used for the first time to understand the pore evolution by copolymer assembly, leading to the formation of isoporous membranes with exceptional porosity and regularity. The formation of copolymer micelle strings in solution (in DMF/DOX/THF and DMF/DOX) was confirmed by cryo field emission scanning electron microscopy (cryo-FESEM) with a distance of 72 nm between centers of micelles placed in different strings. SAXS measurement of block copolymer solutions in DMF/DOX indicated hexagonal assembly with micelle-to-micelle distance of 84-87 nm for 14-20 wt% copolymer solutions. GISAXS in-plane peaks were detected, revealing order close to hexagonal. The d-spacing corresponding to the first peak in this case was 100-130 nm (lattice constant 115-150 nm) for 17 wt% copolymer solutions evaporating up to 100 s. Time-resolved cryo-FESEM showed the formation of incipient pores on the film surface after 4 s copolymer solution casting with distances between void centers of 125 nm. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Time-resolved GISAXS and cryo-microscopy characterization of block copolymer membrane formation

    KAUST Repository

    Marques, Debora S.

    2014-03-01

    Time-resolved grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and cryo-microscopy were used for the first time to understand the pore evolution by copolymer assembly, leading to the formation of isoporous membranes with exceptional porosity and regularity. The formation of copolymer micelle strings in solution (in DMF/DOX/THF and DMF/DOX) was confirmed by cryo field emission scanning electron microscopy (cryo-FESEM) with a distance of 72 nm between centers of micelles placed in different strings. SAXS measurement of block copolymer solutions in DMF/DOX indicated hexagonal assembly with micelle-to-micelle distance of 84-87 nm for 14-20 wt% copolymer solutions. GISAXS in-plane peaks were detected, revealing order close to hexagonal. The d-spacing corresponding to the first peak in this case was 100-130 nm (lattice constant 115-150 nm) for 17 wt% copolymer solutions evaporating up to 100 s. Time-resolved cryo-FESEM showed the formation of incipient pores on the film surface after 4 s copolymer solution casting with distances between void centers of 125 nm. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood implants elicit hyaline cartilage repair integrated with porous subchondral bone in microdrilled rabbit defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoemann, C D; Sun, J; McKee, M D; Chevrier, A; Rossomacha, E; Rivard, G-E; Hurtig, M; Buschmann, M D

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that microfractured ovine defects are repaired with more hyaline cartilage when the defect is treated with in situ-solidified implants of chitosan-glycerol phosphate (chitosan-GP) mixed with autologous whole blood. The objectives of this study were (1) to characterize chitosan-GP/blood clots in vitro, and (2) to develop a rabbit marrow stimulation model in order to determine the effects of the chitosan-GP/blood implant and of debridement on the formation of incipient cartilage repair tissue. Blood clots were characterized by histology and in vitro clot retraction tests. Bilateral 3.5 x 4 mm trochlear defects debrided into the calcified layer were pierced with four microdrill holes and filled with a chitosan-GP/blood implant or allowed to bleed freely as a control. At 1 day post-surgery, initial defects were characterized by histomorphometry (n=3). After 8 weeks of repair, osteochondral repair tissues between or through the drill holes were evaluated by histology, histomorphometry, collagen type II expression, and stereology (n=16). Chitosan-GP solutions structurally stabilized the blood clots by inhibiting clot retraction. Treatment of drilled defects with chitosan-GP/blood clots led to the formation of a more integrated and hyaline repair tissue above a more porous and vascularized subchondral bone plate compared to drilling alone. Correlation analysis of repair tissue between the drill holes revealed that the absence of calcified cartilage and the presence of a porous subchondral bone plate were predictors of greater repair tissue integration with subchondral bone (Phyaline and integrated repair tissue associated with a porous subchondral bone replete with blood vessels. Concomitant regeneration of a vascularized bone plate during cartilage repair could provide progenitors, anabolic factors and nutrients that aid in the formation of hyaline cartilage.

  15. Conformations of islet amyloid polypeptide monomers in a membrane environment: implications for fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojie Duan

    Full Text Available The amyloid fibrils formed by islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP are associated with type II diabetes. One of the proposed mechanisms of the toxicity of IAPP is that it causes membrane damage. The fatal mutation of S20G human IAPP was reported to lead to early onset of type II diabetes and high tendency of amyloid formation in vitro. Characterizing the structural features of the S20G mutant in its monomeric state is experimentally difficult because of its unusually fast aggregation rate. Computational work complements experimental studies. We performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations of the monomeric state of human variants in the membrane. Our simulations are validated by extensive comparisons with experimental data. We find that a helical disruption at His18 is common to both human variants. An L-shaped motif of S20G mutant is observed in one of the conformational families. This motif that bends at His18 resembles the overall topology of IAPP fibrils. The conformational preorganization into the fibril-like topology provides a possible explanation for the fast aggregation rate of S20G IAPP.

  16. Sequential analysis of trans-SNARE formation in intracellular membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Alpadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available SNARE complexes are required for membrane fusion in the endomembrane system. They contain coiled-coil bundles of four helices, three (Q(a, Q(b, and Q(c from target (t-SNAREs and one (R from the vesicular (v-SNARE. NSF/Sec18 disrupts these cis-SNARE complexes, allowing reassembly of their subunits into trans-SNARE complexes and subsequent fusion. Studying these reactions in native yeast vacuoles, we found that NSF/Sec18 activates the vacuolar cis-SNARE complex by selectively displacing the vacuolar Q(a SNARE, leaving behind a Q(bcR subcomplex. This subcomplex serves as an acceptor for a Q(a SNARE from the opposite membrane, leading to Q(a-Q(bcR trans-complexes. Activity tests of vacuoles with diagnostic distributions of inactivating mutations over the two fusion partners confirm that this distribution accounts for a major share of the fusion activity. The persistence of the Q(bcR cis-complex and the formation of the Q(a-Q(bcR trans-complex are both sensitive to the Rab-GTPase inhibitor, GDI, and to mutations in the vacuolar tether complex, HOPS (HOmotypic fusion and vacuolar Protein Sorting complex. This suggests that the vacuolar Rab-GTPase, Ypt7, and HOPS restrict cis-SNARE disassembly and thereby bias trans-SNARE assembly into a preferred topology.

  17. Neurokinin 1 Receptor Mediates Membrane Blebbing and Sheer Stress-Induced Microparticle Formation in HEK293 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Panpan; Douglas, Steven D.; Meshki, John; Tuluc, Florin

    2012-01-01

    Cell-derived microparticles participate in intercellular communication similar to the classical messenger systems of small and macro-molecules that bind to specialized membrane receptors. Microparticles have been implicated in the regulation of a variety of complex physiopathologic processes, such as thrombosis, the control of innate and adaptive immunity, and cancer. The neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) is a Gq-coupled receptor present on the membrane of a variety of tissues, including neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system, immune cells, endocrine and exocrine glands, and smooth muscle. The endogenous agonist of NK1R is the undecapeptide substance P (SP). We have previously described intracellular signaling mechanisms that regulate NK1R-mediated rapid cell shape changes in HEK293 cells and U373MG cells. In the present study, we show that the activation of NK1R in HEK293 cells, but not in U373MG cells, leads to formation of sheer-stress induced microparticles that stain positive with the membrane-selective fluorescent dye FM 2–10. SP-induced microparticle formation is independent of elevated intracellular calcium concentrations and activation of NK1R present on HEK293-derived microparticles triggers detectable calcium increase in SP-induced microparticles. The ROCK inhibitor Y27632 and the dynamin inhibitor dynasore inhibited membrane blebbing and microparticle formation in HEK293 cells, strongly suggesting that microparticle formation in this cell type is dependent on membrane blebbing. PMID:23024816

  18. Neurokinin 1 receptor mediates membrane blebbing and sheer stress-induced microparticle formation in HEK293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panpan Chen

    Full Text Available Cell-derived microparticles participate in intercellular communication similar to the classical messenger systems of small and macro-molecules that bind to specialized membrane receptors. Microparticles have been implicated in the regulation of a variety of complex physiopathologic processes, such as thrombosis, the control of innate and adaptive immunity, and cancer. The neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R is a Gq-coupled receptor present on the membrane of a variety of tissues, including neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system, immune cells, endocrine and exocrine glands, and smooth muscle. The endogenous agonist of NK1R is the undecapeptide substance P (SP. We have previously described intracellular signaling mechanisms that regulate NK1R-mediated rapid cell shape changes in HEK293 cells and U373MG cells. In the present study, we show that the activation of NK1R in HEK293 cells, but not in U373MG cells, leads to formation of sheer-stress induced microparticles that stain positive with the membrane-selective fluorescent dye FM 2-10. SP-induced microparticle formation is independent of elevated intracellular calcium concentrations and activation of NK1R present on HEK293-derived microparticles triggers detectable calcium increase in SP-induced microparticles. The ROCK inhibitor Y27632 and the dynamin inhibitor dynasore inhibited membrane blebbing and microparticle formation in HEK293 cells, strongly suggesting that microparticle formation in this cell type is dependent on membrane blebbing.

  19. Reappraisal of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma: novel morphologic observations of the hyaline cartilage and endochondral ossification and beta-catenin, Sox9, and osteocalcin immunostaining of 22 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanburg-Smith, Julie C; Auerbach, Aaron; Marwaha, Jayson S; Wang, Zengfeng; Rushing, Elisabeth J

    2010-05-01

    Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, a rare malignant round cell and hyaline cartilage tumor, is most commonly intraosseous but can occur in extraskeletal sites. We intensively observed the morphology and applied Sox9 (master regulator of chondrogenesis), beta-catenin (involved in bone formation, thought to inhibit chondrogenesis in a Sox9-dependent manner), and osteocalcin (a marker for osteoblastic phenotype) to 22 central nervous system and musculoskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. Cases of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma were retrieved and reviewed from our files. Immunohistochemistry and follow-up were obtained on mesenchymal chondrosarcoma and tumor controls. Twenty-two mesenchymal chondrosarcomas included 5 central nervous system (all female; mean age, 30.2; mean size, 7.8 cm; in frontal lobe [n = 4] and spinal cord [n = 1]) and 17 musculoskeletal (female-male ratio, 11:6; mean age, 31.1; mean size, 6.2 cm; 3 each of humerus and vertebrae; 2 each of pelvis, rib, tibia, neck soft tissue; one each of femur, unspecified bone, and elbow soft tissue). The hyaline cartilage in most tumors revealed a consistent linear progression of chondrocyte morphology, from resting to proliferating to hypertrophic chondrocytes. Sixty-seven percent of cases demonstrated cell death and acquired osteoblastic phenotype, cells positive for osteocalcin at the site of endochondral ossification. Small round cells of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma were negative for osteocalcin. SOX9 was positive in both components of 21 of 22 cases of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. beta-Catenin highlighted rare nuclei at the interface between round cells and hyaline cartilage in 35% cases. Control skull and central nervous system cases were compared, including chondrosarcomas and small cell osteosarcoma, the latter positive for osteocalcin in small cells. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma demonstrates centrally located hyaline cartilage with a linear progression of chondrocytes from resting to proliferative to hypertrophic

  20. Structure formation of lipid membranes: Membrane self-assembly and vesicle opening-up to octopus-like micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    We briefly review our recent studies on self-assembly and vesicle rupture of lipid membranes using coarse-grained molecular simulations. For single component membranes, lipid molecules self-assemble from random gas states to vesicles via disk-shaped clusters. Clusters aggregate into larger clusters, and subsequently the large disks close into vesicles. The size of vesicles are determined by kinetics than by thermodynamics. When a vesicle composed of lipid and detergent types of molecules is ruptured, a disk-shaped micelle called bicelle can be formed. When both surfactants have negligibly low critical micelle concentration, it is found that bicelles connected with worm-like micelles are also formed depending on the surfactant ratio and spontaneous curvature of the membrane monolayer.

  1. The junction between hyaline cartilage and engineered cartilage in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Makoto; Komura, Hiroko; Otani, Yushi; Kanamori, Yutaka; Iwanaka, Tadashi; Hoshi, Kazuto; Tsuyoshi, Takato; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2013-06-01

    Tracheoplasty using costal cartilage grafts to enlarge the tracheal lumen was performed to treat congenital tracheal stenosis. Fibrotic granulomatous tissue was observed at the edge of grafted costal cartilage. We investigated the junction between the native hyaline cartilage and the engineered cartilage plates that were generated by auricular chondrocytes for fabricating the airway. Controlled, prospecive study. In group 1, costal cartilage from New Zealand white rabbits was collected and implanted into a space created in the cervical trachea. In group 2, chondrocytes from auricular cartilages were seeded on absorbable scaffolds. These constructs were implanted in the subcutaneous space. Engineered cartilage plates were then implanted into the trachea after 3 weeks of implantation of the constructs. The grafts in group 1 and 2 were retrieved after 4 weeks. In group 1, histological studies of the junction between the native hyaline cartilage and the implanted costal cartilage demonstrated chondrogenic tissue in four anastomoses sides out of the 10 examined. In group 2, the junction between the native trachea and the engineered cartilage showed neocartilage tissue in nine anastomoses sides out of 10. Engineered cartilage may be beneficial for engineered airways, based on the findings of the junction between the native and engineered grafts. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Quasi-static elastography comparison of hyaline cartilage structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCredie, A. J.; Stride, E.; Saffari, N.

    2009-11-01

    Joint cartilage, a load bearing structure in mammals, has only limited ability for regeneration after damage. For tissue engineers to design functional constructs, better understanding of the properties of healthy tissue is required. Joint cartilage is a specialised structure of hyaline cartilage; a poroviscoelastic solid containing fibril matrix reinforcements. Healthy joint cartilage is layered, which is thought to be important for correct tissue function. However, the behaviour of each layer during loading is poorly understood. Ultrasound elastography provides access to depth-dependent information in real-time for a sample during loading. A 15 MHz focussed transducer provided details from scatterers within a small fixed region in each sample. Quasi-static loading was applied to cartilage samples while ultrasonic signals before and during compressions were recorded. Ultrasonic signals were processed to provide time-shift profiles using a sum-squared difference method and cross-correlation. Two structures of hyaline cartilage have been tested ultrasonically and mechanically to determine method suitability for monitoring internal deformation differences under load and the effect of the layers on the global mechanical material behaviour. Results show differences in both the global mechanical properties and the ultrasonically tested strain distributions between the two structures tested. It was concluded that these differences are caused primarily by the fibril orientations.

  3. Lipid intermediates in membrane fusion: formation, structure, and decay of hemifusion diaphragm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovsky, Yonathan; Chernomordik, Leonid V; Kozlov, Michael M

    2002-11-01

    Lipid bilayer fusion is thought to involve formation of a local hemifusion connection, referred to as a fusion stalk. The subsequent fusion stages leading to the opening of a fusion pore remain unknown. The earliest fusion pore could represent a bilayer connection between the membranes and could be formed directly from the stalk. Alternatively, fusion pore can form in a single bilayer, referred to as hemifusion diaphragm (HD), generated by stalk expansion. To analyze the plausibility of stalk expansion, we studied the pathway of hemifusion theoretically, using a recently developed elastic model. We show that the stalk has a tendency to expand into an HD for lipids with sufficiently negative spontaneous splay, (~)J(s)action of an external force pulling the diaphragm rim apart. We calculate the dependence of the HD radius on this force. To address the mechanism of fusion pore formation, we analyze the distribution of the lateral tension emerging in the HD due to the establishment of lateral equilibrium between the deformed and relaxed portions of lipid monolayers. We show that this tension concentrates along the HD rim and reaches high values sufficient to rupture the bilayer and form the fusion pore. Our analysis supports the hypothesis that transition from a hemifusion to a fusion pore involves radial expansion of the stalk.

  4. Theory of the formation of the electric double layer at the ion exchange membrane-solution interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, A A

    2015-02-21

    This work aims to extend the study of the formation of the electric double layer at the interface defined by a solution and an ion-exchange membrane on the basis of the Nernst-Planck and Poisson equations, including different values of the counter-ion diffusion coefficient and the dielectric constant in the solution and membrane phases. The network simulation method is used to obtain the time evolution of the electric potential, the displacement electric vector, the electric charge density and the ionic concentrations at the interface between a binary electrolyte solution and a cation-exchange membrane with total co-ion exclusion. The numerical results for the temporal evolution of the interfacial electric potential and the surface electric charge are compared with analytical solutions derived in the limit of the shortest times by considering the Poisson equation for a simple cationic diffusion process. The steady-state results are justified from the Gouy-Chapman theory for the diffuse double layer in the limits of similar and high bathing ionic concentrations with respect to the fixed-charge concentration inside the membrane. Interesting new physical insights arise from the interpretation of the process of the formation of the electric double layer at the ion exchange membrane-solution interface on the basis of a membrane model with total co-ion exclusion.

  5. Can macular xanthophylls replace cholesterol in formation of the liquid-ordered phase in lipid-bilayer membranes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subczynski, Witold K; Wisniewska-Becker, Anna; Widomska, Justyna

    2012-01-01

    Lateral organization of membranes made from binary mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and macular xanthophylls (lutein or zeaxanthin) was investigated using the saturation-recovery (SR) EPR spin-labeling discrimination by oxygen transport (DOT) method in which the bimolecular collision rate of molecular oxygen with the nitroxide spin label is measured. This work was undertaken to examine whether or not lutein and zeaxanthin, macular xanthophylls that parallel cholesterol in its function as a regulator of both membrane fluidity and hydrophobicity, can parallel other structural functions of cholesterol, including formation of the liquid-ordered phase in membranes. The DOT method permits discrimination of different membrane phases when the collision rates (oxygen transport parameter) differ in these phases. Additionally, membrane phases can be characterized by the oxygen transport parameter in situ without the need for separation, which provides information about the dynamics of each phase. In gel-phase membranes, two coexisting phases were discriminated in the presence of macular xanthophylls - namely, the liquid-ordered-like and solid-ordered-like phases. However, in fluid-phase membranes, xanthophylls only induce the solitary liquid-ordered-like phase, while at similar concentrations, cholesterol induces coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases. No significant differences between the effects of lutein and zeaxanthin were found.

  6. Lysosomal membrane permeability stimulates protein aggregate formation in neurons of a lysosomal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micsenyi, Matthew C; Sikora, Jakub; Stephney, Gloria; Dobrenis, Kostantin; Walkley, Steven U

    2013-06-26

    Protein aggregates are a common pathological feature of neurodegenerative diseases and several lysosomal diseases, but it is currently unclear what aggregates represent for pathogenesis. Here we report the accumulation of intraneuronal aggregates containing the macroautophagy adapter proteins p62 and NBR1 in the neurodegenerative lysosomal disease late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN2 disease). CLN2 disease is caused by a deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase I, which results in aberrant lysosomal storage of catabolites, including the subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase (SCMAS). In an effort to define the role of aggregates in CLN2, we evaluated p62 and NBR1 accumulation in the CNS of Cln2(-/-) mice. Although increases in p62 and NBR1 often suggest compromised degradative mechanisms, we found normal ubiquitin-proteasome system function and only modest inefficiency in macroautophagy late in disease. Importantly, we identified that SCMAS colocalizes with p62 in extra-lysosomal aggregates in Cln2(-/-) neurons in vivo. This finding is consistent with SCMAS being released from lysosomes, an event known as lysosomal membrane permeability (LMP). We predicted that LMP and storage release from lysosomes results in the sequestration of this material as cytosolic aggregates by p62 and NBR1. Notably, LMP induction in primary neuronal cultures generates p62-positive aggregates and promotes p62 localization to lysosomal membranes, supporting our in vivo findings. We conclude that LMP is a previously unrecognized pathogenic event in CLN2 disease that stimulates cytosolic aggregate formation. Furthermore, we offer a novel role for p62 in response to LMP that may be relevant for other diseases exhibiting p62 accumulation.

  7. High rate sulfate reduction at pH 6 in a Ph-auxostat submerged membrane bioreactor fed with formate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijmans, M.F.M.; Peeters, T.W.T.; Lens, P.N.L.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2008-01-01

    Many industrial waste and process waters contain high concentrations of sulfate, which can be removed by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). This paper reports on mesophilic (30 °C) sulfate reduction at pH 6 with formate as electron donor in a membrane bioreactor with a pH-auxostat dosing system. A

  8. Electrolytic membrane formation of fluoroalkyl polymer using a UV-radiation-based grafting technique and sulfonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shironita, Sayoko; Mizoguchi, Satoko; Umeda, Minoru, E-mail: mumeda@vos.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188, Niigata (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    A sulfonated fluoroalkyl graft polymer (FGP) membrane was prepared as a polymer electrolyte. First, the FGP membrane was grafted with styrene under UV irradiation. The grafted FGP was then sulfonated to functionalize it for proton conductivity. The grafting degree of the membrane increased with increasing grafting time during UV irradiation. The proton conductivity of the membrane increased with increasing grafting degree. The swelling ratio was independent of the grafting time, however, the water uptake increased with increasing grafting degree. Based on these results, it was found that the UV-initiated styrene grafting occurred along the membrane thickness direction. Moreover, the membrane was embedded within the glass fibers of the composite. This composite electrolytic membrane had 1.15 times the proton conductivity of a Nafion 117 membrane.

  9. Natural organic matter interactions with polyamide and polysulfone membranes: Formation of conditioning film

    KAUST Repository

    Gutierrez, Leonardo; Aubry, Cyril; Valladares Linares, Rodrigo; Croue, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    A conditioning film changes the physicochemical properties of the membrane surface and strongly affects subsequent fouling behavior. Results from this Atomic Force Microscopy study indicate that Natural Organic Matter (NOM) characteristics, membrane

  10. Relating performance of thin-film composite forward osmosis membranes to support layer formation and structure

    KAUST Repository

    Tiraferri, Alberto; Yip, Ngai Yin; Phillip, William A.; Schiffman, Jessica D.; Elimelech, Menachem

    2011-01-01

    the technology to the point that it is commercially viable. Here, a systematic investigation of the influence of thin-film composite membrane support layer structure on forward osmosis performance is conducted. The membranes consist of a selective polyamide

  11. In-situ biofilm characterization in membrane systems using Optical Coherence Tomography: Formation, structure, detachment and impact of flux change

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.; Wexler, Adam D.; Drusová , S.; Overdijk, T.; Zwijnenburg, Arie; Flemming, Hans Curt; Kruithof, Joop C.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.

    2014-01-01

    Biofouling causes performance loss in spiral wound nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane operation for process and drinking water production. The development of biofilm formation, structure and detachment was studied in-situ, non-destructively with Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in direct relation with the hydraulic biofilm resistance and membrane performance parameters: transmembrane pressure drop (TMP) and feed-channel pressure drop (FCP). The objective was to evaluate the suitability of OCT for biofouling studies, applying a membrane biofouling test cell operated at constant crossflow velocity (0.1 m s-1) and permeate flux (20 L m-2h-1).In time, the biofilm thickness on the membrane increased continuously causing a decline in membrane performance. Local biofilm detachment was observed at the biofilm-membrane interface. A mature biofilm was subjected to permeate flux variation (20 to 60 to 20 L m-2h-1). An increase in permeate flux caused a decrease in biofilm thickness and an increase in biofilm resistance, indicating biofilm compaction. Restoring the original permeate flux did not completely restore the original biofilm parameters: After elevated flux operation the biofilm thickness was reduced to 75% and the hydraulic resistance increased to 116% of the original values. Therefore, after a temporarily permeate flux increase the impact of the biofilm on membrane performance was stronger. OCT imaging of the biofilm with increased permeate flux revealed that the biofilm became compacted, lost internal voids, and became more dense. Therefore, membrane performance losses were not only related to biofilm thickness but also to the internal biofilm structure, e.g. caused by changes in pressure.Optical Coherence Tomography proved to be a suitable tool for quantitative in-situ biofilm thickness and morphology studies which can be carried out non-destructively and in real-time in transparent membrane biofouling monitors.

  12. In-situ biofilm characterization in membrane systems using Optical Coherence Tomography: Formation, structure, detachment and impact of flux change

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.

    2014-12-01

    Biofouling causes performance loss in spiral wound nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane operation for process and drinking water production. The development of biofilm formation, structure and detachment was studied in-situ, non-destructively with Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in direct relation with the hydraulic biofilm resistance and membrane performance parameters: transmembrane pressure drop (TMP) and feed-channel pressure drop (FCP). The objective was to evaluate the suitability of OCT for biofouling studies, applying a membrane biofouling test cell operated at constant crossflow velocity (0.1 m s-1) and permeate flux (20 L m-2h-1).In time, the biofilm thickness on the membrane increased continuously causing a decline in membrane performance. Local biofilm detachment was observed at the biofilm-membrane interface. A mature biofilm was subjected to permeate flux variation (20 to 60 to 20 L m-2h-1). An increase in permeate flux caused a decrease in biofilm thickness and an increase in biofilm resistance, indicating biofilm compaction. Restoring the original permeate flux did not completely restore the original biofilm parameters: After elevated flux operation the biofilm thickness was reduced to 75% and the hydraulic resistance increased to 116% of the original values. Therefore, after a temporarily permeate flux increase the impact of the biofilm on membrane performance was stronger. OCT imaging of the biofilm with increased permeate flux revealed that the biofilm became compacted, lost internal voids, and became more dense. Therefore, membrane performance losses were not only related to biofilm thickness but also to the internal biofilm structure, e.g. caused by changes in pressure.Optical Coherence Tomography proved to be a suitable tool for quantitative in-situ biofilm thickness and morphology studies which can be carried out non-destructively and in real-time in transparent membrane biofouling monitors.

  13. Brief report: reconstruction of joint hyaline cartilage by autologous progenitor cells derived from ear elastic cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Shinji; Takebe, Takanori; Kan, Hiroomi; Yabuki, Yuichiro; Matsuzaki, Takahisa; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Ik, Lee Jeong; Maegawa, Jiro; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    In healthy joints, hyaline cartilage covering the joint surfaces of bones provides cushioning due to its unique mechanical properties. However, because of its limited regenerative capacity, age- and sports-related injuries to this tissue may lead to degenerative arthropathies, prompting researchers to investigate a variety of cell sources. We recently succeeded in isolating human cartilage progenitor cells from ear elastic cartilage. Human cartilage progenitor cells have high chondrogenic and proliferative potential to form elastic cartilage with long-term tissue maintenance. However, it is unknown whether ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells can be used to reconstruct hyaline cartilage, which has different mechanical and histological properties from elastic cartilage. In our efforts to develop foundational technologies for joint hyaline cartilage repair and reconstruction, we conducted this study to obtain an answer to this question. We created an experimental canine model of knee joint cartilage damage, transplanted ear-derived autologous cartilage progenitor cells. The reconstructed cartilage was rich in proteoglycans and showed unique histological characteristics similar to joint hyaline cartilage. In addition, mechanical properties of the reconstructed tissues were higher than those of ear cartilage and equal to those of joint hyaline cartilage. This study suggested that joint hyaline cartilage was reconstructed from ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells. It also demonstrated that ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells, which can be harvested by a minimally invasive method, would be useful for reconstructing joint hyaline cartilage in patients with degenerative arthropathies. © AlphaMed Press.

  14. Epithelial membrane protein-2 promotes endometrial tumor formation through activation of FAK and Src.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maoyong Fu

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy diagnosed among women in developed countries. One recent biomarker strongly associated with disease progression and survival is epithelial membrane protein-2 (EMP2, a tetraspan protein known to associate with and modify surface expression of certain integrin isoforms. In this study, we show using a xenograft model system that EMP2 expression is necessary for efficient endometrial tumor formation, and we have started to characterize the mechanism by which EMP2 contributes to this malignant phenotype. In endometrial cancer cells, the focal adhesion kinase (FAK/Src pathway appears to regulate migration as measured through wound healing assays. Manipulation of EMP2 levels in endometrial cancer cells regulates the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, and promotes their distribution into lipid raft domains. Notably, cells with low levels of EMP2 fail to migrate and poorly form tumors in vivo. These findings reveal the pivotal role of EMP2 in endometrial cancer carcinogenesis, and suggest that the association of elevated EMP2 levels with endometrial cancer prognosis may be causally linked to its effect on integrin-mediated signaling.

  15. Correlating PSf Support Physicochemical Properties with the Formation of Piperazine-Based Polyamide and Evaluating the Resultant Nanofiltration Membrane Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micah Belle Marie Yap Ang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Membrane support properties influence the performance of thin-film composite nanofiltration membranes. We fabricated several polysulfone (PSf supports. The physicochemical properties of PSf were altered by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG of varying molecular weights (200–35,000 g/mol. This alteration facilitated the formation of a thin polyamide layer on the PSf surface during the interfacial polymerization reaction involving an aqueous solution of piperazine containing 4-aminobenzoic acid and an organic solution of trimesoyl chloride. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared validated the presence of PEG in the membrane support. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy illustrated that the thin-film polyamide layer morphology transformed from a rough to a smooth surface. A cross-flow filtration test indicated that a thin-film composite polyamide membrane comprising a PSf support (TFC-PEG20k with a low surface porosity, small pore size, and suitable hydrophilicity delivered the highest water flux and separation efficiency (J = 81.1 ± 6.4 L·m−2·h−1, RNa2SO4 = 91.1% ± 1.8%, and RNaCl = 35.7% ± 3.1% at 0.60 MPa. This membrane had a molecular weight cutoff of 292 g/mol and also a high rejection for negatively charged dyes. Therefore, a PSf support exhibiting suitable physicochemical properties endowed a thin-film composite polyamide membrane with high performance.

  16. 1. 5 MRT of the hyaline articular cartilage of the knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, G.; Bohndorf, K.; Krasny, R.; Guenther, R.W.; Prescher, A.

    1988-06-01

    MRI is a new method for imaging the knee joint. There is still some uncertainty regarding the extent and the signal from hyaline articular cartilage. MRI images were therefore compared with anatomical and histological preparations of the knee joint and the difference between MRI and the anatomical sections have been determined. It was shown that demonstration of hyaline cartilage was obscured by an artifact. Further investigations are required to determine the cause of this artifact and to achieve accurate imaging of hyaline cartilage by MRI.

  17. [Internal limiting membrane peeling as prophylaxis of epimacular membrane formation in eyes undergoing vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejsek, L; Dusová, J; Stepanov, A; Rozsíval, P

    2014-06-01

    Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is a serious condition that can significantly impair visual function, even after a successful surgery. One of the complications that can significantly impair visual acuity in the postoperative period is a development of the epimacular membrane (ERM). The aim of this work is to monitor the effect of peeling of the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula at the anatomical and functional results in the postoperative period, especially with regard to the development of ERM. Prospective study of 21 eyes, which underwent peeling of ILM during pars plana vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (on detached macula). The ILM peeling was done without using decalin during this procedure. We tested best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and followed fundus biomicroscopic findings. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) was evaluated according to the recommendations of the Retina Society Terminology Committee. To exclude the development of ERM in the macula optical coherence tomography (OCT) was performed at the end of the 18-month follow-up period. In total, the results of 21 eyes of 21 patients who underwent PPV for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment were evaluated. In all of them was during PPV performed ILM peeling on detached macula, these are followed prospectively. ILM peeling without using decalin was sufficient in all eyes. All eyes with ILM peeling did not develop ERM at the end of the follow-up period. ILM peeling during PPV for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment reduces the risk of developing secondary ERM.

  18. Stepwise visualization of membrane pore formation by suilysin, a bacterial cholesterol-dependent cytolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Carl; Dudkina, Natalya V; Lukoyanova, Natalya; Hodel, Adrian W; Farabella, Irene; Pandurangan, Arun P; Jahan, Nasrin; Pires Damaso, Mafalda; Osmanović, Dino; Reboul, Cyril F; Dunstone, Michelle A; Andrew, Peter W; Lonnen, Rana; Topf, Maya; Saibil, Helen R; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2014-12-02

    Membrane attack complex/perforin/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) proteins constitute a major superfamily of pore-forming proteins that act as bacterial virulence factors and effectors in immune defence. Upon binding to the membrane, they convert from the soluble monomeric form to oligomeric, membrane-inserted pores. Using real-time atomic force microscopy (AFM), electron microscopy (EM), and atomic structure fitting, we have mapped the structure and assembly pathways of a bacterial CDC in unprecedented detail and accuracy, focussing on suilysin from Streptococcus suis. We show that suilysin assembly is a noncooperative process that is terminated before the protein inserts into the membrane. The resulting ring-shaped pores and kinetically trapped arc-shaped assemblies are all seen to perforate the membrane, as also visible by the ejection of its lipids. Membrane insertion requires a concerted conformational change of the monomeric subunits, with a marked expansion in pore diameter due to large changes in subunit structure and packing.

  19. Composite Membrane Formation by Combination of Reaction-Induced and Nonsolvent-Induced Phase Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Aburabie, Jamaliah; Villalobos, Luis Francisco; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2017-01-01

    A novel method of preparing skinned asymmetric membranes with two distinctive layers is described: a top layer composed of chemically cross-linked polymer chains (dense layer) and a bottom layer of non-cross-linked polymer chains (porous substructure). The method consists of two simple steps that are compatible with industrial membrane fabrication facilities. Unlike conventional processes to prepare asymmetric membranes, with this approach it is possible to finely control the structure and functionalities of the final membrane. The thickness of the dense layer can be easily controlled over several orders of magnitude and targeted functional groups can be readily incorporated in it.

  20. Composite Membrane Formation by Combination of Reaction-Induced and Nonsolvent-Induced Phase Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Aburabie, Jamaliah

    2017-05-25

    A novel method of preparing skinned asymmetric membranes with two distinctive layers is described: a top layer composed of chemically cross-linked polymer chains (dense layer) and a bottom layer of non-cross-linked polymer chains (porous substructure). The method consists of two simple steps that are compatible with industrial membrane fabrication facilities. Unlike conventional processes to prepare asymmetric membranes, with this approach it is possible to finely control the structure and functionalities of the final membrane. The thickness of the dense layer can be easily controlled over several orders of magnitude and targeted functional groups can be readily incorporated in it.

  1. Membranous nephropathy (bubbling appearance and spike formation) without immunoglobulin deposition in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Naoto; Mori, Yuki; Yoshino, Masabumi; Suga, Norihiro; Kitagawa, Wataru; Yamada, Harutaka; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Imai, Hirokazu

    2008-12-01

    A 53-year-old Japanese man with systemic lupus erythematosus developed proteinuria and hematuria after a urinary stone episode. A light microscopic study of a kidney biopsy specimen demonstrated a bubbling appearance and spike formation of the basement membrane. Immunofluorescent studies revealed that there were no significant depositions of immunoglobulins, such as IgG (-), IgA (-), IgM (+/-), kappa light chain (+/-), lambda light chain (+/-), or C3 (-) in the glomerular capillary wall, though C1q was present as one-plus positive staining in mesangial areas. Electron microscopic studies showed that the thickness of the basement membrane varied from thin to thick without electron dense deposits, and that the cellular components of the podocyte were irregularly present in the basement membrane. Urinary protein decreased after the usage of prednisolone and mizoribine; however, proteinuria aggravated after an episode of urinary stone during the same treatment.

  2. Urotensin II receptor (UTR) exists in hyaline chondrocytes: a study of peripheral distribution of UTR in the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Norifumi; Fujii, Yuya; Imae, Haruka; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Mukuda, Takao; Miyazato, Mikiya; Matsuda, Kouhei; Uchiyama, Minoru

    2013-05-01

    Urotensin II (UII) and UII-related peptide (URP) exhibit diverse physiological actions including vasoconstriction, locomotor activity, osmoregulation, and immune response through UII receptor (UTR), which is expressed in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues of fish and mammals. In amphibians, only UII has been identified. As the first step toward elucidating the actions of UII and URP in amphibians, we cloned and characterized URP and UTR from the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. Functional analysis showed that treatment of UII or URP with Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with the cloned receptor increased the intracellular calcium concentration in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the administration of the UTR antagonist urantide inhibited UII- or URP-induced Ca(2+) mobilization. An immunohistochemical study showed that UTR was expressed in the splenocytes and leukocytes isolated from peripheral blood, suggesting that UII and URP are involved in the regulation of the immune system. UTR was also localized in the apical membrane of the distal tubule of the kidney and in the transitional epithelial cells of the urinary bladder. This result supports the view that the UII/URP-UTR system plays an important role in osmoregulation of amphibians. Interestingly, immunopositive labeling for UTR was first detected in the chondrocytes of various hyaline cartilages (the lung septa, interphalangeal joint and sternum). The expression of UTR was also observed in the costal cartilage, tracheal cartilages, and xiphoid process of the rat. These novel findings probably suggest that UII and URP mediate the formation of the cartilaginous matrix. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Platelet-rich plasma loaded in situ-formed hydrogel enhances hyaline cartilage regeneration by CB1 upregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Rim; Park, Kyung Min; Joung, Yoon Ki; Park, Ki Dong; Do, Sun Hee

    2012-11-01

    The efficacy of three-dimensional (3D) culture on the proliferation and maturation of chondrocytes seeded into a hydrogel scaffold was assessed. Three types of hydrogel were prepared for the 3D culture of primary isolated chondrocytes. Chondrocyte proliferation was assessed using a live/dead viability/cytotoxicity assay and semiquantitative RT-PCR after 3D culture in hydrogel. Cylindrical defects in the center of rat xyphoids were used for the implantation of platelet-rich plasma (PRP)/hydrogel composites. Rats were killed at day 7 postoperatively and evaluated histochemically and immunohistologically. Xyphoid chondrocytes proliferated well with time in hydrogels. In the PRP-containing hydrogels, xyphoid defects displayed early formation of chondroid matrix with massive peripheral infiltration of spindle cells. These results were consistent with Safranin-O staining for proteoglycans and immunohistochemistry for type II collagen. Gene expression analyses in vitro revealed aggrecan, type II collagen, and ChM-1 and CB1 upregulation by PRP/hydrogel. PRP/hydrogel provided a suitable environment for hyaline cartilaginous regeneration, leading to anti-inflammation by significant increase of CB1 and inhibiting vascular ingrowth via considerable upregulation of ChM-1. The results provide a valuable reference for the clinical application of hydrogel scaffolds for hyaline cartilage regeneration, as well as the use of autologous PRP to improve cellular proliferation and maturation of xyphoid repair. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Regeneration of hyaline cartilage promoted by xenogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells embedded within elastin-like recombinamer-based bioactive hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescador, David; Ibáñez-Fonseca, Arturo; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; Briñón, Jesús G; Arias, Francisco Javier; Muntión, Sandra; Hernández, Cristina; Girotti, Alessandra; Alonso, Matilde; Del Cañizo, María Consuelo; Rodríguez-Cabello, José Carlos; Blanco, Juan Francisco

    2017-08-01

    Over the last decades, novel therapeutic tools for osteochondral regeneration have arisen from the combination of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and highly specialized smart biomaterials, such as hydrogel-forming elastin-like recombinamers (ELRs), which could serve as cell-carriers. Herein, we evaluate the delivery of xenogeneic human MSCs (hMSCs) within an injectable ELR-based hydrogel carrier for osteochondral regeneration in rabbits. First, a critical-size osteochondral defect was created in the femora of the animals and subsequently filled with the ELR-based hydrogel alone or with embedded hMSCs. Regeneration outcomes were evaluated after three months by gross assessment, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, showing complete filling of the defect and the de novo formation of hyaline-like cartilage and subchondral bone in the hMSC-treated knees. Furthermore, histological sectioning and staining of every sample confirmed regeneration of the full cartilage thickness and early subchondral bone repair, which was more similar to the native cartilage in the case of the cell-loaded ELR-based hydrogel. Overall histological differences between the two groups were assessed semi-quantitatively using the Wakitani scale and found to be statistically significant (p hyaline cartilage in osteochondral lesions.

  5. Positive effects of cell-free porous PLGA implants and early loading exercise on hyaline cartilage regeneration in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nai-Jen; Lin, Chih-Chan; Shie, Ming-You; Yeh, Ming-Long; Li, Chien-Feng; Liang, Peir-In; Lee, Kuan-Wei; Shen, Pei-Hsun; Chu, Chih-Jou

    2015-12-01

    The regeneration of hyaline cartilage remains clinically challenging. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of using cell-free porous poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) graft implants (PGIs) along with early loading exercise to repair a full-thickness osteochondral defect. Rabbits were randomly allocated to a treadmill exercise (TRE) group or a sedentary (SED) group and were prepared as either a PGI model or an empty defect (ED) model. TRE was performed as a short-term loading exercise; SED was physical inactivity in a free cage. The knees were evaluated at 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. At the end of testing, none of the knees developed synovitis, formed osteophytes, or became infected. Macroscopically, the PGI-TRE group regenerated a smooth articular surface, with transparent new hyaline-like tissue soundly integrated with the neighboring cartilage, but the other groups remained distinct at the margins with fibrous or opaque tissues. In a micro-CT analysis, the synthesized bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV) was significantly higher in the PGI-TRE group, which also had integrating architecture in the regeneration site. The thickness of the trabecular (subchondral) bone was improved in all groups from 6 to 12 weeks. Histologically, remarkable differences in the cartilage regeneration were visible. At week 6, compared with SED groups, the TRE groups manifested modest inflammatory cells with pro-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., TNF-α and IL-6), improved collagen alignment and higher glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, particularly in the PGI-TRE group. At week 12, the PGI-TRE group had the best regeneration outcomes, showing the formation of hyaline-like cartilage, the development of columnar rounded chondrocytes that expressed enriched levels of collagen type II and GAG, and functionalized trabecular bone with osteocytes. In summary, the combination of implanting cell-free PLGA and performing an early loading exercise can significantly promote the full

  6. The Formation of Porous Membranes by Filtration of Aerosol Nano-particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sune Klint; Johannessen, Tue; Mosleh, Majid

    2002-01-01

    are almost independent of the substrate structure. The development of a membrane with uniform properties is preceded by a short initial period in which the deposited particles, with an equivalent membrane thickness of roughly 2 m, have a significantly lower permeability than the ultimately developed uniform...

  7. Formation of complexes between functionalized chitosan membranes and copper: A study by angle resolved XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurado-López, Belén [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Vieira, Rodrigo Silveira [Chemical Engineering Department, Universidade Federal do Ceará, UFC, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Rabelo, Rodrigo Balloni; Beppu, Marisa Masumi [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6066, 13081-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Casado, Juan [Departamento de Química-Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique, E-mail: castellon@uma.es [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2017-01-01

    Chitosan is a biopolymer with potential applications in various fields. Recently, it has been used for heavy metals removal like copper, due to the presence of amino and hydroxyl groups in its structure. Chitosan membranes were crosslinked with epichlorohydrin and bisoxirano and functionalized with chelating agents, such as iminodiacetic acid, aspartic acid and tris-(2-amino-ethyl) polyamine. These membranes were used for copper adsorption and the formed complexes were characterized. Thermal and crystalline properties of chitosan membranes were studied by TG-DCS and X-ray diffraction. Raman, XPS and FT-IR data confirmed that copper is linked to the modified chitosan membranes by the amino groups. The oxidation state of copper-chitosan membranes were also studied by angle resolved XPS, and by UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Chitosan membranes were crosslinked with epichlorohydrin and bisoxirano and functionalized with chelating agents. • The chelating agent were iminodiacetic acid, aspartic acid and tris-(2-amino-ethyl) polyamine. • The functionalized membranes were used for copper adsorption and studied by ARXPS, Raman, TG-DCS, FT-IR and XRD. • Spectroscopic data confirmed that copper is linked to the modified chitosan membranes by the amino groups.

  8. Joint immobilization inhibits spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration induced by a novel double-network gel implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Kazunobu; Kitamura, Nobuto; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Onodera, Shin; Kanaya, Fuminori; Gong, Jian-Ping; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2011-02-01

    We have recently discovered that spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect in the rabbit, when we implant a novel double-network (DN) gel plug at the bottom of the defect. To clarify whether joint immobilization inhibits the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration, we conducted this study with 20 rabbits. At 4 or 12 weeks after surgery, the defect in the mobile knees was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type-2 collagen, while no cartilage tissues were observed in the defect in the immobilized knees. Type-2 collagen, Aggrecan, and SOX9 mRNAs were expressed only in the mobile knees at each period. This study demonstrated that joint immobilization significantly inhibits the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration induced by the DN gel implantation. This fact suggested that the mechanical environment is one of the significant factors to induce this phenomenon.

  9. Salt Bridge Formation between the I-BAR Domain and Lipids Increases Lipid Density and Membrane Curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Hanawa-Suetsugu, Kyoko; Suetsugu, Shiro; Kitao, Akio

    2017-07-28

    The BAR domain superfamily proteins sense or induce curvature in membranes. The inverse-BAR domain (I-BAR) is a BAR domain that forms a straight "zeppelin-shaped" dimer. The mechanisms by which IRSp53 I-BAR binds to and deforms a lipid membrane are investigated here by all-atom molecular dynamics simulation (MD), binding energy analysis, and the effects of mutation experiments on filopodia on HeLa cells. I-BAR adopts a curved structure when crystallized, but adopts a flatter shape in MD. The binding of I-BAR to membrane was stabilized by ~30 salt bridges, consistent with experiments showing that point mutations of the interface residues have little effect on the binding affinity whereas multiple mutations have considerable effect. Salt bridge formation increases the local density of lipids and deforms the membrane into a concave shape. In addition, the point mutations that break key intra-molecular salt bridges within I-BAR reduce the binding affinity; this was confirmed by expressing these mutants in HeLa cells and observing their effects. The results indicate that the stiffness of I-BAR is important for membrane deformation, although I-BAR does not act as a completely rigid template.

  10. Growth of silicone-immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters, a technique to study microcolony formation under anaerobic conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Højberg, O; Binnerup, S J; Sørensen, J

    1997-01-01

    A technique was developed to study microcolony formation by silicone-immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters under anaerobic conditions. A sudden shift to anaerobiosis was obtained by submerging the filters in medium which was depleted for oxygen by a pure culture of bacteria. The technique was used to demonstrate that preinduction of nitrate reductase under low-oxygen conditions was necessary for nonfermenting, nitrate-respiring bacteria, e.g., Pseudomonas spp., to cope with a...

  11. High-permeance crosslinked PTMSP thin-film composite membranes as supports for CO2 selective layer formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepan D. Bazhenov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the development of the composite gas separation membranes for post-combustion CO2 capture, little attention is focused on the optimization of the membrane supports, which satisfy the conditions of this technology. The primary requirements to the membrane supports are concerned with their high CO2 permeance. In this work, the membrane supports with desired characteristics were developed as high-permeance gas separation thin film composite (TFC membranes with the thin defect-free layer from the crosslinked highly permeable polymer, poly[1-(trimethylsilyl-1-propyne] (PTMSP. This layer is insoluble in chloroform and can be used as a gutter layer for the further deposition of the СО2-selective materials from the organic solvents. Crosslinking of PTMSP was performed using polyethyleneimine (PEI and poly (ethyleneglycol diglycidyl ether (PEGDGE as crosslinking agents. Optimal concentrations of PEI in PTMSP and PEGDGE in methanol were selected in order to diminish the undesirable effect on the final membrane gas transport characteristics. The conditions of the kiss-coating technique for the deposition of the thin defect-free PTMSP-based layer, namely, composition of the casting solution and the speed of movement of the porous commercial microfiltration-grade support, were optimized. The procedure of post-treatment with alcohols and alcohol solutions was shown to be crucial for the improvement of gas permeance of the membranes with the crosslinked PTMSP layer having thickness ranging within 1–2.5 μm. The claimed membranes showed the following characteristics: CO2 permeance is equal to 50–54 m3(STP/(m2 h bar (18,500–20,000 GPU, ideal CO2/N2 selectivity is 3.6–3.7, and their selective layers are insoluble in chloroform. Thus, the developed high-permeance TFC membranes are considered as a promising supports for further modification by enhanced CO2 selective layer formation. Keywords: Thin-film composite membrane

  12. Hyaline articular cartilage dissected by papain: light and scanning electron microscopy and micromechanical studies.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, P; Brereton, J D; Gardner, D L

    1984-01-01

    Papain was used to digest the hyaline femoral condylar cartilages of 30 adult Wistar rats. Matrix proteoglycan degradation was assessed by the light microscopy of paraffin sections stained with toluidine blue. The extent of surface structural change was estimated by scanning electron microscopy, and the structural integrity of the hyaline cartilage tested by the controlled impact of a sharp pin. The results demonstrated an early loss of cartilage metachromasia, increasing with time of papain ...

  13. Characterization of the ectodomain of the envelope protein of dengue virus type 4: expression, membrane association, secretion and particle formation in the absence of precursor membrane protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Chia Hsieh

    Full Text Available The envelope (E of dengue virus (DENV is the major target of neutralizing antibodies and vaccine development. After biosynthesis E protein forms a heterodimer with precursor membrane (prM protein. Recent reports of infection enhancement by anti-prM monoclonal antibodies (mAbs suggest anti-prM responses could be potentially harmful. Previously, we studied a series of C-terminal truncation constructs expressing DENV type 4 prM/E or E proteins and found the ectodomain of E protein alone could be recognized by all 12 mAbs tested, suggesting E protein ectodomain as a potential subunit immunogen without inducing anti-prM response. The characteristics of DENV E protein ectodomain in the absence of prM protein remains largely unknown.In this study, we investigated the expression, membrane association, glycosylation pattern, secretion and particle formation of E protein ectodomain of DENV4 in the presence or absence of prM protein. E protein ectodomain associated with membrane in or beyond trans-Golgi and contained primarily complex glycans, whereas full-length E protein associated with ER membrane and contained high mannose glycans. In the absence of prM protein, E protein ectodomain can secrete as well as form particles of approximately 49 nm in diameter, as revealed by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation with or without detergent and electron microscopy. Mutational analysis revealed that the secretion of E protein ectodomain was affected by N-linked glycosylation and could be restored by treatment with ammonia chloride.Considering the enhancement of DENV infectivity by anti-prM antibodies, our findings provide new insights into the expression and secretion of E protein ectodomain in the absence of prM protein and contribute to future subunit vaccine design.

  14. Adipose stem cells can secrete angiogenic factors that inhibit hyaline cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher Sd; Burnsed, Olivia A; Raghuram, Vineeth; Kalisvaart, Jonathan; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2012-08-24

    Adipose stem cells (ASCs) secrete many trophic factors that can stimulate tissue repair, including angiogenic factors, but little is known about how ASCs and their secreted factors influence cartilage regeneration. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects ASC-secreted factors have in repairing chondral defects. ASCs isolated from male Sprague Dawley rats were cultured in monolayer or alginate microbeads supplemented with growth (GM) or chondrogenic medium (CM). Subsequent co-culture, conditioned media, and in vivo cartilage defect studies were performed. ASC monolayers and microbeads cultured in CM had decreased FGF-2 gene expression and VEGF-A secretion compared to ASCs cultured in GM. Chondrocytes co-cultured with GM-cultured ASCs for 7 days had decreased mRNAs for col2, comp, and runx2. Chondrocytes treated for 12 or 24 hours with conditioned medium from GM-cultured ASCs had reduced sox9, acan, and col2 mRNAs; reduced proliferation and proteoglycan synthesis; and increased apoptosis. ASC-conditioned medium also increased endothelial cell tube lengthening whereas conditioned medium from CM-cultured ASCs had no effect. Treating ASCs with CM reduced or abolished these deleterious effects while adding a neutralizing antibody for VEGF-A eliminated ASC-conditioned medium induced chondrocyte apoptosis and restored proteoglycan synthesis. FGF-2 also mitigated the deleterious effects VEGF-A had on chondrocyte apoptosis and phenotype. When GM-grown ASC pellets were implanted in 1 mm non-critical hyaline cartilage defects in vivo, cartilage regeneration was inhibited as evaluated by radiographic and equilibrium partitioning of an ionic contrast agent via microCT imaging. Histology revealed that defects with GM-cultured ASCs had no tissue ingrowth from the edges of the defect whereas empty defects and defects with CM-grown ASCs had similar amounts of neocartilage formation. ASCs must be treated to reduce the secretion of VEGF-A and other factors that

  15. Pleomorphic Hyalinizing Angiectatic Tumor Arising in the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Patrick M.; Gaspar, Michael P.; Whiting, Benjamin B.; Culp, Randall W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Background: Pleomorphic hyalinizing angiectatic tumors (PHATs) are extremely rare, non-metastasizing tumors of uncertain origin that are typically seen in the lower extremities. To date, it is estimated that less than 100 cases have been reported worldwide since first described in 1996. Methods: The case of a 35-year-old male with a several-year history of a dorsal hand mass is presented. Although the patient was initially asymptomatic, in the months prior to presentation, the patient complained of pain with power grasp and direct pressure over the mass. The patient underwent uncomplicated surgical excision, during which the mass was noted to be adherent to the underlying extensor tendons. Results: Immunopathology confirmed the mass to be PHAT. We believe this is the first documented case of this rare tumor occurring in the hand. Conclusions: History and epidemiology of PHAT are reviewed. Then, in the context of the presented case, pre-operative evaluation, surgical management, pathologic findings and post-operative follow-up are all discussed. PMID:27698646

  16. Recycling endosomes in apical plasma membrane domain formation and epithelial cell polarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golachowska, Magdalena R.; Hoekstra, Dick; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    2010-01-01

    Recycling endosomes have taken central stage in the intracellular sorting and polarized trafficking of apical and basolateral plasma membrane components. Molecular players in the underlying mechanisms are now emerging, including small GTPases, class V myosins and adaptor proteins. In particular,

  17. in Situ Formation of a Biocatalytic Alginate Membrane by Enhanced Concentration Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marpani, Fauziah; Luo, Jianquan; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina

    2015-01-01

    A thin alginate layer induced on the surface of a commercial polysulfone membrane was used as a matrix for noncovalent immobilization of enzymes. Despite the expected decrease of flux across the membrane resulting from the coating, the initial hypothesis was that such a system should allow high...... immobilized enzyme loadings, which would benefit from the decreased flux in terms of increased enzyme/substrate contact time. The study was performed in a sequential fashion: first, the most suitable types of alginate able to induce a very thin, sustainable gel layer by pressure-driven membrane filtration...... were selected and evaluated. Then, an efficient method to make the gel layer adhere to the surface of the membrane was developed. Finally, and after confirming that the enzyme loading could remarkably be enhanced by using this method, several strategies to increase the permeate flux were evaluated...

  18. Ionic Liquids As Self-Assembly Guide for the Formation of Nanostructured Block Copolymer Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima; Sougrat, Rachid; Behzad, Ali Reza; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured block copolymer membranes were manufactured by water induced phase inversion, using ionic liquids (ILs) as cosolvents. The effect of ionic liquids on the morphology was investigated, by using polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinyl pyridine) (PS

  19. A structural and kinetic link between membrane association and amyloid fibril formation of α-Synuclein

    OpenAIRE

    Heise, Henrike; Etzkorn, Manuel; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Buell, Alexander; Strodel, Birgit; Willbold, Dieter; Shaykhalishahi, Hamed; Poojari, Chetan; Uluca, Boran; Wördehoff, Michael; Viennet, Thibault

    2017-01-01

    The protein α-Synuclein (αS) is linked to Parkinson's disease through its abnormal aggregation, which is thought to involve an interplay between cytosolic and membrane-bound forms of αS. Therefore, better insights into the molecular determinants of membrane association and their implications for protein aggregation may help deciphering the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Following previous studies using micelles and vesicles, we present a comprehensive study of αS interaction with phosph...

  20. Formation of 3D cholesterol crystals from 2D nucleation sites in lipid bilayer membranes: implications for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsano, Neta; Fargion, Iael; Wolf, Sharon G; Leiserowitz, Leslie; Addadi, Lia

    2015-02-04

    Atherosclerosis is the major precursor of cardiovascular disease. The formation of cholesterol crystals in atherosclerotic plaques is associated with the onset of acute pathology. The cholesterol crystals induce physical injury in the plaque core, promoting cell apoptosis and triggering an increased inflammatory response. Herein we address the question of how cholesterol crystal formation occurs in atherosclerosis. We demonstrate that three-dimensional (3D) cholesterol crystals can undergo directed nucleation from bilayer membranes containing two-dimensional (2D) cholesterol crystalline domains. We studied crystal formation on supported lipid bilayers loaded with exogenous cholesterol and labeled using a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes ordered cholesterol arrays. Our findings show that 3D crystals are formed exclusively on the bilayer regions where there are segregated 2D cholesterol crystalline domains and that they form on the domains. This study has potentially significant implications for our understanding of the crucial step in the mechanism by which atherosclerotic lesions form.

  1. Activation of Rab GTPase Sec4 by its GEF Sec2 is required for prospore membrane formation during sporulation in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Yasuyuki; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Ichiro; Kurita, Tomokazu; Saito, Chieko; Kurokawa, Kazuo; Nakano, Akihiko; Irie, Kenji

    2018-02-01

    Sec2 activates Sec4 Rab GTPase as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the recruitment of downstream effectors to facilitate tethering and fusion of post-Golgi vesicles at the plasma membrane. During the meiosis and sporulation of budding yeast, post-Golgi vesicles are transported to and fused at the spindle pole body (SPB) to form a de novo membrane, called the prospore membrane. Previous studies have revealed the role of the SPB outer surface called the meiotic outer plaque (MOP) in docking and fusion of post-Golgi vesicles. However, the upstream molecular machinery for post-Golgi vesicular fusion that facilitates prospore membrane formation remains enigmatic. Here, we demonstrate that the GTP exchange factor for Sec4, Sec2, participates in the formation of the prospore membrane. A conditional mutant in which the SEC2 expression is shut off during sporulation showed sporulation defects. Inactivation of Sec2 caused Sec4 targeting defects along the prospore membranes, thereby causing insufficient targeting of downstream effectors and cargo proteins to the prospore membrane. These results suggest that the activation of Sec4 by Sec2 is required for the efficient supply of post-Golgi vesicles to the prospore membrane and thus for prospore membrane formation/extension and subsequent deposition of spore wall materials. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Cake formation and consolidation: main factors governing the applicable flux in anaerobic submerged membrane bioreactors (AnSMBR) treating acidified wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeison, D.; Lier, van J.B.

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory scale anaerobic submerged membrane bioreactor (AnSMBR) was operated for over 200 days, with a volatile fatty acid mixture as substrate. Gas sparging was used for mixing and to provide membrane surface shear. Results show that cake formation was entirely governing the applicable flux.

  3. Enhanced membrane pore formation through high-affinity targeted antimicrobial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Arnusch

    Full Text Available Many cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs target the unique lipid composition of the prokaryotic cell membrane. However, the micromolar activities common for these peptides are considered weak in comparison to nisin, which follows a targeted, pore-forming mode of action. Here we show that AMPs can be modified with a high-affinity targeting module, which enables membrane permeabilization at low concentration. Magainin 2 and a truncated peptide analog were conjugated to vancomycin using click chemistry, and could be directed towards specific membrane embedded receptors both in model membrane systems and whole cells. Compared with untargeted vesicles, a gain in permeabilization efficacy of two orders of magnitude was reached with large unilamellar vesicles that included lipid II, the target of vancomycin. The truncated vancomycin-peptide conjugate showed an increased activity against vancomycin resistant Enterococci, whereas the full-length conjugate was more active against a targeted eukaryotic cell model: lipid II containing erythrocytes. This study highlights that AMPs can be made more selective and more potent against biological membranes that contain structures that can be targeted.

  4. Study of differential properties of fibrochondrocytes and hyaline chondrocytes in growing rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L; Li, M; Li, H; Yang, C; Cai, X

    2015-02-01

    We aimed to build a culture model of chondrocytes in vitro, and to study the differential properties between fibrochondrocytes and hyaline chondrocytes. Histological sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin so that we could analyse the histological structure of the fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. Condylar fibrochondrocytes and femoral hyaline chondrocytes were cultured from four, 4-week-old, New Zealand white rabbits. The production of COL2A1, COL1OA1, SOX9 and aggrecan was detected by real time-q polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunoblotting and the differences between them were compared statistically. Histological structures obviously differed between fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. COL2A1 and SOX9 were highly expressed within cell passage 2 (P2) of both fibrochondrocytes and hyaline chondrocytes, and reduced significantly after cell passage 4 (P4). The mRNA expressions of COL2A1 (p=0.05), COL10A1 (p=0.04), SOX9 (p=0.03), and aggrecan (p=0.04) were significantly higher in hyaline chondrocytes than in fibrochondrocytes, whereas the expression of COL1A1 (p=0.02) was the opposite. Immunoblotting showed similar results. We have built a simple and effective culture model of chondrocytes in vitro, and the P2 of chondrocytes is recommended for further studies. Condylar fibrocartilage and femoral hyaline cartilage have unique biological properties, and the regulatory mechanisms of endochondral ossification for the condyle should be studied independently in the future. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of high-energy extracorporeal shock waves on hyaline cartilage of adult rats in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Ernst, Judith; Maier, Markus; Chiquet, Matthias; Joos, Helga; Müller, Peter E; Jansson, Volkmar; Sievers, Birte; Hausdorf, Jörg

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in vivo affects the structural integrity of articular cartilage. A single bout of ESWT (1500 shock waves of 0.5 mJ/mm(2)) was applied to femoral heads of 18 adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Two sham-treated animals served as controls. Cartilage of each femoral head was harvested at 1, 4, or 10 weeks after ESWT (n = 6 per treatment group) and scored on safranin-O-stained sections. Expression of tenascin-C and chitinase 3-like protein 1 (Chi3L1) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to examine collagen (II)alpha(1) (COL2A1) expression and chondrocyte morphology was investigated by transmission electron microscopy no changes in Mankin scores were observed after ESWT. Positive immunostaining for tenascin-C and Chi3L1 was found up to 10 weeks after ESWT in experimental but not in control cartilage. COL2A1 mRNA was increased in samples 1 and 4 weeks after ESWT. Alterations found on the ultrastructural level showed expansion of the rough-surfaced endoplasmatic reticulum, detachment of the cell membrane and necrotic chondrocytes. Extracorporeal shock waves caused alterations of hyaline cartilage on a molecular and ultrastructural level that were distinctly different from control. Similar changes were described before in the very early phase of osteoarthritis (OA). High-energy ESWT might therefore cause degenerative changes in hyaline cartilage as they are found in initial OA. Copyright 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The casting and mechanism of formation of semi-permeable polymer membranes in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, I.

    The National Electric Company of Venezuela, C.A.D.A.F.E., is sponsoring the development of this experiment which represents Venezuela's first scientific experiment in space. The apparatus for the automatic casting of polymer thin films will be contained in NASA's payload No. G-559 of the Get Away Special program for a future orbital space flight in the U.S. Space Shuttle. Semi-permeable polymer membranes have important applications in a variety of fields, such as medecine, energy, and pharmaceuticals, and in general fluid separation processes such as reverse osmosis, ultra-filtration, and electro-dialysis. The casting of semi-permeable membranes in space will help to identify the roles of convection in determining the strucutre of these membranes.

  7. Shiga toxin induces membrane reorganization and formation of long range lipid order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovyeva, Vita; Johannes, Ludger; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2015-01-01

    membrane reordering. When Shiga toxin was added above the lipid chain melting temperature, the toxin interaction with the membrane induced rearrangement and clustering of Gb3 lipids that resulted in the long range order and alignment of lipids in gel domains. The toxin induced redistribution of Gb3 lipids...... inside gel domains is governed by the temperature at which Shiga toxin was added to the membrane: above or below the phase transition. The temperature is thus one of the critical factors controlling lipid organization and texture in the presence of Shiga toxin. Lipid chain ordering imposed by Shiga toxin...... binding can be another factor driving the reconstruction of lipid organization and crystallization of lipids inside gel domains....

  8. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries regulates formation of membrane vesicles in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind-Kezunovic, Dina; Helix Nielsen, Claus; Wojewodzka, Urszula

    2008-01-01

    of the plasma membrane were predominantly labelled with L-d markers 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate, 1,1'-dilinoleyl-3.3.3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate, 1,1'-didodecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate and weakly stained by L-o marker fluorescein...

  9. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries regulates formation of membrane vesicles in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind-Kezunovic, D.; Nielsen, C.H.; Wojewodzka, U.

    2008-01-01

    of the plasma membrane were predominantly labelled with L(d) markers 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate, 1,1'-dilinoleyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate, 1,1'-didodecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate and weakly stained by L(o) marker...

  10. Effect of Extracellular Matrix Membrane on Bone Formation in a Rabbit Tibial Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wook Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Absorbable extracellular matrix (ECM membrane has recently been used as a barrier membrane (BM in guided tissue regeneration (GTR and guided bone regeneration (GBR. Absorbable BMs are mostly based on collagen, which is more biocompatible than synthetic materials. However, implanted absorbable BMs can be rapidly degraded by enzymes in vivo. In a previous study, to delay degradation time, collagen fibers were treated with cross-linking agents. These compounds prevented the enzymatic degradation of BMs. However, cross-linked BMs can exhibit delayed tissue integration. In addition, the remaining cross-linker could induce inflammation. Here, we attempted to overcome these problems using a natural ECM membrane. The membrane consisted of freshly harvested porcine pericardium that was stripped from cells and immunoreagents by a cleaning process. Acellular porcine pericardium (APP showed a bilayer structure with a smooth upper surface and a significantly coarser bottom layer. APP is an ECM with a thin layer (0.18–0.35 mm but with excellent mechanical properties. Tensile strength of APP was 14.15±2.24 MPa. In in vivo experiments, APP was transplanted into rabbit tibia. The biocompatible material was retained for up to 3 months without the need for cross-linking. Therefore, we conclude that APP could support osteogenesis as a BM for up to 3 months.

  11. The value of MDCT in diagnosis of hyaline-vascular Castleman's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Rengui; Zhu, Xuejun; Gao, Li; Chen, Jiuhong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Castleman's disease (CD) is an uncommon entity characterized by a massive growth of lymphoid tissue. There are two types: the hyaline-vascular (HV) type and the plasma cell (PC) type. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of multiple detector computed tomography (MDCT) in the diagnosis and planning of treatment for hyaline-vascular CD. Materials and methods: Fifty-two cases of confirmed hyaline-vascular CD were retrospectively reviewed. Unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MDCT scans had been performed in all patients, followed by surgery and pathological analysis of the lesion. Original MDCT transverse and reconstructed images were used for image interpretation. Features of the lesion and its adjacent structures were identified. Results: The lesion was present in the thorax of 24 patients and the abdomen in 28. Obvious features of hyaline-vascular CD (especially feeding vessels and draining veins) and its adjacent structures were demonstrated on 52 patients. Conclusion: On MDCT imaging, original MDCT transverse and reconstructed images provide an excellent tool for diagnosis of hyaline-vascular CD and have high value in the determination of a treatment plan

  12. CR2-mediated activation of the complement alternative pathway results in formation of membrane attack complexes on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Marquart, H V; Prodinger, W M

    2001-01-01

    the alternative pathway. Blockade of the CR2 ligand-binding site with the monoclonal antibody FE8 resulted in 56 +/- 13% and 71 +/- 9% inhibition of the C3-fragment and MAC deposition, respectively, whereas the monoclonal antibody HB135, directed against an irrelevant CR2 epitope, had no effect. Blockade......Normal human B lymphocytes activate the alternative pathway of complement via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), that binds hydrolysed C3 (iC3) and thereby promotes the formation of a membrane-bound C3 convertase. We have investigated whether this might lead to the generation of a C5...... processes on CR2, indicate that MAC formation is a consequence of alternative pathway activation....

  13. A role for PDGF-C/PDGFRα signaling in the formation of the meningeal basement membranes surrounding the cerebral cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrae, Johanna; Gouveia, Leonor; Gallini, Radiosa; He, Liqun; Fredriksson, Linda; Nilsson, Ingrid; Johansson, Bengt R.; Eriksson, Ulf; Betsholtz, Christer

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C) is one of three known ligands for the tyrosine kinase receptor PDGFRα. Analysis of Pdgfc null mice has demonstrated roles for PDGF-C in palate closure and the formation of cerebral ventricles, but redundancy with other PDGFRα ligands might obscure additional functions. In search of further developmental roles for PDGF-C, we generated mice that were double mutants for Pdgfc−/− and PdgfraGFP/+. These mice display a range of severe phenotypes including spina bifida, lung emphysema, abnormal meninges and neuronal over-migration in the cerebral cortex. We focused our analysis on the central nervous system (CNS), where PDGF-C was identified as a critical factor for the formation of meninges and assembly of the glia limitans basement membrane. We also present expression data on Pdgfa, Pdgfc and Pdgfra in the cerebral cortex and microarray data on cerebral meninges. PMID:26988758

  14. Evaluation of Zosteric Acid for Mitigating Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas putida Isolated from a Membrane Bioreactor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Polo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study provides data to define an efficient biocide-free strategy based on zosteric acid to counteract biofilm formation on the membranes of submerged bioreactor system plants. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis showed that gammaproteobacteria was the prevalent taxa on fouled membranes of an Italian wastewater plant. Pseudomonas was the prevalent genus among the cultivable membrane-fouler bacteria and Pseudomonas putida was selected as the target microorganism to test the efficacy of the antifoulant. Zosteric acid was not a source of carbon and energy for P. putida cells and, at 200 mg/L, it caused a reduction of bacterial coverage by 80%. Biofilm experiments confirmed the compound caused a significant decrease in biomass (−97% and thickness (−50%, and it induced a migration activity of the peritrichous flagellated P. putida over the polycarbonate surface not amenable to a biofilm phenotype. The low octanol-water partitioning coefficient and the high water solubility suggested a low bioaccumulation potential and the water compartment as its main environmental recipient and capacitor. Preliminary ecotoxicological tests did not highlight direct toxicity effects toward Daphnia magna. For green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata an effect was observed at concentrations above 100 mg/L with a significant growth of protozoa that may be connected to a concurrent algal growth inhibition.

  15. Improvement of β-phase crystal formation in a BaTiO3-modified PVDF membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, SHEN; Lei, GONG; Shuhua, CHEN; Shiping, ZHAN; Cheng, ZHANG; Tao, SHAO

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, low temperature plasma is used to modify the surface of barium titanate (BaTiO3) nanoparticles in order to enhance the interfacial compatibility between ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and BaTiO3 nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that oxygenic groups are successfully attached to the BaTiO3 surface, and the quantity of the functional groups increases with the treatment voltage. Furthermore, the effect of modified BaTiO3 nanoparticles on the morphology and crystal structure of the PVDF/BaTiO3 membrane is investigated. The results reveal that the dispersion of BaTiO3 nanoparticles in the PVDF matrix was greatly improved due to the modification of the BaTiO3 nanoparticles by air plasma. It is worth noting that the formation of a β-phase in a PVDF/modified BaTiO3 membrane is observably promoted, which results from the strong interaction between PVDF chains and oxygenic groups fixed on the BaTiO3 surface and the better dispersion of BaTiO3 nanoparticles in the PVDF matrix. Besides, the PVDF/modified BaTiO3 membrane at the treatment voltage of 24 kV exhibits a lower water contact angle (≈68.4°) compared with the unmodified one (≈86.7°). Meanwhile, the dielectric constant of PVDF/BaTiO3 nanocomposites increases with the increase of working voltage.

  16. Effects of spacer orientations on the cake formation during membrane fouling: Quantitative analysis based on 3D OCT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Li, Weiyi; Chong, Tzyy Haur; Fane, Anthony G

    2017-03-01

    Spacer design plays an important role in improving the performance of membrane processes for water/wastewater treatment. This work focused on a fundamental issue of spacer design, i.e., investigating the effects of spacer orientations on the fouling behavior during a membrane process. A series of fouling experiments with different spacer orientation were carried out to in situ characterize the formation of a cake layer in a spacer unit cell via 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. The cake layers formed at different times were digitalized for quantitatively analyzing the variation in the cake morphology as a function of time. In particular, the local deposition rates were evaluated to determine the active regions where the instantaneous changes in deposit thickness were significant. The characterization results indicate that varying the spacer orientation could substantially change the evolution of membrane fouling by particulate foulants and thereby result in a cake layer with various morphologies; the competition between growth and erosion at different locations would instantaneously respond to the micro-hydrodynamic environment that might change with time. This work confirms that the OCT-based characterization method is a powerful tool for exploring novel spacer design. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. In-situ assessment of biofilm formation in submerged membrane system using optical coherence tomography and computational fluid dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Fortunato, Luca

    2016-09-09

    This paper introduces a novel approach to study the biofouling development on gravity driven submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR). The on-line monitoring of biofilm formation on a flat sheet membrane was conducted non-destructively using optical coherence tomography (OCT), allowing the in-situ investigation of the biofilm structure for 43 d. The OCT enabled to obtain a time-lapse of biofilm development on the membrane under the continuous operation. Acquired real-time information on the biofilm structure related to the change in the flux profile confirming the successful monitoring of the dynamic evolution of the biofouling layer. Four different phases were observed linking the permeate flux with the change of biofilm morphology. In particular, a stable flux of 2.1±0.1 L/m2 h was achieved with the achievement of steady biofilm morphology after 30 d of operation. Biofilm descriptors, such as thickness, biofilm area, macro-porosity and roughness (absolute and relative), were calculated for each OCT acquired scans. Interestingly, relative roughness was correlated with the flux decrease. Furthermore, the precise biofilm morphology obtained from the OCT scans was used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation to better understand the role of biofilm structure on the filtration mechanism. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Effects of an elastic membrane on tube waves in permeable formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H; Johnson, D

    1996-10-01

    In this paper, the modified properties were calculated for tube wave propagation in a fluid-filled borehole penetrating a permeable rock due to the presence of a mudcake which forms on the borehole wall. The mudcake was characterized by an impermeable elastic layer. The mudcake partial sealing mechanism was simulated using a finite membrane stiffness. Consequently, it was shown that the mudcake can reduce, but not eliminate, the permeability effects on the tube wave slowness and attenuation. Moreover, this paper discusses a variety of values for the relevant parameters especially the mudcake thickness and membrane stiffness. The important combinations of mudcake parameters were clarified by using an analytic expression for the low-frequency limit.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of hyaline cartilage regeneration in neocartilage graft implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C F; Ng, K K; Ng, S H; Cheung, Y C

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the regenerative potential of hyaline cartilage in a neocartilage graft implant with the aid of MR cartilage imaging using a rabbit model. Surgical osteochondral defects were created in the femoral condyles of 30 mature New Zealand rabbits. The findings of neocartilage in autologous cartilage grafts packed into osteochondral defects were compared with control group of no implant to the osteochondral defect. The outcome of the implantations was correlated with histologic and MR cartilage imaging findings over a 3-month interval. Neocartilage grafts packed into osteochondral defects showed regeneration of hyaline cartilage at the outer layer of the implant using MR cartilage imaging. Fibrosis of fibrocartilage developed at the outer layer of the autologous cartilage graft together with an inflammatory reaction within the osteochondral defect. This animal study provides evidence of the regenerative ability of hyaline cartilage in neocartilage transplants to repair articular cartilage.

  20. Treatment of deep hyalin cartilage defects with autologous perichondrial grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, J; Steinhagen, J

    2003-07-01

    Perichondrial transplantation was performed in 29 patients suffering from a deep chondral lesion with different etiologies. Only those patients with a cartilage lesion in the knee joint were included. Patients were initially and postoperatively examined using the Lysholm- and HSS-Score. In most of the patients (20/29) trauma and the recurrence of osteochondrosis dissecans (6/29) were the cause of the cartilage lesion. Most often the medial femoral condyle (19/29) and, secondly, the lateral femoral condyle (5/29) were involved. In six patients additional therapeutic measures (ACL-plasty, n = 2; high tibial osteotomy because of varus mal-alignment, n = 4) had to be adopted. Follow-up examination was possible in 26/29 patients after a minimum postoperative period of 12 months. All patients exhibited a distinct and significant increase in both the Lysholm and the HSS-score. A follow-up after a minimum of 24 months was possible in 13/29 patients. Even these patients exhibited a distinct and significant improvement. Multiple follow-up examinations in 9/29 patients demonstrated maintenance of the first postoperative results obtained after one postoperative year for a maximum of 49 months in most of the patients. Only in one female patient, implantation of a semi-constrained total knee replacement was necessary because of osteoarthrosis resulting from crystal arthropathy (chondrocalcinosis). It was possible to obtain biopsies from three patients at the time osteosynthetic material was removed. In all cases hyaline-like cartilage was histologically observed. In the treatment of selected patients suffering from a circumscript cartilaginous lesion resulting from trauma or the recurrence of osteochondritis dissecans with a concomitant cartilage lesion but without major signs of osteoarthritis, perichondrial grafting can achieve acceptable clinical results, after a short follow-up period. In order to achieve satisfying results a good selection of patients and additional

  1. CR2-mediated activation of the complement alternative pathway results in formation of membrane attack complexes on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Marquart, H V; Prodinger, W M

    2001-01-01

    of the CR1 binding site with the monoclonal antibody 3D9 also resulted in a minor reduction in MAC deposition, while FE8 and 3D9, in combination, markedly reduced deposition of both C3 fragments (91 +/- 5%) and C9 (95 +/- 3%). The kinetics of C3-fragment and MAC deposition, as well as the dependence of both......Normal human B lymphocytes activate the alternative pathway of complement via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), that binds hydrolysed C3 (iC3) and thereby promotes the formation of a membrane-bound C3 convertase. We have investigated whether this might lead to the generation of a C5...... convertase and consequent formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC). Deposition of C3 fragments and MAC was assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes in the presence of 30% autologous serum containing 4.4 mM MgCl2/20 mM EGTA, which abrogates the classical pathway of complement without affecting...

  2. Hyaline cartilage cells outperform mandibular condylar cartilage cells in a TMJ fibrocartilage tissue engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Lazebnik, M; Detamore, M S

    2009-03-01

    To compare temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar cartilage cells in vitro to hyaline cartilage cells cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) environment for tissue engineering of mandibular condylar cartilage. Mandibular condylar cartilage and hyaline cartilage cells were harvested from pigs and cultured for 6 weeks in polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds. Both types of cells were treated with glucosamine sulfate (0.4 mM), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) (100 ng/ml) and their combination. At weeks 0 and 6, cell number, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen content were determined, types I and II collagen were visualized by immunohistochemistry and GAGs were visualized by histology. Hyaline cartilage cells produced from half an order to a full order of magnitude more GAGs and collagen than mandibular condylar cartilage cells in 3D culture. IGF-I was a highly effective signal for biosynthesis with hyaline cartilage cells, while glucosamine sulfate decreased cell proliferation and biosynthesis with both types of cells. In vitro culture of TMJ condylar cartilage cells produced a fibrous tissue with predominantly type I collagen, while hyaline cartilage cells formed a fibrocartilage-like tissue with types I and II collagen. The combination of IGF and glucosamine had a synergistic effect on maintaining the phenotype of TMJ condylar cells to generate both types I and II collagen. Given the superior biosynthetic activity by hyaline cartilage cells and the practical surgical limitations of harvesting cells from the TMJ of a patient requiring TMJ reconstruction, cartilage cells from elsewhere in the body may be a potentially better alternative to cells harvested from the TMJ for TMJ tissue engineering. This finding may also apply to other fibrocartilages such as the intervertebral disc and knee meniscus in applications where a mature cartilage cell source is desired.

  3. Similar hyaline-like cartilage repair of osteochondral defects in rabbits using isotropic and anisotropic collagen scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, E.L.W. de; Hannink, G.J.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Daamen, W.F.; Buma, P.

    2014-01-01

    Lesions in knee joint articular cartilage (AC) have limited repair capacity. Many clinically available treatments induce a fibrous-like cartilage repair instead of hyaline cartilage. To induce hyaline cartilage repair, we hypothesized that type I collagen scaffolds with fibers aligned perpendicular

  4. Quantitative assessment of hyaline cartilage elasticity during optical clearing using optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Singh, Manmohan; Li, Jiasong; Han, Zhaolong; Wu, Chen; Wang, Shang; Idugboe, Rita; Raghunathan, Raksha; Zakharov, Valery P.; Sobol, Emil N.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Twa, Michael; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    We report the first study on using optical coherence elastography (OCE) to quantitatively monitor the elasticity change of the hyaline cartilage during the optical clearing administrated by glucose solution. The measurement of the elasticity is verified using uniaxial compression test, demonstrating the feasibility of using OCE to quantify the Young's modulus of the cartilage tissue. As the results, we found that the stiffness of the hyaline cartilage increases during the optical clearing of the tissue. This study might be potentially useful for the early detection of osteoarthritis disease.

  5. Magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) of the knee joint: Meniscus, cruciate ligaments and hyaline cartilage. Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) des Kniegelenks: Meniskus, Kreuzbaender und hyaliner Gelenkknorpel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodler, J. (Radiologie, Universitaetsspital, Zurich (Switzerland) Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland). Radiologische Abt.); Buess, E. (Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland)); Rodriguez, M. (Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland)); Imhoff, A. (Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland))

    1993-08-01

    The use of MRT for diagnosing injury to the meniscus, the cruciate ligaments and hyaline cartilage was evaluated retrospectively in 82 knee joints without any knowledge of operative findings. In 49 cases the results were verified by arthroscopy and in 33 cases by arthrotomy. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of MRT for meniscus lesions was 73.9%, 96.9%, and 94.6%. Corresponding values for lesions of the anterior cruciate ligament were 88.9%, 96.6%, and 94.7%, and for lesions of the hyaline cartilage 62.6%, 96.1%, and 87.9%, respectively. In addition to its high specificity, MRT proved accurate in excluding lesions of the meniscus (97.1%) of the anterior cruciate ligament (96.6%) and of hyaline cartilage (88.8%). A negative finding on MRT therefore makes the presence of a lesion of the meniscus, cruciate ligaments of cartilage unlikely. In such cases one is justified in delaying the use of arthroscopy or arthrotomy. (orig.)

  6. Modulation of Wound Healing and Scar Formation by MG53 Protein-mediated Cell Membrane Repair*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M.; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53−/− mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. PMID:26306047

  7. Formation of chelating agent driven anodized TiO2 nanotubular membrane and its photovoltaic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Subarna; Misra, Mano; Mohapatra, Susanta K.; Howard, Cameron; Mohapatra, Srikanta K.; Kamilla, Sushanta K.

    2010-04-01

    Titania (TiO2) nanotubular arrays provide an exciting material for dye sensitizing solar cells (DSSC) because of their large surface area, lower recombination losses, and fast charge transport properties along the nanotubes. In this paper, design of a next generation DSSC using a TiO2 nanotubular membrane is discussed. A single step, green process is developed to produce stable large area, free-standing TiO2 nanotubular films (in a short time, 30-60 min) by anodizing Ti using an organic electrolyte, containing disodium salt of ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid (Na2[H2EDTA]) as complexing agent, and subsequent drying. Transparent, crack-free TiO2 films, 20-41 µm thick containing ordered hexagonal TiO2 nanotubes are achieved by this process. Films having a geometrical area up to 16.5 cm2 with pore openings of 182 nm have been obtained. These films have been etched to form membranes which provide an exciting prospect for front side illuminated DSSC with good mass and photon transport properties as well as wettability. A photovoltaic efficiency of 2.7% is achieved using a front side illuminated DSSC compared to 1.77% using back side illumination.

  8. Formation of chelating agent driven anodized TiO(2) nanotubular membrane and its photovoltaic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Subarna; Misra, Mano; Mohapatra, Susanta K; Howard, Cameron; Mohapatra, Srikanta K; Kamilla, Sushanta K

    2010-04-09

    Titania (TiO(2)) nanotubular arrays provide an exciting material for dye sensitizing solar cells (DSSC) because of their large surface area, lower recombination losses, and fast charge transport properties along the nanotubes. In this paper, design of a next generation DSSC using a TiO(2) nanotubular membrane is discussed. A single step, green process is developed to produce stable large area, free-standing TiO(2) nanotubular films (in a short time, 30-60 min) by anodizing Ti using an organic electrolyte, containing disodium salt of ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid (Na(2)[H(2)EDTA]) as complexing agent, and subsequent drying. Transparent, crack-free TiO(2) films, 20-41 microm thick containing ordered hexagonal TiO(2) nanotubes are achieved by this process. Films having a geometrical area up to 16.5 cm(2) with pore openings of 182 nm have been obtained. These films have been etched to form membranes which provide an exciting prospect for front side illuminated DSSC with good mass and photon transport properties as well as wettability. A photovoltaic efficiency of 2.7% is achieved using a front side illuminated DSSC compared to 1.77% using back side illumination.

  9. Formation of chelating agent driven anodized TiO2 nanotubular membrane and its photovoltaic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Subarna; Misra, Mano; Mohapatra, Susanta K; Howard, Cameron; Mohapatra, Srikanta K; Kamilla, Sushanta K

    2010-01-01

    Titania (TiO 2 ) nanotubular arrays provide an exciting material for dye sensitizing solar cells (DSSC) because of their large surface area, lower recombination losses, and fast charge transport properties along the nanotubes. In this paper, design of a next generation DSSC using a TiO 2 nanotubular membrane is discussed. A single step, green process is developed to produce stable large area, free-standing TiO 2 nanotubular films (in a short time, 30-60 min) by anodizing Ti using an organic electrolyte, containing disodium salt of ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid (Na 2 [H 2 EDTA]) as complexing agent, and subsequent drying. Transparent, crack-free TiO 2 films, 20-41 μm thick containing ordered hexagonal TiO 2 nanotubes are achieved by this process. Films having a geometrical area up to 16.5 cm 2 with pore openings of 182 nm have been obtained. These films have been etched to form membranes which provide an exciting prospect for front side illuminated DSSC with good mass and photon transport properties as well as wettability. A photovoltaic efficiency of 2.7% is achieved using a front side illuminated DSSC compared to 1.77% using back side illumination.

  10. Trans-complex formation by proteolipid channels in the terminal phase of membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, C; Bayer, M J; Bühler, S

    2001-01-01

    -complex formation occurs downstream from trans-SNARE pairing, and depends on both the Rab-GTPase Ypt7 and calmodulin. The maintenance of existing complexes and completion of fusion are independent of trans-SNARE pairs. Reconstituted proteolipids form sealed channels, which can expand to form aqueous pores in a Ca2...

  11. Adriamycin and derivatives interaction with the mitochondrial membrane: O2 consumption and free radicals formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollakis, G.; Goormaghtigh, E.; Delmelle, M.; Lion, Y.; Ruysschaert, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Adriamycin induces the formation of semiquinone free radicals, O(2) and OH. species, in beef heart intact mitochondria, submitochondrial particles and complex I-III containing proteoliposomes. Free radicals were detected by the use of Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy with the spin trapping

  12. Diffusion mediated coagulation and fragmentation based study of domain formation in lipid bilayer membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Laxminarsimha V., E-mail: laxman@iitk.ac.in [Mechanics and Applied Mathematics Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Roy, Subhradeep [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics (MC 0219), Virginia Tech, 495 Old Turner Street, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Das, Sovan Lal [Mechanics and Applied Mathematics Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2017-01-15

    We estimate the equilibrium size distribution of cholesterol rich micro-domains on a lipid bilayer by solving Smoluchowski equation for coagulation and fragmentation. Towards this aim, we first derive the coagulation kernels based on the diffusion behaviour of domains moving in a two dimensional membrane sheet, as this represents the reality better. We incorporate three different diffusion scenarios of domain diffusion into our coagulation kernel. Subsequently, we investigate the influence of the parameters in our model on the coagulation and fragmentation behaviour. The observed behaviours of the coagulation and fragmentation kernels are also manifested in the equilibrium domain size distribution and its first moment. Finally, considering the liquid domains diffusing in a supported lipid bilayer, we fit the equilibrium domain size distribution to a benchmark solution.

  13. Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri requires the outer membrane porin OprB for maximal virulence and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficarra, Florencia A; Grandellis, Carolina; Galván, Estela M; Ielpi, Luis; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John E; Gottig, Natalia; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2017-06-01

    Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri (Xcc) causes canker disease in citrus, and biofilm formation is critical for the disease cycle. OprB (Outer membrane protein B) has been shown previously to be more abundant in Xcc biofilms compared with the planktonic state. In this work, we showed that the loss of OprB in an oprB mutant abolishes bacterial biofilm formation and adherence to the host, and also compromises virulence and efficient epiphytic survival of the bacteria. Moreover, the oprB mutant is impaired in bacterial stress resistance. OprB belongs to a family of carbohydrate transport proteins, and the uptake of glucose is decreased in the mutant strain, indicating that OprB transports glucose. Loss of OprB leads to increased production of xanthan exopolysaccharide, and the carbohydrate intermediates of xanthan biosynthesis are also elevated in the mutant. The xanthan produced by the mutant has a higher viscosity and, unlike wild-type xanthan, completely lacks pyruvylation. Overall, these results suggest that Xcc reprogrammes its carbon metabolism when it senses a shortage of glucose input. The participation of OprB in the process of biofilm formation and virulence, as well as in metabolic changes to redirect the carbon flux, is discussed. Our results demonstrate the importance of environmental nutrient supply and glucose uptake via OprB for Xcc virulence. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  14. Modulation of wound healing and scar formation by MG53 protein-mediated cell membrane repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-10-02

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53(-/-) mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Temperature and cholera toxin B are factors that influence formation of membrane nanotubes in RT4 and T24 urothelial cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doron Kabaso

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Doron Kabaso1*, Maruša Lokar1*, Veronika Kralj-Iglic2, Peter Veranic3, Aleš Iglic11Laboratory of Biophysics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, 2Laboratory of Clinical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, 3Institute of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia; *These two authors equally share the first authorshipAbstract: The growth of membrane nanotubes is crucial for intercellular communication in both normal development and pathological conditions. Therefore, identifying factors that influence their stability and formation are important for both basic research and in development of potential treatments of pathological states. Here we investigate the effect of cholera toxin B (CTB and temperature on two pathological model systems: urothelial cell line RT4, as a model system of a benign tumor, and urothelial cell line T24, as a model system of a metastatic tumor. In particular, the number of intercellular membrane nanotubes (ICNs; ie, membrane nanotubes that bridge neighboring cells was counted. In comparison with RT4 cells, we reveal a significantly higher number in the density of ICNs in T24 cells not derived from RT4 without treatments (P = 0.005, after 20 minutes at room temperature (P = 0.0007, and following CTB treatment (P = 0.000025. The binding of CTB to GM1–lipid complexes in membrane exvaginations or tips of membrane nanotubes may reduce the positive spontaneous (intrinsic curvature of GM1–lipid complexes, which may lead to lipid mediated attractive interactions between CTB–GM1–lipid complexes, their aggregation and consequent formation of enlarged spherical tips of nanotubes. The binding of CTB to GM1 molecules in the outer membrane leaflet of membrane exvaginations and tips of membrane nanotubes may also increase the area difference between the two leaflets and in this way facilitate the growth of membrane nanotubes.Keywords: cancer cells, membrane nanotubes, cholera toxin

  16. A fluidic device for the controlled formation and real-time monitoring of soft membranes self-assembled at liquid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Meinhardt, Arturo; Botto, Lorenzo; Mata, Alvaro

    2018-02-13

    Membrane materials formed at the interface between two liquids have found applications in a large variety of technologies, from sensors to drug-delivery and catalysis. However, studying the formation of these membranes in real-time presents considerable challenges, owing to the difficulty of prescribing the location and instant of formation of the membrane, the difficulty of observing time-dependent membrane shape and thickness, and the poor reproducibility of results obtained using conventional mixing procedures. Here we report a fluidic device that facilitates characterisation of the time-dependent thickness, morphology and mass transport properties of materials self-assembled at fluid-fluid interfaces. In the proposed device the membrane forms from the controlled coalescence of two liquid menisci in a linear open channel. The linear geometry and controlled mixing of the solutions facilitate real-time visualisation, manipulation and improve reproducibility. Because of its small dimensions, the device can be used in conjunction with standard microscopy methods and reduces the required volumes of potentially expensive reagents. As an example application to tissue engineering, we use the device to characterise interfacial membranes formed by supra-molecular self-assembly of peptide-amphiphiles with either an elastin-like-protein or hyaluronic acid. The device can be adapted to study self-assembling membranes for applications that extend beyond bioengineering.

  17. Generation of hyaline cartilaginous tissue from mouse adult dermal fibroblast culture by defined factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Kunihiko; Sasagawa, Satoru; Outani, Hidetatsu; Nakagawa, Kanako; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2011-01-01

    Repair of cartilage injury with hyaline cartilage continues to be a challenging clinical problem. Because of the limited number of chondrocytes in vivo, coupled with in vitro de-differentiation of chondrocytes into fibrochondrocytes, which secrete type I collagen and have an altered matrix architecture and mechanical function, there is a need for a novel cell source that produces hyaline cartilage. The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has provided a tool for reprogramming dermal fibroblasts to an undifferentiated state by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors. Here, we show that retroviral expression of two reprogramming factors (c-Myc and Klf4) and one chondrogenic factor (SOX9) induces polygonal chondrogenic cells directly from adult dermal fibroblast cultures. Induced cells expressed marker genes for chondrocytes but not fibroblasts, i.e., the promoters of type I collagen genes were extensively methylated. Although some induced cell lines formed tumors when subcutaneously injected into nude mice, other induced cell lines generated stable homogenous hyaline cartilage–like tissue. Further, the doxycycline-inducible induction system demonstrated that induced cells are able to respond to chondrogenic medium by expressing endogenous Sox9 and maintain chondrogenic potential after substantial reduction of transgene expression. Thus, this approach could lead to the preparation of hyaline cartilage directly from skin, without generating iPS cells. PMID:21293062

  18. Research studies of aging changes of hyaline cartilage surface by using Raman-scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timchenko, E. V.; Timchenko, P. E.; Dolgushkin, D. A.; Volova, L. T.; Lazarev, V. A.; Tyumchenkova, A. S.; Markova, M. D.

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents the results of a comparative analysis by the method of Raman spectroscopy of the joint hyaline cartilage of adults and children. Differences in the spectral characteristics of the surface of articular cartilage are shown. New optical coefficients have been introduced, which make it possible to evaluate the age-related changes in cartilaginous tissue.

  19. Quantification of collagen distributions in rat hyaline and fibro cartilages based on second harmonic generation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Liao, Chenxi; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Liu, Wenge; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    Hyaline cartilage is a semitransparent tissue composed of proteoglycan and thicker type II collagen fibers, while fibro cartilage large bundles of type I collagen besides other territorial matrix and chondrocytes. It is reported that the meniscus (fibro cartilage) has a greater capacity to regenerate and close a wound compared to articular cartilage (hyaline cartilage). And fibro cartilage often replaces the type II collagen-rich hyaline following trauma, leading to scar tissue that is composed of rigid type I collagen. The visualization and quantification of the collagen fibrillar meshwork is important for understanding the role of fibril reorganization during the healing process and how different types of cartilage contribute to wound closure. In this study, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscope was applied to image the articular and meniscus cartilage, and textural analysis were developed to quantify the collagen distribution. High-resolution images were achieved based on the SHG signal from collagen within fresh specimens, and detailed observations of tissue morphology and microstructural distribution were obtained without shrinkage or distortion. Textural analysis of SHG images was performed to confirm that collagen in fibrocartilage showed significantly coarser compared to collagen in hyaline cartilage (p < 0.01). Our results show that each type of cartilage has different structural features, which may significantly contribute to pathology when damaged. Our findings demonstrate that SHG microscopy holds potential as a clinically relevant diagnostic tool for imaging degenerative tissues or assessing wound repair following cartilage injury.

  20. Uninduced adipose-derived stem cells repair the defect of full-thickness hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Ning; Li, Lei; Leng, Ping; Wang, Ying-Zhen; Lv, Cheng-Yu

    2009-04-01

    To testify the effect of the stem cells derived from the widely distributed fat tissue on repairing full-thickness hyaline cartilage defects. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were derived from adipose tissue and cultured in vitro. Twenty-seven New Zealand white rabbits were divided into three groups randomly. The cultured ADSCs mixed with calcium alginate gel were used to fill the full-thickness hyaline cartilage defects created at the patellafemoral joint, and the defects repaired with gel or without treatment served as control groups. After 4, 8 and 12 weeks, the reconstructed tissue was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. Histological analysis and qualitative scoring were also performed to detect the outcome. Full thickness hyaline cartilage defects were repaired completely with ADSCs-derived tissue. The result was better in ADSCs group than the control ones. The microstructure of reconstructed tissue with ADSCs was similar to that of hyaline cartilage and contained more cells and regular matrix fibers, being better than other groups. Plenty of collagen fibers around cells could be seen under transmission electron microscopy. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in comparison with other groups at each time point (t equal to 4.360, P less than 0.01). These results indicate that stem cells derived from mature adipose without induction possess the ability to repair cartilage defects.

  1. Growth of silicone-immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters, a technique to study microcolony formation under anaerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højberg, Ole; Binnerup, S. J.; Sørensen, Jan

    1997-01-01

    A technique was developed to study microcolony formation by silicone- immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters under anaerobic conditions. A sudden shift to anaerobiosis was obtained by submerging the filters in medium which was depleted for oxygen by a pure culture of bacteria....... The technique was used to demonstrate that preinduction of nitrate reductase under low-oxygen conditions was necessary for nonfermenting, nitrate-respiring bacteria, e.g., Pseudomonas spp., to cope with a sudden lack of oxygen. In contrast, nitrate-respiring, fermenting bacteria, e.g., Bacillus and Escherichia...... spp, formed microcolonies under anaerobic conditions with or without the presence of nitrate and irrespective of aerobic or anaerobic preculture conditions....

  2. [Water-exchange processes in hyaline cartilage and its basic components in a normal state and in osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeva, S S; Chkhol, K Z; Bykov, V A; Roshchina, A A; Iakovleva, L V; Koroleva, O A; Omel'ianenko, N P; Rebrov, L B

    2000-01-01

    The content of different forms of tissue water was studied in the normal articular cartilage and osteoarthrosis cartilage and its structural components: collagen, potassium hyaluronate, sodium chondroitinsulphate and its complexes. In the components of cartilage matrix a few of fractions of bound water different in the strength of binding are present. At the maximal humidity, all water in collagen binds with the active groups of biopolymers and in the glycosaminoglycans, in addition to bound water, are present, two crystal forms of freezing water (free water) at least. The quantity of free water in the collagen-chondroitin sulphat membrane, is increased with the increase of chondroitin sulphate. In the collagen-hyaluronate complex, fraction of free water is found only at the low concentration of hyaluronate kalium. It was shown that in the hyalin cartilage, in different from the other connective tissue (skin, achilles tendon), the most part of water is free water and its quantity is increased in the osteoarthrosis. It is supposed that the rearrangement of binding and free-water fractions in the osteoarthrosis is the result of deficiency of hyaluronic acid and therefore this may be regarded in the improvement of methods of treatment. This scientific and methodical approach allow to receive information on the forms and binding energy of water in the biological tissues, which is absorbed from fluids and steam phase and determine characters of the pathological changes.

  3. Deciphering chondrocyte behaviour in matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation to undergo accurate cartilage repair with hyaline matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoor, M; Maneix, L; Ollitrault, D; Legendre, F; Duval, E; Claus, S; Mallein-Gerin, F; Moslemi, S; Boumediene, K; Galera, P

    2012-06-01

    Since the emergence in the 1990s of the autologous chondrocytes transplantation (ACT) in the treatment of cartilage defects, the technique, corresponding initially to implantation of chondrocytes, previously isolated and amplified in vitro, under a periosteal membrane, has greatly evolved. Indeed, the first generations of ACT showed their limits, with in particular the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during the monolayer culture, inducing the synthesis of fibroblastic collagens, notably type I collagen to the detriment of type II collagen. Beyond the clinical aspect with its encouraging results, new biological substitutes must be tested to obtain a hyaline neocartilage. Therefore, the use of differentiated chondrocytes phenotypically stabilized is essential for the success of ACT at medium and long-term. That is why researchers try now to develop more reliable culture techniques, using among others, new types of biomaterials and molecules known for their chondrogenic activity, giving rise to the 4th generation of ACT. Other sources of cells, being able to follow chondrogenesis program, are also studied. The success of the cartilage regenerative medicine is based on the phenotypic status of the chondrocyte and on one of its essential component of the cartilage, type II collagen, the expression of which should be supported without induction of type I collagen. The knowledge accumulated by the scientific community and the experience of the clinicians will certainly allow to relief this technological challenge, which influence besides, the validation of such biological substitutes by the sanitary authorities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Key molecular requirements for raft formation in lipid/cholesterol membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davit Hakobyan

    Full Text Available The lipid mixture of DPPC (saturated lipid/DUPC (unsaturated lipid/CHOL (cholesterol is studied with respect to its ability to form liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases. We employ coarse-grained simulations with MARTINI force field. All three components are systematically modified in order to explore the relevant molecular properties, leading to phase separation. Specifically, we show that the DPPC/DUPC/CHOL system unmixes due to enthalpic DPPC-DPPC and DPPC-CHOL interactions. The phase separation remains unchanged, except for the formation of a gel phase at long times after decreasing the conformational degrees of freedom of the unsaturated DUPC. In contrast, the phase separation can be suppressed by softening the DPPC chains. In an attempt to mimic the ordering and unmixing effect of CHOL the latter is replaced by a stiff and shortened DPPC-like lipid. One still observes phase separation, suggesting that it is mainly the rigid and planar structure of CHOL which is important for raft formation. Addition of an extra bead to the head of CHOL has no notable impact on the phase separation of the system, supporting the irrelevance of the Umbrella model for the phase separation. Reduction of the conformational entropy of CHOL by stiffening its last bead results in a significant increase of the order of the DPPC/CHOL domain. This suggests that the conformational entropy of CHOL is important to prohibit the gelation process. The interleaflet interactions as mediated by the terminal molecular groups seem to have a strong impact on the possibility of a subsequent gelation process after phase separation.

  5. Is the T1ρ MRI profile of hyaline cartilage in the normal hip uniform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhra, Kawan S; Cárdenas-Blanco, Arturo; Melkus, Gerd; Schweitzer, Mark E; Cameron, Ian G; Beaulé, Paul E

    2015-04-01

    T1ρ MRI is an imaging technique sensitive to proteoglycan (PG) content of hyaline cartilage. However, normative T1ρ values have not been established for the weightbearing cartilage of the hip, and it is not known whether it is uniform or whether there is topographic variation. Knowledge of the T1ρ profile of hyaline cartilage in the normal hip is important for establishing a baseline against which comparisons can be made to experimental and clinical arthritic subjects. In this diagnostic study, we determined (1) the T1ρ MRI values of hyaline cartilage of the normal hip; and (2) whether the T1ρ MRI profile of the normal hip hyaline cartilage is uniform. Fourteen asymptomatic volunteers (11 men, three women; mean age, 35 years) prospectively underwent 1.5-T T1ρ MRI of a single hip. The weightbearing hyaline cartilage bilayer of the acetabulum and femoral head was evaluated on sagittal images and segmented into four zones: (1) anterior; (2) anterosuperior; (3) posterosuperior; and (4) and posterior. For the full region of interest and within each zone and each sagittal slice, we calculated the mean T1ρ relaxation value, a parameter that indirectly quantifies PG content, where T1ρ is inversely related to PG concentration. There was variation in the T1ρ relaxation values depending on zone (anterior to posterior) and slice (medial to lateral). When combining the most anterior quadrants (Zones 1 and 2), the T1ρ relaxation values were lower than those in the combined posterior quadrants (Zones 3 and 4) (30.4 msec versus 32.2 msec, respectively; p = 0.002), reflecting higher PG concentration. There was a difference between the T1ρ relaxation values of the sagittal slices (p = 0.038), most pronounced anteriorly in Zone 1 (26.6 msec, p = 0.001). With a selective combination of zones and slices, there were lower mean T1ρ values in the anterolateral-most region compared with the remainder of the weightbearing portion of the hip (28.6 msec versus 32.2 msec

  6. Monomeric RC-LH1 core complexes retard LH2 assembly and intracytoplasmic membrane formation in PufX-minus mutants of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Peter G; Mothersole, David J; Ng, Irene W; Olsen, John D; Hunter, C Neil

    2011-09-01

    In the model photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides domains of light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complexes surround and interconnect dimeric reaction centre-light-harvesting 1-PufX (RC-LH1-PufX) 'core' complexes, forming extensive networks for energy transfer and trapping. These complexes are housed in spherical intracytoplasmic membranes (ICMs), which are assembled in a stepwise process where biosynthesis of core complexes tends to dominate the early stages of membrane invagination. The kinetics of LH2 assembly were measured in PufX mutants that assemble monomeric core complexes, as a consequence of either a twelve-residue N-terminal truncation of PufX (PufXΔ12) or the complete removal of PufX (PufX(-)). Lower rates of LH2 assembly and retarded maturation of membrane invagination were observed for the larger and less curved ICM from the PufX(-) mutant, consistent with the proposition that local membrane curvature, initiated by arrays of bent RC-LH1-PufX dimers, creates a favourable environment for stable assembly of LH2 complexes. Transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution atomic force microscopy were used to examine ICM morphology and membrane protein organisation in these mutants. Some partitioning of core and LH2 complexes was observed in PufX(-) membranes, resulting in locally ordered clusters of monomeric RC-LH1 complexes. The distribution of core and LH2 complexes in the three types of membrane examined is consistent with previous models of membrane curvature and domain formation (Frese et al., 2008), which demonstrated that a combination of crowding and asymmetries in sizes and shapes of membrane protein complexes drives membrane organisation. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Complement activation and formation of the membrane attack complex on serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis in the presence or absence of serum bactericidal activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drogari-Apiranthitou, M.; Kuijper, E. J.; Dekker, N. [=Nick; Dankert, J.

    2002-01-01

    Encapsulated meningococci are complement sensitive only in the presence of bactericidal antibodies by yet-unexplored mechanisms. The objective of this study was to investigate the involvement of major bacterial surface constituents on complement activation and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation

  8. Chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood implants improve hyaline cartilage repair in ovine microfracture defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoemann, Caroline D; Hurtig, Mark; Rossomacha, Evgeny; Sun, Jun; Chevrier, Anik; Shive, Matthew S; Buschmann, Michael D

    2005-12-01

    Microfracture is a surgical procedure that is used to treat focal articular cartilage defects. Although joint function improves following microfracture, the procedure elicits incomplete repair. As blood clot formation in the microfracture defect is an essential initiating event in microfracture therapy, we hypothesized that the repair would be improved if the microfracture defect were filled with a blood clot that was stabilized by the incorporation of a thrombogenic and adhesive polymer, specifically, chitosan. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate (1) blood clot adhesion in fresh microfracture defects and (2) the quality of the repair, at six months postoperatively, of microfracture defects that had been treated with or without chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood clot implants, using a sheep model. In eighteen sheep, two 1-cm2 full-thickness chondral defects were created in the distal part of the femur and treated with microfracture; one defect was made in the medial femoral condyle, and the other defect was made in the trochlea. In four sheep, microfracture defects were created bilaterally; the microfracture defects in one knee received no further treatment, and the microfracture defects in the contralateral knee were filled with chitosan-glycerol phosphate/autologous whole blood and the implants were allowed to solidify. Fresh defects in these four sheep were collected at one hour postoperatively to compare the retention of the chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood clot with that of the normal clot and to define the histologic characteristics of these fresh defects. In the other fourteen sheep, microfracture defects were made in only one knee and either were left untreated (control group; six sheep) or were treated with chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood implant (treatment group; eight sheep), and the quality of repair was assessed histologically, histomorphometrically, and biochemically at six months postoperatively. In the defects that were examined

  9. A preclinical evaluation of an autologous living hyaline-like cartilaginous graft for articular cartilage repair: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Yvonne Peck; Pengfei He; Geetha Soujanya V. N. Chilla; Chueh Loo Poh; Dong-An Wang

    2015-01-01

    In this pilot study, an autologous synthetic scaffold-free construct with hyaline quality, termed living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), was applied for treating cartilage lesions. Implantation of autologous LhCG was done at load-bearing regions of the knees in skeletally mature mini-pigs for 6 months. Over the course of this study, significant radiographical improvement in LhCG treated sites was observed via magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, macroscopic repair was effected by LhCG...

  10. Clinical implications of a rare renal entity: Pleomorphic Hyalinizing Angiectatic Tumor (PHAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalici Gesolfo, Cristina; Serretta, Vincenzo; Di Maida, Fabrizio; Giannone, Giulio; Barresi, Elisabetta; Franco, Vito; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2017-02-01

    Pleomorphic Hyalinizing Angiectatic Tumor (PHAT) is a rare benign lesion characterized by slow growth, infiltrative behavior and high rate of local recurrences. Only one case has been described in retroperitoneum, at renal hilum, but not involving pelvis or parenchyma. Here we present the first case of PHAT arising in the renal parenchyma. A nodular lesion in right kidney lower pole was diagnosed to a 61 year old woman. The patient underwent right nephrectomy. Microscopically, the lesion showed solid and pseudo-cystic components with hemorrhagic areas characterized by aggregates of ectatic blood vessels. Pleomorphic cells were characterized by large eosinophilic cytoplasm with irregular and hyperchromatic nuclei. Immunohistochemistry was performed and the lesion was classified as a Pleomorphic Hyalinizing Angiectatic Tumor (PHAT). Due to the clinical behavior of this tumor, in spite of its benign nature, review of the surgical margins and close follow up after partial nephrectomy are mandatory. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  11. MIXED HYALINE VASCULAR AND PLASMA CELL TYPE CASTLEMAN’S DISEASE: REPORT OF A CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Asgarani

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Castleman’s disease (angiofollicular lymphoid hyperplasia includes a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders. The cause of this disease remains uncertain. There are two types of localized Castleman’s disease: the more common hyaline vascular and the plasma cell types. Mixed variant is an uncommon localized lesion in general population. The lesions can occur in any part of the body that contains lymphoid tissue, although seventy percent are found in the anterior mediastinum. We report a thirty years old boy with Castleman’s disease who presented with fever, anorexia, weight loss,sweating, anemia and abdominal mass. The histologic examination of the biopsy specimens revealed a mixed hyaline vascular and plasma cell type of Castleman’s disease.

  12. Biophysical Stimuli: A Review of Electrical and Mechanical Stimulation in Hyaline Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaca-González, Juan J; Guevara, Johana M; Moncayo, Miguel A; Castro-Abril, Hector; Hata, Yoshie; Garzón-Alvarado, Diego A

    2017-09-01

    Objective Hyaline cartilage degenerative pathologies induce morphologic and biomechanical changes resulting in cartilage tissue damage. In pursuit of therapeutic options, electrical and mechanical stimulation have been proposed for improving tissue engineering approaches for cartilage repair. The purpose of this review was to highlight the effect of electrical stimulation and mechanical stimuli in chondrocyte behavior. Design Different information sources and the MEDLINE database were systematically revised to summarize the different contributions for the past 40 years. Results It has been shown that electric stimulation may increase cell proliferation and stimulate the synthesis of molecules associated with the extracellular matrix of the articular cartilage, such as collagen type II, aggrecan and glycosaminoglycans, while mechanical loads trigger anabolic and catabolic responses in chondrocytes. Conclusion The biophysical stimuli can increase cell proliferation and stimulate molecules associated with hyaline cartilage extracellular matrix maintenance.

  13. Real-time UV-visible spectroscopy analysis of purple membrane-polyacrylamide film formation taking into account Fano line shapes and scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomariz, María; Blaya, Salvador; Acebal, Pablo; Carretero, Luis

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally analyze the formation of thick Purple Membrane (PM) polyacrylamide (PA) films by means of optical spectroscopy by considering the absorption of bacteriorhodopsin and scattering. We have applied semiclassical quantum mechanical techniques for the calculation of absorption spectra by taking into account the Fano effects on the ground state of bacteriorhodopsin. A model of the formation of PM-polyacrylamide films has been proposed based on the growth of polymeric chains around purple membrane. Experimentally, the temporal evolution of the polymerization process of acrylamide has been studied as function of the pH solution, obtaining a good correspondence to the proposed model. Thus, due to the formation of intermediate bacteriorhodopsin-doped nanogel, by controlling the polymerization process, an alternative methodology for the synthesis of bacteriorhodopsin-doped nanogels can be provided.

  14. Pleomorphic Hyalinizing Angiectatic Tumour: A Rare Case Report and Discussion of Differential Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmeti, Ambica; Arakeri, Surekha U; Javalgi, Anita P; Goyal, Shefali

    2017-08-01

    Pleomorphic Hyalinizing Angiectatic Tumour (PHAT) is one of the rare soft tissue tumour which is non-metastasizing. The origin of this tumour is yet uncertain. It occurs in adults as a slow growing subcutaneous mass mimicking clinically and histologically to various benign and malignant soft tissue tumours such as schwannoma, haemangioma and malignant fibrous histiocytoma. The microscopic features of this tumour include clusters of ectatic, fibrin containing, hyalinized blood vessels with pleomorphic and spindle shaped tumour cells showing intranuclear inclusions, stromal haemosiderin pigment and a variable inflammatory infiltrate. Despite marked pleomorphism, the lesion behaves as a low grade neoplasm, with frequent recurrences, but no metastases. The incidence of this tumour is very rare with less than 100 cases being published. Hence, awareness of this entity is must for proper management of the patient and to avoid misdiagnosis of the lesion. We report a case of pleomorphic hyalinizing angiectatic tumour in a 50-year-old man who presented with a slow growing mass in the left calf region since two years.

  15. In vitro uptake of 153gadolinium and gadolinium complexes by hyaline articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, A.; Fleischmann, D.; Hamilton, G.; Hajek, P.

    1990-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated whether Gadolinium (Gd) penetrates into hyaline cartilage and would be incorporated into vital chondrocytes. Hyaline joint cartilage of rabbits was exposed to radioactive 153 GdCl 3 and to a radioactive 153 Gd-DTPA-BSA-complex (DTPA, diethylene-triaminepentaacetic acid; BSA, bovine serum albumine). In addition an exchange experiment with radioactive 153 GdCl 3 versus Gd-DTPA-di-N-methylglucamine (Magnevist) was performed. Incorporation of 153 GdCl 3 into neuroblastoma cells, connective tissue cells and chondrocytes was tested. The results showed that the depth and extent of incorporation of Gd depends on the molecular mass and time of exposure. 153 Gd-DTPA-BSA complexes exhibited an incorporation rate of maximal 11 per cent ± 2.8 per cent up to the middle third of the cartilage within 24 h with almost no incorporation (2 ± 1.9 per cent) for the deep layer. The exchange experiment revealed no uptake of Gd for the deep layer. The maximal incorporation rate of 153 GdCl 3 into vital chondrocytes was 6.3 per cent. These data indicate that under the condition of MR-arthrography, Gd-DTPA-di-N-methylglucamine will not be absorbed into the deep layers of hyaline cartilage and will not be incorporated into vital chondrocytes. (author). 8 refs.; 3 tabs

  16. Elastic cartilage reconstruction by transplantation of cultured hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, M; Takebe, T; Kobayashi, S; Kimura, S; Masutani, M; Lee, S; Jo, Y H; Lee, J I; Taniguchi, H

    2014-05-01

    Current surgical intervention of craniofacial defects caused by injuries or abnormalities uses reconstructive materials, such as autologous cartilage grafts. Transplantation of autologous tissues, however, places a significant invasiveness on patients, and many efforts have been made for establishing an alternative graft. Recently, we and others have shown the potential use of reconstructed elastic cartilage from ear-derived chondrocytes or progenitors with the unique elastic properties. Here, we examined the differentiation potential of canine joint cartilage-derived chondrocytes into elastic cartilage for expanding the cell sources, such as hyaline cartilage. Articular chondrocytes are isolated from canine joint, cultivated, and compared regarding characteristic differences with auricular chondrocytes, including proliferation rates, gene expression, extracellular matrix production, and cartilage reconstruction capability after transplantation. Canine articular chondrocytes proliferated less robustly than auricular chondrocytes, but there was no significant difference in the amount of sulfated glycosaminoglycan produced from redifferentiated chondrocytes. Furthermore, in vitro expanded and redifferentiated articular chondrocytes have been shown to reconstruct elastic cartilage on transplantation that has histologic characteristics distinct from hyaline cartilage. Taken together, cultured hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes are a possible cell source for elastic cartilage reconstruction. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Colonization of a Central Venous Catheter by the Hyaline Fungus Fusarium solani Species Complex: A Case Report and SEM Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Colombo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of opportunistic infections by filamentous fungi is increasing partly due to the widespread use of central venous catheters (CVC, indwelling medical devices, and antineoplastic/immunosuppressive drugs. The case of a 13-year-old boy under treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia is presented. The boy was readmitted to the Pediatric Ward for intermittent fever of unknown origin. Results of blood cultures drawn from peripheral venous sites or through the CVC were compared. CVC-derived bottles (but not those from peripheral veins yielded hyaline fungi that, based on morphology, were identified as belonging to the Fusarium solani species complex. Gene amplification and direct sequencing of the fungal ITS1 rRNA region and the EF-1alpha gene confirmed the isolate as belonging to the Fusarium solani species complex. Portions of the CVC were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Fungi mycelia with long protruding hyphae were seen into the lumen. The firm adhesion of the fungal formation to the inner surface of the catheter was evident. In the absence of systemic infection, catheter removal and prophylactic voriconazole therapy were followed by disappearance of febrile events and recovery. Thus, indwelling catheters are prone to contamination by environmental fungi.

  18. Outer membrane protein A (OmpA: a new player in shigella flexneri protrusion formation and inter-cellular spreading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Ambrosi

    Full Text Available Outer membrane protein A (OmpA is a multifaceted predominant outer membrane protein of Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae whose role in the pathogenesis of various bacterial infections has recently been recognized. Here, the role of OmpA on the virulence of Shigella flexneri has been investigated. An ompA mutant of wild-type S. flexneri 5a strain M90T was constructed (strain HND92 and it was shown to be severely impaired in cell-to-cell spreading since it failed to plaque on HeLa cell monolayers. The lack of OmpA significantly reduced the levels of IcsA while the levels of cell associated and released IcsP-cleaved 95 kDa amino-terminal portion of the mature protein were similar. Nevertheless, the ompA mutant displayed IcsA exposed across the entire bacterial surface. Surprisingly, the ompA mutant produced proper F-actin comet tails, indicating that the aberrant IcsA exposition at bacterial lateral surface did not affect proper activation of actin-nucleating proteins, suggesting that the absence of OmpA likely unmasks mature or cell associated IcsA at bacterial lateral surface. Moreover, the ompA mutant was able to invade and to multiply within HeLa cell monolayers, although internalized bacteria were found to be entrapped within the host cell cytoplasm. We found that the ompA mutant produced significantly less protrusions than the wild-type strain, indicating that this defect could be responsible of its inability to plaque. Although we could not definitely rule out that the ompA mutation might exert pleiotropic effects on other S. flexneri genes, complementation of the ompA mutation with a recombinant plasmid carrying the S. flexneri ompA gene clearly indicated that a functional OmpA protein is required and sufficient for proper IcsA exposition, plaque and protrusion formation. Moreover, an independent ompA mutant was generated. Since we found that both mutants displayed identical virulence profile, these results further supported the

  19. High-performance Fuel Cell with Stretched Catalyst-Coated Membrane: One-step Formation of Cracked Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Moon; Ahn, Chi-Yeong; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kim, Sungjun; Hwang, Wonchan; Jang, Segeun; Shin, Sungsoo; Lee, Gunhee; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-05-23

    We have achieved performance enhancement of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) though crack generation on its electrodes. It is the first attempt to enhance the performance of PEMFC by using cracks which are generally considered as defects. The pre-defined, cracked electrode was generated by stretching a catalyst-coated Nafion membrane. With the strain-stress property of the membrane that is unique in the aspect of plastic deformation, membrane electrolyte assembly (MEA) was successfully incorporated into the fuel cell. Cracked electrodes with the variation of strain were investigated and electrochemically evaluated. Remarkably, mechanical stretching of catalyst-coated Nafion membrane led to a decrease in membrane resistance and an improvement in mass transport, which resulted in enhanced device performance.

  20. Heterotrimeric G protein beta1gamma2 subunits change orientation upon complex formation with G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) on a model membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughton, Andrew P; Yang, Pei; Tesmer, Valerie M; Ding, Bei; Tesmer, John J G; Chen, Zhan

    2011-09-13

    Few experimental techniques can assess the orientation of peripheral membrane proteins in their native environment. Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was applied to study the formation of the complex between G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase 2 (GRK2) and heterotrimeric G protein β(1)γ(2) subunits (Gβγ) at a lipid bilayer, without any exogenous labels. The most likely membrane orientation of the GRK2-Gβγ complex differs from that predicted from the known protein crystal structure, and positions the predicted receptor docking site of GRK2 such that it would more optimally interact with GPCRs. Gβγ also appears to change its orientation after binding to GRK2. The developed methodology is widely applicable for the study of other membrane proteins in situ.

  1. Reduction of DOM fractions and their trihalomethane formation potential in surface river water by in-line coagulation with ceramic membrane filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakruam, Pharkphum; Wattanachira, Suraphong

    2014-03-01

    This research was aimed at investigating the reduction of DOM fractions and their trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) by in-line coagulation with 0.1 μm ceramic membrane filtration. The combination of ceramic membrane filtration with a coagulation process is an alternative technology which can be applied to enhance conventional coagulation processes in the field of water treatment and drinking water production. The Ping River water (high turbidity water) was selected as the raw surface water because it is currently the main raw water source for water supply production in the urban and rural areas of Chiang Mai Province. From the investigation, the results showed that the highest percent reductions of DOC, UV-254, and THMFP (47.6%, 71.0%, and 67.4%, respectively) were achieved from in-line coagulation with ceramic membrane filtration at polyaluminum chloride dosage 40 mg/L. Resin adsorption techniques were employed to characterize the DOM in raw surface water and filtered water. The results showed that the use of a ceramic membrane with in-line coagulation was able to most efficiently reduce the hydrophobic fraction (HPOA) (68.5%), which was then followed by the hydrophilic fraction (HPIA) (49.3%). The greater mass DOC reduction of these two fractions provided the highest THMFP reductions (55.1% and 37.2%, respectively). Furthermore, the in-line coagulation with ceramic membrane filtration was able to reduce the hydrophobic (HPOB) fraction which is characterized by high reactivity toward THM formation. The percent reduction of mass DOC and THMFP of HPOB by in-line coagulation with ceramic membrane filtration was 45.9% and 48.0%, respectively. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis in radiological studies. Part I: Formation of inflammatory infiltrates within the synovial membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł‑Szopińska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a multifactorial etiology and varied course, which in the majority of patients leads to partial disability or to permanent handicap. Its characteristic trait is a persistent inflammation of the synovial membrane and the formation of an invasive synovial tissue, called the pannus, which in time leads to destruction of the cartilage, subchondral bone tissue, and the soft tissue of the affected joint(s. The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis is complex and involves cells of both innate and adaptive immunity, a network of various cytokines and an immunoregulatory dysfunction. An important role in the discovery of rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis was played by magnetic resonance imaging, which showed the disease process to extend beyond the synovium into the bone marrow. Many studies have shown a strict correlation between the vascularity of the synovium (assessed through the power Doppler ultrasound and magnetic resonance examinations, bone marrow edema and the clinical, laboratory and histopathological parameters of rheumatoid arthritis. From the current understanding of rheumatoid arthritis, bone erosions could occur from two directions: from the joint cavity and from the bone marrow. With power Doppler ultrasound, as well as in magnetic resonance imaging, it is possible to visualize the well-vascularized pannus and its destructive effects on joint structures and ligaments. In addition, the magnetic resonance study shows inflammatory and destructive changes within the bone marrow (bone marrow edema, inflammatory cysts, and erosions. Bone marrow edema occurs in 68–75% of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis and is considered to be a predictor of rapid disease progression.

  3. Formation, reactivity and aging of amorphous ferric oxides in the presence of model and membrane bioreactor derived organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bligh, Mark W; Maheshwari, Pradeep; David Waite, T

    2017-11-01

    Iron salts are routinely dosed in wastewater treatment as a means of achieving effluent phosphorous concentration goals. The iron oxides that result from addition of iron salts partake in various reactions, including reductive dissolution and phosphate adsorption. The reactivity of these oxides is controlled by the conditions of formation and the processes, such as aggregation, that lead to a reduction in accessible surface sites following formation. The presence of organic compounds is expected to significantly impact these processes in a number of ways. In this study, amorphous ferric oxide (AFO) reactivity and aging was investigated following the addition of ferric iron (Fe(III)) to three solution systems: two synthetic buffered systems, either containing no organic or containing alginate, and a supernatant system containing soluble microbial products (SMPs) sourced from a membrane bioreactor (MBR). Reactivity of the Fe(III) phases in these systems at various times (1-60 min) following Fe(III) addition was quantified by determining the rate constants for ascorbate-mediated reductive dissolution over short (5 min) and long (60 min) dissolution periods and for a range (0.5-10 mM) of ascorbate concentrations. AFO particle size was monitored using dynamic light scattering during the aging and dissolution periods. In the presence of alginate, AFO particles appeared to be stabilized against aggregation. However, aging in the alginate system was remarkably similar to the inorganic system where aging is associated with aggregation. An aging mechanism involving restructuring within the alginate-AFO assemblage was proposed. In the presence of SMPs, a greater diversity of Fe(III) phases was evident with both a small labile pool of organically complexed Fe(III) and a polydisperse population of stabilized AFO particles present. The prevalence of low molecular weight organic molecules facilitated stabilization of the Fe(III) oxyhydroxides formed but subsequent aging

  4. Basal membrane complex architecture is disrupted during posterior subcapsular cataract formation in Royal College of Surgeons rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies detailing the development of posterior subcapsular cataracts (PSC) in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats have shown that aberrant fiber-end migration underlies the structural compromise. This investigation was conducted to examine the distribution of select basal membrane complex (BMC) components and to assess the intravitreal levels of specific cytokines during PSC formation. Methods Lenses from 52 RCS dystrophic rats (RCS/Lav) and 28 genetically matched control animals (RCS-rdy+/Lav) from 2 to 8 weeks old were used. After enucleation, vitreous was collected for eventual cytokine level analyses; lenses were then removed and processed for immunocytochemical localization of actin, cadherin, β integrin, vinculin, and cell nuclei. Results At 2–3 weeks postnatal, dystrophic lenses showed normal BMC distribution of actin, cadherin, and vinculin; however β integrin distribution was altered as compared to controls. By 4–6 weeks of age, F-actin was visible as bright foci arranged in a “rosette” pattern around fiber-end profiles. Concurrently, vinculin was rearranged into a diffuse pattern within the BMC. Cadherin delineated the fiber ends in dystrophic lenses until 5 weeks postnatal, after which it displayed diffuse cytoplasmic staining with more definitive labeling at the BMC periphery. β integrin was initially distributed as punctuate spots at 2–3 weeks postnatal; however, by 4–6 weeks it was co-localized with F-actin around the periphery of fiber ends. The distribution of F-actin, cadherin, and β integrin components did not undergo further changes after 6 weeks of age; however, vinculin was present predominantly at the periphery of the BMC in 7–8-week-old dystrophic lenses. Intravitreal cytokine levels were assessed for interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interferon (IFN)-γ. Levels of IL-1α, IL-4, TNF, and IFN-γ demonstrated a similar pattern, with concentrations increasing from 2 to 6

  5. NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion is required for nuclear envelope formation and completion of nuclear pore complex assembly in Xenopus laevis egg extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Tina; Ramadan, Kristijan; Schlundt, Andreas; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Meyer, Hemmo H

    2007-08-15

    Despite the progress in understanding nuclear envelope (NE) reformation after mitosis, it has remained unclear what drives the required membrane fusion and how exactly this is coordinated with nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. Here, we show that, like other intracellular fusion reactions, NE fusion in Xenopus laevis egg extracts is mediated by SNARE proteins that require activation by NSF. Antibodies against Xenopus NSF, depletion of NSF or the dominant-negative NSF(E329Q) variant specifically inhibited NE formation. Staging experiments further revealed that NSF was required until sealing of the envelope was completed. Moreover, excess exogenous alpha-SNAP that blocks SNARE function prevented membrane fusion and caused accumulation of non-flattened vesicles on the chromatin surface. Under these conditions, the nucleoporins Nup107 and gp210 were fully recruited, whereas assembly of FxFG-repeat-containing nucleoporins was blocked. Together, we define NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events as essential steps during NE formation downstream of Nup107 recruitment, and upstream of membrane flattening and completion of NPC assembly.

  6. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase is involved in methyl jasmonate-induced root hair formation in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Changhua; Yang, Na; Ma, Xiaoling; Li, Guijun; Qian, Meng; Ng, Denny; Xia, Kai; Gan, Lijun

    2015-06-01

    Our results show that methyl jasmonate induces plasma membrane H (+) -ATPase activity and subsequently influences the apoplastic pH of trichoblasts to maintain a cell wall pH environment appropriate for root hair development. Root hairs, which arise from root epidermal cells, are tubular structures that increase the efficiency of water absorption and nutrient uptake. Plant hormones are critical regulators of root hair development. In this study, we investigated the regulatory role of the plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase in methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-induced root hair formation. We found that MeJA had a pronounced effect on the promotion of root hair formation in lettuce seedlings, but that this effect was blocked by the PM H(+)-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Furthermore, MeJA treatment increased PM H(+)-ATPase activity in parallel with H(+) efflux from the root tips of lettuce seedlings and rhizosphere acidification. Our results also showed that MeJA-induced root hair formation was accompanied by hydrogen peroxide accumulation. The apoplastic acidification acted in concert with reactive oxygen species to modulate root hair formation. Our results suggest that the effect of MeJA on root hair formation is mediated by modulation of PM H(+)-ATPase activity.

  7. Capsid protein VP4 of human rhinovirus induces membrane permeability by the formation of a size-selective multimeric pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Panjwani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-enveloped viruses must deliver their viral genome across a cell membrane without the advantage of membrane fusion. The mechanisms used to achieve this remain poorly understood. Human rhinovirus, a frequent cause of the common cold, is a non-enveloped virus of the picornavirus family, which includes other significant pathogens such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus. During picornavirus cell entry, the small myristoylated capsid protein VP4 is released from the virus, interacts with the cell membrane and is implicated in the delivery of the viral RNA genome into the cytoplasm to initiate replication. In this study, we have produced recombinant C-terminal histidine-tagged human rhinovirus VP4 and shown it can induce membrane permeability in liposome model membranes. Dextran size-exclusion studies, chemical crosslinking and electron microscopy demonstrated that VP4 forms a multimeric membrane pore, with a channel size consistent with transfer of the single-stranded RNA genome. The membrane permeability induced by recombinant VP4 was influenced by pH and was comparable to permeability induced by infectious virions. These findings present a molecular mechanism for the involvement of VP4 in cell entry and provide a model system which will facilitate exploration of VP4 as a novel antiviral target for the picornavirus family.

  8. Developments in dynamic MR elastography for in vitro biomechanical assessment of hyaline cartilage under high-frequency cyclical shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Orlando; Amrami, Kimberly K; Manduca, Armando; Rossman, Phillip J; Ehman, Richard L

    2007-02-01

    The design, construction, and evaluation of a customized dynamic magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) technique for biomechanical assessment of hyaline cartilage in vitro are described. For quantification of the dynamic shear properties of hyaline cartilage by dynamic MRE, mechanical excitation and motion sensitization were performed at frequencies in the kilohertz range. A custom electromechanical actuator and a z-axis gradient coil were used to generate and image shear waves throughout cartilage at 1000-10,000 Hz. A radiofrequency (RF) coil was also constructed for high-resolution imaging. The technique was validated at 4000 and 6000 Hz by quantifying differences in shear stiffness between soft ( approximately 200 kPa) and stiff ( approximately 300 kPa) layers of 5-mm-thick bilayered phantoms. The technique was then used to quantify the dynamic shear properties of bovine and shark hyaline cartilage samples at frequencies up to 9000 Hz. The results demonstrate that one can obtain high-resolution shear stiffness measurements of hyaline cartilage and small, stiff, multilayered phantoms at high frequencies by generating robust mechanical excitations and using large magnetic field gradients. Dynamic MRE can potentially be used to directly quantify the dynamic shear properties of hyaline and articular cartilage, as well as other cartilaginous materials and engineered constructs. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Study of MR sequence in detecting hyaline cartilage defects of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Songbai; He Cuiju; Sun Wenge; Li Chunkui; Qi Xixun; Li Yanliang; Xu Ke; Bai Xizhuang; Wu Zhenhua

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of various MR imaging sequences for detecting hyaline cartilage defects. Methods: Ten animal models of cartilage defect were established in 5 pig knees. 5 knees were examined with nine different MR sequences. The signal noise ratio of cartilage and contrast noise ratio were calculated and compared between cartilage and adjacent tissue. Measurement of the defect depth and width on the imaging was correlated with the actual measurement before imaging. 23 patients with hyaline cartilage defects of the knee were evaluated with MR imaging. All these patients underwent subsequent arthroscopy. MR imaging protocol included the selected sequences in the experimental study. Results: The cartilage SNR was better in FSE PD, FS 3D FSPGR, and FS FSE PD sequences. CNR between cartilage and subcartilaginous bone was best in FS 3D FSPGR and FS FSE PD sequences. CNR between cartilage and joint fluid was best in FS 3D FSPGR and FS FSE T 2 WI sequences. CNR between cartilage and meniscus and ligament was best in FS 3D FSPGR, FS FSE PD, SE T 1 WI, and IR TI700 sequences. CNR between cartilage and fat was best in FS 3D FSPGR and SE T 1 WI sequences. The width and depth correlation was best in IR TI700 sequence, which showed the statistical significance (P 2 WI sequence, 68%, 99%, and 0.74, respectively with IR TI700 sequence. Conclusion: The sensitivity of FS 3D FSPGR sequence in detecting hyaline cartilage defect is the highest. T 1 WI of spin echo sequence and T 2 WI/PDWI of fast spin-echo with fat saturation should be the standard sequence in the examination of knee joint. T 1 WI of IR sequence has potential clinical value for cartilage examination

  10. A comparison of different bioinks for 3D bioprinting of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Andrew C; Critchley, Susan E; Rencsok, Emily M; Kelly, Daniel J

    2016-10-07

    Cartilage is a dense connective tissue with limited self-repair capabilities. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) laden hydrogels are commonly used for fibrocartilage and articular cartilage tissue engineering, however they typically lack the mechanical integrity for implantation into high load bearing environments. This has led to increased interested in 3D bioprinting of cell laden hydrogel bioinks reinforced with stiffer polymer fibres. The objective of this study was to compare a range of commonly used hydrogel bioinks (agarose, alginate, GelMA and BioINK™) for their printing properties and capacity to support the development of either hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage in vitro. Each hydrogel was seeded with MSCs, cultured for 28 days in the presence of TGF-β3 and then analysed for markers indicative of differentiation towards either a fibrocartilaginous or hyaline cartilage-like phenotype. Alginate and agarose hydrogels best supported the development of hyaline-like cartilage, as evident by the development of a tissue staining predominantly for type II collagen. In contrast, GelMA and BioINK ™ (a PEGMA based hydrogel) supported the development of a more fibrocartilage-like tissue, as evident by the development of a tissue containing both type I and type II collagen. GelMA demonstrated superior printability, generating structures with greater fidelity, followed by the alginate and agarose bioinks. High levels of MSC viability were observed in all bioinks post-printing (∼80%). Finally we demonstrate that it is possible to engineer mechanically reinforced hydrogels with high cell viability by co-depositing a hydrogel bioink with polycaprolactone filaments, generating composites with bulk compressive moduli comparable to articular cartilage. This study demonstrates the importance of the choice of bioink when bioprinting different cartilaginous tissues for musculoskeletal applications.

  11. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma: Bilateral pulmonary nodules associated with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satti, Mohamed B.; Batouk, Abdelnasir; Ahmad, Mohamed F.; Abdelaal, Mohamed A.; Abdelaziz, Muntasir M.

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of a 30-year-old female who had been treated periodically with steroids for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura ICTP over the last 10 years. Recently, during the course of investigation, she was found to have incidental asymptomatic multiple pulmonary nodules on chest CT. Following a needle biopsy to exclude malignancy, 2 nodules were excised and were histologically confirmed as pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma PHG. The remaining 2 nodules regressed on increasing her dose of steroids. The case is discussed with emphasis on the histological and radiological differential diagnosis, in addition to including ITP among the spectrum of immunologic conditions associated with PHG. (author)

  12. Guanine nucleotide-dependent, pertussis toxin-insensitive, stimulation of inositol phosphate formation by carbachol in a membrane preparation from astrocytoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepler, J.R.; Harden, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    Formation of the inositol phosphates (InsP), InsP 3 , InsP 2 , and InsP 1 was increased in a concentration dependent manner (K/sub 0.5/ ∼ 5 μM) by GTPΣS in washed membranes prepared from 3 H-inositol-prelabelled 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Both GTPγS and GppNHp stimulated InsP formation by 2-3 fold over control; GTP and GDP were much less efficacious and GMP had no effect. Although the muscarinic cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol had no effect in the absence of guanine nucleotide, in the presence of 10 μM GTPγS, carbachol stimulated (K/sub 0.5/ ∼ 10 μ M) the formation of InsP above the level achieved with GTPγS alone. The effect of carbachol was completely blocked by atropine. The order of potency for a series of nucleotides for stimulation of InsP formation in the presence of 500 μM carbachol was GTPγS > GppNHp > GTP = GDP. Pertussis toxin, at concentrations that fully ADP-ribosylate and functionally inactivate G/sub i/, had no effect on InsP formation in the presence of GTPγS or GTPγS plus carbachol. Histamine and bradykinin also stimulated InsP formation in the presence of GTPγS in washed membranes from 1321N1 cells. These data are consistent with the idea that a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein that is not G/sub i/ is involved in receptor-mediated stimulation of InsP formation in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells

  13. Biophysical and biochemical strategies to understand membrane binding and pore formation by sticholysins, pore-forming proteins from a sea anemone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Carlos; Ros, Uris; Valle, Aisel; Pedrera, Lohans; Soto, Carmen; Hervis, Yadira P; Cabezas, Sheila; Valiente, Pedro A; Pazos, Fabiola; Lanio, Maria E

    2017-10-01

    Actinoporins constitute a unique class of pore-forming toxins found in sea anemones that are able to bind and oligomerize in membranes, leading to cell swelling, impairment of ionic gradients and, eventually, to cell death. In this review we summarize the knowledge generated from the combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches to the study of sticholysins I and II (Sts, StI/II), two actinoporins largely characterized by the Center of Protein Studies at the University of Havana during the last 20 years. These approaches include strategies for understanding the toxin structure-function relationship, the protein-membrane association process leading to pore formation and the interaction of toxin with cells. The rational combination of experimental and theoretical tools have allowed unraveling, at least partially, of the complex mechanisms involved in toxin-membrane interaction and of the molecular pathways triggered upon this interaction. The study of actinoporins is important not only to gain an understanding of their biological roles in anemone venom but also to investigate basic molecular mechanisms of protein insertion into membranes, protein-lipid interactions and the modulation of protein conformation by lipid binding. A deeper knowledge of the basic molecular mechanisms involved in Sts-cell interaction, as described in this review, will support the current investigations conducted by our group which focus on the design of immunotoxins against tumor cells and antigen-releasing systems to cell cytosol as Sts-based vaccine platforms.

  14. Membrane microdomains and the cytoskeleton constrain AtHIR1 dynamics and facilitate the formation of an AtHIR1-associated immune complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xueqin; Jing, Yanping; Xiao, Jianwei; Zhang, Yongdeng; Zhu, Yingfang; Julian, Russell; Lin, Jinxing

    2017-04-01

    Arabidopsis hypersensitive-induced reaction (AtHIR) proteins function in plant innate immunity. However, the underlying mechanisms by which AtHIRs participate in plant immunity remain elusive. Here, using VA-TIRFM and FLIM-FRET, we revealed that AtHIR1 is present in membrane microdomains and co-localizes with the membrane microdomain marker REM1.3. Single-particle tracking analysis revealed that membrane microdomains and the cytoskeleton, especially microtubules, restrict the lateral mobility of AtHIR1 at the plasma membrane and facilitate its oligomerization. Furthermore, protein proximity index measurements, fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy, and biochemical experiments demonstrated that the formation of the AtHIR1 complex upon pathogen perception requires intact microdomains and cytoskeleton. Taken together, these findings suggest that microdomains and the cytoskeleton constrain AtHIR1 dynamics, promote AtHIR1 oligomerization, and increase the efficiency of the interactions of AtHIR1 with components of the AtHIR1 complex in response to pathogens, thus providing valuable insight into the mechanisms of defense-related responses in plants. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase interferes with GTP γS stimulated IP3 formation in differentiated HL-60 cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misaki, Naoyuki; Imaizumi, Taro; Watanabe, Yashuiro

    1989-01-01

    The effects of addition of activated cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) on the function of islet-activating protein (IAP)-sensitive GTP-binding (G) protein were studied in the plasma membranes of 3 H-inositol-labeled differentiated human leukemic (HL-60) cells. Pretreatment of the membranes with activated PKA in the presence of MgATP for 15 min. at 37 degree C decreased GTP γS-stimulated inositol trisphosphate (IP 3 ) formation by about 30%, but had no influence on Ca 2+ -stimulated IP 3 formation. And autoradiography in the phosphorylation experiments of solubilized HL-60 cell membranes by PKA showed some 32 P incorporated bands, and among them one of the major bands showed the migration at 40 kDa supporting that the G protein coupling with PI response was phosphorylated by PKA. These results showed that pretreatment with activated PKA inhibited the mediating function of the G protein between the fMLP receptor and phospholipase C by its phosphorylation

  16. Coiled-coil formation of the membrane-fusion K/E peptides viewed by electron paramagnetic resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Kumar

    Full Text Available The interaction of the complementary K (Ac-(KIAALKE3-GW-NH2 and E (Ac-(EIAALEK3-GY-NH2 peptides, components of the zipper of an artificial membrane fusion system (Robson Marsden H. et al. Angew Chemie Int Ed. 2009 is investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR. By frozen solution continuous-wave EPR and double electron-electron resonance (DEER, the distance between spin labels attached to the K- and to the E-peptide is measured. Three constructs of spin-labelled K- and E-peptides are used in five combinations for low temperature investigations. The K/E heterodimers are found to be parallel, in agreement with previous studies. Also, K homodimers in parallel orientation were observed, a finding that was not reported before. Comparison to room-temperature, solution EPR shows that the latter method is less specific to detect this peptide-peptide interaction. Combining frozen solution cw-EPR for short distances (1.8 nm to 2.0 nm and DEER for longer distances thus proves versatile to detect the zipper interaction in membrane fusion. As the methodology can be applied to membrane samples, the approach presented suggests itself for in-situ studies of the complete membrane fusion process, opening up new avenues for the study of membrane fusion.

  17. Two new hyaline-ascospored species of Trichoderma and their phylogenetic positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, W T; Zhuang, W Y

    2016-01-01

    Collections of hypocrealean fungi found on decaying wood in subtropical regions of China were examined. Two new species, Trichoderma confluens and T. hubeiense, were discovered and are described. Trichoderma confluens is characterized by its widely effuse to rarely pulvinate, yellow stromata with densely disposed yellowish brown ostioles, simple acremonium- to verticillium-like conidiophores, hyaline conidia and multiform chlamydospores. Trichoderma hubeiense has pulvinate, grayish yellow stromata with brownish ostioles, trichoderma- to verticillium-like conidiophores and hyaline conidia. The phylogenetic positions of the two fungi were investigated based on sequence analyses of RNA polymerase II subunit b and translation elongation factor 1-α genes. The results indicate that T. confluens belongs to the Hypocreanum clade and is associated with but clearly separated from T. applanatum and T. decipiens. Trichoderma hubeiense belongs to the Polysporum clade and related to T. bavaricum but obviously differs from other members of the clade in sequence data. Morphological distinctions between the new species and their close relatives are noted and discussed. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

  18. Sprifermin (rhFGF18) enables proliferation of chondrocytes producing a hyaline cartilage matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigout, A; Guehring, H; Froemel, D; Meurer, A; Ladel, C; Reker, D; Bay-Jensen, A C; Karsdal, M A; Lindemann, S

    2017-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 18 has been shown to increase cartilage volume when injected intra-articularly in animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) and in patients with knee OA (during clinical development of the recombinant human FGF18, sprifermin). However, the exact nature of this effect is still unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of sprifermin at the cellular level. A combination of different chondrocyte culture systems was used and the effects of sprifermin on proliferation, the phenotype and matrix production were evaluated. The involvement of MAPKs in sprifermin signalling was also studied. In monolayer, we observed that sprifermin promoted a round cell morphology and stimulated both cellular proliferation and Sox9 expression while strongly decreasing type I collagen expression. In 3D culture, sprifermin increased the number of matrix-producing chondrocytes, improved the type II:I collagen ratio and enabled human OA chondrocytes to produce a hyaline extracellular matrix (ECM). Furthermore, we found that sprifermin displayed a 'hit and run' mode of action, with intermittent exposure required for the compound to fully exert its anabolic effect. Finally, sprifermin appeared to signal through activation of ERK. Our results indicate that intermittent exposure to sprifermin leads to expansion of hyaline cartilage-producing chondrocytes. These in vitro findings are consistent with the increased cartilage volume observed in the knees of OA patients after intra-articular injection with sprifermin in clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Hyaline cartilage involvement in patients with gout and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. An ultrasound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippucci, E; Riveros, M Gutierrez; Georgescu, D; Salaffi, F; Grassi, W

    2009-02-01

    The main aim of the present study was to determine the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasonography (US) in detecting monosodium urate and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals deposits at knee cartilage level using clinical definite diagnosis as standard reference. A total of 32 patients with a diagnosis of gout and 48 patients with pyrophosphate arthropathy were included in the study. Fifty-two patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis or osteoarthritis (OA) were recruited as disease controls. All diagnoses were made using an international clinical criterion. US examinations were performed by an experienced sonographer, blind to clinical and laboratory data. Hyaline cartilage was assessed to detect two US findings recently indicated as indicative of crystal deposits: hyperechoic enhancement of the superficial margin of the hyaline cartilage and hyperechoic spots within the cartilage layer not generating a posterior acoustic shadow. Hyperechoic enhancement of the chondrosynovial margin was found in at least one knee of 14 out of 32 (43.7%) patients with gout and in a single knee of only one patient affected by pyrophosphate arthropathy (specificity=99%). Intra-cartilaginous hyperechoic spots were detected in at least one knee of 33 out of 48 (68.7%) patients with pyrophosphate arthropathy and in two disease controls one with OA and the second with RA (specificity=97.6%). The results of the present study indicate that US may play a relevant role in distinguishing cartilage involvement in patients with crystal-related arthropathy. The selected US findings were found to be highly specific.

  20. Talocalcaneal Joint Middle Facet Coalition Resection With Interposition of a Juvenile Hyaline Cartilage Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Dyane E; Wood, Ryan W; Vaardahl, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition is the most common tarsal coalition, occurring in ≤2% of the population. Fewer than 50% of involved feet obtain lasting relief of symptoms after nonoperative treatment, and surgical intervention is commonly used to relieve symptoms, increase the range of motion, improve function, reconstruct concomitant pes planovalgus, and prevent future arthrosis from occurring at the surrounding joints. Several approaches to surgical intervention are available for patients with middle facet coalitions, ranging from resection to hindfoot arthrodesis. We present a series of 4 cases, in 3 adolescent patients, of talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition resection with interposition of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft (DeNovo(®) NT Natural Tissue Graft, Zimmer, Inc., Warsaw, IN). With a mean follow-up period of 42.8 ± 2.9 (range 41 to 47) months, the 3 adolescent patients in the present series were doing well with improved subtalar joint motion and decreased pain, and 1 foot showed no bony regrowth on a follow-up computed tomography scan. The use of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft as interposition material after talocalcaneal middle facet coalition resection combined with adjunct procedures to address concomitant pes planovalgus resulted in good short-term outcomes in 4 feet in 3 adolescent patients. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An all-aromatic polypyridine: Monomer and polymer synthesis; Film formation and crosslinking; A candidate fuel cell membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkema, Doetze J.; Versteegen, Ron M.; Pouderoijen, Maarten J.; Janssen, Henk M.; Boere, Ben; Brands, Ferry; Kemperman, GerJan; Rewinkel, Jos B. M.; Koeman, Menno

    2018-03-01

    2,6-di (3-pyridyl)phenol and the title polymer are synthesized at 1 kg scale. Polymer is processed and crosslinked without the introduction of non-aromatic moieties after shaping into membranes. Attractive proton conduction, at high temperature (140-180 °C: 300 mS cm-1) and at room temperature (60 mS cm-1) are recorded in the dry state (higher numbers at modest humidity) and excellent retention of properties after challenge by humidity (in contrast with state-of-the-art PBI membranes). Functional fuel cells are made and tested. In prolonged use the membrane is plasticized and this seems attributable to curing reversal at the hydrogen electrode. For high temperature fuel cell use, another curing scheme (again without the introduction of aliphatic character) must be found.

  2. Lipid domain formation and ligand-receptor distribution in lipid bilayer membranes investigated by atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Mouritsen, O.G.; Jørgensen, K.

    2002-01-01

    A novel experimental technique, based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), is proposed to visualize the lateral organization of membrane systems in the nanometer range. The technique involves the use of a ligand-receptor pair, biotin-avidin, which introduces a height variation on a solid-supported l......A novel experimental technique, based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), is proposed to visualize the lateral organization of membrane systems in the nanometer range. The technique involves the use of a ligand-receptor pair, biotin-avidin, which introduces a height variation on a solid...

  3. The Major Outer Membrane Protein MopB Is Required for Twitching Movement and Affects Biofilm Formation and Virulence in Two Xylella fastidiosa strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongyu; Kandel, Prem P; Cruz, Luisa F; Cobine, Paul A; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2017-11-01

    MopB is a major outer membrane protein (OMP) in Xylella fastidiosa, a bacterial plant pathogen that causes losses on many economically important crops. Based on in silico analysis, the uncharacterized MopB protein of X. fastidiosa contains a β-barrel structure with an OmpA-like domain and a predicted calcium-binding motif. Here, MopB function was studied by mutational analysis taking advantage of the natural competence of X. fastidiosa. Mutants of mopB were constructed in two different X. fastidiosa strains, the type strain Temecula and the more virulent WM1-1. Deletion of the mopB gene impaired cell-to-cell aggregation, surface attachment, and biofilm formation in both strains. Interestingly, mopB deletion completely abolished twitching motility. Electron microscopy of the bacterial cell surface revealed that mopB deletion eliminated type IV and type I pili formation, potentially caused by destabilization of the outer membrane. Both mopB mutants showed reduced virulence using tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) as a host under greenhouse conditions. These results suggest that MopB has pleiotropic functions in biofilm formation and twitching motility and is important for virulence of X. fastidiosa.

  4. Bacteriocin AS-48 binding to model membranes and pore formation as revealed by coarse-grained simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz, Victor L.; Ramos, Javier; Martinez-Salazar, Javier; Melo, Manuel N.

    Bacteriocin AS-48 is a membrane-interacting peptide that acts as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Prior Nuclear Magnetic Resonance experiments and the high resolution crystal structure of AS-48 have suggested a mechanism for the molecular activity of

  5. In-situ assessment of biofilm formation in submerged membrane system using optical coherence tomography and computational fluid dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Fortunato, Luca; Qamar, Adnan; Wang, Yiran; Jeong, Sanghyun; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-01-01

    coherence tomography (OCT), allowing the in-situ investigation of the biofilm structure for 43 d. The OCT enabled to obtain a time-lapse of biofilm development on the membrane under the continuous operation. Acquired real-time information on the biofilm

  6. Regeneration of hyaline-like cartilage in situ with SOX9 stimulation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Zhang

    Full Text Available Microfracture, a common procedure for treatment of cartilage injury, induces fibrocartilage repair by recruiting bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC to the site of cartilage injury. However, fibrocartilage is inferior biomechanically to hyaline cartilage. SRY-type high-mobility group box-9 (SOX9 is a master regulator of chondrogenesis by promoting proliferation and differentiation of MSC into chondrocytes. In this study we aimed to test the therapeutic potential of cell penetrating recombinant SOX9 protein in regeneration of hyaline cartilage in situ at the site of cartilage injury. We generated a recombinant SOX9 protein which was fused with super positively charged green fluorescence protein (GFP (scSOX9 to facilitate cell penetration. scSOX9 was able to induce chondrogenesis of bone marrow derived MSC in vitro. In a rabbit cartilage injury model, scSOX9 in combination with microfracture significantly improved quality of repaired cartilage as shown by macroscopic appearance. Histological analysis revealed that the reparative tissue induced by microfracture with scSOX9 had features of hyaline cartilage; and collagen type II to type I ratio was similar to that in normal cartilage. This short term in vivo study demonstrated that when administered at the site of microfracture, scSOX9 was able to induce reparative tissue with features of hyaline cartilage.

  7. Distinction between the extracellular matrix of the nucleus pulposus and hyaline cartilage: a requisite for tissue engineering of intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwale, F; Roughley, P; Antoniou, J

    2004-12-15

    Tissue engineering of intervertebral discs (IVD) using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) induced to differentiate into a disc-cell phenotype has been considered as an alternative treatment for disc degeneration. However, since there is no unique marker characteristic of discs and since hyaline cartilage and immature nucleus pulposus (NP) possess similar macromolecules in their extracellular matrix, it is currently difficult to recognize MSC conversion to a disc cell. This study was performed to compare the proteoglycan to collagen ratio (measured as GAG to hydroxyproline ratio) in the NP of normal disc to that of the hyaline cartilage of the endplate within the same group of individuals and test the hypothesis that this ratio can be used for in vivo studies to distinguish between a normal NP and hyaline cartilage phenotype. Whole human lumbar spine specimens from fresh cadavers, ranging in age from 12 weeks to 79 years, were used to harvest the IVDs and adjacent endplates. The GAG to hydroxyproline ratio within the NP of young adults is approximately 27:1, whereas the ratio within the hyaline cartilage endplate of the same aged individuals is about 2:1. The production of an extracellular matrix with a high proteoglycan to collagen ratio can be used in vivo to distinguish NP cells from chondrocytes, and could help in identifying a NP-like phenotype in vivo as opposed to a chondrocyte when MSCs are induced to differentiate for tissue engineering of a disc.

  8. Distinction between the extracellular matrix of the nucleus pulposus and hyaline cartilage: a requisite for tissue engineering of intervertebral disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwale F.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering of intervertebral discs (IVD using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs induced to differentiate into a disc-cell phenotype has been considered as an alternative treatment for disc degeneration. However, since there is no unique marker characteristic of discs and since hyaline cartilage and immature nucleus pulposus (NP possess similar macromolecules in their extracellular matrix, it is currently difficult to recognize MSC conversion to a disc cell. This study was performed to compare the proteoglycan to collagen ratio (measured as GAG to hydroxyproline ratio in the NP of normal disc to that of the hyaline cartilage of the endplate within the same group of individuals and test the hypothesis that this ratio can be used for in vivo studies to distinguish between a normal NP and hyaline cartilage phenotype. Whole human lumbar spine specimens from fresh cadavers, ranging in age from 12 weeks to 79 years, were used to harvest the IVDs and adjacent endplates. The GAG to hydroxyproline ratio within the NP of young adults is approximately 27:1, whereas the ratio within the hyaline cartilage endplate of the same aged individuals is about 2:1. The production of an extracellular matrix with a high proteoglycan to collagen ratio can be used in vivo to distinguish NP cells from chondrocytes, and could help in identifying a NP-like phenotype in vivo as opposed to a chondrocyte when MSCs are induced to differentiate for tissue engineering of a disc.

  9. Regeneration of hyaline-like cartilage in situ with SOX9 stimulation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Wu, Shili; Naccarato, Ty; Prakash-Damani, Manan; Chou, Yuan; Chu, Cong-Qiu; Zhu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Microfracture, a common procedure for treatment of cartilage injury, induces fibrocartilage repair by recruiting bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to the site of cartilage injury. However, fibrocartilage is inferior biomechanically to hyaline cartilage. SRY-type high-mobility group box-9 (SOX9) is a master regulator of chondrogenesis by promoting proliferation and differentiation of MSC into chondrocytes. In this study we aimed to test the therapeutic potential of cell penetrating recombinant SOX9 protein in regeneration of hyaline cartilage in situ at the site of cartilage injury. We generated a recombinant SOX9 protein which was fused with super positively charged green fluorescence protein (GFP) (scSOX9) to facilitate cell penetration. scSOX9 was able to induce chondrogenesis of bone marrow derived MSC in vitro. In a rabbit cartilage injury model, scSOX9 in combination with microfracture significantly improved quality of repaired cartilage as shown by macroscopic appearance. Histological analysis revealed that the reparative tissue induced by microfracture with scSOX9 had features of hyaline cartilage; and collagen type II to type I ratio was similar to that in normal cartilage. This short term in vivo study demonstrated that when administered at the site of microfracture, scSOX9 was able to induce reparative tissue with features of hyaline cartilage.

  10. Fibrous cartilage of human menisci is less shock-absorbing and energy-dissipating than hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaugler, Mario; Wirz, Dieter; Ronken, Sarah; Hafner, Mirjam; Göpfert, Beat; Friederich, Niklaus F; Elke, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    To test meniscal mechanical properties such as the dynamic modulus of elasticity E* and the loss angle δ at two loading frequencies ω at different locations of the menisci and compare it to E* and δ of hyaline cartilage in indentation mode with spherical indenters. On nine pairs of human menisci, the dynamic E*-modulus and loss angle δ (as a measure of the energy dissipation) were determined. The measurements were performed at two different strain rates (slow sinusoidal and fast single impact) to show the strain rate dependence of the material. The measurements were compared to previous similar measurements with the same equipment on human hyaline cartilage. The resultant E* at fast indentation (median 1.16 MPa) was significantly higher, and the loss angle was significantly lower (median 10.2°) compared to slow-loading mode's E* and δ (median 0.18 MPa and 16.9°, respectively). Further, significant differences for different locations are shown. On the medial meniscus, the anterior horn shows the highest resultant dynamic modulus. In dynamic measurements with a spherical indenter, the menisci are much softer and less energy-dissipating than hyaline cartilage. Further, the menisci are stiffer and less energy-dissipating in the middle, intermediate part compared to the meniscal base. In compression, the energy dissipation of meniscus cartilage plays a minor role compared to hyaline cartilage. At high impacts, energy dissipation is less than on low impacts, similar to cartilage.

  11. Similar hyaline-like cartilage repair of osteochondral defects in rabbits using isotropic and anisotropic collagen scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mulder, Eric L W; Hannink, Gerjon; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Daamen, Willeke F; Buma, Pieter

    2014-02-01

    Lesions in knee joint articular cartilage (AC) have limited repair capacity. Many clinically available treatments induce a fibrous-like cartilage repair instead of hyaline cartilage. To induce hyaline cartilage repair, we hypothesized that type I collagen scaffolds with fibers aligned perpendicular to the AC surface would result in qualitatively better tissue repair due to a guided cellular influx from the subchondral bone. By specific freezing protocols, type I collagen scaffolds with isotropic and anisotropic fiber architectures were produced. Rabbits were operated on bilaterally and two full thickness defects were created in each knee joint. The defects were filled with (1) an isotropic scaffold, (2) an anisotropic scaffold with pores parallel to the cartilage surface, and (3) an anisotropic scaffold with pores perpendicular to the cartilage surface. Empty defects served as controls. After 4 (n=13) and 12 (n=13) weeks, regeneration was scored qualitatively and quantitatively using histological analysis and a modified O'Driscoll score. After 4 weeks, all defects were completely filled with partially differentiated hyaline cartilage tissue. No differences in O'Driscoll scores were measured between empty defects and scaffold types. After 12 weeks, all treatments led to hyaline cartilage repair visualized by increased glycosaminoglycan staining. Total scores were significantly increased for parallel anisotropic and empty defects over time (phyaline-like cartilage repair. Fiber architecture had no effect on cartilage repair.

  12. Spinning process variables and polymer solution effects in the die-swell phenomenon during hollow fiber membranes formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira C.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available During hollow fiber spinning many variables are involved whose effects are still not completely clear. However, its understanding is of great interest because the control of these variables may originate membranes with the desired morphologies and physical properties. In this work, the phase inversion process induced by the immersion precipitation technique was applied to prepare hollow fibers membranes. It was verified that some of the variables involved, can promote a visco-elastic polymer solution expansion, called die-swell phenomenon, which is undesired since it may lead to low reproducibility of the permeation properties. The effects of the distance between spinneret and precipitation bath, the bore liquid composition, and the polymer solution composition were analyzed and discussed in order to avoid this phenomenon. According to the results, it was verified that the parameters investigated might promote a delay precipitation, which restrained the visco-elastic expansion.

  13. Can macular xanthophylls replace cholesterol in formation of the liquid-ordered phase in lipid-bilayer membranes?

    OpenAIRE

    Subczynski, Witold K.; Wisniewska, Anna; Widomska, Justyna

    2012-01-01

    Lateral organization of membranes made from binary mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and macular xanthophylls (lutein or zeaxanthin) was investigated using the saturation-recovery (SR) EPR spin-labeling discrimination by oxygen transport (DOT) method in which the bimolecular collision rate of molecular oxygen with the nitroxide spin label is measured. This work was undertaken to examine whether or not lutein and zeaxanthin, macular xant...

  14. Formation of cubic phases from large unilamellar vesicles of dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol/monoolein membranes induced by low concentrations of Ca2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Tarek S; Okamoto, Yoshihide; Masum, Shah Md; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2005-12-06

    We developed a new method for the transformation of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) into the cubic phase. We found that the addition of low concentrations of Ca(2+) to suspensions of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) of membranes of monoolein (MO) and dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG) mixtures (DOPG/MO) changed their L(alpha) phase to the cubic phases. For instance, the addition of 15-25 mM Ca(2+) to 30%-DOPG/70%-MO-MLVs induced the Q(229) phase, whereas the addition of > or =28 mM Ca(2+) induced the Q(224) phase. LUVs of DOPG/MO membranes containing > or =25 mol % DOPG were prepared easily. Low concentrations of Ca(2+) transformed these LUVs in excess buffer into the Q(224) or the Q(229) phase, depending on the Ca(2+) concentration. For example, 15 and 50 mM Ca(2+) induced the Q(224) and Q(229) phase in the 30%-DOPG/70%-MO-LUVs at 25 degrees C, respectively. This finding is the first demonstration of transformation of LUVs of lipid membranes into the cubic phase under excess water condition.

  15. Hyaline Tintinnina (Protozoa-Ciliophora-Oligotrichida from northeast Brazilian coastal reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Sassi

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven species of hyaline Tintinnina were obtained from plankton samples collected near the coastal reefs of Ponta do Seixas (Lat. 7º09'16"S, Long. 34º4735"W, Northeastern Brazil, from April 1981 to May 1982 and from April 1983 to May 1984: Amphorellopsis acuta (Schmidt, 1901, Dadayiella ganymedes (Entz Sr., 1884, Epiplocyloides reticulata (Ostenfeld & Schmidt, 1901, Eutintinnus tubulosus (Ostenfeld, 1899, Favella ehrenbergi (Claparède & Lachmann, 1858, Metacylis mereschkowskyi Kofoid & Campbell, 1929 and M. perspicax (Hada, 1938. The most frequent and abundant species were M. mereschkowskyi and F. ehrenbergi. Except/.ganymedes, E. reticulata and F. ehrenbergi all species are new records from Brazil. Metacylis perspicax is also the seventh world register. For all species we provide description, drawings, measurements, seasonal occurrence, world distribution and some systematic comments.

  16. pH-Dependent Formation and Disintegration of the Influenza A Virus Protein Scaffold To Provide Tension for Membrane Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batishchev, O V; Shilova, L A; Kachala, M V; Tashkin, V Y; Sokolov, V S; Fedorova, N V; Baratova, L A; Knyazev, D G; Zimmerberg, J; Chizmadzhev, Y A

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus is taken up from a pH-neutral extracellular milieu into an endosome, whose contents then acidify, causing changes in the viral matrix protein (M1) that coats the inner monolayer of the viral lipid envelope. At a pH of ~6, M1 interacts with the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) in a putative priming stage; at this stage, the interactions of the M1 scaffold coating the lipid envelope are intact. The M1 coat disintegrates as acidification continues to a pH of ~5 to clear a physical path for the viral genome to transit from the viral interior to the cytoplasm. Here we investigated the physicochemical mechanism of M1's pH-dependent disintegration. In neutral media, the adsorption of M1 protein on the lipid bilayer was electrostatic in nature and reversible. The energy of the interaction of M1 molecules with each other in M1 dimers was about 10 times as weak as that of the interaction of M1 molecules with the lipid bilayer. Acidification drives conformational changes in M1 molecules due to changes in the M1 charge, leading to alterations in their electrostatic interactions. Dropping the pH from 7.1 to 6.0 did not disturb the M1 layer; dropping it lower partially desorbed M1 because of increased repulsion between M1 monomers still stuck to the membrane. Lipid vesicles coated with M1 demonstrated pH-dependent rupture of the vesicle membrane, presumably because of the tension generated by this repulsive force. Thus, the disruption of the vesicles coincident with M1 protein scaffold disintegration at pH 5 likely stretches the lipid membrane to the point of rupture, promoting fusion pore widening for RNP release. Influenza remains a top killer of human beings throughout the world, in part because of the influenza virus's rapid binding to cells and its uptake into compartments hidden from the immune system. To attack the influenza virus during this time of hiding, we need to understand the physical forces that allow the internalized virus to infect the cell. In

  17. Ultrasonography shows disappearance of monosodium urate crystal deposition on hyaline cartilage after sustained normouricemia is achieved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Ralf G; Schlesinger, Naomi

    2010-02-01

    This study aimed at determining whether lowering serum urate (SU) to less than 6 mg/dl in patients with gout affects ultrasonographic findings. Seven joints in five patients with monosodium urate (MSU) crystal proven gout and hyperuricemia were examined over time with serial ultrasonography. Four of the five patients were treated with urate lowering drugs (ULDs) (allopurinol, n = 3; probenecid, n = 1). One patient was treated with colchicine alone. Attention was given to changes in a hyperechoic, irregular coating of the hyaline cartilage in the examined joints (double contour sign or "urate icing"). This coating was considered to represent precipitate of MSU crystals. Index joints included metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints (n = 2), knee joints (n = 3), and first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints (n = 2). The interval between baseline and follow-up images ranged from 7 to 18 months. Serial SU levels were obtained during the follow-up period. During the follow-up period, three patients treated with ULD (allopurinol, n = 2; probenecid, n = 1) achieved a SU level of or =7 mg/dl. In one patient treated with allopurinol, SU levels improved from 13 to 7 mg/dl during the follow-up period. Decrease, but not resolution of the hyperechoic coating was seen in this patient. In the patient treated with colchicine alone, SU levels remained >8 mg/dl, and no sonographic change was observed. In our patients, sonographic signs of deposition of MSU crystals on the surface of hyaline cartilage disappeared completely if sustained normouricemia was achieved. This is the first report showing that characteristic sonographic changes are influenced by ULDs once SU levels remain studies are needed to further assess these potentially important findings.

  18. Transient permeabilization of cell membranes by ultrasound-exposed microbubbles is related to formation of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juffermans, L J M; Dijkmans, P A; Musters, R J P; Visser, C A; Kamp, O

    2006-10-01

    In the present study, we addressed the interactions among ultrasound, microbubbles, and living cells as well as consequent arising bioeffects. We specifically investigated whether hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is involved in transient permeabilization of cell membranes in vitro after ultrasound exposure at low diagnostic power, in the presence of stable oscillating microbubbles, by measuring the generation of H(2)O(2) and Ca(2+) influx. Ultrasound, in the absence or presence of SonoVue microbubbles, was applied to H9c2 cells at 1.8 MHz with a mechanical index (MI) of 0.1 or 0.5 during 10 s. This was repeated every minute, for a total of five times. The production of H(2)O(2) was measured intracellularly with CM-H(2)DCFDA. Cell membrane permeability was assessed by measuring real-time changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration with fluo-4 using live-cell fluorescence microscopy. Ultrasound, in the presence of microbubbles, caused a significant increase in intracellular H(2)O(2) at MI 0.1 of 50% and MI 0.5 of 110% compared with control (P ultrasound exposure was completely blocked at MI 0.1 (P ultrasound-exposed microbubbles.

  19. Formation of chelating agent driven anodized TiO{sub 2} nanotubular membrane and its photovoltaic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Subarna; Misra, Mano; Mohapatra, Susanta K; Howard, Cameron [Chemical and Materials Engineering/MS 388, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Mohapatra, Srikanta K [NM Institute of Engineering and Technology, Bhubaneswar 751009 (India); Kamilla, Sushanta K, E-mail: Misra@unr.edu [Institute of Technical Education and Research, Bhubaneswar 751030 (India)

    2010-04-09

    Titania (TiO{sub 2}) nanotubular arrays provide an exciting material for dye sensitizing solar cells (DSSC) because of their large surface area, lower recombination losses, and fast charge transport properties along the nanotubes. In this paper, design of a next generation DSSC using a TiO{sub 2} nanotubular membrane is discussed. A single step, green process is developed to produce stable large area, free-standing TiO{sub 2} nanotubular films (in a short time, 30-60 min) by anodizing Ti using an organic electrolyte, containing disodium salt of ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid (Na{sub 2}[H{sub 2}EDTA]) as complexing agent, and subsequent drying. Transparent, crack-free TiO{sub 2} films, 20-41 {mu}m thick containing ordered hexagonal TiO{sub 2} nanotubes are achieved by this process. Films having a geometrical area up to 16.5 cm{sup 2} with pore openings of 182 nm have been obtained. These films have been etched to form membranes which provide an exciting prospect for front side illuminated DSSC with good mass and photon transport properties as well as wettability. A photovoltaic efficiency of 2.7% is achieved using a front side illuminated DSSC compared to 1.77% using back side illumination.

  20. Effect of Cytokines on Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption during Mechanical Force Loading of the Periodontal Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Kitaura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical force loading exerts important effects on the skeleton by controlling bone mass and strength. Several in vivo experimental models evaluating the effects of mechanical loading on bone metabolism have been reported. Orthodontic tooth movement is a useful model for understanding the mechanism of bone remodeling induced by mechanical loading. In a mouse model of orthodontic tooth movement, TNF-α was expressed and osteoclasts appeared on the compressed side of the periodontal ligament. In TNF-receptor-deficient mice, there was less tooth movement and osteoclast numbers were lower than in wild-type mice. These results suggest that osteoclast formation and bone resorption caused by loading forces on the periodontal ligament depend on TNF-α. Several cytokines are expressed in the periodontal ligament during orthodontic tooth movement. Studies have found that inflammatory cytokines such as IL-12 and IFN-γ strongly inhibit osteoclast formation and tooth movement. Blocking macrophage colony-stimulating factor by using anti-c-Fms antibody also inhibited osteoclast formation and tooth movement. In this review we describe and discuss the effect of cytokines in the periodontal ligament on osteoclast formation and bone resorption during mechanical force loading.

  1. NANOCOVERING OF TITAN WITH SILICON AND MOLYBDENUM AS ACTIVATOR OF FORMATION AND REACTIONARY AGGLOMERATION OF FILTERS AND MEMBRANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kovalevski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The technology of production of porous powder materials with frame structure on the basis of spherical particles of titan powder by means of applying on them technological coverings (Si + Mo + C with the thickness up to 2 mm is developed. Formation of powders with covering was carried out in the mold at pressure below yield point (up to 150 MPa.

  2. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2)-dependent Oligomerization of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2) Triggers the Formation of a Lipidic Membrane Pore Implicated in Unconventional Secretion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steringer, Julia P.; Bleicken, Stephanie; Andreas, Helena; Zacherl, Sonja; Laussmann, Mareike; Temmerman, Koen; Contreras, F. Xabier; Bharat, Tanmay A. M.; Lechner, Johannes; Müller, Hans-Michael; Briggs, John A. G.; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Nickel, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is a critical mitogen with a central role in specific steps of tumor-induced angiogenesis. It is known to be secreted by unconventional means bypassing the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi-dependent secretory pathway. However, the mechanism of FGF2 membrane translocation into the extracellular space has remained elusive. Here, we show that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-dependent membrane recruitment causes FGF2 to oligomerize, which in turn triggers the formation of a lipidic membrane pore with a putative toroidal structure. This process is strongly up-regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation of FGF2. Our findings explain key requirements of FGF2 secretion from living cells and suggest a novel self-sustained mechanism of protein translocation across membranes with a lipidic membrane pore being a transient translocation intermediate. PMID:22730382

  3. Influence of Structure and Composition on Dynamic Viscoelastic Property of Cartilaginous Tissue: Criteria for Classification between Hyaline Cartilage and Fibrocartilage Based on Mechanical Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Shogo; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Furukawa, Katsuko; Ushida, Takashi

    Recently, many types of methodologies have been developed to regenerate articular cartilage. It is important to assess whether the reconstructed cartilaginous tissue has the appropriate mechanical functions to qualify as hyaline (articular) cartilage. In some cases, the reconstructed tissue may become fibrocartilage and not hyaline cartilage. In this study, we determined the dynamic viscoelastic properties of these two types of cartilage by using compression and shear tests, respectively. Hyaline cartilage specimens were harvested from the articular surface of bovine knee joints and fibrocartilage specimens were harvested from the meniscus tissue of the same. The results of this study revealed that the compressive energy dissipation of hyaline cartilage showed a strong dependence on testing frequency at low frequencies, while that of fibrocartilage did not. Therefore, the compressive energy dissipation that is indicated by the loss tangent could become the criterion for the in vitro assessment of the mechanical function of regenerated cartilage.

  4. Collagen metabolism and basement membrane formation in cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells: Induction of assembly on fibrillar type I collagen substrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, G.; van der Schueren, B.; van den Berghe, H.; Nusgens, B.; Van Cauwenberge, D.; Lapiere, C.

    1987-01-01

    Collagen metabolism was compared in cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells maintained on plastic or fibrillar type I collagen gel substrata. The accumulation of dialysable and non-dialysable [ 3 H]hydroxyproline and the identification of the collagens produced suggest no difference between substrata in the allover rates of collagen synthesis and degradation. The proportion of the [ 3 H]collagen which accumulates in the monolayers of cultures on collagen, however, markedly exceeds that of cultures on plastic. Cultures on collagen deposit a sheet-like layer of extracellular matrix materials on the surface of the collagen fibers. Transformed cells on collagen produce and accumulate more [ 3 H]collage, yet are less effective in basement membrane formation than normal cells, indicting that the accumulation of collagen alone and the effect of interstitial collagen thereupon do not suffice. Thus, exogenous fibrillar collagen appears to enhance, but is not sufficient for proper assembly of collagenous basement membrane components near the basal epithelial cell surface

  5. Effect of Holarrhena antidysentrica (Ha) and Andrographis paniculata (Ap) on the biofilm formation and cell membrane integrity of opportunistic pathogen Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanwar, Ankit; Chawla, Raman; Chakotiya, Ankita Singh; Thakur, Pallavi; Goel, Rajeev; Basu, Mitra; Arora, Rajesh; Khan, Haider Ali

    2016-12-01

    Increasing occurrence of gastroenteritis outbreaks caused by food borne opportunistic microorganisms has become a major problem in food industry as well as in immunocompromised host. Antimicrobial agents are losing their efficacy due to increase in the microbial resistance. For such reasons, conventional treatment has become limited to manage the infections state. Need of the hour is to instigate the search for safer holistic alternatives. The present study was hence conducted to assess the antibiofilm effect and mode of action of aquo alcoholic extracts of Holarrhena antidysentrica (Ha) and Andrographis paniculata (Ap) against the Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium. Both the extracts were screened for the presence of phytocompounds followed by the characterization using Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) infrared spectroscopy and bioactivity finger print analysis. Anti-biofilm assays were determined to test the potential of both extracts to inhibit the biofilm formation, while Propidium Iodide (PI) uptake analysis revealed that cell membrane was damaged by the exposure of nutraceuticals for 1 h. This study has demonstrated that both nutraceuticals have anti-biofilm and antimicrobial activity perturbing the membrane integrity of food-borne S. typhimurium and could be used as curative remedy to control the food borne microbial infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Secretory granule formation and membrane recycling by the trans-Golgi network in adipokinetic cells of Locusta migratoria in relation to flight and rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederen, J H; Vullings, H G

    1995-03-01

    The influence of flight activity on the formation of secretory granules and the concomitant membrane recycling by the trans-Golgi network in the peptidergic neurosecretory adipokinetic cells of Locusta migratoria was investigated by means of ultrastructural morphometric methods. The patterns of labelling of the trans-Golgi network by the exogenous adsorptive endocytotic tracer wheat-germ agglutinin-conjugated horse-radish peroxidase and by the endogenous marker enzyme acid phosphatase were used as parameters and were measured by an automatic image analysis system. The results show that endocytosed fragments of plasma membrane with bound peroxidase label were transported to the trans-Golgi network and used to build new secretory granules. The amounts of peroxidase and especially of acid phosphatase within the trans-Golgi network showed a strong tendency to be smaller in flight-stimulated cells than in non-stimulated cells. The amounts of acid phosphatase in the immature secretory granules originating from the trans-Golgi network were significantly smaller in stimulated cells. The number of immature secretory granules positive for acid phosphatase tended to be higher in stimulated cells. Thus, flight stimulation of adipokinetic cells for 1 h influences the functioning of the trans-Golgi network; this most probably results in a slight enhancement of the production of secretory granules by the trans-Golgi network.

  7. Effects of inorganic ions on morphology of octacalcium phosphate grown on cation selective membrane at physiological temperature and pH in relation to enamel formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Mayumi; Moriwaki, Yutaka

    1989-05-01

    The crystal growth of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) is of particular interest, since there is a possibility that OCP is formed in the early stage of tooth enamel formation. In this study, the effects of CO2-3, Mg2+ and F-ions on the morphology of OCP were investigated in a membrane system, where a cation selective membrane was used to simulate amelogenesis. Reactions were carried out at pH 6.3, 6.5 and 6.8 for 3 days at 37°C. In most cases, these ions suppressed the crystal growth in the c-axis direction of OCP, particularly when they coexisted. The morphology of OCP crystal changed from ribbon-like to flake-like, depending on the inhibitory activity. The inhibitory activity, particularly that of F - ion, was suppressed at pH lower than pH 6.8. Antagonistic effect of Mg2+ and F-ion was observed at pH 6.5. In the case of F - ion, OCP crystals showed a unique pattern, which suggests hydrolysis of OCP and subsequent growth of apatite. These findings indicate that inorganic ions, particularly F - ion, influence the growth of OCP. Although CO2-3, Mg2+andF-ions coexisted, extended growth in the c-axis direction of OCP took place at pH 6.0.

  8. Distinction between the extracellular matrix of the nucleus pulposus and hyaline cartilage: a requisite for tissue engineering of intervertebral disc

    OpenAIRE

    Mwale F.; Roughley P.; Antoniou J.

    2004-01-01

    Tissue engineering of intervertebral discs (IVD) using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) induced to differentiate into a disc-cell phenotype has been considered as an alternative treatment for disc degeneration. However, since there is no unique marker characteristic of discs and since hyaline cartilage and immature nucleus pulposus (NP) possess similar macromolecules in their extracellular matrix, it is currently difficult to recognize MSC conversion to a disc cell. This study was performed to c...

  9. Regeneration of hyaline-like cartilage in situ with SOX9 stimulation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Wu, Shili; Naccarato, Ty; Prakash-Damani, Manan; Chou, Yuan; Chu, Cong-Qiu; Zhu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Microfracture, a common procedure for treatment of cartilage injury, induces fibrocartilage repair by recruiting bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to the site of cartilage injury. However, fibrocartilage is inferior biomechanically to hyaline cartilage. SRY-type high-mobility group box-9 (SOX9) is a master regulator of chondrogenesis by promoting proliferation and differentiation of MSC into chondrocytes. In this study we aimed to test the therapeutic potential of cell penetrat...

  10. Hyaline cartilage regeneration by combined therapy of microfracture and long-term bone morphogenetic protein-2 delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee Seok; La, Wan-Geun; Bhang, Suk Ho; Kim, Hak-Jun; Im, Gun-Il; Lee, Haeshin; Park, Jung-Ho; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2011-07-01

    Microfracture of cartilage induces migration of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. However, this treatment often results in fibrocartilage regeneration. Growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 induce the differentiation of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes, which can be used for hyaline cartilage regeneration. Here, we tested the hypothesis that long-term delivery of BMP-2 to cartilage defects subjected to microfracture results in regeneration of high-quality hyaline-like cartilage, as opposed to short-term delivery of BMP-2 or no BMP-2 delivery. Heparin-conjugated fibrin (HCF) and normal fibrin were used as carriers for the long- and short-term delivery of BMP-2, respectively. Rabbit articular cartilage defects were treated with microfracture combined with one of the following: no treatment, fibrin, short-term delivery of BMP-2, HCF, or long-term delivery of BMP-2. Eight weeks after treatment, histological analysis revealed that the long-term delivery of BMP-2 group (microfracture + HCF + BMP-2) showed the most staining with alcian blue. A biochemical assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction assay and Western blot analysis all revealed that the long-term delivery of BMP-2 group had the highest glucosaminoglycan content as well as the highest expression level of collagen type II. Taken together, the long-term delivery of BMP-2 to cartilage defects subjected to microfracture resulted in regeneration of hyaline-like cartilage, as opposed to short-term delivery or no BMP-2 delivery. Therefore, this method could be more convenient for hyaline cartilage regeneration than autologous chondrocyte implantation due to its less invasive nature and lack of cell implantation.

  11. Rotating three-dimensional dynamic culture of adult human bone marrow-derived cells for tissue engineering of hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shinsuke; Mishima, Hajime; Ishii, Tomoo; Akaogi, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Chang, Fei; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2009-04-01

    The method of constructing cartilage tissue from bone marrow-derived cells in vitro is considered a valuable technique for hyaline cartilage regenerative medicine. Using a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor developed in a NASA space experiment, we attempted to efficiently construct hyaline cartilage tissue from human bone marrow-derived cells without using a scaffold. Bone marrow aspirates were obtained from the iliac crest of nine patients during orthopedic operation. After their proliferation in monolayer culture, the adherent cells were cultured in the RWV bioreactor with chondrogenic medium for 2 weeks. Cells from the same source were cultured in pellet culture as controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluations (collagen type I and II) and quantification of glycosaminoglycan were performed on formed tissues and compared. The engineered constructs obtained using the RWV bioreactor showed strong features of hyaline cartilage in terms of their morphology as determined by histological and immunohistological evaluations. The glycosaminoglycan contents per microg DNA of the tissues were 10.01 +/- 3.49 microg/microg DNA in the case of the RWV bioreactor and 6.27 +/- 3.41 microg/microg DNA in the case of the pellet culture, and their difference was significant. The RWV bioreactor could provide an excellent environment for three-dimensional cartilage tissue architecture that can promote the chondrogenic differentiation of adult human bone marrow-derived cells.

  12. Regeneration of hyaline cartilage by cell-mediated gene therapy using transforming growth factor beta 1-producing fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K H; Song, S U; Hwang, T S; Yi, Y; Oh, I S; Lee, J Y; Choi, K B; Choi, M S; Kim, S J

    2001-09-20

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) has been considered as a candidate for gene therapy of orthopedic diseases. The possible application of cell-mediated TGF-beta gene therapy as a new treatment regimen for degenerative arthritis was investigated. In this study, fibroblasts expressing active TGF-beta 1 were injected into the knee joints of rabbits with artificially made cartilage defects to evaluate the feasibility of this therapy for orthopedic diseases. Two to 3 weeks after the injection there was evidence of cartilage regeneration, and at 4 to 6 weeks the cartilage defect was completely filled with newly grown hyaline cartilage. Histological analyses of the regenerated cartilage suggested that it was well integrated with the adjacent normal cartilage at the sides of the defect and that the newly formed tissue was indeed hyaline cartilage. Our findings suggest that cell-mediated TGF-beta 1 gene therapy may be a novel treatment for orthopedic diseases in which hyaline cartilage damage has occurred.

  13. Effects of growth factors and glucosamine on porcine mandibular condylar cartilage cells and hyaline cartilage cells for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limin; Detamore, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar cartilage is a distinct cartilage that has both fibrocartilaginous and hyaline-like character, with a thin proliferative zone that separates the fibrocartilaginous fibrous zone at the surface from the hyaline-like mature and hypertrophic zones below. In this study, we compared the effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), and glucosamine sulphate on porcine TMJ condylar cartilage and ankle cartilage cells in monolayer culture. In general, TMJ condylar cartilage cells proliferated faster than ankle cartilage cells, while ankle cells produced significantly greater amounts of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen than TMJ condylar cartilage cells. IGF-I and bFGF were potent stimulators of TMJ cell proliferation, while no signals statistically outperformed controls for ankle cell proliferation. IGF-I was the most effective signal for GAG production with ankle cells, and the most potent upregulator of collagen synthesis for both cell types. Glucosamine sulphate promoted cell proliferation and biosynthesis at specific concentrations and outperformed growth factors in certain instances. In conclusion, hyaline cartilage cells had lower cell numbers and superior biosynthesis compared to TMJ condylar cartilage cells, and we have found IGF-I at 100 ng/mL and glucosamine sulphate at 100 microg/mL to be the most effective signals for these cells under the prescribed conditions.

  14. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1) is present in hyaline membranes and modulates surface tension of surfactant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Hanna; End, Caroline; Renner, Marcus

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1) is a secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein that binds various bacteria and is thought to participate in innate pulmonary host defense. We hypothesized that pulmonary DMBT1 could contribute to respiratory distress syndrome...

  15. Shear-induced formation of vesicles in membrane phases: Kinetics and size selection mechanisms, elasticity versus surface tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbin, L.; Panizza, P.

    2004-02-01

    Multilamellar vesicles can be formed upon shearing lamellar phases (Lα) and phase-separated lamellar-sponge (Lα/L3) mixtures. In the first case, the vesicle volume fraction is always 100% and the vesicle size is monitored by elasticity (“onion textures”). In the second system the vesicle volume fraction can be tuned from 0 to 100% and the mean size results from a balance between capillary and viscous forces (“Taylor droplets”). However, despite these differences, in both systems we show that the formation of vesicles is a strain-controlled process monitored by a universal primary buckling instability of the lamellae.

  16. Proof of pore formation and biophysical perturbations through a 2D amoxicillin-lipid membrane interaction approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Daniela; Nunes, Cláudia; Fontaine, Philippe; Sarmento, Bruno; Reis, Salette

    2017-05-01

    Amoxicillin is a worldwide used antibiotic, and it is classified as a first-line drug against Helicobacter pylori gastric infections. However, the current treatment of these infections has several limitations, such as the side effects and the low therapeutic compliance. Amoxicillin has been associated with gastrointestinal and renal side effects, with higher toxicity when the pH is lower. By considering this association and the well-known pH gradient of the gastric mucosa, this work aims to evaluate the influence of pH on the toxicity of amoxicillin. For that purpose, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) monolayers were used since phosphatidylcholines are the most common phospholipid headgroup of biological membranes. To have insight of the effects of amoxicillin, different techniques were employed, namely, isotherm measurements, infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, grazing incident X-ray diffraction and Brewster angle microscopy. The monolayers of DPPC spread onto different buffer solutions (pH1.2, pH5 and pH7.4) showed different structural and packing properties. The interaction with amoxicillin also depended on the pH. At pH7.4, the highest effect was visualized at lower pressures, with partial restoration of the biophysical properties of the monolayer at 30 mN.m -1 . A higher perturbation is shown at acidic pH, in which pores were visualized by Brewster angle microscopy. These perturbations may ultimately be related with amoxicillin toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Formation and elasticity of membranes of the class II hydrophobin Cerato-ulmin at oil-water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xujun; Kirby, Stephanie M; Chen, Yuwu; Anna, Shelley L; Walker, Lynn M; Hung, Francisco R; Russo, Paul S

    2018-04-01

    Protein surfactants show great potential to stabilize foams, bubbles, and emulsions. An important family of surface active proteins, the hydrophobins, is secreted by filamentous fungi. Two hydrophobin classes have been recognized, with Class II exhibiting slightly better solubility than Class I, although neither is very soluble in water. Hydrophobins are small proteins (8-14 kDa), but they are larger and more rigid than typical surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate. This rigidity seems to be manifested in the strength of adsorbed hydrophobin layers on oil droplets or air bubbles. A particular Class II hydrophobin, Cerato-ulmin, was characterized at the oil-water interface (the oil was squalane). The results are compared to measurements at the air-water interface, newly extended to lower Cerato-ulmin concentrations. For both oil-water and air-water interfaces, static and dynamic properties were measured during the evolution of the membrane structure. The static measurements reveal that dilute Cerato-ulmin solution efficiently decreases the interfacial tension, whether at oil-water or air-water interfaces. The reduction in surface tension requires several hours. Interfacial mechanics were characterized too, and the dilatational modulus was found to reach large values at both types of interfaces: 339 ± 19 mN/m at the squalane-water interface and at least 764 ± 45 mN/m at the air-water interface. Both values well exceed those typical of small-molecule surfactants, but come closer to those expected of particulate-loaded interfaces. Circular dichroism provides some insight to adsorption-induced molecular rearrangements, which seem to be more prevalent at the oil-water interface than at the air-water interface. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Glucuronylated core 1 glycans are required for precise localization of neuromuscular junctions and normal formation of basement membranes on Drosophila muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Kondo, Shu; Ichimiya, Tomomi; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Tiemeyer, Michael; Nishihara, Shoko

    2018-04-15

    , basement membrane formation, and NMJ arborization on larval muscles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Microstructural and compositional features of the fibrous and hyaline cartilage on the medial tibial plateau imply a unique role for the hopping locomotion of kangaroo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo He

    Full Text Available Hopping provides efficient and energy saving locomotion for kangaroos, but it results in great forces in the knee joints. A previous study has suggested that a unique fibrous cartilage in the central region of the tibial cartilage could serve to decrease the peak stresses generated within kangaroo tibiofemoral joints. However, the influences of the microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of the central fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage on the function of the knee joints are still to be defined. The present study showed that the fibrous cartilage was thicker and had a lower chondrocyte density than the hyaline cartilage. Despite having a higher PG content in the middle and deep zones, the fibrous cartilage had an inferior compressive strength compared to the peripheral hyaline cartilage. The fibrous cartilage had a complex three dimensional collagen meshwork with collagen bundles parallel to the surface in the superficial zone, and with collagen bundles both parallel and perpendicular to the surface in the middle and deep zones. The collagen in the hyaline cartilage displayed a typical Benninghoff structure, with collagen fibres parallel to the surface in the superficial zone and collagen fibres perpendicular to the surface in the deep zone. Elastin fibres were found throughout the entire tissue depth of the fibrous cartilage and displayed a similar alignment to the adjacent collagen bundles. In comparison, the elastin fibres in the hyaline cartilage were confined within the superficial zone. This study examined for the first time the fibrillary structure, PG content and compressive properties of the central fibrous cartilage pad and peripheral hyaline cartilage within the kangaroo medial tibial plateau. It provided insights into the microstructure and composition of the fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage in relation to the unique mechanical properties of the tissues to provide for the normal activities of kangaroos.

  20. Microstructural and compositional features of the fibrous and hyaline cartilage on the medial tibial plateau imply a unique role for the hopping locomotion of kangaroo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bo; Wu, Jian Ping; Xu, Jiake; Day, Robert E; Kirk, Thomas Brett

    2013-01-01

    Hopping provides efficient and energy saving locomotion for kangaroos, but it results in great forces in the knee joints. A previous study has suggested that a unique fibrous cartilage in the central region of the tibial cartilage could serve to decrease the peak stresses generated within kangaroo tibiofemoral joints. However, the influences of the microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of the central fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage on the function of the knee joints are still to be defined. The present study showed that the fibrous cartilage was thicker and had a lower chondrocyte density than the hyaline cartilage. Despite having a higher PG content in the middle and deep zones, the fibrous cartilage had an inferior compressive strength compared to the peripheral hyaline cartilage. The fibrous cartilage had a complex three dimensional collagen meshwork with collagen bundles parallel to the surface in the superficial zone, and with collagen bundles both parallel and perpendicular to the surface in the middle and deep zones. The collagen in the hyaline cartilage displayed a typical Benninghoff structure, with collagen fibres parallel to the surface in the superficial zone and collagen fibres perpendicular to the surface in the deep zone. Elastin fibres were found throughout the entire tissue depth of the fibrous cartilage and displayed a similar alignment to the adjacent collagen bundles. In comparison, the elastin fibres in the hyaline cartilage were confined within the superficial zone. This study examined for the first time the fibrillary structure, PG content and compressive properties of the central fibrous cartilage pad and peripheral hyaline cartilage within the kangaroo medial tibial plateau. It provided insights into the microstructure and composition of the fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage in relation to the unique mechanical properties of the tissues to provide for the normal activities of kangaroos.

  1. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) of Cadaveric Shoulders: Comparison of Contrast Dynamics in Hyaline and Fibrous Cartilage after Intraarticular Gadolinium Injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, E. (Dept. of Radiology, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany)); Hodler, J.; Pfirrmann, C.W.A. (Dept. of Radiology, Orthopedic Univ. Hospital Balgrist, Zuerich (Switzerland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a novel method to investigate cartilaginous and fibrocartilaginous structures. Purpose: To investigate the contrast dynamics in hyaline and fibrous cartilage of the glenohumeral joint after intraarticular injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine. Material and Methods: Transverse T1 maps were acquired on a 1.5T scanner before and after intraarticular injection of 2.0 mmol/l gadopentetate dimeglumine in five cadaveric shoulders using a dual flip angle three-dimensional gradient echo (3D-GRE) sequence. The acquisition time for the T1 maps was 5 min 5 s for the whole shoulder. Measurements were repeated every 15 min over 2.5 hours. Regions of interest (ROIs) covering the glenoid cartilage and the labrum were drawn to assess the temporal evolution of the relaxation parameters. Results: T1 of unenhanced hyaline cartilage of the glenoid was 568+-34 ms. T1 of unenhanced fibrous cartilage of the labrum was 552+-38 ms. Significant differences (P=0.002 and 0.03) in the relaxation parameters were already measurable after 15 min. After 2 to 2.5 hours, hyaline and fibrous cartilage still demonstrated decreasing relaxation parameters, with a larger range of the T1(Gd) values in fibrous cartilage. T1 and ?R1 values of hyaline and fibrous cartilage after 2.5 hours were 351+-16 ms and 1.1+-0.09/s, and 332+-31 ms and 1.2+-0.1/s, respectively. Conclusion: A significant decrease in T1(Gd) was found 15 min after intraarticular contrast injection. Contrast accumulation was faster in hyaline than in fibrous cartilage. After 2.5 hours, contrast accumulation showed a higher rate of decrease in hyaline cartilage, but neither hyaline nor fibrous cartilage had reached equilibrium

  2. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) of cadaveric shoulders: comparison of contrast dynamics in hyaline and fibrous cartilage after intraarticular gadolinium injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, E; Hodler, J; Pfirrmann, C W A

    2009-01-01

    Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a novel method to investigate cartilaginous and fibrocartilaginous structures. To investigate the contrast dynamics in hyaline and fibrous cartilage of the glenohumeral joint after intraarticular injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine. Transverse T(1) maps were acquired on a 1.5T scanner before and after intraarticular injection of 2.0 mmol/l gadopentetate dimeglumine in five cadaveric shoulders using a dual flip angle three-dimensional gradient echo (3D-GRE) sequence. The acquisition time for the T(1) maps was 5 min 5 s for the whole shoulder. Measurements were repeated every 15 min over 2.5 hours. Regions of interest (ROIs) covering the glenoid cartilage and the labrum were drawn to assess the temporal evolution of the relaxation parameters. T(1) of unenhanced hyaline cartilage of the glenoid was 568+/-34 ms. T(1) of unenhanced fibrous cartilage of the labrum was 552+/-38 ms. Significant differences (P=0.002 and 0.03) in the relaxation parameters were already measurable after 15 min. After 2 to 2.5 hours, hyaline and fibrous cartilage still demonstrated decreasing relaxation parameters, with a larger range of the T(1)(Gd) values in fibrous cartilage. T(1) and triangle Delta R(1) values of hyaline and fibrous cartilage after 2.5 hours were 351+/-16 ms and 1.1+/-0.09 s(-1), and 332+/-31 ms and 1.2+/-0.1 s(-1), respectively. A significant decrease in T(1)(Gd) was found 15 min after intraarticular contrast injection. Contrast accumulation was faster in hyaline than in fibrous cartilage. After 2.5 hours, contrast accumulation showed a higher rate of decrease in hyaline cartilage, but neither hyaline nor fibrous cartilage had reached equilibrium.

  3. An experimental study on the effect of irradiation on deciduous dental pulp and periodontal membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagayama, Takehiko

    1986-01-01

    Left mandibular third deciduous molars of young dogs were irradiated for 3,000 R with 200 kVp X-ray and the effect on the dental pulp and periodontal membrane was investigated histopathologically. 1. From 3rd to 7th days after irradiation, localized inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in part in the dental pulp tissue. No abnormal findings were observed in the periodontal membrane. 2. On 14th day after irradiation in the coronal dental pulp, cells decreased; karyopycnosis occurred; cells were connected only by cellular processes, and large and small reticular networks were formed. In the periodontal membrane, fibers ran irregularly although in part and findings of atrophy were seen. Fibroblasts showed a decreasing tendency. 3. In the cases from 1 to 2 months after irradiation, the pulp tissue showed marked atrophy of odontoblasts and the dental pulp showed hyalinization-like changes. In the periodontal membrane, Sharpey's fibers ran irregularly or became indistinct, and fibroblasts decreased extensively. The periodontal membrane in general showed hyalinization. 4. In the cases of 4 months after irradiation, the pulp tissue on the whole showed marked atrophy and disappearance of odontoblast layers. In the periodontal membrane, inflammatory cell infiltration was seen in part and membrane fibers, as those in 2nd month, showed marked atrophy, became enlarged, and presented findings of hyalinization. 5. At 8th month, the necleoli nearly disappeared in the pulp tissue from the crown to the root and the cells were connected like filaments by cellular processes. Nearly all the blood vessels and fibers disappeared. In the periodontal membrane, most of Sharpey's fibers disappeared. Fibroblasts showed marked atrophy and disappearance, and few normal fibloblasts could be found. (J.P.N.)

  4. Hyaline cartilage thickness in radiographically normal cadaveric hips: comparison of spiral CT arthrographic and macroscopic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyler, Annabelle; Bousson, Valérie; Bergot, Catherine; Polivka, Marc; Leveque, Eric; Vicaut, Eric; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2007-02-01

    To assess spiral multidetector computed tomographic (CT) arthrography for the depiction of cartilage thickness in hips without cartilage loss, with evaluation of anatomic slices as the reference standard. Permission to perform imaging studies in cadaveric specimens of individuals who had willed their bodies to science was obtained from the institutional review board. Two independent observers measured the femoral and acetabular hyaline cartilage thickness of 12 radiographically normal cadaveric hips (from six women and five men; age range at death, 52-98 years; mean, 76.5 years) on spiral multidetector CT arthrographic reformations and on coronal anatomic slices. Regions of cartilage loss at gross or histologic examination were excluded. CT arthrographic and anatomic measurements in the coronal plane were compared by using Bland-Altman representation and a paired t test. Differences between mean cartilage thicknesses at the points of measurement were tested by means of analysis of variance. Interobserver and intraobserver reproducibilities were determined. At CT arthrography, mean cartilage thickness ranged from 0.32 to 2.53 mm on the femoral head and from 0.95 to 3.13 mm on the acetabulum. Observers underestimated cartilage thickness in the coronal plane by 0.30 mm +/- 0.52 (mean +/- standard error) at CT arthrography (P cartilage thicknesses at the different measurement points was significant for coronal spiral multidetector CT arthrography and anatomic measurement of the femoral head and acetabulum and for sagittal and transverse CT arthrography of the femoral head (P cartilage thickness from the periphery to the center of the joint ("gradients") were found by means of spiral multidetector CT arthrography and anatomic measurement. Spiral multidetector CT arthrography depicts cartilage thickness gradients in radiographically normal cadaveric hips. (c) RSNA, 2007.

  5. Engineering of hyaline cartilage with a calcified zone using bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W D; Hurtig, M B; Pilliar, R M; Stanford, W L; Kandel, R A

    2015-08-01

    In healthy joints, a zone of calcified cartilage (ZCC) provides the mechanical integration between articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Recapitulation of this architectural feature should serve to resist the constant shear force from the movement of the joint and prevent the delamination of tissue-engineered cartilage. Previous approaches to create the ZCC at the cartilage-substrate interface have relied on strategic use of exogenous scaffolds and adhesives, which are susceptible to failure by degradation and wear. In contrast, we report a successful scaffold-free engineering of ZCC to integrate tissue-engineered cartilage and a porous biodegradable bone substitute, using sheep bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as the cell source for both cartilaginous zones. BMSCs were predifferentiated to chondrocytes, harvested and then grown on a porous calcium polyphosphate substrate in the presence of triiodothyronine (T3). T3 was withdrawn, and additional predifferentiated chondrocytes were placed on top of the construct and grown for 21 days. This protocol yielded two distinct zones: hyaline cartilage that accumulated proteoglycans and collagen type II, and calcified cartilage adjacent to the substrate that additionally accumulated mineral and collagen type X. Constructs with the calcified interface had comparable compressive strength to native sheep osteochondral tissue and higher interfacial shear strength compared to control without a calcified zone. This protocol improves on the existing scaffold-free approaches to cartilage tissue engineering by incorporating a calcified zone. Since this protocol employs no xenogeneic material, it will be appropriate for use in preclinical large-animal studies. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Regulation of membrane fusion and secretory events in the sea urchin embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roe, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Membrane fusion and secretory events play a key role in fertilization and early development in the sea urchin embryo. To investigate the mechanism of membrane fusion, the effect of inhibitors of metalloendoprotease activity was studied on two model systems of cell fusion; fertilization and spiculogenesis by primary mesenchyme cells in the embryo. Both the zinc chelator, 1,10-phenanthroline, and peptide metalloprotease substrates were found to inhibit both fertilization and gamete fusion, while peptides that are not substrates of metalloproteases did not affect either process. Primary mesenchyme cells form the larval skeleton in the embryo by deposition of mineral and an organic matrix into a syncytial cavity formed by fusion of filopodia of these cells. Metalloprotease inhibitors were found to inhibit spiculogenesis both in vivo and in cultures of isolated primary mesenchyme cells, and the activity of a metalloprotease of the appropriate specificity was found in the primary mesenchyme cells. These two studies implicate the activity of a metalloprotease in a necessary step in membrane fusion. Following fertilization, exocytosis of the cortical granules results in the formation of the fertilization envelope and the hyaline layer, that surround the developing embryo. The hatching enzyme is secreted by the blastula stage sea urchin embryo, which proteolyzes the fertilization envelope surrounding the embryo, allowing the embryo to hatch. Using an assay that measures 125 I-fertilization envelope degradation, the hatching enzyme was identified as a 33 kDa metalloprotease, and was purified by ion-exchange and affinity chromatography from the hatching media of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryos. The hatching enzyme showed a substrate preference for only a minor subset of fertilization envelope proteins

  7. Microporous silica membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boffa, Vittorio; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal stability is a crucial factor for the application of microporous silica-based membranes in industrial processes. Indeed, it is well established that steam exposure may cause densification and defect formation in microporous silica membranes, which are detrimental to both membrane...... permeability and selectivity. Numerous previous studies show that microporous transition metal doped-silica membranes are hydrothermally more stable than pure silica membranes, but less permeable. Here we present a quantitative study on the impact of type and concentration of transition metal ions...... on the microporous structure, stability and permeability of amorphous silica-based membranes, providing information on how to design chemical compositions and synthetic paths for the fabrication of silica-based membranes with a well accessible and highly stabile microporous structure....

  8. Exogenous modification of platelet membranes with the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA reduces platelet procoagulant activity and thrombus formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Mark K; Tormoen, Garth W; Weaver, Lucinda J; Luepke, Kristen J; Patel, Ishan A; Hjelmen, Carl E; Ensz, Nicole M; McComas, Leah S; McCarty, Owen J T

    2013-02-01

    Several studies have implicated the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in inhibition of normal platelet function, suggesting a role for platelets in EPA- and DHA-mediated cardioprotection. However, it is unclear whether the cardioprotective mechanisms arise from alterations to platelet-platelet, platelet-matrix, or platelet-coagulation factor interactions. Our previous results led us to hypothesize that EPA and DHA alter the ability of platelets to catalyze the generation of thrombin. We tested this hypothesis by exogenously modifying platelet membranes with EPA and DHA, which resulted in compositional changes analogous to increased dietary EPA and DHA intake. Platelets treated with EPA and DHA showed reductions in the rate of thrombin generation and exposure of platelet phosphatidylserine. In addition, treatment of platelets with EPA and DHA decreased thrombus formation and altered the processing of thrombin precursor proteins. Furthermore, treatment of whole blood with EPA and DHA resulted in increased occlusion time and a sharply reduced accumulation of fibrin under flow conditions. These results demonstrate that EPA and DHA inhibit, but do not eliminate, the ability of platelets to catalyze thrombin generation in vitro. The ability of EPA and DHA to reduce the procoagulant function of platelets provides a possible mechanism behind the cardioprotective phenotype in individuals consuming high levels of EPA and DHA.

  9. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...... for the lateral organization of membranes as wells as for physical properties like bending, permeability and elasticity...

  10. MR imaging of hyaline cartilage in chondromalacia patellae and osteochondrosis dissecans: A comparison with CT-arthrography and arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, K.; Heuck, A.; Lukas, P.; Rodammer, G.; Allgayer, B.; Pasquay, E.

    1987-01-01

    Superior to spin-echo sequences, the articular hyaline cartilage was imaged with fast-field-echo sequences (FFE, Gyroscan 0.5-T, Philips) with an excitation pulse angle of 40 0 to 60 0 . Chondromalaceous lesions could be demonstrated in 30 patients with chondropathia patellae with the same sensitivity compared with CT arthrography. In a further 50 patients with osteochondrosis dissecans, discontinuities of the cartilage could be predicted using the deeply invading articular fluid as an indicator. The sensitivity of MR imaging, as controlled by arthroscopy, was very high in that respect. Separate from the nonhemorrhagic articular fluid, the cartilaginous defects could be imaged directly by variation of the FFE parameters

  11. Two rare entities in the same palate lesion: hyalinizing-type clear cell carcinoma and necrotizing sialometaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpaci, Rabia Bozdoğan; Kara, Tuba; Porgali, Canan; Serinsoz, Ebru; Polat, Ayse; Vayisoglu, Yusuf; Ozcan, Cengiz

    2014-05-01

    Hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma is a low-grade malignant epithelial neoplasm of the salivary glands. The tumor has epithelial cells and lacks myoepithelial cells. Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign, self-limiting lesion of the salivary glands. The clinical and histologic features mimic those of mucoepidermoid carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma. The importance of these entities are the rarity of both of them and their potential to be misdiagnosed as other lesions. Pathologists and clinicians should be aware of these entities to prevent misdiagnosis. This is the first clinical report of 2 rare and consecutive different entities of the same location on the hard palate to our knowledge.

  12. Cartilage T2 assessment: differentiation of normal hyaline cartilage and reparative tissue after arthroscopic cartilage repair in equine subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lawrence M; Sussman, Marshall S; Hurtig, Mark; Probyn, Linda; Tomlinson, George; Kandel, Rita

    2006-11-01

    To prospectively assess T2 mapping characteristics of normal articular cartilage and of cartilage at sites of arthroscopic repair, including comparison with histologic results and collagen organization assessed at polarized light microscopy (PLM). Study protocol was compliant with the Canadian Council on Animal Care Guidelines and approved by the institutional animal care committee. Arthroscopic osteochondral autograft transplantation (OAT) and microfracture arthroplasty (MFx) were performed in knees of 10 equine subjects (seven female, three male; age range, 3-5 years). A site of arthroscopically normal cartilage was documented in each joint as a control site. Joints were harvested at 12 (n = 5) and 24 (n = 5) weeks postoperatively and were imaged at 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) with a 10-echo sagittal fast spin-echo acquisition. T2 maps of each site (21 OAT harvest, 10 MFx, 12 OAT plug, and 10 control sites) were calculated with linear least-squares curve fitting. Cartilage T2 maps were qualitatively graded as "organized" (normal transition of low-to-high T2 signal from deep to superficial cartilage zones) or "disorganized." Quantitative mean T2 values were calculated for deep, middle, and superficial cartilage at each location. Results were compared with histologic and PLM assessments by using kappa analysis. T2 maps were qualitatively graded as organized at 20 of 53 sites and as disorganized at 33 sites. Perfect agreement was seen between organized T2 and histologic findings of hyaline cartilage and between disorganized T2 and histologic findings of fibrous reparative tissue (kappa = 1.0). Strong agreement was seen between organized T2 and normal PLM findings and between disorganized T2 and abnormal PLM findings (kappa = .92). Quantitative assessment of the deep, middle, and superficial cartilage, respectively, showed mean T2 values of 53.3, 58.6, and 54.9 msec at reparative fibrous tissue sites and 40.7, 53.6, and 61.6 msec at hyaline cartilage sites. A

  13. Granuloma hialinizante de pulmão recidivante Recurrent pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme D'Andréa Saba Arruda

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos o caso de um paciente de 61 anos, masculino, internado com objetivo de exérese de massa pulmonar para estudo anatomopatológico. O paciente apresentara anteriormente um quadro de febre, tosse seca e dor torácica, associado à presença de massas pulmonares detectadas por radiografia de tórax, tendo sido submetido em duas ocasiões (1976 e 1981 a toracotomia para a investigação diagnóstica, sem diagnóstico anatomopatológico conclusivo. A TC de tórax revelou volumosas massas com áreas de calcificação em ambos os campos pulmonares. O material do estudo anatomopatológico foi compatível com granuloma hialinizante de pulmão. No pós-operatório, o paciente apresentou vários episódios de broncoespasmo que foram revertidos com medicação sintomática. Foi mantido com prednisona na dose de 40 mg/dia com boa evolução clínica até o envio deste relato.We report the case of a 61-year-old male patient who underwent surgical excision of a lung mass for anatomopathological study. The patient had previously presented with fever, dry cough, and chest pain, together with lung masses detected by chest X-ray, and had undergone thoracotomy for diagnostic investigation on two occasions (1976 and 1981, although a conclusive diagnosis had not been made. A CT scan of the chest revealed large masses with areas of calcification in both lung fields. The anatomopathological study was consistent with pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma. In the postoperative period, the patient experienced several episodes of bronchospasm, which was reversible with the use of symptomatic medication. At this writing, the patient was receiving maintenance therapy with prednisone (40 mg/day and had shown clinical improvement.

  14. Reconstruction of Hyaline Cartilage Deep Layer Properties in 3-Dimensional Cultures of Human Articular Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, Vibudha; Tattikota, Surendra Mohan; T, Avinash Raj; Sriramagiri, Vijaya Rama Rao; Kantipudi, Suma; Pande, Gopal

    2014-06-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) injuries and malformations are commonly noticed because of trauma or age-related degeneration. Many methods have been adopted for replacing or repairing the damaged tissue. Currently available AC repair methods, in several cases, fail to yield good-quality long-lasting results, perhaps because the reconstructed tissue lacks the cellular and matrix properties seen in hyaline cartilage (HC). To reconstruct HC tissue from 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) cultures of AC-derived human chondrocytes that would specifically exhibit the cellular and biochemical properties of the deep layer of HC. Descriptive laboratory study. Two-dimensional cultures of human AC-derived chondrocytes were established in classical medium (CM) and newly defined medium (NDM) and maintained for a period of 6 weeks. These cells were suspended in 2 mm-thick collagen I gels, placed in 24-well culture inserts, and further cultured up to 30 days. Properties of chondrocytes, grown in 2D cultures and the reconstructed 3D cartilage tissue, were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopic techniques, immunohistochemistry, and cartilage-specific gene expression profiling by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and were compared with those of the deep layer of native human AC. Two-dimensional chondrocyte cultures grown in NDM, in comparison with those grown in CM, showed more chondrocyte-specific gene activity and matrix properties. The NDM-grown chondrocytes in 3D cultures also showed better reproduction of deep layer properties of HC, as confirmed by microscopic and gene expression analysis. The method used in this study can yield cartilage tissue up to approximately 1.6 cm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness that satisfies the very low cell density and matrix composition properties present in the deep layer of normal HC. This study presents a novel and reproducible method for long-term culture of AC-derived chondrocytes and reconstruction of cartilage

  15. Effect of low-dose irradiation on structural and mechanical properties of hyaline cartilage-like fibrocartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öncan, Tevfik; Demirağ, Burak; Ermutlu, Cenk; Yalçinkaya, Ulviye; Özkan, Lütfü

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of low-dose irradiation on fibrous cartilage and to obtain a hyaline cartilage-like fibrocartilage (HCLF) with similar structural and mechanical properties to hyaline cartilage. An osteochondral defect was created in 40 knees of 20 rabbits. At the 7th postoperative day, a single knee of each rabbit was irradiated with a total dose of 5.0 Gy in 1.0 Gy fractions for 5 days (radiotherapy group), while the other knee was not irradiated (control group). Rabbits were then divided into four groups of 5 rabbits each. The first three groups were sacrificed at the 4th, 8th and the 12th postoperative weeks and cartilage defects were macroscopically and microscopically evaluated. The remaining group of 5 rabbits was sacrificed at the 12th week and biomechanical compression tests were performed on the cartilage defects. There was no significant biomechanical difference between the radiotherapy and the control group (p=0.686). There was no significant macroscopic and microscopic difference between groups (p=0.300). Chondrocyte clustering was observed in the irradiated group. Low-dose irradiation does not affect the mechanical properties of HCLF in vivo. However, structural changes such as chondrocyte clustering were observed.

  16. Which cartilage is regenerated, hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage? Non-invasive ultrasonic evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, K; Takakura, Y; Ohgushi, H; Habata, T; Uematsu, K; Takenaka, M; Ikeuchi, K

    2004-09-01

    To investigate ultrasonic evaluation methods for detecting whether the repair tissue is hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage in new cartilage regeneration therapy. We examined four experimental rabbit models: a spontaneous repair model (group S), a large cartilage defect model (group L), a periosteal graft model (group P) and a tissue-engineered cartilage regeneration model (group T). From the resulting ultrasonic evaluation, we used %MM (the maximum magnitude of the measurement area divided by that of the intact cartilage) as a quantitative index of cartilage regeneration. The results of the ultrasonic evaluation were compared with the histological findings and histological score. The %MM values were 61.1 +/- 16.5% in group S, 29.8 +/- 15.1% in group L, 36.3 +/- 18.3% in group P and 76.5 +/- 18.7% in group T. The results showed a strong similarity to the histological scoring. The ultrasonic examination showed that all the hyaline-like cartilage in groups S and T had a high %MM (more than 60%). Therefore, we could define the borderline between the two types of regenerated cartilage by the %MM.

  17. A preclinical evaluation of an autologous living hyaline-like cartilaginous graft for articular cartilage repair: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Yvonne; He, Pengfei; Chilla, Geetha Soujanya V N; Poh, Chueh Loo; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-11-09

    In this pilot study, an autologous synthetic scaffold-free construct with hyaline quality, termed living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), was applied for treating cartilage lesions. Implantation of autologous LhCG was done at load-bearing regions of the knees in skeletally mature mini-pigs for 6 months. Over the course of this study, significant radiographical improvement in LhCG treated sites was observed via magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, macroscopic repair was effected by LhCG at endpoint. Microscopic inspection revealed that LhCG engraftment restored cartilage thickness, promoted integration with surrounding native cartilage, produced abundant cartilage-specific matrix molecules, and re-established an intact superficial tangential zone. Importantly, the repair efficacy of LhCG was quantitatively shown to be comparable to native, unaffected cartilage in terms of biochemical composition and biomechanical properties. There were no complications related to the donor site of cartilage biopsy. Collectively, these results imply that LhCG engraftment may be a viable approach for articular cartilage repair.

  18. Biochemical characterisation of navicular hyaline cartilage, navicular fibrocartilage and the deep digital flexor tendon in horses with navicular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, M; Bird, J; Smith, R; Tulamo, R-M; May, S A

    2003-10-01

    The study hypothesis was that navicular disease is a process analogous to degenerative joint disease, which leads to changes in navicular fibrocartilage and in deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) matrix composition and that the process extends to the adjacent distal interphalangeal joint. The objectives were to compare the biochemical composition of the navicular articular and palmar cartilages from 18 horses with navicular disease with 49 horses with no history of front limb lameness, and to compare navicular fibrocartilage with medial meniscus of the stifle and collateral cartilage of the hoof. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), total glycosaminoglycan (GAG), metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 and water content in tissues were measured. Hyaline cartilage had the highest content of COMP and COMP content in hyaline cartilage and tendon was higher in lame horses than in sound horses (phyaline cartilage was higher in lame horses than in sound horses. The MMP-2 amounts were significantly higher in tendons compared to other tissue types. Overall, 79% of the lame horses with lesions had MMP-9 in their tendons and the amount was higher than in sound horses (phyaline and fibrocartilage as well as the DDFT with potential implications for the pathogenesis and management of the condition.

  19. Effect of exercise on thicknesses of mature hyaline cartilage, calcified cartilage, and subchondral bone of equine tarsi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquille, Carolyne A; Blunden, Antony S; Dyson, Sue J; Parkin, Tim D H; Goodship, Allen E; Murray, Rachel C

    2009-12-01

    OBJECTIVE-To investigate effects of exercise on hyaline cartilage (HC), calcified cartilage (CC), and subchondral bone (SCB) thickness patterns of equine tarsi. SAMPLE POPULATION-30 tarsi from cadavers of horses with known exercise history. PROCEDURES-Tarsi were assigned to 3 groups according to known exercise history as follows: pasture exercise only (PE tarsi), low-intensity general-purpose riding exercise (LE tarsi), and high-intensity elite competition riding exercise (EE tarsi). Osteochondral tissue from distal tarsal joints underwent histologic preparation. Hyaline cartilage, CC, and SCB thickness were measured at standard sites at medial, midline, and lateral locations across joints with a histomorphometric technique. RESULTS-HC, CC, and SCB thickness were significantly greater at all sites in EE tarsi, compared with PE tarsi; this was also true when LE tarsi were compared with PE tarsi. At specific sites, HC, CC, and SCB were significantly thicker in EE tarsi, compared with LE tarsi. Along the articular surface of the proximal aspect of the third metatarsal bone, SCB was thickest in EE tarsi and thinnest in LE tarsi; increases were greatest at sites previously reported to undergo peak strains and osteochondral damage. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE-Increased exercise was associated with increased HC, CC, and SCB thickness in mature horses. At sites that undergo high compressive strains, with a reported predisposition to osteoarthritic change, there was increased CC and SCB thickness. These results may provide insight into the interaction between adaptive response to exercise and pathological change.

  20. Annulus Fibrosus Can Strip Hyaline Cartilage End Plate from Subchondral Bone: A Study of the Intervertebral Disk in Tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkovec, Christian; Adams, Michael A; Dolan, Patricia; McGill, Stuart M

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Biomechanical study on cadaveric spines. Objective Spinal bending causes the annulus to pull vertically (axially) on the end plate, but failure mechanisms in response to this type of loading are poorly understood. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify the weak point of the intervertebral disk in tension. Methods Cadaveric motion segments (aged 79 to 88 years) were dissected to create midsagittal blocks of tissue, with ∼10 mm of bone superior and inferior to the disk. From these blocks, 14 bone-disk-bone slices (average 4.8 mm thick) were cut in the frontal plane. Each slice was gripped by its bony ends and stretched to failure at 1 mm/s. Mode of failure was recorded using a digital camera. Results Of the 14 slices, 10 failed by the hyaline cartilage being peeled off the subchondral bone, with the failure starting opposite the lateral annulus and proceeding medially. Two slices failed by rupturing of the trabecular bone, and a further two failed in the annulus. Conclusions The hyaline cartilage-bone junction is the disk's weak link in tension. These findings provide a plausible mechanism for the appearance of bone and cartilage fragments in herniated material. Stripping cartilage from the bony end plate would result in the herniated mass containing relatively stiff cartilage that does not easily resorb.

  1. Ion-conducting membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Richard I.; Sajjad, Syed Dawar; Gao, Yan; Liu, Zengcai; Chen, Qingmei

    2017-12-26

    An anion-conducting polymeric membrane comprises a terpolymer of styrene, vinylbenzyl-R.sub.s and vinylbenzyl-R.sub.x. R.sub.s is a positively charged cyclic amine group. R.sub.x is at least one constituent selected from the group consisting Cl, OH and a reaction product between an OH or Cl and a species other than a simple amine or a cyclic amine. The total weight of the vinylbenzyl-R.sub.x groups is greater than 0.3% of the total weight of the membrane. In a preferred embodiment, the membrane is a Helper Membrane that increases the faradaic efficiency of an electrochemical cell into which the membrane is incorporated, and also allows product formation at lower voltages than in cells without the Helper Membrane.

  2. In-situ birth of MSCs multicellular spheroids in poly(L-glutamic acid)/chitosan scaffold for hyaline-like cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kunxi; Yan, Shifeng; Li, Guifei; Cui, Lei; Yin, Jingbo

    2015-12-01

    The success of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) based articular cartilage tissue engineering is limited by the presence of fibrous tissue in generated cartilage, which is associated with the current scaffold strategy that promotes cellular adhesion and spreading. Here we design a non-fouling scaffold based on amide bonded poly(l-glutamic acid) (PLGA) and chitosan (CS) to drive adipose stem cells (ASCs) to aggregate to form multicellular spheroids with diameter of 80-110 μm in-situ. To illustrate the advantage of the present scaffolds, a cellular adhesive scaffold based on the same amide bonded PLGA and CS was created through a combination of air-drying and freeze-drying to limit the hydration effect while also achieving porous structure. Compared to ASCs spreading along the surface of pores within scaffold, the dense mass of aggregated ASCs in PLGA/CS scaffold exhibited enhanced chondrogenic differentiation capacity, as determined by up-regulated GAGs and COL II expression, and greatly decreased COL I deposition during in vitro chondrogenesis. Furthermore, after 12 weeks of implantation, neo-cartilages generated by ASCs adhered on scaffold significantly presented fibrous matrix which was characterized by high levels of COL I deposition. However, neo-cartilage at 12 weeks post-implantation generated by PLGA/CS scaffold carrying ASC spheroids possessed similar high level of GAGs and COL II and low level of COL I as that in normal cartilage. The in vitro and in vivo results indicated the present strategy could not only promote chondrogenesis of ASCs, but also facilitate hyaline-like cartilage regeneration with reduced fibrous tissue formation which may attenuate cartilage degradation in future long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Transplantation of autologous endothelial progenitor cells in porous PLGA scaffolds create a microenvironment for the regeneration of hyaline cartilage in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, N-J; Lam, C-F; Lin, C-C; Chen, W-L; Li, C-F; Lin, Y-T; Yeh, M-L

    2013-10-01

    Repairing articular cartilage is clinically challenging. We investigated a simple, effective and clinically feasible cell-based therapeutic approach using a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffold seeded with autologous endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to repair a full-thickness osteochondral defect in rabbits using a one-step surgery. EPC obtained by purifying a small amount of peripheral blood from rabbits were seeded into a highly porous, biocompatible PLGA scaffold, namely, EPC-PLGA, and implanted into the osteochondral defect in the medial femoral condyle. Twenty two rabbits were randomized into one of three groups: the empty defect group (ED), the PLGA-only group or the EPC-PLGA group. The defect sites were evaluated 4 and 12 weeks after implantation. At the end of testing, only the EPC-PLGA group showed the development of new cartilage tissue with a smooth, transparent and integrated articular surface. Moreover, histological analysis showed obvious differences in cartilage regeneration. At week 4, the EPC-PLGA group showed considerably higher TGF-β2 and TGF-β3 expression, a greater amount of synthesized glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, and a higher degree of osteochondral angiogenesis in repaired tissues. At week 12, the EPC-PLGA group showed enhanced hyaline cartilage regeneration with a normal columnar chondrocyte arrangement, higher SOX9 expression, and greater GAG and collagen type II (COLII) content. Moreover, the EPC-PLGA group showed organized osteochondral integration, the formation of vessel-rich tubercular bone and significantly higher bone volume per tissue volume and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th). The present EPC-PLGA cell delivery system generates a suitable in situ microenvironment for osteochondral regeneration without the supplement of exogenous growth factors. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Towards bio-silicon interfaces: Formation of an ultra-thin self-hydrated artificial membrane composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and chitosan deposited in high vacuum from the gas-phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retamal, María J., E-mail: moretama@uc.cl; Cisternas, Marcelo A.; Seifert, Birger; Volkmann, Ulrich G. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Avda. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación en Nanotecnología y Materiales Avanzados (CIEN-UC), Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Avda. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Santiago (Chile); Gutierrez-Maldonado, Sebastian E.; Perez-Acle, Tomas [Computational Biology Lab (DLab), Fundación Ciencia y Vida, Av. Zañartu 1482, Santiago (Chile); Centro Interdisciplinario de Neurociencias de Valparaiso (CINV), Universidad de Valparaiso, Pasaje Harrington 287, Valparaiso (Chile); Busch, Mark; Huber, Patrick [Institute of Materials Physics and Technology, Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH), D-21073 Hamburg-Harburg (Germany)

    2014-09-14

    The recent combination of nanoscale developments with biological molecules for biotechnological research has opened a wide field related to the area of biosensors. In the last years, device manufacturing for medical applications adapted the so-called bottom-up approach, from nanostructures to larger devices. Preparation and characterization of artificial biological membranes is a necessary step for the formation of nano-devices or sensors. In this paper, we describe the formation and characterization of a phospholipid bilayer (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC) on a mattress of a polysaccharide (Chitosan) that keeps the membrane hydrated. The deposition of Chitosan (∼25 Å) and DPPC (∼60 Å) was performed from the gas phase in high vacuum onto a substrate of Si(100) covered with its native oxide layer. The layer thickness was controlled in situ using Very High Resolution Ellipsometry (VHRE). Raman spectroscopy studies show that neither Chitosan nor DPPC molecules decompose during evaporation. With VHRE and Atomic Force Microscopy we have been able to detect phase transitions in the membrane. The presence of the Chitosan interlayer as a water reservoir is essential for both DPPC bilayer formation and stability, favoring the appearance of phase transitions. Our experiments show that the proposed sample preparation from the gas phase is reproducible and provides a natural environment for the DPPC bilayer. In future work, different Chitosan thicknesses should be studied to achieve a complete and homogeneous interlayer.

  5. Towards bio-silicon interfaces: Formation of an ultra-thin self-hydrated artificial membrane composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and chitosan deposited in high vacuum from the gas-phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamal, María J.; Cisternas, Marcelo A.; Gutierrez-Maldonado, Sebastian E.; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Seifert, Birger; Busch, Mark; Huber, Patrick; Volkmann, Ulrich G.

    2014-09-01

    The recent combination of nanoscale developments with biological molecules for biotechnological research has opened a wide field related to the area of biosensors. In the last years, device manufacturing for medical applications adapted the so-called bottom-up approach, from nanostructures to larger devices. Preparation and characterization of artificial biological membranes is a necessary step for the formation of nano-devices or sensors. In this paper, we describe the formation and characterization of a phospholipid bilayer (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC) on a mattress of a polysaccharide (Chitosan) that keeps the membrane hydrated. The deposition of Chitosan (˜25 Å) and DPPC (˜60 Å) was performed from the gas phase in high vacuum onto a substrate of Si(100) covered with its native oxide layer. The layer thickness was controlled in situ using Very High Resolution Ellipsometry (VHRE). Raman spectroscopy studies show that neither Chitosan nor DPPC molecules decompose during evaporation. With VHRE and Atomic Force Microscopy we have been able to detect phase transitions in the membrane. The presence of the Chitosan interlayer as a water reservoir is essential for both DPPC bilayer formation and stability, favoring the appearance of phase transitions. Our experiments show that the proposed sample preparation from the gas phase is reproducible and provides a natural environment for the DPPC bilayer. In future work, different Chitosan thicknesses should be studied to achieve a complete and homogeneous interlayer.

  6. Towards bio-silicon interfaces: Formation of an ultra-thin self-hydrated artificial membrane composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and chitosan deposited in high vacuum from the gas-phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retamal, María J.; Cisternas, Marcelo A.; Seifert, Birger; Volkmann, Ulrich G.; Gutierrez-Maldonado, Sebastian E.; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Busch, Mark; Huber, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The recent combination of nanoscale developments with biological molecules for biotechnological research has opened a wide field related to the area of biosensors. In the last years, device manufacturing for medical applications adapted the so-called bottom-up approach, from nanostructures to larger devices. Preparation and characterization of artificial biological membranes is a necessary step for the formation of nano-devices or sensors. In this paper, we describe the formation and characterization of a phospholipid bilayer (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC) on a mattress of a polysaccharide (Chitosan) that keeps the membrane hydrated. The deposition of Chitosan (∼25 Å) and DPPC (∼60 Å) was performed from the gas phase in high vacuum onto a substrate of Si(100) covered with its native oxide layer. The layer thickness was controlled in situ using Very High Resolution Ellipsometry (VHRE). Raman spectroscopy studies show that neither Chitosan nor DPPC molecules decompose during evaporation. With VHRE and Atomic Force Microscopy we have been able to detect phase transitions in the membrane. The presence of the Chitosan interlayer as a water reservoir is essential for both DPPC bilayer formation and stability, favoring the appearance of phase transitions. Our experiments show that the proposed sample preparation from the gas phase is reproducible and provides a natural environment for the DPPC bilayer. In future work, different Chitosan thicknesses should be studied to achieve a complete and homogeneous interlayer

  7. Hydrogen superpermeable membrane operation under plasma conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacal, M.; Bruneteau, A.M.; Livshits, A.I.; Alimov, V.N.; Notkin, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of ion bombardment on hydrogen plasma-driven permeation through a superpermeable niobium membrane was investigated. It was found that the increase of membrane temperature and the doping of membrane material with oxygen results in the decrease of ion bombardment effect and in permeability increase. It was demonstrated that membrane decarbonization leads to the formation of a membrane state resistant to sputtering. Possible applications of the membrane resistant to ion bombardment as plasma facing components are considered

  8. Formation of semi-IPN membrane composed of crosslinked SPS-[PVdF-co-HFP/Nafion] for application in DMFC: A fine tuning between crosslinker and initiator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Piyush; Kundu, Patit Paban, E-mail: ppk923@yahoo.com

    2015-08-15

    The semi-interpenetrating (semi-IPN) membrane composed of crosslinked sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) within the host blend of PVdF-co-HFP (Polyvinylidenefluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) and Nafion has already been tested as a promising polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) in terms of improved water uptake, proton conductivity and electrical efficiency for application in the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). These desired results have generated further curiosity about a fine tuning between the contents of divinyl benzene (DVB) as a crosslinker and azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as an initiator for the optimization of PEM characteristics. It has been observed that an increase in AIBN content leads to an acceptable degree of water uptake, swelling ratio and proton conductivity in PEM, while higher DVB content causes declined methanol crossover, leading to higher membrane selectivity. These two opposing effects are optimized in terms of proton conductivity, tensile strength and membrane selectivity for the membrane consisting of 0.4 wt% of AIBN and 1.2 wt% of DVB. Moreover, the maximum power density obtained for the membrane having optimum selectivity is 56 mW cm{sup −2}, when analyzed at 90 °C. These results indicate that one can achieve a high power density in comparison to Nafion by fine tuning the contents of initiator and cross-linker during the synthesis of the semi-IPN membrane. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • PEM composed of 0.4/1.2 wt% of AIBN/DVB produced best result. • Lower methanol crossover (1.02 × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1}) compare to Nafion-117. • Higher membrane selectivity i.e 3.05 × 10{sup 4} Ss cm{sup −3} was obtained. • A maximum power density of 56 mW cm{sup −2} was obtained at 90 °C.

  9. Formation of semi-IPN membrane composed of crosslinked SPS-[PVdF-co-HFP/Nafion] for application in DMFC: A fine tuning between crosslinker and initiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Piyush; Kundu, Patit Paban

    2015-01-01

    The semi-interpenetrating (semi-IPN) membrane composed of crosslinked sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) within the host blend of PVdF-co-HFP (Polyvinylidenefluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) and Nafion has already been tested as a promising polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) in terms of improved water uptake, proton conductivity and electrical efficiency for application in the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). These desired results have generated further curiosity about a fine tuning between the contents of divinyl benzene (DVB) as a crosslinker and azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as an initiator for the optimization of PEM characteristics. It has been observed that an increase in AIBN content leads to an acceptable degree of water uptake, swelling ratio and proton conductivity in PEM, while higher DVB content causes declined methanol crossover, leading to higher membrane selectivity. These two opposing effects are optimized in terms of proton conductivity, tensile strength and membrane selectivity for the membrane consisting of 0.4 wt% of AIBN and 1.2 wt% of DVB. Moreover, the maximum power density obtained for the membrane having optimum selectivity is 56 mW cm −2 , when analyzed at 90 °C. These results indicate that one can achieve a high power density in comparison to Nafion by fine tuning the contents of initiator and cross-linker during the synthesis of the semi-IPN membrane. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • PEM composed of 0.4/1.2 wt% of AIBN/DVB produced best result. • Lower methanol crossover (1.02 × 10 −6 cm 2 s −1 ) compare to Nafion-117. • Higher membrane selectivity i.e 3.05 × 10 4 Ss cm −3 was obtained. • A maximum power density of 56 mW cm −2 was obtained at 90 °C

  10. Simultaneous AuIII Extraction and In Situ Formation of Polymeric Membrane-Supported Au Nanoparticles: A Sustainable Process with Application in Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Tamez, Lucía; Esquivel-Peña, Vicente; Ocampo, Ana L; Rodríguez de San Miguel, Eduardo; Grande, Daniel; de Gyves, Josefina

    2017-04-10

    A polymeric membrane-supported catalyst with immobilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was prepared through the extraction and in situ reduction of Au III salts in a one-step strategy. Polymeric inclusion membranes (PIMs) and polymeric nanoporous membranes (PNMs) were tested as different membrane-support systems. Transport experiments indicated that PIMs composed of cellulose triacetate, 2-nitrophenyloctyl ether, and an aliphatic tertiary amine (Adogen 364 or Alamine 336) were the most efficient supports for Au III extraction. The simultaneous extraction and reduction processes were proven to be the result of a synergic phenomenon in which all the membrane components were involved. Scanning electron microscopy characterization of cross-sectional samples suggested a distribution of AuNPs throughout the membrane. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of the AuNPs indicated average particle sizes of 36.7 and 2.9 nm for the PIMs and PNMs, respectively. AuNPs supported on PIMs allowed for >95.4 % reduction of a 0.05 mmol L -1 4-nitrophenol aqueous solution with 10 mmol L -1 NaBH 4 solution within 25 min. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Gold nanoparticles induced cloudy swelling to hydropic degeneration, cytoplasmic hyaline vacuolation, polymorphism, binucleation, karyopyknosis, karyolysis, karyorrhexis and necrosis in the liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrar Bashir M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanoparticles (NPs can potentially cause adverse effects on organ, tissue, cellular, subcellular and protein levels due to their unusual physicochemical properties. Advances in nanotechnology have identified promising candidates for many biological and biomedical applications. The aim of the present study was to investigate the particle-size, dose and exposure duration effects of gold nanoparticles (GNPs on the hepatic tissue in an attempt to cover and understand the toxicity and their potential therapeutic and diagnostic use. Methods A total of 70 healthy male Wistar-Kyoto rats were exposed to GNPs received 50 or 100 ul of GNPs infusion of size (10, 20 and 50 nm for 3 or 7 days to investigate particle-size, dose and exposure duration effects of GNPs on the hepatic tissue. Results In comparison with respective control rats, exposure to GNPs doses has produced alterations in the hepatocytes, portal triads and the sinusoids. The alterations in the hepatocytes were mainly vacuolar to hydropic degeneration, cytopasmic hyaline vacuolation, polymorphism, binucleation, karyopyknosis, karyolysis, karyorrhexis and necrosis. Conclusions The hepatocytes swelling might be exhibited as a result of disturbances of membranes function that lead to massive influx of water and Na+ due to GNPs effects accompanied by leakage of lysosomal hydrolytic enzymes that lead to cytoplasmic degeneration and macromolecular crowding. Hydropic degeneration is a result of ion and fluid homestasis that lead to an increase of intracellular water. The vacuolated swelling of the cytoplasm of the hepatocytes of the GNPs treated rats might indicate acute and subacute liver injury induced by the GNPs. Binucleation represents a consequence of cell injury and is a sort of chromosomes hyperplasia which is usually seen in regenerating cells. The induced histological alterations might be an indication of injured hepatocytes due to GNPs toxicity that became unable to deal

  12. Photoresponsive nanostructured membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2016-07-26

    The perspective of adding stimuli-response to isoporous membranes stimulates the development of separation devices with pores, which would open or close under control of environment chemical composition, temperature or exposure to light. Changes in pH and temperature have been previously investigated. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of photoresponsive isoporous membranes, applying self-assembly non-solvent induced phase separation to a new light responsive block copolymer. First, we optimized the membrane formation by using poly(styrene-b-anthracene methyl methacrylate-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA) copolymer, identifying the most suitable solvent, copolymer block length, and other parameters. The obtained final triblock copolymer membrane morphologies were characterized using atomic force and electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis reveals that the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer can form both lamellar and ordered hexagonal nanoporous structures on the membrane top layer in appropriate solvent compositions. The nanostructured membrane emits fluorescence due to the presence of the anthracene mid-block. On irradiation of light the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer membranes has an additional stimuli response. The anthracene group undergoes conformational changes by forming [4 + 4] cycloadducts and this alters the membrane\\'s water flux and solute retention. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Lineage plasticity and cell biology of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage: Its significance in cartilage repair and replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freemont, Anthony J.; Hoyland, Judith

    2006-01-01

    Cartilage repair is a major goal of modern tissue engineering. To produce novel engineered implants requires a knowledge of the basic biology of the tissues that are to be replaced or reproduced. Hyaline articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage are two tissues that have excited attention because of the frequency with which they are damaged. A basic strategy is to re-engineer these tissues ex vivo by stimulating stem cells to differentiate into the cells of the mature tissue capable of producing an intact functional matrix. In this brief review, the sources of cells for tissue engineering cartilage and the culture conditions that have promoted differentiation are discussed within the context of natural cartilage repair. In particular, the role of cell density, cytokines, load, matrices and oxygen tension are discussed

  14. Intratubular large cell hyalinizing Sertoli cell tumor of the testis presenting with prepubertal gynecomastia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuhan, Hale; Abaci, Ayhan; Sarsık, Banu; Öztürk, Tülay; Olguner, Mustafa; Catli, Gonul; Anik, Ahmet; Olgun, Nur; Bober, Ece

    2017-08-01

    Intratubular large cell hyalinizing Sertoli cell neoplasia (ITLCHSCN) resulting from Sertoli cells of the testis are mainly reported in young adults and these are rarely seen in childhood. The most common presenting symptoms of the patients diagnosed with ITLCHSCN are gynecomastia, enlargement in the testicles, increase in growth velocity, and advanced bone age. Symptoms are basically resulting from increased aromatase enzyme activity in Sertoli cells. In this case report, an eight-and-a-half-year-old case presenting with complaint of bilateral gynecomastia since two years, showing no endocrine abnormality in laboratory during two years of follow-up, determined to have progression in bilateral gynecomastia, increase in testicular volumes, advanced bone age, increase in growth velocity in the clinical follow-up, and diagnosed with ITLCHSCN after testis biopsy was presented.

  15. Lineage plasticity and cell biology of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage: Its significance in cartilage repair and replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemont, Anthony J. [Regenerative Medicine Research Group, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Tony.freemont@man.ac.uk; Hoyland, Judith [Regenerative Medicine Research Group, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-15

    Cartilage repair is a major goal of modern tissue engineering. To produce novel engineered implants requires a knowledge of the basic biology of the tissues that are to be replaced or reproduced. Hyaline articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage are two tissues that have excited attention because of the frequency with which they are damaged. A basic strategy is to re-engineer these tissues ex vivo by stimulating stem cells to differentiate into the cells of the mature tissue capable of producing an intact functional matrix. In this brief review, the sources of cells for tissue engineering cartilage and the culture conditions that have promoted differentiation are discussed within the context of natural cartilage repair. In particular, the role of cell density, cytokines, load, matrices and oxygen tension are discussed.

  16. Use of Interim Scaffolding and Neotissue Development to Produce a Scaffold-Free Living Hyaline Cartilage Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ting Ting; Leong, Wenyan; Peck, Yvonne; Su, Kai; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) constructs relies heavily on the use of biomaterial-based scaffolds. These are required as mechanical supports as well as to translate two-dimensional cultures to 3D cultures for clinical applications. Regardless of the choice of scaffold, timely degradation of scaffolds is difficult to achieve and undegraded scaffold material can lead to interference in further tissue development or morphogenesis. In cartilage tissue engineering, hydrogel is the highly preferred scaffold material as it shares many similar characteristics with native cartilaginous matrix. Hence, we employed gelatin microspheres as porogens to create a microcavitary alginate hydrogel as an interim scaffold to facilitate initial chondrocyte 3D culture and to establish a final scaffold-free living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG) for cartilage tissue engineering.

  17. Release of transgenic progranulin from a living hyaline cartilage graft model: An in vitro evaluation on anti-inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ting Ting; Zhang, Feng; Tang, Wei; Wang, Dong-An

    2016-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent condition that compromises and even jeopardizes the life quality of millions of people. Common symptoms in OA includes joint stiffness and soreness, and they are often associated with inflammations to various extend. Due to the avascular and aneural nature of articular hyaline cartilage, it has limited self-repair capabilities; especially under inflammatory conditions, damages inflicted on cartilage are often irreversible. Hence, treatment approaches focus on anti-inflammation or articular cartilage replacement. In this study, an engineered, dual-functional living hyaline cartilage graft (LhCG), capable of releasing transgenic anti-inflammatory cytokine-progranulin (PGRN) is developed and envisioned to simultaneously fulfil both requirements. The therapeutic functionality of PGRN releasing LhCG is evaluated by co-culturing the constructs with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) secreting THP-1 cells to simulate the inflammatory condition in arthritis. Non-transgenic LhCG constructs and non-coculture sample groups were set up as controls. Gene expression and ECM composition changes across samples were assessed to understand the effects of PGRN as well as inflammatory environment on the cartilage graft. Collectively, the results in this study suggest that in situ release of transgenic recombinant PGRN protects LhCG from induced inflammation in vitro; contrastively, in the absence of PGRN, cartilage grafts are at risk of being degraded and mineralized under exposure to TNFα signaling. This shows that cartilage graft itself can be at risk of degradation or calcification when implanted in arthritic microenvironment. Hence, the inflammatory microenvironment has to be considered in cartilage replacement therapy to increase chances of successful joint mobility restoration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2968-2977, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Production of hyaline-like cartilage by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in a self-assembly model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Steven H; Cooley, Avery J; Borazjani, Ali; Sowell, Brittany L; To, Harrison; Tran, Scott C

    2009-10-01

    A scaffoldless or self-assembly approach to cartilage tissue engineering has been used to produce hyaline cartilage from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bMSCs), but the mechanical properties of such engineered cartilage and the effects the transforming growth factor (TGF) isoform have not been fully explored. This study employs a cell culture insert model to produce tissue-engineered cartilage using bMSCs. Neonatal pig bMSCs were isolated by plastic adherence and expanded in monolayer before being seeded into porous transwell inserts and cultured for 4 or 8 weeks in defined chondrogenic media containing either TGF-beta1 or TGF-beta3. Following biomechanical evaluation in confined compression, colorimetric dimethyl methylene blue and Sircol dye-binding assays were used to analyze glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen contents, respectively. Histological sections were stained with toluidine blue for proteoglycans and with picrosirius red to reveal collagen orientation, and immunostained for detection of collagen types I and II. Neocartilage increased in thickness, collagen, and GAG content between 4 and 8 weeks. Proteoglycan concentration increased with depth from the top surface. The tissue contained much more collagen type II than type I, and there was a consistent pattern of collagen alignment. TGF-beta1-treated and TGF-beta3-treated constructs were similar at 4 weeks, but 8-week TGF-beta1 constructs had a higher aggregate modulus and GAG content compared to TGF-beta3. These results demonstrate that bMSCs can generate functional hyaline-like cartilage through a self-assembling process.

  19. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  20. The role of complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21) in promoting C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex formation on normal peripheral human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke Hansen

    2002-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes are known to activate the alternative pathway (AP) of complement, leading to C3-fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. The process is mediated via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), with complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) playing...... a subsidiary role. In this study, we examine the relative contributions of CR1 and CR2 to the deposition of C3 fragments and MAC on B lymphocytes under circumstances where all complement pathways are operational. C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation were assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes...... in the presence of 30% autologous serum. Blocking the CR2 ligand-binding site with monoclonal antibody (mAb) FE8 resulted in significant reduction (37.9+/-11.9%) in C3-fragment deposition, whereas MAC formation was only marginally affected (12.1+/-22.2% reduction). Blocking the CR1 binding-site resulted...

  1. Functional microdomains in bacterial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Daniel; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-09-01

    The membranes of eukaryotic cells harbor microdomains known as lipid rafts that contain a variety of signaling and transport proteins. Here we show that bacterial membranes contain microdomains functionally similar to those of eukaryotic cells. These membrane microdomains from diverse bacteria harbor homologs of Flotillin-1, a eukaryotic protein found exclusively in lipid rafts, along with proteins involved in signaling and transport. Inhibition of lipid raft formation through the action of zaragozic acid--a known inhibitor of squalene synthases--impaired biofilm formation and protein secretion but not cell viability. The orchestration of physiological processes in microdomains may be a more widespread feature of membranes than previously appreciated.

  2. Cell-Free and Cell-Based Approaches to Explore the Roles of Host Membranes and Lipids in the Formation of Viral Replication Compartment Induced by Tombusviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Peter D; Pogany, Judit; Xu, Kai

    2016-03-03

    Plant positive strand RNA viruses are intracellular infectious agents that take advantage of cellular lipids and membranes to support replication and protect viral RNA from degradation by host antiviral responses. In this review, we discuss how Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) co-opts lipid transfer proteins and modulates lipid metabolism and transport to facilitate the assembly of the membrane-bound viral replicase complexes within intricate replication compartments. Identification and characterization of the proviral roles of specific lipids and proteins involved in lipid metabolism based on results from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) model host and cell-free approaches are discussed. The review also highlights the advantage of using liposomes with chemically defined composition to identify specific lipids required for TBSV replication. Remarkably, all the known steps in TBSV replication are dependent on cellular lipids and co-opted membranes.

  3. Photoresponsive nanostructured membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima; Sutisna, Burhannudin; Sougrat, Rachid; Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2016-01-01

    The perspective of adding stimuli-response to isoporous membranes stimulates the development of separation devices with pores, which would open or close under control of environment chemical composition, temperature or exposure to light. Changes in pH and temperature have been previously investigated. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of photoresponsive isoporous membranes, applying self-assembly non-solvent induced phase separation to a new light responsive block copolymer. First, we optimized the membrane formation by using poly(styrene-b-anthracene methyl methacrylate-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA) copolymer, identifying the most suitable solvent, copolymer block length, and other parameters. The obtained final triblock copolymer membrane morphologies were characterized using atomic force and electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis reveals that the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer can form both lamellar and ordered hexagonal nanoporous structures on the membrane top layer in appropriate solvent compositions. The nanostructured membrane emits fluorescence due to the presence of the anthracene mid-block. On irradiation of light the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer membranes has an additional stimuli response. The anthracene group undergoes conformational changes by forming [4 + 4] cycloadducts and this alters the membrane's water flux and solute retention. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. Membrane fusion and exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, R; Südhof, T C

    1999-01-01

    Membrane fusion involves the merger of two phospholipid bilayers in an aqueous environment. In artificial lipid bilayers, fusion proceeds by means of defined transition states, including hourglass-shaped intermediates in which the proximal leaflets of the fusing membranes are merged whereas the distal leaflets are separate (fusion stalk), followed by the reversible opening of small aqueous fusion pores. Fusion of biological membranes requires the action of specific fusion proteins. Best understood are the viral fusion proteins that are responsible for merging the viral with the host cell membrane during infection. These proteins undergo spontaneous and dramatic conformational changes upon activation. In the case of the paradigmatic fusion proteins of the influenza virus and of the human immunodeficiency virus, an amphiphilic fusion peptide is inserted into the target membrane. The protein then reorients itself, thus forcing the fusing membranes together and inducing lipid mixing. Fusion of intracellular membranes in eukaryotic cells involves several protein families including SNAREs, Rab proteins, and Sec1/Munc-18 related proteins (SM-proteins). SNAREs form a novel superfamily of small and mostly membrane-anchored proteins that share a common motif of about 60 amino acids (SNARE motif). SNAREs reversibly assemble into tightly packed helical bundles, the core complexes. Assembly is thought to pull the fusing membranes closely together, thus inducing fusion. SM-proteins comprise a family of soluble proteins that bind to certain types of SNAREs and prevent the formation of core complexes. Rab proteins are GTPases that undergo highly regulated GTP-GDP cycles. In their GTP form, they interact with specific proteins, the effector proteins. Recent evidence suggests that Rab proteins function in the initial membrane contact connecting the fusing membranes but are not involved in the fusion reaction itself.

  5. Two conformational states of the membrane-associated Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba δ-endotoxin complex revealed by electron crystallography: Implications for toxin-pore formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ounjai, Puey; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Sigworth, Fred J.; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2007-01-01

    The insecticidal nature of Cry δ-endotoxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis is generally believed to be caused by their ability to form lytic pores in the midgut cell membrane of susceptible insect larvae. Here we have analyzed membrane-associated structures of the 65-kDa dipteran-active Cry4Ba toxin by electron crystallography. The membrane-associated toxin complex was crystallized in the presence of DMPC via detergent dialysis. Depending upon the charge of the adsorbed surface, 2D crystals of the oligomeric toxin complex have been captured in two distinct conformations. The projection maps of those crystals have been generated at 17 A resolution. Both complexes appeared to be trimeric; as in one crystal form, its projection structure revealed a symmetrical pinwheel-like shape with virtually no depression in the middle of the complex. The other form revealed a propeller-like conformation displaying an obvious hole in the center region, presumably representing the toxin-induced pore. These crystallographic data thus demonstrate for the first time that the 65-kDa activated Cry4Ba toxin in association with lipid membranes could exist in at least two different trimeric conformations, conceivably implying the closed and open states of the pore

  6. Supported liquid membrane extraction coupled in-line to commercial capillary electrophoresis for rapid determination of formate in undiluted blood samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pantůčková, Pavla; Kubáň, Pavel; Boček, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1299, JUL (2013), s. 33-39 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-05762S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : capillary electrophoresis * supported liquid membranes * methanol intoxication Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.258, year: 2013

  7. Structured Ni catalysts on porous anodic alumina membranes for methane dry reforming: NiAl 2 O 4 formation and characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu

    2015-06-29

    This communication presents the successful design of a structured catalyst based on porous anodic alumina membranes for methane dry reforming. The catalyst with a strong Ni-NiAl2O4 interaction shows both excellent activity and stability. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. In-line formation of chemically cross-linked P84® co-polyimide hollow fibre membranes for H2/CO2 separation

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Seung Hak; Jansen, Johannes C.; Tasselli, Franco; Barbieri, Giuseppe; Drioli, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    In this study, chemically cross-linked asymmetric P84® co-polyimide hollow fibre membranes with enhanced separation performance were fabricated, using a dry-wet spinning process with an innovative in-line cross-linking step. The chemical

  9. Structured Ni catalysts on porous anodic alumina membranes for methane dry reforming: NiAl 2 O 4 formation and characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu; Guo, Y.; Basset, Jean-Marie; Kameyama, H.

    2015-01-01

    This communication presents the successful design of a structured catalyst based on porous anodic alumina membranes for methane dry reforming. The catalyst with a strong Ni-NiAl2O4 interaction shows both excellent activity and stability. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. In-line formation of chemically cross-linked P84® co-polyimide hollow fibre membranes for H2/CO2 separation

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Seung Hak

    2010-12-13

    In this study, chemically cross-linked asymmetric P84® co-polyimide hollow fibre membranes with enhanced separation performance were fabricated, using a dry-wet spinning process with an innovative in-line cross-linking step. The chemical modification was conducted by controlled immersion of the coagulated fibre in an aqueous 1,5-diamino-2-methylpentane (DAMP) cross-linker solution before the take-up. The effect of the cross-linker concentration on the thermal, mechanical, chemical and gas transport properties of the membranes was investigated. FT-IR/ATR analysis was used to identify the chemical changes in the polymer, while DSC analysis confirmed the changes in the Tg and the specific heat of the polymer upon cross-linking. Chemical cross-linking with a 10 wt.% aqueous DAMP solution strongly enhanced the H2/CO2 ideal selectivity from 5.3 to 16.1, while the H2 permeance of the membranes decreased from 7.06 × 10−3 to 1.01 × 10−3 m3(STP) m−2 h−1 bar−1 for a feed pressure of 1 bar at 25 °C. The increase of selectivity with decreasing permeance is somewhat higher than the slope in the Robeson upper bound, evidencing the positive effect of the cross-linking on the separation performance of the fibres. Simultaneously, the cross-linking leads to improved mechanical resistance of the membranes, which could be further enhanced by an additional thermal treatment. The produced membranes are therefore more suitable for use under harsh conditions and have a better overall performance than the uncross-linked ones.

  11. Nanodisc-solubilized membrane protein library reflects the membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Michael T; Wilcox, Kyle C; Klein, William L; Sligar, Stephen G

    2013-05-01

    The isolation and identification of unknown membrane proteins offers the prospect of discovering new pharmaceutical targets and identifying key biochemical receptors. However, interactions between membrane protein targets and soluble ligands are difficult to study in vitro due to the insolubility of membrane proteins in non-detergent systems. Nanodiscs, nanoscale discoidal lipid bilayers encircled by a membrane scaffold protein belt, have proven to be an effective platform to solubilize membrane proteins and have been used to study a wide variety of purified membrane proteins. This report details the incorporation of an unbiased population of membrane proteins from Escherichia coli membranes into Nanodiscs. This solubilized membrane protein library (SMPL) forms a soluble in vitro model of the membrane proteome. Since Nanodiscs contain isolated proteins or small complexes, the SMPL is an ideal platform for interactomics studies and pull-down assays of membrane proteins. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the protein population before and after formation of the Nanodisc library indicates that a large percentage of the proteins are incorporated into the library. Proteomic identification of several prominent bands demonstrates the successful incorporation of outer and inner membrane proteins into the Nanodisc library.

  12. Dynamics of membrane nanotubes coated with I-BAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farhangibarooji, Younes; Rørvig-Lund, Andreas; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Membrane deformation is a necessary step in a number of cellular processes such as filopodia and invadopodia formation and has been shown to involve membrane shaping proteins containing membrane binding domains from the IRSp53-MIM protein family. In reconstituted membranes the membrane shaping...

  13. In-line coupling of microextractions across polymer inclusion membranes to capillary zone electrophoresis for rapid determination of formate in blood samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pantůčková, Pavla; Kubáň, Pavel; Boček, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 887, AUG (2015), s. 111-117 ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-05762S Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) R200311404 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : capillary electrophoresis * in-line coupling * polymer inclusion membrane extraction Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.712, year: 2015

  14. MRI of the hyaline knee joint cartilage. Animal experimental and clinical studies; MRT des hyalinen Kniegelenkknorpels. Tierexperimentelle und klinische Untersuchungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, G. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Prescher, A. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie; Nolte-Ernsting, C. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Buehne, M. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Scherer, K. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Versuchstierkunde; Kuepper, W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Versuchstierkunde; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    1994-02-01

    The value of MR imaging for the detection of hyaline cartilage lesions using 2-D spin-echo and 3-D gradient-echo imaging was evaluated in an animal experiment in 10 dogs and in a clinical study in 30 patients. MR imaging findings were compared with histopathological and arthroscopy findings, respectively. Using MRI neither grade I nor grade II hyaline cartilage lesions were detectable. In the animal experiments 77% of grade III lesions and all the grade IV lesions were seen. However, in the clinical study only about the half of grade III and IV lesions were detected. 3-D gradient-echo MR imaging was superior to 2-D spin-echo imaging (p<0.001), while 3-D FLASH and 3-D FISP did not differ significantly in the detection rate (p<0.34). 3-D gradient-echo MR imaging seems to be the best method for the delineation of high grade cartilage lesions. However, early stages of cartilage degeneration are invisible even with this imaging modality. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Wertigkeit der MRT in der Erfassung von Knorpellaesionen mit 2-D-Spin-Echo- und 3-D-Grafienten-Echo-Sequenzen wurde in einer tierexperimentellen Untersuchung an 10 Hunden sowie in einer klinischen Studie an 30 Patienten ueberprueft. Die kernspintomographischen Ergebnisse wurden mit dem pathologisch-anatomischen Befund bzw. der Arthroskopie verglichen. MR-tomographisch konnten weder Grad-I- noch Grad-II-Knorpellaesionen erfasst werden. Die Erkennbarkeitsrate der Grad-III- und -IV-Laesionen lag fuer die tierexperimentellen Untersuchungen bei 77 bzw. 100%, waehrend klinisch nur etwa 50% dieser Veraenderungen erkannt werden konnten. Dabei waren die 3-D-Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen den 2-D-Spin-Echo-Sequenzen signifikant ueberlegen (p<0,001), waehrend sich die 3-D-Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen FISP und FLASH nicht voneinander unterschieden (p<0,34). Derzeit muessen die 3-D-Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen als die beste Methode zur Erfassung hoehergradiger Knorpellaesionen angesehen werden. Fruehe Stadien der Knorpelschaedigung sind

  15. Investigations into the visualisation of osseous and hyaline cartilaginous surface structures of the femural head using X-ray computed tomography. Untersuchung der Visualisierbarkeit knoecherner und hyalin knorpeliger Oberflaechenstrukturen des caput femoris mit Roentgen-Computertomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laemmermann, G.

    1989-03-06

    This study investigates into the extent to which fine osseous structures in the head of the femur and hyaline cartilaginous surfaces of the hip joint are accessible to X-ray computed tomography as a method of diagnosis. At first, a true model of the femural head (post-mortem preparation embedded in methylacrylate) was tomographed to compare the sectional displays thus obtained with hard-microtome sections of similar thickness made at the same levels. This permitted preliminary evaluations to be carried out and confirmed that those structures can be visualised by high-resolution CT (1 mm sections). Methods using high-resolution sectional imaging have a role in examinations of congruence in the the hip joint. Particularly useful here are three-dimensional displays of osseous and cartilaginous surfaces of the joint parts examined. Further research is needed until a more refined method of reconstruction can be made available, the usefulness of which in actual practice will depend on the degree of geometrical congruence achieved between a patient's joint and its display on the screen. (orig./GDG).

  16. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstad, Astrid; Rasmussen, Knut Einar; Parmer, Marthe Petrine

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports development of a new approach towards analytical liquid-liquid-liquid membrane extraction termed parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction. A donor plate and acceptor plate create a sandwich, in which each sample (human plasma) and acceptor solution is separated by an arti......This paper reports development of a new approach towards analytical liquid-liquid-liquid membrane extraction termed parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction. A donor plate and acceptor plate create a sandwich, in which each sample (human plasma) and acceptor solution is separated...... by an artificial liquid membrane. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction is a modification of hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction, where the hollow fibers are replaced by flat membranes in a 96-well plate format....

  17. Membrane Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Physics, mathematics and chemistry all play a vital role in understanding the true nature and functioning of biological membranes, key elements of living processes. Besides simple spectroscopic observations and electrical measurements of membranes we address in this book the phenomena of coexistence and independent existence of different membrane components using various theoretical approaches. This treatment will be helpful for readers who want to understand biological processes by applying both simple observations and fundamental scientific analysis. It provides a deep understanding of the causes and effects of processes inside membranes, and will thus eventually open new doors for high-level pharmaceutical approaches towards fighting membrane- and cell-related diseases.

  18. [Effects of in vitro continuous passaging on the phenotype of mouse hyaline chondrocytes and the balance of the extra- cellular matrix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linyi, Cai; Xiangli, Kong; Jing, Xie

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of in vitro continuous passaging on the morphological phenotype and differentiation characteristics of mouse hyaline chondrocytes, as well as on the balance of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Enzymatic digestion was conducted to isolate mouse hyaline chondrocytes, which expanded over five passages in vitro. Hematoxylin-eosin stain was used to show the changes in chondrocyte morphology. Semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to analyze the mRNA changes in the marker genes, routine genes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs) in chondrocytes. Zymography was carried out to elucidate changes in gelatinase activities. After continuous expansion in vitro, the morphology of round or polygonal chondrocytes changed to elongated and spindled shape. The expression of marker genes significantly decreased (P 0.05). Meanwhile, the ratio of MMPs/TIMPs was altered. At the protein level, the activities of gelatinases decreased after passaging, especially for P4 and P5 chondrocytes (P cartilage ECM became uncontrollable and led to the imbalance of ECM homeostasis. When hyaline chondrocytes are applied in research on relevant diseases or cartilage tissue engineering, P0-P2 chondrocytes should be used.

  19. Biostable scaffolds of polyacrylate polymers implanted in the articular cartilage induce hyaline-like cartilage regeneration in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho-Tello, María; Forriol, Francisco; Martín de Llano, José J; Antolinos-Turpin, Carmen; Gómez-Tejedor, José A; Gómez Ribelles, José L; Carda, Carmen

    2017-07-05

    To study the influence of scaffold properties on the organization of in vivo cartilage regeneration. Our hypothesis was that stress transmission to the cells seeded inside the pores of the scaffold or surrounding it, which is highly dependent on the scaffold properties, determines the differentiation of both mesenchymal cells and dedifferentiated autologous chondrocytes. 4 series of porous scaffolds made of different polyacrylate polymers, previously seeded with cultured rabbit chondrocytes or without cells, were implanted in cartilage defects in rabbits. Subchondral bone was injured during the surgery to allow blood to reach the implantation site and fill the scaffold pores. At 3 months after implantation, excellent tissue regeneration was obtained, with a well-organized layer of hyaline-like cartilage at the condylar surface in most cases of the hydrophobic or slightly hydrophilic series. The most hydrophilic material induced the poorest regeneration. However, no statistically significant difference was observed between preseeded and non-preseeded scaffolds. All of the materials used were biocompatible, biostable polymers, so, in contrast to some other studies, our results were not perturbed by possible effects attributable to material degradation products or to the loss of scaffold mechanical properties over time due to degradation. Cartilage regeneration depends mainly on the properties of the scaffold, such as stiffness and hydrophilicity, whereas little difference was observed between preseeded and non-preseeded scaffolds.

  20. Hyaline articular cartilage: relaxation times, pulse-sequence parameters and MR appearance at 1.5 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalkias, S.M. [Dept. of Radiology, A.H.E.P.A. General Hospital of the Aristotelian Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece); Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste (Italy); Pozzi-Mucelli, M. [Orthopaedic Clinic, Univ. of Trieste (Italy); Frezza, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste (Italy); Longo, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste (Italy)

    1994-08-01

    In order to optimize the parameters for the best visualization of the internal architecture of the hyaline articular cartilage a study both ex vivo and in vivo was performed. Accurate T1 and T2 relaxation times of articular cartilage were obtained with a particular mixed sequence and then used for the creation of isocontrast intensity graphs. These graphs subsequently allowed in all pulse sequences (spin echo, SE and gradient echo, GRE) the best combination of repetition time (TR), echo time (TE) and flip angle (FA) for optimization of signal differences between MR cartilage zones. For SE sequences maximum contrast between cartilage zones can be obtained by using a long TR (> 1,500 ms) with a short TE (< 30 ms), whereas for GRE sequences maximum contrast is obtained with the shortest TE (< 15 ms) combined with a relatively long TR (> 400 ms) and an FA greater than 40 . A trilaminar appearance was demonstrated with a superficial and deep hypointense zone in all sequences and an intermediate zone that was moderately hyperintense on SE T1-weighted images, slightly more hyperintense on proton density Rho and SE T2-weighted images and even more hyperintense on GRE images. (orig.)

  1. Injectable glycosaminoglycan-protein nano-complex in semi-interpenetrating networks: A biphasic hydrogel for hyaline cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Janani; Subramanian, Anuradha; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2017-11-01

    Articular hyaline cartilage regeneration remains challenging due to its less intrinsic reparability. The study develops injectable biphasic semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (SIPN) hydrogel impregnated with chondroitin sulfate (ChS) nanoparticles for functional cartilage restoration. ChS loaded zein nanoparticles (∼150nm) prepared by polyelectrolyte-protein complexation were interspersed into injectable SIPNs developed by blending alginate with poly(vinyl alcohol) and calcium crosslinking. The hydrogel exhibited interconnected porous microstructure (39.9±5.8μm pore diameter, 57.7±5.9% porosity), 92% swellability and >350Pa elastic modulus. Primary chondrocytes compatibility, chondrocyte-matrix interaction with cell-cell clustering and spheroidal morphology was demonstrated in ChS loaded hydrogel and long-term (42days) proliferation was also determined. Higher fold expression of cartilage-specific genes sox9, aggrecan and collagen-II was observed in ChS loaded hydrogel while exhibiting poor expression of collagen-I. Immunoblotting of aggregan and collagen II demonstrate favorable positive influence of ChS on chondrocytes. Thus, the injectable biphasic SIPNs could be promising composition-mimetic substitute for cartilage restoration at irregular defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Plasma membrane associated, virus-specific polypeptides required for the formation of target antigen complexes recognized by virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domber, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    These studies were undertaken to define some of the poxvirus-specific target antigens which are synthesized in infected cells and recognized by vaccinia virus-specific CTLs (VV-CTLs). Since vaccinia virus infected, unmanipulated target cells express numerous virus-specific antigens on the plasma membrane, attempts were made to manipulate expression of the poxvirus genome after infection so that one or a few defined virus-specified antigens were expressed on the surface of infected cells. In vitro [ 51 Cr]-release assays determined that viral DNA synthesis and expression of late viral proteins were not necessary to form a target cell which was fully competent for lysis by VV-CTLs. Under the conditions employed in these experiments, 90-120 minutes of viral protein synthesis were necessary to produce a competent cell for lysis by VV-CTLs. In order to further inhibit the expression of early viral proteins in infected cells, partially UV-inactivated vaccinia virus was employed to infect target cells. It was determined that L-cells infected with virus preparations which had been UV-irradiated for 90 seconds were fully competent for lysis by VV-CTLs. Cells infected with 90 second UV-irr virus expressed 3 predominant, plasma membrane associated antigens of 36-37K, 27-28K, and 19-17K. These 3 viral antigens represent the predominant membrane-associated viral antigens available for interaction with class I, major histocompatibility antigens and hence are potential target antigens for VV-CTLs

  3. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac75 is required for egress of nucleocapsids from the nucleus and formation of de novo intranuclear membrane microvesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Jun Guo

    Full Text Available In this study, Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac75 was functionally characterized. Ac75 has homologs in all sequenced genomes of alphabaculoviruses, betabaculoviruses, and gammabaculoviruses. It was determined to encode a protein that is associated with the nucleocapsid of budded virus and with both envelope and nucleocapsids of occlusion-derived virus. Sf9 cells transfected by an ac75-knockout bacmid resulted in the infection being restricted to single cells. No budded virus were detected although viral DNA replication and late gene expression were unaffected. Electron microscopy revealed that the virogenic stroma, nucleocapsids and occlusion bodies appeared normal in the cells transfected by an ac75-knockout bacmid. However, the nucleocapsids were unenveloped, the occlusion bodies did not contain any virions or nucleocapsids, and no nucleocapsids were found outside the nucleus or spanning the nuclear membrane. In addition, de novo intranuclear membrane microvesicles that are the precursor of occlusion-derived virus envelopes were absent in the nuclei of transfected cells. Confocal microscopy showed that AC75 protein appeared in the cytoplasm as early as 6 hours post infection. It localized to the ring zone at the periphery of the nucleus from 15 to 24 hours post infection and demonstrated light blocky cloud-like distribution in the center of the nucleus. AC75 was found to co-immunoprecipitate with BV and ODV associated envelope protein ODV-E25. The data from this study suggest that ac75 is essential for induction of the intranuclear membrane microvesicles, it appears to be required for the intranuclear envelopment of nucleocapsids, and is also essential for egress of nucleocapsids from the nuclei, in infected cells.

  4. In situ nanostructure formation of (micro-hydroxo)bis(micro-carboxylato) diruthenium units in nafion membrane and its utilization for selective reduction of nitrosonium ion in aqueous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Annamalai Senthil; Tanase, Tomoaki; Iida, Masayasu

    2007-01-16

    Nanostructured molecular film containing the (micro-hydroxo)bis(micro-carboxylato) diruthenium(III) units, [RuIII2(micro-OH)(micro-CH3COO)2(HBpz3)2]+ ({RuIII2(micro-OH)}), was prepared by an in situ conversion of its micro-oxo precursor, [RuIII2(micro-O)(micro-CH3COO)2(HBpz3)2] ({RuIII2(micro-O)}), in a Nafion membrane matrix, where HBpz3 is hydrotris(1-pyrazolyl)borate. The conversion procedure results in fine nanoparticle aggregates of the {RuIII2(micro-OH)} units in the Nafion membrane (Nf-{RuIII2(micro-OH)}), where an average particle size (4.1 +/- 2.3 nm) is close to the Nafion's cluster dimension of approximately 4 nm. Chemically modified electrodes by using the Nafion molecular membrane films (Nf-{RuIII2(micro-OH)}-MMFEs) were further developed on ITO/glass and glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surfaces, and a selective reduction of nitrosonium ion (NO+), presumably through reaction of a {RuIIRuIII(micro-OH)} mixed-valence state with HNO2, was demonstrated without interference by molecular oxygen in an acidic aqueous solution. The Nf-{RuIII2(micro-OH)}-MMFEs are stable even in a physiological condition (pH 7), where the naked {RuIII2(-OH)} complex is readily transformed into its deprotonated {RuIII2(micro-O)} form, demonstrating an unusual stabilizing effects for the {RuIII2(micro-OH)} unit by the Nafion cluster environment.

  5. A new multicompartmental reaction-diffusion modeling method links transient membrane attachment of E. coli MinE to E-ring formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Satya Nanda Vel; Tomita, Masaru

    2010-03-01

    Many important cellular processes are regulated by reaction-diffusion (RD) of molecules that takes place both in the cytoplasm and on the membrane. To model and analyze such multicompartmental processes, we developed a lattice-based Monte Carlo method, Spatiocyte that supports RD in volume and surface compartments at single molecule resolution. Stochasticity in RD and the excluded volume effect brought by intracellular molecular crowding, both of which can significantly affect RD and thus, cellular processes, are also supported. We verified the method by comparing simulation results of diffusion, irreversible and reversible reactions with the predicted analytical and best available numerical solutions. Moreover, to directly compare the localization patterns of molecules in fluorescence microscopy images with simulation, we devised a visualization method that mimics the microphotography process by showing the trajectory of simulated molecules averaged according to the camera exposure time. In the rod-shaped bacterium Escherichia coli, the division site is suppressed at the cell poles by periodic pole-to-pole oscillations of the Min proteins (MinC, MinD and MinE) arising from carefully orchestrated RD in both cytoplasm and membrane compartments. Using Spatiocyte we could model and reproduce the in vivo MinDE localization dynamics by accounting for the previously reported properties of MinE. Our results suggest that the MinE ring, which is essential in preventing polar septation, is largely composed of MinE that is transiently attached to the membrane independently after recruited by MinD. Overall, Spatiocyte allows simulation and visualization of complex spatial and reaction-diffusion mediated cellular processes in volumes and surfaces. As we showed, it can potentially provide mechanistic insights otherwise difficult to obtain experimentally. The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11693-009-9047-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to

  6. Laser-induced micropore formation and modification of cartilage structure in osteoarthritis healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobol, Emil [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod, RussiabFederal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Photonic Technologies, Moscow, Russia; Baum, Olga [Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Photonic Technologies, Moscow, Russia; Shekhter, Anatoly [Sechenov First Medical University of Moscow, Institute of Regenerative Medicine, Moscow, Russia; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian [University of California, Center for Biophotonics, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Sacramento, California, United StateseMcGill University, Department of Bioengineering, Montreal, Canada; Shnirelman, Alexander [Concordia University, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Montreal, Canada; Alexandrovskaya, Yulia [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod, RussiabFederal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Photonic Technologies, Moscow, Russia; Sadovskyy, Ivan [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Argonne, Illinois, United States; Vinokur, Valerii [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Argonne, Illinois, United States

    2017-05-31

    Pores are vital for functioning of avascular tissues. Laser-induced pores play an important role in the process of cartilage regeneration. The aim of any treatment for osteoarthritis is to repair hyaline-type cartilage. The aims of this study are to answer two questions: (1) How do laser-assisted pores affect the cartilaginous cells to synthesize hyaline cartilage (HC)? and (2) How can the size distribution of pores arising in the course of laser radiation be controlled? We have shown that in cartilage, the pores arise predominately near chondrocytes, which promote nutrition of cells and signal molecular transfer that activates regeneration of cartilage. In vivo laser treatment of damaged cartilage of miniature pig joints provides cellular transformation and formation of HC. We propose a simple model of pore formation in biopolymers that paves the way for going beyond the trial-anderror approach when choosing an optimal laser treatment regime. Our findings support the approach toward laser healing of osteoarthritis.

  7. Evaluation of autogenous PRGF+β-TCP with or without a collagen membrane on bone formation and implant osseointegration in large size bone defects. A preclinical in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batas, Leonidas; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Papadimitriou, Serafim; Nyengaard, Jens R; Konstantinidis, Antonios

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the adjunctive use of a collagen membrane enhances bone formation and implant osseointegration in non-contained defects grafted with chair-side prepared autologous platelet-rich growth factor (PRGF) adsorbed on a β-TCP particulate carrier. Large box-type defects (10 × 6 mm; W × D) were prepared in the edentulated and completely healed mandibles of six Beagles dogs. An implant with moderately rough surface was placed in the center of each defect leaving the coronal 6 mm of the implant not covered with bone. The remaining defect space was then filled out with chair-side prepared autologous PRGF adsorbed on β-TCP particles and either covered with a collagen membrane (PRGF/β-TCP+CM) (6 defects) or left without a membrane (PRGF/β-TCP) (5 defects). Histology 4 months post-op showed new lamellar and woven bone formation encompassing almost entirely the defect and limited residual β-TCP particles. Extent of osseointegration of the previously exposed portion of the implants varied, but in general was limited. Within the defect, new mineralized bone (%) averaged 43.2 ± 9.86 vs. 39.9 ± 13.7 in the PRGF/β-TCP+CM and PRGF/β-TCP group (P = 0.22) and relative mineralized bone-to-implant contact (%) averaged 26.2 ± 16.45 vs. 35.91 ± 24.45, respectively (P = 0.5). First, bone-to-implant contact from the implant top was 4.1 ± 1.5 and 3.2 ± 2.3 (P = 0.9), in the PRGF/β-TCP+CM and PRGF/β-TCP group, respectively. Implantation of chair-side prepared autologous PRGF adsorbed on a β-TCP carrier in non-contained peri-implant defects resulted in large amounts of bone regeneration, but osseointegration was limited. Provisions for GBR with a collagen membrane did not significantly enhance bone regeneration or implant osseointegration. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Characterization of clean and fouled ultrafiltration membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanemaaijer, J.H.; Robbertsen, T.; van den Boomgaard, Anthonie; Olieman, C.; Both, P.; Schmidt, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    Much research into the fundamentals of membrane formation and separation has been performed in order to improve the efficiency of the manufacture of ultrafiltration membranes. Determination of the membrane characteristics is a key problem in these investigations. In this paper, we report on a study

  9. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B [NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at University Tuebingen, Markwiesenstr. 55, D-72770 Reutlingen (Germany); Ahlers, M [GELITA AG, Gammelsbacher Str. 2, D-69412 Eberbach (Germany)], E-mail: schlosshauer@nmi.de

    2008-09-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation.

  10. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B; Ahlers, M

    2008-01-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation

  11. Evidence that the assembly of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex involves the formation of a large core structure in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Vincenzo; Conte, Laura; Trumpower, Bernard L

    2009-04-01

    The assembly status of the cytochrome bc(1) complex has been analyzed in distinct yeast deletion strains in which genes for one or more of the bc(1) subunits were deleted. In all the yeast strains tested, a bc(1) sub-complex of approximately 500 kDa was found when the mitochondrial membranes were analyzed by blue native electrophoresis. The subsequent molecular characterization of this sub-complex, carried out in the second dimension by SDS/PAGE and immunodecoration, revealed the presence of the two catalytic subunits, cytochrome b and cytochrome c(1), associated with the noncatalytic subunits core protein 1, core protein 2, Qcr7p and Qcr8p. Together, these bc(1) subunits build up the core structure of the cytochrome bc(1) complex, which is then able to sequentially bind the remaining subunits, such as Qcr6p, Qcr9p, the Rieske iron-sulfur protein and Qcr10p. This bc(1) core structure may represent a true assembly intermediate during the maturation of the bc(1) complex; first, because of its wide distribution in distinct yeast deletion strains and, second, for its characteristics of stability, which resemble those of the intact homodimeric bc(1) complex. By contrast, the bc(1) core structure is unable to interact with the cytochrome c oxidase complex to form respiratory supercomplexes. The characterization of this novel core structure of the bc(1) complex provides a number of new elements clarifying the molecular events leading to the maturation of the yeast cytochrome bc(1) complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  12. Evidence that assembly of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex involves formation of a large core structure in the inner mitochondrial membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Vincenzo; Conte, Laura; Trumpower, Bernard L.

    2009-01-01

    The assembly status of the cytochrome bc1 complex has been analyzed in distinct yeast deletion strains in which genes for one or more of the bc1 subunits had been deleted. In all the yeast strains tested a bc1 sub-complex of about 500 kDa was found when the mitochondrial membranes were analyzed by blue native electrophoresis. The subsequent molecular characterization of this sub-complex, carried out in the second dimension by SDS-PAGE and immunodecoration, revealed the presence of the two catalytic subunits cytochrome b and cytochrome c1, associated with the non catalytic subunits core protein 1, core protein 2, Qcr7p and Qcr8p. Altogether these bc1 subunits build up the core structure of the cytochrome bc1 complex which is then able to sequentially bind the remaining subunits, such as Qcr6p, Qcr9p, the Rieske iron-sulfur protein and Qcr10p. This bc1 core structure may represent a true assembly intermediate during the maturation of the bc1 complex, first because of its wide distribution in distinct yeast deletion strains and second for its characteristics of stability which resemble those of the intact homodimeric bc1 complex. Differently from this latter, however, the bc1 core structure is not able to interact with the cytochrome c oxidase complex to form respiratory supercomplexes. The characterization of this novel core structure of the bc1 complex provides a number of new elements for clarification of the molecular events leading to the maturation of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:19236481

  13. Cell-free system for synthesizing membrane proteins cell free method for synthesizing membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Philip D; Hanson, Deborah K

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides an in vitro method for producing proteins, membrane proteins, membrane-associated proteins, and soluble proteins that interact with membrane-associated proteins for assembly into an oligomeric complex or that require association with a membrane for proper folding. The method comprises, supplying intracytoplasmic membranes from organisms; modifying protein composition of intracytoplasmic membranes from organism by modifying DNA to delete genes encoding functions of the organism not associated with the formation of the intracytoplasmic membranes; generating appropriate DNA or RNA templates that encode the target protein; and mixing the intracytoplasmic membranes with the template and a transcription/translation-competent cellular extract to cause simultaneous production of the membrane proteins and encapsulation of the membrane proteins within the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  14. Hyalinizing trabecular tumor of the thyroid: Diagnosed of a rare tumor using ultrasonography, cytology, and intraoperative frozen sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyun Sik; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kwak, Jin Young; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Cheol Keun; Son, Eun Ju [Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the clinicopathological and imaging features of thyroid nodules surgically diagnosed as hyaline trabecular tumor (HTT), and to assess the role of cytology and frozen sections (FS) in the diagnosis of HTT. This study included 21 thyroid nodules in 21 patients treated from August 2005 to March 2015 (mean age, 53.3 years) who were either diagnosed as HTT or had HTT suggested as a possible diagnosis based on cytology, FS, or the final pathology report. Patients' medical records were retrospectively reviewed for cytopathologic results and outcomes during the course of follow-up. Sonograms were reviewed and categorized. Twelve nodules from 12 patients were surgically confirmed as HTT. Ultrasonography (US)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) was performed on 11 nodules, of which six (54.5%) were papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) or suspicious for PTC and three (27.3%) were HTT or suspicious for HTT. Intraoperative FS suggested the possibility of HTT in seven nodules, of which four (57.1%) were confirmed as HTT. US-FNA suggested the diagnosis of HTT in 10 nodules, of which three (30.0%) were confirmed as HTT. Common US features of the 12 pathologically confirmed cases of HTT were hypoechogenicity or marked hypoechogenicity (83.4%), absence of calcifications (91.7%), parallel shape (100.0%), presence of vascularity (75.0%), and probable benignity (58.3%). HTT should be included in the differential diagnosis of solid tumors with hypoechogenicity or marked hypoechogenicity and otherwise benign US features that have been diagnosed as PTC through cytology.

  15. Hyaline cartilage calcification of the first metatarsophalangeal joint is associated with osteoarthritis but independent of age and BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Jan; Hawellek, Thelonius; Hischke, Sandra; Bertrand, Jessica; Krause, Matthias; Püschel, Klaus; Rüther, Wolfgang; Niemeier, Andreas

    2016-11-15

    Hyaline cartilage calcification (CC) is associated with osteoarthritis (OA) in hip and knee joints. The first metatarsophalangeal joint (1 st MTPJ) is frequently affected by OA, but it is unclear if CC occurs in the 1 st MTPJ. The aim of the present study was to analyze the prevalence of CC of the 1 st MTPJ in the general population by high-resolution digital contact radiography (DCR) and to determine its association with histological OA severity, age and body mass index (BMI). 168 metatarsal heads of 84 donors (n = 47 male, n = 37 female; mean age 62.73 years, SD ±18.8, range 20-93) were analyzed by DCR for the presence of CC. Histological OA grade (hOA) by OARSI was analyzed in the central load-bearing zone of the first metatarsal head (1 st MH). Structural equation modeling (SEM) was performed to analyze the interrelationship between CC, hOA, age and BMI. The prevalence of CC of 1 st MH was 48.8 % (41/84) (95 %-CI [37.7 %, 60.0 %]), independent of the affected side (p = 0.42), gender (p = 0.41) and BMI (p = 0.51). The mean amount of CC of one MH correlated significantly with that of the contralateral side (r s  = 0.4, 95 %-CI [0.26, 0.52], p cartilage area) of the MH correlated significantly with the severity of hOA (r s  = 0.51, 95 %-CI [0.32, 0.65], p studies.

  16. Hyalinizing trabecular tumor of the thyroid: Diagnosed of a rare tumor using ultrasonography, cytology, and intraoperative frozen sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Hyun Sik; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kwak, Jin Young; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Park, Cheol Keun; Son, Eun Ju

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the clinicopathological and imaging features of thyroid nodules surgically diagnosed as hyaline trabecular tumor (HTT), and to assess the role of cytology and frozen sections (FS) in the diagnosis of HTT. This study included 21 thyroid nodules in 21 patients treated from August 2005 to March 2015 (mean age, 53.3 years) who were either diagnosed as HTT or had HTT suggested as a possible diagnosis based on cytology, FS, or the final pathology report. Patients' medical records were retrospectively reviewed for cytopathologic results and outcomes during the course of follow-up. Sonograms were reviewed and categorized. Twelve nodules from 12 patients were surgically confirmed as HTT. Ultrasonography (US)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) was performed on 11 nodules, of which six (54.5%) were papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) or suspicious for PTC and three (27.3%) were HTT or suspicious for HTT. Intraoperative FS suggested the possibility of HTT in seven nodules, of which four (57.1%) were confirmed as HTT. US-FNA suggested the diagnosis of HTT in 10 nodules, of which three (30.0%) were confirmed as HTT. Common US features of the 12 pathologically confirmed cases of HTT were hypoechogenicity or marked hypoechogenicity (83.4%), absence of calcifications (91.7%), parallel shape (100.0%), presence of vascularity (75.0%), and probable benignity (58.3%). HTT should be included in the differential diagnosis of solid tumors with hypoechogenicity or marked hypoechogenicity and otherwise benign US features that have been diagnosed as PTC through cytology

  17. Osteochondral lesions in distal tarsal joints of Icelandic horses reveal strong associations between hyaline and calcified cartilage abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CJ Ley

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteochondral lesions in the joints of the distal tarsal region of young Icelandic horses provide a natural model for the early stages of osteoarthritis (OA in low-motion joints. We describe and characterise mineralised and non-mineralised osteochondral lesions in left distal tarsal region joint specimens from twenty-two 30 ±1 month-old Icelandic horses. Combinations of confocal scanning light microscopy, backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (including, importantly, iodine staining and three-dimensional microcomputed tomography were used on specimens obtained with guidance from clinical imaging. Lesion-types were described and classified into groups according to morphological features. Their locations in the hyaline articular cartilage (HAC, articular calcified cartilage (ACC, subchondral bone (SCB and the joint margin tissues were identified and their frequency in the joints recorded. Associations and correlations between lesion-types were investigated for centrodistal joints only. In centrodistal joints the lesion-types HAC chondrocyte loss, HAC fibrillation, HAC central chondrocyte clusters, ACC arrest and ACC advance had significant associations and strong correlations. These lesion-types had moderate to high frequency in centrodistal joints but low frequencies in tarsometatarsal and talocalcaneal-centroquartal joints. Joint margin lesion-types had no significant associations with other lesion-types in the centrodistal joints but high frequency in both the centrodistal and tarsometatarsal joints. The frequency of SCB lesion-types in all joints was low. Hypermineralised infill phase lesion-types were detected. Our results emphasise close associations between HAC and ACC lesions in equine centrodistal joints and the importance of ACC lesions in the development of OA in low-motion compression-loaded equine joints.

  18. Osteochondral lesions in distal tarsal joints of Icelandic horses reveal strong associations between hyaline and calcified cartilage abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, C J; Ekman, S; Hansson, K; Björnsdóttir, S; Boyde, A

    2014-03-25

    Osteochondral lesions in the joints of the distal tarsal region of young Icelandic horses provide a natural model for the early stages of osteoarthritis (OA) in low-motion joints. We describe and characterise mineralised and non-mineralised osteochondral lesions in left distal tarsal region joint specimens from twenty-two 30 ±1 month-old Icelandic horses. Combinations of confocal scanning light microscopy, backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (including, importantly, iodine staining) and three-dimensional microcomputed tomography were used on specimens obtained with guidance from clinical imaging. Lesion-types were described and classified into groups according to morphological features. Their locations in the hyaline articular cartilage (HAC), articular calcified cartilage (ACC), subchondral bone (SCB) and the joint margin tissues were identified and their frequency in the joints recorded. Associations and correlations between lesion-types were investigated for centrodistal joints only. In centrodistal joints the lesion-types HAC chondrocyte loss, HAC fibrillation, HAC central chondrocyte clusters, ACC arrest and ACC advance had significant associations and strong correlations. These lesion-types had moderate to high frequency in centrodistal joints but low frequencies in tarsometatarsal and talocalcaneal-centroquartal joints. Joint margin lesion-types had no significant associations with other lesion-types in the centrodistal joints but high frequency in both the centrodistal and tarsometatarsal joints. The frequency of SCB lesion-types in all joints was low. Hypermineralised infill phase lesion-types were detected. Our results emphasise close associations between HAC and ACC lesions in equine centrodistal joints and the importance of ACC lesions in the development of OA in low-motion compression-loaded equine joints.

  19. Membrane paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.; Thorne, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    The membrane paradigm is a modified frozen star approach to modeling black holes, with particles and fields assuming a complex, static, boundary-layer type structure (membrane) near the event horizon. The membrane has no effects on the present or future evolution of particles and fields above itself. The mathematical representation is a combination of a formalism containing terms for the shear and bulk viscosity, surface pressure, momentum, temperature, entropy, etc., of the horizon and the 3+1 formalism. The latter model considers a family of three-dimensional spacelike hypersurfaces in one-dimensional time. The membrane model considers a magnetic field threading the hole and undergoing torque from the hole rotation. The field is cleaned by the horizon and distributed over the horizon so that ohmic dissipation is minimized. The membrane paradigm is invalid inside the horizon, but is useful for theoretically probing the properties of slowly evolving black holes

  20. Membrane processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, Katarzyna

    2017-11-01

    The membrane processes have played important role in the industrial separation process. These technologies can be found in all industrial areas such as food, beverages, metallurgy, pulp and paper, textile, pharmaceutical, automotive, biotechnology and chemical industry, as well as in water treatment for domestic and industrial application. Although these processes are known since twentieth century, there are still many studies that focus on the testing of new membranes' materials and determining of conditions for optimal selectivity, i. e. the optimum transmembrane pressure (TMP) or permeate flux to minimize fouling. Moreover the researchers proposed some calculation methods to predict the membrane processes properties. In this article, the laboratory scale experiments of membrane separation techniques, as well their validation by calculation methods are presented. Because membrane is the "heart" of the process, experimental and computational methods for its characterization are also described.

  1. Influence of Nafion film on oxygen reduction reaction and hydrogen peroxide formation on Pt electrode for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohma, Atsushi; Fushinobu, Kazuyoshi; Okazaki, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The influence of Nafion film on ORR kinetics and H 2 O 2 formation on a Pt electrode was investigated using RRDE in 0.1 M HClO 4 . It was found that the Nafion-coated Pt system showed lower apparent ORR activity and more H 2 O 2 production than the bare Pt electrode system. From the temperature sensitivity, it was revealed that the apparent activation energies of ORR in the Nafion-coated Pt system were lower than the bare Pt electrode system, and the H 2 O 2 formation was suppressed with the increase of the temperature. In order to analyze the results furthermore, other systems (0.1/1.0 M, HClO 4 /CF 3 SO 3 H) with the bare Pt electrodes were also examined as references. It was exhibited that the ORR kinetic current, the H 2 O 2 formation, and the apparent activation energies of 1.0 M CF 3 SO 3 H system were close to those of the Nafion-coated Pt system. We concluded that the orientation of anion species of Nafion and CF 3 SO 3 H to the Pt surface via water molecules, as well as a fluorocarbon polymer network of Nafion, might block O 2 adsorption, resulting in the smaller effective surface area of the Pt electrode for ORR, the smaller ORR kinetic current, and the more H 2 O 2 production.

  2. Dual role of beta-carotene in combination with cigarette smoke aqueous extract on the formation of mutagenic lipid peroxidation products in lung membranes: dependence on pO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palozza, P; Serini, S; Trombino, S; Lauriola, L; Ranelletti, F O; Calviello, G

    2006-12-01

    Results from some intervention trials indicated that supplemental beta-carotene enhanced lung cancer incidence and mortality in chronic smokers. The aim of this study was to verify the hypothesis that high concentrations of the carotenoid, under the pO2 present in lung (100-150 mmHg), may exert deleterious effects through a prooxidant mechanism. To test this hypothesis, we examined the interactions of beta-carotene and cigarette smoke condensate (tar) on the formation of lipid peroxidation products in rat lung microsomal membranes enriched in vitro with varying beta-carotene concentrations (from 1 to 10 nmol/mg prot) and then incubated with tar (6-25 microg/ml) under different pO2. As markers of lipid peroxidation, we evaluated the levels of conjugated dienes and malondialdehyde, possessing mutagenic and pro-carcinogenic activity. The exposure of microsomal membranes to tar induced a dose-dependent enhancement of lipid peroxidation, which progressively increased as a function of pO2. Under a low pO2 (15 mmHg), beta-carotene acted clearly as an antioxidant, inhibiting tar-induced lipid peroxidation. However, the carotenoid progressively lost its antioxidant efficiency by increasing pO2 (50-100 mmHg) and acted as a prooxidant at pO2 ranging from 100 to 760 mmHg in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with this finding, the addition of alpha-tocopherol (25 microM) prevented the prooxidant effects of the carotenoid. beta-Carotene auto-oxidation, measured as formation of 5,6-epoxy-beta,beta-carotene, was faster at high than at low pO2 and the carotenoid was more rapidly consumed in the presence of tar. These data point out that the carotenoid may enhance cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress and exert potential deleterious effects at the pO2 normally present in lung tissue.

  3. How to link pyrene to its host lipid to minimize the extent of membrane perturbations and to optimize pyrene dimer formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franova, M. D.; Repakova, J.; Holopainen, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    We study how lipid probes based on pyrene-labeling could be designed to minimize perturbations in lipid bilayers, and how the same design principles could be exploited to develop probes which gauge lipid dynamics primarily within a single lipid monolayer or between them. To this end, we use......, simulations suggest that formation of dimers is a slow process, where the rate is limited by both lateral diffusion and the dimerization process once the two probes are neighbors to one another. Typical lifetimes of pyrene dimers turn out be of the order of nanoseconds. The results are expected to pave...

  4. MICROECOLOGY OF NASOPHARYNGEAL MUCOSAL MEMBRANES AND ESTIMATION OF FACTORS OF MUCOSAL AND LYMPHOCYTIC IMMUNITY IN RECRUITS DURING THE FORMATION OF ORGANIZED TEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Nikiforov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of nasopharyngeal mucosa by opportunistic and pathogenic bacteria in practically healthy people during the formation of the close group has been accompanied by a dysfunction of mucosal immunity, imbalanceof cytokine profile, insolvency of antioxidant system, increasing endointoxication. Adequate changes of serum immunoglobulins level in patients with nasopharyngeal dysbiosis allow to conclude of usefulness of the pre-emptive vaccination and using drugs with immunomodulatory effect which reliably satisfy body’s need for antioxidants.

  5. Subchondral chitosan/blood implant-guided bone plate resorption and woven bone repair is coupled to hyaline cartilage regeneration from microdrill holes in aged rabbit knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Morales, J; Lafantaisie-Favreau, C-H; Chen, G; Hoemann, C D

    2014-02-01

    Little is known of how to routinely elicit hyaline cartilage repair tissue in middle-aged patients. We tested the hypothesis that in skeletally aged rabbit knees, microdrill holes can be stimulated to remodel the bone plate and induce a more integrated, voluminous and hyaline cartilage repair tissue when treated by subchondral chitosan/blood implants. New Zealand White rabbits (13 or 32 months old, N = 7) received two 1.5 mm diameter, 2 mm depth drill holes in each knee, either left to bleed as surgical controls or press-fit with a 10 kDa (distal hole: 10K) or 40 kDa (proximal hole: 40K) chitosan/blood implant with fluorescent chitosan tracer. Post-operative knee effusion was documented. Repair tissues at day 0 (N = 1) and day 70 post-surgery (N = 6) were analyzed by micro-computed tomography, and by histological scoring and histomorphometry (SafO, Col-2, and Col-1) at day 70. All chitosan implants were completely cleared after 70 days, without increasing transient post-operative knee effusion compared to controls. Proximal control holes had worse osteochondral repair than distal holes. Both implant formulations induced bone remodeling and improved lateral integration of the bone plate at the hole edge. The 40K implant inhibited further bone repair inside 50% of the proximal holes, while the 10K implant specifically induced a "wound bloom" reaction, characterized by decreased bone plate density in a limited zone beyond the initial hole edge, and increased woven bone (WB) plate repair inside the initial hole (P = 0.016), which was accompanied by a more voluminous and hyaline cartilage repair (P holes with a biodegradable subchondral implant that elicits bone plate resorption followed by anabolic WB repair within a 70-day repair period. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle using a novel double-network hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Masashi; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kitamura, Nobuto; Arakaki, Kazunobu; Onodera, Shin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2011-02-22

    Functional repair of articular osteochondral defects remains a major challenge not only in the field of knee surgery but also in tissue regeneration medicine. The purpose is to clarify whether the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in a large osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting a novel double-network (DN) gel at the bottom of the defect. Twenty-five mature rabbits were used in this study. In the bilateral knees of each animal, we created an osteochondral defect having a diameter of 2.4-mm in the medial condyle. Then, in 21 rabbits, we implanted a DN gel plug into a right knee defect so that a vacant space of 1.5-mm depth (in Group I), 2.5-mm depth (in Group II), or 3.5-mm depth (in Group III) was left. In the left knee, we did not apply any treatment to the defect to obtain the control data. All the rabbits were sacrificed at 4 weeks, and the gross and histological evaluations were performed. The remaining 4 rabbits underwent the same treatment as used in Group II, and real-time PCR analysis was performed at 4 weeks. The defect in Group II was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type-2 collagen. The Wayne's gross appearance and histology scores showed that Group II was significantly greater than Group I, III, and Control (p hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in vivo in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect so that an approximately 2-mm deep vacant space was intentionally left in the defect. This fact has prompted us to propose an innovative strategy without cell culture to repair osteochondral lesions in the femoral condyle.

  7. Intra-articular administration of hyaluronic acid increases the volume of the hyaline cartilage regenerated in a large osteochondral defect by implantation of a double-network gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Takaaki; Kitamura, Nobuto; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Yokota, Masashi; Kondo, Eiji; Gong, Jian Ping; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2014-04-01

    Implantation of PAMPS/PDMAAm double-network (DN) gel can induce hyaline cartilage regeneration in the osteochondral defect. However, it is a problem that the volume of the regenerated cartilage tissue is gradually reduced at 12 weeks. This study investigated whether intra-articular administration of hyaluronic acid (HA) increases the volume of the cartilage regenerated with the DN gel at 12 weeks. A total of 48 rabbits were used in this study. A cylindrical osteochondral defect created in the bilateral femoral trochlea was treated with DN gel (Group DN) or left without any implantation (Group C). In both Groups, we injected 1.0 mL of HA in the left knee, and 1.0 mL of saline solution in the right knee. Quantitative histological evaluations were performed at 2, 4, and 12 weeks, and PCR analysis was performed at 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. In Group DN, the proteoglycan-rich area was significantly greater in the HA-injected knees than in the saline-injected knees at 12 weeks (P = 0.0247), and expression of type 2 collagen, aggrecan, and Sox9 mRNAs was significantly greater in the HA-injected knees than in the saline-injected knees at 2 weeks (P = 0.0475, P = 0.0257, P = 0.0222, respectively). The intra-articular administration of HA significantly enhanced these gene expression at 2 weeks and significantly increased the volume of the hyaline cartilage regenerated by implantation of a DN gel at 12 weeks. This information is important to develop an additional method to increase the volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue in a potential cartilage regeneration strategy using the DN gel.

  8. Primordial membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2017-01-01

    Cellular membranes, which are self-assembled bilayer structures mainly composed of lipids, proteins and conjugated polysaccharides, are the defining feature of cell physiology. It is likely that the complexity of contemporary cells was preceded by simpler chemical systems or protocells during...... the various evolutionary stages that led from inanimate to living matter. It is also likely that primitive membranes played a similar role in protocell 'physiology'. The composition of such ancestral membranes has been proposed as mixtures of single hydrocarbon chain amphiphiles, which are simpler versions...

  9. Introducing Membrane Charge and Membrane Potential to T Cell Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqing Ma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available While membrane models now include the heterogeneous distribution of lipids, the impact of membrane charges on regulating the association of proteins with the plasma membrane is often overlooked. Charged lipids are asymmetrically distributed between the two leaflets of the plasma membrane, resulting in the inner leaflet being negatively charged and a surface potential that attracts and binds positively charged ions, proteins, and peptide motifs. These interactions not only create a transmembrane potential but they can also facilitate the formation of charged membrane domains. Here, we reference fields outside of immunology in which consequences of membrane charge are better characterized to highlight important mechanisms. We then focus on T cell receptor (TCR signaling, reviewing the evidence that membrane charges and membrane-associated calcium regulate phosphorylation of the TCR–CD3 complex and discuss how the immunological synapse exhibits distinct patterns of membrane charge distribution. We propose that charged lipids, ions in solution, and transient protein interactions form a dynamic equilibrium during T cell activation.

  10. Articular cartilage: from formation to tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero-Espinosa, Sandra; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Foster, E Johan; Weder, Christoph

    2016-05-26

    Hyaline cartilage is the nonlinear, inhomogeneous, anisotropic, poro-viscoelastic connective tissue that serves as friction-reducing and load-bearing cushion in synovial joints and is vital for mammalian skeletal movements. Due to its avascular nature, low cell density, low proliferative activity and the tendency of chondrocytes to de-differentiate, cartilage cannot regenerate after injury, wear and tear, or degeneration through common diseases such as osteoarthritis. Therefore severe damage usually requires surgical intervention. Current clinical strategies to generate new tissue include debridement, microfracture, autologous chondrocyte transplantation, and mosaicplasty. While articular cartilage was predicted to be one of the first tissues to be successfully engineered, it proved to be challenging to reproduce the complex architecture and biomechanical properties of the native tissue. Despite significant research efforts, only a limited number of studies have evolved up to the clinical trial stage. This review article summarizes the current state of cartilage tissue engineering in the context of relevant biological aspects, such as the formation and growth of hyaline cartilage, its composition, structure and biomechanical properties. Special attention is given to materials development, scaffold designs, fabrication methods, and template-cell interactions, which are of great importance to the structure and functionality of the engineered tissue.

  11. Membranous nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin-lightening creams Systemic lupus erythematosus , rheumatoid arthritis, Graves disease, and other autoimmune disorders The disorder occurs at ... diagnosis. The following tests can help determine the cause of membranous nephropathy: Antinuclear antibodies test Anti-double- ...

  12. Influence of freezing stress on morphological alteration and biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes: relationship with cell surface hydrophobicity and membrane fluidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladi, Hanene; Ammar, Emna; Ben Slama, Rihab; Sakly, Nawfel; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2013-11-01

    The morphological changes and adhesive property of three Listeria monocytogenes strains submitted to freezing stress (-20 °C) were studied. The atomic force micrographs showed a reduction in the cell size and an evolution to coccoid shape. The phenotypic slime production of L. monocytogenes and the expression of the adhesive gene were investigated before and after 10 months of incubation in salmon at -20°. Our results showed that after ten months, stressed stains become more adherent and able to produce slime. In addition, we noted that this pathogen presents same physiological changes to adapt to starvation conditions. The cellular fatty acids composition of adhered and floating cells of three L. monocytogenes strains was taken into consideration. The stressed strains presented different chain lengths and therefore an increase in the hydrophobicity level. Moreover, we noted that the adhesive property of L. monocytogenes strains affects the Benzalkonium chloride bacterial sensitivity which increased after biofilm formation.

  13. Spontaneous formation of small unilamellar vesicles by pH jump: A pH gradient across the bilayer membrane as the driving force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, H.; Mantsch, H.H.; Casal, H.L.

    1990-01-01

    31 P NMR and infrared spectroscopic methods have been used to study the formation of small unilamellar vesicles by the pH-jump method. It is shown that increasing the pH of different lamellar phospholipid dispersions (phosphatidic acids and phosphatidylserines) induces a pH gradient. This pH gradient is estimated to be 4 ± 1 pH units, and its direction is such that the inner monolayer of the vesicles is at lower pH. There is spectroscopic evidence for tighter packing of the lipid hydrocarbon chains in the inner monolayer, probably due to the constraints imposed by the high curvature of the small vesicles formed. These results are discussed in terms of the driving force of the spontaneous vesiculation

  14. [New determinations of the eye rotation center and criteria for the formation of its membrane in terms of the floating eye model and experimental support of the latter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galoian, V R

    1988-01-01

    It is well known that the eye is a phylogenetically stabilized body with rotation properties. The eye has an elastic cover and is filled with uniform fluid. According to the theory of covers and other concepts on the configuration of turning fluid mass we concluded that the eyeball has an elliptic configuration. Classification of the eyeball is here presented with simultaneous studies of the principles of the eye situation. The parallelism between the state and different types of heterophory and orthophory was studied. To determine normal configuration it is necessary to have in mind some principles of achieving advisable correct situation of the eye in orbit. We determined the centre of the eye rotation and showed that it is impossible to situate it out of the geometrical centre of the eyeball. It was pointed out that for adequate perception the rotation centre must be situated on the visual axis. Using the well known theory of floating we experimentally determined that the centre of the eye rotation lies on the level of the floating eye, just on the point of cross of the visual line with the optical axis. It was shown experimentally on the basis of recording the eye movements in the process of eyelid closing that weakening of the eye movements is of gravitational pattern and proceeds under the action of stability forces, which directly indicates the floating state of the eye. For the first time using the model of the floating eye it was possible to show the formation of extraeye vacuum by straining the back wall. This effect can be obtained without any difficulty, if the face is turned down. The role of negative pressure in the formation of the eye ametropy, as well as new conclusions and prognostications about this new model are discussed.

  15. Assessment of apoptosis and MMP-1, MMP-3 and TIMP-2 expression in tibial hyaline cartilage after viable medial meniscus transplantation in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwierzchowski, Tomasz J; Stasikowska-Kanicka, Olga; Danilewicz, Marian; Fabiś, Jarosław

    2012-12-20

    The porpuse of this animal study was to assess chondrocyte apoptosis and MMP-1, MMP-3 and TIMP-2 expression in rabbit tibial cartilage 6 months after viable medial meniscal autografts and allografts. Twenty white male New Zealand rabbits were chosen for the study. The medial meniscus was excised from 14 animals and stored under tissue culture conditions for 2 weeks, following which t of them were implantated as autografts and 7 as allografts. The control group consisted of 6 animals which underwent arthtrotomy. When the animals were eutanized, the tibial cartilage was used for immunohisochemical examination. Apoptosis (TUNEL method) and MMP-1, MMP-3 and TIMP-2 expression were estimated semiquantatively. An increased level of chodrocyte apoptosis in the tibail cartilage was observed after both kinds of transplants (p hyaline cartilage against excessive apoptosis. The results of experimantal studies on humans indicate the need to device a method of apoptosis inhibition in the hyaline cartilage to improve long-term results of meniscal transplantation.

  16. Programmed Application of Transforming Growth Factor β3 and Rac1 Inhibitor NSC23766 Committed Hyaline Cartilage Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Osteochondral Defect Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shouan; Chen, Pengfei; Wu, Yan; Xiong, Si; Sun, Heng; Xia, Qingqing; Shi, Libing; Liu, Huanhuan; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2014-10-01

    Hyaline cartilage differentiation is always the challenge with application of stem cells for joint repair. Transforming growth factors (TGFs) and bone morphogenetic proteins can initiate cartilage differentiation but often lead to hypertrophy and calcification, related to abnormal Rac1 activity. In this study, we developed a strategy of programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 to commit the hyaline cartilage differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for joint cartilage repair. ADSCs were isolated and cultured in a micromass and pellet culture model to evaluate chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation. The function of Rac1 was investigated with constitutively active Rac1 mutant and dominant negative Rac1 mutant. The efficacy of ADSCs with programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor for cartilage repair was studied in a rat model of osteochondral defects. The results showed that TGFβ3 promoted ADSCs chondro-lineage differentiation and that NSC23766 prevented ADSC-derived chondrocytes from hypertrophy in vitro. The combination of ADSCs, TGFβ3, and NSC23766 promoted quality osteochondral defect repair in rats with much less chondrocytes hypertrophy and significantly higher International Cartilage Repair Society macroscopic and microscopic scores. The findings have illustrated that programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 can commit ADSCs to chondro-lineage differentiation and improve the efficacy of ADSCs for cartilage defect repair. These findings suggest a promising stem cell-based strategy for articular cartilage repair. ©AlphaMed Press.

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Oriented PLGA/ACECM Composite Scaffolds Enhance Structure-Specific Regeneration of Hyaline Cartilage in a Rabbit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weimin; Zheng, Xifu; Zhang, Weiguo; Chen, Mingxue; Wang, Zhenyong; Hao, Chunxiang; Huang, Jingxiang; Yuan, Zhiguo; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Mingjie; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Aiyuan; Wang, Yu; Sui, Xiang; Xu, Wenjing; Liu, Shuyun; Lu, Shibi; Guo, Quanyi

    2018-01-01

    Articular cartilage lacks a blood supply and nerves. Hence, articular cartilage regeneration remains a major challenge in orthopedics. Decellularized extracellular matrix- (ECM-) based strategies have recently received particular attention. The structure of native cartilage exhibits complex zonal heterogeneity. Specifically, the development of a tissue-engineered scaffold mimicking the aligned structure of native cartilage would be of great utility in terms of cartilage regeneration. Previously, we fabricated oriented PLGA/ACECM (natural, nanofibrous, articular cartilage ECM) composite scaffolds. In vitro, we found that the scaffolds not only guided seeded cells to proliferate in an aligned manner but also exhibited high biomechanical strength. To detect whether oriented cartilage regeneration was possible in vivo, we used mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)/scaffold constructs to repair cartilage defects. The results showed that cartilage defects could be completely regenerated. Histologically, these became filled with hyaline cartilage and subchondral bone. Moreover, the aligned structure of cartilage was regenerated and was similar to that of native tissue. In conclusion, the MSC/scaffold constructs enhanced the structure-specific regeneration of hyaline cartilage in a rabbit model and may be a promising treatment strategy for the repair of human cartilage defects.

  18. Zinc and cadmium complexes of a plant metallothionein under radical stress: desulfurisation reactions associated with the formation of trans-lipids in model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreggiani, Armida; Domènech, Jordi; Orihuela, Ruben; Ferreri, Carla; Atrian, Sílvia; Capdevila, Mercè; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos

    2009-06-08

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are sulfur-rich proteins capable of binding metal ions to give metal clusters. The metal-MT aggregates used in this work were Zn- and Cd-QsMT, where QsMT is an MT from the plant Quercus suber. Reactions of reductive reactive species (H(*) atoms and e(aq)(-)), produced by gamma irradiation of water, with Zn- and Cd-QsMT were carried out in both aqueous solutions and vesicle suspensions, and were characterized by different approaches. By using a biomimetic model based on unsaturated lipid vesicle suspensions, the occurrence of tandem protein/lipid damage was shown. The reactions of reductive reactive species with methionine residues and/or sulfur-containing ligands afford diffusible sulfur-centred radicals, which migrate from the aqueous phase to the lipid bilayer and transform the cis double bond of the oleate moiety into the trans isomer. Tailored experiments allowed the reaction mechanism to be elucidated in some detail. The formation of sulfur-centred radicals is accompanied by the modification of the metal-QsMT complexes, which were monitored by various spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques (Raman, CD, and ESI-MS). Attack of the H(*) atom and e(aq)(-) on the metal-QsMT aggregates can induce significant structural changes such as partial deconstruction and/or rearrangement of the metal clusters and breaking of the protein backbone. Substantial differences were observed in the behaviour of the Zn- and Cd-QsMT aggregates towards the reactive species, depending on the different folding of the polypeptide in these two cases.

  19. Morphology transition of raft-model membrane induced by osmotic pressure: Formation of double-layered vesicle similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onai, Teruaki; Hirai, Mitsuhiro

    2010-01-01

    The effect of osmotic pressure on the structure of large uni-lamellar vesicle (LUV) of the lipid mixtures of monosialoganglioside (G M1 )-cholesterol-dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) was studies by using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) method. The molar ratios of the mixtures were 0.1/0.1/1, 0/0.1/1, and 0/0/1. The ternary lipid mixture is a model of lipid rafts. The value of osmotic pressure was varied from 0 to 4.16x10 5 N/m 2 by adding the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in the range from 0 to 25 % w/v. In the case of the mixtures without G M1 , the rise of the osmotic pressure just enhances the multi-lamellar stacking with deceasing the inter-lamellar spacing. On the other hand, the mixture containing G M1 shows the structural transition from a uni-lamellar vesicle to a double-layered vesicle (a liposome including a smaller one inside) by the rise of osmotic pressure. In this morphology transition the total surface area of the double-layered vesicle is mostly as same as that of the LUV at the initial state. The polar head region of G M1 is bulky and highly hydrophilic due to the oligosaccharide chain containing a sialic acid residue. Then, the present results suggest that the existence of G M1 in the outer-leaflet of the LUV is essentially important for such a double-layered vesicle formation. Alternatively, a phenomenon similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis in cells can be caused simply by a variation of osmotic pressure.

  20. Axionic membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurilia, A.; Spallucci, E.

    1992-01-01

    A metal ring removed from a soap-water solution encloses a film of soap which can be mathematically described as a minimal surface having the ring as its only boundary. This is known to everybody. In this letter we suggest a relativistic extension of the above fluidodynamic system where the soap film is replaced by a Kalb-Ramand gauge potential B μν (x) and the ring by a closed string. The interaction between the B μν field and the string current excites a new configuration of the system consisting of a relativistic membrane bounded by the string. We call such a classical solution of the equation of motion an axionic membrane. As a dynamical system, the axionic membrane admits a Hamilton-Jacobi formulation which is an extension of the HJ theory of electromagnetic strings. (orig.)

  1. Metamaterial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo-Flórez, Juan Manuel; Maldovan, Martin

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a new class of metamaterial device to achieve separation of compounds by using coordinate transformations and metamaterial theory. By rationally designing the spatial anisotropy for mass diffusion, we simultaneously concentrate different compounds in different spatial locations, leading to separation of mixtures across a metamaterial membrane. The separation of mixtures into their constituent compounds is critically important in biophysics, biomedical, and chemical applications. We present a practical case where a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen diffusing through a polymeric planar matrix is separated. This work opens doors to new paradigms in membrane separations via coordinate transformations and metamaterials by introducing novel properties and unconventional mass diffusion phenomena. (paper)

  2. Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) stimulates cAMP formation in human mononuclear cells and inhibits angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Stefania; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2011-04-01

    The effects of Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) have been studied in cancer and other conditions where angiogenesis is deregulated. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that the mitogenic response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to GcMAF was associated with 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formation. The effect was dose dependent, and maximal stimulation was achieved using 0.1 ng/ml. Heparin inhibited the stimulatory effect of GcMAF on PBMCs. In addition, we demonstrate that GcMAF (1 ng/ml) inhibited prostaglandin E(1)- and human breast cancer cell-stimulated angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Finally, we tested different GcMAF preparations on CAM, and the assay proved to be a reliable, reproducible and inexpensive method to determine the relative potencies of different preparations and their stability; we observed that storage at room temperature for 15 days decreased GcMAF potency by about 50%. These data could prove useful for upcoming clinical trials on GcMAF.

  3. Artificial Lipid Membrane Permeability Method for Predicting Intestinal Drug Transport: Probing the Determining Step in the Oral Absorption of Sulfadiazine; Influence of the Formation of Binary and Ternary Complexes with Cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrivo, Alicia; Aloisio, Carolina; Longhi, Marcela R; Granero, Gladys

    2018-04-01

    We propose an in vitro permeability assay by using a modified lipid membrane to predict the in vivo intestinal passive permeability of drugs. Two conditions were tested, one with a gradient pH (pH 5.5 donor/pH 7.4 receptor) and the other with an iso-pH 7.4. The predictability of the method was established by correlating the obtained apparent intestinal permeability coefficients (P app ) and the oral dose fraction absorbed in humans (f a ) of 16 drugs with different absorption properties. The P app values correlated well with the absorption rates under the two conditions, and the method showed high predictability and good reproducibility. On the other hand, with this method, we successfully predicted the transport characteristics of oral sulfadiazine (SDZ). Also, the tradeoff between the increase in the solubility of SDZ by its complex formation with cyclodextrins and/or aminoacids and its oral permeability was assessed. Results suggest that SDZ is transported through the gastrointestinal epithelium by passive diffusion in a pH-dependent manner. These results support the classification of SDZ as a high/low borderline permeability compound and are in agreement with the Biopharmaceutics Classification Systems (BCS). This conclusion is consistent with the in vivo pharmacokinetic properties of SDZ.

  4. Chelating polymeric membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Villalobos Vazquez de la Parra, Luis Francisco; Hilke, Roland

    2015-01-01

    microporous chelating polymeric membrane. Embodiments include, but are not limited to, microporous chelating polymeric membranes, device comprising the membranes, and methods of using and making the same.

  5. Physics of smectic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieranski, P.; Beliard, L.; Tournellec, J.-Ph.; Leoncini, X.; Furtlehner, C.; Dumoulin, H.; Riou, E.; Jouvin, B.; Fénerol, J.-P.; Palaric, Ph.; Heuving, J.; Cartier, B.; Kraus, I.

    1993-03-01

    Due to their layered structure, smectic liquid crystals can form membranes, similar to soap bubbles, that can be spanned on frames. Such smectic membranes have been used extensively as samples in many structural X-ray studies of smectic liquid crystals. In this context they have been considered as very convenient and highly perfect samples but little attention has been paid to the reasons for their existence and to the process of their formation. Our aim here is to address a first list of questions, which are the most urgent to answer. We will also describe experiments and models that have been conceived especially in order to understand the physics of these fascinating systems.

  6. Membrane fouling mechanism of biofilm-membrane bioreactor (BF-MBR): Pore blocking model and membrane cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Wenxiang; Tang, Bing; Ding, Jie; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Zhien

    2018-02-01

    Biofilm membrane bioreactor (BF-MBR) is considered as an important wastewater treatment technology that incorporates advantages of both biofilm and MBR process, as well as can alleviate membrane fouling, with respect to the conventional activated sludge MBR. But, to be efficient, it necessitates the establishment of proper methods for the assessment of membrane fouling. Four Hermia membrane blocking models were adopted to quantify and evaluate the membrane fouling of BF-MBR. The experiments were conducted with various operational conditions, including membrane types, agitation speeds and transmembrane pressure (TMP). Good agreement between cake formation model and experimental data was found, confirming the validity of the Hermia models for assessing the membrane fouling of BF-MBR and that cake layer deposits on membrane. Moreover, the influences of membrane types, agitation speeds and transmembrane pressure on the Hermia pore blocking coefficient of cake layer were investigated. In addition, the permeability recovery after membrane cleaning at various operational conditions was studied. This work confirms that, unlike conventional activated sludge MBR, BF-MBR possesses a low degree of membrane fouling and a higher membrane permeability recovery after cleaning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. New membrane structures with proton conducting properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Casper Frydendal

    if higher operating temperature is enabled. One approach to obtain improved membranes in the aspects of applicable operating temperature and methanol permeability, which has attracted considerable attention, is the formation of composites by distributing inorganic fillers into Nafion or alternative polymers...... temperature and high relative humidity can cause excessive swelling of the membranes, yielding insufficient mechanical properties and breakdown of membrane function. Moreover, in the case of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC), their significant methanol permeability causes loss of efficiency. Higher...

  8. Membrane potentials of membranes with fixed ionic sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Albert; van der Wal, P.D.; van der Wal, P.D.; Skowronska-ptasinska, M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Sudholter, Ernst; Bergveld, Piet; Reinhoudt, David

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical model has been developed to simulate the formation of a membrane potential as a function of physically accessible parameters. The description is an extension of the well-known Teorell-Meyer-Sievers (TMS) model, now including free and fixed ionic sites and free and fixed neutral

  9. Using the AD12-ICT rapid-format test to detect Wuchereria bancrofti circulating antigens in comparison to Og4C3-ELISA and nucleopore membrane filtration and microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Moamly, Amal Abdul-Rasheed; El-Sweify, Mohamed Aly; Hafez, Mohamad Abdul

    2012-09-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) continues to be a major source of permanent disability and an impediment to socio-economic development in 73 countries where more than 1 billion people are at risk and over 120 millions are infected. The global drive to eliminate LF necessitates an increasing demand for valid, reliable and rapid diagnostic tests. This study aimed to assess the performance of the AD12 rapid format immunochromatographic test (ICT) to detect Wuchereria bancrofti circulating antigens, against the combined gold standard: TropBio Og4C3-ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) which detects circulating filarial antigen (CFA) and the nucleopore membrane filtration and microscopic examination. This prospective case-control study involved 647 asymptomatic migrant workers from filariasis-endemic countries. Of these specimens, 32 were positive for microfilaremia using the membrane filtration and microscopy, 142 positive by ELISA (of which 32 had microfilaremia), and 128 positive by the ICT (of which 31 had microfilaremia). The performance of the ICT was calculated against 32 true-positive and 90 true-negative cases. For the detection of CFA, the ICT had a sensitivity of 97% (95% confidence interval [CI] 91-103), specificity 100% (95% CI 100-100), Positive Predictive Value (PPV) 100% (95% CI 100-100), Negative Predictive Value (NPV) 99% (95% CI 97-101); and the total accuracy of the test was 99% (95% CI 98-101). The agreement between ICT and ELISA in detecting W. bancrofti antigens was excellent (kappa = 0.934; p = 0.000). In conclusion, the AD12-ICT test for the detection of W. bancrofti-CFA was sensitive and specific and comparable to the performance of ELISA. The ICT would be a useful additional test to facilitate the proposed strategies for control and elimination of LF. Because it is rapid, simple to perform, and does not require the use of special equipment, the ICT may be most appropriate in screening programs and in monitoring the possible risk of introducing

  10. Lipid Directed Intrinsic Membrane Protein Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper S.; Thompson, James R.; Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new approach for direct reconstitution of membrane proteins during giant vesicle formation. We show that it is straightforward to create a tissue-like giant vesicle film swelled with membrane protein using aquaporin SoPIP2;1 as an illustration. These vesicles can also be easily h...

  11. Proliferation and differentiation of stem cells in contact with eluate from fibrin-rich plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Gimenez de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the ability of the eluate from fibrin-rich plasma (FRP membrane to induce proliferation and differentiation of isolated human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs into chondrocytes. Method: FRP membranes were obtained by centrifugation of peripheral blood from two healthy donors, cut, and maintained in culture plate wells for 48 h to prepare the fibrin eluate. The SCATh were isolated from adipose tissue by collagenase digestion solution, and expanded in vitro. Cells were expanded and treated with DMEM-F12 culture, a commercial media for chondrogenic differentiation, and eluate from FRP membrane for three days, and labeled with BrdU for quantitative assessment of cell proliferation using the High-Content Operetta® imaging system. For the chondrogenic differentiation assay, the SCATh were grown in micromass for 21 days and stained with toluidine blue and aggrecan for qualitative evaluation by light microscopy. The statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results: There was a greater proliferation of cells treated with the eluate from FRP membrane compared to the other two treatments, where the ANOVA test showed significance (p < 0.001. The differentiation into chondrocytes was visualized by the presence of mucopolysaccharide in the matrix of the cells marked in blue toluidine and aggrecan. Conclusions: Treatment with eluate from FRP membrane stimulated cell proliferation and induced differentiation of the stem cells into chondrocytes, suggesting a potential application of FRP membranes in hyaline cartilage regeneration therapies.

  12. Storage of the complement components C4, C3, and C 3-activator in the human liver as PAS-negative globular hyaline bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, W; Riedel, H; Trautmann, B; Justus, J; Hiemann, D

    1982-01-01

    Liver biopsies of a 58-year-old clinically healthy patient with a hepatomegaly and intracisternal PAS-negative globular hyaline bodies were immunofluorescent-optically examined for the content of the complement components C 1 q, C 4, C 9, C 1-inactivator, C 3-activator. Further examinations were performed for fibrinogen, IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD, IgE, L-chain (type chi and lambda), alpha 1-antitrypsin, alpha 1-fetoprotein, alpha 1- and alpha 2-glycoprotein, cholinesterase, ceruloplasmin, myoglobin, hemopexin, HBsAg and HBsAg. Th inclusion bodies reacted with antisera against the complement components C 4, C 3 and C 3-activator, as also identified by double immunofluorescence. Probably this is a disturbance of the protein metabolism of the liver cell with abnormal complement storage in the presence of normal total complement and normal complement components in the serum.

  13. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Change in the optical properties of hyaline cartilage heated by the near-IR laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagratashvili, Viktor N.; Bagratashvili, N. V.; Gapontsev, V. P.; Makhmutova, G. Sh; Minaev, V. P.; Omel'chenko, A. I.; Samartsev, I. E.; Sviridov, A. P.; Sobol', E. N.; Tsypina, S. I.

    2001-06-01

    The in vitro dynamics of the change in optical properties of hyaline cartilage heated by fibre lasers at wavelengths 0.97 and 1.56 μm is studied. The laser-induced bleaching (at 1.56 μm) and darkening (at 0.97 μm) of the cartilage, caused by the heating and transport of water as well as by a change in the cartilage matrix, were observed and studied. These effects should be taken into account while estimating the depth of heating of the tissue. The investigated dynamics of light scattering in the cartilage allows one to choose the optimum radiation dose for laser plastic surgery of cartilage tissues.

  14. Membrane manufacture for peptide separations

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dooli; Salazar Moya, Octavio Ruben; Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured polymeric membranes are key tools in biomedical applications such as hemodialysis, protein separations, in the food industry, and drinking water supply from seawater. Despite of the success in different separation processes, membrane manufacture itself is at risk, since the most used solvents are about to be banned in many countries due to environmental and health issues. We propose for the first time the preparation of polyethersulfone membranes based on dissolution in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate ([EMIM]DEP). We obtained a series of membranes tailored for separation of solutes with molecular weight of 30, 5, 1.3, and 1.25 kg mol-1 with respective water permeances of 140, 65, 30 and 20 Lm-2h-1bar-1. We demonstrate their superior efficiency in the separation of complex mixtures of peptides with molecular weights in the range of 800 to 3500 gmol-1. Furthermore, the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase separation leading to the pore formation in the membranes were investigated. The rheology of the solutions and the morphology of the prepared membranes were examed and compared to those of polyethersulfone in organic solvents currently used for membrane manufacture.

  15. Membrane manufacture for peptide separations

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dooli

    2016-06-07

    Nanostructured polymeric membranes are key tools in biomedical applications such as hemodialysis, protein separations, in the food industry, and drinking water supply from seawater. Despite of the success in different separation processes, membrane manufacture itself is at risk, since the most used solvents are about to be banned in many countries due to environmental and health issues. We propose for the first time the preparation of polyethersulfone membranes based on dissolution in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate ([EMIM]DEP). We obtained a series of membranes tailored for separation of solutes with molecular weight of 30, 5, 1.3, and 1.25 kg mol-1 with respective water permeances of 140, 65, 30 and 20 Lm-2h-1bar-1. We demonstrate their superior efficiency in the separation of complex mixtures of peptides with molecular weights in the range of 800 to 3500 gmol-1. Furthermore, the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase separation leading to the pore formation in the membranes were investigated. The rheology of the solutions and the morphology of the prepared membranes were examed and compared to those of polyethersulfone in organic solvents currently used for membrane manufacture.

  16. Enhanced hyaline cartilage matrix synthesis in collagen sponge scaffolds by using siRNA to stabilize chondrocytes phenotype cultured with bone morphogenetic protein-2 under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Florence; Ollitrault, David; Hervieu, Magalie; Baugé, Catherine; Maneix, Laure; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Galera, Philippe; Demoor, Magali

    2013-07-01

    Cartilage healing by tissue engineering is an alternative strategy to reconstitute functional tissue after trauma or age-related degeneration. However, chondrocytes, the major player in cartilage homeostasis, do not self-regenerate efficiently and lose their phenotype during osteoarthritis. This process is called dedifferentiation and also occurs during the first expansion step of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). To ensure successful ACI therapy, chondrocytes must be differentiated and capable of synthesizing hyaline cartilage matrix molecules. We therefore developed a safe procedure for redifferentiating human chondrocytes by combining appropriate physicochemical factors: hypoxic conditions, collagen scaffolds, chondrogenic factors (bone morphogenetic protein-2 [BMP-2], and insulin-like growth factor I [IGF-I]) and RNA interference targeting the COL1A1 gene. Redifferentiation of dedifferentiated chondrocytes was evaluated using gene/protein analyses to identify the chondrocyte phenotypic profile. In our conditions, under BMP-2 treatment, redifferentiated and metabolically active chondrocytes synthesized a hyaline-like cartilage matrix characterized by type IIB collagen and aggrecan molecules without any sign of hypertrophy or osteogenesis. In contrast, IGF-I increased both specific and noncharacteristic markers (collagens I and X) of chondrocytes. The specific increase in COL2A1 gene expression observed in the BMP-2 treatment was shown to involve the specific enhancer region of COL2A1 that binds the trans-activators Sox9/L-Sox5/Sox6 and Sp1, which are associated with a decrease in the trans-inhibitors of COL2A1, c-Krox, and p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. Our procedure in which BMP-2 treatment under hypoxia is associated with a COL1A1 siRNA, significantly increased the differentiation index of chondrocytes, and should offer the opportunity to develop new ACI-based therapies in humans.

  17. Cardiolipin effects on membrane structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsay, Joseph D; Cosentino, Katia; Subburaj, Yamunadevi; García-Sáez, Ana J

    2013-12-23

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a lipid with unique properties solely found in membranes generating electrochemical potential. It contains four acyl chains and tends to form nonlamellar structures, which are believed to play a key role in membrane structure and function. Indeed, CL alterations have been linked to disorders such as Barth syndrome and Parkinson's disease. However, the molecular effects of CL on membrane organization remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated the structure and physical properties of CL-containing membranes using confocal microscopy, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. We found that the fluidity of the lipid bilayer increased and its mechanical stability decreased with CL concentration, indicating that CL decreases the packing of the membrane. Although the presence of up to 20% CL gave rise to flat, stable bilayers, the inclusion of 5% CL promoted the formation of flowerlike domains that grew with time. Surprisingly, we often observed two membrane-piercing events in atomic force spectroscopy experiments with CL-containing membranes. Similar behavior was observed with a lipid mixture mimicking the mitochondrial outer membrane composition. This suggests that CL promotes the formation of membrane areas with apposed double bilayers or nonlamellar structures, similar to those proposed for mitochondrial contact sites. All together, we show that CL induces membrane alterations that support the role of CL in facilitating bilayer structure remodeling, deformation, and permeabilization.

  18. Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Francesco; Biasizzo, Miriam; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Although the roots of molecularly imprinted polymers lie in the beginning of 1930s in the past century, they have had an exponential growth only 40–50 years later by the works of Wulff and especially by Mosbach. More recently, it was also proved that molecular imprinted membranes (i.e., polymer thin films) that show recognition properties at molecular level of the template molecule are used in their formation. Different procedures and potential application in separation processes and catalysis are reported. The influences of different parameters on the discrimination abilities are also discussed. PMID:24958291

  19. Membrane Disordering is not Sufficient for Membrane Permeabilization by Islet Amyloidogenic Polypeptide: Studies of IAPP(20-29) Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brender, Jeffrey R.; Heyl, Deborah L.; Samisetti, Shyamprasad; Kotler, Samuel A.; Osborne, Joshua M.; Pesaru, Ranadheer R.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-01-01

    A key factor in the development of type II diabetes is the loss of insulin-producing beta-cells. Human islet amyloid polypeptide protein (human-IAPP) is believed to play a crucial role in this process by forming small aggregates that exhibit toxicity by disrupting the cell membrane. The actual mechanism of membrane disruption is complex and appears to involve an early component before fiber formation and later component associated with fiber formation on the membrane. By comparing the peptide-lipid interactions derived from solid-state NMR experiments of two IAPP fragments that bind the membrane and cause membrane disordering to IAPP derived peptides known to cause significant early membrane permeabilization, we show here that membrane disordering is not likely to be sufficient by itself to cause the early membrane permeabilization observed by IAPP, and may play a lesser role in IAPP membrane disruption than expected. PMID:23493863

  20. Membrane lipidome of an epithelial cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sampaio, Julio L; Gerl, Mathias J; Klose, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Tissue differentiation is an important process that involves major cellular membrane remodeling. We used Madin-Darby canine kidney cells as a model for epithelium formation and investigated the remodeling of the total cell membrane lipidome during the transition from a nonpolarized morphology...... to an epithelial morphology and vice versa. To achieve this, we developed a shotgun-based lipidomics workflow that enabled the absolute quantification of mammalian membrane lipidomes with minimal sample processing from low sample amounts. Epithelial morphogenesis was accompanied by a major shift from sphingomyelin...... to generate an apical membrane domain that serves as a protective barrier for the epithelial sheet....

  1. Failure Modes of thin supported Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Høgsberg, J.R.; Kjeldsen, Ane Mette

    2007-01-01

    Four different failure modes relevant to tubular supported membranes (thin dense films on a thick porous support) were analyzed. The failure modes were: 1) Structural collapse due to external pressure 2) burst of locally unsupported areas, 3) formation of surface cracks in the membrane due to TEC......-mismatches, and finally 4) delamination between membrane and support due to expansion of the membrane on use. Design criteria to minimize risk of failure by the four different modes are discussed. The theoretical analysis of the two last failure modes is compared to failures observed on actual components....

  2. Peripheral Protein Unfolding Drives Membrane Bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siaw, Hew Ming Helen; Raghunath, Gokul; Dyer, R Brian

    2018-06-20

    Dynamic modulation of lipid membrane curvature can be achieved by a number of peripheral protein binding mechanisms such as hy-drophobic insertion of amphipathic helices and membrane scaffolding. Recently, an alternative mechanism was proposed in which crowding of peripherally bound proteins induces membrane curvature through steric pressure generated by lateral collisions. This effect was enhanced using intrinsically disordered proteins that possess high hydrodynamic radii, prompting us to explore whether membrane bending can be triggered by the folding-unfolding transition of surface-bound proteins. We utilized histidine-tagged human serum albumin bound to Ni-NTA-DGS containing liposomes as our model system to test this hypothesis. We found that reduction of the disulfide bonds in the protein resulted in unfolding of HSA, which subsequently led to membrane tubule formation. The frequency of tubule formation was found to be significantly higher when the proteins were unfolded while being localized to a phase-separated domain as opposed to randomly distributed in fluid phase liposomes, indicating that the steric pressure generated from protein unfolding is directly responsible for membrane deformation. Our results are critical for the design of peripheral membrane protein-immobilization strategies and open new avenues for exploring mechanisms of membrane bending driven by conformational changes of peripheral membrane proteins.

  3. A biodegradable vascularizing membrane: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushiva, Anchal; Turzhitsky, Vladimir M; Darmoc, Marissa; Backman, Vadim; Ameer, Guillermo A

    2007-09-01

    Regenerative medicine and in vivo biosensor applications require the formation of mature vascular networks for long-term success. This study investigated whether biodegradable porous membranes could induce the formation of a vascularized fibrous capsule and, if so, the effect of degradation kinetics on neovascularization. Poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) membranes were created by a solvent casting/salt leaching method. Specifically, PLLA, PLGA 75:25 and PLGA 50:50 polymers were used to vary degradation kinetics. The membranes were designed to have an average 60mum pore diameter, as this pore size has been shown to be optimal for inducing blood vessel formation around nondegradable polymer materials. Membrane samples were imaged by scanning electron microscopy at several time points during in vitro degradation to assess any changes in pore structure. The in vivo performance of the membranes was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats by measuring vascularization within the fibrous capsule that forms adjacent to implants. The vascular density within 100microm of the membranes was compared with that seen in normal tissue, and to that surrounding the commercially available vascularizing membrane TheraCyte. The hemoglobin content of tissue containing the membranes was measured by four-dimensional elastic light scattering as a novel method to assess tissue perfusion. Results from this study show that slow-degrading membranes induce greater amounts of neovascularization and a thinner fibrous capsule relative to fast degrading membranes. These results may be due both to an initially increased number of macrophages surrounding the slower degrading membranes and to the maintenance of their initial pore structure.

  4. Lignin-based membranes for electrolyte transference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao; Garcia-Valls, Ricard [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola Tecnica Superior d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Benavente, Juana [Department of Applied Fisics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaga, Malaga (Spain)

    2005-08-18

    Homogeneous PSf-LS membranes are formed by incorporating Lignosulfonate (LS) into the Polysulfone (PSf) network. LS obtained from sulfite pulping process contains sulfonic acid groups that will act as proton transport media. PSf-LS membranes were characterized by reflectance Infrared and scanning electron microscopy. LS showed significant influence on membrane morphology. Higher LS concentration caused a decrease in macrovoid formation and induced larger pores. Precipitation temperature was investigated as influencing parameter. Proton fluxes through PSf-LS membranes were measured by transport experiments. Impedance analysis confirmed that PSf-LS membranes possess ion conductivity. The selected PSf-LS membranes exhibited high selectivity for proton over methanol, which indicates their potential applicability in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). (author)

  5. Robotic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between digital and analogue is often constructed as one of opposition. The perception that the world is permeated with underlying patterns of data, describing events and matter alike, suggests that information can be understood apart from the substance to which it is associated......, and that its encoded logic can be constructed and reconfigured as an isolated entity. This disembodiment of information from materiality implies that an event like a thunderstorm, or a material like a body, can be described equally by data, in other words it can be read or written. The following prototypes......, Vivisection and Strange Metabolisms, were developed at the Centre for Information Technology and Architecture (CITA) at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen as a means of engaging intangible digital data with tactile physical material. As robotic membranes, they are a dual examination...

  6. Membrane microdomains, rafts, and detergent-resistant membranes in plants and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinsky, Jan; Opekarová, Miroslava; Grossmann, Guido; Tanner, Widmar

    2013-01-01

    The existence of specialized microdomains in plasma membranes, postulated for almost 25 years, has been popularized by the concept of lipid or membrane rafts. The idea that detergent-resistant membranes are equivalent to lipid rafts, which was generally abandoned after a decade of vigorous data accumulation, contributed to intense discussions about the validity of the raft concept. The existence of membrane microdomains, meanwhile, has been verified by unequivocal independent evidence. This review summarizes the current state of research in plants and fungi with respect to common aspects of both kingdoms. In these organisms, principally immobile microdomains large enough for microscopic detection have been visualized. These microdomains are found in the context of cell-cell interactions (plant symbionts and pathogens), membrane transport, stress, and polarized growth, and the data corroborate at least three mechanisms of formation. As documented in this review, modern methods of visualization of lateral membrane compartments are also able to uncover the functional relevance of membrane microdomains.

  7. Eggshell membrane-templated porous gold membranes using nanoparticles as building blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, S.; Khalid, Z. M.; Hussain, I.

    2013-01-01

    Highly porous gold membrane-like structures are formed using eggshell membrane, as such and heat denatured, as a template and gold nanoparticles as building blocks. Gold nanoparticles were produced in-situ on the eggshell membranes without using additional reducing agents. The morphology and loading of gold nanoparticles can easily be controlled by adjusting the pH and thus the redox potential of eggshell membranes. Lower pH favored the formation of irregularly-shaped but dense gold macro/ nanocrystals whereas higher pH(8-9) favored the formation of fairly uniform but less dense gold nanoparticles onto the eggshell membranes. Heat treatment of eggshell membrane-gold nanoparticle composites formed at pH 8-9 led to the formation of highly porous membrane like gold while mimicking the original structure of eggshell membrane. All these materials have been thoroughly characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ISP-AES). These highly porous membrane-like gold materials may have potential applications in catalysis, biosensors, electrode materials, optically selective coatings, heat dissipation and biofiltration. (author)

  8. Plasma membrane associated membranes (PAM) from Jurkat cells contain STIM1 protein is PAM involved in the capacitative calcium entry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozieł, Katarzyna; Lebiedzinska, Magdalena; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Onopiuk, Marta; Brutkowski, Wojciech; Wierzbicka, Katarzyna; Wilczyński, Grzegorz; Pinton, Paolo; Duszyński, Jerzy; Zabłocki, Krzysztof; Wieckowski, Mariusz R

    2009-12-01

    A proper cooperation between the plasma membrane, the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria seems to be essential for numerous cellular processes involved in Ca(2+) signalling and maintenance of Ca(2+) homeostasis. A presence of microsomal and mitochondrial proteins together with those characteristic for the plasma membrane in the fraction of the plasma membrane associated membranes (PAM) indicates a formation of stabile interactions between these three structures. We isolated the plasma membrane associated membranes from Jurkat cells and found its significant enrichment in the plasma membrane markers including plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and CD3 as well as sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase as a marker of the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. In addition, two proteins involved in the store-operated Ca(2+) entry, Orai1 located in the plasma membrane and an endoplasmic reticulum protein STIM1 were found in this fraction. Furthermore, we observed a rearrangement of STIM1-containing protein complexes isolated from Jurkat cells undergoing stimulation by thapsigargin. We suggest that the inter-membrane compartment composed of the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum, and isolated as a stabile plasma membrane associated membranes fraction, might be involved in the store-operated Ca(2+) entry, and their formation and rebuilding have an important regulatory role in cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  9. Biomimetic devices functionalized by membrane channel proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jacob

    2004-03-01

    We are developing a new family of active materials which derive their functional properties from membrane proteins. These materials have two primary components: the proteins and the membranes themselves. I will discuss our recent work directed toward development of a generic platform for a "plug-and-play" philosophy of membrane protein engineering. By creating a stable biomimetic polymer membrane a single molecular monolayer thick, we will enable the exploitation of the function of any membrane protein, from pores and pumps to sensors and energy transducers. Our initial work has centered on the creation, study, and characterization of the biomimetic membranes. We are attempting to make large areas of membrane monolayers using Langmuir-Blodgett film formation as well as through arrays of microfabricated black lipid membrane-type septa. A number of techniques allow the insertion of protein into the membranes. As a benchmark, we have been employing a model system of voltage-gated pore proteins, which have electrically controllable porosities. I will report on the progress of this work, the characterization of the membranes, protein insertion processes, and the yield and functionality of the composite.

  10. Treatment of Knee Osteochondral Lesions Using a Novel Clot of Autologous Plasma Rich in Growth Factors Mixed with Healthy Hyaline Cartilage Chips and Intra-Articular Injection of PRGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugat, Ramón; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Álvarez-Díaz, Pedro; Cuscó, Xavier; Seijas, Roberto; Barastegui, David; Navarro, Jordi; Laiz, Patricia; García-Balletbó, Montserrat

    2017-01-01

    Knee cartilage or osteochondral lesions are common and challenging injuries. To date, most symptomatic lesions warrant surgical treatment. We present two cases of patients with knee osteochondral defects treated with a one-step surgical procedure consisting of an autologous-based matrix composed of healthy hyaline cartilage chips, mixed plasma poor-rich in platelets clot, and plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF). Both patients returned to playing soccer at the preinjury activity level and demonstrated excellent defect filling in both magnetic resonance imaging and second-look arthroscopy (in one of them). The use of a clot of autologous plasma poor in platelets with healthy hyaline cartilage chips and intra-articular injection of plasma rich in platelets is an effective, easy, and cheap option to treat knee cartilage injuries in young and athletic patients.

  11. Treatment of Knee Osteochondral Lesions Using a Novel Clot of Autologous Plasma Rich in Growth Factors Mixed with Healthy Hyaline Cartilage Chips and Intra-Articular Injection of PRGF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Cugat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Knee cartilage or osteochondral lesions are common and challenging injuries. To date, most symptomatic lesions warrant surgical treatment. We present two cases of patients with knee osteochondral defects treated with a one-step surgical procedure consisting of an autologous-based matrix composed of healthy hyaline cartilage chips, mixed plasma poor-rich in platelets clot, and plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF. Both patients returned to playing soccer at the preinjury activity level and demonstrated excellent defect filling in both magnetic resonance imaging and second-look arthroscopy (in one of them. The use of a clot of autologous plasma poor in platelets with healthy hyaline cartilage chips and intra-articular injection of plasma rich in platelets is an effective, easy, and cheap option to treat knee cartilage injuries in young and athletic patients.

  12. Effect of dope solution temperature on the membrane structure and membrane distillation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawi, N. I. M.; Bilad, M. R.; Nordin, N. A. H. M.

    2018-04-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) is a non-isothermal process applicable to purify water using hydrophobic membrane. Membrane in MD is hydrophobic, permeable to water vapor but repels liquid water. MD membrane is expected to pose high flux, high fouling and scaling resistances and most importantly high wetting resistance. This study develops flat-sheet polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane by exploring both liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase inversion technique largely to improve its wetting resistance and flux performance. We hypothesize that temperature of dope solution play roles in solid-liquid separation during membrane formation and an optimum balance between liquid-liquid and liquid-solid (crystallization) separation leads to highly performance PVDF membrane. Findings obtained from differential scanning calorimeter test show that increasing dope solution temperature reduces degree of PVDF crystallinity and suppresses formation of crystalline structure. The morphological images of the resulting membranes show that at elevated dope solution temperature (40, 60, 80 and 100°C), the spherulite-like structures are formed across the thickness of membranes ascribed from due to different type of crystals. The performance of direct-contact MD shows that the obtained flux of the optimum dope temperature (60°C) of 10.8 L/m2h is comparable to commercial PTFE-based MD membrane.

  13. Microdrilled cartilage defects treated with thrombin-solidified chitosan/blood implant regenerate a more hyaline, stable, and structurally integrated osteochondral unit compared to drilled controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Catherine; Chen, Gaoping; Tran-Khanh, Nicolas; Sun, Jun; Chen, Hongmei; Buschmann, Michael D; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2012-03-01

    This study analyzed the long-term cartilage and subchondral bone repair of microdrilled defects treated with chitosan glycerol-phosphate/blood implant, using thrombin (Factor IIa) to accelerate in situ solidification. We also evaluated the cartilage repair response to six smaller microdrill holes compared with two larger holes. Bilateral knee trochlear cartilage defects were created in n=8 skeletally mature rabbits, drilled with six proximal 0.5 mm and two distal 0.9 mm holes, then covered with in situ-solidified IIa-implants (treated) or with IIa-alone (control). After 6.5 months of repair, cartilage repair tissues were analyzed by histological scoring and histomorphometry for hyaline matrix characteristics and osseous integration. Subchondral repair bone was analyzed by 3D microcomputed tomography and compared to acute defects (n=6) and intact trochlea (n=8). Implant-treated cartilage repair tissues had higher structural integrity through the entire defect (p=0.02), twofold higher percent staining for glycosaminoglycan (p=0.0004), and ~24% more collagen type II staining over the smaller drill holes (p=0.008) compared with controls. Otherwise, hole diameter had no specific effect on cartilage repair. The subchondral bone plate was partially restored in treated and control defects but less dense than intact trochlea, with evidence of incomplete regeneration of the calcified cartilage layer. More residual drill holes (p=0.054) were detected in control versus treated defects, and control defects with more than 40% residual holes presented abnormally thicker trabeculae compared with treated defects. Low osteoclast numbers after 6.5 months repair suggested that bone was no longer remodeling. The subchondral bone plate surrounding the defects exhibited a significant thickening compared with age-matched intact trochlea. These data suggest that debridement and drilling can lead to long-term subchondral bone changes outside the cartilage defect. Compared with drilled

  14. New Polymeric Membranes for Organic Solvent Nanofiltration

    KAUST Repository

    Aburabie, Jamaliah

    2017-05-01

    The focus of this dissertation was the development, synthesis and modification of polymers for the preparation of membranes for organic solvent nanofiltration. High chemical stability in a wide range of solvents was a key requirement. Membranes prepared from synthesized polymers as well as from commercial polymers were designed and chemically modified to reach OSN requirements. A solvent stable thin-film composite (TFC) membrane is reported, which is fabricated on crosslinked polythiosemicarbazide (PTSC) as substrate. The membranes exhibited high fluxes towards solvents like THF, DMF and DMSO ranging around 20 L/m2 h at 5 bar with a MWCO of around 1000 g/mol. Ultrafiltration PTSC membranes were prepared by non-solvent induced phase separation and crosslinked with GPTMS. The crosslinking reaction was responsible for the formation of an inorganic-type-network that tuned the membrane pore size. The crosslinked membranes acquired high solvent stability in DMSO, DMF and THF with a MWCO above 1300 g/mol. Reaction Induced Phase Separation (RIPS) was introduced as a new method for the preparation of skinned asymmetric membranes. These membranes have two distinctive layers with different morphologies both from the same polymer. The top dense layer is composed of chemically crosslinked polymer chains while the bottom layer is a porous structure formed by non-crosslinked polymer chains. Such membranes were tested for vitamin B12 in solvents after either crosslinking the support or dissolving the support and fixing the freestanding membrane on alumina. Pebax® 1657 was utilized for the preparation of composite membranes by simple coating. Porous PAN membranes were coated with Pebax® 1657 which was then crosslinked using TDI. Crosslinked Pebax® membranes show high stability towards ethanol, propanol and acetone. The membranes were also stable in DMF once crosslinked PAN supports were used. Sodium alginate polymer was investigated for the preparation of thin film composite

  15. Investigations into the visualisation of osseous and hyaline cartilaginous surface structures of the femural head using X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laemmermann, G.

    1989-01-01

    This study investigates into the extent to which fine osseous structures in the head of the femur and hyaline cartilaginous surfaces of the hip joint are accessible to X-ray computed tomography as a method of diagnosis. At first, a true model of the femural head (post-mortem preparation embedded in methylacrylate) was tomographed to compare the sectional displays thus obtained with hard-microtome sections of similar thickness made at the same levels. This permitted preliminary evaluations to be carried out and confirmed that those structures can be visualised by high-resolution CT (1 mm sections). Methods using high-resolution sectional imaging have a role in examinations of congruence in the the hip joint. Particularly useful here are three-dimensional displays of osseous and cartilaginous surfaces of the joint parts examined. Further research is needed until a more refined method of reconstruction can be made available, the usefulness of which in actual practice will depend on the degree of geometrical congruence achieved between a patient's joint and its display on the screen. (orig./GDG) [de

  16. Multifunctional nanocomposite hollow fiber membranes by solvent transfer induced phase separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Martin F; Jeon, Harim; Hough, Noah; Kim, Jong Hak; Stebe, Kathleen J; Lee, Daeyeon

    2017-11-01

    The decoration of porous membranes with a dense layer of nanoparticles imparts useful functionality and can enhance membrane separation and anti-fouling properties. However, manufacturing of nanoparticle-coated membranes requires multiple steps and tedious processing. Here, we introduce a facile single-step method in which bicontinuous interfacially jammed emulsions are used to form nanoparticle-functionalized hollow fiber membranes. The resulting nanocomposite membranes prepared via solvent transfer-induced phase separation and photopolymerization have exceptionally high nanoparticle loadings (up to 50 wt% silica nanoparticles) and feature densely packed nanoparticles uniformly distributed over the entire membrane surfaces. These structurally well-defined, asymmetric membranes facilitate control over membrane flux and selectivity, enable the formation of stimuli responsive hydrogel nanocomposite membranes, and can be easily modified to introduce antifouling features. This approach forms a foundation for the formation of advanced nanocomposite membranes comprising diverse building blocks with potential applications in water treatment, industrial separations and as catalytic membrane reactors.

  17. Recent advances on polymeric membranes for membrane reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Buonomenna, M. G.; Choi, Seung Hak

    2012-01-01

    . The successful use of membranes in membrane reactors is primary the result of two developments concerning: (i) membrane materials and (ii) membrane structures. The selection of a suited material and preparation technique depends on the application the membrane

  18. MEMBRANE BIOREACTOR FOR TREATMENT OF RECALCITRANT WASTEWATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suprihatin Suprihatin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The low biodegradable wastewaters remain a challenge in wastewater treatment technology. The performance of membrane bioreactor systems with submerged hollow fiber micro- and ultrafiltration membrane modules were examined for purifying recalcitrant wastewaters of leachate of a municipal solid waste open dumping site and effluent of pulp and paper mill. The use of MF and UF membrane bioreactor systems showed an efficient treatment for both types wastewaters with COD reduction of 80-90%. The membrane process achieved the desirable effects of maintaining reasonably high biomass concentration and long sludge retention time, while producing a colloid or particle free effluent. For pulp and paper mill effluent a specific sludge production of 0.11 kg MLSS/kg COD removed was achieved. A permeate flux of about 5 L/m²h could be achieved with the submerged microfiltration membrane. Experiments using ultrafiltration membrane produced relatively low permeate fluxes of 2 L/m²h. By applying periodical backwash, the flux could be improved significantly. It was indicated that the particle or colloid deposition on membrane surface was suppressed by backwash, but reformation of deposit was not effectively be prevented by shear-rate effect of aeration. Particle and colloid started to accumulate soon after backwash. Construction of membrane module and operation mode played a critical role in achieving the effectiveness of aeration in minimizing deposit formation on the membrane surface.

  19. Polymalic Acid Tritryptophan Copolymer Interacts with Lipid Membrane Resulting in Membrane Solubilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anionic polymers with membrane permeation functionalities are highly desirable for secure cytoplasmic drug delivery. We have developed tritryptophan containing copolymer (P/WWW of polymalic acid (PMLA that permeates membranes by a mechanism different from previously described PMLA copolymers of trileucine (P/LLL and leucine ethyl ester (P/LOEt that use the “barrel stave” and “carpet” mechanism, respectively. The novel mechanism leads to solubilization of membranes by forming copolymer “belts” around planar membrane “packages.” The formation of such packages is supported by results obtained from studies including size-exclusion chromatography, confocal microscopy, and fluorescence energy transfer. According to this “belt” mechanism, it is hypothesized that P/WWW first attaches to the membrane surface. Subsequently the hydrophobic tryptophan side chains translocate into the periphery and insert into the lipid bilayer thereby cutting the membrane into packages. The reaction is driven by the high affinity between the tryptophan residues and lipid side chains resulting in a stable configuration. The formation of the membrane packages requires physical agitation suggesting that the success of the translocation depends on the fluidity of the membrane. It is emphasized that the “belt” mechanism could specifically function in the recognition of abnormal cells with high membrane fluidity and in response to hyperthermia.

  20. Model of mouth-to-mouth transfer of bacterial lipoproteins through inner membrane LolC, periplasmic LolA, and outer membrane LolB

    OpenAIRE

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    Outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in Escherichia coli are released from the inner membrane by an ATP-binding cassette transporter, the LolCDE complex, which causes the formation of a soluble complex with a periplasmic molecular chaperone, LolA. LolA then transports lipoproteins to the outer membrane where an outer membrane receptor, LolB, incorporates lipoproteins into the outer membrane. The molecular mechanisms underlying the Lol-dependent lipoprotein sorting have been clarified in detai...

  1. Magnetically controlled permeability membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-10-31

    A bioactive material delivery system can include a thermoresponsive polymer membrane and nanowires distributed within the thermoresponsive polymer membrane. Magnetic activation of a thermoresponsive polymer membrane can take place via altering the magnetization or dimensions of nanowires dispersed or ordered within the membrane matrix.

  2. Magnetically controlled permeability membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jü rgen; Khashab, Niveen M.; Zaher, Amir

    2013-01-01

    A bioactive material delivery system can include a thermoresponsive polymer membrane and nanowires distributed within the thermoresponsive polymer membrane. Magnetic activation of a thermoresponsive polymer membrane can take place via altering the magnetization or dimensions of nanowires dispersed or ordered within the membrane matrix.

  3. ACTIVITY OF CANONICAL WNT SIGNAL SYSTEM IN HYALINE CARTILAGE ARTICULAR CHONDROCYTES IN PROCESS OF SYNOVIAL JOINT DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Molotkov

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Canonical and non-canonical Wnt systems are essential regulators of chondrogenesis and bone development. However, the roles of these systems in synovial joint development are not well studied. To determine if canonical Wnt system is active in developing articular chondrocytes we used immunohistochemistry for в-galactosidase and doublecortin (cell-type specific marker for articular chondrocytes to double label sections through joint regions of E14.5, E18.5, P10 and adult mice. Here the following results are presented. Canonical Wnt signal system does not work in developing articular chondrocytes at early embryonic stages (E14.5; it is active in the articular chondrocytes at late embryonic stages (E16.5-E18.5 and during postnatal development (P7-P10, but is turned off again in the adult articular chondrocytes. These results suggest that canonical Wnt signaling is being regulated during articular chondrocytes differentiation and joint formation.

  4. High Cholesterol/Low Cholesterol: Effects in Biological Membranes: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subczynski, Witold K; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Widomska, Justyna; Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija

    2017-12-01

    Lipid composition determines membrane properties, and cholesterol plays a major role in this determination as it regulates membrane fluidity and permeability, as well as induces the formation of coexisting phases and domains in the membrane. Biological membranes display a very diverse lipid composition, the lateral organization of which plays a crucial role in regulating a variety of membrane functions. We hypothesize that, during biological evolution, membranes with a particular cholesterol content were selected to perform certain functions in the cells of eukaryotic organisms. In this review, we discuss the major membrane properties induced by cholesterol, and their relationship to certain membrane functions.

  5. Interaction of elaiophylin with model bilayer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, J.; Dencheva-Zarkova, M.

    2017-01-01

    Elaiophylin is a new macrodiolide antibiotic, which is produced by the Streptomyces strains [1]. It displays biological activities against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. The mode of action of this antibiotic has been attributed to an alteration of the membrane permeability. When this antibiotic is inserted into the bilayer membranes destabilization of the membrane and formation of ion-penetrable channels is observed. The macrodiolide antibiotic forms stable cation selective ion channels in synthetic lipid bilayer membranes. The aim of this work was to study the interactions of Elaiophylin with model bilayer membranes and to get information on the mechanical properties of lipid bilayers in presence of this antibiotic. Patch-clamp technique [2] were used in the study

  6. Factors Determining the Oxygen Permeability of Biological Membranes: Oxygen Transport Across Eye Lens Fiber-Cell Plasma Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subczynski, Witold Karol; Widomska, Justyna; Mainali, Laxman

    2017-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-label oximetry allows the oxygen permeability coefficient to be evaluated across homogeneous lipid bilayer membranes and, in some cases, across coexisting membrane domains without their physical separation. The most pronounced effect on oxygen permeability is observed for cholesterol, which additionally induces the formation of membrane domains. In intact biological membranes, integral proteins induce the formation of boundary and trapped lipid domains with a low oxygen permeability. The effective oxygen permeability coefficient across the intact biological membrane is affected not only by the oxygen permeability coefficients evaluated for each lipid domain but also by the surface area occupied by these domains in the membrane. All these factors observed in fiber cell plasma membranes of clear human eye lenses are reviewed here.

  7. Biogenesis and Membrane Targeting of Lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins represent a unique class of membrane proteins, which are anchored to membranes through triacyl chains attached to the amino-terminal cysteine. They are involved in various functions localized in cell envelope. Escherichia coli possesses more than 90 species of lipoproteins, most of which are localized in the outer membrane, with others being in the inner membrane. All lipoproteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm with an N-terminal signal peptide, translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane, and converted to mature lipoproteins through sequential reactions catalyzed by three lipoprotein-processing enzymes: Lgt, LspA, and Lnt. The sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane requires a system comprising five Lol proteins. An ATP-binding cassette transporter, LolCDE, initiates the sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane. Formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is coupled to this LolCDE-dependent release reaction. LolA accommodates the amino-terminal acyl chain of lipoproteins in its hydrophobic cavity, thereby generating a hydrophilic complex that can traverse the periplasmic space by diffusion. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB on the outer membrane and anchored to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane by the action of LolB. In contrast, since LolCDE does not recognize lipoproteins possessing Asp at position +2, these lipoproteins remain anchored to the inner membrane. Genes for Lol proteins are widely conserved among gram-negative bacteria, and Lol-mediated outer membrane targeting of lipoproteins is considered to be the general lipoprotein localization mechanism.

  8. Characterising antimicrobial protein-membrane complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xun, Gloria; Dingley, Andrew; Tremouilhac, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Antimicrobial proteins (AMPs) are host defence molecules that protect organisms from microbial infection. A number of hypotheses for AMP activity have been proposed which involve protein membrane interactions. However, there is a paucity of information describing AMP-membrane complexes in detail. The aim of this project is to characterise the interactions of amoebapore-A (APA-1) with membrane models using primarily solution-state NMR spectroscopy. APA-1 is an AMP which is regulated by a pH-dependent dimerisation event. Based on the atomic resolution solution structure of monomeric APA-1, it is proposed that this dimerisation is a prerequisite for ring-like hexameric pore formation. Due to the cytotoxicity of APA-1, we have developed a cell-free system to produce this protein. To facilitate our studies, we have adapted the cell-free system to isotope label APA-1. 13 C /15 N -enriched APA-1 sample was achieved and we have begun characterising APA-1 dimerisation and membrane interactions using NMR spectroscopy and other biochemical/biophysical methods. Neutron reflectometry is a surface-sensitive technique and therefore represents an ideal technique to probe how APA-1 interacts with membranes at the molecular level under different physiological conditions. Using Platypus, the pH-induced APA-1-membrane interactions should be detectable as an increase of the amount of protein adsorbed at the membrane surface and changes in the membrane properties. Specifically, detailed information of the structure and dimensions of the protein-membrane complex, the position and amount of the protein in the membrane, and the perturbation of the membrane phospholipids on protein incorporation can be extracted from the neutron reflectometry measurement. Such information will enable critical assessment of current proposed mechanisms of AMP activity in bacterial membranes and complement our NMR studies

  9. RADIATION STABILITY OF NAFION MEMBRANES USED FOR ISOTOPE SEPARATION BY PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE ELECTROLYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, E.

    2009-01-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzers have potential interest for use for hydrogen isotope separation from water. In order for PEME to be fully utilized, more information is needed on the stability of Nafion when exposed to radiation. This work examines Nafion 117 under varying exposure conditions, including dose rate, total dosage and atmospheric condition. Analytical tools, such as FT-IR, ion exchange capacity, DMA and TIC-TOC were used to characterize the exposed membranes. Analysis of the water from saturated membranes can provide important data on the stability of the membranes during radiation exposure. It was found that the dose rate of exposure plays an important role in membrane degradation. Potential mechanisms for membrane degradation include peroxide formation by free radicals

  10. Flavonoid-membrane Interactions: A Protective Role of Flavonoids at the Membrane Surface?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia I. Oteiza

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids can exert beneficial health effects through multiple mechanisms. In this paper, we address the important, although not fully understood, capacity of flavonoids to interact with cell membranes. The interactions of polyphenols with bilayers include: (a the partition of the more non-polar compounds in the hydrophobic interior of the membrane, and (b the formation of hydrogen bonds between the polar head groups of lipids and the more hydrophilic flavonoids at the membrane interface. The consequences of these interactions are discussed. The induction of changes in membrane physical properties can affect the rates of membrane lipid and protein oxidation. The partition of certain flavonoids in the hydrophobic core can result in a chain breaking antioxidant activity. We suggest that interactions of polyphenols at the surface of bilayers through hydrogen bonding, can act to reduce the access of deleterious molecules (i.e. oxidants, thus protecting the structure and function of membranes.

  11. RADIATION STABILITY OF NAFION MEMBRANES USED FOR ISOTOPE SEPARATION BY PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE ELECTROLYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, E

    2009-05-15

    Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzers have potential interest for use for hydrogen isotope separation from water. In order for PEME to be fully utilized, more information is needed on the stability of Nafion when exposed to radiation. This work examines Nafion 117 under varying exposure conditions, including dose rate, total dosage and atmospheric condition. Analytical tools, such as FT-IR, ion exchange capacity, DMA and TIC-TOC were used to characterize the exposed membranes. Analysis of the water from saturated membranes can provide important data on the stability of the membranes during radiation exposure. It was found that the dose rate of exposure plays an important role in membrane degradation. Potential mechanisms for membrane degradation include peroxide formation by free radicals.

  12. Membranes for corrosive oxidations. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this project is to develop porous hydrophilic membranes that are highly resistant to oxidative and corrosive conditions and to deploy them for recovery and purification of high tonnage chemicals such as hydrogen peroxide and other oxychemicals. The research team patented a process for membrane-based separation of hydrogen peroxide (US Patent No. 5,662,878). The process is based on using a hydrophilic membrane to separate hydrogen peroxide from the organic working solution. To enable this process, a new method for producing hydrophilic membrane materials (Patent No.6,464,880) was reported. We investigated methods of producing these hydrophilic materials and evaluated separations performance in comparison to membrane stability. It was determined that at the required membrane flux, membrane stability was not sufficient to design a commercial process. This work was published (Hestekin et al., J. Membrane Science 2006). To meet the performance needs of the process, we developed a membrane contactor method to extract the hydrogen peroxide, then we surveyed several commercial and pre-commercial membrane materials. We identified pre-commercial hydrophilic membranes with the required selectivity, flux, and stability to meet the needs of the process. In addition, we invented a novel reaction/separations format that greatly increases the performance of the process. To test the performance of the membranes and the new formats we procured and integrated reactor/membrane separations unit that enables controlled mixing, flow, temperature control, pressure control, and sampling. The results were used to file a US non-provisional patent application (ANL-INV 03-12). Hydrogen peroxide is widely used in pulp and paper applications, environmental treatment, and other industries. Virtually all hydrogen peroxide production is now based on a process featuring catalytic hydrogenation followed by auto-oxidation of suitable organic carrier molecules. This process has several

  13. Oxygen Transport Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay

    2008-08-30

    small polaron conduction mechanism. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to develop strategies to detect and characterize vacancy creation, dopant segregations and defect association in the oxygen conducting membrane material. The pO{sub 2} and temperature dependence of the conductivity, non-stoichiometry and thermal-expansion behavior of compositions with increasing complexity of substitution on the perovskite A and B sites were studied. Studies with the perovskite structure show anomalous behavior at low oxygen partial pressures (<10{sup -5} atm). The anomalies are due to non-equilibrium effects and can be avoided by using very strict criteria for the attainment of equilibrium. The slowness of the oxygen equilibration kinetics arises from two different mechanisms. In the first, a two phase region occurs between an oxygen vacancy ordered phase such as brownmillerite SrFeO{sub 2.5} and perovskite SrFeO{sub 3-x}. The slow kinetics is associated with crossing the two phase region. The width of the miscibility gap decreases with increasing temperature and consequently the effect is less pronounced at higher temperature. The preferred kinetic pathway to reduction of perovskite ferrites when the vacancy concentration corresponds to the formation of significant concentrations of Fe{sup 2+} is via the formation of a Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phases as clearly observed in the case of La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3-x} where LaSrFeO{sub 4} is found together with Fe. In more complex compositions, such as LSFTO, iron or iron rich phases are observed locally with no evidence for the presence of discrete RP phase. Fracture strength of tubular perovskite membranes was determined in air and in reducing atmospheric conditions. The strength of the membrane decreased with temperature and severity of reducing conditions although the strength distribution (Weibull parameter, m) was relatively unaltered. Surface and volume

  14. Dynamic shaping of cellular membranes by phospholipids and membrane-deforming proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Shiro; Kurisu, Shusaku; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2014-10-01

    All cellular compartments are separated from the external environment by a membrane, which consists of a lipid bilayer. Subcellular structures, including clathrin-coated pits, caveolae, filopodia, lamellipodia, podosomes, and other intracellular membrane systems, are molded into their specific submicron-scale shapes through various mechanisms. Cells construct their micro-structures on plasma membrane and execute vital functions for life, such as cell migration, cell division, endocytosis, exocytosis, and cytoskeletal regulation. The plasma membrane, rich in anionic phospholipids, utilizes the electrostatic nature of the lipids, specifically the phosphoinositides, to form interactions with cytosolic proteins. These cytosolic proteins have three modes of interaction: 1) electrostatic interaction through unstructured polycationic regions, 2) through structured phosphoinositide-specific binding domains, and 3) through structured domains that bind the membrane without specificity for particular phospholipid. Among the structured domains, there are several that have membrane-deforming activity, which is essential for the formation of concave or convex membrane curvature. These domains include the amphipathic helix, which deforms the membrane by hemi-insertion of the helix with both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions, and/or the BAR domain superfamily, known to use their positively charged, curved structural surface to deform membranes. Below the membrane, actin filaments support the micro-structures through interactions with several BAR proteins as well as other scaffold proteins, resulting in outward and inward membrane micro-structure formation. Here, we describe the characteristics of phospholipids, and the mechanisms utilized by phosphoinositides to regulate cellular events. We then summarize the precise mechanisms underlying the construction of membrane micro-structures and their involvements in physiological and pathological processes. Copyright © 2014 the

  15. Electrospun chitosan nanofibre membranes for antimicrobial application: role of electrospinning processing parameters

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs, V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available for biomedical applications such as wound dressing. In this paper, the authors report investigation on the effects of governing parameters on the formation of chitosan nanofibre membranes. These membranes were subjected to various cell cultures for antibacterial...

  16. Ultrathin Polyamide Membranes Fabricated from Free-Standing Interfacial Polymerization: Synthesis, Modifications, and Post-treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Yue; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Chung, Neal Tai-Shung

    2016-01-01

    ) membranes. The polyamide selective layer usually possesses a high selectivity and permeability, making it the heart of this membrane technology. To further improve and understand its formation, with entirely excluding the effect of substrate, an ultrathin

  17. Review on Development of Ceramic Membrane From Sol-Gel Route: Parameters Affecting Characteristics of the Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Othman and H. Mukhtar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of laboratory scale ceramic membrane preparation using sol-gel technique with pore sizes in the range of 1-10nm is reviewed. Parameters affecting the characteristics of membrane during membrane development are highlighted and discussed in detail. Experimental results from literatures have shown that the correct amount of acid, water, PVA, appropriate membrane thickness, proper control of drying rate, and appropriate temperature profile selection during sintering process are necessary in order to acquire sufficient strength and reduce the formation of crack in the membrane. The different temperature setting during sintering process also influences the size of pore formed.Key Words: Sol-Gel, Inorganic Membrane, Ceramic Membrane, Gas Permeation, Sintering, Sol Properties, Membrane Morphologies, Pore Size Distribution.

  18. MR imaging of hyaline cartilage at 0.5 T: a quantitative and qualitative in vitro evaluation of three types of sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, E. van der; Kroon, H.M.; Doornbos, J.; Bloem, J.L.; Hermans, J.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To identify an optimal pulse sequence for in vitro imaging of hyaline cartilage at 0.5 T. Materials and methods. Twelve holes of varying diameter and depth were drilled in cartilage of two pig knees. These were submerged in saline and scanned with a 0.5-T MR system. Sixteen T1-weighted gradient echo (GE), two T2-weighted GE, and 16 fast spin echo sequences were used, by varying repetition time (TR), echo time (TE), flip angle (FA), echo train length, profile order, and by use of fat saturation. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of cartilage versus saline solution and cartilage versus subchondral bone were measured. Cartilaginous lesions were evaluated separately by three independent observers. Interobserver variability and correlation between the quantitative and qualitative analyses were calculated. Results. The mean CNRs of two specimens of cartilage versus saline solution ranged from 6.3 (±2.1) to 27.7 (±2.5), and those of cartilage versus subchondral bone from 0.3 (±0.2) to 22.5 (±1.4). The highest CNR was obtained with a T1-weighted spoiled 3D-GE technique (TR 65 ms, TE 11.5 ms, FA 45 ). The number of lesions observed per sequence varied from 35 to 69. Observer agreement was fair to good. The T1-weighted spoiled GE sequences with a TR of 65 ms, TE of 11.5 ms and FA of 30 and 45 were significantly superior to the other 34 sequences in the qualitative analysis. Conclusion. T1-weighted spoiled 3D-GE sequences with a TR of 65 ms, a TE of 11.5 ms, and a FA of 30-45 were found to be optimal for in vitro imaging of cartilage at 0.5 T. (orig.)

  19. MR imaging of hyaline cartilage at 0.5 T: a quantitative and qualitative in vitro evaluation of three types of sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, E. van der; Kroon, H.M.; Doornbos, J.; Bloem, J.L. [Department of Radiology C2-S, Albinusdreef 2, Leiden University Medical Center, Postbus 9600, NL-2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Hermans, J. [Department of Medical Statistics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

    1998-06-01

    Objective. To identify an optimal pulse sequence for in vitro imaging of hyaline cartilage at 0.5 T. Materials and methods. Twelve holes of varying diameter and depth were drilled in cartilage of two pig knees. These were submerged in saline and scanned with a 0.5-T MR system. Sixteen T1-weighted gradient echo (GE), two T2-weighted GE, and 16 fast spin echo sequences were used, by varying repetition time (TR), echo time (TE), flip angle (FA), echo train length, profile order, and by use of fat saturation. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of cartilage versus saline solution and cartilage versus subchondral bone were measured. Cartilaginous lesions were evaluated separately by three independent observers. Interobserver variability and correlation between the quantitative and qualitative analyses were calculated. Results. The mean CNRs of two specimens of cartilage versus saline solution ranged from 6.3 ({+-}2.1) to 27.7 ({+-}2.5), and those of cartilage versus subchondral bone from 0.3 ({+-}0.2) to 22.5 ({+-}1.4). The highest CNR was obtained with a T1-weighted spoiled 3D-GE technique (TR 65 ms, TE 11.5 ms, FA 45 ). The number of lesions observed per sequence varied from 35 to 69. Observer agreement was fair to good. The T1-weighted spoiled GE sequences with a TR of 65 ms, TE of 11.5 ms and FA of 30 and 45 were significantly superior to the other 34 sequences in the qualitative analysis. Conclusion. T1-weighted spoiled 3D-GE sequences with a TR of 65 ms, a TE of 11.5 ms, and a FA of 30-45 were found to be optimal for in vitro imaging of cartilage at 0.5 T. (orig.) With 8 figs., 1 tab., 31 refs.

  20. Induction of spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration using a double-network gel: efficacy of a novel therapeutic strategy for an articular cartilage defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Nobuto; Yasuda, Kazunori; Ogawa, Munehiro; Arakaki, Kazunobu; Kai, Shuken; Onodera, Shin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Gong, Jian Ping

    2011-06-01

    A double-network (DN) gel, which was composed of poly-(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) and poly-(N,N'-dimetyl acrylamide) (PAMPS/PDMAAm), has the potential to induce chondrogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. To establish the efficacy of a therapeutic strategy for an articular cartilage defect using a DN gel. Controlled laboratory study. A 4.3-mm-diameter osteochondral defect was created in rabbit trochlea. A DN gel plug was implanted into the defect of the right knee so that a defect 2 mm in depth remained after surgery. An untreated defect of the left knee provided control data. The osteochondral defects created were examined by histological and immunohistochemical evaluations, surface assessment using confocal laser scanning microscopy, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis at 4 and 12 weeks. Samples were quantitatively evaluated with 2 scoring systems reported by Wayne et al and O'Driscoll et al. The DN gel-implanted defect was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type 2 collagen. Quantitative evaluation using the grading scales revealed a significantly higher score in the DN gel-implanted defects compared with the untreated control at each period (P cartilage at 12 weeks (P = .0106), while there was no statistical difference between the DN gel-implanted and normal knees. This study using the mature rabbit femoral trochlea osteochondral defect model demonstrated that DN gel implantation is an effective treatment to induce cartilage regeneration in vivo without any cultured cells or mammalian-derived scaffolds. This study has prompted us to develop a potential innovative strategy to repair cartilage lesions in the field of joint surgery.

  1. Differentiating normal hyaline cartilage from post-surgical repair tissue using fast gradient echo imaging in delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI (dGEMRIC) at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Pinker, Katja; Welsch, Goetz H. [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center-High field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Mamisch, Tallal C. [Inselspital Bern, Orthopedic Surgery Department, Bern (Switzerland); Domayer, Stephan [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center-High field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Orthopaedics, Vienna (Austria); Szomolanyi, Pavol [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center-High field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); Marlovits, Stefan; Kutscha-Lissberg, Florian [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Traumatology, Center for Joints and Cartilage, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the relative glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of repair tissue in patients after microfracturing (MFX) and matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) of the knee joint with a dGEMRIC technique based on a newly developed short 3D-GRE sequence with two flip angle excitation pulses. Twenty patients treated with MFX or MACT (ten in each group) were enrolled. For comparability, patients from each group were matched by age (MFX: 37.1 {+-} 16.3 years; MACT: 37.4 {+-} 8.2 years) and postoperative interval (MFX: 33.0 {+-} 17.3 months; MACT: 32.0 {+-} 17.2 months). The {delta} relaxation rate ({delta}R1) for repair tissue and normal hyaline cartilage and the relative {delta}R1 were calculated, and mean values were compared between both groups using an analysis of variance. The mean {delta}R1 for MFX was 1.07 {+-} 0.34 versus 0.32 {+-} 0.20 at the intact control site, and for MACT, 1.90 {+-} 0.49 compared to 0.87 {+-} 0.44, which resulted in a relative {delta}R1 of 3.39 for MFX and 2.18 for MACT. The difference between the cartilage repair groups was statistically significant. The new dGEMRIC technique based on dual flip angle excitation pulses showed higher GAG content in patients after MACT compared to MFX at the same postoperative interval and allowed reducing the data acquisition time to 4 min. (orig.)

  2. Mechano growth factor (MGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 functionalized silk scaffolds enhance articular hyaline cartilage regeneration in rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ziwei; Jiang, Li; Xu, Yan; Li, Haibin; Xu, Wei; Wu, Shuangchi; Wang, Yuanliang; Tang, Zhenyu; Lv, Yonggang; Yang, Li

    2015-06-01

    Damaged cartilage has poor self-healing ability and usually progresses to scar or fibrocartilaginous tissue, and finally degenerates to osteoarthritis (OA). Here we demonstrated that one of alternative isoforms of IGF-1, mechano growth factor (MGF) acted synergistically with transforming growth factor β3 (TGF-β3) embedded in silk fibroin scaffolds to induce chemotactic homing and chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Combination of MGF and TGF-β3 significantly increased cell recruitment up to 1.8 times and 2 times higher than TGF-β3 did in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, MGF increased Collagen II and aggrecan secretion of TGF-β3 induced hMSCs chondrogenesis, but decreased Collagen I in vitro. Silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds have been widely used for tissue engineering, and we showed that methanol treated pured SF scaffolds were porous, similar to compressive module of native cartilage, slow degradation rate and excellent drug released curves. At 7 days after subcutaneous implantation, TGF-β3 and MGF functionalized silk fibroin scaffolds (STM) recruited more CD29+/CD44+cells (Pcartilage-like extracellular matrix and less fibrillar collagen were detected in STM scaffolds than that in TGF-β3 modified scaffolds (ST) at 2 months after subcutaneous implantation. When implanted into articular joints in a rabbit osteochondral defect model, STM scaffolds showed the best integration into host tissues, similar architecture and collagen organization to native hyaline cartilage, as evidenced by immunostaining of aggrecan, collagen II and collagen I, as well as Safranin O and Masson's trichrome staining, and histological evalution based on the modified O'Driscoll histological scoring system (Pcartilage regeneration. This study demonstrated that TGF-β3 and MGF functionalized silk fibroin scaffolds enhanced endogenous stem cell recruitment and facilitated in situ articular cartilage regeneration, thus providing a novel strategy for cartilage repair

  3. A transduced living hyaline cartilage graft releasing transgenic stromal cell-derived factor-1 inducing endogenous stem cell homing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Leong, Wenyan; Su, Kai; Fang, Yu; Wang, Dong-An

    2013-05-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), also known as a homing factor, is a potent chemokine that activates and directs mobilization, migration, and retention of certain cell species via systemic circulation. The responding homing cells largely consist of activated stem cells, so that, in case of tissue lesions, such SDF-1-induced cell migration may execute recruitment of endogenous stem cells to perform autoreparation and compensatory regeneration in situ. In this study, a recombinant adenoviral vector carrying SDF-1 transgene was constructed and applied to transduce a novel scaffold-free living hyaline cartilage graft (SDF-t-LhCG). As an engineered transgenic living tissue, SDF-t-LhCG is capable of continuously producing and releasing SDF-1 in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro trials were examined with ELISA, while the in vivo trials were subsequently performed via a subcutaneous implantation of SDF-t-LhCG in a nude mouse model, followed by series of biochemical and biological analyses. The results indicate that transgenic SDF-1 enhanced the presence of this chemokine in mouse's circulation system; in consequence, SDF-1-induced activation and recruitment of endogenous stem cells were also augmented in both peripheral blood and SDF-t-LhCG implant per se. These results were obtained via flow cytometry analyses on mouse blood samples and implanted SDF-t-LhCG samples, indicating an upregulation of the CXCR4(+)(SDF-1 receptor) cell population, accompanied by upregulation of the CD34(+), CD44(+), and Sca-1(+) cell populations as well as a downregulation of the CD11b(+) cell population. With the supply of SDF-1-recruited endogenous stem cells, enhanced chondrogenesis was observed in SDF-t-LhCG implants in situ.

  4. Polymeric membranes for guided bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Piergiorgio; Chiono, Valeria; Tonda-Turo, Chiara; Ferreira, Ana M; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2011-10-01

    In this review, different barrier membranes for guided bone regeneration (GBR) are described as a useful surgical technique to enhance bone regeneration in damaged alveolar sites before performing implants and fitting other dental appliances. The GBR procedure encourages bone regeneration through cellular exclusion and avoids the invasion of epithelial and connective tissues that grow at the defective site instead of bone tissue. The barrier membrane should satisfy various properties, such as biocompatibility, non-immunogenicity, non-toxicity, and a degradation rate that is long enough to permit mechanical support during bone formation. Other characteristics such as tissue integration, nutrient transfer, space maintenance and manageability are also of interest. In this review, various non-resorbable and resorbable commercially available membranes are described, based on expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, poly(lactic acid), poly(glycolic acid) and their copolymers. The polyester-based membranes are biodegradable, permit a single-stage procedure, and have higher manageability than non-resorbable membranes; however, they have shown poor biocompatibility. In contrast, membranes based on natural materials, such as collagen, are biocompatible but are characterized by poor mechanical properties and stability due to their early degradation. Moreover, new approaches are described, such as the use of multi-layered, graft-copolymer-based and composite membranes containing osteoconductive ceramic fillers as alternatives to conventional membranes. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Effects of Lateral and Terminal Chains of X-Shaped Bolapolyphiles with Oligo(phenylene ethynylene Cores on Self-Assembly Behavior. Part 2: Domain Formation by Self-Assembly in Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Werner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Supramolecular self-assembly of membrane constituents within a phospholipid bilayer creates complex functional platforms in biological cells that operate in intracellular signaling, trafficking and membrane remodeling. Synthetic polyphilic compounds of macromolecular or small size can be incorporated into artificial phospholipid bilayers. Featuring three or four moieties of different philicities, they reach beyond ordinary amphiphilicity and open up avenues to new functions and interaction concepts. Here, we have incorporated a series of X-shaped bolapolyphiles into DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayers of giant unilamellar vesicles. The bolapolyphiles consist of a rod-like oligo(phenylene ethynylene (OPE core, hydrophilic glycerol-based headgroups with or without oligo(ethylene oxide expansions at both ends and two lateral alkyl chains attached near the center of the OPE core. In the absence of DPPC and water, the compounds showed thermotropic liquid-crystalline behavior with a transition between polyphilic and amphiphilic assembly (see part 1 in this issue. In DPPC membranes, various trends in the domain morphologies were observed upon structure variations, which entailed branched alkyl chains of various sizes, alkyl chain semiperfluorination and size expansion of the headgroups. Observed effects on domain morphology are interpreted in the context of the bulk behavior (part 1 and of a model that was previously developed based on spectroscopic and physicochemical data.

  6. Effects of internal limiting membrane peeling during vitrectomy for macula-off primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Teijeiro, María José; Bande Rodriguez, Manuel; Mansilla Cuñarro, Raquel; Paniagua Fernández, Laura; Ruiz-Oliva Ruiz, Francisco; Piñeiro Ces, Antonio

    2018-03-01

    To determine the effectiveness of internal limiting membrane peeling during vitrectomy for macula-off primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in the prevention of postoperative epiretinal membrane formation and achievement of good visual outcomes and to identify preoperative and intraoperative risk factors for epiretinal membrane formation. We retrospectively analyzed data from 62 eyes of 62 consecutive patients with macula-off primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment who underwent vitrectomy with (n = 30) or without (n = 32) internal limiting membrane peeling between January 2014 and March 2016 and were followed up for at least 12 months. The effects of internal limiting membrane peeling on visual outcomes and postoperative recovery of the macular structure were determined. We subsequently divided patients into an epiretinal membrane group and a non-epiretinal membrane group and assessed the effects of various preoperative and intraoperative factors on postoperative epiretinal membrane formation. Postoperative epiretinal membrane developed in 10 patients in the no internal limiting membrane peeling group and three patients in the internal limiting membrane peeling group. Postoperative visual acuity significantly improved in both groups. Epiretinal membrane formation was found to be correlated with a higher number of retinal breaks. Our results suggest that internal limiting membrane peeling during macula-off primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment surgery can reduce the occurrence of postoperative epiretinal membrane, is safe, and results in favorable visual outcomes.

  7. Caveolae as plasma membrane sensors, protectors and organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Robert G; del Pozo, Miguel A

    2013-02-01

    Caveolae are submicroscopic, plasma membrane pits that are abundant in many mammalian cell types. The past few years have seen a quantum leap in our understanding of the formation, dynamics and functions of these enigmatic structures. Caveolae have now emerged as vital plasma membrane sensors that can respond to plasma membrane stresses and remodel the extracellular environment. Caveolae at the plasma membrane can be removed by endocytosis to regulate their surface density or can be disassembled and their structural components degraded. Coat proteins, called cavins, work together with caveolins to regulate the formation of caveolae but also have the potential to dynamically transmit signals that originate in caveolae to various cellular destinations. The importance of caveolae as protective elements in the plasma membrane, and as membrane organizers and sensors, is highlighted by links between caveolae dysfunction and human diseases, including muscular dystrophies and cancer.

  8. Laser-induced micropore formation and modification of cartilage structure in osteoarthritis healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Emil; Baum, Olga; Shekhter, Anatoly; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Shnirelman, Alexander; Alexandrovskaya, Yulia; Sadovskyy, Ivan; Vinokur, Valerii

    2017-09-01

    Pores are vital for functioning of avascular tissues. Laser-induced pores play an important role in the process of cartilage regeneration. The aim of any treatment for osteoarthritis is to repair hyaline-type cartilage. The aims of this study are to answer two questions: (1) How do laser-assisted pores affect the cartilaginous cells to synthesize hyaline cartilage (HC)? and (2) How can the size distribution of pores arising in the course of laser radiation be controlled? We have shown that in cartilage, the pores arise predominately near chondrocytes, which promote nutrition of cells and signal molecular transfer that activates regeneration of cartilage. In vivo laser treatment of damaged cartilage of miniature pig joints provides cellular transformation and formation of HC. We propose a simple model of pore formation in biopolymers that paves the way for going beyond the trial-and-error approach when choosing an optimal laser treatment regime. Our findings support the approach toward laser healing of osteoarthritis.

  9. Laser-induced micropore formation and modification of cartilage structure in osteoarthritis healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Emil; Baum, Olga; Shekhter, Anatoly; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Shnirelman, Alexander; Alexandrovskaya, Yulia; Sadovskyy, Ivan; Vinokur, Valerii

    2017-09-01

    Pores are vital for functioning of avascular tissues. Laser-induced pores play an important role in the process of cartilage regeneration. The aim of any treatment for osteoarthritis is to repair hyaline-type cartilage. The aims of this study are to answer two questions: (1) How do laser-assisted pores affect the cartilaginous cells to synthesize hyaline cartilage (HC)? and (2) How can the size distribution of pores arising in the course of laser radiation be controlled? We have shown that in cartilage, the pores arise predominately near chondrocytes, which promote nutrition of cells and signal molecular transfer that activates regeneration of cartilage. In vivo laser treatment of damaged cartilage of miniature pig joints provides cellular transformation and formation of HC. We propose a simple model of pore formation in biopolymers that paves the way for going beyond the trial-and-error approach when choosing an optimal laser treatment regime. Our findings support the approach toward laser healing of osteoarthritis.

  10. MRI monitoring of autologous hyaline cartilage grafts in the knee joint: a follow-up study over 12 months; MRT-Monitoring autologer Chondrozytentransplantate im Kniegelenk: Eine Verlaufsstudie ueber 12 Monate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Horvat, C.; Schick, F.; Claussen, C.D.; Groenewaeller, E. [Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. Tuebingen (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the suitability of different MR sequences for monitoring the stage of maturation of hyaline cartilage grafts in the knee joint and the early detection of complications like hypertrophy. In addition, it was analyzed whether indirect MR arthrography can indicate debonding of the graft. Materials and Methods: MRI examinations were performed in 19 patients, aged 17-43 years, with autologous transplantation of a hyaline cartilage tissue graft after knee trauma. Examination dates were prior to transplantation to localize the defect, and 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months after transplantation to control morphology and maturation of the autologous graft. Standard T2- and protondensity-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences and T1-weighted spin echo (SE) sequences were used, as well as gradient echo (GRE) sequences with and without magnetization transfer (MT) prepulses. In some cases, indirect MR arthrography was performed. Results: Cartilage defect and the hyaline cartilage graft could be detected in all 19 patients. Hypertrophy of the graft could be found early in 3 patients and debonding in 1 patient. For depicting the graft a short time after surgery. T2-weighted TSE-sequences showed the best results. Six and 12 months after transplantation, spoiled 3D-GRE-sequences like FLASH3D (fast low angle shot) showed reduced artifacts due to magnetic residues from the surgery. Difference images from GRE-sequences with and without MT pulse provided high contrast between cartilage and surrounding tissue. The quantification of the MT effect showed an assimilation of the graft to the original cartilage within 12 months. Indirect MR arthrography showed subchondral contrast medium even 12 months after transplantation in 3 patients. (orig.)

  11. Influence of the gel thickness on in vivo hyaline cartilage regeneration induced by double-network gel implanted at the bottom of a large osteochondral defect: Short-term results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuda Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A double-network (DN gel, which is composed of poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid and poly(N,N’-dimethyl acrylamide, can induce hyaline cartilage regeneration in vivo in a large osteochondral defect. The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of the thickness of the implanted DN gel on the induction ability of hyaline cartilage regeneration. Methods Thirty-eight mature rabbits were used in this study. We created an osteochondral defect having a diameter of 4.3-mm in the patellofemoral joint. The knees were randomly divided into 4 groups (Group I: 0.5-mm thick gel, Group II: 1.0-mm thick gel, Group III: 5.0-mm thick gel, and Group IV: untreated control. Animals in each group were further divided into 3 sub-groups depending on the gel implant position (2.0-, 3.0-, or 4.0-mm depth from the articular surface in the defect. The regenerated tissues were evaluated with the Wayne’s gross and histological grading scales and real time PCR analysis of the cartilage marker genes at 4 weeks. Results According to the total Wayne’s score, when the depth of the final vacant space was set at 2.0 mm, the scores in Groups I, II, and III were significantly greater than that Group IV (p  Conclusions The 1.0-mm thick DN gel sheet had the same ability to induce hyaline cartilage regeneration as the 5.0-mm thick DN gel plug. However, the induction ability of the 0.5-mm thick sheet was significantly lower when compared with the 1.0-mm thick gel sheet. The 1.0-mm DN gel sheet is a promising device to establish a cell-free cartilage regeneration strategy that minimizes bone loss from the gel implantation.

  12. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  13. Premature rupture of membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000512.htm Premature rupture of membranes To use the sharing features on this page, ... water that surrounds your baby in the womb. Membranes or layers of tissue hold in this fluid. ...

  14. Oxygen transport membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof.......The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof....

  15. Membrane with integrated spacer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balster, J.H.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Many membrane processes are severely influenced by concentration polarisation. Turbulence promoting spacers placed in between the membranes can reduce the diffusional resistance of concentration polarisation by inducing additional mixing. Electrodialysis (ED) used for desalination suffers from

  16. Complex Dynamic Development of Poliovirus Membranous Replication Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vinod; Hansen, Bryan T.; Hoyt, Forrest H.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2012-01-01

    Replication of all positive-strand RNA viruses is intimately associated with membranes. Here we utilize electron tomography and other methods to investigate the remodeling of membranes in poliovirus-infected cells. We found that the viral replication structures previously described as “vesicles” are in fact convoluted, branching chambers with complex and dynamic morphology. They are likely to originate from cis-Golgi membranes and are represented during the early stages of infection by single-walled connecting and branching tubular compartments. These early viral organelles gradually transform into double-membrane structures by extension of membranous walls and/or collapsing of the luminal cavity of the single-membrane structures. As the double-membrane regions develop, they enclose cytoplasmic material. At this stage, a continuous membranous structure may have double- and single-walled membrane morphology at adjacent cross-sections. In the late stages of the replication cycle, the structures are represented mostly by double-membrane vesicles. Viral replication proteins, double-stranded RNA species, and actively replicating RNA are associated with both double- and single-membrane structures. However, the exponential phase of viral RNA synthesis occurs when single-membrane formations are predominant in the cell. It has been shown previously that replication complexes of some other positive-strand RNA viruses form on membrane invaginations, which result from negative membrane curvature. Our data show that the remodeling of cellular membranes in poliovirus-infected cells produces structures with positive curvature of membranes. Thus, it is likely that there is a fundamental divergence in the requirements for the supporting cellular membrane-shaping machinery among different groups of positive-strand RNA viruses. PMID:22072780

  17. Smart membranes for monitoring membrane based desalination processes

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem; Karam, Ayman M.

    2017-01-01

    Various examples are related to smart membranes for monitoring membrane based process such as, e.g., membrane distillation processes. In one example, a membrane, includes a porous surface and a plurality of sensors (e.g., temperature, flow and

  18. Model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Nylander, Tommy; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    The high complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development and application of a wide range of model membrane systems to study biochemical and biophysical aspects of membranes in situ under well defined conditions. The aim is to provide fundamental understanding of processes control...

  19. Idiopathic epiretinal membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bu, Shao-Chong; Kuijer, Roelof; Li, Xiao-Rong; Hooymans, Johanna M M; Los, Leonoor I

    2014-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM) is a fibrocellular membrane that proliferates on the inner surface of the retina at the macular area. Membrane contraction is an important sight-threatening event and is due to fibrotic remodeling. Methods: Analysis of the current literature

  20. Meniscus Membranes For Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C.; Jorgensen, Betty; Pesiri, David R.

    2005-09-20

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  1. Meniscus membranes for separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C [Irvine, CA; Jorgensen, Betty [Jemez Springs, NM; Pesiri, David R [Aliso Viejo, CA

    2004-01-27

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  2. Composite Membranes Based on Polyether Sulfone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Soroush

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of polymeric additives such as PVP and PEG is studied with respect to the morphology of PES porous layer as a sublayer of nanofiltration composite membranes based on PES/PA. Results show that by phase inversionprocess of quaternary systems comprised of four components of polymer/solvent/non-solvent/additive and the diffusion of intertwined polymers some changes occur in membrane morphology with changes in their concentration. With addition of PVP, tear-like pores, finger-like and channel-like morphology change to enlarged channel cavities and by adding more PVP, membrane morphology changes further and spongy regions are extended in the membrane. Presence of PEG in casting solution delayed the precipitation time. By adding PEG, the solution viscosity is increased which is followed by decreases in diffusion rates of solvent/non-solvent in coagulation bath.Therefore, membrane morphology shifts to small pores and spongier region. Another effect of increased PEG content would be deformed PA layer formation in PES sublayer which affects membrane performance. However, PVP as an additive does not change membrane salt rejection very much while it leads to higher fluxes. A membrane with 2.5 percent PVP would perform by 40 percent flux increases, while a membrane with 5% PVP shows flux reductions even below the initial value. Contrary to PVP, the PEG content of 20 percent leads to 4 folds flux increases and in a membrane with 50 percent PEG, there is a flux increase by 7 folds and drop in salt rejection occurs by 50 percent and 70 percent, respectively.

  3. Models of dynamic extraction of lipid tethers from cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Sarah A; Chou, Tom

    2010-01-01

    When a ligand that is bound to an integral membrane receptor is pulled, the membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton can deform before either the membrane delaminates from the cytoskeleton or the ligand detaches from the receptor. If the membrane delaminates from the cytoskeleton, it may be further extruded and form a membrane tether. We develop a phenomenological model for this process by assuming that deformations obey Hooke's law up to a critical force at which the cell membrane locally detaches from the cytoskeleton and a membrane tether forms. We compute the probability of tether formation and show that tethers can be extruded only within an intermediate range of force loading rates and pulling velocities. The mean tether length that arises at the moment of ligand detachment is computed as are the force loading rates and pulling velocities that yield the longest tethers

  4. Characterization of retrokeratoprosthetic membranes in the Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, Rebecca C; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Michaud, Norman A; Dohlman, Claes H; Colby, Kathryn A

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate retroprosthetic membranes that can occur in 25% to 65% of patients with the Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis (KPro). Two patients with Peter anomaly and 2 with neurotrophic scarred corneas underwent revisions of their type 1 KPros because of visually compromising retroprosthetic membranes. The excised membranes were studied by light microscopy with hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid-Schiff, and toluidine blue stains. Immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscopic examination were also used. Light microscopic examination revealed that the retro-KPro fibrous membranes originated from the host's corneal stroma. These mildly to moderately vascularized membranes grew through gaps in the Descemet membrane to reach behind the KPro back plate and adhere to the anterior iris surface, which had undergone partial lysis. In 2 cases, the fibrous membranes merged at the pupil with matrical portions of metaplastic lens epithelium, forming a bilayered structure that crossed the optical axis. Retro-KPro membranes stained positively for α-smooth muscle actin but negatively for pancytokeratin. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of actin filaments within myofibroblasts and small surviving clusters of metaplastic lens epithelial cells. Stromal downgrowth, rather than epithelial downgrowth, was the major element of the retro-KPro membranes in this series. Metaplastic lens epithelium also contributed to opacification of the visual axis. Florid membranous inflammation was not a prominent finding and thus probably not a requisite stimulus for membrane development. Further advances in prosthetic design and newer antifibroproliferative agents may reduce membrane formation.

  5. Differential Effect of Plant Lipids on Membrane Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosjean, Kevin; Mongrand, Sébastien; Beney, Laurent; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The high diversity of the plant lipid mixture raises the question of their respective involvement in the definition of membrane organization. This is particularly the case for plant plasma membrane, which is enriched in specific lipids, such as free and conjugated forms of phytosterols and typical phytosphingolipids, such as glycosylinositolphosphoceramides. This question was here addressed extensively by characterizing the order level of membrane from vesicles prepared using various plant lipid mixtures and labeled with an environment-sensitive probe. Fluorescence spectroscopy experiments showed that among major phytosterols, campesterol exhibits a stronger ability than β-sitosterol and stigmasterol to order model membranes. Multispectral confocal microscopy, allowing spatial analysis of membrane organization, demonstrated accordingly the strong ability of campesterol to promote ordered domain formation and to organize their spatial distribution at the membrane surface. Conjugated sterol forms, alone and in synergy with free sterols, exhibit a striking ability to order membrane. Plant sphingolipids, particularly glycosylinositolphosphoceramides, enhanced the sterol-induced ordering effect, emphasizing the formation and increasing the size of sterol-dependent ordered domains. Altogether, our results support a differential involvement of free and conjugated phytosterols in the formation of ordered domains and suggest that the diversity of plant lipids, allowing various local combinations of lipid species, could be a major contributor to membrane organization in particular through the formation of sphingolipid-sterol interacting domains. PMID:25575593

  6. The Cirque du Soleil of Golgi membrane dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankaitis, Vytas A

    2009-07-27

    The role of lipid metabolic enzymes in Golgi membrane remodeling is a subject of intense interest. Now, in this issue, Schmidt and Brown (2009. J. Cell Biol. doi:10.1083/jcb.200904147) report that lysophosphatidic acid-specific acyltransferase, LPAAT3, contributes to Golgi membrane dynamics by suppressing tubule formation.

  7. The Cirque du Soleil of Golgi membrane dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2009-01-01

    The role of lipid metabolic enzymes in Golgi membrane remodeling is a subject of intense interest. Now, in this issue, Schmidt and Brown (2009. J. Cell Biol. doi:10.1083/jcb.200904147) report that lysophosphatidic acid?specific acyltransferase, LPAAT3, contributes to Golgi membrane dynamics by suppressing tubule formation.

  8. Biogenesis of the demarcation membrane system (DMS) in megakaryocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckly, A.; Heijnen, H.F.G.; Pertuy, F.; Geerts, W.J.C.; Proamer, F.; Rinckel, J.Y.; Leon, C.; Lanza, F; Gachet, C.

    2014-01-01

    The demarcation membrane system (DMS) in megakaryocytes forms the plasma membrane (PM) of future platelets. Using confocal microscopy, electron tomography, and large volume focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), we determined the sequential steps of DMS formation. We identified a

  9. Distribution of Basement Membrane Molecules, Laminin and Collagen Type IV, in Normal and Degenerated Cartilage Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Toh, Wei Seong; Gomoll, Andreas H; Olsen, Bjørn Reino; Spector, Myron

    2014-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence and distribution of 2 basement membrane (BM) molecules, laminin and collagen type IV, in healthy and degenerative cartilage tissues. Normal and degenerated tissues were obtained from goats and humans, including articular knee cartilage, the intervertebral disc, and meniscus. Normal tissue was also obtained from patella-tibial enthesis in goats. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using anti-laminin and anti-collagen type IV antibodies. Human and goat skin were used as positive controls. The percentage of cells displaying the pericellular presence of the protein was graded semiquantitatively. When present, laminin and collagen type IV were exclusively found in the pericellular matrix, and in a discrete layer on the articulating surface of normal articular cartilage. In normal articular (hyaline) cartilage in the human and goat, the proteins were found co-localized pericellularly. In contrast, in human osteoarthritic articular cartilage, collagen type IV but not laminin was found in the pericellular region. Nonpathological fibrocartilaginous tissues from the goat, including the menisci and the enthesis, were also positive for both laminin and collagen type IV pericellularly. In degenerated fibrocartilage, including intervertebral disc, as in degenerated hyaline cartilage only collagen type IV was found pericellularly around chondrocytes but with less intense staining than in non-degenerated tissue. In calcified cartilage, some cells were positive for laminin but not type IV collagen. We report differences in expression of the BM molecules, laminin and collagen type IV, in normal and degenerative cartilaginous tissues from adult humans and goats. In degenerative tissues laminin is depleted from the pericellular matrix before collagen type IV. The findings may inform future studies of the processes underlying cartilage degeneration and the functional roles of these 2 extracellular matrix proteins

  10. Distribution of Basement Membrane Molecules, Laminin and Collagen Type IV, in Normal and Degenerated Cartilage Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Wei Seong; Gomoll, Andreas H.; Olsen, Bjørn Reino; Spector, Myron

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence and distribution of 2 basement membrane (BM) molecules, laminin and collagen type IV, in healthy and degenerative cartilage tissues. Design: Normal and degenerated tissues were obtained from goats and humans, including articular knee cartilage, the intervertebral disc, and meniscus. Normal tissue was also obtained from patella-tibial enthesis in goats. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using anti-laminin and anti–collagen type IV antibodies. Human and goat skin were used as positive controls. The percentage of cells displaying the pericellular presence of the protein was graded semiquantitatively. Results: When present, laminin and collagen type IV were exclusively found in the pericellular matrix, and in a discrete layer on the articulating surface of normal articular cartilage. In normal articular (hyaline) cartilage in the human and goat, the proteins were found co-localized pericellularly. In contrast, in human osteoarthritic articular cartilage, collagen type IV but not laminin was found in the pericellular region. Nonpathological fibrocartilaginous tissues from the goat, including the menisci and the enthesis, were also positive for both laminin and collagen type IV pericellularly. In degenerated fibrocartilage, including intervertebral disc, as in degenerated hyaline cartilage only collagen type IV was found pericellularly around chondrocytes but with less intense staining than in non-degenerated tissue. In calcified cartilage, some cells were positive for laminin but not type IV collagen. Conclusions: We report differences in expression of the BM molecules, laminin and collagen type IV, in normal and degenerative cartilaginous tissues from adult humans and goats. In degenerative tissues laminin is depleted from the pericellular matrix before collagen type IV. The findings may inform future studies of the processes underlying cartilage degeneration and the functional

  11. Up-regulated expression of cartilage intermediate-layer protein and ANK in articular hyaline cartilage from patients with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Jun; Ryan, Lawrence M; Masuda, Ikuko

    2002-12-01

    Excess accumulation of extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (ePPi) in aged human cartilage is crucial in calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal formation in cartilage matrix. Two sources of ePPi are ePPi-generating ectoenzymes (NTPPPH) and extracellular transport of intracellular PPi by ANK. This study was undertaken to evaluate the role of NTPPPH and ANK in ePPi elaboration, by investigating expression of NTPPPH enzymes (cartilage intermediate-layer protein [CILP] and plasma cell membrane glycoprotein 1 [PC-1]) and ANK in human chondrocytes from osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilage containing CPPD crystals and without crystals. Chondrocytes were harvested from knee cartilage at the time of arthroplasty (OA with CPPD crystals [CPPD], n = 8; OA without crystals [OA], n = 10). Normal adult human chondrocytes (n = 1) were used as a control. Chondrocytes were cultured with transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1), which stimulates ePPi elaboration, and/or insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), which inhibits ePPi elaboration. NTPPPH and ePPi were measured in the media at 48 hours. Media CILP, PC-1, and ANK were determined by dot-immunoblot analysis. Chondrocyte messenger RNA (mRNA) was extracted for reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to study expression of mRNA for CILP, PC-1, and ANK. NTPPPH and ANK mRNA and protein were also studied in fresh frozen cartilage. Basal ePPi elaboration and NTPPPH activity in conditioned media from CPPD chondrocytes were elevated compared with normal chondrocytes, and tended to be higher compared with OA chondrocytes. Basal expression of mRNA for CILP (chondrocytes) and ANK (cartilage) was higher in both CPPD chondrocytes and CPPD cartilage extract than in OA or normal samples. PC-1 mRNA was less abundant in CPPD chondrocytes and cartilage extract than in OA chondrocytes and extract, although the difference was not significant. CILP, PC-1, and ANK protein levels were similar in CPPD, OA, and normal chondrocytes

  12. The Physical Properties of Ceramides in Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Félix M

    2018-05-20

    Ceramides are sphingolipids containing a sphingosine or a related base, to which a fatty acid is linked through an amide bond. When incorporated into a lipid bilayer, ceramides exhibit a number of properties not shared by almost any other membrane lipid: Ceramides ( a) are extremely hydrophobic and thus cannot exist in suspension in aqueous media; ( b) increase the molecular order (rigidity) of phospholipids in membranes; ( c) give rise to lateral phase separation and domain formation in phospholipid bilayers; ( d) possess a marked intrinsic negative curvature that facilitates formation of inverted hexagonal phases; ( e) make bilayers and cell membranes permeable to small and large (i.e., protein-size) solutes; and ( f) promote transmembrane (flip-flop) lipid motion. Unfortunately, there is hardly any link between the physical studies reviewed here and the mass of biological and clinical studies on the effects of ceramides in health and disease.

  13. Separation membrane development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.W. [Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A ceramic membrane has been developed to separate hydrogen from other gases. The method used is a sol-gel process. A thin layer of dense ceramic material is coated on a coarse ceramic filter substrate. The pore size distribution in the thin layer is controlled by a densification of the coating materials by heat treatment. The membrane has been tested by permeation measurement of the hydrogen and other gases. Selectivity of the membrane has been achieved to separate hydrogen from carbon monoxide. The permeation rate of hydrogen through the ceramic membrane was about 20 times larger than Pd-Ag membrane.

  14. Block copolymer membranes for aqueous solution applications

    KAUST Repository

    Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2016-03-22

    Block copolymers are known for their intricate morphology. We review the state of the art of block copolymer membranes and discuss perspectives in this field. The main focus is on pore morphology tuning with a short introduction on non-porous membranes. The two main strategies for pore formation in block copolymer membranes are (i) film casting and selective block sacrifice and (ii) self-assembly and non-solvent induced phase separation (SNIPS). Different fundamental aspects involved in the manufacture of block copolymer membranes are considered, including factors affecting the equilibrium morphology in solid films, self-assembly of copolymer in solutions and macrophase separation by solvent-non-solvent exchange. Different mechanisms are proposed for different depths of the SNIPS membrane. Block copolymer membranes can be prepared with much narrower pore size distribution than homopolymer membranes. Open questions and indications of what we consider the next development steps are finally discussed. They include the synthesis and application of new copolymers and specific functionalization, adding characteristics to respond to stimuli and chemical environment, polymerization-induced phase separation, and the manufacture of organic-inorganic hybrids.

  15. Block copolymer membranes for aqueous solution applications

    KAUST Repository

    Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Block copolymers are known for their intricate morphology. We review the state of the art of block copolymer membranes and discuss perspectives in this field. The main focus is on pore morphology tuning with a short introduction on non-porous membranes. The two main strategies for pore formation in block copolymer membranes are (i) film casting and selective block sacrifice and (ii) self-assembly and non-solvent induced phase separation (SNIPS). Different fundamental aspects involved in the manufacture of block copolymer membranes are considered, including factors affecting the equilibrium morphology in solid films, self-assembly of copolymer in solutions and macrophase separation by solvent-non-solvent exchange. Different mechanisms are proposed for different depths of the SNIPS membrane. Block copolymer membranes can be prepared with much narrower pore size distribution than homopolymer membranes. Open questions and indications of what we consider the next development steps are finally discussed. They include the synthesis and application of new copolymers and specific functionalization, adding characteristics to respond to stimuli and chemical environment, polymerization-induced phase separation, and the manufacture of organic-inorganic hybrids.

  16. Role for chlamydial inclusion membrane proteins in inclusion membrane structure and biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Mital

    Full Text Available The chlamydial inclusion membrane is extensively modified by the insertion of type III secreted effector proteins. These inclusion membrane proteins (Incs are exposed to the cytosol and share a common structural feature of a long, bi-lobed hydrophobic domain but little or no primary amino acid sequence similarity. Based upon secondary structural predictions, over 50 putative inclusion membrane proteins have been identified in Chlamydia trachomatis. Only a limited number of biological functions have been defined and these are not shared between chlamydial species. Here we have ectopically expressed several C. trachomatis Incs in HeLa cells and find that they induce the formation of morphologically distinct membranous vesicular compartments. Formation of these vesicles requires the bi-lobed hydrophobic domain as a minimum. No markers for various cellular organelles were observed in association with these vesicles. Lipid probes were incorporated by the Inc-induced vesicles although the lipids incorporated were dependent upon the specific Inc expressed. Co-expression of Inc pairs indicated that some colocalized in the same vesicle, others partially overlapped, and others did not associate at all. Overall, it appears that Incs may have an intrinsic ability to induce membrane formation and that individual Incs can induce membranous structures with unique properties.

  17. The electrolysis time on electrosynthesis of hydroxyapatite with bipolar membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Adrian; Jumari, Arif; Budiman, Anatta Wahyu; Puspitaningtyas, Stella Febianti; Cahyaningrum, Suci; Nazriati, Nazriati; Fajaroh, Fauziatul

    2018-02-01

    The electrochemical method with bipolar membrane has been successfully used for the synthesis of hydroxyapatite. In this work, we have developed 2 chambers electrolysis system separated by a bipolar membrane. The membrane was used to separate cations (H+ ions produced by the oxidation of water at the anode) and anions (OH- ions produced by the reduction of water at the cathode). With this system, we have designed that OH- ions still stay in the anions chamber because OH- ions was very substantial in the hydroxyapatite particles formation. The aim of this paper was to compare the electrolysis time on electrosynthesis of hydroxyapatite with and without the bipolar membrane. The electrosynthesis was performed at 500 mA/cm2 for 0.5 to 2 hours at room temperature and under ultrasonic cleaner to void agglomeration with and without the bipolar membrane. The electrosynthesis of hydroxyapatite with the bipolar membrane more effective than without the bipolar membrane. The hydroxyapatite has been appeared at 0.5 h of the electrolysis time with the bipolar membrane (at the cathode chamber) while it hasn't been seen without the bipolar membrane. The bipolar membrane prevents OH- ions migrate to the cation chamber. The formation of HA becomes more effective because OH- ions just formed HA particle.

  18. Clustering on Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannes, Ludger; Pezeshkian, Weria; Ipsen, John H

    2018-01-01

    Clustering of extracellular ligands and proteins on the plasma membrane is required to perform specific cellular functions, such as signaling and endocytosis. Attractive forces that originate in perturbations of the membrane's physical properties contribute to this clustering, in addition to direct...... protein-protein interactions. However, these membrane-mediated forces have not all been equally considered, despite their importance. In this review, we describe how line tension, lipid depletion, and membrane curvature contribute to membrane-mediated clustering. Additional attractive forces that arise...... from protein-induced perturbation of a membrane's fluctuations are also described. This review aims to provide a survey of the current understanding of membrane-mediated clustering and how this supports precise biological functions....

  19. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become

  20. Membrane processes in nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrzewska-Trznadel, G.

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of radioactive wastes is necessary taking into account the potential hazard of radioactive substances to human health and surrounding environment. The choice of appropriate technology depends on capital and operational costs, wastes amount and their characteristics, appointed targets of the process, e.g. the values of decontamination factors and volume reduction coefficients. The conventional technologies applied for radioactive waste processing, such as precipitation coupled with sedimentation, ion exchange and evaporation have many drawbacks. These include high energy consumption and formation of secondary wastes, e.g. the sludge from sediment tanks, spent ion exchange adsorbents and regeneration solutions. There are also many limitations of such processes, i.e. foaming and drop entrainment in evaporators, loses of solvents and production of secondary wastes in solvent extraction or bed clogging in ion exchange columns. Membrane processes as the newest achievement of the process engineering can successfully supersede many non-effective, out-of-date methods. But in some instances they can also complement these methods whilst improving the parameters of effluents and purification economy. This monograph presents own research data on the application of recent achievements in the area of membrane processes for solving selected problems in nuclear technology. Relatively big space was devoted to the use of membrane processing of low and intermediate radioactive liquid wastes because of numerous applications of these processes in nuclear centres over the world and also because of the interests of the author that was reflected by her recent research projects and activity. This work presents a review on the membrane methods recently introduced into the nuclear technology against the background of the other, commonly applied separation techniques, with indications of the possibilities and prospects for their further developments. Particular attention was paid

  1. Membrane raft association is a determinant of plasma membrane localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Rohrer, Blanca B; Levental, Kandice R; Simons, Kai; Levental, Ilya

    2014-06-10

    The lipid raft hypothesis proposes lateral domains driven by preferential interactions between sterols, sphingolipids, and specific proteins as a central mechanism for the regulation of membrane structure and function; however, experimental limitations in defining raft composition and properties have prevented unequivocal demonstration of their functional relevance. Here, we establish a quantitative, functional relationship between raft association and subcellular protein sorting. By systematic mutation of the transmembrane and juxtamembrane domains of a model transmembrane protein, linker for activation of T-cells (LAT), we generated a panel of variants possessing a range of raft affinities. These mutations revealed palmitoylation, transmembrane domain length, and transmembrane sequence to be critical determinants of membrane raft association. Moreover, plasma membrane (PM) localization was strictly dependent on raft partitioning across the entire panel of unrelated mutants, suggesting that raft association is necessary and sufficient for PM sorting of LAT. Abrogation of raft partitioning led to mistargeting to late endosomes/lysosomes because of a failure to recycle from early endosomes. These findings identify structural determinants of raft association and validate lipid-driven domain formation as a mechanism for endosomal protein sorting.

  2. Improved surface property of PVDF membrane with amphiphilic zwitterionic copolymer as membrane additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianhua; Li Mizi; Miao Jing; Wang Jiabin; Shao Xisheng; Zhang Qiqing

    2012-01-01

    An attempt to improve hydrophilicity and anti-fouling properties of PVDF membranes, a novel amphiphilic zwitterionic copolymer poly(vinylidene fluoride)-graft-poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PVDF-g-PSBMA) was firstly synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and used as amphiphilic copolymer additive in the preparation of PVDF membranes. The PVDF-g-PSBMA/PVDF blend membranes were prepared by immersion precipitation process. Fourier transform infrared attenuated reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy (XPS) measurements confirmed that PSBMA brushes from amphiphilic additives were preferentially segregated to membrane-coagulant interface during membrane formation. The morphology of membranes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Water contact angle measurements showed that the surface hydrophilicity of PVDF membranes was improved significantly with the increasing of amphiphilic copolymer PVDF-g-PSBMA in cast solution. Protein static adsorption experiment and dynamic fouling resistance experiment revealed that the surface enrichment of PSBMA brush endowed PVDF blend membrane great improvement of surface anti-fouling ability.

  3. Flux recovery of ceramic tubular membranes fouled with whey proteins: Some aspects of membrane cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Svetlana S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of membrane processes is greatly affected by the flux reduction due to the deposits formation at the surface and/or in the pores of the membrane. Efficiency of membrane processes is affected by cleaning procedure applied to regenerate flux. In this work, flux recovery of ceramic tubular membranes with 50 and 200 nm pore size was investigated. The membranes were fouled with reconstituted whey solution for 1 hour. After that, the membranes were rinsed with clean water and then cleaned with sodium hydroxide solutions or formulated detergents (combination of P3 Ultrasil 67 and P3 Ultrasil 69. Flux recovery after the rinsing step was not satisfactory although fouling resistance reduction was significant so that chemical cleaning was necessary. In the case of 50 nm membrane total flux recovery was achieved after cleaning with 1.0% (w/w sodium hydroxide solution. In the case of 200 nm membrane total flux recovery was not achieved irrespective of the cleaning agent choice and concentration. Cleaning with commercial detergent was less efficient than cleaning with the sodium hydroxide solution.

  4. Improved surface property of PVDF membrane with amphiphilic zwitterionic copolymer as membrane additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Jianhua, E-mail: jhli_2005@163.com [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350001 (China); Li Mizi; Miao Jing; Wang Jiabin; Shao Xisheng [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350001 (China); Zhang Qiqing, E-mail: zhangqiq@126.com [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350001 (China) and Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300192 (China)

    2012-06-15

    An attempt to improve hydrophilicity and anti-fouling properties of PVDF membranes, a novel amphiphilic zwitterionic copolymer poly(vinylidene fluoride)-graft-poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PVDF-g-PSBMA) was firstly synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and used as amphiphilic copolymer additive in the preparation of PVDF membranes. The PVDF-g-PSBMA/PVDF blend membranes were prepared by immersion precipitation process. Fourier transform infrared attenuated reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy (XPS) measurements confirmed that PSBMA brushes from amphiphilic additives were preferentially segregated to membrane-coagulant interface during membrane formation. The morphology of membranes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Water contact angle measurements showed that the surface hydrophilicity of PVDF membranes was improved significantly with the increasing of amphiphilic copolymer PVDF-g-PSBMA in cast solution. Protein static adsorption experiment and dynamic fouling resistance experiment revealed that the surface enrichment of PSBMA brush endowed PVDF blend membrane great improvement of surface anti-fouling ability.

  5. Probing lipid membrane electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi

    The electrostatic properties of lipid bilayer membranes play a significant role in many biological processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is highly sensitive to membrane surface potential in electrolyte solutions. With fully characterized probe tips, AFM can perform quantitative electrostatic analysis of lipid membranes. Electrostatic interactions between Silicon nitride probes and supported zwitterionic dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayer with a variable fraction of anionic dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) were measured by AFM. Classical Gouy-Chapman theory was used to model the membrane electrostatics. The nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation was numerically solved with finite element method to provide the potential distribution around the AFM tips. Theoretical tip-sample electrostatic interactions were calculated with the surface integral of both Maxwell and osmotic stress tensors on tip surface. The measured forces were interpreted with theoretical forces and the resulting surface charge densities of the membrane surfaces were in quantitative agreement with the Gouy-Chapman-Stern model of membrane charge regulation. It was demonstrated that the AFM can quantitatively detect membrane surface potential at a separation of several screening lengths, and that the AFM probe only perturbs the membrane surface potential by external field created by the internai membrane dipole moment. The analysis yields a dipole moment of 1.5 Debye per lipid with a dipole potential of +275 mV for supported DOPC membranes. This new ability to quantitatively measure the membrane dipole density in a noninvasive manner will be useful in identifying the biological effects of the dipole potential. Finally, heterogeneous model membranes were studied with fluid electric force microscopy (FEFM). Electrostatic mapping was demonstrated with 50 nm resolution. The capabilities of quantitative electrostatic measurement and lateral charge density mapping make AFM a unique and powerful

  6. Emulsification using microporous membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran T. Vladisavljević

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Membrane emulsification is a process of injecting a pure dispersed phase or pre-emulsion through a microporous membrane into the continuous phase. As a result of the immiscibility of the two phases, droplets of the dispersed phase are formed at the outlets of membrane pores. The droplets formed in the process are removed from the membrane surface by applying cross-flow or stirring of the continuous phase or using a dynamic (rotating or vibrating membrane. The most commonly used membrane for emulsification is the Shirasu Porous Glass (SPG membrane, fabricated through spinodal decomposition in a melt consisting of Japanese volcanic ash (Shirasu, boric acid and calcium carbonate. Microsieve membranes are increasingly popular as an alternative to highly tortuous glass and ceramic membranes. Microsieves are usually fabricated from nickel by photolithography and electroplating or they can be manufactured from silicon nitride via Reactive Ion Etching (RIE. An advantage of microsieves compared to the SPG membrane is in much higher transmembrane fluxes and higher tolerance to fouling by the emulsion ingredients due to the existence of short, straight through pores. Unlike conventional emulsification devices such as high-pressure valve homogenisers and rotor-stator devices, membrane emulsification devices permit a precise control over the mean pore size over a wide range and during the process insignificant amount of energy is dissipated as heat. The drop size is primarily determined by the pore size, but it depends also on other parameters, such as membrane wettability, emulsion formulation, shear stress on the membrane surface, transmembrane pressure, etc.

  7. Does Chlorination of Seawater Reverse Osmosis Membranes Control Biofouling?

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq; Hong, Pei-Ying; Nada, Nabil; Croue, Jean Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full–scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations.

  8. Does Chlorination of Seawater Reverse Osmosis Membranes Control Biofouling?

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq

    2015-04-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full–scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations.

  9. Peripheral myelin protein 22 alters membrane architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittendorf, Kathleen F.; Marinko, Justin T.; Hampton, Cheri M.; Ke, Zunlong; Hadziselimovic, Arina; Schlebach, Jonathan P.; Law, Cheryl L.; Li, Jun; Wright, Elizabeth R.; Sanders, Charles R.; Ohi, Melanie D.

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) is highly expressed in myelinating Schwann cells of the peripheral nervous system. PMP22 genetic alterations cause the most common forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTD), which is characterized by severe dysmyelination in the peripheral nerves. However, the functions of PMP22 in Schwann cell membranes remain unclear. We demonstrate that reconstitution of purified PMP22 into lipid vesicles results in the formation of compressed and cylindrically wrapped protein-lipid vesicles that share common organizational traits with compact myelin of peripheral nerves in vivo. The formation of these myelin-like assemblies depends on the lipid-to-PMP22 ratio, as well as on the PMP22 extracellular loops. Formation of the myelin-like assemblies is disrupted by a CMTD-causing mutation. This study provides both a biochemical assay for PMP22 function and evidence that PMP22 directly contributes to membrane organization in compact myelin. PMID:28695207

  10. Chapter 6: cubic membranes the missing dimension of cell membrane organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almsherqi, Zakaria A; Landh, Tomas; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Deng, Yuru

    2009-01-01

    Biological membranes are among the most fascinating assemblies of biomolecules: a bilayer less than 10 nm thick, composed of rather small lipid molecules that are held together simply by noncovalent forces, defines the cell and discriminates between "inside" and "outside", survival, and death. Intracellular compartmentalization-governed by biomembranes as well-is a characteristic fe