WorldWideScience

Sample records for hvsal1 gene regulation

  1. Combinatorial Gene Regulation Using Auto-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, Rutger; Ursem, Bas; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2010-01-01

    As many as 59% of the transcription factors in Escherichia coli regulate the transcription rate of their own genes. This suggests that auto-regulation has one or more important functions. Here, one possible function is studied. Often the transcription rate of an auto-regulator is also controlled by additional transcription factors. In these cases, the way the expression of the auto-regulator responds to changes in the concentrations of the “input” regulators (the response function) is obviously affected by the auto-regulation. We suggest that, conversely, auto-regulation may be used to optimize this response function. To test this hypothesis, we use an evolutionary algorithm and a chemical–physical model of transcription regulation to design model cis-regulatory constructs with predefined response functions. In these simulations, auto-regulation can evolve if this provides a functional benefit. When selecting for a series of elementary response functions—Boolean logic gates and linear responses—the cis-regulatory regions resulting from the simulations indeed often exploit auto-regulation. Surprisingly, the resulting constructs use auto-activation rather than auto-repression. Several design principles show up repeatedly in the simulation results. They demonstrate how auto-activation can be used to generate sharp, switch-like activation and repression circuits and how linearly decreasing response functions can be obtained. Auto-repression, on the other hand, resulted only when a high response speed or a suppression of intrinsic noise was also selected for. The results suggest that, while auto-repression may primarily be valuable to improve the dynamical properties of regulatory circuits, auto-activation is likely to evolve even when selection acts on the shape of response function only. PMID:20548950

  2. Nongenomic regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Monk, David

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the recent advances in epigenetic regulation and chromatin biology for a better understanding of gene regulation related to human disease. Alterations to chromatin influence genomic function, including gene transcription. At its most simple level, this involves DNA methylation and posttranscriptional histone modifications. However, recent developments in biochemical and molecular techniques have revealed that transcriptional regulation is far more complex, involving combinations of histone modifications and discriminating transcription factor binding, and long-range chromatin loops with enhancers, to generate a multifaceted code. Here, we describe the most recent advances, culminating in the example of genomic imprinting, the parent-of-origin monoallelic expression that utilizes the majority of these mechanisms to attain one active and one repressed allele. It is becoming increasingly evident that epigenetic mechanisms work in unison to maintain tight control of gene expression and genome function. With the wealth of knowledge gained from recent molecular studies, future goals should focus on the application of this information in deciphering their role in developmental diseases.

  3. miRNA regulation of cytokine genes

    OpenAIRE

    Asirvatham, Ananthi J.; Magner, William J.; Tomasi, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we discuss specific examples of regulation of cytokine genes and focus on a new mechanism involving post-transcriptional regulation via miRNAs. The post-transcriptional regulation of cytokine genes via the destabilizing activity of AU-rich elements [AREs] and miRNAs is a pre-requisite for regulating the half-life of many cytokines and achieving the temporal and spatial distributions required for regulation of these genes.

  4. Gene regulation by mechanical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwole, B. O.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Endothelial cells are subjected to various mechanical forces in vivo from the flow of blood across the luminal surface of the blood vessel. The purpose of this review was to examine the data available on how these mechanical forces, in particular cyclic strain, affect the expression and regulation of endothelial cell function. Studies from various investigators using models of cyclic strain in vitro have shown that various vasoactive mediators such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin are induced by the effect of mechanical deformation, and that the expression of these mediators may be regulated at the transcription level by mechanical forces. There also seems to be emerging evidence that endothelial cells may also act as mechanotransducers, whereby the transmission of external forces induces various cytoskeletal changes and second messenger cascades. Furthermore, it seems these forces may act on specific response elements of promoter genes.

  5. Mathematical Models of Gene Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Michael C.

    2004-03-01

    This talk will focus on examples of mathematical models for the regulation of repressible operons (e.g. the tryptophan operon), inducible operons (e.g. the lactose operon), and the lysis/lysogeny switch in phage λ. These ``simple" gene regulatory elements can display characteristics experimentally of rapid response to perturbations and bistability, and biologically accurate mathematical models capture these aspects of the dynamics. The models, if realistic, are always nonlinear and contain significant time delays due to transcriptional and translational delays that pose substantial problems for the analysis of the possible ranges of dynamics.

  6. QB1 - Stochastic Gene Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munsky, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-23

    Summaries of this presentation are: (1) Stochastic fluctuations or 'noise' is present in the cell - Random motion and competition between reactants, Low copy, quantization of reactants, Upstream processes; (2) Fluctuations may be very important - Cell-to-cell variability, Cell fate decisions (switches), Signal amplification or damping, stochastic resonances; and (3) Some tools are available to mode these - Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (SSA and variants), Moment approximation methods, Finite State Projection. We will see how modeling these reactions can tell us more about the underlying processes of gene regulation.

  7. Dynamics of bacterial gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Atul

    2009-03-01

    The phenomenon of diauxic growth is a classical problem of bacterial gene regulation. The most well studied example of this phenomenon is the glucose-lactose diauxie, which occurs because the expression of the lac operon is strongly repressed in the presence of glucose. This repression is often explained by appealing to molecular mechanisms such as cAMP activation and inducer exclusion. I will begin by analyzing data showing that these molecular mechanisms cannot explain the strong lac repression because they exert a relatively weak effect. I will then present a minimal model accounting only for enzyme induction and dilution, which yields strong repression despite the absence of catabolite repression and inducer exclusion. The model also explains the growth patterns observed in batch and continuous cultures of various bacterial strains and substrate mixtures. The talk will conclude with a discussion of the experimental evidence regarding positive feedback, the key component of the minimal model.

  8. Identification of let-7-regulated oncofetal genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyerinas, Benjamin; Park, Sun-Mi; Shomron, Noam

    2008-01-01

    -regulated at the end of embryonic development. Let-7 is often down-regulated early during cancer development, suggesting that let-7-regulated oncofetal genes (LOG) may become reexpressed in cancer cells. Using comparative bioinformatics, we have identified 12 conserved LOGs that include HMGA2 and IMP-1/CRD-BP. IMP-1...

  9. Regulation of gene expression by retinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, P M; Eichmüller, S B; Schmidt, J; Bazhin, A V

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin A serves as substrate for the biosynthesis of several derivates (retinoids) which are important for cell growth and cell differentiation as well as for vision. Retinoic acid is the major physiologically active form of vitamin A regulating the expression of different genes. At present, hundreds of genes are known to be regulated by retinoic acid. This regulation is very complex and is, in turn, regulated on many levels. To date, two families of retinoid nuclear receptors have been identified: retinoic acid receptors and retinoid X receptors, which are members of the steroid hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. In order to regulate gene expression, all-trans retinal needs to be oxidized to retinoic acid. All-trans retinal, in turn, can be produced during oxidation of all-trans retinol or in a retinol-independent metabolic pathway through cleavage of β-carotene with all-trans retinal as an intermediate metabolite. Recently it has been shown that not only retinoic acid is an active form of vitamin A, but also that all-trans retinal can play an important role in gene regulation. In this review we comprehensively summarize recent literature on regulation of gene expression by retinoids, biochemistry of retinoid receptors, and molecular mechanisms of retinoid-mediated effects on gene regulation.

  10. Gene Regulation Networks for Modeling Drosophila Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjolsness, E.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter will very briefly introduce and review some computational experiments in using trainable gene regulation network models to simulate and understand selected episodes in the development of the fruit fly, Drosophila Melanogaster.

  11. Epigenetic control of gene regulation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauria, Massimiliano; Rossi, Vincenzo

    2011-08-01

    In eukaryotes, including plants, the genome is compacted into chromatin, which forms a physical barrier for gene transcription. Therefore, mechanisms that alter chromatin structure play an essential role in gene regulation. When changes in the chromatin states are inherited trough mitotic or meiotic cell division, the mechanisms responsible for these changes are defined as epigenetic. In this paper, we review data arising from genome-wide analysis of the epigenetic landscapes in different plant species to establish the correlation between specific epigenetic marks and transcription. In the subsequent sections, mechanisms of epigenetic control of gene regulation mediated by DNA-binding transcription factors and by transposons located in proximity to genes are illustrated. Finally, plant peculiarities for epigenetic control of gene regulation and future perspectives in this research area are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Epigenetic Control of cellular and developmental processes in plants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Genome-wide Analysis of Gene Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun

    IP-seq and small RNA-seq, we delineated the landscape of the promoters with bidirectional transcriptions that yield steady-state RNA in only one directions (Paper III). A subsequent motif analysis enabled us to uncover specific DNA signals – early polyA sites – that make RNA on the reverse strand sensitive......). Gene enrichment analysis on the detected NMD substrates revealed an unappreciated NMD-based regulatory mechanism of the genes hosting multiple intronic snoRNAs, which can facilitate differential expression of individual snoRNAs from a single host gene locus. Finally, supported by RNA-seq and small RNA...... gene regulation will disrupt the cell’s fundamental processes, which in turn can cause disease. Hence, understanding gene regulation is essential for deciphering the code of life. Along with the development of high throughput sequencing (HTS) technology and the subsequent large-scale data analysis...

  13. Gene regulation by MAP kinase cascades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus; Petersen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are signaling modules that transduce extracellular stimuli to a range of cellular responses. Research in yeast and metazoans has shown that MAPK-mediated phosphorylation directly or indirectly regulates the activity of transcription factors. Plant ...... gene expression....

  14. Gene expression regulation in roots under drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiak, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Stress signalling and regulatory networks controlling expression of target genes are the basis of plant response to drought. Roots are the first organs exposed to water deficiency in the soil and are the place of drought sensing. Signalling cascades transfer chemical signals toward the shoot and initiate molecular responses that lead to the biochemical and morphological changes that allow plants to be protected against water loss and to tolerate stress conditions. Here, we present an overview of signalling network and gene expression regulation pathways that are actively induced in roots under drought stress. In particular, the role of several transcription factor (TF) families, including DREB, AP2/ERF, NAC, bZIP, MYC, CAMTA, Alfin-like and Q-type ZFP, in the regulation of root response to drought are highlighted. The information provided includes available data on mutual interactions between these TFs together with their regulation by plant hormones and other signalling molecules. The most significant downstream target genes and molecular processes that are controlled by the regulatory factors are given. These data are also coupled with information about the influence of the described regulatory networks on root traits and root development which may translate to enhanced drought tolerance. This is the first literature survey demonstrating the gene expression regulatory machinery that is induced by drought stress, presented from the perspective of roots. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Stochastic single-gene auto-regulation

    CERN Document Server

    Aquino, Tomás; Nunes, Ana

    2011-01-01

    A detailed stochastic model of single-gene auto-regulation is established and its solutions are explored when mRNA dynamics is fast compared with protein dynamics and in the opposite regime. The model includes all the sources of randomness that are intrinsic to the auto-regulation process. The timescale separation allows the derivation of analytic expressions for the equilibrium distributions of protein and mRNA. These distributions are shown to be well described in the continuous approximation, which is then used to discuss the qualitative features of the protein equilibrium distributions as a function of the biological parameters in the fast mRNA regime.

  16. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  17. The population genetics of cooperative gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Alexander J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in gene regulatory networks drive the evolution of phenotypic diversity both within and between species. Rewiring of transcriptional networks is achieved either by changes to transcription factor binding sites or by changes to the physical interactions among transcription factor proteins. It has been suggested that the evolution of cooperative binding among factors can facilitate the adaptive rewiring of a regulatory network. Results We use a population-genetic model to explore when cooperative binding of transcription factors is favored by evolution, and what effects cooperativity then has on the adaptive re-writing of regulatory networks. We consider a pair of transcription factors that regulate multiple targets and overlap in the sets of target genes they regulate. We show that, under stabilising selection, cooperative binding between the transcription factors is favoured provided the amount of overlap between their target genes exceeds a threshold. The value of this threshold depends on several population-genetic factors: strength of selection on binding sites, cost of pleiotropy associated with protein-protein interactions, rates of mutation and population size. Once it is established, we find that cooperative binding of transcription factors significantly accelerates the adaptive rewiring of transcriptional networks under positive selection. We compare our qualitative predictions to systematic data on Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factors, their binding sites, and their protein-protein interactions. Conclusions Our study reveals a rich set of evolutionary dynamics driven by a tradeoff between the beneficial effects of cooperative binding at targets shared by a pair of factors, and the detrimental effects of cooperative binding for non-shared targets. We find that cooperative regulation will evolve when transcription factors share a sufficient proportion of their target genes. These findings help to

  18. Gene therapy on demand: site specific regulation of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazwa, Agnieszka; Florczyk, Urszula; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2013-08-10

    Since 1990 when the first clinical gene therapy trial was conducted, much attention and considerable promise have been given to this form of treatment. Gene therapy has been used with success in patients suffering from severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes (X-SCID and ADA-deficiency), Leber's congenital amaurosis, hemophilia, β-thalassemia and adrenoleukodystrophy. Last year, the first therapeutic vector (Glybera) for treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency has been registered in the European Union. Nevertheless, there are still several numerous issues that need to be improved to make this technique more safe, effective and easily accessible for patients. Introduction of the therapeutic gene to the given cells should provide the level of expression which will restore the production of therapeutic protein to normal values or will provide therapeutic efficacy despite not fully physiological expression. However, in numerous diseases the expression of therapeutic genes has to be kept at certain level for some time, and then might be required to be switched off to be activated again when worsening of the symptoms may aggravate the risk of disease relapse. In such cases the promoters which are regulated by local conditions may be more required. In this article the special emphasis is to discuss the strategies of regulation of gene expression by endogenous stimuli. Particularly, the hypoxia- or miRNA-regulated vectors offer the possibilities of tight but, at the same time, condition-dependent and cell-specific expression. Such means have been already tested in certain pathophysiological conditions. This creates the chance for the translational approaches required for development of effective treatments of so far incurable diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation of gene expression in human tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archambault Joanne M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic tendon injuries, also known as tendinopathies, are common among professional and recreational athletes. These injuries result in a significant amount of morbidity and health care expenditure, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to tendinopathy. Methods We have used histological evaluation and molecular profiling to determine gene expression changes in 23 human patients undergoing surgical procedures for the treatment of chronic tendinopathy. Results Diseased tendons exhibit altered extracellular matrix, fiber disorientation, increased cellular content and vasculature, and the absence of inflammatory cells. Global gene expression profiling identified 983 transcripts with significantly different expression patterns in the diseased tendons. Global pathway analysis further suggested altered expression of extracellular matrix proteins and the lack of an appreciable inflammatory response. Conclusions Identification of the pathways and genes that are differentially regulated in tendinopathy samples will contribute to our understanding of the disease and the development of novel therapeutics.

  20. Expression regulation of design process gene in product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bo; Fang, Lusheng; Li, Bo

    2011-01-01

    is proposed and analyzed, as well as its three categories i.e., the operator gene, the structural gene and the regulator gene. Second, the trigger mechanism that design objectives and constraints trigger the operator gene is constructed. Third, the expression principle of structural gene is analyzed...... with the example of design management gene. Last, the regulation mode that the regulator gene regulates the expression of the structural gene is established and it is illustrated by taking the design process management gene as an example. © (2011) Trans Tech Publications.......To improve the design process efficiency, this paper proposes the principle and methodology that design process gene controls the characteristics of design process under the framework of design process reuse and optimization based on design process gene. First, the concept of design process gene...

  1. LICORN: learning cooperative regulation networks from gene expression data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elati, Mohamed; Neuvial, Pierre; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique; Barillot, Emmanuel; Radvanyi, François; Rouveirol, Céline

    2007-01-01

    .... The goal is to identify, for each gene expressed in a particular cellular context, the regulators affecting its transcription, and the co-ordination of several regulators in specific types of regulation...

  2. Dietary methanol regulates human gene activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia V Shindyapina

    Full Text Available Methanol (MeOH is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA, which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling.

  3. Dietary Methanol Regulates Human Gene Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  4. Endogenous Methanol Regulates Mammalian Gene Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Shindyapina, Anastasia V.; Silachev, Denis N.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that methanol emitted by wounded plants might function as a signaling molecule for plant-to-plant and plant-to-animal communications. In mammals, methanol is considered a poison because the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) converts methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, the detection of methanol in the blood and exhaled air of healthy volunteers suggests that methanol may be a chemical with specific functions rather than a metabolic waste product. Using a genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain, we demonstrated that an increase in blood methanol concentration led to a change in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes primarily involved in detoxification processes and regulation of the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases gene cluster. To test the role of ADH in the maintenance of low methanol concentration in the plasma, we used the specific ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) and showed that intraperitoneal administration of 4-MP resulted in a significant increase in the plasma methanol, ethanol and formaldehyde concentrations. Removal of the intestine significantly decreased the rate of methanol addition to the plasma and suggested that the gut flora may be involved in the endogenous production of methanol. ADH in the liver was identified as the main enzyme for metabolizing methanol because an increase in the methanol and ethanol contents in the liver homogenate was observed after 4-MP administration into the portal vein. Liver mRNA quantification showed changes in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes involved in cell signalling and detoxification processes. We hypothesized that endogenous methanol acts as a regulator of homeostasis by controlling the mRNA synthesis. PMID:24587296

  5. Fine mapping of gene regions regulating neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Swanberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Damage to nerve cells and axons leading to neurodegeneration is a characteristic feature of many neurological diseases. The degree of genetic influence on susceptibility to axotomy-induced neuronal death has so far been unknown. We have examined two gene regions, Vra1 and Vra2, previously linked to nerve cell loss after ventral root avulsion in a rat F2 intercross between the DA and PVG inbred rat strains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we use two generations (G8 and G10 cohorts of an advanced intercross line between DA and PVG(av1 to reproduce linkage to Vra1 and to fine-map this region. By isolating the effect from Vra1 in congenic strains, we demonstrate that Vra1 significantly regulates the loss of motoneurons after avulsion. The regulatory effect mediated by Vra1 thus resides in a congenic fragment of 9 megabases. Furthermore, we have used the advanced intercross lines to give more support to Vra2, originally detected as a suggestive QTL. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrated here show that naturally occurring allelic variations affect susceptibility to axotomy-induced nerve cell death. Vra1 and Vra2 represent the first quantitative trait loci regulating this phenotype that are characterized and fine mapped in an advanced intercross line. In addition, congenic strains provide experimental evidence for the Vra1 effect on the extent of injury-induced neurodegeneration. Identification of the underlying genetic variations will increase our understanding of the regulation and mechanisms of neurodegeneration.

  6. FRUITING GENES OF SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE ARE TRANSCRIPTIONALLY REGULATED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHUREN, FHJ; VANDERLENDE, TR; WESSELS, JGH

    Fruiting genes in Schizophyllum commune are controlled by the mating-type genes and other regulatory genes. To examine whether differential accumulation of mRNAs for these fruiting genes is caused by transcriptional regulation, run-on transcription assaYs were performed with nuclei isolated from

  7. Classification of topological domains based on gene expression and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingjing; Shi, Hongbo; Ahituv, Nadav

    2013-07-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression is thought to be one of the major forces shaping mammalian gene order. A recent study that used whole-genome chromosome conformation assays has shown that the mammalian genome is divided into specific topological domains that are shared between different tissues and organisms. Here, we wanted to assess whether gene expression and regulation are involved in shaping these domains and can be used to classify them. We analyzed gene expression and regulation levels in these domains by using RNA-seq and enhancer-associated ChIP-seq datasets for 17 different mouse tissues. We found 162 domains that are active (high gene expression and regulation) in all 17 tissues. These domains are significantly shorter, contain less repeats, and have more housekeeping genes. In contrast, we found 29 domains that are inactive (low gene expression and regulation) in all analyzed tissues and are significantly longer, have more repeats, and gene deserts. Tissue-specific active domains showed some correlation with tissue-type and gene ontology. Domain temporal gene regulation and expression differences also displayed some gene ontology terms fitting their temporal function. Combined, our results provide a catalog of shared and tissue-specific topological domains and suggest that gene expression and regulation could have a role in shaping them.

  8. Dissecting specific and global transcriptional regulation of bacterial gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerosa, Luca; Kochanowski, Karl; Heinemann, Matthias; Sauer, Uwe

    Gene expression is regulated by specific transcriptional circuits but also by the global expression machinery as a function of growth. Simultaneous specific and global regulation thus constitutes an additional-but often neglected-layer of complexity in gene expression. Here, we develop an

  9. Polymorphic cis- and trans-regulation of human gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian G Cheung

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Expression levels of human genes vary extensively among individuals. This variation facilitates analyses of expression levels as quantitative phenotypes in genetic studies where the entire genome can be scanned for regulators without prior knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms, thus enabling the identification of unknown regulatory relationships. Here, we carried out such genetic analyses with a large sample size and identified cis- and trans-acting polymorphic regulators for about 1,000 human genes. We validated the cis-acting regulators by demonstrating differential allelic expression with sequencing of transcriptomes (RNA-Seq and the trans-regulators by gene knockdown, metabolic assays, and chromosome conformation capture analysis. The majority of the regulators act in trans to the target (regulated genes. Most of these trans-regulators were not known to play a role in gene expression regulation. The identification of these regulators enabled the characterization of polymorphic regulation of human gene expression at a resolution that was unattainable in the past.

  10. Using gene expression noise to understand gene regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munsky, B.; Neuert, G.; van Oudenaarden, A.

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic variation is ubiquitous in biology and is often traceable to underlying genetic and environmental variation. However, even genetically identical cells in identical environments display variable phenotypes. Stochastic gene expression, or gene expression "noise," has been suggested as a

  11. Trainable Gene Regulation Networks with Applications to Drosophila Pattern Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjolsness, Eric

    2000-01-01

    This chapter will very briefly introduce and review some computational experiments in using trainable gene regulation network models to simulate and understand selected episodes in the development of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. For details the reader is referred to the papers introduced below. It will then introduce a new gene regulation network model which can describe promoter-level substructure in gene regulation. As described in chapter 2, gene regulation may be thought of as a combination of cis-acting regulation by the extended promoter of a gene (including all regulatory sequences) by way of the transcription complex, and of trans-acting regulation by the transcription factor products of other genes. If we simplify the cis-action by using a phenomenological model which can be tuned to data, such as a unit or other small portion of an artificial neural network, then the full transacting interaction between multiple genes during development can be modelled as a larger network which can again be tuned or trained to data. The larger network will in general need to have recurrent (feedback) connections since at least some real gene regulation networks do. This is the basic modeling approach taken, which describes how a set of recurrent neural networks can be used as a modeling language for multiple developmental processes including gene regulation within a single cell, cell-cell communication, and cell division. Such network models have been called "gene circuits", "gene regulation networks", or "genetic regulatory networks", sometimes without distinguishing the models from the actual modeled systems.

  12. The retinoid anticancer signal: mechanisms of target gene regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, T.; Bohlken, A; Kuljaca, S; Lee, M.; Nguyen, T; S.; Smith; Cheung, B; Norris, M D; Haber, M; Holloway, A.J.; Bowtell, D D L; Marshall, G M

    2005-01-01

    Retinoids induce growth arrest, differentiation, and cell death in many cancer cell types. One factor determining the sensitivity or resistance to the retinoid anticancer signal is the transcriptional response of retinoid-regulated target genes in cancer cells. We used cDNA microarray to identify 31 retinoid-regulated target genes shared by two retinoid-sensitive neuroblastoma cell lines, and then sought to determine the relevance of the target gene responses to the retinoid anticancer signal...

  13. Anthocyanin biosynthesis in fruit tree crops: Genes and their regulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Regulatory genes regulate spatiotemporally the structural genes and then form complicated metabolic network. Anthocyanin biosynthesis can be affected by external and internal factors, such as light, UV-B, low temperature and ABA through changes in expression of structural and regulatory genes. Key words: Anthocyanin ...

  14. Comparative analysis of gene expression and regulation of replicative aging associated genes in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhami, Sukhraj Pal Singh; Mittal, Nitish; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Roy, Nilanjan

    2011-02-01

    Aging is a multi-factorial and complex phenomenon. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is developed as a model of aging and has been widely studied in order to understand the mechanism of lifespan regulation. A large number of high-throughput studies were conducted to identify the genes which modulate lifespan. These studies provide the list of genes that regulates the lifespan in yeast; however the regulation of these aging associated genes had not been fully understood. In this study, we have shown that deletion of the genes which increase the replicative lifespan (RLS) of yeast show discrete expression patterns when compared with the genes that, on deletion, cause a decrease in lifespan. Expression of longlived (LL) genes decreases as the cell progresses from mid log to stationary phase, whereas expression of shortlived (SL) genes remains unchanged. This distinct expression of LL and SL gene-sets suggests their differential gene regulation. Further analysis of transcriptional regulation by transcription factors and epigenetic regulators (acetylation and methylation) suggests that this differential expression of the two gene-sets is due to their differential epigenetic regulations, rather than regulation by transcription factors. These results accentuate the importance of epigenetic modifications in aging. We deduce that future focused studies on epigenetic modification regulation will help lead to a better understanding of the aging process.

  15. Discover Gene Specific Local Co-Regulations from Time-Course Gene Expression Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Discovering gene co-regulatory relationships is one of most important research in DNA microarray data analysis. The problem of gene specific co-regulation discovery is to, for a particular gene of interest (called target gene, identify the condition subsets where strong gene co-regulations of the target gene are observed and its co-regulated genes in these condition subsets. The co-regulations are local in the sense that they occur in some subsets of full experimental conditions. The study on this problem can contribute to better understanding and characterizing the target gene during the biological activity involved. In this paper, we propose an innovative method for finding gene specific co-regulations using genetic algorithm (GA. A sliding window is used to delimit the allowed length of conditions in which gene co-regulations occur and an ad hoc GA, called the progressive GA, is performed in each window position to find those condition subsets having high fitness. It is called progressive because the initial population for the GA in a window position inherits the top-ranked individuals obtained in its preceding window position, enabling the GA to achieve a better accuracy than the non-progressive algorithm. kNN Lookup Table is utilized to substantially speed up fitness evaluation in the GA. Experimental results with a real-life gene expression data demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of our technique in discovering gene specific co-regulations.

  16. Pharmacogenomics genes show varying perceptibility to microRNA regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Vinther, Jeppe; Shomron, Noam

    2011-01-01

    The aim of pharmacogenomics is to identify individual differences in genome and transcriptome composition and their effect on drug efficacy. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate expression of the majority of animal genes, including many genes involved in drug...... efficacy. Consequently, differences in the miRNA expression among individuals could be an important factor contributing to differential drug response. Pharmacogenomics genes can be divided into drug target genes termed as pharmacodynamics genes (PD) and genes involved in drug transport and metabolism...... termed as pharmacokinetics genes (PK). To clarify the regulatory potential of miRNAs in pharmacogenomics, we have examined the potential regulation by miRNAs of PK and PD genes....

  17. Epigenetic regulation of monoallelic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Hiroshi; Takayama, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    Monoallelic expression from biallelic genes is frequently observed in diploid eukaryotic organisms. Classic examples of this phenomenon include the well-characterized cases of genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. However, recent studies have shown that monoallelic expression is widespread in autosomal genes. This discovery was met with great interest because it represents another mechanism to generate diversity in gene expression that can affect cell fate and physiology. To date, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are largely unknown. In our original study describing the dominant ⁄ recessive relationships of pollen- determinant alleles in Brassica self-incompatibility, we found that the recessive allele was specifically methylated and silenced through the action of small RNA derived from the dominant allele. In this review, we focus on recent studies of monoallelic expression in autosomal genes, and discuss the possible mechanisms driving this form of monoallelic gene suppression.

  18. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loss, Leandro A; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Durinck, Steffen; Nautiyal, Shivani; Flaucher, Diane; Carlton, Victoria EH; Moorhead, Martin; Lu, Yontao; Gray, Joe W; Faham, Malek; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-05-04

    Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP). The pipeline (i) reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii) associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii) ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i) methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii) methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between methylation profles and gene expression in the

  19. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yontao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP. The pipeline (i reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Results Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between

  20. A Discovery Lab for Studying Gene Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Presents a laboratory in which students are provided with cultures of three bacterial strains. Using the results, students will determine which of the strains corresponds to a mutant lacking a particular functional gene. (DDR)

  1. Expression profiling of genes regulated by TGF-beta: Differential regulation in normal and tumour cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Takashi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGF-beta is one of the key cytokines implicated in various disease processes including cancer. TGF-beta inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis in normal epithelial cells and in contrast, acts as a pro-tumour cytokine by promoting tumour angiogenesis, immune-escape and metastasis. It is not clear if various actions of TGF-beta on normal and tumour cells are due to differential gene regulations. Hence we studied the regulation of gene expression by TGF-beta in normal and cancer cells. Results Using human 19 K cDNA microarrays, we show that 1757 genes are exclusively regulated by TGF-beta in A549 cells in contrast to 733 genes exclusively regulated in HPL1D cells. In addition, 267 genes are commonly regulated in both the cell-lines. Semi-quantitative and real-time qRT-PCR analysis of some genes agrees with the microarray data. In order to identify the signalling pathways that influence TGF-beta mediated gene regulation, we used specific inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase, ERK kinase, JNK kinase and integrin signalling pathways. The data suggest that regulation of majority of the selected genes is dependent on at least one of these pathways and this dependence is cell-type specific. Interestingly, an integrin pathway inhibitor, RGD peptide, significantly affected TGF-beta regulation of Thrombospondin 1 in A549 cells. Conclusion These data suggest major differences with respect to TGF-beta mediated gene regulation in normal and transformed cells and significant role of non-canonical TGF-beta pathways in the regulation of many genes by TGF-beta.

  2. Unraveling the Complex Epigenetic Mechanisms that Regulate Gene Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian

    2018-01-01

    Our understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate gene expression has been largely increased in recent years by the development and refinement of different techniques. This has revealed that gene transcription is highly influenced by epigenetic mechanisms, i.e., those that do not involve changes in the genome sequence, but rather in nuclear architecture, chromosome conformation and histone and DNA modifications. Our understanding of how these different levels of epigenetic regulation interact with each other and with classical transcription-factor based gene regulation to influence gene transcription has just started to emerge. This review discusses the latest advances in unraveling the complex interactions between different types of epigenetic regulation and transcription factor activity, with special attention to the approaches that can be used to study these interactions.

  3. Transcriptional regulation of the uncoupling protein-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroya, Francesc; Peyrou, Marion; Giralt, Marta

    2017-03-01

    Regulated transcription of the uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) gene, and subsequent UCP1 protein synthesis, is a hallmark of the acquisition of the differentiated, thermogenically competent status of brown and beige/brite adipocytes, as well as of the responsiveness of brown and beige/brite adipocytes to adaptive regulation of thermogenic activity. The 5' non-coding region of the UCP1 gene contains regulatory elements that confer tissue specificity, differentiation dependence, and neuro-hormonal regulation to UCP1 gene transcription. Two main regions-a distal enhancer and a proximal promoter region-mediate transcriptional regulation through interactions with a plethora of transcription factors, including nuclear hormone receptors and cAMP-responsive transcription factors. Co-regulators, such as PGC-1α, play a pivotal role in the concerted regulation of UCP1 gene transcription. Multiple interactions of transcription factors and co-regulators at the promoter region of the UCP1 gene result in local chromatin remodeling, leading to activation and increased accessibility of RNA polymerase II and subsequent gene transcription. Moreover, a commonly occurring A-to-G polymorphism in close proximity to the UCP1 gene enhancer influences the extent of UCP1 gene transcription. Notably, it has been reported that specific aspects of obesity and associated metabolic diseases are associated with human population variability at this site. On another front, the unique properties of the UCP1 promoter region have been exploited to develop brown adipose tissue-specific gene delivery tools for experimental purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  4. Genes regulating hypothalamic and pituitary development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, J S; Adess, M E; Brown, M R

    1997-11-01

    Several pituitary transcription factors have been identified in the last 3 years. They offer new insights into the processes that direct organogenesis, cell commitment, proliferation and differentiated function. All are DNA-binding proteins, but they have ties to different families of homeodomain proteins. They differ in their distribution and in the timing of their appearance and extinction. The Rathke's pouch homeobox protein (Rpx) has a paired-like homeodomain. In mice, it appears on embryonic day 8.5 (day e8.5) and is gone by day e14.5. Its targets for activation are unknown. Pituitary OTX has a tryptophan--phenylalanine--lysine motif in its homeodomain. It appears early and persists. It shows independent activation of the alpha-glycoprotein subunit (alpha-GSU) and pro-opiomelanocortin genes and co-operates with Pit-1 in activation of the growth hormone and prolactin genes. Pituitary Lim (P-Lim) protein also acts independently on the alpha-GSU gene, and acts in concert with Pit-1 to activate other genes. A fourth protein, termed the 'Prophet of Pit-1', or Prop-1, is the recently discovered cause of Ames dwarfism in mice. This paired-like protein is necessary for the subsequent expression of Pit-1 in somatotrophs, lactotrophs and thyrotrophs. Any or all of the newly discovered pituitary genes are candidates for mutations causing hypopituitarism in humans. As several are expressed transiently in tissues other than the pituitary during organogenesis, the phenotypes produced by mutations in these genes may prove to be complex.

  5. Gene regulation: hacking the network on a sugar high.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Tom; Wang, Xiao; Collins, James J

    2008-04-11

    In a recent issue of Molecular Cell, Kaplan et al. (2008) determine the input functions for 19 E. coli sugar-utilization genes by using a two-dimensional high-throughput approach. The resulting input-function map reveals that gene network regulation follows non-Boolean, and often nonmonotonic, logic.

  6. Unraveling the complex epigenetic mechanisms that regulate gene activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, Marian

    2018-01-01

    Our understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate gene expression has been largely increased in recent years by the development and refinement of different techniques. This has revealed that gene transcription is highly influenced by epigenetic mechanisms, i.e., those that do not involve

  7. Regulation of gene expression in entomopathogenic fungi in three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The entomopathogenic fungi are subject to regulation system known as signal transduction that regulates the expression of the different genes required for each life stage, first comprising cuticle adhesion and degradation, later the survival in the hemolymph, and finally the fungal growth in soils. There are two ...

  8. Plant defense genes are regulated by ethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, J.R.; Davis, R.W.

    1987-08-01

    One of the earliest detectable events during plant-pathogen interaction is a rapid increase in ethylene biosynthesis. This gaseous plant stress hormone may be a signal for plants to activate defense mechanisms against invading pathogens such as bacteria, fungi, and viruses. The effect of ethylene on four plant genes involved in three separate plant defense response pathways was examined; these included (i and ii) genes that encode L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (EC 4.3.1.5) and 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4-coumarate:CoA ligase (AMP-forming), EC 6.2.1.12), enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway, (iii) the gene encoding chalcone synthase, an enzyme of the flavonoid glycoside pathway, and (iv) the genes encoding hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein, a major protein component(s) of plant cell walls. Blot hybridization analysis of mRNA from ethylene-treated carrot roots reveals marked increases in the levels of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase mRNA, 4-coumarate CoA ligase mRNA, chalcone synthase mRNA, and certain hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein transcripts. The effect of ethylene on hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mRNA accumulation was different from that of wounding. Ethylene induces two hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mRNAs (1.8 and 4.0 kilobases), whereas wounding of carrot root leads to accumulation of an additional hydroxyproline-rich mRNA (1.5 kilobases). These results indicate that at least two distinct signals, ethylene and a wound signal, can affect the expression of plant defense-response genes.

  9. Histone modification profiles characterize function-specific gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Inkyung; Kim, Dongsup

    2012-10-07

    Chromatin modification is ubiquitous in gene regulation. Despite much effort, a systematic investigation is needed to understand whether each modification has a unique property depending on the function of its associated genes. Here, we show that consideration of function-specific histone modification profiles is important for accurate prediction of gene expression levels, and is maintained across cell types. The performance improvement is thought to originate from the association between modifications and gene expression levels for each biological function. The varying relationship between histone modifications and gene expression levels can be partly explained by considering function-specific PolII recruitment mechanisms, and is supported by more accurate predictions of PolII occupancies with function-specific modification profiles. We suggest that the function-specific binding of transcription factors and chromatin regulators may explain similar gene regulatory mechanisms, such as function-specific PolII recruitment, in each functional gene set. Our study demonstrates that each histone modification has a different characteristic according to the function of its associated genes; thus, different combinations of histone modification profiles characterize function-specific gene regulation. The current analysis is available on our web server (biodb.kaist.ac.kr/impohis). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation of bacterial gene expression by ribosome stalling and rescuing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yongxin; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2016-05-01

    Ribosome is responsible for protein synthesis and is able to monitor the sequence and structure of the nascent peptide. Such ability plays an important role in determining overall gene expression profile of the bacteria through ribosome stalling and rescuing. In this review, we briefly summarize our current understanding of the regulation of gene expression through ribosome stalling and rescuing in bacteria, as well as mechanisms that modulate ribosome activity. Understanding the mechanisms of how bacteria modulate ribosome activity will provide not only fundamental insights into bacterial gene regulation, but also new candidate targets for the development of novel antimicrobial agents.

  11. The intriguing complexities of mammalian gene regulation: how to link enhancers to regulated genes. Are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Bence; Nagy, Gergely; Nagy, Laszlo

    2014-08-01

    The information encoded in genomes supports the differentiation and function of the more than 200 unique cell types, which exist in various mammalian species. The major mechanism driving cellular differentiation and specification is differential gene expression regulation. Cis-acting enhancers and silencers appear to have key roles in regulating the expression of mammalian genes. However, these cis-acting elements are often located very far away from the regulated gene. Therefore, it is hard to find all of them and link them to the regulated gene. An intriguing and unresolved issue of the field is to identify all of the enhancers of a particular gene and link these short regulatory sequences to the genes they regulate and thus, reliably identify gene regulatory enhancer networks. Recent advances in molecular biological methods coupled with Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies have opened up new possibilities in this area of genomics. In this review we summarize the technological advances, bioinformatics challenges and the potential molecular mechanisms allowing the construction of enhancer networks operating in specific cell types and/or activated by various signals. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cost benefit theory and optimal design of gene regulation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisky, Tomer; Dekel, Erez; Alon, Uri

    2007-12-01

    Cells respond to the environment by regulating the expression of genes according to environmental signals. The relation between the input signal level and the expression of the gene is called the gene regulation function. It is of interest to understand the shape of a gene regulation function in terms of the environment in which it has evolved and the basic constraints of biological systems. Here we address this by presenting a cost-benefit theory for gene regulation functions that takes into account temporally varying inputs in the environment and stochastic noise in the biological components. We apply this theory to the well-studied lac operon of E. coli. The present theory explains the shape of this regulation function in terms of temporal variation of the input signals, and of minimizing the deleterious effect of cell-cell variability in regulatory protein levels. We also apply the theory to understand the evolutionary tradeoffs in setting the number of regulatory proteins and for selection of feed-forward loops in genetic circuits. The present cost-benefit theory can be used to understand the shape of other gene regulatory functions in terms of environment and noise constraints.

  13. Glucose Regulates the Expression of the Apolipoprotein A5 Gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruchart, Jamila; Nowak, Maxime; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Jakel, Heidelinde; Moitrot, Emmanuelle; Rommens, Corinne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2008-04-07

    The apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) is a key player in determining triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. Since diabetes is often associated with hypertriglyceridemia, this study explores whether APOA5 gene expression is regulated by alteration in glucose homeostasis and the related pathways. D-glucose activates APOA5 gene expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes, and the glycolytic pathway involved was determined using D-glucose analogs and metabolites. Together, transient transfections, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level through an increase of USF1/2 binding to an E-box in the APOA5 promoter. We show that this phenomenon is not due to an increase of mRNA or protein expression levels of USF. Using protein phosphatases 1 and 2A inhibitor, we demonstrate that D-glucose regulates APOA5 gene via a dephosphorylation mechanism, thereby resulting in an enhanced USF1/2-promoter binding. Last, subsequent suppressions of USF1/2 and phosphatases mRNA through siRNA gene silencing abolished the regulation. We demonstrate that APOA5 gene is up regulated by D-glucose and USF through phosphatase activation. These findings may provide a new cross talk between glucose and lipid metabolism.

  14. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in Yersinia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea A Schiano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Proper regulation of gene expression is required by bacterial pathogens to respond to continually changing environmental conditions and the host response during the infectious process. While transcriptional regulation is perhaps the most well understood form of controlling gene expression, recent studies have demonstrated the importance of post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene regulation that allow for more refined management of the bacterial response to host conditions. Yersinia species of bacteria are known to use various forms of post-transcriptional regulation for control of many virulence-associated genes. These include regulation by cis- and trans-acting small non-coding RNAs, RNA-binding proteins, RNases, and thermoswitches. The effects of these and other regulatory mechanisms on Yersinia physiology can be profound and have been shown to influence type III secretion, motility, biofilm formation, host cell invasion, intracellular survival and replication, and more. In this review, we will discuss these and other post-transcriptional mechanisms and their influence on virulence gene regulation, with a particular emphasis on how these processes influence the virulence of Yersinia in the host.

  15. REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION IN THE GENOMIC CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor J Atkinson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metazoan life is dependent on the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression within the many cells—essentially all with the identical genome—that make up the organism. While much is understood about how individual gene regulatory elements function, many questions remain about how they interact to maintain correct regulation globally throughout the genome. In this review we summarize the basic features and functions of the crucial regulatory elements promoters, enhancers, and insulators and discuss some of the ways in which proper interactions between these elements is realized. We focus in particular on the role of core promoter sequences and propose explanations for some of the contradictory results seen in experiments aimed at understanding insulator function. We suggest that gene regulation depends on local genomic context and argue that more holistic in vivo investigations that take into account multiple local features will be necessary to understand how genome-wide gene regulation is maintained.

  16. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R; Peters, Antoine H F M; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. © 2016 Teperek et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. Identification of Human HK Genes and Gene Expression Regulation Study in Cancer from Transcriptomics Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Jiayan; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is essential for eukaryotes, as it drives the processes of cellular differentiation and morphogenesis, leading to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms. RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides researchers with a powerful toolbox for characterization and quantification of transcriptome. Many different human tissue/cell transcriptome datasets coming from RNA-Seq technology are available on public data resource. The fundamental issue here is how to develop an effective analysis method to estimate expression pattern similarities between different tumor tissues and their corresponding normal tissues. We define the gene expression pattern from three directions: 1) expression breadth, which reflects gene expression on/off status, and mainly concerns ubiquitously expressed genes; 2) low/high or constant/variable expression genes, based on gene expression level and variation; and 3) the regulation of gene expression at the gene structure level. The cluster analysis indicates that gene expression pattern is higher related to physiological condition rather than tissue spatial distance. Two sets of human housekeeping (HK) genes are defined according to cell/tissue types, respectively. To characterize the gene expression pattern in gene expression level and variation, we firstly apply improved K-means algorithm and a gene expression variance model. We find that cancer-associated HK genes (a HK gene is specific in cancer group, while not in normal group) are expressed higher and more variable in cancer condition than in normal condition. Cancer-associated HK genes prefer to AT-rich genes, and they are enriched in cell cycle regulation related functions and constitute some cancer signatures. The expression of large genes is also avoided in cancer group. These studies will help us understand which cell type-specific patterns of gene expression differ among different cell types, and particularly for cancer. PMID:23382867

  18. Identification of human HK genes and gene expression regulation study in cancer from transcriptomics data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meili; Xiao, Jingfa; Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Jiayan; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is essential for eukaryotes, as it drives the processes of cellular differentiation and morphogenesis, leading to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms. RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides researchers with a powerful toolbox for characterization and quantification of transcriptome. Many different human tissue/cell transcriptome datasets coming from RNA-Seq technology are available on public data resource. The fundamental issue here is how to develop an effective analysis method to estimate expression pattern similarities between different tumor tissues and their corresponding normal tissues. We define the gene expression pattern from three directions: 1) expression breadth, which reflects gene expression on/off status, and mainly concerns ubiquitously expressed genes; 2) low/high or constant/variable expression genes, based on gene expression level and variation; and 3) the regulation of gene expression at the gene structure level. The cluster analysis indicates that gene expression pattern is higher related to physiological condition rather than tissue spatial distance. Two sets of human housekeeping (HK) genes are defined according to cell/tissue types, respectively. To characterize the gene expression pattern in gene expression level and variation, we firstly apply improved K-means algorithm and a gene expression variance model. We find that cancer-associated HK genes (a HK gene is specific in cancer group, while not in normal group) are expressed higher and more variable in cancer condition than in normal condition. Cancer-associated HK genes prefer to AT-rich genes, and they are enriched in cell cycle regulation related functions and constitute some cancer signatures. The expression of large genes is also avoided in cancer group. These studies will help us understand which cell type-specific patterns of gene expression differ among different cell types, and particularly for cancer.

  19. Identifying local co-regulation relationships in gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yonggang; Gao, Qinghui; Li, Juntao; Zhao, Xiting

    2014-11-07

    Identifying interesting relationships between pairs of genes, presented over some of experimental conditions in gene expression data set, is useful for discovering novel functional gene interactions. In this paper, we introduce a new method for id entifying L ocal C o-regulation R elationships (IdLCR). These local relationships describe the behaviors of pairwise genes, which are either up- or down-regulated throughout the identified condition subset. IdLCR firstly detects the pairwise gene-gene relationships taking functional forms and the condition subsets by using a regression spline model. Then it measures the relationships using a penalized Pearson correlation and ranks the responding gene pairs by their scores. By this way, those relationships without clearly biological interpretations can be filtered out and the local co-regulation relationships can be obtained. In the simulation data sets, ten different functional relationships are embedded. Applying IdLCR to these data sets, the results show its ability to identify functional relationships and the condition subsets. For micro-array and RNA-seq gene expression data, IdLCR can identify novel biological relationships which are different from those uncovered by IFGR and MINE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The NSL Complex Regulates Housekeeping Genes in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Sunil Jayaramaiah; Holz, Herbert; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Manke, Thomas; Akhtar, Asifa

    2012-01-01

    MOF is the major histone H4 lysine 16-specific (H4K16) acetyltransferase in mammals and Drosophila. In flies, it is involved in the regulation of X-chromosomal and autosomal genes as part of the MSL and the NSL complexes, respectively. While the function of the MSL complex as a dosage compensation regulator is fairly well understood, the role of the NSL complex in gene regulation is still poorly characterized. Here we report a comprehensive ChIP–seq analysis of four NSL complex members (NSL1, NSL3, MBD-R2, and MCRS2) throughout the Drosophila melanogaster genome. Strikingly, the majority (85.5%) of NSL-bound genes are constitutively expressed across different cell types. We find that an increased abundance of the histone modifications H4K16ac, H3K4me2, H3K4me3, and H3K9ac in gene promoter regions is characteristic of NSL-targeted genes. Furthermore, we show that these genes have a well-defined nucleosome free region and broad transcription initiation patterns. Finally, by performing ChIP–seq analyses of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in NSL1- and NSL3-depleted cells, we demonstrate that both NSL proteins are required for efficient recruitment of Pol II to NSL target gene promoters. The observed Pol II reduction coincides with compromised binding of TBP and TFIIB to target promoters, indicating that the NSL complex is required for optimal recruitment of the pre-initiation complex on target genes. Moreover, genes that undergo the most dramatic loss of Pol II upon NSL knockdowns tend to be enriched in DNA Replication–related Element (DRE). Taken together, our findings show that the MOF-containing NSL complex acts as a major regulator of housekeeping genes in flies by modulating initiation of Pol II transcription. PMID:22723752

  1. The NSL complex regulates housekeeping genes in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Chung Lam

    Full Text Available MOF is the major histone H4 lysine 16-specific (H4K16 acetyltransferase in mammals and Drosophila. In flies, it is involved in the regulation of X-chromosomal and autosomal genes as part of the MSL and the NSL complexes, respectively. While the function of the MSL complex as a dosage compensation regulator is fairly well understood, the role of the NSL complex in gene regulation is still poorly characterized. Here we report a comprehensive ChIP-seq analysis of four NSL complex members (NSL1, NSL3, MBD-R2, and MCRS2 throughout the Drosophila melanogaster genome. Strikingly, the majority (85.5% of NSL-bound genes are constitutively expressed across different cell types. We find that an increased abundance of the histone modifications H4K16ac, H3K4me2, H3K4me3, and H3K9ac in gene promoter regions is characteristic of NSL-targeted genes. Furthermore, we show that these genes have a well-defined nucleosome free region and broad transcription initiation patterns. Finally, by performing ChIP-seq analyses of RNA polymerase II (Pol II in NSL1- and NSL3-depleted cells, we demonstrate that both NSL proteins are required for efficient recruitment of Pol II to NSL target gene promoters. The observed Pol II reduction coincides with compromised binding of TBP and TFIIB to target promoters, indicating that the NSL complex is required for optimal recruitment of the pre-initiation complex on target genes. Moreover, genes that undergo the most dramatic loss of Pol II upon NSL knockdowns tend to be enriched in DNA Replication-related Element (DRE. Taken together, our findings show that the MOF-containing NSL complex acts as a major regulator of housekeeping genes in flies by modulating initiation of Pol II transcription.

  2. Differential regulation of polyphosphate genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munévar, Nicolás Federico Villamil; de Almeida, Luiz Gustavo; Spira, Beny

    2017-02-01

    Phosphate homeostasis is tightly regulated in bacteria. Phosphate scarcity is overcome by inducing the expression of genes associated with the scavenging of phosphate and phosphate-containing molecules, while phosphate surplus is stored in the form of polyphosphate (polyP). Regulation of the genes involved in polyP metabolism was investigated. Knockout of the most distal gene of the pstSCAB-phoU operon that encodes a Pi-transport system results in large accumulation of polyphosphate (polyP). Here, we show that the phoU mutation differentially affects the transcription of ppk and ppx, that respectively, encode a polyP kinase and a polyP exopolyphosphatase, by increasing the former and reducing the latter, further contributing the accumulation of polyP. We also show that ppk forms an operon with the upstream gene hemB and that neither ppk nor ppx positively respond to Pi starvation. Furthermore, a putative PHO-box sequence in ppx regulatory region did not show a strong affinity for the PHO response regulator PhoB, while the promoter of hemB does not carry a PHO-box sequence. Altogether, the data indicate that the main genes involved in polyP metabolism, ppk and ppx, are differentially regulated in the absence of phoU, but neither gene belongs to the PHO regulon.

  3. Social Regulation of Gene Expression in Threespine Sticklebacks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K Greenwood

    Full Text Available Identifying genes that are differentially expressed in response to social interactions is informative for understanding the molecular basis of social behavior. To address this question, we described changes in gene expression as a result of differences in the extent of social interactions. We housed threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus females in either group conditions or individually for one week, then measured levels of gene expression in three brain regions using RNA-sequencing. We found that numerous genes in the hindbrain/cerebellum had altered expression in response to group or individual housing. However, relatively few genes were differentially expressed in either the diencephalon or telencephalon. The list of genes upregulated in fish from social groups included many genes related to neural development and cell adhesion as well as genes with functions in sensory signaling, stress, and social and reproductive behavior. The list of genes expressed at higher levels in individually-housed fish included several genes previously identified as regulated by social interactions in other animals. The identified genes are interesting targets for future research on the molecular mechanisms of normal social interactions.

  4. Alu Elements as Novel Regulators of Gene Expression in Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility Genes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-07-13

    Despite numerous studies implicating Alu repeat elements in various diseases, there is sparse information available with respect to the potential functional and biological roles of the repeat elements in Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Therefore, we performed a genome-wide sequence analysis of T1D candidate genes to identify embedded Alu elements within these genes. We observed significant enrichment of Alu elements within the T1D genes (p-value genes harboring Alus revealed significant enrichment for immune-mediated processes (p-value genes harboring inverted Alus (IRAlus) within their 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) that are known to regulate the expression of host mRNAs by generating double stranded RNA duplexes. Our in silico analysis predicted the formation of duplex structures by IRAlus within the 3'UTRs of T1D genes. We propose that IRAlus might be involved in regulating the expression levels of the host T1D genes.

  5. Epigenetic regulation on the gene expression signature in esophagus adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Ting; Zhang, Guizhi

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms represents an important step in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic measures of esophagus adenocarcinoma (NOS). The objective of this study is to identify the epigenetic regulation on gene expression in NOS, shedding light on the molecular mechanisms of NOS. In this study, 78 patients with NOS were included and the data of mRNA, miRNA and DNA methylation of were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Differential analysis between NOS and controls was performed in terms of gene expression, miRNA expression, and DNA methylation. Bioinformatic analysis was followed to explore the regulation mechanisms of miRNA and DNA methylationon gene expression. Totally, up to 1320 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 32 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified. 240 DEGs that were not only the target genes but also negatively correlated with the screened differentially expressed miRNAs. 101 DEGs were found to be highlymethylated in CpG islands. Then, 8 differentially methylated genes (DMGs) were selected, which showed down-regulated expression in NOS. Among of these genes, 6 genes including ADHFE1, DPP6, GRIA4, CNKSR2, RPS6KA6 and ZNF135 were target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs (hsa-mir-335, hsa-mir-18a, hsa-mir-93, hsa-mir-106b and hsa-mir-21). The identified altered miRNA, genes and DNA methylation site may be applied as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of NOS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Inferring Gene Regulatory Networks Using Conditional Regulation Pattern to Guide Candidate Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fei; Gao, Lin; Ye, Yusen; Hu, Yuxuan; He, Ruijie

    2016-01-01

    Combining path consistency (PC) algorithms with conditional mutual information (CMI) are widely used in reconstruction of gene regulatory networks. CMI has many advantages over Pearson correlation coefficient in measuring non-linear dependence to infer gene regulatory networks. It can also discriminate the direct regulations from indirect ones. However, it is still a challenge to select the conditional genes in an optimal way, which affects the performance and computation complexity of the PC algorithm. In this study, we develop a novel conditional mutual information-based algorithm, namely RPNI (Regulation Pattern based Network Inference), to infer gene regulatory networks. For conditional gene selection, we define the co-regulation pattern, indirect-regulation pattern and mixture-regulation pattern as three candidate patterns to guide the selection of candidate genes. To demonstrate the potential of our algorithm, we apply it to gene expression data from DREAM challenge. Experimental results show that RPNI outperforms existing conditional mutual information-based methods in both accuracy and time complexity for different sizes of gene samples. Furthermore, the robustness of our algorithm is demonstrated by noisy interference analysis using different types of noise.

  7. Regulation of mitochondrial gene expression, the epigenetic enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mposhi, Archibold; Van der Wijst, Monique Gp; Faber, Klaas Nico; Rots, Marianne G

    2017-03-01

    Epigenetics provides an important layer of information on top of the DNA sequence and is essential for establishing gene expression profiles. Extensive studies have shown that nuclear DNA methylation and histone modifications influence nuclear gene expression. However, it remains unclear whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) undergoes similar epigenetic changes to regulate mitochondrial gene expression. Recently, it has been shown that mtDNA is differentially methylated in various diseases such as diabetes and colorectal cancer. Interestingly, this differential methylation was often associated with altered mitochondrial gene expression. However, the direct role of mtDNA methylation on gene expression remains elusive. Alternatively, the activity of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), a protein involved in mtDNA packaging, might also influence gene expression. This review discusses the role of mtDNA methylation and potential epigenetic-like modifications of TFAM with respect to mtDNA transcription and replication. We suggest three mechanisms: (1) methylation within the non-coding D-loop, (2) methylation at gene start sites (GSS) and (3) post-translational modifications (PTMs) of TFAM. Unraveling mitochondrial gene expression regulation could open new therapeutic avenues for mitochondrial diseases.

  8. Methylation of microRNA genes regulates gene expression in bisexual flower development in andromonoecious poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuepeng; Tian, Min; Ci, Dong; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies showed sex-specific DNA methylation and expression of candidate genes in bisexual flowers of andromonoecious poplar, but the regulatory relationship between methylation and microRNAs (miRNAs) remains unclear. To investigate whether the methylation of miRNA genes regulates gene expression in bisexual flower development, the methylome, microRNA, and transcriptome were examined in female and male flowers of andromonoecious poplar. 27 636 methylated coding genes and 113 methylated miRNA genes were identified. In the coding genes, 64.5% of the methylated reads mapped to the gene body region; by contrast, 60.7% of methylated reads in miRNA genes mainly mapped in the 5' and 3' flanking regions. CHH methylation showed the highest methylation levels and CHG showed the lowest methylation levels. Correlation analysis showed a significant, negative, strand-specific correlation of methylation and miRNA gene expression (r=0.79, P genes included eight long miRNAs (lmiRNAs) of 24 nucleotides and 11 miRNAs related to flower development. miRNA172b might play an important role in the regulation of bisexual flower development-related gene expression in andromonoecious poplar, via modification of methylation. Gynomonoecious, female, and male poplars were used to validate the methylation patterns of the miRNA172b gene, implying that hyper-methylation in andromonoecious and gynomonoecious poplar might function as an important regulator in bisexual flower development. Our data provide a useful resource for the study of flower development in poplar and improve our understanding of the effect of epigenetic regulation on genes other than protein-coding genes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Every which way – nanos gene regulation in echinoderms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulhen, Nathalie; Wessel, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    Nanos is an essential factor of germ line success in all animals tested. This gene encodes a Zn-finger RNA-binding protein that in complex with its partner pumilio, binds to and changes the fate of several known transcripts. We summarize here the documented functions of nanos in several key organisms, and then emphasize echinoderms as a working model for how nanos expression is regulated. Nanos presence outside of the target cells is often detrimental to the animal, and in sea urchins, nanos expression appears to be regulated at every step of transcription, and post-transcriptional activity, making this gene product exciting, every which way. PMID:24376110

  10. Histone H3 tail clipping regulates gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Santos-Rosa, Helena; Kirmizis, Antonis; Nelson, Christopher; Bartke, Till; Saksouk, Nehme; Cote, Jacques; Kouzarides, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Induction of gene expression in yeast and human cells involves changes in histone modifications associated with promoters. Here we identify a histone H3 endopeptidase activity in S. cerevisiae that may regulate these events. The endopeptidase cleaves H3 after alanine 21, generating a histone lacking the first 21 residues and displays a preference for H3 tails carrying repressive modifications. In vivo, the H3 N-terminus is clipped, specifically within the promoter of genes following the induc...

  11. Regulation of Gene Expression Patterns in Mosquito Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sourav; Saha, Tusar T; Johnson, Lisa; Zhao, Bo; Ha, Jisu; White, Kevin P; Girke, Thomas; Zou, Zhen; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2015-08-01

    In multicellular organisms, development, growth and reproduction require coordinated expression of numerous functional and regulatory genes. Insects, in addition to being the most speciose animal group with enormous biological and economical significance, represent outstanding model organisms for studying regulation of synchronized gene expression due to their rapid development and reproduction. Disease-transmitting female mosquitoes have adapted uniquely for ingestion and utilization of the huge blood meal required for swift reproductive events to complete egg development within a 72-h period. We investigated the network of regulatory factors mediating sequential gene expression in the fat body, a multifunctional organ analogous to the vertebrate liver and adipose tissue, of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito. Transcriptomic and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ~7500 transcripts are differentially expressed in four sequential waves during the 72-h reproductive period. A combination of RNA-interference gene-silencing and in-vitro organ culture identified the major regulators for each of these waves. Amino acids (AAs) regulate the first wave of gene activation between 3 h and 12 h post-blood meal (PBM). During the second wave, between 12 h and 36 h, most genes are highly upregulated by a synergistic action of AAs, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and the Ecdysone-Receptor (EcR). Between 36 h and 48 h, the third wave of gene activation-regulated mainly by HR3-occurs. Juvenile Hormone (JH) and its receptor Methoprene-Tolerant (Met) are major regulators for the final wave between 48 h and 72 h. Each of these key regulators also has repressive effects on one or more gene sets. Our study provides a better understanding of the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms related to temporal coordination of gene expression during reproduction. We have detected the novel function of 20E/EcR responsible for transcriptional repression. This study also reveals the previously

  12. Regulation of Gene Expression Patterns in Mosquito Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lisa; Zhao, Bo; Ha, Jisu; White, Kevin P.; Girke, Thomas; Zou, Zhen; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, development, growth and reproduction require coordinated expression of numerous functional and regulatory genes. Insects, in addition to being the most speciose animal group with enormous biological and economical significance, represent outstanding model organisms for studying regulation of synchronized gene expression due to their rapid development and reproduction. Disease-transmitting female mosquitoes have adapted uniquely for ingestion and utilization of the huge blood meal required for swift reproductive events to complete egg development within a 72-h period. We investigated the network of regulatory factors mediating sequential gene expression in the fat body, a multifunctional organ analogous to the vertebrate liver and adipose tissue, of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito. Transcriptomic and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ~7500 transcripts are differentially expressed in four sequential waves during the 72-h reproductive period. A combination of RNA-interference gene-silencing and in-vitro organ culture identified the major regulators for each of these waves. Amino acids (AAs) regulate the first wave of gene activation between 3 h and 12 h post-blood meal (PBM). During the second wave, between 12 h and 36 h, most genes are highly upregulated by a synergistic action of AAs, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and the Ecdysone-Receptor (EcR). Between 36 h and 48 h, the third wave of gene activation—regulated mainly by HR3—occurs. Juvenile Hormone (JH) and its receptor Methoprene-Tolerant (Met) are major regulators for the final wave between 48 h and 72 h. Each of these key regulators also has repressive effects on one or more gene sets. Our study provides a better understanding of the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms related to temporal coordination of gene expression during reproduction. We have detected the novel function of 20E/EcR responsible for transcriptional repression. This study also reveals the previously

  13. Gene profile analysis of osteoblast genes differentially regulated by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamblin Anne-Francoise

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoblast differentiation requires the coordinated stepwise expression of multiple genes. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs accelerate the osteoblast differentiation process by blocking the activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs, which alter gene expression by modifying chromatin structure. We previously demonstrated that HDIs and HDAC3 shRNAs accelerate matrix mineralization and the expression of osteoblast maturation genes (e.g. alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin. Identifying other genes that are differentially regulated by HDIs might identify new pathways that contribute to osteoblast differentiation. Results To identify other osteoblast genes that are altered early by HDIs, we incubated MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts with HDIs (trichostatin A, MS-275, or valproic acid for 18 hours in osteogenic conditions. The promotion of osteoblast differentiation by HDIs in this experiment was confirmed by osteogenic assays. Gene expression profiles relative to vehicle-treated cells were assessed by microarray analysis with Affymetrix GeneChip 430 2.0 arrays. The regulation of several genes by HDIs in MC3T3-E1 cells and primary osteoblasts was verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Nine genes were differentially regulated by at least two-fold after exposure to each of the three HDIs and six were verified by PCR in osteoblasts. Four of the verified genes (solute carrier family 9 isoform 3 regulator 1 (Slc9a3r1, sorbitol dehydrogenase 1, a kinase anchor protein, and glutathione S-transferase alpha 4 were induced. Two genes (proteasome subunit, beta type 10 and adaptor-related protein complex AP-4 sigma 1 were suppressed. We also identified eight growth factors and growth factor receptor genes that are significantly altered by each of the HDIs, including Frizzled related proteins 1 and 4, which modulate the Wnt signaling pathway. Conclusion This study identifies osteoblast genes that are regulated early by HDIs and indicates pathways that

  14. Harnessing mobile genetic elements to explore gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakes, Leighcraft A; Wolf, Hope M; Norford, Derek C; Grant, Delores J; Chatterjee, Pradeep K

    2014-01-01

    Sequences that regulate expression of a gene in cis but are located at large distances along the DNA from the gene, as found with most developmentally regulated genes in higher vertebrates, are difficult to identify if those sequences are not conserved across species. Mutating suspected gene-regulatory sequences to alter expression then becomes a hit-or-miss affair. The relaxed specificity of transposon insertions offers an opportunity to develop alternate strategies, to scan in an unbiased manner, pieces of chromosomal DNA cloned in BACs for transcription enhancing elements. This article illustrates how insertions of Tn10 with enhancer-traps into BAC DNA containing the gene, and its germ-line expression in zebrafish, have identified distal regulatory elements functionally. Transposition of Tn10 first introduces the enhancer-trap with a loxP site randomly into BAC DNA. Cre-recombination between the inserted loxP and the loxP endogenous to a BAC-end positions the enhancer-trap to the newly created truncated end of BAC DNA. The procedure generates a library of integration-ready enhancer-trap BACs with progressive truncations from an end in a single experiment. Individual enhancer-trap BACs from the library can be evaluated functionally in zebrafish or mice. Furthermore, the ability to readily alter sequences in a small transposon plasmid containing a regulatory domain of the gene allows re-introduction of altered parts of a BAC back into itself. It serves as a useful strategy to functionally dissect multiple discontinuous regulatory domains of a gene quickly. These methodologies have been successfully used in identifying novel regulatory domains of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (appb) gene in zebrafish, and provided important clues for regulation of the gene in humans.

  15. Evolution of yellow gene regulation and pigmentation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkopp, Patricia J; Vaccaro, Kathy; Carroll, Sean B

    2002-09-17

    Changes in developmental gene expression are central to phenotypic evolution, but the genetic mechanisms underlying these changes are not well understood. Interspecific differences in gene expression can arise from evolutionary changes in cis-regulatory DNA and/or in the expression of trans-acting regulatory proteins, but few case studies have distinguished between these mechanisms. Here, we compare the regulation of the yellow gene, which is required for melanization, among distantly related Drosophila species with different pigment patterns and determine the phenotypic effects of divergent Yellow expression. Yellow expression has diverged among D. melanogaster, D. subobscura, and D. virilis and, in all cases, correlates with the distribution of black melanin. Species-specific Yellow expression patterns were retained in D. melanogaster transformants carrying the D. subobscura and D. virilis yellow genes, indicating that sequence evolution within the yellow gene underlies the divergence of Yellow expression. Evolutionary changes in the activity of orthologous cis-regulatory elements are responsible for differences in abdominal Yellow expression; however, cis-regulatory element evolution is not the sole cause of divergent Yellow expression patterns. Transformation of the D. melanogaster yellow gene into D. virilis altered its expression pattern, indicating that trans-acting factors that regulate the D. melanogaster yellow gene have also diverged between these two species. Finally, we found that the phenotypic effects of evolutionary changes in Yellow expression depend on epistatic interactions with other genes. Evolutionary changes in Yellow expression correlate with divergent melanin patterns and are a result of evolution in both cis- and trans-regulation. These changes were likely necessary for the divergence of pigmentation, but evolutionary changes in other genes were also required.

  16. Approximation scheme based on effective interactions for stochastic gene regulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ohkubo, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Since gene regulatory systems contain sometimes only a small number of molecules, these systems are not described well by macroscopic rate equations; a master equation approach is needed for such cases. We develop an approximation scheme for dealing with the stochasticity of the gene regulatory systems. Using an effective interaction concept, original master equations can be reduced to simpler master equations, which can be solved analytically. We apply the approximation scheme to self-regulating systems with monomer or dimer interactions, and a two-gene system with an exclusive switch. The approximation scheme can recover bistability of the exclusive switch adequately.

  17. Transcriptional regulation of inflammatory genes associated with severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Rachel L; Coward, William R; Knox, Alan J; John, Alison E

    2011-01-01

    The 10% of patients with the most severe asthma are responsible for a large part of healthcare expenditure and morbidity. Understanding the processes involved is key if new therapeutic approaches are to be developed. Evidence is accumulating that chronic diseases such as asthma are associated with temporal and spatial alterations in the pattern of inflammatory gene expression within the airways. Expression of these genes can be regulated by transcriptional, posttranscriptional, translational and epigenetic mechanisms. It is well established that binding of activated transcription factors to specific inducible gene promoter sites is tightly controlled by chromatin state as a result of histone modifications, particularly the balance between histone acetylation and deacetylation [1]. The interaction between transcription factors and the promoter is key to the diversification of gene expression in a time dependent manner leading to altered gene expression profiles. Alterations of the accessibility of transcription factors to the DNA can have residing effects upon gene transcription. This review will focus on the regulation of several groups of key genes which are involved in chronic airway inflammation and remodelling in asthma drawing mainly from our experience of studying these processes in airway smooth muscle cells. An overview is shown in figure 1.

  18. Gravity-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederoff, Heike; Brown, Christopher S.; Heber, Steffen; Kajla, Jyoti D.; Kumar, Sandeep; Lomax, Terri L.; Wheeler, Benjamin; Yalamanchili, Roopa

    Plant growth and development is regulated by changes in environmental signals. Plants sense environmental changes and respond to them by modifying gene expression programs to ad-just cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. Functional expression of genes comprises many different processes including transcription, translation, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, as well as the degradation of RNA and proteins. Recently, it was discovered that small RNAs (sRNA, 18-24 nucleotides long), which are heritable and systemic, are key elements in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic changes. Sev-eral different classes of sRNAs have been identified that are part of a non-cell autonomous and phloem-mobile network of regulators affecting transcript stability, translational kinetics, and DNA methylation patterns responsible for heritable transcriptional silencing (epigenetics). Our research has focused on gene expression changes in response to gravistimulation of Arabidopsis roots. Using high-throughput technologies including microarrays and 454 sequencing, we iden-tified rapid changes in transcript abundance of genes as well as differential expression of small RNA in Arabidopsis root apices after minutes of reorientation. Some of the differentially regu-lated transcripts are encoded by genes that are important for the bending response. Functional mutants of those genes respond faster to reorientation than the respective wild type plants, indicating that these proteins are repressors of differential cell elongation. We compared the gravity responsive sRNAs to the changes in transcript abundances of their putative targets and identified several potential miRNA: target pairs. Currently, we are using mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis plants to characterize the function of those miRNAs and their putative targets in gravitropic and phototropic responses in Arabidopsis.

  19. Epigenetic regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Pek Siew; Li, Jasmine; Holloway, Adele F; Rao, Sudha

    2013-07-01

    T cells are exquisitely poised to respond rapidly to pathogens and have proved an instructive model for exploring the regulation of inducible genes. Individual genes respond to antigenic stimulation in different ways, and it has become clear that the interplay between transcription factors and the chromatin platform of individual genes governs these responses. Our understanding of the complexity of the chromatin platform and the epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to transcriptional control has expanded dramatically in recent years. These mechanisms include the presence/absence of histone modification marks, which form an epigenetic signature to mark active or inactive genes. These signatures are dynamically added or removed by epigenetic enzymes, comprising an array of histone-modifying enzymes, including the more recently recognized chromatin-associated signalling kinases. In addition, chromatin-remodelling complexes physically alter the chromatin structure to regulate chromatin accessibility to transcriptional regulatory factors. The advent of genome-wide technologies has enabled characterization of the chromatin landscape of T cells in terms of histone occupancy, histone modification patterns and transcription factor association with specific genomic regulatory regions, generating a picture of the T-cell epigenome. Here, we discuss the multi-layered regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system, focusing on the interplay between transcription factors, and the T-cell epigenome, including the role played by chromatin remodellers and epigenetic enzymes. We will also use IL2, a key inducible cytokine gene in T cells, as an example of how the different layers of epigenetic mechanisms regulate immune responsive genes during T-cell activation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Signaling, Gene Regulation and Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although there have been tremendous progress in cancer research and treatment, the mortality caused by this disease is still very high. Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide and second leading cause of death in the United States of America. Signaling, Gene Regulation and Cancer covers topics including the role of various signaling pathways in development, regulation of cell fate, tumor angiogenesis, duodenal neoplasias, breast, colorectal and prostate cancer, cancer development and progression, microRNA in cancer and epigenetic regulation of cancer.

  1. Querying Co-regulated Genes on Diverse Gene Expression Datasets Via Biclustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveci, Mehmet; Küçüktunç, Onur; Eren, Kemal; Bozdağ, Doruk; Kaya, Kamer; Çatalyürek, Ümit V

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development and increasing popularity of gene expression microarrays have resulted in a number of studies on the discovery of co-regulated genes. One important way of discovering such co-regulations is the query-based search since gene co-expressions may indicate a shared role in a biological process. Although there exist promising query-driven search methods adapting clustering, they fail to capture many genes that function in the same biological pathway because microarray datasets are fraught with spurious samples or samples of diverse origin, or the pathways might be regulated under only a subset of samples. On the other hand, a class of clustering algorithms known as biclustering algorithms which simultaneously cluster both the items and their features are useful while analyzing gene expression data, or any data in which items are related in only a subset of their samples. This means that genes need not be related in all samples to be clustered together. Because many genes only interact under specific circumstances, biclustering may recover the relationships that traditional clustering algorithms can easily miss. In this chapter, we briefly summarize the literature using biclustering for querying co-regulated genes. Then we present a novel biclustering approach and evaluate its performance by a thorough experimental analysis.

  2. Regulation of human autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene translation by miR-220b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Tomohito; Noguchi, Yukiko; Shindo, Mieko; Morita, Yoshifumi; Oda, Yoshie; Yoshida, Eiko; Hamada, Hiroko; Harada, Mine; Shiokawa, Yuichi; Nishida, Takahiro; Tominaga, Ryuji; Kikushige, Yoshikane; Akashi, Koichi; Kudoh, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Tanaka, Yuka; Umemura, Tsukuru; Taniguchi, Taketoshi; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Takashi; Mitsuyama, Masao; Kurisaki, Hironori; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Nagafuchi, Seiho

    2013-11-01

    Although mutations of autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene are responsible for autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), presenting a wide spectrum of many characteristic and non-characteristic clinical features, some patients lack AIRE gene mutations. Therefore, something other than a mutation, such as dysregulation of AIRE gene, may be a causal factor for APECED or its related diseases. However, regulatory mechanisms for AIRE gene expression and/or translation have still remained elusive. We found that IL-2-stimulated CD4(+) T (IL-2T) cells showed a high expression of AIRE gene, but very low AIRE protein production, while Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B (EBV-B) cells express both AIRE gene and AIRE protein. By using microarray analysis, we could identify miR-220b as a possible regulatory mechanism for AIRE gene translation in IL-2T cells. Here we report that miR-220b significantly reduced the expression of AIRE protein in AIRE gene with 3'UTR region transfected 293T cells, whereas no alteration of AIRE protein production was observed in the open reading frame of AIRE gene alone transfected cells. In addition, anti-miR-220b reversed the inhibitory function of miR-220b for the expression of AIRE protein in AIRE gene with 3'UTR region transfected cells. Moreover, when AIRE gene transfected cells with mutated 3'UTR were transfected with miR-220b, no reduction of AIRE protein production was observed. Taken together, it was concluded that miR-220b inhibited the AIRE gene translation through the 3'UTR region of AIRE gene, indicating that miR-220b could serve as a regulator for human AIRE gene translation. © 2013.

  3. Developmentally regulated expression of reporter gene in adult ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. The genetic regulation of adult brain development has re- mained enigmatic to developmental biologists since long. The practical difficulty in understanding the adult brain de- velopment is that most of the mutational searches done for genes in different model systems yield mutations inducing embryonic ...

  4. Gene Expression Profiling of Apoptosis Regulators in Patients with Sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwerf, Jacobien J.; van Zoelen, Marieke A.; Wiersinga, W. Joost; van 't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F.; de Boer, Anita; Schultz, Marcus J.; Hooibrink, Berend; de Jonge, Evert; van der Poll, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Sepsis is associated with a dysregulation of apoptosis in immune cells, which has been implicated in both immunosuppression and multiple organ failure. We describe the expression profiles of genes encoding key regulators of apoptosis in highly purified monocytes, granulocytes and CD4+

  5. Nitrogen regulates chitinase gene expression in a marine bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delpin, Marina; Goodman, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    Ammonium concentration and nitrogen source regulate promoter activity and use for the transcription of chiA, the major chitinase gene of Pseudoalteromonas sp. S91 and S91CX, an S91 transposon lacZ fusion mutant. The activity of chiA was quantified by beta-galactosidase assay of S91CX cultures...

  6. Cytogenetics as a tool to study gene regulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tessadori, F.; van Driel, R.; Fransz, P.F.

    2004-01-01

    Cell identity is determined by the nuclear program and established by a complex molecular interplay between DNA sequence and proteins. The past few years have witnessed major breakthroughs in the elucidation of this intricate mechanism of epigenetic gene regulation. Covalent modifications in

  7. Identification of a novel submergence response gene regulated by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our results also show that RS1 is highly expressed under submergence, drought, and NaCl stresses, but not under cold or dehydration stress. Hormone ABA treatment induces, whereas GA treatment decreases, RS1 expression. The RS1 and Sub1A genes are co-regulated under submergence. Overexpression of RS1 in ...

  8. The Role of Bromodomain Proteins in Regulating Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Duffy

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Histone modifications are important in regulating gene expression in eukaryotes. Of the numerous histone modifications which have been identified, acetylation is one of the best characterised and is generally associated with active genes. Histone acetylation can directly affect chromatin structure by neutralising charges on the histone tail, and can also function as a binding site for proteins which can directly or indirectly regulate transcription. Bromodomains specifically bind to acetylated lysine residues on histone tails, and bromodomain proteins play an important role in anchoring the complexes of which they are a part to acetylated chromatin. Bromodomain proteins are involved in a diverse range of functions, such as acetylating histones, remodeling chromatin, and recruiting other factors necessary for transcription. These proteins thus play a critical role in the regulation of transcription.

  9. Early development of Moniliophthora perniciosa basidiomata and developmentally regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Gonçalo AG

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hemibiotrophic fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa is the causal agent of Witches' broom, a disease of Theobroma cacao. The pathogen life cycle ends with the production of basidiocarps in dead tissues of the infected host. This structure generates millions of basidiospores that reinfect young tissues of the same or other plants. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying the sexual phase of this fungus may help develop chemical, biological or genetic strategies to control the disease. Results Mycelium was morphologically analyzed prior to emergence of basidiomata by stereomicroscopy, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The morphological changes in the mycelium before fructification show a pattern similar to other members of the order Agaricales. Changes and appearance of hyphae forming a surface layer by fusion were correlated with primordia emergence. The stages of hyphal nodules, aggregation, initial primordium and differentiated primordium were detected. The morphological analysis also allowed conclusions on morphogenetic aspects. To analyze the genes involved in basidiomata development, the expression of some selected EST genes from a non-normalized cDNA library, representative of the fruiting stage of M. perniciosa, was evaluated. A macroarray analysis was performed with 192 selected clones and hybridized with two distinct RNA pools extracted from mycelium in different phases of basidiomata formation. This analysis showed two groups of up and down-regulated genes in primordial phases of mycelia. Hydrophobin coding, glucose transporter, Rho-GEF, Rheb, extensin precursor and cytochrome p450 monooxygenase genes were grouped among the up-regulated. In the down-regulated group relevant genes clustered coding calmodulin, lanosterol 14 alpha demethylase and PIM1. In addition, 12 genes with more detailed expression profiles were analyzed by RT-qPCR. One aegerolysin gene had a peak of expression in

  10. Canalization of gene expression in the Drosophila blastoderm by gap gene cross regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Developing embryos exhibit a robust capability to reduce phenotypic variations that occur naturally or as a result of experimental manipulation. This reduction in variation occurs by an epigenetic mechanism called canalization, a phenomenon which has resisted understanding because of a lack of necessary molecular data and of appropriate gene regulation models. In recent years, quantitative gene expression data have become available for the segment determination process in the Drosophila blastoderm, revealing a specific instance of canalization. These data show that the variation of the zygotic segmentation gene expression patterns is markedly reduced compared to earlier levels by the time gastrulation begins, and this variation is significantly lower than the variation of the maternal protein gradient Bicoid. We used a predictive dynamical model of gene regulation to study the effect of Bicoid variation on the downstream gap genes. The model correctly predicts the reduced variation of the gap gene expression patterns and allows the characterization of the canalizing mechanism. We show that the canalization is the result of specific regulatory interactions among the zygotic gap genes. We demonstrate the validity of this explanation by showing that variation is increased in embryos mutant for two gap genes, Krüppel and knirps, disproving competing proposals that canalization is due to an undiscovered morphogen, or that it does not take place at all. In an accompanying article in PLoS Computational Biology (doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000303, we show that cross regulation between the gap genes causes their expression to approach dynamical attractors, reducing initial variation and providing a robust output. These results demonstrate that the Bicoid gradient is not sufficient to produce gap gene borders having the low variance observed, and instead this low variance is generated by gap gene cross regulation. More generally, we show that the complex

  11. The cell cycle-regulated genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oliva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Many genes are regulated as an innate part of the eukaryotic cell cycle, and a complex transcriptional network helps enable the cyclic behavior of dividing cells. This transcriptional network has been studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast and elsewhere. To provide more perspective on these regulatory mechanisms, we have used microarrays to measure gene expression through the cell cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast. The 750 genes with the most significant oscillations were identified and analyzed. There were two broad waves of cell cycle transcription, one in early/mid G2 phase, and the other near the G2/M transition. The early/mid G2 wave included many genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, possibly explaining the cell cycle oscillation in protein synthesis in S. pombe. The G2/M wave included at least three distinctly regulated clusters of genes: one large cluster including mitosis, mitotic exit, and cell separation functions, one small cluster dedicated to DNA replication, and another small cluster dedicated to cytokinesis and division. S. pombe cell cycle genes have relatively long, complex promoters containing groups of multiple DNA sequence motifs, often of two, three, or more different kinds. Many of the genes, transcription factors, and regulatory mechanisms are conserved between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae. Finally, we found preliminary evidence for a nearly genome-wide oscillation in gene expression: 2,000 or more genes undergo slight oscillations in expression as a function of the cell cycle, although whether this is adaptive, or incidental to other events in the cell, such as chromatin condensation, we do not know.

  12. "Self-regulation," a new facet of Hox genes' function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rushikesh; Bastida, Maria Félix; Kmita, Marie; Ros, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Precise temporal and spatial expression of the clustered Hox genes is essential for patterning the developing embryo. Temporal activation of Hox genes was shown to be cluster-autonomous. However, gene clustering appears dispensable for spatial colinear expression. Generally, a set of Hox genes expressed in a group of cells instructs these cells about their fate such that the differential expression of Hox genes results in morphological diversity. The spatial colinearity is considered to rely both on local and long-range cis regulation. Here, we report on the global deregulation of HoxA and HoxD expression patterns upon inactivation of a subset of HOXA and HOXD proteins. Our data suggest the existence of a "self-regulation" mechanism, a process by which HOX proteins establish and/or maintain the spatial domains of the Hox gene family and we propose that the functionally dominant HOX proteins could contribute to generating the spatial parameters of Hox expression in a given tissue, i.e., HOX controlling the establishment of the ultimate HOX code. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Nucleoporin-mediated regulation of cell identity genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Arkaitz; Benner, Chris; Tyagi, Swati; Cool, Jonah; Hetzer, Martin W

    2016-10-15

    The organization of the genome in the three-dimensional space of the nucleus is coupled with cell type-specific gene expression. However, how nuclear architecture influences transcription that governs cell identity remains unknown. Here, we show that nuclear pore complex (NPC) components Nup93 and Nup153 bind superenhancers (SE), regulatory structures that drive the expression of key genes that specify cell identity. We found that nucleoporin-associated SEs localize preferentially to the nuclear periphery, and absence of Nup153 and Nup93 results in dramatic transcriptional changes of SE-associated genes. Our results reveal a crucial role of NPC components in the regulation of cell type-specifying genes and highlight nuclear architecture as a regulatory layer of genome functions in cell fate. © 2016 Ibarra et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  14. Drosha regulates gene expression independently of RNA cleavage function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromak, Natalia; Dienstbier, Martin; Macias, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Drosha is the main RNase III-like enzyme involved in the process of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis in the nucleus. Using whole-genome ChIP-on-chip analysis, we demonstrate that, in addition to miRNA sequences, Drosha specifically binds promoter-proximal regions of many human genes in a transcription......-dependent manner. This binding is not associated with miRNA production or RNA cleavage. Drosha knockdown in HeLa cells downregulated nascent gene transcription, resulting in a reduction of polyadenylated mRNA produced from these gene regions. Furthermore, we show that this function of Drosha is dependent on its N......-terminal protein-interaction domain, which associates with the RNA-binding protein CBP80 and RNA Polymerase II. Consequently, we uncover a previously unsuspected RNA cleavage-independent function of Drosha in the regulation of human gene expression....

  15. Achieving HIV-1 Control through RNA-Directed Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Klemm

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection has been transformed by combined anti-retroviral therapy (ART, changing a universally fatal infection into a controllable infection. However, major obstacles for an HIV-1 cure exist. The HIV latent reservoir, which exists in resting CD4+ T cells, is not impacted by ART, and can reactivate when ART is interrupted or ceased. Additionally, multi-drug resistance can arise. One alternate approach to conventional HIV-1 drug treatment that is being explored involves gene therapies utilizing RNA-directed gene regulation. Commonly known as RNA interference (RNAi, short interfering RNA (siRNA induce gene silencing in conserved biological pathways, which require a high degree of sequence specificity. This review will provide an overview of the silencing pathways, the current RNAi technologies being developed for HIV-1 gene therapy, current clinical trials, and the challenges faced in progressing these treatments into clinical trials.

  16. Drosha Regulates Gene Expression Independently of RNA Cleavage Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Gromak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Drosha is the main RNase III-like enzyme involved in the process of microRNA (miRNA biogenesis in the nucleus. Using whole-genome ChIP-on-chip analysis, we demonstrate that, in addition to miRNA sequences, Drosha specifically binds promoter-proximal regions of many human genes in a transcription-dependent manner. This binding is not associated with miRNA production or RNA cleavage. Drosha knockdown in HeLa cells downregulated nascent gene transcription, resulting in a reduction of polyadenylated mRNA produced from these gene regions. Furthermore, we show that this function of Drosha is dependent on its N-terminal protein-interaction domain, which associates with the RNA-binding protein CBP80 and RNA Polymerase II. Consequently, we uncover a previously unsuspected RNA cleavage-independent function of Drosha in the regulation of human gene expression.

  17. Artificial transcription factor-mediated regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tol, Niels; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2014-08-01

    The transcriptional regulation of endogenous genes with artificial transcription factors (TFs) can offer new tools for plant biotechnology. Three systems are available for mediating site-specific DNA recognition of artificial TFs: those based on zinc fingers, TALEs, and on the CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Artificial TFs require an effector domain that controls the frequency of transcription initiation at endogenous target genes. These effector domains can be transcriptional activators or repressors, but can also have enzymatic activities involved in chromatin remodeling or epigenetic regulation. Artificial TFs are able to regulate gene expression in trans, thus allowing them to evoke dominant mutant phenotypes. Large scale changes in transcriptional activity are induced when the DNA binding domain is deliberately designed to have lower binding specificity. This technique, known as genome interrogation, is a powerful tool for generating novel mutant phenotypes. Genome interrogation has clear mechanistic and practical advantages over activation tagging, which is the technique most closely resembling it. Most notably, genome interrogation can lead to the discovery of mutant phenotypes that are unlikely to be found when using more conventional single gene-based approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  19. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  20. Brucella abortus: pathogenicity and gene regulation of virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Rivas-Solano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Brucella abortus is a zoonotic intracellular facultative pathogen belonging to the subdivision α2 of class Proteobacteria. It causes a worldwide distributed zoonotic disease called brucellosis. The main symptoms are abortion and sterility in cattle, as well as an undulant febrile condition in humans. In endemic regions like Central America, brucellosis has a high socioeconomic impact. A basic research project was recently conducted at the ITCR with the purpose of studying gene regulation of virulence, structure and immunogenicity in B. abortus. The present review was written as part of this project. B. abortus virulence seems to be determined by its ability to invade, survive and replicate inside professional and non-professional phagocytes. It reaches its intracellular replicative niche without the activation of host antimicrobial mechanisms of innate immunity. It also has gene regulation mechanisms for a rapid adaptation to an intracellular environment such as the two-component signal transduction system BvrR/BvrS and the quorum sensing regulator called Vjbr, as well as other transcription factors. All of them integrate a complex gene regulation network.

  1. Local and global responses in complex gene regulation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Masa; Selvarajoo, Kumar; Piras, Vincent; Tomita, Masaru; Giuliani, Alessandro

    2009-04-01

    An exacerbated sensitivity to apparently minor stimuli and a general resilience of the entire system stay together side-by-side in biological systems. This apparent paradox can be explained by the consideration of biological systems as very strongly interconnected network systems. Some nodes of these networks, thanks to their peculiar location in the network architecture, are responsible for the sensitivity aspects, while the large degree of interconnection is at the basis of the resilience properties of the system. One relevant feature of the high degree of connectivity of gene regulation networks is the emergence of collective ordered phenomena influencing the entire genome and not only a specific portion of transcripts. The great majority of existing gene regulation models give the impression of purely local ‘hard-wired’ mechanisms disregarding the emergence of global ordered behavior encompassing thousands of genes while the general, genome wide, aspects are less known. Here we address, on a data analysis perspective, the discrimination between local and global scale regulations, this goal was achieved by means of the examination of two biological systems: innate immune response in macrophages and oscillating growth dynamics in yeast. Our aim was to reconcile the ‘hard-wired’ local view of gene regulation with a global continuous and scalable one borrowed from statistical physics. This reconciliation is based on the network paradigm in which the local ‘hard-wired’ activities correspond to the activation of specific crucial nodes in the regulation network, while the scalable continuous responses can be equated to the collective oscillations of the network after a perturbation.

  2. [Transcriptional regulation of aco gene cluster in Bacillus thuringiensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minzhong; Zhang, Jie; Gao, Jiguo; Song, Fuping

    2015-09-04

    We analyzed the transcriptional regulation of aco gene cluster and the phenotype of acoR mutant, to determine the effect of acoR deletion on sporulation efficiency and Cry protein production. Sequence of aco gene cluster in Bacillus thuringiensis was analyzed by sequence alignment. RT-PCR was carried out to reveal the transcriptional units of the aco gene cluster. acoR insertion mutant was constructed by homologous recombination. Transcriptional activity was analyzed by promoter fusions with lacZ gene. Comparison of the Cry1Ac protein production was determined by protein quantitation. The aco gene cluster was composed of four genes. The acoABCL formed one transcriptional unit. The transcriptional activity of acoA promoter sharply decreased in sigL and acoR mutants, respectively. Deletion of acoR had no effect on growth and Cry protein production, but decreased the motility of cells and sporulation efficiency. The aco gene cluster is controlled by Sigma 54 and activated by AcoR. Deletion of acoR has no effect on Cry protein production, but decreased the motility of the cells.

  3. The FAD2 Gene in Plants: Occurrence, Regulation, and Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aejaz A. Dar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable oils rich in oleic acid are more desirable than oils rich in polyunsaturated and saturated fatty acids. The biological switch of oleic acid to linoleic acid is facilitated by fatty acid desaturase 2 enzyme that is further classified into FAD2-1, FAD2-2, FAD2-3, and FAD2-4. The genes coding these enzymes have high sequence similarity, but differ mostly in their expression patterns. The seed-type FAD2 genes had evolved independently after segregation by duplication from constitutively expressed FAD2 genes. Temperature, light and wounding effectively regulate FAD2 expression in plants. FAD2 genes are expressed differently in different tissues of the plant, and the over-expression of FAD2 modifies physiological and vegetative characteristics. The activity of FAD2 leads to an increase in the content of dienoic fatty acids, and hence increases the resistance toward cold and salt stress. The thorough study of the FAD2 gene is important for understanding the expression, regulation and mechanism that will help in improving the quality of oil and stress resistance in plants.

  4. Computational identification of transcriptionally co-regulated genes, validation with the four ANT isoform genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dupont Pierre-Yves

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of gene promoters is essential to understand the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation required under the effects of physiological processes, nutritional intake or pathologies. In higher eukaryotes, transcriptional regulation implies the recruitment of a set of regulatory proteins that bind on combinations of nucleotide motifs. We developed a computational analysis of promoter nucleotide sequences, to identify co-regulated genes by combining several programs that allowed us to build regulatory models and perform a crossed analysis on several databases. This strategy was tested on a set of four human genes encoding isoforms 1 to 4 of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier ANT. Each isoform has a specific tissue expression profile linked to its role in cellular bioenergetics. Results From their promoter sequence and from the phylogenetic evolution of these ANT genes in mammals, we constructed combinations of specific regulatory elements. These models were screened using the full human genome and databases of promoter sequences from human and several other mammalian species. For each of transcriptionally regulated ANT1, 2 and 4 genes, a set of co-regulated genes was identified and their over-expression was verified in microarray databases. Conclusions Most of the identified genes encode proteins with a cellular function and specificity in agreement with those of the corresponding ANT isoform. Our in silico study shows that the tissue specific gene expression is mainly driven by promoter regulatory sequences located up to about a thousand base pairs upstream the transcription start site. Moreover, this computational strategy on the study of regulatory pathways should provide, along with transcriptomics and metabolomics, data to construct cellular metabolic networks.

  5. Differential regulation of NAB corepressor genes in Schwann cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachdev Shrikesh

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myelination of peripheral nerves by Schwann cells requires not only the Egr2/Krox-20 transactivator, but also the NGFI-A/Egr-binding (NAB corepressors, which modulate activity of Egr2. Previous work has shown that axon-dependent expression of Egr2 is mediated by neuregulin stimulation, and NAB corepressors are co-regulated with Egr2 expression in peripheral nerve development. NAB corepressors have also been implicated in macrophage development, cardiac hypertrophy, prostate carcinogenesis, and feedback regulation involved in hindbrain development. Results To test the mechanism of NAB regulation in Schwann cells, transfection assays revealed that both Nab1 and Nab2 promoters are activated by Egr2 expression. Furthermore, direct binding of Egr2 at these promoters was demonstrated in vivo by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of myelinating sciatic nerve, and binding of Egr2 to the Nab2 promoter was stimulated by neuregulin in primary Schwann cells. Although Egr2 expression activates the Nab2 promoter more highly than Nab1, we surprisingly found that only Nab1 – but not Nab2 – expression levels were reduced in sciatic nerve from Egr2 null mice. Analysis of the Nab2 promoter showed that it is also activated by ETS proteins (Ets2 and Etv1/ER81 and is bound by Ets2 in vivo. Conclusion Overall, these results indicate that induction of Nab2 expression in Schwann cells involves not only Egr2, but also ETS proteins that are activated by neuregulin stimulation. Although Nab1 and Nab2 play partially redundant roles, regulation of Nab2 expression by ETS factors explains several observations regarding regulation of NAB genes. Finally, these data suggest that NAB proteins are not only feedback inhibitors of Egr2, but rather that co-induction of Egr2 and NAB genes is involved in forming an Egr2/NAB complex that is crucial for regulation of gene expression.

  6. Cloning and regulation of the rat mdr2 gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, P C; Thorgeirsson, S.S.; Silverman, J A

    1993-01-01

    We have cloned the complete cDNA encoding the rat mdr2 gene by a combination of library screening and the polymerase chain reaction. The sequence of rat mdr2 cDNA is highly similar to other members of the mdr gene family but the initiation of transcription, tissue distribution and regulation of expression of rat mdr2 diverge from the other isoforms. Primer extension analysis showed rat mdr2 mRNA to have a major transcription start point at -277 and a minor one at approximately -518. We constr...

  7. Gene regulation and the origins of human biological uniqueness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholtis, Samuel J; Noonan, James P

    2010-03-01

    What makes us human? It is likely that changes in gene expression and regulation, in addition to those in protein-coding genes, drove the evolution of uniquely human biological traits. In this review, we discuss how efforts to annotate regulatory functions in the human genome are being combined with maps of human-specific sequence acceleration to identify cis-regulatory elements with human-specific activity. Although the evolutionary interpretation of these events is a subject of considerable debate, the technical and analytical means are now at hand to identify the set of evolutionary genetic events that shaped our species. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mechanisms of biotin-regulated gene expression in microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Satiaputra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biotin is an essential micronutrient that acts as a co-factor for biotin-dependent metabolic enzymes. In bacteria, the supply of biotin can be achieved by de novo synthesis or import from exogenous sources. Certain bacteria are able to obtain biotin through both mechanisms while others can only fulfill their biotin requirement through de novo synthesis. Inability to fulfill their cellular demand for biotin can have detrimental consequences on cell viability and virulence. Therefore understanding the transcriptional mechanisms that regulate biotin biosynthesis and transport will extend our knowledge about bacterial survival and metabolic adaptation during pathogenesis when the supply of biotin is limited. The most extensively characterized protein that regulates biotin synthesis and uptake is BirA. In certain bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, BirA is a bi-functional protein that serves as a transcriptional repressor to regulate biotin biosynthesis genes, as well as acting as a ligase to catalyze the biotinylation of biotin-dependent enzymes. Recent studies have identified two other proteins that also regulate biotin synthesis and transport, namely BioQ and BioR. This review summarizes the different transcriptional repressors and their mechanism of action. Moreover, the ability to regulate the expression of target genes through the activity of a vitamin, such as biotin, may have biotechnological applications in synthetic biology.

  9. Developmental regulation of neuronal genes by DNA methylation: environmental influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Melinda E; Sengoku, Tomoko

    2013-10-01

    Steroid hormones have wide-ranging organizational, activational and protective actions in the brain. In particular, the organizational effects of early exposure to 17β-estradiol (E2) and glucocorticoids are essential for long-lasting behavioral and cognitive functions. Both steroid hormones mediate many of their actions through intracellular receptors that act as transcription factors. In the rodent cerebral cortex, estrogen receptor mRNA and protein expression are high early in postnatal life and declines dramatically as the animal approaches puberty. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving this developmental regulation of gene expression is critical for understanding the complex events that determine lasting brain physiology and prime the plasticity of neurons. Gene expression can be suppressed by the epigenetic modification of the promoter regions by DNA methylation that results in gene silencing. Indeed, the decrease in ERα mRNA expression in the cortex during development is accompanied by an increase in promoter methylation. Numerous environmental stimuli can alter the DNA methylation that occurs for ERα, glucocorticoid receptors, as well as many other critical genes involved in neuronal development. For example, maternal behavior toward pups can alter epigenetic regulation of ERα mRNA expression. Additionally perinatal stress and exposure to environmental estrogens can also have lasting effects on gene expression by modifying DNA methylation of these important genes. Taken together, there appears to be a critical window during development where, outside factors that alter epigenetic programming can have lasting effects on neuronal gene expression. Copyright © 2013 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Every which way--nanos gene regulation in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulhen, Nathalie; Wessel, Gary M

    2014-03-01

    Nanos is an essential factor of germ line success in all animals tested. This gene encodes a Zn-finger RNA-binding protein that in complex with its partner pumilio binds to and changes the fate of several known transcripts. We summarize here the documented functions of Nanos in several key organisms, and then emphasize echinoderms as a working model for how nanos expression is regulated. Nanos presence outside of the target cells is often detrimental to the animal, and in sea urchins, nanos expression appears to be regulated at every step of transcription, and post-transcriptional activity, making this gene product exciting, every which way. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Regulation of clock-controlled genes in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bozek

    Full Text Available The complexity of tissue- and day time-specific regulation of thousands of clock-controlled genes (CCGs suggests that many regulatory mechanisms contribute to the transcriptional output of the circadian clock. We aim to predict these mechanisms using a large scale promoter analysis of CCGs.Our study is based on a meta-analysis of DNA-array data from rodent tissues. We searched in the promoter regions of 2065 CCGs for highly overrepresented transcription factor binding sites. In order to compensate the relatively high GC-content of CCG promoters, a novel background model to avoid a bias towards GC-rich motifs was employed. We found that many of the transcription factors with overrepresented binding sites in CCG promoters exhibit themselves circadian rhythms. Among the predicted factors are known regulators such as CLOCKratioBMAL1, DBP, HLF, E4BP4, CREB, RORalpha and the recently described regulators HSF1, STAT3, SP1 and HNF-4alpha. As additional promising candidates of circadian transcriptional regulators PAX-4, C/EBP, EVI-1, IRF, E2F, AP-1, HIF-1 and NF-Y were identified. Moreover, GC-rich motifs (SP1, EGR, ZF5, AP-2, WT1, NRF-1 and AT-rich motifs (MEF-2, HMGIY, HNF-1, OCT-1 are significantly overrepresented in promoter regions of CCGs. Putative tissue-specific binding sites such as HNF-3 for liver, NKX2.5 for heart or Myogenin for skeletal muscle were found. The regulation of the erythropoietin (Epo gene was analysed, which exhibits many binding sites for circadian regulators. We provide experimental evidence for its circadian regulated expression in the adult murine kidney. Basing on a comprehensive literature search we integrate our predictions into a regulatory network of core clock and clock-controlled genes. Our large scale analysis of the CCG promoters reveals the complexity and extensiveness of the circadian regulation in mammals. Results of this study point to connections of the circadian clock to other functional systems including

  12. Regulation of Clock-Controlled Genes in Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielbasa, Szymon M.; Heine, Markus; Dame, Christof; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of tissue- and day time-specific regulation of thousands of clock-controlled genes (CCGs) suggests that many regulatory mechanisms contribute to the transcriptional output of the circadian clock. We aim to predict these mechanisms using a large scale promoter analysis of CCGs. Our study is based on a meta-analysis of DNA-array data from rodent tissues. We searched in the promoter regions of 2065 CCGs for highly overrepresented transcription factor binding sites. In order to compensate the relatively high GC-content of CCG promoters, a novel background model to avoid a bias towards GC-rich motifs was employed. We found that many of the transcription factors with overrepresented binding sites in CCG promoters exhibit themselves circadian rhythms. Among the predicted factors are known regulators such as CLOCK∶BMAL1, DBP, HLF, E4BP4, CREB, RORα and the recently described regulators HSF1, STAT3, SP1 and HNF-4α. As additional promising candidates of circadian transcriptional regulators PAX-4, C/EBP, EVI-1, IRF, E2F, AP-1, HIF-1 and NF-Y were identified. Moreover, GC-rich motifs (SP1, EGR, ZF5, AP-2, WT1, NRF-1) and AT-rich motifs (MEF-2, HMGIY, HNF-1, OCT-1) are significantly overrepresented in promoter regions of CCGs. Putative tissue-specific binding sites such as HNF-3 for liver, NKX2.5 for heart or Myogenin for skeletal muscle were found. The regulation of the erythropoietin (Epo) gene was analysed, which exhibits many binding sites for circadian regulators. We provide experimental evidence for its circadian regulated expression in the adult murine kidney. Basing on a comprehensive literature search we integrate our predictions into a regulatory network of core clock and clock-controlled genes. Our large scale analysis of the CCG promoters reveals the complexity and extensiveness of the circadian regulation in mammals. Results of this study point to connections of the circadian clock to other functional systems including metabolism, endocrine

  13. Cognitive analysis of schizophrenia risk genes that function as epigenetic regulators of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, Laura; Cosgrove, Donna; Clarkson, Christopher; Harold, Denise; Kendall, Kimberley; Richards, Alex; Mantripragada, Kiran; Owen, Michael J; O'Donovan, Michael C; Walters, James; Hartmann, Annette; Konte, Betina; Rujescu, Dan; Gill, Michael; Corvin, Aiden; Rea, Stephen; Donohoe, Gary; Morris, Derek W

    2016-12-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are an important heritable and dynamic means of regulating various genomic functions, including gene expression, to orchestrate brain development, adult neurogenesis, and synaptic plasticity. These processes when perturbed are thought to contribute to schizophrenia pathophysiology. A core feature of schizophrenia is cognitive dysfunction. For genetic disorders where cognitive impairment is more severe such as intellectual disability, there are a disproportionally high number of genes involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Evidence now supports some shared genetic aetiology between schizophrenia and intellectual disability. GWAS have identified 108 chromosomal regions associated with schizophrenia risk that span 350 genes. This study identified genes mapping to those loci that have epigenetic functions, and tested the risk alleles defining those loci for association with cognitive deficits. We developed a list of 350 genes with epigenetic functions and cross-referenced this with the GWAS loci. This identified eight candidate genes: BCL11B, CHD7, EP300, EPC2, GATAD2A, KDM3B, RERE, SATB2. Using a dataset of Irish psychosis cases and controls (n = 1235), the schizophrenia risk SNPs at these loci were tested for effects on IQ, working memory, episodic memory, and attention. Strongest associations were for rs6984242 with both measures of IQ (P = 0.001) and episodic memory (P = 0.007). We link rs6984242 to CHD7 via a long range eQTL. These associations were not replicated in independent samples. Our study highlights that a number of genes mapping to risk loci for schizophrenia may function as epigenetic regulators of gene expression but further studies are required to establish a role for these genes in cognition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Evolution of stress-regulated gene expression in duplicate genes of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zou

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the selection pressure imposed by highly variable environmental conditions, stress sensing and regulatory response mechanisms in plants are expected to evolve rapidly. One potential source of innovation in plant stress response mechanisms is gene duplication. In this study, we examined the evolution of stress-regulated gene expression among duplicated genes in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Key to this analysis was reconstructing the putative ancestral stress regulation pattern. By comparing the expression patterns of duplicated genes with the patterns of their ancestors, duplicated genes likely lost and gained stress responses at a rapid rate initially, but the rate is close to zero when the synonymous substitution rate (a proxy for time is > approximately 0.8. When considering duplicated gene pairs, we found that partitioning of putative ancestral stress responses occurred more frequently compared to cases of parallel retention and loss. Furthermore, the pattern of stress response partitioning was extremely asymmetric. An analysis of putative cis-acting DNA regulatory elements in the promoters of the duplicated stress-regulated genes indicated that the asymmetric partitioning of ancestral stress responses are likely due, at least in part, to differential loss of DNA regulatory elements; the duplicated genes losing most of their stress responses were those that had lost more of the putative cis-acting elements. Finally, duplicate genes that lost most or all of the ancestral responses are more likely to have gained responses to other stresses. Therefore, the retention of duplicates that inherit few or no functions seems to be coupled to neofunctionalization. Taken together, our findings provide new insight into the patterns of evolutionary changes in gene stress responses after duplication and lay the foundation for testing the adaptive significance of stress regulatory changes under highly variable biotic and abiotic environments.

  15. Regulation of cry Gene Expression in Bacillus thuringiensis

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Deng; Qi Peng; Fuping Song; Didier Lereclus

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis differs from the closely related Bacillus cereus group species by its ability to produce crystalline inclusions. The production of these crystals mainly results from the expression of the cry genes, from the stability of their transcripts and from the synthesis, accumulation and crystallization of large amounts of insecticidal Cry proteins. This process normally coincides with sporulation and is regulated by various factors operating at the transcriptional, post-transcr...

  16. Regulation of cry gene expression in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chao; Peng, Qi; Song, Fuping; Lereclus, Didier

    2014-07-23

    Bacillus thuringiensis differs from the closely related Bacillus cereus group species by its ability to produce crystalline inclusions. The production of these crystals mainly results from the expression of the cry genes, from the stability of their transcripts and from the synthesis, accumulation and crystallization of large amounts of insecticidal Cry proteins. This process normally coincides with sporulation and is regulated by various factors operating at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, metabolic and post-translational levels.

  17. Regulation of cry Gene Expression in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Deng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis differs from the closely related Bacillus cereus group species by its ability to produce crystalline inclusions. The production of these crystals mainly results from the expression of the cry genes, from the stability of their transcripts and from the synthesis, accumulation and crystallization of large amounts of insecticidal Cry proteins. This process normally coincides with sporulation and is regulated by various factors operating at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, metabolic and post-translational levels.

  18. Statistical modelling of transcript profiles of differentially regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeant Martin J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vast quantities of gene expression profiling data produced in microarray studies, and the more precise quantitative PCR, are often not statistically analysed to their full potential. Previous studies have summarised gene expression profiles using simple descriptive statistics, basic analysis of variance (ANOVA and the clustering of genes based on simple models fitted to their expression profiles over time. We report the novel application of statistical non-linear regression modelling techniques to describe the shapes of expression profiles for the fungus Agaricus bisporus, quantified by PCR, and for E. coli and Rattus norvegicus, using microarray technology. The use of parametric non-linear regression models provides a more precise description of expression profiles, reducing the "noise" of the raw data to produce a clear "signal" given by the fitted curve, and describing each profile with a small number of biologically interpretable parameters. This approach then allows the direct comparison and clustering of the shapes of response patterns between genes and potentially enables a greater exploration and interpretation of the biological processes driving gene expression. Results Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR-derived time-course data of genes were modelled. "Split-line" or "broken-stick" regression identified the initial time of gene up-regulation, enabling the classification of genes into those with primary and secondary responses. Five-day profiles were modelled using the biologically-oriented, critical exponential curve, y(t = A + (B + CtRt + ε. This non-linear regression approach allowed the expression patterns for different genes to be compared in terms of curve shape, time of maximal transcript level and the decline and asymptotic response levels. Three distinct regulatory patterns were identified for the five genes studied. Applying the regression modelling approach to microarray-derived time course data

  19. Core promoter functions in the regulation of gene expression of Drosophila dorsal target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehavi, Yonathan; Kuznetsov, Olga; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2014-04-25

    Developmental processes are highly dependent on transcriptional regulation by RNA polymerase II. The RNA polymerase II core promoter is the ultimate target of a multitude of transcription factors that control transcription initiation. Core promoters consist of core promoter motifs, e.g. the initiator, TATA box, and the downstream core promoter element (DPE), which confer specific properties to the core promoter. Here, we explored the importance of core promoter functions in the dorsal-ventral developmental gene regulatory network. This network includes multiple genes that are activated by different nuclear concentrations of Dorsal, an NFκB homolog transcription factor, along the dorsal-ventral axis. We show that over two-thirds of Dorsal target genes contain DPE sequence motifs, which is significantly higher than the proportion of DPE-containing promoters in Drosophila genes. We demonstrate that multiple Dorsal target genes are evolutionarily conserved and functionally dependent on the DPE. Furthermore, we have analyzed the activation of key Dorsal target genes by Dorsal, as well as by another Rel family transcription factor, Relish, and the dependence of their activation on the DPE motif. Using hybrid enhancer-promoter constructs in Drosophila cells and embryo extracts, we have demonstrated that the core promoter composition is an important determinant of transcriptional activity of Dorsal target genes. Taken together, our results provide evidence for the importance of core promoter composition in the regulation of Dorsal target genes.

  20. Conservation of noncoding microsatellites in plants: implication for gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xiaofen

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellites are extremely common in plant genomes, and in particular, they are significantly enriched in the 5' noncoding regions. Although some 5' noncoding microsatellites involved in gene regulation have been described, the general properties of microsatellites as regulatory elements are still unknown. To address the question of microsatellites associated with regulatory elements, we have analyzed the conserved noncoding microsatellite sequences (CNMSs in the 5' noncoding regions by inter- and intragenomic phylogenetic footprinting in the Arabidopsis and Brassica genomes. Results We identified 247 Arabidopsis-Brassica orthologous and 122 Arabidopsis paralogous CNMSs, representing 491 CT/GA and CTT/GAA repeats, which accounted for 10.6% of these types located in the 500-bp regions upstream of coding sequences in the Arabidopsis genome. Among these identified CNMSs, 18 microsatellites show high conservation in the regulatory regions of both orthologous and paralogous genes, and some of them also appear in the corresponding positions of more distant homologs in Arabidopsis, as well as in other plants. A computational scan of CNMSs for known cis-regulatory elements showed that light responsive elements were clustered in the region of CT/GA repeats, as well as salicylic acid responsive elements in the (CTTn/(GAAn sequences. Patterns of gene expression revealed that 70–80% of CNMS (CTTn/(GAAn associated genes were regulated by salicylic acid, which was consistent with the prediction of regulatory elements in silico. Conclusion Our analyses showed that some noncoding microsatellites were conserved in plants and appeared to be ancient. These CNMSs served as regulatory elements involved in light and salicylic acid responses. Our findings might have implications in the common features of the over-represented microsatellites for gene regulation in plant-specific pathways.

  1. Structure and regulation of the Asr gene family in banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Isabelle M; Carpentier, Sebastien C; Pampurova, Suzana; Van Hoylandt, Anais; Panis, Bart; Swennen, Rony; Remy, Serge

    2011-10-01

    Abscisic acid, stress, ripening proteins (ASR) are a family of plant-specific small hydrophilic proteins. Studies in various plant species have highlighted their role in increased resistance to abiotic stress, including drought, but their specific function remains unknown. As a first step toward their potential use in crop improvement, we investigated the structure and regulation of the Asr gene family in Musa species (bananas and plantains). We determined that the Musa Asr gene family contained at least four members, all of which exhibited the typical two exons, one intron structure of Asr genes and the "ABA/WDS" (abscisic acid/water deficit stress) domain characteristic of Asr genes. Phylogenetic analyses determined that the Musa Asr genes were closely related to each other, probably as the product of recent duplication events. For two of the four members, two versions corresponding to the two sub-genomes of Musa, acuminata and balbisiana were identified. Gene expression and protein analyses were performed and Asr expression could be detected in meristem cultures, root, pseudostem, leaf and cormus. In meristem cultures, mAsr1 and mAsr3 were induced by osmotic stress and wounding, while mAsr3 and mAsr4 were induced by exposure to ABA. mASR3 exhibited the most variation both in terms of amino acid sequence and expression pattern, making it the most promising candidate for further functional study and use in crop improvement.

  2. Alternative RNA Structure-Coupled Gene Regulations in Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Chi Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative RNA structures (ARSs, or alternative transcript isoforms, are critical for regulating cellular phenotypes in humans. In addition to generating functionally diverse protein isoforms from a single gene, ARS can alter the sequence contents of 5'/3' untranslated regions (UTRs and intronic regions, thus also affecting the regulatory effects of these regions. ARS may introduce premature stop codon(s into a transcript, and render the transcript susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay, which in turn can influence the overall gene expression level. Meanwhile, ARS can regulate the presence/absence of upstream open reading frames and microRNA targeting sites in 5'UTRs and 3'UTRs, respectively, thus affecting translational efficiencies and protein expression levels. Furthermore, since ARS may alter exon-intron structures, it can influence the biogenesis of intronic microRNAs and indirectly affect the expression of the target genes of these microRNAs. The connections between ARS and multiple regulatory mechanisms underline the importance of ARS in determining cell fate. Accumulating evidence indicates that ARS-coupled regulations play important roles in tumorigenesis. Here I will review our current knowledge in this field, and discuss potential future directions.

  3. Regulation of heat-shock genes in bacteria: from signal sensing to gene expression output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncarati, Davide; Scarlato, Vincenzo

    2017-07-01

    The heat-shock response is a mechanism of cellular protection against sudden adverse environmental growth conditions and results in the prompt production of various heat-shock proteins. In bacteria, specific sensory biomolecules sense temperature fluctuations and transduce intercellular signals that coordinate gene expression outputs. Sensory biomolecules, also known as thermosensors, include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) and proteins. Once a stress signal is perceived, it is transduced to invoke specific molecular mechanisms controlling transcription of genes coding for heat-shock proteins. Transcriptional regulation of heat-shock genes can be under either positive or negative control mediated by dedicated regulatory proteins. Positive regulation exploits specific alternative sigma factors to redirect the RNA polymerase enzyme to a subset of selected promoters, while negative regulation is mediated by transcriptional repressors. Interestingly, while various bacteria adopt either exclusively positive or negative mechanisms, in some microorganisms these two opposite strategies coexist, establishing complex networks regulating heat-shock genes. Here, we comprehensively summarize molecular mechanisms that microorganisms have adopted to finely control transcription of heat-shock genes. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Regulation in vitro of Metallothionein Gene Binding Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Carl; Hamer, Dean H.

    1987-03-01

    Mouse nuclear factors that bind to an upstream metal regulatory element of the mouse metallothionein-I gene have been identified by DNA footprinting and oligonucleotide band shift assays. The formation of complexes at this site can be activated 20- to 40- fold by the in vitro addition of ionic cadmium. The activation reaction is rapid, reversible by a metal chelator, and may involve multiple proteins. These results suggest that the initial step in cadmium detoxification is an interaction between the metal and nuclear DNA-binding factors leading to an increase in metallothionein gene transcription. The ability to observe metal activation in vitro makes this a powerful system to study the biochemistry of eukaryotic gene regulation.

  5. Methods and compositions for regulating gene expression in plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachy, Roger N. (Inventor); Luis, Maria Isabel Ordiz (Inventor); Dai, Shunhong (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Novel chimeric plant promoter sequences are provided, together with plant gene expression cassettes comprising such sequences. In certain preferred embodiments, the chimeric plant promoters comprise the BoxII cis element and/or derivatives thereof. In addition, novel transcription factors are provided, together with nucleic acid sequences encoding such transcription factors and plant gene expression cassettes comprising such nucleic acid sequences. In certain preferred embodiments, the novel transcription factors comprise the acidic domain, or fragments thereof, of the RF2a transcription factor. Methods for using the chimeric plant promoter sequences and novel transcription factors in regulating the expression of at least one gene of interest are provided, together with transgenic plants comprising such chimeric plant promoter sequences and novel transcription factors.

  6. Osmotic pressure can regulate matrix gene expression in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Shmuel M; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; McLoon, Anna; Chai, Liraz; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard; Weitz, David A

    2012-10-01

    Many bacteria organize themselves into structurally complex communities known as biofilms in which the cells are held together by an extracellular matrix. In general, the amount of extracellular matrix is related to the robustness of the biofilm. Yet, the specific signals that regulate the synthesis of matrix remain poorly understood. Here we show that the matrix itself can be a cue that regulates the expression of the genes involved in matrix synthesis in Bacillus subtilis. The presence of the exopolysaccharide component of the matrix causes an increase in osmotic pressure that leads to an inhibition of matrix gene expression. We further show that non-specific changes in osmotic pressure also inhibit matrix gene expression and do so by activating the histidine kinase KinD. KinD, in turn, directs the phosphorylation of the master regulatory protein Spo0A, which at high levels represses matrix gene expression. Sensing a physical cue such as osmotic pressure, in addition to chemical cues, could be a strategy to non-specifically co-ordinate the behaviour of cells in communities composed of many different species. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. LEF-1 Regulates Tyrosinase Gene Transcription In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueping Wang

    Full Text Available TYR, DCT and MITF are three important genes involved in maintaining the mature phenotype and producing melanin; they therefore participate in neural crest cell development into melanocytes. Previous studies have revealed that the Wnt signaling factor lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (LEF-1 can enhance DCT and MITF gene expression. However, whether LEF-1 also affects TYR gene expression remains unclear. In the present study, we found that LEF-1 regulated TYR transcription in vitro. LEF-1 overexpression increased TYR gene promoter activity, whereas LEF-1 knockdown by RNA interference significantly decreased TYR expression. Moreover, the core GTTTGAT sequence (-56 to -50 within the TYR promoter is essential for the effect of LEF-1 on TYR expression, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay indicated that endogenous LEF-1 interacts with the TYR promoter. In addition, we observed a synergistic transactivation of the TYR promoter by LEF-1 and MITF. These data suggest that Wnt signaling plays an important role in regulating melanocyte development and differentiation.

  8. MTA3 regulates CGB5 and Snail genes in trophoblast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Miyazaki, Jun [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Division of Molecular Genetics, Institute for Comprehensive Medical Science, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Nishizawa, Haruki [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Kurahashi, Hiroki [Division of Molecular Genetics, Institute for Comprehensive Medical Science, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Leach, Richard, E-mail: Richard.Leach@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health, Spectrum Health Medical Group, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Wang, Kai, E-mail: Kai.Wang@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Impaired MTA3, raised CGB5 and Snail expression are associated with preeclampsia. •Knock-down of MTA3 causes up-regulation of CGB5 and Snail genes in BeWo cells. •MTA3 occupies CGB5 and Snail gene promoters in BeWo cells. -- Abstract: Secreted by the placental trophoblast, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is an important hormone during pregnancy and is required for the maintenance of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that dys-regulation of hCG expression is associated with preeclampsia. However, the exact relationship between altered hCG levels and development of preeclampsia is unknown. Metastasis associated protein 3 (MTA3), a chromatin remodeling protein, is abundantly expressed in the placental trophoblasts, but its function is unknown. In breast cancer, MTA3 has been shown to repress the expression of Snail and cell migration. However, whether MTA3 acts similarly in the trophoblast has not been investigated. In the present study, we examined the role of MTA3 in regulating the hCG β-subunit gene (gene name: CGB5) and Snail expression in the trophoblast cell line, BeWo, as well as its relevance to the high hCG expression levels seen in preeclampsia. First, we investigated MTA3 expression in preeclamptic placenta as compared to normal control placenta via gene expression microarray and qRT-PCR and found that MTA3 was significantly down-regulated, whereas both CGB5 and Snail were up-regulated in preeclamptic placenta. Secondly, we knocked down MTA3 gene in trophoblast cell line BeWo and found Snail and hCG were both up-regulated, suggesting that MTA3 represses Snail and hCG gene expression in trophoblasts. Next, we cloned the CGB5 and Snail promoters into the pGL3-basic vector individually and found that silencing of MTA3 by siRNA resulted in an increase of both CGB5 and Snail promoter activities. To confirm that this MTA3 inhibition is a direct effect, we performed a chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) assay and found that MTA3

  9. An optimized, chemically regulated gene expression system for Chlamydomonas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Ferrante

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model system for algal and cell biology and is used for biotechnological applications, such as molecular farming or biological hydrogen production. The Chlamydomonas metal-responsive CYC6 promoter is repressed by copper and induced by nickel ions. However, induction by nickel is weak in some strains, poorly reversible by chelating agents like EDTA, and causes, at high concentrations, toxicity side effects on Chlamydomonas growth. Removal of these bottlenecks will encourage the wide use of this promoter as a chemically regulated gene expression system. METHODOLOGY: Using a codon-optimized Renilla luciferase as a reporter gene, we explored several strategies to improve the strength and reversibility of CYC6 promoter induction. Use of the first intron of the RBCS2 gene or of a modified TAP medium increases the strength of CYC6 induction up to 20-fold. In the modified medium, induction is also obtained after addition of specific copper chelators, like TETA. At low concentrations (up to 10 microM TETA is a more efficient inducer than Ni, which becomes a very efficient inducer at higher concentrations (50 microM. Neither TETA nor Ni show toxicity effects at the concentrations used. Unlike induction by Ni, induction by TETA is completely reversible by micromolar copper concentrations, thus resulting in a transient "wave" in luciferase activity, which can be repeated in subsequent growth cycles. CONCLUSIONS: We have worked out a chemically regulated gene expression system that can be finely tuned to produce temporally controlled "waves" in gene expression. The use of cassettes containing the CYC6 promoter, and of modified growth media, is a reliable and economically sustainable system for the temporally controlled expression of foreign genes in Chlamydomonas.

  10. Decorin gene expression and its regulation in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velez-DelValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Castro-Munozledo, Federico [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico); Kuri-Harcuch, Walid, E-mail: walidkuri@gmail.com [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} We showed that cultured human diploid epidermal keratinocytes express and synthesize decorin. {yields} Decorin is found intracytoplasmic in suprabasal cells of cultures and in human epidermis. {yields} Decorin mRNA expression in cHEK is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. {yields} Decorin immunostaining of psoriatic lesions showed a lower intensity and altered intracytoplasmic arrangements. -- Abstract: In various cell types, including cancer cells, decorin is involved in regulation of cell attachment, migration and proliferation. In skin, decorin is seen in dermis, but not in keratinocytes. We show that decorin gene (DCN) is expressed in the cultured keratinocytes, and the protein is found in the cytoplasm of differentiating keratinocytes and in suprabasal layers of human epidermis. RT-PCR experiments showed that DCN expression is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. Our data suggest that decorin should play a significant role in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, cutaneous homeostasis and dermatological diseases.

  11. Tradeoffs and optimality in the evolution of gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelwijk, Frank J; de Vos, Marjon G J; Tans, Sander J

    2011-08-05

    Cellular regulation is believed to evolve in response to environmental variability. However, this has been difficult to test directly. Here, we show that a gene regulation system evolves to the optimal regulatory response when challenged with variable environments. We engineered a genetic module subject to regulation by the lac repressor (LacI) in E. coli, whose expression is beneficial in one environmental condition and detrimental in another. Measured tradeoffs in fitness between environments predict the competition between regulatory phenotypes. We show that regulatory evolution in adverse environments is delayed at specific boundaries in the phenotype space of the regulatory LacI protein. Once this constraint is relieved by mutation, adaptation proceeds toward the optimum, yielding LacI with an altered allosteric mechanism that enables an opposite response to its regulatory ligand IPTG. Our results indicate that regulatory evolution can be understood in terms of tradeoff optimization theory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Transcriptional regulation of bkd gene cluster in Bacillus thuringiensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guannan; Peng, Qi; Zheng, Qingyun; Li, Jie; Zhang, Jie

    2014-10-04

    In order to determine the effect of bkdR deletion on Cry protein production. We analyzed the transcriptional regulation of bkd gene cluster and the phenotype of bkdR mutant. Sequence of bkd gene cluster in Bacillus thuringiensis was analyzed by sequence alignment. RT-PCRwas used to reveal the transcriptional units of the bkd gene cluster. bkdR insertion mutant was constructed by homologous recombination. Transcriptional activity was analyzed by promoter fusions with lacZ gene. Comparison of the CrylAc protein production was determined by protein quantitation. The bkd gene cluster was composed of eight genes. The ptb-bkdB formed one transcriptional unit. The transcriptional activity of ptb sharply decreased in sigL and bkdR mutants. Deletion of bkdR decreased the motility of cells, but no effect on growth, sporulation efficiency and Cry protein production. The bkd gene cluster is controlled by Sigma 54 and activated by BkdR. Deletion of bkdR has no effect on Cry protein production, but decreased the motility of the cells. The bkd gene cluster is controlled by Sigma 54 and activated by BkdR. Deletion of bkdR has nb effect on Cry protein production, but decreased the motility of the cells. It suggested that deletion of bkdR do not affect the Cry protein production the same as sigL mutant. It means decreasing of Cry protein productioninsigL mutant was not caused by only one EBP mutation, but might be multiple roles.

  13. Regulation of lux Genes in Vibrio fischeri: Control of Symbiosis-Related Gene Expression System in a Marine Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-04

    RR04106 411d019 11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) U. Regulation of lux Genes in Vibrio fischeri : Control of a Symbiosis-Related Gene Expression...communication - - 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) The lux genes of Vibrio fischeri encode the ability of this...Regulation of lux Genes in Vibrio fischeri : Control of a Symbiosis-related Gene Expression System in a Marine Bacterium START DATE: 15 August 1988

  14. Detection and sequence analysis of accessory gene regulator genes of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ananda Chitra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (SP is the major pathogenic species of dogs involved in a wide variety of skin and soft tissue infections. The accessory gene regulator (agr locus of Staphylococcus aureus has been extensively studied, and it influences the expression of many virulence genes. It encodes a two-component signal transduction system that leads to down-regulation of surface proteins and up-regulation of secreted proteins during in vitro growth of S. aureus. The objective of this study was to detect and sequence analyzing the AgrA, B, and D of SP isolated from canine skin infections. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have isolated and identified SP from canine pyoderma and otitis cases by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and confirmed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Primers for SP agrA and agrBD genes were designed using online primer designing software and BLAST searched for its specificity. Amplification of the agr genes was carried out for 53 isolates of SP by PCR and sequencing of agrA, B, and D were carried out for five isolates and analyzed using DNAstar and Mega5.2 software. Results: A total of 53 (59% SP isolates were obtained from 90 samples. 15 isolates (28% were confirmed to be methicillinresistant SP (MRSP with the detection of the mecA gene. Accessory gene regulator A, B, and D genes were detected in all the SP isolates. Complete nucleotide sequences of the above three genes for five isolates were submitted to GenBank, and their accession numbers are from KJ133557 to KJ133571. AgrA amino acid sequence analysis showed that it is mainly made of alpha-helices and is hydrophilic in nature. AgrB is a transmembrane protein, and AgrD encodes the precursor of the autoinducing peptide (AIP. Sequencing of the agrD gene revealed that the 5 canine SP strains tested could be divided into three Agr specificity groups (RIPTSTGFF, KIPTSTGFF, and RIPISTGFF based on the putative AIP produced by each strain

  15. A Novel Gene Involved in Regulating the Flagellar Gene Cascade in Proteus mirabilis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Lindsay G.; Rather, Philip N.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we identified a transposon insertion in a novel gene, designated disA, that restored swarming motility to a putrescine-deficient speA mutant of Proteus mirabilis. A null allele in disA also increased swarming in a wild-type background. The DisA gene product was homologous to amino acid decarboxylases, and its role in regulating swarming was investigated by examining the expression of genes in the flagellar cascade. In a disA mutant background, we observed a 1.4-fold increase in...

  16. Mining disease genes using integrated protein-protein interaction and gene-gene co-regulation information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Wang, Limei; Guo, Maozu; Zhang, Ruijie; Dai, Qiguo; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Xuan, Ping; Zhang, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    In humans, despite the rapid increase in disease-associated gene discovery, a large proportion of disease-associated genes are still unknown. Many network-based approaches have been used to prioritize disease genes. Many networks, such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI), KEGG, and gene co-expression networks, have been used. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) have been successfully applied for the determination of genes associated with several diseases. In this study, we constructed an eQTL-based gene-gene co-regulation network (GGCRN) and used it to mine for disease genes. We adopted the random walk with restart (RWR) algorithm to mine for genes associated with Alzheimer disease. Compared to the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) PPI network alone, the integrated HPRD PPI and GGCRN networks provided faster convergence and revealed new disease-related genes. Therefore, using the RWR algorithm for integrated PPI and GGCRN is an effective method for disease-associated gene mining.

  17. The evolution of combinatorial gene regulation in fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian B Tuch

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available It is widely suspected that gene regulatory networks are highly plastic. The rapid turnover of transcription factor binding sites has been predicted on theoretical grounds and has been experimentally demonstrated in closely related species. We combined experimental approaches with comparative genomics to focus on the role of combinatorial control in the evolution of a large transcriptional circuit in the fungal lineage. Our study centers on Mcm1, a transcriptional regulator that, in combination with five cofactors, binds roughly 4% of the genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and regulates processes ranging from the cell-cycle to mating. In Kluyveromyces lactis and Candida albicans, two other hemiascomycetes, we find that the Mcm1 combinatorial circuits are substantially different. This massive rewiring of the Mcm1 circuitry has involved both substantial gain and loss of targets in ancient combinatorial circuits as well as the formation of new combinatorial interactions. We have dissected the gains and losses on the global level into subsets of functionally and temporally related changes. One particularly dramatic change is the acquisition of Mcm1 binding sites in close proximity to Rap1 binding sites at 70 ribosomal protein genes in the K. lactis lineage. Another intriguing and very recent gain occurs in the C. albicans lineage, where Mcm1 is found to bind in combination with the regulator Wor1 at many genes that function in processes associated with adaptation to the human host, including the white-opaque epigenetic switch. The large turnover of Mcm1 binding sites and the evolution of new Mcm1-cofactor interactions illuminate in sharp detail the rapid evolution of combinatorial transcription networks.

  18. Precise regulation of gene expression dynamics favors complex promoter architectures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Müller

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Promoters process signals through recruitment of transcription factors and RNA polymerase, and dynamic changes in promoter activity constitute a major noise source in gene expression. However, it is barely understood how complex promoter architectures determine key features of promoter dynamics. Here, we employ prototypical promoters of yeast ribosomal protein genes as well as simplified versions thereof to analyze the relations among promoter design, complexity, and function. These promoters combine the action of a general regulatory factor with that of specific transcription factors, a common motif of many eukaryotic promoters. By comprehensively analyzing stationary and dynamic promoter properties, this model-based approach enables us to pinpoint the structural characteristics underlying the observed behavior. Functional tradeoffs impose constraints on the promoter architecture of ribosomal protein genes. We find that a stable scaffold in the natural design results in low transcriptional noise and strong co-regulation of target genes in the presence of gene silencing. This configuration also exhibits superior shut-off properties, and it can serve as a tunable switch in living cells. Model validation with independent experimental data suggests that the models are sufficiently realistic. When combined, our results offer a mechanistic explanation for why specific factors are associated with low protein noise in vivo. Many of these findings hold for a broad range of model parameters and likely apply to other eukaryotic promoters of similar structure.

  19. Turning the gene tap off; implications of regulating gene expression for cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, James F; Candolfi, Marianela; Xiong, Weidong; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2008-03-01

    Cancer poses a tremendous therapeutic challenge worldwide, highlighting the critical need for developing novel therapeutics. A promising cancer treatment modality is gene therapy, which is a form of molecular medicine designed to introduce into target cells genetic material with therapeutic intent. Anticancer gene therapy strategies currently used in preclinical models, and in some cases in the clinic, include proapoptotic genes, oncolytic/replicative vectors, conditional cytotoxic approaches, inhibition of angiogenesis, inhibition of growth factor signaling, inactivation of oncogenes, inhibition of tumor invasion and stimulation of the immune system. The translation of these novel therapeutic modalities from the preclinical setting to the clinic has been driven by encouraging preclinical efficacy data and advances in gene delivery technologies. One area of intense research involves the ability to accurately regulate the levels of therapeutic gene expression to achieve enhanced efficacy and provide the capability to switch gene expression off completely if adverse side effects should arise. This feature could also be implemented to switch gene expression off when a successful therapeutic outcome ensues. Here, we will review recent developments related to the engineering of transcriptional switches within gene delivery systems, which could be implemented in clinical gene therapy applications directed at the treatment of cancer.

  20. Phasevarion mediated epigenetic gene regulation in Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogitha N Srikhanta

    Full Text Available Many host-adapted bacterial pathogens contain DNA methyltransferases (mod genes that are subject to phase-variable expression (high-frequency reversible ON/OFF switching of gene expression. In Haemophilus influenzae and pathogenic Neisseria, the random switching of the modA gene, associated with a phase-variable type III restriction modification (R-M system, controls expression of a phase-variable regulon of genes (a "phasevarion", via differential methylation of the genome in the modA ON and OFF states. Phase-variable type III R-M systems are also found in Helicobacter pylori, suggesting that phasevarions may also exist in this key human pathogen. Phylogenetic studies on the phase-variable type III modH gene revealed that there are 17 distinct alleles in H. pylori, which differ only in their DNA recognition domain. One of the most commonly found alleles was modH5 (16% of isolates. Microarray analysis comparing the wild-type P12modH5 ON strain to a P12ΔmodH5 mutant revealed that six genes were either up- or down-regulated, and some were virulence-associated. These included flaA, which encodes a flagella protein important in motility and hopG, an outer membrane protein essential for colonization and associated with gastric cancer. This study provides the first evidence of this epigenetic mechanism of gene expression in H. pylori. Characterisation of H. pylori modH phasevarions to define stable immunological targets will be essential for vaccine development and may also contribute to understanding H. pylori pathogenesis.

  1. The prolactin gene: a paradigm of tissue-specific gene regulation with complex temporal transcription dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, K; White, M R H; Davis, J R E

    2012-07-01

    Transcription of numerous mammalian genes is highly pulsatile, with bursts of expression occurring with variable duration and frequency. The presence of this stochastic or 'noisy' expression pattern has been relatively unexplored in tissue systems. The prolactin gene provides a model of tissue-specific gene regulation resulting in pulsatile transcription dynamics in both cell lines and endocrine tissues. In most cell culture models, prolactin transcription appears to be highly variable between cells, with differences in transcription pulse duration and frequency. This apparently stochastic transcription is constrained by a transcriptional refractory period, which may be related to cycles of chromatin remodelling. We propose that prolactin transcription dynamics result from the summation of oscillatory cellular inputs and by regulation through chromatin remodelling cycles. Observations of transcription dynamics in cells within pituitary tissue show reduced transcriptional heterogeneity and can be grouped into a small number of distinct patterns. Thus, it appears that the tissue environment is able to reduce transcriptional noise to enable coordinated tissue responses to environmental change. We review the current knowledge on the complex tissue-specific regulation of the prolactin gene in pituitary and extra-pituitary sites, highlighting differences between humans and rodent experimental animal models. Within this context, we describe the transcription dynamics of prolactin gene expression and how this may relate to specific processes occurring within the cell. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Regulator of calcineurin 1 gene transcription is regulated by nuclear factor-kappaB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lanlan; Liu, Heng; Wang, Pin; Song, Weihong; Sun, Xiulian

    2014-02-01

    Regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) has been implicated in pathogenesis of neurodegeneration and various cancers. Recently, we showed that RCAN1 expression was elevated in Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's disease and its expression transpose over induced neuronal apoptosis. As NF-κB is an important transcription factor involved in cell survival and RCAN1 played vital roles in cell viability, we examined whether NF-κB regulates RCAN1 gene expression. Our results here showed that the RCAN1 isoform 4 gene transcription can be activated by NF-κB signaling. NF-κB activated RCAN1 isoform 4 gene promoter. Luciferase assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation identified a NF-κB responsive element in the region of -576-554bp of the RCAN1 isoform 4 promoter. Activation of RCAN1 gene expression by NF-κB is independent from the calcineurin-NFAT signaling since the NF-κB responsive element was distinct from the NFAT binding sites that was previously identified in the region of -350-166bp. Indeed, activation of calcineurin-NFAT signaling decreased NF-κB transcriptional activity, while activation of NF-κB elevated NFAT transcriptional activity. RCAN1 isoform 4 gene transcription was repressed by its own protein expression in a negative feedback loop. Our findings about RCAN1 gene transcription regulated by NF-κB further supported the vital roles of RCAN1 in cellular functions and its involvement in AD pathogenesis.

  3. Growth phase-dependent gene regulation in vivo in Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeYoung, M.; Oost, van der J.

    2011-01-01

    Ribosomal genes are strongly regulated dependent on growth phase in all organisms, but this regulation is poorly understood in Archaea. Moreover, very little is known about growth phase-dependent gene regulation in Archaea. SSV1-based lacS reporter gene constructs containing the Sulfolobus 16S/23S

  4. DMPD: Interferon gene regulation: not all roads lead to Tolls. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16095970 Interferon gene regulation: not all roads lead to Tolls. Jefferies CA, Fit...zgerald KA. Trends Mol Med. 2005 Sep;11(9):403-11. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Interferon gene regulation: not all roads lead... to Tolls. PubmedID 16095970 Title Interferon gene regulation: not all roads lead to

  5. Synthetic RNAs for Gene Regulation: Design Principles and Computational Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganà, Alessandro; Shasha, Dennis; Croce, Carlo Maria

    2014-01-01

    The use of synthetic non-coding RNAs for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression has not only become a standard laboratory tool for gene functional studies but it has also opened up new perspectives in the design of new and potentially promising therapeutic strategies. Bioinformatics has provided researchers with a variety of tools for the design, the analysis, and the evaluation of RNAi agents such as small-interfering RNA (siRNA), short-hairpin RNA (shRNA), artificial microRNA (a-miR), and microRNA sponges. More recently, a new system for genome engineering based on the bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), was shown to have the potential to also regulate gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in a more specific way. In this mini review, we present RNAi and CRISPRi design principles and discuss the advantages and limitations of the current design approaches.

  6. Gene regulation during cold stress acclimation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Sunkar, Ramanjulu

    2010-01-01

    Cold stress adversely affects plant growth and development and thus limits crop productivity. Diverse plant species tolerate cold stress to a varying degree, which depends on reprogramming gene expression to modify their physiology, metabolism, and growth. Cold signal in plants is transmitted to activate CBF-dependent (C-repeat/drought-responsive element binding factor-dependent) and CBF-independent transcriptional pathway, of which CBF-dependent pathway activates CBF regulon. CBF transcription factor genes are induced by the constitutively expressed ICE1 (inducer of CBF expression 1) by binding to the CBF promoter. ICE1-CBF cold response pathway is conserved in diverse plant species. Transgenic analysis in different plant species revealed that cold tolerance can be significantly enhanced by genetic engineering CBF pathway. Posttranscriptional regulation at pre-mRNA processing and export from nucleus plays a role in cold acclimation. Small noncoding RNAs, namely micro-RNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), are emerging as key players of posttranscriptional gene silencing. Cold stress-regulated miRNAs have been identified in Arabidopsis and rice. In this chapter, recent advances on cold stress signaling and tolerance are highlighted.

  7. Synthetic RNAs for gene regulation: design principles and computational tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eLaganà

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of synthetic non-coding RNAs for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression has not only become a standard laboratory tool for gene functional studies, but it has also opened up new perspectives in the design of new and potentially promising therapeutic strategies. Bioinformatics has provided researchers with a variety of tools for the design, the analysis and the evaluation of RNAi agents such as small-interfering RNA (siRNA, short-hairpin RNA (shRNA, artificial microRNA (a-miR and microRNA sponges. More recently, a new system for genome engineering based on the bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, was shown to have the potential to also regulate gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in a more specific way. In this mini review, we present RNAi and CRISPRi design principles and discuss the advantages and limitations of the current design approaches.

  8. Strategies to identify long noncoding RNAs involved in gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Catherine

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have been detected in nearly every cell type and found to be fundamentally involved in many biological processes. The characterization of lncRNAs has immense potential to advance our comprehensive understanding of cellular processes and gene regulation, along with implications for the treatment of human disease. The recent ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements study reported 9,640 lncRNA loci in the human genome, which corresponds to around half the number of protein-coding genes. Because of this sheer number and their functional diversity, it is crucial to identify a pool of potentially relevant lncRNAs early on in a given study. In this review, we evaluate the methods for isolating lncRNAs by immunoprecipitation and review the advantages, disadvantages, and applications of three widely used approaches – microarray, tiling array, and RNA-seq – for identifying lncRNAs involved in gene regulation. We also look at ways in which data from publicly available databases such as ENCODE can support the study of lncRNAs.

  9. Intron retention as a component of regulated gene expression programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Aishwarya G; Smith, Christopher W J

    2017-09-01

    Intron retention has long been an exemplar of regulated splicing with case studies of individual events serving as models that provided key mechanistic insights into the process of splicing control. In organisms such as plants and budding yeast, intron retention is well understood as a major mechanism of gene expression regulation. In contrast, in mammalian systems, the extent and functional significance of intron retention have, until recently, remained greatly underappreciated. Technical challenges to the global detection and quantitation of transcripts with retained introns have often led to intron retention being overlooked or dismissed as "noise". Now, however, with the wealth of information available from high-throughput deep sequencing, combined with focused computational and statistical analyses, we are able to distinguish clear intron retention patterns in various physiological and pathological contexts. Several recent studies have demonstrated intron retention as a central component of gene expression programs during normal development as well as in response to stress and disease. Furthermore, these studies revealed various ways in which intron retention regulates protein isoform production, RNA stability and translation efficiency, and rapid induction of expression via post-transcriptional splicing of retained introns. In this review, we highlight critical findings from these transcriptomic studies and discuss commonalties in the patterns prevalent in intron retention networks at the functional and regulatory levels.

  10. Endosymbiotic gene transfer and transcriptional regulation of transferred genes in Paulinella chromatophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, Eva C M; Vogel, Heiko; Groth, Marco; Grossman, Arthur R; Melkonian, Michael; Glöckner, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    Paulinella chromatophora is a cercozoan amoeba that contains "chromatophores," which are photosynthetic inclusions of cyanobacterial origin. The recent discovery that chromatophores evolved independently of plastids, underwent major genome reduction, and transferred at least two genes to the host nucleus has highlighted P. chromatophora as a model to infer early steps in the evolution of photosynthetic organelles. However, owing to the paucity of nuclear genome sequence data, the extent of endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT) and host symbiont regulation are currently unknown. A combination of 454 and Illumina next generation sequencing enabled us to generate a comprehensive reference transcriptome data set for P. chromatophora on which we mapped short Illumina cDNA reads generated from cultures from the dark and light phases of a diel cycle. Combined with extensive phylogenetic analyses of the deduced protein sequences, these data revealed that 1) about 0.3-0.8% of the nuclear genes were obtained by EGT compared with 11-14% in the Plantae, 2) transferred genes show a distinct bias in that many encode small proteins involved in photosynthesis and photoacclimation, 3) host cells established control over expression of transferred genes, and 4) not only EGT, but to a minor extent also horizontal gene transfer from organisms that presumably served as food sources, helped to shape the nuclear genome of P. chromatophora. The identification of a significant number of transferred genes involved in photosynthesis and photoacclimation of thylakoid membranes as well as the observed transcriptional regulation of these genes strongly implies import of the encoded gene products into chromatophores, a feature previously thought to be restricted to canonical organelles. Thus, a possible mechanism by which P. chromatophora exerts control over the performance of its newly acquired photosynthetic organelle may involve controlling the expression of nuclear-encoded chromatophore

  11. Human nutrigenomics of gene regulation by dietary fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afman, Lydia A; Müller, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Nutrigenomics employs high-throughput genomics technologies to unravel how nutrients modulate gene and protein expression and ultimately influence cellular and organism metabolism. The most often-applied genomics technique so far is transcriptomics, which allows quantifying genome-wide changes in gene expression of thousands of genes at the same time in one sample. The performance of gene expression quantification requires sufficient high-quality homogenous cellular material, therefore research in healthy volunteers is restricted to biopsies from easy accessible tissues such as subcutaneous adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and intestinal biopsies or even more easily accessible cells such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells from blood. There is now significant evidence that fatty acids, in particular unsaturated fatty acids, exert many of their effects through modulation of gene transcription by regulating the activity of numerous transcription factors, including nuclear receptors such as peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, liver X receptor and sterol regulatory binding proteins. This review evaluates the human nutrigenomics studies performed on dietary fat since the initiation of nutrigenomics research around 10 years ago. Although the number of studies is still limited, all studies clearly suggest that changes in dietary fatty acids intake and composition can have a significant impact on cellular adaptive response capacity by gene transcription changes in humans. This adds important knowledge to our understanding of the strong effects that various fatty acids can have on numerous metabolic and inflammatory pathways, signaling routes and homeostatic control in the cell and ultimately on whole body health. It is important to use and integrate nutrigenomics in all future nutrition studies to build up the necessary framework for evidence-based nutrition in near future. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Trachealess (Trh) regulates all tracheal genes during Drosophila embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, SeYeon; Chavez, Cy; Andrew, Deborah J

    2011-12-01

    The Drosophila trachea is a branched tubular epithelia that transports oxygen and other gases. trachealess (trh), which encodes a bHLH-PAS transcription factor, is among the first genes to be expressed in the cells that will form the trachea. In the absence of trh, tracheal cells fail to invaginate to form tubes and remain on the embryo surface. Expression of many tracheal-specific genes depends on trh, but all of the known targets have relatively minor phenotypes compared to loss of trh, suggesting that there are additional targets. To identify uncharacterized transcriptional targets of Trh and to further understand the role of Trh in embryonic tracheal formation, we performed an in situ hybridization screen using a library of ~100 tracheal-expressed genes identified by the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP). Surprisingly, expression of every tracheal gene we tested was dependent on Trh, suggesting a major role for Trh in activation and maintenance of tracheal gene expression. A re-examination of the interdependence of the known early-expressed transcription factors, including trh, ventral veinless (vvl) and knirps/knirps-related (kni/knrl), suggests a new model for how gene expression is controlled in the trachea, with trh regulating expression of vvl and kni, but not vice versa. A pilot screen for the targets of Vvl and Kni/Knrl revealed that Vvl and Kni have only minor roles compared to Trh. Finally, genome-wide microarray experiments identified additional Trh targets and revealed that a variety of biological processes are affected by the loss of trh. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermodynamics-based models of transcriptional regulation with gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuqiang; Shen, Yanyan; Hu, Jinxing

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative models of gene regulatory activity have the potential to improve our mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation. However, the few models available today have been based on simplistic assumptions about the sequences being modeled or heuristic approximations of the underlying regulatory mechanisms. In this work, we have developed a thermodynamics-based model to predict gene expression driven by any DNA sequence. The proposed model relies on a continuous time, differential equation description of transcriptional dynamics. The sequence features of the promoter are exploited to derive the binding affinity which is derived based on statistical molecular thermodynamics. Experimental results show that the proposed model can effectively identify the activity levels of transcription factors and the regulatory parameters. Comparing with the previous models, the proposed model can reveal more biological sense.

  14. Coherent organization in gene regulation: a study on six networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aral, Neşe; Kabakçıoğlu, Alkan

    2016-04-01

    Structural and dynamical fingerprints of evolutionary optimization in biological networks are still unclear. Here we analyze the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks responsible for the regulation of cell cycle and cell differentiation in three organisms or cell types each, and show that they follow a version of Hebb's rule which we have termed coherence. More precisely, we find that simultaneously expressed genes with a common target are less likely to act antagonistically at the attractors of the regulatory dynamics. We then investigate the dependence of coherence on structural parameters, such as the mean number of inputs per node and the activatory/repressory interaction ratio, as well as on dynamically determined quantities, such as the basin size and the number of expressed genes.

  15. Evolutionary dynamics of gene and isoform regulation in Mammalian tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkin, Jason; Russell, Caitlin; Chen, Ping; Burge, Christopher B

    2012-12-21

    Most mammalian genes produce multiple distinct messenger RNAs through alternative splicing, but the extent of splicing conservation is not clear. To assess tissue-specific transcriptome variation across mammals, we sequenced complementary DNA from nine tissues from four mammals and one bird in biological triplicate, at unprecedented depth. We find that while tissue-specific gene expression programs are largely conserved, alternative splicing is well conserved in only a subset of tissues and is frequently lineage-specific. Thousands of previously unknown, lineage-specific, and conserved alternative exons were identified; widely conserved alternative exons had signatures of binding by MBNL, PTB, RBFOX, STAR, and TIA family splicing factors, implicating them as ancestral mammalian splicing regulators. Our data also indicate that alternative splicing often alters protein phosphorylatability, delimiting the scope of kinase signaling.

  16. Gene regulation and noise reduction by coupling of stochastic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Alexandre F; Hornos, José Eduardo M; Reinitz, John

    2015-02-01

    Here we characterize the low-noise regime of a stochastic model for a negative self-regulating binary gene. The model has two stochastic variables, the protein number and the state of the gene. Each state of the gene behaves as a protein source governed by a Poisson process. The coupling between the two gene states depends on protein number. This fact has a very important implication: There exist protein production regimes characterized by sub-Poissonian noise because of negative covariance between the two stochastic variables of the model. Hence the protein numbers obey a probability distribution that has a peak that is sharper than those of the two coupled Poisson processes that are combined to produce it. Biochemically, the noise reduction in protein number occurs when the switching of the genetic state is more rapid than protein synthesis or degradation. We consider the chemical reaction rates necessary for Poisson and sub-Poisson processes in prokaryotes and eucaryotes. Our results suggest that the coupling of multiple stochastic processes in a negative covariance regime might be a widespread mechanism for noise reduction.

  17. Dynamical Processes in Ageing, Gene Regulation and Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Kristian Moss

    My thesis consists of three parts. The first part covers ageing phenomena. In the first project I measured the mobility of two DNA repair proteins. Contrasting diffusion coefficients from literature I was able to classify DNA repair protein into either "scanners" or "responders". In a second...... project we constructed a mathematical model and showed that if DNA damage is primarily caused by geno-toxic agents, it would be advantageous for cells to have a fragile DNA repair mechanism. The second part of my Ph.D. thesis covers gene regulation. In the first project we show how RNA polymerase can...

  18. Dynamic model of gene regulation for the lac operon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelova, Maia; Ben-Halim, Asma, E-mail: maia.angelova@northumbria.ac.uk, E-mail: asma.benhalim@northumbria.ac.uk [Intelligent Modelling Lab, School of Computing, Engineering and Information Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 1XE (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-01

    Gene regulatory network is a collection of DNA which interact with each other and with other matter in the cell. The lac operon is an example of a relatively simple genetic network and is one of the best-studied structures in the Escherichia coli bacteria. In this work we consider a deterministic model of the lac operon with a noise term, representing the stochastic nature of the regulation. The model is written in terms of a system of simultaneous first order differential equations with delays. We investigate an analytical and numerical solution and analyse the range of values for the parameters corresponding to a stable solution.

  19. SUPERMAN, a regulator of floral homeotic genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, J L; Sakai, H; Jack, T; Weigel, D; Mayer, U; Meyerowitz, E M

    1992-03-01

    We describe a locus, SUPERMAN, mutations in which result in extra stamens developing at the expense of the central carpels in the Arabidopsis thaliana flower. The development of superman flowers, from initial primordium to mature flower, is described by scanning electron microscopy. The development of doubly and triply mutant strains, constructed with superman alleles and previously identified homeotic mutations that cause alterations in floral organ identity, is also described. Essentially additive phenotypes are observed in superman agamous and superman apetala2 double mutants. The epistatic relationships observed between either apetala3 or pistillata and superman alleles suggest that the SUPERMAN gene product could be a regulator of these floral homeotic genes. To test this, the expression patterns of AGAMOUS and APETALA3 were examined in superman flowers. In wild-type flowers, APETALA3 expression is restricted to the second and third whorls where it is required for the specification of petals and stamens. In contrast, in superman flowers, APETALA3 expression expands to include most of the cells that would normally constitute the fourth whorl. This ectopic APETALA3 expression is proposed to be one of the causes of the development of the extra stamens in superman flowers. The spatial pattern of AGAMOUS expression remains unaltered in superman flowers as compared to wild-type flowers. Taken together these data indicate that one of the functions of the wild-type SUPERMAN gene product is to negatively regulate APETALA3 in the fourth whorl of the flower. In addition, superman mutants exhibit a loss of determinacy of the floral meristem, an effect that appears to be mediated by the APETALA3 and PISTILLATA gene products.

  20. In silico analysis of miRNA-mediated gene regulation in OCA and OA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaraj, Balu; Gopalakrishnan, Chandrasekhar; Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-12-01

    Albinism is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder due to low secretion of melanin. The oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and ocular albinism (OA) genes are responsible for melanin production and also act as a potential targets for miRNAs. The role of miRNA is to inhibit the protein synthesis partially or completely by binding with the 3'UTR of the mRNA thus regulating gene expression. In this analysis, we predicted the genetic variation that occurred in 3'UTR of the transcript which can be a reason for low melanin production thus causing albinism. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3'UTR cause more new binding sites for miRNA which binds with mRNA which leads to inhibit the translation process either partially or completely. The SNPs in the mRNA of OCA and OA genes can create new binding sites for miRNA which may control the gene expression and lead to hypopigmentation. We have developed a computational procedure to determine the SNPs in the 3'UTR region of mRNA of OCA (TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2) and OA (GPR143) genes which will be a potential cause for albinism. We identified 37 SNPs in five genes that are predicted to create 87 new binding sites on mRNA, which may lead to abrogation of the translation process. Expression analysis confirms that these genes are highly expressed in skin and eye regions. It is well supported by enrichment analysis that these genes are mainly involved in eye pigmentation and melanin biosynthesis process. The network analysis also shows how the genes are interacting and expressing in a complex network. This insight provides clue to wet-lab researches to understand the expression pattern of OCA and OA genes and binding phenomenon of mRNA and miRNA upon mutation, which is responsible for inhibition of translation process at genomic levels.

  1. Gene expression in human hippocampus from cocaine abusers identifies genes which regulate extracellular matrix remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah C Mash

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The chronic effects of cocaine abuse on brain structure and function are blamed for the inability of most addicts to remain abstinent. Part of the difficulty in preventing relapse is the persisting memory of the intense euphoria or cocaine "rush". Most abused drugs and alcohol induce neuroplastic changes in brain pathways subserving emotion and cognition. Such changes may account for the consolidation and structural reconfiguration of synaptic connections with exposure to cocaine. Adaptive hippocampal plasticity could be related to specific patterns of gene expression with chronic cocaine abuse. Here, we compare gene expression profiles in the human hippocampus from cocaine addicts and age-matched drug-free control subjects. Cocaine abusers had 151 gene transcripts upregulated, while 91 gene transcripts were downregulated. Topping the list of cocaine-regulated transcripts was RECK in the human hippocampus (FC = 2.0; p<0.05. RECK is a membrane-anchored MMP inhibitor that is implicated in the coordinated regulation of extracellular matrix integrity and angiogenesis. In keeping with elevated RECK expression, active MMP9 protein levels were decreased in the hippocampus from cocaine abusers. Pathway analysis identified other genes regulated by cocaine that code for proteins involved in the remodeling of the cytomatrix and synaptic connections and the inhibition of blood vessel proliferation (PCDH8, LAMB1, ITGB6, CTGF and EphB4. The observed microarray phenotype in the human hippocampus identified RECK and other region-specific genes that may promote long-lasting structural changes with repeated cocaine abuse. Extracellular matrix remodeling in the hippocampus may be a persisting effect of chronic abuse that contributes to the compulsive and relapsing nature of cocaine addiction.

  2. Regulators of gene expression in Enteric Neural Crest Cells are putative Hirschsprung disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriemer, Duco; Sribudiani, Yunia; IJpma, Arne; Natarajan, Dipa; MacKenzie, Katherine C; Metzger, Marco; Binder, Ellen; Burns, Alan J; Thapar, Nikhil; Hofstra, Robert M W; Eggen, Bart J L

    2016-08-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) is required for peristalsis of the gut and is derived from Enteric Neural Crest Cells (ENCCs). During ENS development, the RET receptor tyrosine kinase plays a critical role in the proliferation and survival of ENCCs, their migration along the developing gut, and differentiation into enteric neurons. Mutations in RET and its ligand GDNF cause Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), a complex genetic disorder in which ENCCs fail to colonize variable lengths of the distal bowel. To identify key regulators of ENCCs and the pathways underlying RET signaling, gene expression profiles of untreated and GDNF-treated ENCCs from E14.5 mouse embryos were generated. ENCCs express genes that are involved in both early and late neuronal development, whereas GDNF treatment induced neuronal maturation. Predicted regulators of gene expression in ENCCs include the known HSCR genes Ret and Sox10, as well as Bdnf, App and Mapk10. The regulatory overlap and functional interactions between these genes were used to construct a regulatory network that is underlying ENS development and connects to known HSCR genes. In addition, the adenosine receptor A2a (Adora2a) and neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 (Npy2r) were identified as possible regulators of terminal neuronal differentiation in GDNF-treated ENCCs. The human orthologue of Npy2r maps to the HSCR susceptibility locus 4q31.3-q32.3, suggesting a role for NPY2R both in ENS development and in HSCR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. CALCIUM-SENSING RECEPTOR GENE: REGULATION OF EXPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Noel Hendy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5’-untranslated regions (UTRs that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2-7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes – promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation – as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2 have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the tumor suppressor activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2 – the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR––the calciostat––is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level.

  4. Regulation of Corticosteroidogenic Genes by MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy Robertson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of normal regulation of corticosteroid secretion is important in the development of cardiovascular disease. We previously showed that microRNAs regulate the terminal stages of corticosteroid biosynthesis. Here, we assess microRNA regulation across the whole corticosteroid pathway. Knockdown of microRNA using Dicer1 siRNA in H295R adrenocortical cells increased levels of CYP11A1, CYP21A1, and CYP17A1 mRNA and the secretion of cortisol, corticosterone, 11-deoxycorticosterone, 18-hydroxycorticosterone, and aldosterone. Bioinformatic analysis of genes involved in corticosteroid biosynthesis or metabolism identified many putative microRNA-binding sites, and some were selected for further study. Manipulation of individual microRNA levels demonstrated a direct effect of miR-125a-5p and miR-125b-5p on CYP11B2 and of miR-320a-3p levels on CYP11A1 and CYP17A1 mRNA. Finally, comparison of microRNA expression profiles from human aldosterone-producing adenoma and normal adrenal tissue showed levels of various microRNAs, including miR-125a-5p to be significantly different. This study demonstrates that corticosteroidogenesis is regulated at multiple points by several microRNAs and that certain of these microRNAs are differentially expressed in tumorous adrenal tissue, which may contribute to dysregulation of corticosteroid secretion. These findings provide new insights into the regulation of corticosteroid production and have implications for understanding the pathology of disease states where abnormal hormone secretion is a feature.

  5. Expression of conjoined genes: another mechanism for gene regulation in eukaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika Prakash

    Full Text Available From the ENCODE project, it is realized that almost every base of the entire human genome is transcribed. One class of transcripts resulting from this arises from the conjoined gene, which is formed by combining the exons of two or more distinct (parent genes lying on the same strand of a chromosome. Only a very limited number of such genes are known, and the definition and terminologies used for them are highly variable in the public databases. In this work, we have computationally identified and manually curated 751 conjoined genes (CGs in the human genome that are supported by at least one mRNA or EST sequence available in the NCBI database. 353 representative CGs, of which 291 (82% could be confirmed, were subjected to experimental validation using RT-PCR and sequencing methods. We speculate that these genes are arising out of novel functional requirements and are not merely artifacts of transcription, since more than 70% of them are conserved in other vertebrate genomes. The unique splicing patterns exhibited by CGs reveal their possible roles in protein evolution or gene regulation. Novel CGs, for which no transcript is available, could be identified in 80% of randomly selected potential CG forming regions, indicating that their formation is a routine process. Formation of CGs is not only limited to human, as we have also identified 270 CGs in mouse and 227 in drosophila using our approach. Additionally, we propose a novel mechanism for the formation of CGs. Finally, we developed a database, ConjoinG, which contains detailed information about all the CGs (800 in total identified in the human genome. In summary, our findings reveal new insights about the functionality of CGs in terms of another possible mechanism for gene regulation and genomic evolution and the mechanism leading to their formation.

  6. Transcriptional regulation of the interleukin-11 gene by oncogenic Ras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Soon Young; Choi, Chan; Lee, Hong Ghi; Lim, Yoongho; Lee, Young Han

    2012-12-01

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11), which belongs to a class of IL6-type cytokines, plays an important role in inflammation, motility and invasion in cancer. The ras mutation is frequently found in human cancer, but little is known regarding the transcriptional activation of the IL-11 gene by the Ras signal pathway in tumour cells. In this study, we investigated the role of Ras in the regulation of IL-11 using two different cell model systems: mouse NIH3T3 cells over-expressing oncogenic Ras with a tet-on system and Capan-1 human pancreatic carcinoma cells harbouring a K-ras mutation. We found that IL-11 expression was up-regulated at the transcriptional level by oncogenic Ras. Activation of the AP-1 response element, located between -153 and -30 in the 5'-regulatory region of the IL-11 gene, was necessary for oncogenic Ras-induced IL-11 promoter activation. AP-1 proteins, including Fra-1 and Fra-2, were up-regulated through the Raf/MEK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways by oncogenic Ras. Knockdown of Fra-1 by siRNA in NIH3T3 or Capan-1 cells strongly attenuated oncogenic Ras-induced IL-11 expression. Additionally, inhibition of JNK, p38 and Stat3 abrogated oncogenic Ras-induced IL-11 expression. These results suggest that both the PI3K and Raf pathways are necessary for the expression of IL-11 in oncogenic Ras-mutated cells, and that JNK, p38 and Stat3 also contribute to oncogenic Ras-induced IL-11 expression.

  7. Modeling gene regulation from paired expression and chromatin accessibility data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duren, Zhana; Chen, Xi; Jiang, Rui; Wang, Yong; Wong, Wing Hung

    2017-06-20

    The rapid increase of genome-wide datasets on gene expression, chromatin states, and transcription factor (TF) binding locations offers an exciting opportunity to interpret the information encoded in genomes and epigenomes. This task can be challenging as it requires joint modeling of context-specific activation of cis-regulatory elements (REs) and the effects on transcription of associated regulatory factors. To meet this challenge, we propose a statistical approach based on paired expression and chromatin accessibility (PECA) data across diverse cellular contexts. In our approach, we model (i) the localization to REs of chromatin regulators (CRs) based on their interaction with sequence-specific TFs, (ii) the activation of REs due to CRs that are localized to them, and (iii) the effect of TFs bound to activated REs on the transcription of target genes (TGs). The transcriptional regulatory network inferred by PECA provides a detailed view of how trans- and cis-regulatory elements work together to affect gene expression in a context-specific manner. We illustrate the feasibility of this approach by analyzing paired expression and accessibility data from the mouse Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and explore various applications of the resulting model.

  8. Feeding Regulates the Expression of Pancreatic Genes in Gastric Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita De Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ineffective short-term control of feeding behavior compromises energy homeostasis and can lead to obesity. The gastrointestinal tract secretes several regulatory peptides. However, little is known about the stomach peptide contribution to the acute regulation of intake. In an attempt to identify new gastric signals, the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE method was used for the transcription profiling of stomach mucosa in 7 groups of mice: fasting and sacrificed 30 minutes, 1 hour, 3 hours after a low-fat (LF or high-fat (HF ad libitum meal. In total, 35 genes were differentially modulated by LF and HF meals compared to fasting, including 15 mRNAs coding for digestive enzymes/secretory proteins, and 10 novel transcripts. Although the basic expression profile did not undergo substantial variations, both LF and HF meals influenced the transcription. This study represents the first global analysis of stomach transcriptome as induced by different nutritional stimuli. Further studies including the characterization of novel genes may help to identify new targets for the therapy and prevention of obesity.

  9. Regulation of Smad-mediated gene transcription by RGS3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Douglas M; Sethakorn, Nan; Taurin, Sebastien; Kregel, Steven; Sandbo, Nathan; Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Sperling, Anne I; Dulin, Nickolai O

    2008-05-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins are united into a family by the presence of the homologous RGS domain that binds the alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and accelerates their GTPase activity. A member of this family, RGS3 regulates the signaling mediated by G(q) and G(i) proteins by binding the corresponding Galpha subunits. Here we show that RGS3 interacts with the novel partners Smad2, Smad3, and Smad4-the transcription factors that are activated through a transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) receptor signaling. This interaction is mediated by the region of RGS3 outside of the RGS domain and by Smad's Mad homology 2 domain. Overexpression of RGS3 results in inhibition of Smad-mediated gene transcription. RGS3 does not affect TGF-beta-induced Smad phosphorylation, but it prevents heteromerization of Smad3 with Smad4, which is required for transcriptional activity of Smads. This translates to functional inhibition of TGF-beta-induced myofibroblast differentiation by RGS3. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel, noncanonical role of RGS3 in regulation of TGF-beta signaling through its interaction with Smads and interfering with Smad heteromerization.

  10. Regulation of gene expression by CAR: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kaoru; Hashimoto, Mari; Honkakoski, Paavo; Negishi, Masahiko

    2015-07-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is a well-known xenosensor that regulates hepatic drug metabolism and detoxification. CAR activation can be elicited by a large variety of xenobiotics, including phenobarbital (PB) which is not a directly binding CAR ligand. The mechanism of CAR activation is complex and involves translocation from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, followed by further activation steps in the nucleus. Recently, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been identified as a PB-responsive receptor, and PB activates CAR by inhibiting the EGFR signaling. In addition to regulation of drug metabolism, activation of CAR has multiple biological end points such as modulation of xenobiotic-elicited liver injury, and the role of CAR in endobiotic functions such as glucose metabolism and cholesterol homeostasis is increasingly recognized. Thus, investigations on the molecular mechanism of CAR activation are critical for the real understanding of CAR-mediated processes. Here, we summarize the current understanding of mechanisms by which CAR activators regulate gene expression through cellular signaling pathways and the roles of CAR on xenobiotic-elicited hepatocellular carcinoma, liver injury, glucose metabolism and cholesterol homeostasis.

  11. Mobile gene silencing in Arabidopsis is regulated by hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacheng Liang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In plants and nematodes, RNAi can spread from cells from which it is initiated to other cells in the organism. The underlying mechanism controlling the mobility of RNAi signals is not known, especially in the case of plants. A genetic screen designed to recover plants impaired in the movement but not the production or effectiveness of the RNAi signal identified RCI3, which encodes a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-producing type III peroxidase, as a key regulator of silencing mobility in Arabidopsis thaliana. Silencing initiated in the roots of rci3 plants failed to spread into leaf tissue or floral tissue. Application of exogenous H2O2 reinstated the spread in rci3 plants and accelerated it in wild-type plants. The addition of catalase or MnO2, which breaks down H2O2, slowed the spread of silencing in wild-type plants. We propose that endogenous H2O2, under the control of peroxidases, regulates the spread of gene silencing by altering plasmodesmata permeability through remodelling of local cell wall structure, and may play a role in regulating systemic viral defence.

  12. Genes Affecting the Regulation of SUC2 Gene Expression by Glucose Repression in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    OpenAIRE

    Neigeborn, Lenore; Carlson, Marian

    1984-01-01

    Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with defects in sucrose or raffinose fermentation were isolated. In addition to mutations in the SUC2 structural gene for invertase, we recovered 18 recessive mutations that affected the regulation of invertase synthesis by glucose repression. These mutations included five new snf1 (sucrose nonfermenting) alleles and also defined five new complementation groups, designated snf2, snf3, snf4, snf5 and snf6. The snf2, snf4 and snf5 mutants produced little or...

  13. Pitx2, an atrial fibrillation predisposition gene, directly regulates ion transport and intercalated disc genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Zhang, Min; Li, Lele; Bai, Yan; Zhou, Yuefang; Moon, Anne M; Kaminski, Henry J; Martin, James F

    2014-02-01

    Pitx2 is the homeobox gene located in proximity to the human 4q25 familial atrial fibrillation (AF) locus. When deleted in the mouse germline, Pitx2 haploinsufficiency predisposes to pacing-induced AF, indicating that reduced Pitx2 promotes an arrhythmogenic substrate. Previous work focused on Pitx2 developmental functions that predispose to AF. Although Pitx2 is expressed in postnatal left atrium, it is unknown whether Pitx2 has distinct postnatal and developmental functions. To investigate Pitx2 postnatal function, we conditionally inactivated Pitx2 in the postnatal atrium while leaving its developmental function intact. Unstressed adult Pitx2 homozygous mutant mice display variable R-R interval with diminished P-wave amplitude characteristic of sinus node dysfunction, an AF risk factor in human patients. An integrated genomics approach in the adult heart revealed Pitx2 target genes encoding cell junction proteins, ion channels, and critical transcriptional regulators. Importantly, many Pitx2 target genes have been implicated in human AF by genome-wide association studies. Immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy studies in adult Pitx2 mutant mice revealed structural remodeling of the intercalated disc characteristic of human patients with AF. Our findings, revealing that Pitx2 has genetically separable postnatal and developmental functions, unveil direct Pitx2 target genes that include channel and calcium handling genes, as well as genes that stabilize the intercalated disc in postnatal atrium.

  14. Arabidopsis response regulator 22 inhibits cytokinin-regulated gene transcription in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallmeroth, Niklas; Anastasia, Anna Katharina; Harter, Klaus; Berendzen, Kenneth Wayne; Mira-Rodado, Virtudes

    2017-01-01

    Cytokinin signaling in Arabidopsis is carried out by a two-component system (TCS) multi-step phosphorelay mechanism that involves three different protein families: histidine kinases (AHKs), phosphotransfer proteins (AHPs), and response regulators (ARRs) that are in turn, subdivided into A-, B- and C-type ARRs depending on their function and structure. Upon cytokinin perception, AHK proteins autophosphorylate; this phosphate is then transferred from the AHKs to the AHPs to finally reach the ARRs. When B-type ARRs are activated by phosphorylation, they function as transcription factors that regulate the expression of cytokinin-dependent genes such as the A-type ARRs, among many others. In cytokinin signaling, while A- and B-type ARR function is well understood, it is still unclear if C-type ARRs (ARR22 and ARR24) play a role in this mechanism. Here, we describe a novel method suitable to study TCS activity natively as an in vivo system. We also show that ARR22 inhibits gene transcription of an A-type ARR upon cytokinin treatment in vivo. Consequently, we propose that ARR22, by acting as a phosphatase on specific AHPs, disrupts the TCS phosphorelay and prevents B-type ARR phosphorylation, and thus their activation as transcription factors, explaining the observed deactivation of cytokinin-responsive genes.

  15. Gene expression dosage regulation in an allopolyploid fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Matos

    Full Text Available How allopolyploids are able not only to cope but profit from their condition is a question that remains elusive, but is of great importance within the context of successful allopolyploid evolution. One outstanding example of successful allopolyploidy is the endemic Iberian cyprinid Squalius alburnoides. Previously, based on the evaluation of a few genes, it was reported that the transcription levels between diploid and triploid S. alburnoides were similar. If this phenomenon occurs on a full genomic scale, a wide functional ''diploidization'' could be related to the success of these polyploids. We generated RNA-seq data from whole juvenile fish and from adult livers, to perform the first comparative quantitative transcriptomic analysis between diploid and triploid individuals of a vertebrate allopolyploid. Together with an assay to estimate relative expression per cell, it was possible to infer the relative sizes of transcriptomes. This showed that diploid and triploid S. alburnoides hybrids have similar liver transcriptome sizes. This in turn made it valid to directly compare the S. alburnoides RNA-seq transcript data sets and obtain a profile of dosage responses across the S. alburnoides transcriptome. We found that 64% of transcripts in juveniles' samples and 44% in liver samples differed less than twofold between diploid and triploid hybrids (similar expression. Yet, respectively 29% and 15% of transcripts presented accurate dosage compensation (PAA/PA expression ratio of 1 instead of 1.5. Therefore, an exact functional diploidization of the triploid genome does not occur, but a significant down regulation of gene expression in triploids was observed. However, for those genes with similar expression levels between diploids and triploids, expression is not globally strictly proportional to gene dosage nor is it set to a perfect diploid level. This quantitative expression flexibility may be a strong contributor to overcome the genomic shock

  16. Regulation and Function of Adult Neurogenesis: From Genes to Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimone, James B.; Li, Yan; Lee, Star W.; Clemenson, Gregory D.; Deng, Wei; Gage, Fred H.

    2014-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is a notable process due not only to its uniqueness and potential impact on cognition but also to its localized vertical integration of different scales of neuroscience, ranging from molecular and cellular biology to behavior. This review summarizes the recent research regarding the process of adult neurogenesis from these different perspectives, with particular emphasis on the differentiation and development of new neurons, the regulation of the process by extrinsic and intrinsic factors, and their ultimate function in the hippocampus circuit. Arising from a local neural stem cell population, new neurons progress through several stages of maturation, ultimately integrating into the adult dentate gyrus network. The increased appreciation of the full neurogenesis process, from genes and cells to behavior and cognition, makes neurogenesis both a unique case study for how scales in neuroscience can link together and suggests neurogenesis as a potential target for therapeutic intervention for a number of disorders. PMID:25287858

  17. Post-transcriptional gene regulation by mRNA modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Roundtree, Ian A.; He, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of reversible mRNA methylation has opened a new realm of post-transcriptional gene regulation in eukaryotes. The identification and functional characterization of proteins that specifically recognize RNA N6-methyladenosine (m6A) unveiled it as a modification that cells utilize to accelerate mRNA metabolism and translation. N6-adenosine methylation directs mRNAs to distinct fates by grouping them for differential processing, translation and decay in processes such as cell differentiation, embryonic development and stress responses. Other mRNA modifications, including N1-methyladenosine (m1A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C) and pseudouridine, together with m6A form the epitranscriptome and collectively code a new layer of information that controls protein synthesis. PMID:27808276

  18. Maternal obesity regulates gene expression in the hearts of offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raipuria, M; Hardy, G O; Bahari, H; Morris, M J

    2015-09-01

    Growing evidence suggests maternal obesity leads to adverse outcomes for offspring, including increased cardiovascular disease (CVD). Alterations in taste preferences of offspring from mothers consuming a high fat diet (HFD) have also been reported. Given recent reports describing cardiac taste receptors, we examined whether the expression of umami and bitter taste receptors is modulated by maternal obesity, and compared this with the physiological challenge of maternal exercise. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed chow (C) or HFD (F) and half of each were provided with a running wheel to enable voluntary exercise (CE or FE), the others remaining sedentary (CS or FS). Two pups from each mother were killed at postnatal day 19. Both lean and obese dams undertook similar amounts of exercise (8.1 ± 2.4 vs 5.1 ± 1.5 km). Maternal obesity increased offspring body weight, adiposity, net and weight-corrected heart ventricle weight, with no effect of exercise. Maternal obesity also increased offspring plasma leptin concentrations, which were normalised by maternal exercise. Cardiac ventricle mRNA expression of bitter taste receptors, β-adrenoceptor (Adrbk1) and angiotensin II receptor type 1a (Agtr1a) were significantly decreased in response to maternal obesity, with maternal exercise decreasing Agtr1a in FE offspring. No changes in umami receptors were observed. FTO mRNA expression was down-regulated by maternal HFD with an up-regulation in offspring of CE mothers. Maternal obesity affected the expression of bitter taste receptors and other genes in the heart ventricle, potentially implicating these genes in the development of CVD associated with maternal obesity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of HIR1 and HIR2, two genes required for regulation of histone gene transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Sherwood, P. W.; Tsang, S V; Osley, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The products of the HIR1 and HIR2 genes have been defined genetically as repressors of histone gene transcription in S. cerevisiae. A mutation in either gene affects cell cycle regulation of three of the four histone gene loci; transcription of these loci occurs throughout the cell cycle and is no longer repressed in response to the inhibition of DNA replication. The same mutations also eliminate autogenous regulation of the HTA1-HTB1 locus by histones H2A and H2B. The HIR1 and HIR2 genes hav...

  20. Regulation of gene expression in vertebrate skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Jaime J; Rigby, Peter W J

    2010-11-01

    During embryonic development the integration of numerous synergistic signalling pathways turns a single cell into a multicellular organism with specialized cell types and highly structured, organized tissues. To achieve this, cells must grow, proliferate, differentiate and die according to their spatiotemporal position. Unravelling the mechanisms by which a cell adopts the correct fate in response to its local environment remains one of the fundamental goals of biological research. In vertebrates skeletal myogenesis is coordinated by the activation of the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) in response to signals that are interpreted by their associated regulatory elements in different precursor cells during development. The MRFs trigger a cascade of transcription factors and downstream structural genes, ultimately resulting in the generation of one of the fundamental histotypes. In this review we discuss the regulation of the different MRFs in relation to their position in the myogenic cascade, the changes in the general transcriptional machinery during muscle differentiation and the emerging importance of miRNA regulation in skeletal myogenesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Epigenetic Regulation of Inflammatory Gene Expression in Macrophages by Selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Vivek; Ravindra, Kodihalli C.; Liao, Chang; Kaushal, Naveen; Carlson, Bradley A.; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins by histone acetyltransferases plays a pivotal role in the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Given the importance of dietary selenium in mitigating inflammation, we hypothesized that selenium supplementation may regulate inflammatory gene expression at the epigenetic level. The effect of selenium towards histone acetylation was examined in both in vitro and in vivo models of inflammation by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and immunoblotting. Our results indicated that selenium supplementation, as selenite, decreased acetylation of histone H4 at K12 and K16 in COX-2 and TNF promoters, and of the p65 subunit of the redox sensitive transcription factor NFκB in primary and immortalized macrophages. On the other hand, selenomethionine had a much weaker effect. Selenite treatment of HIV-1 infected human monocytes also significantly decreased the acetylation of H4 at K12 and K16 on the HIV-1 promoter, supporting the downregulation of proviral expression by selenium. A similar decrease in histone acetylation was also seen in the colonic extracts of mice treated with dextran sodium sulfate that correlated well with the levels of selenium in the diet. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from Trspfl/flCreLysM mice that lack expression of selenoproteins in macrophages confirmed the important role of selenoproteins in the inhibition of histone H4 acetylation. Our studies suggest that the ability of selenoproteins to skew the metabolism of arachidonic acid to contribute, in part, to their ability to inhibit histone acetylation. In summary, our studies suggest a new role for selenoproteins in the epigenetic modulation of pro-inflammatory genes. PMID:25458528

  2. Co-modulation analysis of gene regulation in breast cancer reveals complex interplay between ESR1 and ERBB2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Wu, Chin-Ting; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Lai, Yi-Pin; Hsiao, Chuhsing; Chen, Yidong; Chuang, Eric Y

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulation is dynamic across cellular conditions and disease subtypes. From the aspect of regulation under modulation, regulation strength between a pair of genes can be modulated by (dependent on) expression abundance of another gene (modulator gene). Previous studies have demonstrated the involvement of genes modulated by single modulator genes in cancers, including breast cancer. However, analysis of multi-modulator co-modulation that can further delineate the landscape of complex gene regulation is, to our knowledge, unexplored previously. In the present study we aim to explore the joint effects of multiple modulator genes in modulating global gene regulation and dissect the biological functions in breast cancer. To carry out the analysis, we proposed the Covariability-based Multiple Regression (CoMRe) method. The method is mainly built on a multiple regression model that takes expression levels of multiple modulators as inputs and regulation strength between genes as output. Pairs of genes were divided into groups based on their co-modulation patterns. Analyzing gene expression profiles from 286 breast cancer patients, CoMRe investigated ten candidate modulator genes that interacted and jointly determined global gene regulation. Among the candidate modulators, ESR1, ERBB2, and ADAM12 were found modulating the most numbers of gene pairs. The largest group of gene pairs was composed of ones that were modulated by merely ESR1. Functional annotation revealed that the group was significantly related to tumorigenesis and estrogen signaling in breast cancer. ESR1-ERBB2 co-modulation was the largest group modulated by more than one modulators. Similarly, the group was functionally associated with hormone stimulus, suggesting that functions of the two modulators are performed, at least partially, through modulation. The findings were validated in majorities of patients (> 99%) of two independent breast cancer datasets. We have showed CoMRe is a robust method to

  3. Orthogonal Cas9 proteins for RNA-guided gene regulation and editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, George M.; Esvelt, Kevin; Mali, Prashant

    2017-03-07

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including use of multiple orthogonal Cas9 proteins to simultaneously and independently regulate corresponding genes or simultaneously and independently edit corresponding genes.

  4. Gene regulation and genetics in neurochemistry, past to future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Steven W

    2016-10-01

    Ask any neuroscientist to name the most profound discoveries in the field in the past 60 years, and at or near the top of the list will be a phenomenon or technique related to genes and their expression. Indeed, our understanding of genetics and gene regulation has ushered in whole new systems of knowledge and new empirical approaches, many of which could not have even been imagined prior to the molecular biology boon of recent decades. Neurochemistry, in the classic sense, intersects with these concepts in the manifestation of neuropeptides, obviously dependent upon the central dogma (the established rules by which DNA sequence is eventually converted into protein primary structure) not only for their conformation but also for their levels and locales of expression. But, expanding these considerations to non-peptide neurotransmitters illustrates how gene regulatory events impact neurochemistry in a much broader sense, extending beyond the neurochemicals that translate electrical signals into chemical ones in the synapse, to also include every aspect of neural development, structure, function, and pathology. From the beginning, the mutability - yet relative stability - of genes and their expression patterns were recognized as potential substrates for some of the most intriguing phenomena in neurobiology - those instances of plasticity required for learning and memory. Near-heretical speculation was offered in the idea that perhaps the very sequence of the genome was altered to encode memories. A fascinating component of the intervening progress includes evidence that the central dogma is not nearly as rigid and consistent as we once thought. And this mutability extends to the potential to manipulate that code for both experimental and clinical purposes. Astonishing progress has been made in the molecular biology of neurochemistry during the 60 years since this journal debuted. Many of the gains in conceptual understanding have been driven by methodological

  5. Methyltransferase G9A Regulates Osteogenesis via Twist Gene Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashihori, N; Lehnertz, B; Sampaio, A; Underhill, T M; Rossi, F; Richman, J M

    2017-09-01

    Here we investigate the role of epigenetic factors in controlling the timing of cranial neural crest cell differentiation. The gene coding for histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase G9A was conditionally deleted in neural crest cells with Wnt1-Cre. The majority of homozygous-null animals survived to birth but thereafter failed to thrive. Phenotypic analysis of postnatal animals revealed that the mutants displayed incomplete ossification and 20% shorter jaws as compared to their wild-type littermates. At E13.5, patterns of expression of the osteogenic transcription factor RUNX2 and the mesenchymal transcription factor TWIST are similar in controls and mutants; both overlap in areas of future intramembranous bone formation. At E14.5, the nonosteogenic mesenchyme expressed TWIST, whereas the ossification center had strong RUNX2 and osteopontin expression. In the mutants, TWIST protein was present in the osteogenic mesenchyme, while osteopontin was not expressed until E15.5. In addition, in mutants, small regions of TWIST-positive osteogenic mesenchyme were visible until E15.5. The delay in ossification and reduction in size of the ossification centers were correlated with an earlier decrease in proliferation. We used micromass cultures of the face to investigate the direct effects of G9A inhibition on skeletal differentiation. Addition of a small molecule inhibitor for G9A, BIX-01294, to wild-type cells upregulated Twist genes similar to what was observed in vivo. The inhibitor also caused decreases in several osteogenic markers. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of primary osteogenic mesenchyme from calvaria revealed that Twist1 and Twist2 regulatory regions contain the repressive H3K9me2 marks catalyzed by G9A, which are removed when BIX-01294 is added. Our results establish a role for G9A and H3K9me2 in the regulation of Twist genes and provide novel insights into the significance of epigenetic mechanisms in controlling temporal and tissue-specific gene

  6. Transcriptomic analysis in the developing zebrafish embryo after compound exposure: Individual gene expression and pathway regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermsen, Sanne A.B., E-mail: Sanne.Hermsen@rivm.nl [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.178, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Pronk, Tessa E. [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht (Netherlands); Brandhof, Evert-Jan van den [Centre for Environmental Quality, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Ven, Leo T.M. van der [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H. [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.178, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-10-01

    The zebrafish embryotoxicity test is a promising alternative assay for developmental toxicity. Classically, morphological assessment of the embryos is applied to evaluate the effects of compound exposure. However, by applying differential gene expression analysis the sensitivity and predictability of the test may be increased. For defining gene expression signatures of developmental toxicity, we explored the possibility of using gene expression signatures of compound exposures based on commonly expressed individual genes as well as based on regulated gene pathways. Four developmental toxic compounds were tested in concentration-response design, caffeine, carbamazepine, retinoic acid and valproic acid, and two non-embryotoxic compounds, D-mannitol and saccharin, were included. With transcriptomic analyses we were able to identify commonly expressed genes, which were mostly development related, after exposure to the embryotoxicants. We also identified gene pathways regulated by the embryotoxicants, suggestive of their modes of action. Furthermore, whereas pathways may be regulated by all compounds, individual gene expression within these pathways can differ for each compound. Overall, the present study suggests that the use of individual gene expression signatures as well as pathway regulation may be useful starting points for defining gene biomarkers for predicting embryotoxicity. - Highlights: • The zebrafish embryotoxicity test in combination with transcriptomics was used. • We explored two approaches of defining gene biomarkers for developmental toxicity. • Four compounds in concentration-response design were tested. • We identified commonly expressed individual genes as well as regulated gene pathways. • Both approaches seem suitable starting points for defining gene biomarkers.

  7. Expression and chromatin structures of cellulolytic enzyme gene regulated by heterochromatin protein 1

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiujun; Qu, Yinbo; Qin, Yuqi

    2016-01-01

    Background Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1, homologue HepA in Penicillium oxalicum) binding is associated with a highly compact chromatin state accompanied by gene silencing or repression. HP1 loss leads to the derepression of gene expression. We investigated HepA roles in regulating cellulolytic enzyme gene expression, as an increasingly number of studies have suggested that cellulolytic enzyme gene expression is not only regulated by transcription factors, but is also affected by the chromat...

  8. Sex Differences in Drosophila Somatic Gene Expression: Variation and Regulation by doublesex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle N. Arbeitman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sex differences in gene expression have been widely studied in Drosophila melanogaster. Sex differences vary across strains, but many molecular studies focus on only a single strain, or on genes that show sexually dimorphic expression in many strains. How extensive variability is and whether this variability occurs among genes regulated by sex determination hierarchy terminal transcription factors is unknown. To address these questions, we examine differences in sexually dimorphic gene expression between two strains in Drosophila adult head tissues. We also examine gene expression in doublesex (dsx mutant strains to determine which sex-differentially expressed genes are regulated by DSX, and the mode by which DSX regulates expression. We find substantial variation in sex-differential expression. The sets of genes with sexually dimorphic expression in each strain show little overlap. The prevalence of different DSX regulatory modes also varies between the two strains. Neither the patterns of DSX DNA occupancy, nor mode of DSX regulation explain why some genes show consistent sex-differential expression across strains. We find that the genes identified as regulated by DSX in this study are enriched with known sites of DSX DNA occupancy. Finally, we find that sex-differentially expressed genes and genes regulated by DSX are highly enriched on the fourth chromosome. These results provide insights into a more complete pool of potential DSX targets, as well as revealing the molecular flexibility of DSX regulation.

  9. Sex Differences in Drosophila Somatic Gene Expression: Variation and Regulation by doublesex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeitman, Michelle N; New, Felicia N; Fear, Justin M; Howard, Tiffany S; Dalton, Justin E; Graze, Rita M

    2016-07-07

    Sex differences in gene expression have been widely studied in Drosophila melanogaster Sex differences vary across strains, but many molecular studies focus on only a single strain, or on genes that show sexually dimorphic expression in many strains. How extensive variability is and whether this variability occurs among genes regulated by sex determination hierarchy terminal transcription factors is unknown. To address these questions, we examine differences in sexually dimorphic gene expression between two strains in Drosophila adult head tissues. We also examine gene expression in doublesex (dsx) mutant strains to determine which sex-differentially expressed genes are regulated by DSX, and the mode by which DSX regulates expression. We find substantial variation in sex-differential expression. The sets of genes with sexually dimorphic expression in each strain show little overlap. The prevalence of different DSX regulatory modes also varies between the two strains. Neither the patterns of DSX DNA occupancy, nor mode of DSX regulation explain why some genes show consistent sex-differential expression across strains. We find that the genes identified as regulated by DSX in this study are enriched with known sites of DSX DNA occupancy. Finally, we find that sex-differentially expressed genes and genes regulated by DSX are highly enriched on the fourth chromosome. These results provide insights into a more complete pool of potential DSX targets, as well as revealing the molecular flexibility of DSX regulation. Copyright © 2016 Arbeitman et al.

  10. Gravity regulated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana (GENARA experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucheron-Dubuisson, Elodie; Carnero-D&íaz, Eugénie; Medina, Francisco Javier; Gasset, Gilbert; Pereda-Loth, Veronica; Graziana, Annick; Mazars, Christian; Le Disquet, Isabelle; Eche, Brigitte; Grat, Sabine; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette

    2012-07-01

    In higher plants, post-embryonic development is possible through the expression of a set of genes constituting the morphogenetic program that contribute to the production of tissues and organs during the whole plant life cycle. Plant development is mainly controlled by internal factors such as phytohormones, as well as by environmental factors, among which gravity plays a key role (gravi-morphogenetic program). The GENARA space experiment has been designed with the goal of contributing to a better understanding of this gravi-morphogenetic program through the identification and characterization of some gravity regulated proteins (GR proteins) by using quantitative proteomic methods, and through the study of the impact of plant hormones on the expression of this program. Among plant hormones, auxin is the major regulator of organogenesis. In fact, it affects numerous plant developmental processes, e.g. cell division and elongation, autumnal loss of leaves, and the formation of buds, roots, flowers and fruits. Furthermore, it also plays a key role in the mechanisms of different tropisms (including gravitropism) that modulate fundamental features of plant growth. The expression of significant genes involved in auxin transport and in auxin signal perception in root cells is being studied in space-grown seedlings and compared with the corresponding ground controls. This experiment was scheduled to be performed in The European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS), a new facility for plant cultivation and Plant Molecular Biology studies, at ISS. However only one aspect of this experiment was flown and concerns the qualitative and quantitative changes in membrane proteins supposed to be mainly associated with cell signaling and has been called GENARA A. The second part dealing with the function of auxin in the gravi-morphogenetic program and the alterations induced by microgravity will be studied through mutants affected on biosynthesis, transport or perception of auxin in a

  11. Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Regulations of the HLA-G Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Erick C.; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana C.; Yaghi, Layale; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    HLA-G has a relevant role in immune response regulation. The overall structure of the HLA-G coding region has been maintained during the evolution process, in which most of its variable sites are synonymous mutations or coincide with introns, preserving major functional HLA-G properties. The HLA-G promoter region is different from the classical class I promoters, mainly because (i) it lacks regulatory responsive elements for IFN-γ and NF-κB, (ii) the proximal promoter region (within 200 bases from the first translated ATG) does not mediate transactivation by the principal HLA class I transactivation mechanisms, and (iii) the presence of identified alternative regulatory elements (heat shock, progesterone and hypoxia-responsive elements) and unidentified responsive elements for IL-10, glucocorticoids, and other transcription factors is evident. At least three variable sites in the 3′ untranslated region have been studied that may influence HLA-G expression by modifying mRNA stability or microRNA binding sites, including the 14-base pair insertion/deletion, +3142C/G and +3187A/G polymorphisms. Other polymorphic sites have been described, but there are no functional studies on them. The HLA-G coding region polymorphisms might influence isoform production and at least two null alleles with premature stop codons have been described. We reviewed the structure of the HLA-G promoter region and its implication in transcriptional gene control, the structure of the HLA-G 3′UTR and the major actors of the posttranscriptional gene control, and, finally, the presence of regulatory elements in the coding region. PMID:24741620

  12. Compositional features are potentially involved in the regulation of gene expression of tumor suppressor genes in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjari, Mohammadreza; Khoshnevisan, Atefeh; Behmanesh, Mehrdad

    2014-12-15

    Different mechanisms regulate the expression level of tissue specific genes in human. Here we report some compositional features such as codon usage bias, amino acid usage bias, codon frequency, and base composition which may be potentially related to mRNA amount of tissue specific tumor suppressor genes. Our findings support the possibility that structural elements in gene and protein may play an important role in the regulation of tumor suppressor genes, development, and tumorigenesis. The data presented here can open broad vistas in the understanding and treatment of a variety of human malignancies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The impact of mammalian gene regulation concepts on functional genomic research, metabolic engineering, and advanced gene therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussenegger, M

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of heterologous gene expression is of prime importance for a wide variety of basic and applied biological research areas including functional genomics, tissue engineering, gene therapy, and biopharmaceutical manufacturing. Initial gene regulation strategies employed endogenous responsive elements, which resulted in pleiotropic interference of transgene expression with host regulatory networks. Current regulation systems are binary and consist of chimeric transactivators and responsive target promoters of heterologous bacterial or insect origin, or they contain artificially designed components. Regulation of generic systems is based on binding of a transactivator to its cognate promoter, which is modulated by specific molecules such as antibiotics or hormones and brings the transactivation domain into contact with a minimal promoter, thereby inducing target gene expression. Binary gene regulation concepts have been significantly refined in recent years with a focus to improve their regulation performance and their compatibility with human-therapeutic use. In this review we present a detailed analysis of currently available mammalian gene regulation systems and document progress that has pioneered the use of such systems in various aspects of human therapy.

  14. Coordinate gene regulation by fimbriae-induced signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Klemm, Per

    2001-01-01

    whether fimbriae expression can affect expression of other genes, Analysis of gene expression in two E.coli strains, differing in the fim locus, indicated the flu gene to be affected. The flu gene encodes the antigen 43 (Ag43) surface protein, specifically involved in bacterial aggregation...

  15. Multi-scale modeling of gene regulation of morphogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaandorp, J.A.; Botman, D.; Tamulonis, C.; Dries, R

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a spatio-temporal gene regulatory network for early gastrulation in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. We measure gene expression during early gastrulation using a gene expression quantification tool. We measure gene expression during early gastrulation when the

  16. The CO-Regulation Database (CORD): a tool to identify coordinately expressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenbach, John P; Andrade, Jorge; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-01-01

    Meta-analysis of gene expression array databases has the potential to reveal information about gene function. The identification of gene-gene interactions may be inferred from gene expression information but such meta-analysis is often limited to a single microarray platform. To address this limitation, we developed a gene-centered approach to analyze differential expression across thousands of gene expression experiments and created the CO-Regulation Database (CORD) to determine which genes are correlated with a queried gene. Using the GEO and ArrayExpress database, we analyzed over 120,000 group by group experiments from gene microarrays to determine the correlating genes for over 30,000 different genes or hypothesized genes. CORD output data is presented for sample queries with focus on genes with well-known interaction networks including p16 (CDKN2A), vimentin (VIM), MyoD (MYOD1). CDKN2A, VIM, and MYOD1 all displayed gene correlations consistent with known interacting genes. We developed a facile, web-enabled program to determine gene-gene correlations across different gene expression microarray platforms. Using well-characterized genes, we illustrate how CORD's identification of co-expressed genes contributes to a better understanding a gene's potential function. The website is found at http://cord-db.org.

  17. A Hox Gene, Antennapedia, Regulates Expression of Multiple Major Silk Protein Genes in the Silkworm Bombyx mori*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Takuya; Tomita, Shuichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Kimoto, Mai; Takiya, Shigeharu; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sezutsu, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Hox genes play a pivotal role in the determination of anteroposterior axis specificity during bilaterian animal development. They do so by acting as a master control and regulating the expression of genes important for development. Recently, however, we showed that Hox genes can also function in terminally differentiated tissue of the lepidopteran Bombyx mori. In this species, Antennapedia (Antp) regulates expression of sericin-1, a major silk protein gene, in the silk gland. Here, we investigated whether Antp can regulate expression of multiple genes in this tissue. By means of proteomic, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization analyses, we demonstrate that misexpression of Antp in the posterior silk gland induced ectopic expression of major silk protein genes such as sericin-3, fhxh4, and fhxh5. These genes are normally expressed specifically in the middle silk gland as is Antp. Therefore, the evidence strongly suggests that Antp activates these silk protein genes in the middle silk gland. The putative sericin-1 activator complex (middle silk gland-intermolt-specific complex) can bind to the upstream regions of these genes, suggesting that Antp directly activates their expression. We also found that the pattern of gene expression was well conserved between B. mori and the wild species Bombyx mandarina, indicating that the gene regulation mechanism identified here is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism and not an artifact of the domestication of B. mori. We suggest that Hox genes have a role as a master control in terminally differentiated tissues, possibly acting as a primary regulator for a range of physiological processes. PMID:26814126

  18. Computer System "Gene Discovery" for Regularities Search and Knowledge Discovery on Gene Expression Regulation Using Integrated Digital Library Geneexpress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vityaev, E. E.; Orlov, Yu. L.; Pozdnyakov, M. A.; Levitsky, V. G.; Vishnevsky, O. V.; Podkolodny, N. L.; Kolchanov, N. A.

    Digital library GeneExpress 2.1 is designed for accumulation of experimental data, data navigation, data analysis, and analysis of dependencies in the field of gene expression regulation. It integrates the databases and programs for processing the data about structure and function of DNA, RNA, and proteins and serves as background for data mining in the field of gene expression regulation. This paper presents implementation of Data Mining techniques for searching regularities in tables of context features of DNA sequences involved in transcription regulation. The goal is to discover regularities that interrelate nucleotide sequences with the functional class of these sequences. The search for regularities is implemented in a software system "Gene Discovery" which is based on first-order probabilistic logic. The "Gene Discovery" system provides a general scenario of functional annotation of an arbitrary nucleotide sequence. The method relies to original Knowledge Discovery approach that can be used for wide variety of complex bioinformatics problems.

  19. In silico clustering of Salmonella global gene expression data reveals novel genes co-regulated with the SPI-1 virulence genes through HilD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Flores, Irma; Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Sánchez-Pérez, Mishael; Paredes, Claudia C; Collado-Vides, Julio; Salgado, Heladia; Bustamante, Víctor H

    2016-11-25

    A wide variety of Salmonella enterica serovars cause intestinal and systemic infections to humans and animals. Salmonella Patogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1) is a chromosomal region containing 39 genes that have crucial virulence roles. The AraC-like transcriptional regulator HilD, encoded in SPI-1, positively controls the expression of the SPI-1 genes, as well as of several other virulence genes located outside SPI-1. In this study, we applied a clustering method to the global gene expression data of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium from the COLOMBOS database; thus genes that show an expression pattern similar to that of SPI-1 genes were selected. This analysis revealed nine novel genes that are co-expressed with SPI-1, which are located in different chromosomal regions. Expression analyses and protein-DNA interaction assays showed regulation by HilD for six of these genes: gtgE, phoH, sinR, SL1263 (lpxR) and SL4247 were regulated directly, whereas SL1896 was regulated indirectly. Interestingly, phoH is an ancestral gene conserved in most of bacteria, whereas the other genes show characteristics of genes acquired by Salmonella. A role in virulence has been previously demonstrated for gtgE, lpxR and sinR. Our results further expand the regulon of HilD and thus identify novel possible Salmonella virulence genes.

  20. Chromatin regulation and gene centrality are essential for controlling fitness pleiotropy in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linqi Zhou

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available There are a wide range of phenotypes that are due to loss-of-function or null mutations. Previously, the functions of gene products that distinguish essential from nonessential genes were characterized. However, the functions of products of non-essential genes that contribute to fitness remain minimally understood.Using data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we investigated several gene characteristics, which we are able to measure, that are significantly associated with a gene's fitness pleiotropy. Fitness pleiotropy is a measurement of the gene's importance to fitness. These characteristics include: 1 whether the gene's product functions in chromatin regulation, 2 whether the regulation of the gene is influenced by chromatin state, measured by chromatin regulation effect (CRE, 3 whether the gene's product functions as a transcription factor (TF and the number of genes a TF regulates, 4 whether the gene contains TATA-box, and 5 whether the gene's product is central in a protein interaction network. Partial correlation analysis was used to study how these characteristics interact to influence fitness pleiotropy. We show that all five characteristics that were measured are statistically significantly associated with fitness pleiotropy. However, fitness pleiotropy is not associated with the presence of TATA-box when CRE is controlled. In particular, two characteristics: 1 whether the regulation of a gene is more likely to be influenced by chromatin state, and 2 whether the gene product is central in a protein interaction network measured by the number of protein interactions were found to play the most important roles affecting a gene's fitness pleiotropy.These findings highlight the significance of both epigenetic gene regulation and protein interaction networks in influencing the fitness pleiotropy.

  1. Gene expression profiling of hormonal regulation related to the residual feed intake of Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Y M; Yang, Z; Wu, F; Han, Z Y; Wang, G L

    2015-09-11

    An accumulation of over a decade of research in cattle has shown that genetic selection for decreased residual feed intake (RFI), defined as the difference between an animal's actual feed intake and its expected feed intake, is a viable option for improving feed efficiency and reducing the feed requirements of herds, thereby improving the profitability of cattle producers. Hormonal regulation is one of the most important factors in feed intake. To determine the relationship between hormones and feed efficiency, we performed gene expression profiling of jugular vein serum on hormonal regulation of Chinese Holstein cattle with low and high RFI coefficients. 857 differential expression genes (from 24683 genes) were found. Among these, 415 genes were up-regulated and 442 genes were down-regulated in the low RFI group. The gene ontology (GO) search revealed 6 significant terms and 64 genes associated with hormonal regulation, and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) selected the adipocytokine signaling pathway, insulin signaling pathway. In conclusion, the study indicated that the molecular expression of genes associated with hormonal regulation differs in dairy cows, depending on their RFI coefficients, and that these differences may be related to the molecular regulation of the leptin-NPY and insulin signaling pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cholinergic regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bo; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing...

  3. A light-switchable bidirectional expression module allowing simultaneous regulation of multiple genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianjun; Li, Ting; Wang, Xue; Yang, Yi

    2015-10-02

    Several light-regulated genetic circuits have been applied to spatiotemporally control transgene expression in mammalian cells. However, simultaneous regulation of multiple genes using one genetic device by light has not yet been reported. In this study, we engineered a bidirectional expression module based on LightOn system. Our data showed that both reporter genes could be regulated at defined and quantitative levels. Simultaneous regulation of four genes was further achieved in cultured cells and mice. Additionally, we successfully utilized the bidirectional expression module to monitor the expression of a suicide gene, showing potential for photodynamic gene therapy. Collectively, we provide a robust and useful tool to simultaneously control multiple genes expression by light, which will be widely used in biomedical research and biotechnology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CHD7, the gene mutated in CHARGE syndrome, regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Yvonne; Wehner, Peter; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bongers, Ernie M H F; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Wincent, Josephine; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Borchers, Annette; Pauli, Silke

    2014-08-01

    Heterozygous loss of function mutations in CHD7 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7) lead to CHARGE syndrome, a complex developmental disorder affecting craniofacial structures, cranial nerves and several organ systems. Recently, it was demonstrated that CHD7 is essential for the formation of multipotent migratory neural crest cells, which migrate from the neural tube to many regions of the embryo, where they differentiate into various tissues including craniofacial and heart structures. So far, only few CHD7 target genes involved in neural crest cell development have been identified and the role of CHD7 in neural crest cell guidance and the regulation of mesenchymal-epithelial transition are unknown. Therefore, we undertook a genome-wide microarray expression analysis on wild-type and CHD7 deficient (Chd7 (Whi/+) and Chd7 (Whi/Whi)) mouse embryos at day 9.5, a time point of neural crest cell migration. We identified 98 differentially expressed genes between wild-type and Chd7 (Whi/Whi) embryos. Interestingly, many misregulated genes are involved in neural crest cell and axon guidance such as semaphorins and ephrin receptors. By performing knockdown experiments for Chd7 in Xenopus laevis embryos, we found abnormalities in the expression pattern of Sema3a, a protein involved in the pathogenesis of Kallmann syndrome, in vivo. In addition, we detected non-synonymous SEMA3A variations in 3 out of 45 CHD7-negative CHARGE patients. In summary, we discovered for the first time that Chd7 regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance, demonstrating a new aspect in the pathogenesis of CHARGE syndrome. Furthermore, we showed for Sema3a a conserved regulatory mechanism across different species, highlighting its significance during development. Although we postulated that the non-synonymous SEMA3A variants which we found in CHD7-negative CHARGE patients alone are not sufficient to produce the phenotype, we suggest an important modifier role for SEMA3A in the

  5. [Identification of a gene regulating "behavioral despair" in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Shizufumi; Tomida, Shigeru

    2010-02-01

    We found that CS mice exhibit an extremely low immobility time (almost no immobility) in both the tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST). In these tests, animals are subjected to the short-term, inescapable stress of being suspended by their tail or being forced to swim in a water-filled cylinder. In such situations, the animals rapidly adopt a characteristic immobile posture that has been named "behavioral despair" on the assumption that the animals have given up hope of escaping. These tests have been widely used for assessing antidepressant activity and depression-like behavior. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping using CS and C57BL/6J mice revealed significant QTLs on chromosomes (Chrs) 4 (FST) and 5 (TST and FST). To identify the quantitative trait gene on Chr 5, we narrowed the QTL interval to 0.5 Mb using several congenic and subcongenic strains. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase 46 (Usp46) with a lysine codon deletion was located in this region. This deletion affected nest-building, muscimol-induced righting reflex and anti-immobility effects of imipramine. The muscimol-induced current in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and hippocampal expression of the 67-kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase significantly decreased in the Usp46 mutant mice compared to control mice. All these phenotypes were rescued in transgenic mice with bacterial artificial chromosomes containing wild-type Usp46. Thus, Usp46 affects "behavioral despair" and it is implicated in the regulation of GABA action.

  6. Nitric oxide directly regulates gene expression during Drosophila development: need some gas to drive into metamorphosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Naoki; O'Connor, Michael B

    2011-07-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important second messenger involved in numerous biological processes, but how it regulates gene expression is not well understood. In this issue of Genes & Development, Cáceres and colleagues (pp. 1476-1485) report a critical requirement of NO as a direct regulator of gene expression through its binding to a heme-containing nuclear receptor in Drosophila. This may be an anciently evolved mechanism to coordinate behavior and metabolism during animal development.

  7. Differential timing of gene expression regulation between leptocephali of North Atlantic eels in the Sargasso Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernatchez, Louis; Saint-Cyr, Jérôme; Maes, Gregory E.

    2011-01-01

    the alternative hypotheses of (1) differential timing of gene expression regulation during early development versus (2) species-specific differences in expression of particular genes. Our results provide much stronger support for the former hypothesis since no gene showed consistent significant differences...... in expression levels between the two species. In contrast, 146 genes showed differential timings of expression between species, although the observed expression level differences between the species were generally small. Consequently, species-specific gene expression regulation seems to play a minor role...... in species differentiation. Overall, these results show that the basis of the early developmental divergence between the American and European eel is probably influenced by differences in the timing of gene expression regulation for genes involved in a large array of biological functions...

  8. NeuroD1: developmental expression and regulated genes in the rodent pineal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, Estela M; Bailey, Michael J; Rath, Martin F

    2007-01-01

    -regulated (>twofold, p 5C ( approximately 100-fold) and the most dramatically up-regulated gene is glutamic acid decarboxylase 1 ( approximately fourfold). Other impacted transcripts encode proteins involved...... development. Pineal NeuroD1 levels are similar during the day and night, and do not appear to be influenced by sympathetic neural input. Gene expression analysis of the pineal glands from neonatal NeuroD1 knockout mice identifies 127 transcripts that are down-regulated (>twofold, p

  9. Circadian yin-yang regulation and its manipulation to globally reprogram gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yao; Weyman, Philip D; Umetani, Miki; Xiong, Jing; Qin, Ximing; Xu, Qing; Iwasaki, Hideo; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2013-12-02

    The cyanobacterial circadian program exerts genome-wide control of gene expression. KaiC undergoes rhythms of phosphorylation that are regulated by interactions with KaiA and KaiB. The phosphorylation status of KaiC is thought to mediate global transcription via output factors SasA, CikA, LabA, RpaA, and RpaB. Overexpression of kaiC has been reported to globally repress gene expression. Here, we show that the positive circadian component KaiA upregulates "subjective dusk" genes and that its overexpression deactivates rhythmic gene expression without significantly affecting growth rates in constant light. We analyze the global patterns of expression that are regulated by KaiA versus KaiC and find in contrast to the previous report of KaiC repression that there is a "yin-yang" regulation of gene expression whereby kaiA overexpression activates "dusk genes" and represses "dawn genes," whereas kaiC overexpression complementarily activates dawn genes and represses dusk genes. Moreover, continuous induction of kaiA latched KaiABC-regulated gene expression to provide constitutively increased transcript levels of diverse endogenous and heterologous genes that are expressed in the predominant subjective dusk phase. In addition to analyzing KaiA regulation of endogenous gene expression, we apply these insights to the expression of heterologous proteins whose products are of potential value, namely human proinsulin, foreign luciferase, and exogenous hydrogenase. Both KaiC and KaiA complementarily contribute to the regulation of circadian gene expression via yin-yang switching. Circadian patterns can be reprogrammed by overexpression of kaiA or kaiC to constitutively enhance gene expression, and this reprogramming can improve 24/7 production of heterologous proteins that are useful as pharmaceuticals or biofuels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Rapid male-specific regulatory divergence and down regulation of spermatogenesis genes in Drosophila species hybrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Ferguson

    Full Text Available In most crosses between closely related species of Drosophila, the male hybrids are sterile and show postmeiotic abnormalities. A series of gene expression studies using genomic approaches have found significant down regulation of postmeiotic spermatogenesis genes in sterile male hybrids. These results have led some to suggest a direct relationship between down regulation in gene expression and hybrid sterility. An alternative explanation to a cause-and-effect relationship between misregulation of gene expression and male sterility is rapid divergence of male sex regulatory elements leading to incompatible interactions in an interspecies hybrid genome. To test the effect of regulatory divergence in spermatogenesis gene expression, we isolated 35 fertile D. simulans strains with D. mauritiana introgressions in either the X, second or third chromosome. We analyzed gene expression in these fertile hybrid strains for a subset of spermatogenesis genes previously reported as significantly under expressed in sterile hybrids relative to D. simulans. We found that fertile autosomal introgressions can cause levels of gene down regulation similar to that of sterile hybrids. We also found that X chromosome heterospecific introgressions cause significantly less gene down regulation than autosomal introgressions. Our results provide evidence that rapid male sex gene regulatory divergence can explain misexpression of spermatogenesis genes in hybrids.

  11. Regulation of cell-to-cell variability in divergent gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao; Wu, Shuyang; Pocetti, Christopher; Bai, Lu

    2016-03-24

    Cell-to-cell variability (noise) is an important feature of gene expression that impacts cell fitness and development. The regulatory mechanism of this variability is not fully understood. Here we investigate the effect on gene expression noise in divergent gene pairs (DGPs). We generated reporters driven by divergent promoters, rearranged their gene order, and probed their expressions using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH). We show that two genes in a co-regulated DGP have higher expression covariance compared with the separate, tandem and convergent configurations, and this higher covariance is caused by more synchronized firing of the divergent transcriptions. For differentially regulated DGPs, the regulatory signal of one gene can stochastically 'leak' to the other, causing increased gene expression noise. We propose that the DGPs' function in limiting or promoting gene expression noise may enhance or compromise cell fitness, providing an explanation for the conservation pattern of DGPs.

  12. A Hox Gene, Antennapedia, Regulates Expression of Multiple Major Silk Protein Genes in the Silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Takuya; Tomita, Shuichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Kimoto, Mai; Takiya, Shigeharu; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sezutsu, Hideki

    2016-03-25

    Hoxgenes play a pivotal role in the determination of anteroposterior axis specificity during bilaterian animal development. They do so by acting as a master control and regulating the expression of genes important for development. Recently, however, we showed that Hoxgenes can also function in terminally differentiated tissue of the lepidopteranBombyx mori In this species,Antennapedia(Antp) regulates expression of sericin-1, a major silk protein gene, in the silk gland. Here, we investigated whether Antpcan regulate expression of multiple genes in this tissue. By means of proteomic, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization analyses, we demonstrate that misexpression of Antpin the posterior silk gland induced ectopic expression of major silk protein genes such assericin-3,fhxh4, and fhxh5 These genes are normally expressed specifically in the middle silk gland as is Antp Therefore, the evidence strongly suggests that Antpactivates these silk protein genes in the middle silk gland. The putativesericin-1 activator complex (middle silk gland-intermolt-specific complex) can bind to the upstream regions of these genes, suggesting that Antpdirectly activates their expression. We also found that the pattern of gene expression was well conserved between B. moriand the wild species Bombyx mandarina, indicating that the gene regulation mechanism identified here is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism and not an artifact of the domestication of B. mori We suggest that Hoxgenes have a role as a master control in terminally differentiated tissues, possibly acting as a primary regulator for a range of physiological processes. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Gene regulation in response to protein disulphide isomerase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Per; Tachibana, Christine; Bruun, Anette W

    2003-01-01

    We have examined the activities of promoters of a number of yeast genes encoding resident endoplasmic reticulum proteins, and found increased expression in a strain with severe protein disulphide isomerase deficiency. Serial deletion in the promoter of the MPD1 gene, which encodes a PDI1-homologue...... element. The sequence (GACACG) does not resemble the unfolded protein response element. It is present in the upstream regions of the MPD1, MPD2, KAR2, PDI1 and ERO1 genes....

  14. A large-scale RNA interference screen identifies genes that regulate autophagy at different stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Sujuan; Pridham, Kevin J; Virbasius, Ching-Man

    2018-01-01

    Dysregulated autophagy is central to the pathogenesis and therapeutic development of cancer. However, how autophagy is regulated in cancer is not well understood and genes that modulate cancer autophagy are not fully defined. To gain more insights into autophagy regulation in cancer, we performed...... with fluorescence-activated cell sorting, we successfully isolated autophagic K562 cells where we identified 336 short hairpin RNAs. After candidate validation using Cyto-ID fluorescence spectrophotometry, LC3B immunoblotting, and quantitative RT-PCR, 82 genes were identified as autophagy-regulating genes. 20 genes...... have been reported previously and the remaining 62 candidates are novel autophagy mediators. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that most candidate genes were involved in molecular pathways regulating autophagy, rather than directly participating in the autophagy process. Further autophagy flux assays...

  15. Gene program-specific regulation of PGC-1{alpha} activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Søren F; Mandrup, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator 1 α (PGC-1α) activation coordinates induction of the hepatic fasting response through coactivation of numerous transcription factors and gene programs. In the June 15, 2011, issue of Genes & Development, Lustig and colleagues (pp....... 1232-1244) demonstrated that phosphorylation of PGC-1α by the p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) specifically interfered with the interaction between PGC-1α and HNF4α in liver and blocked the coactivation of the gluconeogenic target genes. This demonstrates how independent fine-tuning of gene...

  16. Orientation, distance, regulation and function of neighbouring genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gherman Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The sequencing of the human genome has allowed us to observe globally and in detail the arrangement of genes along the chromosomes. There are multiple lines of evidence that this arrangement is not random, both in terms of intergenic distances and orientation of neighbouring genes. We have undertaken a systematic evaluation of the spatial distribution and orientation of known genes across the human genome. We used genome-level information, including phylogenetic conservation, single nucleotide polymorphism density and correlation of gene expression to assess the importance of this distribution. In addition to confirming and extending known properties of the genome, such as the significance of gene deserts and the importance of 'head to head' orientation of gene pairs in proximity, we provide significant new observations that include a smaller average size for intervals separating the 3' ends of neighbouring genes, a correlation of gene expression across tissues for genes as far as 100 kilobases apart and signatures of increasing positive selection with decreasing interval size surprisingly relaxing for intervals smaller than ~500 base pairs. Further, we provide extensive graphical representations of the genome-wide data to allow for observations and comparisons beyond what we address.

  17. Functional Architectures of Local and Distal Regulation of Gene Expression in Multiple Human Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuanyao; Finucane, Hilary K; Gusev, Alexander; Bhatia, Gaurav; Gazal, Steven; O'Connor, Luke; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Wright, Fred A; Sullivan, Patrick F; Neale, Benjamin M; Price, Alkes L

    2017-04-06

    Genetic variants that modulate gene expression levels play an important role in the etiology of human diseases and complex traits. Although large-scale eQTL mapping studies routinely identify many local eQTLs, the molecular mechanisms by which genetic variants regulate expression remain unclear, particularly for distal eQTLs, which these studies are not well powered to detect. Here, we leveraged all variants (not just those that pass stringent significance thresholds) to analyze the functional architecture of local and distal regulation of gene expression in 15 human tissues by employing an extension of stratified LD-score regression that produces robust results in simulations. The top enriched functional categories in local regulation of peripheral-blood gene expression included coding regions (11.41×), conserved regions (4.67×), and four histone marks (p regulation of peripheral-blood gene expression: coding regions (4.47×), conserved regions (4.51×), and two histone marks (p gene expression across tissues confirmed that local regulation of gene expression is largely shared across tissues but that distal regulation is highly tissue specific. Our results elucidate the functional components of the genetic architecture of local and distal regulation of gene expression. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Associating transcription factors and conserved RNA structures with gene regulation in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, Nikolai; Seemann, Stefan E.; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2017-01-01

    Anatomical subdivisions of the human brain can be associated with different neuronal functions. This functional diversification is reflected by differences in gene expression. By analyzing post-mortem gene expression data from the Allen Brain Atlas, we investigated the impact of transcription...... factors (TF) and RNA secondary structures on the regulation of gene expression in the human brain. First, we modeled the expression of a gene as a linear combination of the expression of TFs. We devised an approach to select robust TF-gene interactions and to determine localized contributions to gene...

  19. Mechanisms for the environmental regulation of gene expression ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2005-01-07

    Jan 7, 2005 ... Here, the nervous system monitors the environment and transfers signals to the endocrine system. The endocrine hormones can then alter gene expression. The second route involves environmental factors that change the methylation pattern of genes, thereby altering their transcriptional capabilities.

  20. Regulation of mitochondrial gene expression, the epigenetic enigma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mposhi, Archibold; van der Wijst, Monique G. P.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Rots, Marianne G.

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetics provides an important layer of information on top of the DNA sequence and is essential for establishing gene expression profiles. Extensive studies have shown that nuclear DNA methylation and histone modifications influence nuclear gene expression. However, it remains unclear whether

  1. Regulation of reductive dehalogenase gene transcription in Dehalococcoides mccartyi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, A.; Segler, L.; Kleinsteuber, S.; Sawers, G.; Smidt, H.; Lechner, U.

    2013-01-01

    The remarkable capacity of the genus Dehalococcoides to dechlorinate a multitude of different chlorinated organic compounds reflects the number and diversity of genes in the genomes of Dehalococcoides species encoding reductive dehalogenase homologues (rdh). Most of these genes are located in the

  2. An efficient method for mining cross-timepoint gene regulation sequential patterns from time course gene expression datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chun-Pei; Liu, Yu-Cheng; Tsai, Yi-Lin; Tseng, Vincent S

    2013-01-01

    Observation of gene expression changes implying gene regulations using a repetitive experiment in time course has become more and more important. However, there is no effective method which can handle such kind of data. For instance, in a clinical/biological progression like inflammatory response or cancer formation, a great number of differentially expressed genes at different time points could be identified through a large-scale microarray approach. For each repetitive experiment with different samples, converting the microarray datasets into transactional databases with significant singleton genes at each time point would allow sequential patterns implying gene regulations to be identified. Although traditional sequential pattern mining methods have been successfully proposed and widely used in different interesting topics, like mining customer purchasing sequences from a transactional database, to our knowledge, the methods are not suitable for such biological dataset because every transaction in the converted database may contain too many items/genes. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm called CTGR-Span (Cross-Timepoint Gene Regulation Sequential pattern) to efficiently mine CTGR-SPs (Cross-Timepoint Gene Regulation Sequential Patterns) even on larger datasets where traditional algorithms are infeasible. The CTGR-Span includes several biologically designed parameters based on the characteristics of gene regulation. We perform an optimal parameter tuning process using a GO enrichment analysis to yield CTGR-SPs more meaningful biologically. The proposed method was evaluated with two publicly available human time course microarray datasets and it was shown that it outperformed the traditional methods in terms of execution efficiency. After evaluating with previous literature, the resulting patterns also strongly correlated with the experimental backgrounds of the datasets used in this study. We propose an efficient CTGR-Span to mine several biologically

  3. Overexpression and Down-Regulation of Barley Lipoxygenase LOX2.2 Affects Jasmonate-Regulated Genes and Aphid Fecundity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Losvik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aphids are pests on many crops and depend on plant phloem sap as their food source. In an attempt to find factors improving plant resistance against aphids, we studied the effects of overexpression and down-regulation of the lipoxygenase gene LOX2.2 in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. on the performance of two aphid species. A specialist, bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L. and a generalist, green peach aphid (Myzus persicae Sulzer were studied. LOX2.2 overexpressing lines showed up-regulation of some other jasmonic acid (JA-regulated genes, and antisense lines showed down-regulation of such genes. Overexpression or suppression of LOX2.2 did not affect aphid settling or the life span on the plants, but in short term fecundity tests, overexpressing plants supported lower aphid numbers and antisense plants higher aphid numbers. The amounts and composition of released volatile organic compounds did not differ between control and LOX2.2 overexpressing lines. Up-regulation of genes was similar for both aphid species. The results suggest that LOX2.2 plays a role in the activation of JA-mediated responses and indicates the involvement of LOX2.2 in basic defense responses.

  4. Regulation of contractile protein gene expression in unloaded mouse skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, D. S.; Carson, J. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1996-01-01

    Hindlimb unloading was performed on mice in an effort to study the regulation of contractile protein genes. In particular, the regulation of myosin heavy chain IIb was examined. During unloading, muscle fibers undergo a type conversion. Preliminary data from this study does not support the hypothesis that the fiber type conversion is due to an increase in promoter activity of fast isoform genes, such as myosin heavy chain IIb. The consequences of this finding are examined, with particular focus on other factors controlling gene regulation.

  5. Gene length as a biological timer to establish temporal transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkconnell, Killeen S; Magnuson, Brian; Paulsen, Michelle T; Lu, Brian; Bedi, Karan; Ljungman, Mats

    2017-02-01

    Transcriptional timing is inherently influenced by gene length, thus providing a mechanism for temporal regulation of gene expression. While gene size has been shown to be important for the expression timing of specific genes during early development, whether it plays a role in the timing of other global gene expression programs has not been extensively explored. Here, we investigate the role of gene length during the early transcriptional response of human fibroblasts to serum stimulation. Using the nascent sequencing techniques Bru-seq and BruUV-seq, we identified immediate genome-wide transcriptional changes following serum stimulation that were linked to rapid activation of enhancer elements. We identified 873 significantly induced and 209 significantly repressed genes. Variations in gene size allowed for a large group of genes to be simultaneously activated but produce full-length RNAs at different times. The median length of the group of serum-induced genes was significantly larger than the median length of all expressed genes, housekeeping genes, and serum-repressed genes. These gene length relationships were also observed in corresponding mouse orthologs, suggesting that relative gene size is evolutionarily conserved. The sizes of transcription factor and microRNA genes immediately induced after serum stimulation varied dramatically, setting up a cascade mechanism for temporal expression arising from a single activation event. The retention and expansion of large intronic sequences during evolution have likely played important roles in fine-tuning the temporal expression of target genes in various cellular response programs.

  6. Gene expression analysis of E. coli strains provides insights into the role of gene regulation in diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, Marius; Chai, Benli; Østman, Bjørn; Cole, James; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Tiedje, James M

    2015-05-01

    Escherichia coli spans a genetic continuum from enteric strains to several phylogenetically distinct, atypical lineages that are rare in humans, but more common in extra-intestinal environments. To investigate the link between gene regulation, phylogeny and diversification in this species, we analyzed global gene expression profiles of four strains representing distinct evolutionary lineages, including a well-studied laboratory strain, a typical commensal (enteric) strain and two environmental strains. RNA-Seq was employed to compare the whole transcriptomes of strains grown under batch, chemostat and starvation conditions. Highly differentially expressed genes showed a significantly lower nucleotide sequence identity compared with other genes, indicating that gene regulation and coding sequence conservation are directly connected. Overall, distances between the strains based on gene expression profiles were largely dependent on the culture condition and did not reflect phylogenetic relatedness. Expression differences of commonly shared genes (all four strains) and E. coli core genes were consistently smaller between strains characterized by more similar primary habitats. For instance, environmental strains exhibited increased expression of stress defense genes under carbon-limited growth and entered a more pronounced survival-like phenotype during starvation compared with other strains, which stayed more alert for substrate scavenging and catabolism during no-growth conditions. Since those environmental strains show similar genetic distance to each other and to the other two strains, these findings cannot be simply attributed to genetic relatedness but suggest physiological adaptations. Our study provides new insights into ecologically relevant gene-expression and underscores the role of (differential) gene regulation for the diversification of the model bacterial species.

  7. The ULT1 and ULT2 trxG genes play overlapping roles in Arabidopsis development and gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfared, Mona M; Carles, Cristel C; Rossignol, Pascale; Pires, Helena R; Fletcher, Jennifer C

    2013-09-01

    The epigenetic regulation of gene expression is critical for ensuring the proper deployment and stability of defined genome transcription programs at specific developmental stages. The cellular memory of stable gene expression states during animal and plant development is mediated by the opposing activities of Polycomb group (PcG) factors and trithorax group (trxG) factors. Yet, despite their importance, only a few trxG factors have been characterized in plants and their roles in regulating plant development are poorly defined. In this work, we report that the closely related Arabidopsis trxG genes ULTRAPETALA1 (ULT1) and ULT2 have overlapping functions in regulating shoot and floral stem cell accumulation, with ULT1 playing a major role but ULT2 also making a minor contribution. The two genes also have a novel, redundant activity in establishing the apical–basal polarity axis of the gynoecium, indicating that they function in differentiating tissues. Like ULT1 proteins, ULT2 proteins have a dual nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, and the two proteins physically associate in planta. Finally, we demonstrate that ULT1 and ULT2 have very similar overexpression phenotypes and regulate a common set of key development target genes, including floral MADS-box genes and class I KNOX genes. Our results reveal that chromatin remodeling mediated by the ULT1 and ULT2 proteins is necessary to control the development of meristems and reproductive organs. They also suggest that, like their animal counterparts, plant trxG proteins may function in multi-protein complexes to up-regulate the expression of key stage- and tissue-specific developmental regulatory genes.

  8. Detection of oestrogenic chemicals by assaying the expression level of oestrogen regulated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M; Hummel, R; Bévort, M

    1998-01-01

    or the yeast E-screen, with methods that are based on mammalian cells or whole animals. An alternative is to assay gene expression directly by methods such as differential display, where the expression of both genes known to be regulated directly by the receptor and genes regulated by other pathways can...... by dimerisation and binding of their corresponding response elements. By interacting with the transcriptional apparatus they then either activate or repress the transcription of target genes. However, this is a highly simplified view, since the activated oestrogen receptor interacts with other signal transduction...

  9. The precise regulation of different COR genes by individual CBF transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yihao; Huang, Jiaying; Sun, Tianshu; Wang, Xuefei; Zhu, Chenqi; Ai, Yuxi; Gu, Hongya

    2017-02-01

    The transcription factors CBF1/2/3 are reported to play a dominant role in the cold responsive network of Arabidopsis by directly regulating the expression levels of cold responsive (COR) genes. In this study, we obtained CRISPR/Cas9-mediated loss-of-function mutants of cbf1∼3. Over 3,000 COR genes identified by RNA-seq analysis showed a slight but significant change in their expression levels in the mutants compared to the wild-type plants after being treated at 4 °C for 12 h. The C-repeat (CRT) motif (5'-CCGAC-3') was enriched in promoters of genes that were up-regulated by CBF2 and CBF3 but not in promoters of genes up-regulated by CBF1. These data suggest that CBF2 and CBF3 play a more important role in directing the cold response by regulating different sets of downstream COR genes. More than 2/3 of COR genes were co-regulated by two or three CBFs and were involved mainly in cellular signal transduction and metabolic processes; less than 1/3 of the genes were regulated by one CBF, and those genes up-regulated were enriched in cold-related abiotic stress responses. Our results indicate that CBFs play an important role in the trade-off between cold tolerance and plant growth through the precise regulation of COR genes in the complicated transcriptional network. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Integrative Plant Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  10. Pax6 regulates gene expression in the vertebrate lens through miR-204.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaham, Ohad; Gueta, Karen; Mor, Eyal; Oren-Giladi, Pazit; Grinberg, Dina; Xie, Qing; Cvekl, Ales; Shomron, Noam; Davis, Noa; Keydar-Prizant, Maya; Raviv, Shaul; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Bell, Rachel E; Levy, Carmit; Avellino, Raffaella; Banfi, Sandro; Conte, Ivan; Ashery-Padan, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    During development, tissue-specific transcription factors regulate both protein-coding and non-coding genes to control differentiation. Recent studies have established a dual role for the transcription factor Pax6 as both an activator and repressor of gene expression in the eye, central nervous system, and pancreas. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the inhibitory activity of Pax6 is not fully understood. Here, we reveal that Trpm3 and the intronic microRNA gene miR-204 are co-regulated by Pax6 during eye development. miR-204 is probably the best known microRNA to function as a negative modulator of gene expression during eye development in vertebrates. Analysis of genes altered in mouse Pax6 mutants during lens development revealed significant over-representation of miR-204 targets among the genes up-regulated in the Pax6 mutant lens. A number of new targets of miR-204 were revealed, among them Sox11, a member of the SoxC family of pro-neuronal transcription factors, and an important regulator of eye development. Expression of Trpm/miR-204 and a few of its targets are also Pax6-dependent in medaka fish eyes. Collectively, this study identifies a novel evolutionarily conserved mechanism by which Pax6 controls the down-regulation of multiple genes through direct up-regulation of miR-204.

  11. Pax6 regulates gene expression in the vertebrate lens through miR-204.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohad Shaham

    Full Text Available During development, tissue-specific transcription factors regulate both protein-coding and non-coding genes to control differentiation. Recent studies have established a dual role for the transcription factor Pax6 as both an activator and repressor of gene expression in the eye, central nervous system, and pancreas. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the inhibitory activity of Pax6 is not fully understood. Here, we reveal that Trpm3 and the intronic microRNA gene miR-204 are co-regulated by Pax6 during eye development. miR-204 is probably the best known microRNA to function as a negative modulator of gene expression during eye development in vertebrates. Analysis of genes altered in mouse Pax6 mutants during lens development revealed significant over-representation of miR-204 targets among the genes up-regulated in the Pax6 mutant lens. A number of new targets of miR-204 were revealed, among them Sox11, a member of the SoxC family of pro-neuronal transcription factors, and an important regulator of eye development. Expression of Trpm/miR-204 and a few of its targets are also Pax6-dependent in medaka fish eyes. Collectively, this study identifies a novel evolutionarily conserved mechanism by which Pax6 controls the down-regulation of multiple genes through direct up-regulation of miR-204.

  12. An alternative pathway for gene regulation by Myc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peukert, K; Staller, P; Schneider, A

    1997-01-01

    The c-Myc protein activates transcription as part of a heteromeric complex with Max. However, Myc-transformed cells are characterized by loss of expression of several genes, suggesting that Myc may also repress gene expression. Two-hybrid cloning identifies a novel POZ domain Zn finger protein (Miz...... of the POZ domain of Miz-1, suggesting that Myc binding activates a latent inhibitory function of this domain. Fusion of a nuclear localization signal induces efficient nuclear transport of Miz-1 and impairs the ability of Myc to overcome transcriptional activation and growth arrest by Miz-1. Our data...... suggest a model for how gene repression by Myc may occur in vivo....

  13. Intrinsic Noise of microRNA-Regulated Genes and the ceRNA Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorbakhsh, Javad; Lang, Alex H.; Mehta, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that regulate genes post-transciptionally by binding and degrading target eukaryotic mRNAs. We use a quantitative model to study gene regulation by inhibitory microRNAs and compare it to gene regulation by prokaryotic small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs). Our model uses a combination of analytic techniques as well as computational simulations to calculate the mean-expression and noise profiles of genes regulated by both microRNAs and sRNAs. We find that despite very different molecular machinery and modes of action (catalytic vs stoichiometric), the mean expression levels and noise profiles of microRNA-regulated genes are almost identical to genes regulated by prokaryotic sRNAs. This behavior is extremely robust and persists across a wide range of biologically relevant parameters. We extend our model to study crosstalk between multiple mRNAs that are regulated by a single microRNA and show that noise is a sensitive measure of microRNA-mediated interaction between mRNAs. We conclude by discussing possible experimental strategies for uncovering the microRNA-mRNA interactions and testing the competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) hypothesis. PMID:23991139

  14. Lipopolysaccharide triggers nuclear import of Lpcat1 to regulate inducible gene expression in lung epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Bryon; Kaercher, Leah; Snavely, Courtney; Zhao, Yutong; Zou, Chunbin

    2012-07-26

    To report that Lpcat1 plays an important role in regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inducible gene transcription. Gene expression in Murine Lung Epithelial MLE-12 cells with LPS treatment or Haemophilus influenza and Escherichia coli infection was analyzed by employing quantitative Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction techniques. Nucleofection was used to deliver Lenti-viral system to express or knock down Lpcat1 in MLE cells. Subcellular protein fractionation and Western blotting were utilized to study Lpcat1 nuclear relocation. Lpcat1 translocates into the nucleus from the cytoplasm in murine lung epithelia (MLE) after LPS treatment. Haemophilus influenza and Escherichia coli, two LPS-containing pathogens that cause pneumonia, triggered Lpcat1 nuclear translocation from the cytoplasm. The LPS inducible gene expression profile was determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction after silencing Lpcat1 or overexpression of the enzyme in MLE cells. We detected that 17 out of a total 38 screened genes were upregulated, 14 genes were suppressed, and 7 genes remained unchanged in LPS treated cells in comparison to controls. Knockdown of Lpcat1 by shRNA dramatically changed the spectrum of the LPS inducible gene transcription, as 18 genes out of 38 genes were upregulated, of which 20 genes were suppressed or unchanged. Notably, in Lpcat1 overexpressed cells, 25 genes out of 38 genes were reduced in the setting of LPS treatment. These observations suggest that Lpcat1 relocates into the nucleus in response to bacterial infection to differentially regulate gene transcriptional repression.

  15. Identification of cell cycle-regulated genes by convolutional neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenglin; Cui, Peng; Huang, Tao

    2017-04-17

    The cell cycle-regulated genes express periodically with the cell cycle stages, and the identification and study of these genes can provide a deep understanding of the cell cycle process. Large false positives and low overlaps are big problems in cell cycle-regulated gene detection. Here, a computational framework called DLGene was proposed for cell cycle-regulated gene detection. It is based on the convolutional neural network, a deep learning algorithm representing raw form of data pattern without assumption of their distribution. First, the expression data was transformed to categorical state data to denote the changing state of gene expression, and four different expression patterns were revealed for the reported cell cycle-regulated genes. Then, DLGene was applied to discriminate the non-cell cycle gene and the four subtypes of cell cycle genes. Its performances were compared with six traditional machine learning methods. At last, the biological functions of representative cell cycle genes for each subtype were analyzed. Our method showed better and more balanced performance of sensitivity and specificity comparing to other machine learning algorithms. The cell cycle genes had very different expression pattern with non-cell cycle genes and among the cell-cycle genes, there were four subtypes. Our method not only detects the cell cycle genes, but also describes its expression pattern, such as when its highest expression level is reached and how it changes with time. For each type, we analyzed the biological functions of the representative genes and such results provided novel insight of the cell cycle mechanisms. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Modeling Gene Regulation in Liver Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Random Forests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hilal Kazan

    2016-01-01

    .... We developed a random forest model that incorporates copy-number variation, DNA methylation, transcription factor, and microRNA binding information as features to predict gene expression in HCC...

  17. How to regulate a gene: to repress or to activate?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slavov, N.; van Oudenaarden, A.

    2012-01-01

    Gene-expression responses to an input can depend on growth conditions; in this issue, Sasson et al. (2012) show that this dependence is lower when the input results in a high degree of promoter occupancy.

  18. Environmental exposures and gene regulation in disease etiology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thea M. Edwards; John Peterson Myers

    2008-01-01

    .... Exactly how the environment changes gene expression and how this can lead to disease are being explored in a fruitful new approach to environmental health research, representative studies of which are reviewed here...

  19. DMPD: Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1757110 Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. Bl... (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. Pubmed...ID 1757110 Title Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene stor

  20. Interspecies variations in Bordetella catecholamine receptor gene regulation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickman, Timothy J; Suhadolc, Ryan J; Armstrong, Sandra K

    2015-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Multiple oscillators regulate circadian gene expression in Neurospora

    OpenAIRE

    Correa, Alejandro; Lewis, Zachary A.; Greene, Andrew V.; March, Irene J.; Gomer, Richard H.; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    High-density microarrays were used to profile circadian gene expression in Neurospora crassa cultures grown in constant darkness. We identified 145 clock-controlled genes (ccgs). The ccgs peaked in mRNA accumulation at all phases of the day, with the majority peaking in the late night to early morning. The predicted or known functions of the ccgs demonstrate that the clock contributes to a wide range of cellular processes, including cell signaling, development, metabolism, and stress response...

  2. Disparate chromatin landscapes and kinetics of inactivation impact differential regulation of p53 target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Nathan P; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2010-09-01

    The p53 transcription factor regulates the expression of genes involved in cellular responses to stress, including cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The p53 transcriptional program is extremely malleable, with target gene expression varying in a stress- and cell type-specific fashion. The molecular mechanisms underlying differential p53 target gene expression remain elusive. Here we provide evidence for gene-specific mechanisms affecting expression of three important p53 target genes. First we show that transcription of the apoptotic gene PUMA is regulated through intragenic chromatin boundaries, as revealed by distinct histone modification territories that correlate with binding of the insulator factors CTCF, Cohesins and USF1/2. Interestingly, this mode of regulation produces an evolutionary conserved long non-coding RNA of unknown function. Second, we demonstrate that the kinetics of transcriptional competence of the cell cycle arrest gene p21 and the apoptotic gene FAS are markedly different in vivo, as predicted by recent biochemical dissection of their core promoter elements in vitro. After a pulse of p53 activity in cells, assembly of the transcriptional apparatus on p21 is rapidly reversed, while FAS transcriptional activation is more sustained. Collectively these data add to a growing list of p53-autonomous mechanisms that impact differential regulation of p53 target genes.

  3. Autism and increased paternal age related changes in global levels of gene expression regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Alter

    Full Text Available A causal role of mutations in multiple general transcription factors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism suggested that alterations in global levels of gene expression regulation might also relate to disease risk in sporadic cases of autism. This premise can be tested by evaluating for changes in the overall distribution of gene expression levels. For instance, in mice, variability in hippocampal-dependent behaviors was associated with variability in the pattern of the overall distribution of gene expression levels, as assessed by variance in the distribution of gene expression levels in the hippocampus. We hypothesized that a similar change in variance might be found in children with autism. Gene expression microarrays covering greater than 47,000 unique RNA transcripts were done on RNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL of children with autism (n = 82 and controls (n = 64. Variance in the distribution of gene expression levels from each microarray was compared between groups of children. Also tested was whether a risk factor for autism, increased paternal age, was associated with variance. A decrease in the variance in the distribution of gene expression levels in PBL was associated with the diagnosis of autism and a risk factor for autism, increased paternal age. Traditional approaches to microarray analysis of gene expression suggested a possible mechanism for decreased variance in gene expression. Gene expression pathways involved in transcriptional regulation were down-regulated in the blood of children with autism and children of older fathers. Thus, results from global and gene specific approaches to studying microarray data were complimentary and supported the hypothesis that alterations at the global level of gene expression regulation are related to autism and increased paternal age. Global regulation of transcription, thus, represents a possible point of convergence for multiple etiologies of autism and other

  4. Dynamics of chromatin accessibility and gene regulation by MADS-domain transcription factorsin flower development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pajoro, A.; Madrigal, P.; Muiño, J.M.; Tomas Matus, J.; Jin, J.; Mecchia, M.A.; Debernardi, J.M.; Palatnik, J.F.; Balazadeh, S.; Arif, M.; Ó’Maoiléidigh, D.S.; Wellmer, F.; Krajewski, P.; Riechmann, J.L.; Angenent, G.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Development of eukaryotic organisms is controlled by transcription factors that trigger specific and global changes in gene expression programs. In plants, MADS-domain transcription factors act as master regulators of developmental switches and organ specification. However, the

  5. Gene regulation by the VirS/VirR system in Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Kaori

    2016-10-01

    The Gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming rod, Clostridium perfringens, is widely distributed in nature, especially in soil and the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals. C. perfringens produces many secreted toxins and enzymes that are involved in the pathogenesis of gas gangrane and gastrointestinal disease. One of the most important systems regulating the production of these proteins in C. perfringens is the VirS/VirR-VR-RNA signal transduction cascade. The Agr system also important for the regulation of toxin genes. VirS appears to sense the peptide produced by the Agr (accessory gene regulator) system. The VirS/VirR-VR-RNA cascade controls the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infections by regulating virulence related genes and genes for energy metabolism. These systems are important for the host cell-induced upregulation of toxin production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Beijerinck Centennial Microbial Physiology and Gene Regulation : Emerging Principles and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffers, W.A.; Van Dijken, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Book of abstracts of Beijerinck Centennial Microbial Physiology and Gene Regulation: Emerging Principles and Applications, 10-14 December 1995 The Hague, The Netherlands. Under the auspices of the Netherlands Foundation for Biotechnology.

  7. HOXB4 Gene Expression Is Regulated by CDX2 in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Steffen; Coshun, Mehmet; Mikkelsen Homburg, Keld

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) plays a key role in the homeobox regulatory network and is essential in regulating the expression of several homeobox (HOX) genes during embryonic development, particularly in the gut. Genome-wide CDX2 chromatin immunoprecipitation...... analysis and expression data from Caco2 cells also suggests a role for CDX2 in the regulation of HOXB4 gene expression in the intestinal epithelium. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether HOXB4 gene expression is regulated by CDX2 in the intestinal epithelium. We demonstrated binding of CDX...... demonstrating the CDX2 regulation of HOXB4 gene expression in the developed intestinal epithelium, indicating a possible role for HOXB4 in intestinal homeostasis....

  8. Overview of the gene regulation network and the bacteria biotope tasks in BioNLP'13 shared task

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bossy, Robert; Golik, Wiktoria; Ratkovic, Zorana; Valsamou, Dialekti; Bessières, Philippe; Nédellec, Claire

    2015-01-01

    .... New evaluation metrics were designed for the new goals. Moving beyond a list of gene interactions, the goal of the GRN task is to build a gene regulation network from the extracted gene interactions...

  9. PREFACE: Physics approaches to protein interactions and gene regulation Physics approaches to protein interactions and gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Panchenko, Anna R.; Przytycka, Teresa

    2011-06-01

    networks have been identified, including scale free distribution of the vertex degree, network motifs, and modularity, to name a few. These studies of network organization require the network to be as complete as possible, which given the limitations of experimental techniques is not currently the case. Therefore, experimental procedures for detecting biomolecular interactions should be complemented by computational approaches. The paper by Lees et al provides a review of computational methods, integrating multiple independent sources of data to infer physical and functional protein-protein interaction networks. One of the important aspects of protein interactions that should be accounted for in the prediction of protein interaction networks is that many proteins are composed of distinct domains. Protein domains may mediate protein interactions while proteins and their interaction networks may gain complexity through gene duplication and expansion of existing domain architectures via domain rearrangements. The latter mechanisms have been explored in detail in the paper by Cohen-Gihon et al. Protein-protein interactions are not the only component of the cell's interactome. Regulation of cell activity can be achieved at the level of transcription and involve a transcription factor—DNA binding which typically requires recognition of a specific DNA sequence motif. Chip-Chip and the more recent Chip-Seq technologies allow in vivo identification of DNA binding sites and, together with novel in vitro approaches, provide data necessary for deciphering the corresponding binding motifs. Such information, complemented by structures of protein-DNA complexes and knowledge of the differences in binding sites among homologs, opens the door to constructing predictive binding models. The paper by Persikov and Singh provides an example of such a model in the Cys2His2 zinc finger family. Recent studies have indicated that the presence of such binding motifs is, however, neither necessary

  10. Microarray profiling of progesterone-regulated endometrial genes during the rhesus monkey secretory phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okulicz William C

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the endometrium the steroid hormone progesterone (P, acting through its nuclear receptors, regulates the expression of specific target genes and gene networks required for endometrial maturation. Proper endometrial maturation is considered a requirement for embryo implantation. Endometrial receptivity is a complex process that is spatially and temporally restricted and the identity of genes that regulate receptivity has been pursued by a number of investigators. Methods In this study we have used high density oligonucleotide microarrays to screen for changes in mRNA transcript levels between normal proliferative and adequate secretory phases in Rhesus monkey artificial menstrual cycles. Biotinylated cRNA was prepared from day 13 and days 21–23 of the reproductive cycle and transcript levels were compared by hybridization to Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. Results Of ~12,000 genes profiled, we identified 108 genes that were significantly regulated during the shift from a proliferative to an adequate secretory endometrium. Of these genes, 39 were up-regulated at days 21–23 versus day 13, and 69 were down-regulated. Genes up-regulated in P-dominant tissue included: secretoglobin (uteroglobin, histone 2A, polo-like kinase (PLK, spermidine/spermine acetyltransferase 2 (SAT2, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI and metallothionein 1G (MT1G, all of which have been previously documented as elevated in the Rhesus monkey or human endometrium during the secretory phase. Genes down-regulated included: transforming growth factor beta-induced (TGFBI or BIGH3, matrix metalloproteinase 11 (stromelysin 3, proenkephalin (PENK, cysteine/glycine-rich protein 2 (CSRP2, collagen type VII alpha 1 (COL7A1, secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (SFRP4, progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1, chemokine (C-X-C ligand 12 (CXCL12 and biglycan (BGN. In addition, many novel/unknown genes were also identified. Validation of array data

  11. Uncovering transcriptional regulation of glycerol metabolism in Aspergilli through genome-wide gene expression data anlysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salazar, Margarita Pena; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2009-01-01

    and Aspergillus niger) with glucose and glycerol as carbon sources. Protein comparisons and cross-analysis with gene expression data of all three species resulted in the identification of 88 genes having a conserved response across the three Aspergilli. A promoter analysis of the up-regulated genes led...... to the identification of a conserved binding site for a putative regulator to be 5′-TGCGGGGA-3′, a binding site that is similar to the binding site for Adr1 in yeast and humans. We show that this Adr1 consensus binding sequence was over-represented on promoter regions of several genes in A. nidulans, A. oryzae and A....... niger. Our transcriptome analysis indicated that genes involved in ethanol, glycerol, fatty acid, amino acids and formate utilization are putatively regulated by Adr1 in Aspergilli as in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and this transcription factor therefore is likely to be cross-species conserved among...

  12. The rules of gene expression in plants: organ identity and gene body methylation are key factors for regulation of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceituno, Felipe F; Moseyko, Nick; Rhee, Seung Y; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A

    2008-09-23

    Microarray technology is a widely used approach for monitoring genome-wide gene expression. For Arabidopsis, there are over 1,800 microarray hybridizations representing many different experimental conditions on Affymetrix ATH1 gene chips alone. This huge amount of data offers a unique opportunity to infer the principles that govern the regulation of gene expression in plants. We used bioinformatics methods to analyze publicly available data obtained using the ATH1 chip from Affymetrix. A total of 1887 ATH1 hybridizations were normalized and filtered to eliminate low-quality hybridizations. We classified and compared control and treatment hybridizations and determined differential gene expression. The largest differences in gene expression were observed when comparing samples obtained from different organs. On average, ten-fold more genes were differentially expressed between organs as compared to any other experimental variable. We defined "gene responsiveness" as the number of comparisons in which a gene changed its expression significantly. We defined genes with the highest and lowest responsiveness levels as hypervariable and housekeeping genes, respectively. Remarkably, housekeeping genes were best distinguished from hypervariable genes by differences in methylation status in their transcribed regions. Moreover, methylation in the transcribed region was inversely correlated (R2 = 0.8) with gene responsiveness on a genome-wide scale. We provide an example of this negative relationship using genes encoding TCA cycle enzymes, by contrasting their regulatory responsiveness to nitrate and methylation status in their transcribed regions. Our results indicate that the Arabidopsis transcriptome is largely established during development and is comparatively stable when faced with external perturbations. We suggest a novel functional role for DNA methylation in the transcribed region as a key determinant capable of restraining the capacity of a gene to respond to

  13. The rules of gene expression in plants: Organ identity and gene body methylation are key factors for regulation of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez Rodrigo A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology is a widely used approach for monitoring genome-wide gene expression. For Arabidopsis, there are over 1,800 microarray hybridizations representing many different experimental conditions on Affymetrix™ ATH1 gene chips alone. This huge amount of data offers a unique opportunity to infer the principles that govern the regulation of gene expression in plants. Results We used bioinformatics methods to analyze publicly available data obtained using the ATH1 chip from Affymetrix. A total of 1887 ATH1 hybridizations were normalized and filtered to eliminate low-quality hybridizations. We classified and compared control and treatment hybridizations and determined differential gene expression. The largest differences in gene expression were observed when comparing samples obtained from different organs. On average, ten-fold more genes were differentially expressed between organs as compared to any other experimental variable. We defined "gene responsiveness" as the number of comparisons in which a gene changed its expression significantly. We defined genes with the highest and lowest responsiveness levels as hypervariable and housekeeping genes, respectively. Remarkably, housekeeping genes were best distinguished from hypervariable genes by differences in methylation status in their transcribed regions. Moreover, methylation in the transcribed region was inversely correlated (R2 = 0.8 with gene responsiveness on a genome-wide scale. We provide an example of this negative relationship using genes encoding TCA cycle enzymes, by contrasting their regulatory responsiveness to nitrate and methylation status in their transcribed regions. Conclusion Our results indicate that the Arabidopsis transcriptome is largely established during development and is comparatively stable when faced with external perturbations. We suggest a novel functional role for DNA methylation in the transcribed region as a key determinant

  14. Time-dependent regulation analysis dissects shifts between metabolic and gene-expression regulation during nitrogen starvation in baker's yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, Karen; Bouwman, Jildau; Lindenbergh, Alexander; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Bakker, Barbara M.

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent regulation analysis is a new methodology that allows us to unravel, both quantitatively and dynamically, how and when functional changes in the cell are brought about by the interplay of gene expression and metabolism. In this first experimental implementation, we dissect the initial

  15. The inner nuclear membrane protein Src1 associates with subtelomeric genes and alters their regulated gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Grund, S.E.; Fischer, Tomás; Cabal, G.G.; Antúnez Temporal, Oreto; Pérez Ortín, José Enrique; Hurt, E.

    2008-01-01

    Inner nuclear membrane proteins containing a LEM (LAP2, emerin, and MAN1) domain participate in different processes, including chromatin organization, gene expression, and nuclear envelope biogenesis. In this study, we identify a robust genetic interaction between transcription export (TREX) factors and yeast Src1, an integral inner nuclear membrane protein that is homologous to vertebrate LEM2. DNA macroarray analysis revealed that the expression of the phosphate-regulated genes PHO11 ,PHO12...

  16. Transcriptional regulation and spatial interactions of head-to-head genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunqin; Li, Yixue; Wei, Jia; Li, Yuan-Yuan

    2014-06-24

    In eukaryotic genomes, about 10% of genes are arranged in a head-to-head (H2H) orientation, and the distance between the transcription start sites of each gene pair is closer than 1 kb. Two genes in an H2H pair are prone to co-express and co-function. There have been many studies on bidirectional promoters. However, the mechanism by which H2H genes are regulated at the transcriptional level still needs further clarification, especially with regard to the co-regulation of H2H pairs. In this study, we first used the Hi-C data of chromatin linkages to identify spatially interacting H2H pairs, and then integrated ChIP-seq data to compare H2H gene pairs with and without evidence of spatial interactions in terms of their binding transcription factors (TFs). Using ChIP-seq and DNase-seq data, histones and DNase associated with H2H pairs were identified. Furthermore, we looked into the connections between H2H genes in a human co-expression network. We found that i) Similar to the behaviour of two genes within an H2H pair (intra-H2H pair), a gene pair involving two distinct H2H pairs (inter-H2H pair) which interact with each other spatially, share common transcription factors (TFs); ii) TFs of intra- and inter-H2H pairs are distributed differently. Factors such as HEY1, GABP, Sin3Ak-20, POL2, E2F6, and c-MYC are essential for the bidirectional transcription of intra-H2H pairs; while factors like CTCF, BDP1, GATA2, RAD21, and POL3 play important roles in coherently regulating inter-H2H pairs; iii) H2H gene blocks are enriched with hypersensitive DNase and modified histones, which participate in active transcriptions; and iv) H2H genes tend to be highly connected compared with non-H2H genes in the human co-expression network. Our findings shed new light on the mechanism of the transcriptional regulation of H2H genes through their linear and spatial interactions. For intra-H2H gene pairs, transcription factors regulate their transcriptions through bidirectional promoters

  17. Identification of a cis-regulatory element by transient analysis of co-ordinately regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Andrew C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors (TFs co-ordinately regulate target genes that are dispersed throughout the genome. This co-ordinate regulation is achieved, in part, through the interaction of transcription factors with conserved cis-regulatory motifs that are in close proximity to the target genes. While much is known about the families of transcription factors that regulate gene expression in plants, there are few well characterised cis-regulatory motifs. In Arabidopsis, over-expression of the MYB transcription factor PAP1 (PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT 1 leads to transgenic plants with elevated anthocyanin levels due to the co-ordinated up-regulation of genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway. In addition to the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes, there are a number of un-associated genes that also change in expression level. This may be a direct or indirect consequence of the over-expression of PAP1. Results Oligo array analysis of PAP1 over-expression Arabidopsis plants identified genes co-ordinately up-regulated in response to the elevated expression of this transcription factor. Transient assays on the promoter regions of 33 of these up-regulated genes identified eight promoter fragments that were transactivated by PAP1. Bioinformatic analysis on these promoters revealed a common cis-regulatory motif that we showed is required for PAP1 dependent transactivation. Conclusion Co-ordinated gene regulation by individual transcription factors is a complex collection of both direct and indirect effects. Transient transactivation assays provide a rapid method to identify direct target genes from indirect target genes. Bioinformatic analysis of the promoters of these direct target genes is able to locate motifs that are common to this sub-set of promoters, which is impossible to identify with the larger set of direct and indirect target genes. While this type of analysis does not prove a direct interaction between protein and DNA

  18. Targeted expression of suicide gene by tissue-specific promoter and microRNA regulation for cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danda, Ravikanth; Krishnan, Gopinath; Ganapathy, Kalaivani; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Vikas, Khetan; Elchuri, Sailaja; Chatterjee, Nivedita; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2013-01-01

    In order to realise the full potential of cancer suicide gene therapy that allows the precise expression of suicide gene in cancer cells, we used a tissue specific Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) promoter (EGP-2) that directs transgene Herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) expression preferentially in EpCAM over expressing cancer cells. EpCAM levels are considerably higher in retinoblastoma (RB), a childhood eye cancer with limited expression in normal cells. Use of miRNA regulation, adjacent to the use of the tissue-specific promoter, would provide the second layer of control to the transgene expression only in the tumor cells while sparing the normal cells. To test this hypothesis we cloned let-7b miRNA targets in the 3'UTR region of HSV-TK suicide gene driven by EpCAM promoter because let-7 family miRNAs, including let-7b, were found to be down regulated in the RB tumors and cell lines. We used EpCAM over expressing and let-7 down regulated RB cell lines Y79, WERI-Rb1 (EpCAM (+ve)/let-7b(down-regulated)), EpCAM down regulated, let-7 over expressing normal retinal Müller glial cell line MIO-M1(EpCAM (-ve)/let-7b(up-regulated)), and EpCAM up regulated, let-7b up-regulated normal thyroid cell line N-Thy-Ori-3.1(EpCAM (+ve)/let-7b(up-regulated)) in the study. The cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay, apoptosis was measured by probing cleaved Caspase3, EpCAM and TK expression were quantified by Western blot. Our results showed that the EGP2-promoter HSV-TK (EGP2-TK) construct with 2 or 4 copies of let-7b miRNA targets expressed TK gene only in Y79, WERI-Rb-1, while the TK gene did not express in MIO-M1. In summary, we have developed a tissue-specific, miRNA-regulated dual control vector, which selectively expresses the suicide gene in EpCAM over expressing cells.

  19. Targeted expression of suicide gene by tissue-specific promoter and microRNA regulation for cancer gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikanth Danda

    Full Text Available In order to realise the full potential of cancer suicide gene therapy that allows the precise expression of suicide gene in cancer cells, we used a tissue specific Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM promoter (EGP-2 that directs transgene Herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK expression preferentially in EpCAM over expressing cancer cells. EpCAM levels are considerably higher in retinoblastoma (RB, a childhood eye cancer with limited expression in normal cells. Use of miRNA regulation, adjacent to the use of the tissue-specific promoter, would provide the second layer of control to the transgene expression only in the tumor cells while sparing the normal cells. To test this hypothesis we cloned let-7b miRNA targets in the 3'UTR region of HSV-TK suicide gene driven by EpCAM promoter because let-7 family miRNAs, including let-7b, were found to be down regulated in the RB tumors and cell lines. We used EpCAM over expressing and let-7 down regulated RB cell lines Y79, WERI-Rb1 (EpCAM (+ve/let-7b(down-regulated, EpCAM down regulated, let-7 over expressing normal retinal Müller glial cell line MIO-M1(EpCAM (-ve/let-7b(up-regulated, and EpCAM up regulated, let-7b up-regulated normal thyroid cell line N-Thy-Ori-3.1(EpCAM (+ve/let-7b(up-regulated in the study. The cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay, apoptosis was measured by probing cleaved Caspase3, EpCAM and TK expression were quantified by Western blot. Our results showed that the EGP2-promoter HSV-TK (EGP2-TK construct with 2 or 4 copies of let-7b miRNA targets expressed TK gene only in Y79, WERI-Rb-1, while the TK gene did not express in MIO-M1. In summary, we have developed a tissue-specific, miRNA-regulated dual control vector, which selectively expresses the suicide gene in EpCAM over expressing cells.

  20. AI-2-dependent gene regulation in Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sturdevant Daniel E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autoinducer 2 (AI-2, a widespread by-product of the LuxS-catalyzed S-ribosylhomocysteine cleavage reaction in the activated methyl cycle, has been suggested to serve as an intra- and interspecies signaling molecule, but in many bacteria AI-2 control of gene expression is not completely understood. Particularly, we have a lack of knowledge about AI-2 signaling in the important human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis. Results To determine the role of LuxS and AI-2 in S. epidermidis, we analyzed genome-wide changes in gene expression in an S. epidermidis luxS mutant and after addition of AI-2 synthesized by over-expressed S. epidermidis Pfs and LuxS enzymes. Genes under AI-2 control included mostly genes involved in sugar, nucleotide, amino acid, and nitrogen metabolism, but also virulence-associated genes coding for lipase and bacterial apoptosis proteins. In addition, we demonstrate by liquid chromatography/mass-spectrometry of culture filtrates that the pro-inflammatory phenol-soluble modulin (PSM peptides, key virulence factors of S. epidermidis, are under luxS/AI-2 control. Conclusion Our results provide a detailed molecular basis for the role of LuxS in S. epidermidis virulence and suggest a signaling function for AI-2 in this bacterium.

  1. Regulation of Chlamydia Gene Expression by Tandem Promoters with Different Temporal Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Christopher J; Tan, Ming

    2015-11-02

    Chlamydia is a genus of pathogenic bacteria with an unusual intracellular developmental cycle marked by temporal waves of gene expression. The three main temporal groups of chlamydial genes are proposed to be controlled by separate mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. However, we have noted genes with discrepancies, such as the early gene dnaK and the midcycle genes bioY and pgk, which have promoters controlled by the late transcriptional regulators EUO and σ(28). To resolve this issue, we analyzed the promoters of these three genes in vitro and in Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria grown in cell culture. Transcripts from the σ(28)-dependent promoter of each gene were detected only at late times in the intracellular infection, bolstering the role of σ(28) RNA polymerase in late gene expression. In each case, however, expression prior to late times was due to a second promoter that was transcribed by σ(66) RNA polymerase, which is the major form of chlamydial polymerase. These results demonstrate that chlamydial genes can be transcribed from tandem promoters with different temporal profiles, leading to a composite expression pattern that differs from the expression profile of a single promoter. In addition, tandem promoters allow a gene to be regulated by multiple mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, such as DNA supercoiling or late regulation by EUO and σ(28). We discuss how tandem promoters broaden the repertoire of temporal gene expression patterns in the chlamydial developmental cycle and can be used to fine-tune the expression of specific genes. Chlamydia is a pathogenic bacterium that is responsible for the majority of infectious disease cases reported to the CDC each year. It causes an intracellular infection that is characterized by coordinated expression of chlamydial genes in temporal waves. Chlamydial transcription has been shown to be regulated by DNA supercoiling, alternative forms of RNA polymerase, and transcription factors, but the number

  2. The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen S. Browning; Marie Petrocek; Bonnie Bartel

    2006-06-01

    The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE) will be held June 8-12, 2005 at the University of Texas at Austin. Exciting new and ongoing discoveries show significant regulation of gene expression occurs after transcription. These post-transcriptional control events in plants range from subtle regulation of transcribed genes and phosphorylation, to the processes of gene regulation through small RNAs. This meeting will focus on the regulatory role of RNA, from transcription, through translation and finally degradation. The cross-disciplinary design of this meeting is necessary to encourage interactions between researchers that have a common interest in post-transcriptional gene expression in plants. By bringing together a diverse group of plant molecular biologist and biochemists at all careers stages from across the world, this meeting will bring about more rapid progress in understanding how plant genomes work and how genes are finely regulated by post-transcriptional processes to ultimately regulate cells.

  3. Direct and Indirect Gene Regulation by a Life-Extending FOXO Protein in C. elegans: Roles for GATA Factors and Lipid Gene Regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peichuan; Judy, Meredith; Lee, Seung-Jae; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In long-lived C. elegans insulin/IGF-1 pathway mutants, the life-extending FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 is present throughout the animal, but we find that its activity in a single tissue can delay the aging of other tissues and extend the animal’s life span. To better understand the topography of DAF-16 action among the tissues, we analyzed a collection of DAF-16-regulated genes. DAF-16 regulated most of these genes in a cell-autonomous fashion, often using tissue-specific GATA factors to direct their expression to specific tissues. DAF-16 could also act cell nonautonomously to influence gene expression. DAF-16 affected gene expression in other cells, at least in part, via the lipid-gene regulator MDT-15. DAF-16, and probably MDT-15, could act cell non-autonomously in the endoderm to ameliorate the paralysis caused by expressing Alzheimer’s Aβ protein in muscles. These findings suggest that MDT-15-dependent intercellular signals, possibly lipid signals, can help to coordinate tissue physiology, enhance proteostasis, and extend life in response to DAF-16/FOXO activity. PMID:23312285

  4. Co-regulation of metabolic genes is better explained by flux coupling than by network distance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Notebaart

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To what extent can modes of gene regulation be explained by systems-level properties of metabolic networks? Prior studies on co-regulation of metabolic genes have mainly focused on graph-theoretical features of metabolic networks and demonstrated a decreasing level of co-expression with increasing network distance, a naïve, but widely used, topological index. Others have suggested that static graph representations can poorly capture dynamic functional associations, e.g., in the form of dependence of metabolic fluxes across genes in the network. Here, we systematically tested the relative importance of metabolic flux coupling and network position on gene co-regulation, using a genome-scale metabolic model of Escherichia coli. After validating the computational method with empirical data on flux correlations, we confirm that genes coupled by their enzymatic fluxes not only show similar expression patterns, but also share transcriptional regulators and frequently reside in the same operon. In contrast, we demonstrate that network distance per se has relatively minor influence on gene co-regulation. Moreover, the type of flux coupling can explain refined properties of the regulatory network that are ignored by simple graph-theoretical indices. Our results underline the importance of studying functional states of cellular networks to define physiologically relevant associations between genes and should stimulate future developments of novel functional genomic tools.

  5. The yeast VPS genes affect telomere length regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rog, Ofer; Smolikov, Sarit; Krauskopf, Anat; Kupiec, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells invest a large proportion of their genome in maintaining telomere length homeostasis. Among the 173 non-essential yeast genes found to affect telomere length, a large proportion is involved in vacuolar traffic. When mutated, these vacuolar protein-sorting (VPS) genes lead to telomeres shorter than those observed in the wild type. Using genetic analysis, we characterized the pathway by which VPS15, VPS34, VPS22, VPS23 and VPS28 affect the telomeres. Our results indicate that these VPS genes affect telomere length through a single pathway and that this effect requires the activity of telomerase and the Ku heterodimer, but not the activity of Tel1p or Rif2p. We present models to explain the link between vacuolar traffic and telomere length homeostasis.

  6. Splicing factor SR34b mutation reduces cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis by regulating iron-regulated transporter 1 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wentao; Du, Bojing; Liu, Di; Qi, Xiaoting, E-mail: qixiaoting@cnu.edu.cn

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Arabidopsis splicing factor SR34b gene is cadmium-inducible. • SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant is sensitive to cadmium due to high cadmium uptake. • SR34b is a regulator of cadmium transporter IRT1 at the posttranscription level. • These results highlight the roles of splicing factors in cadmium tolerance of plant. - Abstract: Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors. However, the biological functions of plant SR proteins remain unclear especially in abiotic stresses. Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element that negatively affects plant growth and development. In this study, we provided clear evidence for SR gene involved in Cd tolerance in planta. Systemic expression analysis of 17 Arabidopsis SR genes revealed that SR34b is the only SR gene upregulated by Cd, suggesting its potential roles in Arabidopsis Cd tolerance. Consistent with this, a SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant (sr34b) was moderately sensitive to Cd, which had higher Cd{sup 2+} uptake rate and accumulated Cd in greater amounts than wild-type. This was due to the altered expression of iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) gene in sr34b mutant. Under normal growth conditions, IRT1 mRNAs highly accumulated in sr34b mutant, which was a result of increased stability of IRT1 mRNA. Under Cd stress, however, sr34b mutant plants had a splicing defect in IRT1 gene, thus reducing the IRT1 mRNA accumulation. Despite of this, sr34b mutant plants still constitutively expressed IRT1 proteins under Cd stress, thereby resulting in Cd stress-sensitive phenotype. We therefore propose the essential roles of SR34b in posttranscriptional regulation of IRT1 expression and identify it as a regulator of Arabidopsis Cd tolerance.

  7. The importance of topoisomerases for chromatin regulated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2013-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are enzymes, which function to relieve torsional stress in the DNA helix by introducing transient breaks into the DNA molecule. By use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and microarray technology we have previously shown that topoisomerases are required for the activation of chromatin...... topoisomerases for optimal activation, but in contrast to the PHO5 gene, topoisomerases are not required for chromatin remodeling of the GAL1/10 promoter region, indicating a different role of the enzymes. We are currently performing a detailed investigation of the GAL genes to elucidate the precise role...

  8. Sugar- and nitrogen-dependent regulation of an Amanita muscaria phenylalanine ammonium lyase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehls, U; Ecke, M; Hampp, R

    1999-03-01

    The cDNA of a key enzyme of secondary metabolism, phenylalanine ammonium lyase, was identified for an ectomycorrhizal fungus by differential screening of a mycorrhizal library. The gene was highly expressed in hyphae grown at low external monosaccharide concentrations, but its expression was 30-fold reduced at elevated concentrations. Gene repression was regulated by hexokinase.

  9. Conservation of the response regulator gene gacA in Pseudomonas species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, J.T.; Mazzola, M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The response regulator gene gacA influences the production of several secondary metabolites in both pathogenic and beneficial Pseudomonas spp. In this study, we developed primers and a probe for the gacA gene of Pseudomonas species and sequenced a 425 bp fragment of gacA from ten Pseudomonas strains

  10. Gene co-regulation is highly conserved in the evolution of eukaryotes and prokaryotes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, B.; Noort, V. van; Huynen, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Differences between species have been suggested to largely reside in the network of connections among the genes. Nevertheless, the rate at which these connections evolve has not been properly quantified. Here, we measure the extent to which co-regulation between pairs of genes is conserved over

  11. Honey Bee Aggression Supports a Link Between Gene Regulation and Behavioral Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    A prominent theory holds that animal phenotypes arise by evolutionary changes in the regulation of gene expression. Emerging from studies of animal development, evidence for this theory consists largely of differences in temporal or spatial patterns of gene expression that are related to morphologi...

  12. Gene set enrichment in eQTL data identifies novel annotations and pathway regulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlei Wu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide gene expression profiling has been extensively used to generate biological hypotheses based on differential expression. Recently, many studies have used microarrays to measure gene expression levels across genetic mapping populations. These gene expression phenotypes have been used for genome-wide association analyses, an analysis referred to as expression QTL (eQTL mapping. Here, eQTL analysis was performed in adipose tissue from 28 inbred strains of mice. We focused our analysis on "trans-eQTL bands", defined as instances in which the expression patterns of many genes were all associated to a common genetic locus. Genes comprising trans-eQTL bands were screened for enrichments in functional gene sets representing known biological pathways, and genes located at associated trans-eQTL band loci were considered candidate transcriptional modulators. We demonstrate that these patterns were enriched for previously characterized relationships between known upstream transcriptional regulators and their downstream target genes. Moreover, we used this strategy to identify both novel regulators and novel members of known pathways. Finally, based on a putative regulatory relationship identified in our analysis, we identified and validated a previously uncharacterized role for cyclin H in the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation. We believe that the specific molecular hypotheses generated in this study will reveal many additional pathway members and regulators, and that the analysis approaches described herein will be broadly applicable to other eQTL data sets.

  13. The vertebrate RCAN gene family: novel insights into evolution, structure and regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Serrano-Candelas

    Full Text Available Recently there has been much interest in the Regulators of Calcineurin (RCAN proteins which are important endogenous modulators of the calcineurin-NFATc signalling pathway. They have been shown to have a crucial role in cellular programmes such as the immune response, muscle fibre remodelling and memory, but also in pathological processes such as cardiac hypertrophy and neurodegenerative diseases. In vertebrates, the RCAN family form a functional subfamily of three members RCAN1, RCAN2 and RCAN3 whereas only one RCAN is present in the rest of Eukarya. In addition, RCAN genes have been shown to collocate with RUNX and CLIC genes in ACD clusters (ACD21, ACD6 and ACD1. How the RCAN genes and their clustering in ACDs evolved is still unknown. After analysing RCAN gene family evolution using bioinformatic tools, we propose that the three RCAN vertebrate genes within the ACD clusters, which evolved from single copy genes present in invertebrates and lower eukaryotes, are the result of two rounds of whole genome duplication, followed by a segmental duplication. This evolutionary scenario involves the loss or gain of some RCAN genes during evolution. In addition, we have analysed RCAN gene structure and identified the existence of several characteristic features that can be involved in RCAN evolution and gene expression regulation. These included: several transposable elements, CpG islands in the 5' region of the genes, the existence of antisense transcripts (NAT associated with the three human genes, and considerable evidence for bidirectional promoters that regulate RCAN gene expression. Furthermore, we show that the CpG island associated with the RCAN3 gene promoter is unmethylated and transcriptionally active. All these results provide timely new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying RCAN function and a more in depth knowledge of this gene family whose members are obvious candidates for the development of future therapies.

  14. Gene set of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial regulators is enriched for common inherited variation in obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Knoll

    Full Text Available There are hints of an altered mitochondrial function in obesity. Nuclear-encoded genes are relevant for mitochondrial function (3 gene sets of known relevant pathways: (1 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes, (2 91 genes for oxidative phosphorylation and (3 966 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA showed no association with type 2 diabetes mellitus in these gene sets. Here we performed a GSEA for the same gene sets for obesity. Genome wide association study (GWAS data from a case-control approach on 453 extremely obese children and adolescents and 435 lean adult controls were used for GSEA. For independent confirmation, we analyzed 705 obesity GWAS trios (extremely obese child and both biological parents and a population-based GWAS sample (KORA F4, n = 1,743. A meta-analysis was performed on all three samples. In each sample, the distribution of significance levels between the respective gene set and those of all genes was compared using the leading-edge-fraction-comparison test (cut-offs between the 50(th and 95(th percentile of the set of all gene-wise corrected p-values as implemented in the MAGENTA software. In the case-control sample, significant enrichment of associations with obesity was observed above the 50(th percentile for the set of the 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes (p(GSEA,50 = 0.0103. This finding was not confirmed in the trios (p(GSEA,50 = 0.5991, but in KORA (p(GSEA,50 = 0.0398. The meta-analysis again indicated a trend for enrichment (p(MAGENTA,50 = 0.1052, p(MAGENTA,75 = 0.0251. The GSEA revealed that weak association signals for obesity might be enriched in the gene set of 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes.

  15. Tight regulation of the intS gene of the KplE1 prophage: a new paradigm for integrase gene regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaël Panis

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Temperate phages have the ability to maintain their genome in their host, a process called lysogeny. For most, passive replication of the phage genome relies on integration into the host's chromosome and becoming a prophage. Prophages remain silent in the absence of stress and replicate passively within their host genome. However, when stressful conditions occur, a prophage excises itself and resumes the viral cycle. Integration and excision of phage genomes are mediated by regulated site-specific recombination catalyzed by tyrosine and serine recombinases. In the KplE1 prophage, site-specific recombination is mediated by the IntS integrase and the TorI recombination directionality factor (RDF. We previously described a sub-family of temperate phages that is characterized by an unusual organization of the recombination module. Consequently, the attL recombination region overlaps with the integrase promoter, and the integrase and RDF genes do not share a common activated promoter upon lytic induction as in the lambda prophage. In this study, we show that the intS gene is tightly regulated by its own product as well as by the TorI RDF protein. In silico analysis revealed that overlap of the attL region with the integrase promoter is widely encountered in prophages present in prokaryotic genomes, suggesting a general occurrence of negatively autoregulated integrase genes. The prediction that these integrase genes are negatively autoregulated was biologically assessed by studying the regulation of several integrase genes from two different Escherichia coli strains. Our results suggest that the majority of tRNA-associated integrase genes in prokaryotic genomes could be autoregulated and that this might be correlated with the recombination efficiency as in KplE1. The consequences of this unprecedented regulation for excessive recombination are discussed.

  16. CodY of Streptococcus pneumoniae : Link between nutritional gene regulation and colonization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, Wouter T.; Bootsma, Hester J.; Estevao, Silvia; Hoogenboezem, Theo; de Jong, Anne; de Groot, Ronald; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Hermans, Peter W. M.

    CodY is a nutritional regulator mainly involved in amino acid metabolism. It has been extensively studied in Bacillus subtilis and Lactococcus lactis. We investigated the role of CodY in gene regulation and virulence of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. We constructed a codY mutant and

  17. Transcriptional Regulation of Apolipoprotein A5 Gene Expression by the Nuclear Receptor ROR alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genoux, Annelise; Dehondt, Helene; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Duhem, Christian; Hum, Dean W.; Martin, Genevieve; Pennacchio, Len; Staels, Bart; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2004-10-01

    Apolipoprotein A5 has recently been identified as a crucial determinant of plasma triglyceride levels. Our results showed that RORa up-regulates human APOA5 but has no effect on mouse apoa5 promoter. These data suggest an additional important physiological role for RORa in the regulation of genes involved in plasma triglyceride homeostasis in human and probably in the development of atherosclerosis

  18. An Effective Tri-Clustering Algorithm Combining Expression Data with Gene Regulation Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao Li

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Motivation: Bi-clustering algorithms aim to identify sets of genes sharing similar expression patterns across a subset of conditions. However direct interpretation or prediction of gene regulatory mechanisms may be difficult as only gene expression data is used. Information about gene regulators may also be available, most commonly about which transcription factors may bind to the promoter region and thus control the expression level of a gene. Thus a method to integrate gene expression and gene regulation information is desirable for clustering and analyzing. Methods: By incorporating gene regulatory information with gene expression data, we define regulated expression values (REV as indicators of how a gene is regulated by a specific factor. Existing bi-clustering methods are extended to a three dimensional data space by developing a heuristic TRI-Clustering algorithm. An additional approach named Automatic Boundary Searching algorithm (ABS is introduced to automatically determine the boundary threshold. Results: Results based on incorporating ChIP-chip data representing transcription factor-gene interactions show that the algorithms are efficient and robust for detecting tri-clusters. Detailed analysis of the tri-cluster extracted from yeast sporulation REV data shows genes in this cluster exhibited significant differences during the middle and late stages. The implicated regulatory network was then reconstructed for further study of defined regulatory mechanisms. Topological and statistical analysis of this network demonstrated evidence of significant changes of TF activities during the different stages of yeast sporulation, and suggests this approach might be a general way to study regulatory networks undergoing transformations.

  19. Mendelian and non-Mendelian regulation of gene expression in maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    Full Text Available Transcriptome variation plays an important role in affecting the phenotype of an organism. However, an understanding of the underlying mechanisms regulating transcriptome variation in segregating populations is still largely unknown. We sought to assess and map variation in transcript abundance in maize shoot apices in the intermated B73 × Mo17 recombinant inbred line population. RNA-based sequencing (RNA-seq allowed for the detection and quantification of the transcript abundance derived from 28,603 genes. For a majority of these genes, the population mean, coefficient of variation, and segregation patterns could be predicted by the parental expression levels. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL mapping identified 30,774 eQTL including 96 trans-eQTL "hotspots," each of which regulates the expression of a large number of genes. Interestingly, genes regulated by a trans-eQTL hotspot tend to be enriched for a specific function or act in the same genetic pathway. Also, genomic structural variation appeared to contribute to cis-regulation of gene expression. Besides genes showing Mendelian inheritance in the RIL population, we also found genes whose expression level and variation in the progeny could not be predicted based on parental difference, indicating that non-Mendelian factors also contribute to expression variation. Specifically, we found 145 genes that show patterns of expression reminiscent of paramutation such that all the progeny had expression levels similar to one of the two parents. Furthermore, we identified another 210 genes that exhibited unexpected patterns of transcript presence/absence. Many of these genes are likely to be gene fragments resulting from transposition, and the presence/absence of their transcripts could influence expression levels of their ancestral syntenic genes. Overall, our results contribute to the identification of novel expression patterns and broaden the understanding of transcriptional variation in

  20. Somatic, germline and sex hierarchy regulated gene expression during Drosophila metamorphosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbeitman Michelle N

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drosophila melanogaster undergoes a complete metamorphosis, during which time the larval male and female forms transition into sexually dimorphic, reproductive adult forms. To understand this complex morphogenetic process at a molecular-genetic level, whole genome microarray analyses were performed. Results The temporal gene expression patterns during metamorphosis were determined for all predicted genes, in both somatic and germline tissues of males and females separately. Temporal changes in transcript abundance for genes of known functions were found to correlate with known developmental processes that occur during metamorphosis. We find that large numbers of genes are sex-differentially expressed in both male and female germline tissues, and relatively few are sex-differentially expressed in somatic tissues. The majority of genes with somatic, sex-differential expression were found to be expressed in a stage-specific manner, suggesting that they mediate discrete developmental events. The Sex-lethal paralog, CG3056, displays somatic, male-biased expression at several time points in metamorphosis. Gene expression downstream of the somatic, sex determination genes transformer and doublesex (dsx was examined in two-day old pupae, which allowed for the identification of genes regulated as a consequence of the sex determination hierarchy. These include the homeotic gene abdominal A, which is more highly expressed in females as compared to males, as a consequence of dsx. For most genes regulated downstream of dsx during pupal development, the mode of regulation is distinct from that observed for the well-studied direct targets of DSX, Yolk protein 1 and 2. Conclusion The data and analyses presented here provide a comprehensive assessment of gene expression during metamorphosis in each sex, in both somatic and germline tissues. Many of the genes that underlie critical developmental processes during metamorphosis, including sex

  1. Somatic, germline and sex hierarchy regulated gene expression during Drosophila metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebo, Matthew S; Sanders, Laura E; Sun, Fengzhu; Arbeitman, Michelle N

    2009-02-13

    Drosophila melanogaster undergoes a complete metamorphosis, during which time the larval male and female forms transition into sexually dimorphic, reproductive adult forms. To understand this complex morphogenetic process at a molecular-genetic level, whole genome microarray analyses were performed. The temporal gene expression patterns during metamorphosis were determined for all predicted genes, in both somatic and germline tissues of males and females separately. Temporal changes in transcript abundance for genes of known functions were found to correlate with known developmental processes that occur during metamorphosis. We find that large numbers of genes are sex-differentially expressed in both male and female germline tissues, and relatively few are sex-differentially expressed in somatic tissues. The majority of genes with somatic, sex-differential expression were found to be expressed in a stage-specific manner, suggesting that they mediate discrete developmental events. The Sex-lethal paralog, CG3056, displays somatic, male-biased expression at several time points in metamorphosis. Gene expression downstream of the somatic, sex determination genes transformer and doublesex (dsx) was examined in two-day old pupae, which allowed for the identification of genes regulated as a consequence of the sex determination hierarchy. These include the homeotic gene abdominal A, which is more highly expressed in females as compared to males, as a consequence of dsx. For most genes regulated downstream of dsx during pupal development, the mode of regulation is distinct from that observed for the well-studied direct targets of DSX, Yolk protein 1 and 2. The data and analyses presented here provide a comprehensive assessment of gene expression during metamorphosis in each sex, in both somatic and germline tissues. Many of the genes that underlie critical developmental processes during metamorphosis, including sex-specific processes, have been identified. These results

  2. Mendelian and Non-Mendelian Regulation of Gene Expression in Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Petsch, Katherine; Shimizu, Rena; Liu, Sanzhen; Xu, Wayne Wenzhong; Ying, Kai; Yu, Jianming; Scanlon, Michael J.; Schnable, Patrick S.; Timmermans, Marja C. P.; Springer, Nathan M.; Muehlbauer, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptome variation plays an important role in affecting the phenotype of an organism. However, an understanding of the underlying mechanisms regulating transcriptome variation in segregating populations is still largely unknown. We sought to assess and map variation in transcript abundance in maize shoot apices in the intermated B73×Mo17 recombinant inbred line population. RNA–based sequencing (RNA–seq) allowed for the detection and quantification of the transcript abundance derived from 28,603 genes. For a majority of these genes, the population mean, coefficient of variation, and segregation patterns could be predicted by the parental expression levels. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping identified 30,774 eQTL including 96 trans-eQTL “hotspots,” each of which regulates the expression of a large number of genes. Interestingly, genes regulated by a trans-eQTL hotspot tend to be enriched for a specific function or act in the same genetic pathway. Also, genomic structural variation appeared to contribute to cis-regulation of gene expression. Besides genes showing Mendelian inheritance in the RIL population, we also found genes whose expression level and variation in the progeny could not be predicted based on parental difference, indicating that non-Mendelian factors also contribute to expression variation. Specifically, we found 145 genes that show patterns of expression reminiscent of paramutation such that all the progeny had expression levels similar to one of the two parents. Furthermore, we identified another 210 genes that exhibited unexpected patterns of transcript presence/absence. Many of these genes are likely to be gene fragments resulting from transposition, and the presence/absence of their transcripts could influence expression levels of their ancestral syntenic genes. Overall, our results contribute to the identification of novel expression patterns and broaden the understanding of transcriptional variation in plants. PMID

  3. Human nutrigenomics of gene regulation by dietary fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afman, L.A.; Muller, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Nutrigenomics employs high-throughput genomics technologies to unravel how nutrients modulate gene and protein expression and ultimately influence cellular and organism metabolism. The most often-applied genomics technique so far is transcriptomics, which allows quantifying genome-wide changes in

  4. LncRNAs: emerging players in gene regulation and disease ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and Diederichs 2012; Hauptman and Glavac 2013). In low- level DNA damages, p53 induces the expression of PANDA. (P21 associated ncRNA DNA damage activated). PANDA is the next example which interacts with NF-YA, a nuclear transcription factor. NF-YA induces transcription of some apoptotic genes. Accordingly ...

  5. Early gene regulation of osteogenesis in embryonic stem cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kirkham, Glen R.

    2012-01-01

    The early gene regulatory networks (GRNs) that mediate stem cell differentiation are complex, and the underlying regulatory associations can be difficult to map accurately. In this study, the expression profiles of the genes Dlx5, Msx2 and Runx2 in mouse embryonic stem cells were monitored over a 48 hour period after exposure to the growth factors BMP2 and TGFβ1. Candidate GRNs of early osteogenesis were constructed based on published experimental findings and simulation results of Boolean and ordinary differential equation models were compared with our experimental data in order to test the validity of these models. Three gene regulatory networks were found to be consistent with the data, one of these networks exhibited sustained oscillation, a behaviour which is consistent with the general view of embryonic stem cell plasticity. The work cycle presented in this paper illustrates how mathematical modelling can be used to elucidate from gene expression profiles GRNs that are consistent with experimental data. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  6. Identification of a novel submergence response gene regulated by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-12-07

    Dec 7, 2016 ... 3Engineering Research Center of Ecology and Agricultural Use of Wetland, Ministry of Education, Yangzte University,. Jingzhou 434025, P.R. .... intolerance to submergence) and M202(Sub1A) by qRT-. PCR. We identified a novel gene responsive to submergence, called RS1. The expression patterns of.

  7. Dynamic regulation of cerebral DNA repair genes by psychological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Kristin; Aalling, Nadia; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2015-01-01

    was seen in HC, but with overall smaller effects and without the induction after acute stress. Nuclear DNA damage from oxidation as measured by the comet assay was unaffected by stress in both regions. We conclude that psychological stress have a dynamic influence on brain DNA repair gene expression...

  8. Nrf2 transcription factor gene regulates basal transcription of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... Key words: Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), antioxidant response element (ARE), mitochondrial superoxide ... the commonality of the presence of a cis-acting anti- oxidant response element (ARE) ... stream genes encoding GSTs (Lee et al., 2002) and glutamate-cysteine ligase (Ishii et al., ...

  9. RBM20 Regulates Circular RNA Production From the Titin Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, Mohsin A. F.; Reckman, Yolan J.; Aufiero, Simona; van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M. G.; van der Made, Ingeborg; Beqqali, Abdelaziz; Koolbergen, Dave R.; Rasmussen, Torsten B.; van der Velden, Jolanda; Creemers, Esther E.; Pinto, Yigal M.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding motif protein 20 (RBM20) is essential for normal splicing of many cardiac genes, and loss of RBM20 causes dilated cardiomyopathy. Given its role in splicing, we hypothesized an important role for RBM20 in forming circular RNAs (circRNAs), a novel class of noncoding RNA molecules. To

  10. Receptor Ck-dependent signaling regulates hTERT gene transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varma Neelam

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Available evidence suggests that the regulation of telomerase activity primarily depends on the transcriptional control of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene. Although several activators and repressors of hTERT gene transcription have been identified, the exact mechanism by which hTERT transcription is repressed in normal cells and activated in cancer cells remains largely unknown. In an attempt to identify possible novel mechanisms involved in the regulation of hTERT transcription, the present study examined the role of Receptor Ck, a cell surface receptor specific for cholesterol, in the transcription of hTERT gene in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results Activated Receptor Ck was found to down-regulate hTERT mRNA expression by repressing the transcription of c-myc gene. Receptor Ck-dependent signaling was also found to down-regulate the mRNA expression of the gene coding for the ligand inducible transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ. The ligand activation of PPARγ resulted in the down-regulation of c-myc and hTERT mRNA expression. By using specific activator and inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC, it was demonstrated that Receptor Ck dependent down-regulation of hTERT gene transcription involved inhibition of PKC. In addition, 25-hydroxycholesterol was found to contribute to the transcriptional regulation of hTERT gene. Conclusion Taken together, the findings of this study present evidence for a molecular link between cholesterol-activated Receptor Ck and hTERT transcription, and provide new insights into the regulation of hTERT expression in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  11. LCGbase: A Comprehensive Database for Lineage-Based Co-regulated Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dapeng; Zhang, Yubin; Fan, Zhonghua; Liu, Guiming; Yu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Animal genes of different lineages, such as vertebrates and arthropods, are well-organized and blended into dynamic chromosomal structures that represent a primary regulatory mechanism for body development and cellular differentiation. The majority of genes in a genome are actually clustered, which are evolutionarily stable to different extents and biologically meaningful when evaluated among genomes within and across lineages. Until now, many questions concerning gene organization, such as what is the minimal number of genes in a cluster and what is the driving force leading to gene co-regulation, remain to be addressed. Here, we provide a user-friendly database-LCGbase (a comprehensive database for lineage-based co-regulated genes)-hosting information on evolutionary dynamics of gene clustering and ordering within animal kingdoms in two different lineages: vertebrates and arthropods. The database is constructed on a web-based Linux-Apache-MySQL-PHP framework and effective interactive user-inquiry service. Compared to other gene annotation databases with similar purposes, our database has three comprehensible advantages. First, our database is inclusive, including all high-quality genome assemblies of vertebrates and representative arthropod species. Second, it is human-centric since we map all gene clusters from other genomes in an order of lineage-ranks (such as primates, mammals, warm-blooded, and reptiles) onto human genome and start the database from well-defined gene pairs (a minimal cluster where the two adjacent genes are oriented as co-directional, convergent, and divergent pairs) to large gene clusters. Furthermore, users can search for any adjacent genes and their detailed annotations. Third, the database provides flexible parameter definitions, such as the distance of transcription start sites between two adjacent genes, which is extendable to genes that flanking the cluster across species. We also provide useful tools for sequence alignment, gene

  12. Discovering hidden relationships between renal diseases and regulated genes through 3D network visualizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavnani Suresh K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a recent study, two-dimensional (2D network layouts were used to visualize and quantitatively analyze the relationship between chronic renal diseases and regulated genes. The results revealed complex relationships between disease type, gene specificity, and gene regulation type, which led to important insights about the underlying biological pathways. Here we describe an attempt to extend our understanding of these complex relationships by reanalyzing the data using three-dimensional (3D network layouts, displayed through 2D and 3D viewing methods. Findings The 3D network layout (displayed through the 3D viewing method revealed that genes implicated in many diseases (non-specific genes tended to be predominantly down-regulated, whereas genes regulated in a few diseases (disease-specific genes tended to be up-regulated. This new global relationship was quantitatively validated through comparison to 1000 random permutations of networks of the same size and distribution. Our new finding appeared to be the result of using specific features of the 3D viewing method to analyze the 3D renal network. Conclusions The global relationship between gene regulation and gene specificity is the first clue from human studies that there exist common mechanisms across several renal diseases, which suggest hypotheses for the underlying mechanisms. Furthermore, the study suggests hypotheses for why the 3D visualization helped to make salient a new regularity that was difficult to detect in 2D. Future research that tests these hypotheses should enable a more systematic understanding of when and how to use 3D network visualizations to reveal complex regularities in biological networks.

  13. Identification of Plagl1/Zac1 binding sites and target genes establishes its role in the regulation of extracellular matrix genes and the imprinted gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrault, Annie; Dantec, Christelle; Le Digarcher, Anne; Chotard, Laëtitia; Bilanges, Benoit; Parrinello, Hugues; Dubois, Emeric; Rialle, Stéphanie; Severac, Dany; Bouschet, Tristan; Journot, Laurent

    2017-10-13

    PLAGL1/ZAC1 undergoes parental genomic imprinting, is paternally expressed, and is a member of the imprinted gene network (IGN). It encodes a zinc finger transcription factor with anti-proliferative activity and is a candidate tumor suppressor gene on 6q24 whose expression is frequently lost in various neoplasms. Conversely, gain of PLAGL1 function is responsible for transient neonatal diabetes mellitus, a rare genetic disease that results from defective pancreas development. In the present work, we showed that Plagl1 up-regulation was not associated with DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest. It was rather associated with physiological cell cycle exit that occurred with contact inhibition, growth factor withdrawal, or cell differentiation. To gain insights into Plagl1 mechanism of action, we identified Plagl1 target genes by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome-wide transcriptomics in transfected cell lines. Plagl1-elicited gene regulation correlated with multiple binding to the proximal promoter region through a GC-rich motif. Plagl1 target genes included numerous genes involved in signaling, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix composition, including collagens. Plagl1 targets also included 22% of the 409 genes that make up the IGN. Altogether, this work identified Plagl1 as a transcription factor that coordinated the regulation of a subset of IGN genes and controlled extracellular matrix composition. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Leptin regulates gallbladder genes related to absorption and secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz-Basile, Deborah A; Lu, Debao; Basile, David P; Graewin, Shannon J; Al-Azzawi, Hayder; Kiely, James M; Mathur, Abhishek; Yancey, Kyle; Pitt, Henry A

    2007-07-01

    Dysregulation of gallbladder ion and water absorption and/or secretion has been linked to cholesterol crystal and gallstone formation. We have recently demonstrated that obese, leptin-deficient (Lep(ob)) mice have enlarged gallbladder volumes and decreased gallbladder contractility and that leptin administration to these mice normalizes gallbladder function. However, the effect of leptin on gallbladder absorption/secretion is not known. Therefore, we sought to determine whether leptin would alter the expression of genes involved in water and ion transport across the gallbladder epithelium. Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays representing 39,000 transcripts were used to compare gallbladder gene-expression profiles from 12-wk-old control saline-treated Lep(ob) and from leptin-treated Lep(ob) female mice. Leptin administration to Lep(ob) mice decreased gallbladder volume, bile sodium concentration, and pH. Leptin repletion upregulated the expression of aquaporin 1 water channel by 1.3-fold and downregulated aquaporin 4 by 2.3-fold. A number of genes involved in sodium transport were also influenced by leptin replacement. Epithelial sodium channel-alpha and sodium hydrogen exchangers 1 and 3 were moderately downregulated by 2.0-, 1.6-, and 1.3-fold, respectively. Carbonic anhydrase-IV, which plays a role in the acidification of bile, was upregulated 3.7-fold. In addition, a number of inflammatory cytokines that are known to influence gallbladder epithelial cell absorption and secretion were upregulated. Thus leptin, an adipocyte-derived cytokine involved with satiety and energy balance, influences gallbladder bile volume, sodium, and pH as well as multiple inflammatory cytokine genes and genes related to water, sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate transport.

  15. Identification and analysis of Phytophthora cactorum genes up-regulated during cyst germination and strawberry infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoren; Klemsdal, Sonja Sletner; Brurberg, May Bente

    2011-10-01

    The oomycete Phytophthora cactorum can cause economically important diseases on numerous host plants worldwide, such as crown rot on strawberry. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of P. cactorum on strawberry, transcriptional analysis of P. cactorum during strawberry infection and cyst germination was performed by applying suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and effector-specific differential display (ESDD) techniques. Two SSH cDNA libraries were generated, enriched for P. cactorum genes expressed during infection or during cyst germination, respectively, and 137 unique differentially expressed genes were identified. To specifically select RxLR effector genes from P. cactorum, ESDD was performed using RxLR and EER motif-based degenerate primers. Eight RxLR effector candidate genes as well as 67 other genes were identified out of 124 selected fragments. The expression levels of 20 putatively up-regulated genes were further analyzed using real-time RT-PCR, showing that, indeed 19 of these 20 genes were up-regulated during at least one of the studied developmental stages or during strawberry crown invasion, relative to the mycelium. This study provides a first overview of P. cactorum genes that are up-regulated immediately prior to or during strawberry infection and also provides a novel method for selecting RxLR effector genes from the unsequenced genome of P. cactorum.

  16. Unsaturated fatty acid: Metabolism, synthesis and gene regulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In both plants and animals, unsaturated fatty acids are considered to be essential membrane components. Also they play key roles in many cellular events. The synthesis and metabolism of unsaturated fatty acid are very complex processes, involving a variety of enzymes and regulated pathways. Most recently, research has ...

  17. What DNA sequence tells us about gene regulation - The ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Siddharthan

    2007-11-03

    Nov 3, 2007 ... Computational tasks in transcriptional regulation. In higher organisms: predicting cis-regulatory modules. (enhancers, etc). ▻ Standard approach: predict binding sites based on already-characterised transcription factors, cluster them. ▻ Use phylogenetic information if possible. ▻ Examples: Stubb ...

  18. Characterization of gene expression regulated by human OTK18 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    One hypothesis is that OTK18 aids in the regulation of the innate immune system. To test this hypothesis, cDNA microarray analysis was performed on the total RNA extracted from Drosophila melanogaster embryonic Schneider 2 (S2) cells transfected with either pEGFP-OTK18 (enhanced green fluorescent protein) or ...

  19. Hormonal regulation of gluconeogenic gene transcription in the liver

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Glucose homeostasis in mammals is achieved by the actions of counterregulatory hormones, namely insulin, glucagon and glucocorticoids. Glucose levels in the circulation are regulated by the liver, the metabolic centre which produces glucose when it is scarce in the blood. This process is catalysed by two rate-limiting ...

  20. Characterization of gene expression regulated by human OTK18 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with severe HIV encephalitis (Carlson et al. 2004b), and be- ing regulated by interactions with the Tat protein (Carlson et al. 2004a). In contrast, OTK18 is ubiquitously expressed in all normal human tissues, and OTK18 expression in HIV-1 infected MDM is not significantly different at day 9 post- infection when compared to ...

  1. Bacterial Competition Reveals Differential Regulation of the pks Genes by Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Rahlwes, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is adaptable to many environments in part due to its ability to produce a broad range of bioactive compounds. One such compound, bacillaene, is a linear polyketide/nonribosomal peptide. The pks genes encode the enzymatic megacomplex that synthesizes bacillaene. The majority of pks genes appear to be organized as a giant operon (>74 kb from pksC-pksR). In previous work (P. D. Straight, M. A. Fischbach, C. T. Walsh, D. Z. Rudner, and R. Kolter, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 104:305–310, 2007, doi:10.1073/pnas.0609073103), a deletion of the pks operon in B. subtilis was found to induce prodiginine production by Streptomyces coelicolor. Here, colonies of wild-type B. subtilis formed a spreading population that induced prodiginine production from Streptomyces lividans, suggesting differential regulation of pks genes and, as a result, bacillaene. While the parent colony showed widespread induction of pks expression among cells in the population, we found the spreading cells uniformly and transiently repressed the expression of the pks genes. To identify regulators that control pks genes, we first determined the pattern of pks gene expression in liquid culture. We next identified mutations in regulatory genes that disrupted the wild-type pattern of pks gene expression. We found that expression of the pks genes requires the master regulator of development, Spo0A, through its repression of AbrB and the stationary-phase regulator, CodY. Deletions of degU, comA, and scoC had moderate effects, disrupting the timing and level of pks gene expression. The observed patterns of expression suggest that complex regulation of bacillaene and other antibiotics optimizes competitive fitness for B. subtilis. PMID:24187085

  2. Inhibition of p53-induced apoptosis without affecting expression of p53-regulated genes

    OpenAIRE

    Lotem, Joseph; Gal, Hilah; Kama, Rachel; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; Domany, Eytan; Sachs, Leo; Givol, David

    2003-01-01

    Using DNA microarray and clustering of expressed genes we have analyzed the mechanism of inhibition of wild-type p53-induced apoptosis by the cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) and the calcium mobilizer thapsigargin (TG). Clustering analysis of 1,786 genes, the expression level of which changed after activation of wild-type p53 in the absence or presence of IL-6 or TG, showed that these compounds did not cause a general inhibition of the ability of p53 to up-regulate or down-regulate gene ex...

  3. The DAF-7 TGF-β signaling pathway regulates chemosensory receptor gene expression in C. elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Nolan, Katherine M.; Sarafi-Reinach, Trina R.; Horne, Jennifer G.; Saffer, Adam M.; Sengupta, Piali

    2002-01-01

    Regulation of chemoreceptor gene expression in response to environmental or developmental cues provides a mechanism by which animals can alter their sensory responses. Here we demonstrate a role for the daf-7 TGF-β pathway in the regulation of expression of a subset of chemoreceptor genes in Caenorhabditis elegans. We describe a novel role of this pathway in maintaining receptor gene expression in the adult and show that the DAF-4 type II TGF-β receptor functions cell-autonomously to modulate...

  4. Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 4 regulates gene expression via transcription factor release in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Plant and animal perception of microbes through pathogen surveillance proteins leads to MAP kinase signalling and the expression of defence genes. However, little is known about how plant MAP kinases regulate specific gene expression. We report that, in the absence of pathogens, Arabidopsis MAP...... supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation....

  5. The Effects of Destruxin A on Relish and Rel Gene Regulation to the Suspected Immune-Related Genes of Silkworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weina; He, Guangwei; Wang, Jingjing; Hu, Qiongbo

    2016-12-29

    Destruxin A (DA), a cyclodepsipeptidic mycotoxin of entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae, has anti-immunity activity against insects, but the mechanism of immune regulation is not clear yet. In our previous experiment, the significant expression changes of Bm_nscaf2838_045, Bm_nscaf2674_066, and Bm_nscaf2767_133 genes in a silkworm's hemocytes were found, which suggested that these genes might be involved in insect's innate immunity. In the current experiment, the silkworm cell line Bm12 was used to survey the expression levels of these genes after the cells were treated with DA and the transcription factors BmRel, BmRelish1 and BmRelish2 were silenced by specific siRNA. The results indicated that, after the cells were treated by DA, the gene expression level of BmRelish2 was significantly downregulated, but BmRel and BmRelish1 were not changed. The results also showed that the gene expression levels of Bm_nscaf2838_045 and Bm_nscaf2674_066 had similar phenomena, i.e., downregulation with individual BmRelish1 gene silence or DA treatment, upregulation with combination of BmRelish1 gene silence and DA treatment, upregulation with individual BmRelish2 gene silence, and downregulation with combination of BmRelish2 gene silence plus DA treatment, but no changes in the BmRel gene silence combined with DA treatment. For the Bm_nscaf2767_133 gene, the downregulated expressions were found in individual BmRelish2 gene silence or DA treatment, upregulation in the combination treatment of BmRelish2 gene silence plus DA, and the individual treatment of BmRel or BmRelish1 silence. It is suggested that expressions of the Bm_nscaf2838_045 and Bm_nscaf2674_066 genes are closely related to the Imd signal pathway, but Bm_nscaf2767_133 genes might involve in both Toll and Imd pathways. Furthermore, the BmRelish1 gene acts as an activator and the BmRelish2 gene acts as a repressor for both Bm_nscaf2838_045 and Bm_nscaf2674_066 gene expressions. It also implies that DA may

  6. Gene expression and stress response mediated by the epigenetic regulation of a transposable element small RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea D McCue

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The epigenetic activity of transposable elements (TEs can influence the regulation of genes; though, this regulation is confined to the genes, promoters, and enhancers that neighbor the TE. This local cis regulation of genes therefore limits the influence of the TE's epigenetic regulation on the genome. TE activity is suppressed by small RNAs, which also inhibit viruses and regulate the expression of genes. The production of TE heterochromatin-associated endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs in the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana is mechanistically distinct from gene-regulating small RNAs, such as microRNAs or trans-acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs. Previous research identified a TE small RNA that potentially regulates the UBP1b mRNA, which encodes an RNA-binding protein involved in stress granule formation. We demonstrate that this siRNA, siRNA854, is under the same trans-generational epigenetic control as the Athila family LTR retrotransposons from which it is produced. The epigenetic activation of Athila elements results in a shift in small RNA processing pathways, and new 21-22 nucleotide versions of Athila siRNAs are produced by protein components normally not responsible for processing TE siRNAs. This processing results in siRNA854's incorporation into ARGONAUTE1 protein complexes in a similar fashion to gene-regulating tasiRNAs. We have used reporter transgenes to demonstrate that the UPB1b 3' untranslated region directly responds to the epigenetic status of Athila TEs and the accumulation of siRNA854. The regulation of the UPB1b 3' untranslated region occurs both on the post-transcriptional and translational levels when Athila TEs are epigenetically activated, and this regulation results in the phenocopy of the ubp1b mutant stress-sensitive phenotype. This demonstrates that a TE's epigenetic activity can modulate the host organism's stress response. In addition, the ability of this TE siRNA to regulate a gene's expression in trans blurs

  7. Reciprocal regulation of transcription factors and PLC isozyme gene expression in adult cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Tushi; Dhalla, Naranjan S; Tappia, Paramjit S

    2010-06-01

    By employing a pharmacological approach, we have shown that phospholipase C (PLC) activity is involved in the regulation of gene expression of transcription factors such as c-Fos and c-Jun in cardiomyocytes in response to norepinephrine (NE). However, there is no information available regarding the identity of specific PLC isozymes involved in the regulation of c-Fos and c-Jun or on the involvement of these transcription factors in PLC isozyme gene expression in adult cardiomyocytes. In this study, transfection of cardiomyocytes with PLC isozyme specific siRNA was found to prevent the NE-mediated increases in the corresponding PLC isozyme gene expression, protein content and activity. Unlike PLC gamma(1) gene, silencing of PLC beta(1), beta(3) and delta(1) genes with si RNA prevented the increases in c-Fos and c-Jun gene expression in response to NE. On the other hand, transfection with c-Jun si RNA suppressed the NE-induced increase in c-Jun as well as PLC beta(1), beta(3) and delta(1) gene expression, but had no effect on PLC gamma(1) gene expression. Although transfection of cardiomyocytes with c-Fos si RNA prevented NE-induced expression of c-Fos, PLC beta(1) and PLC beta(3) genes, it did not affect the increases in PLC delta(1) and PLC gamma(1) gene expression. Silencing of either c-Fos or c-Jun also depressed the NE-mediated increases in PLC beta(1), beta(3) and gamma(1) protein content and activity in an isozyme specific manner. Furthermore, silencing of all PLC isozymes as well as of c-Fos and c-Jun resulted in prevention of the NE-mediated increase in atrial natriuretic factor gene expression. These findings, by employing gene silencing techniques, demonstrate that there occurs a reciprocal regulation of transcription factors and specific PLC isozyme gene expression in cardiomyocytes.

  8. Thermo-regulation of genes mediating motility and plant interactions in Pseudomonas syringae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin L Hockett

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae is an important phyllosphere colonist that utilizes flagellum-mediated motility both as a means to explore leaf surfaces, as well as to invade into leaf interiors, where it survives as a pathogen. We found that multiple forms of flagellum-mediated motility are thermo-suppressed, including swarming and swimming motility. Suppression of swarming motility occurs between 28° and 30 °C, which coincides with the optimal growth temperature of P. syringae. Both fliC (encoding flagellin and syfA (encoding a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase involved in syringafactin biosynthesis were suppressed with increasing temperature. RNA-seq revealed 1440 genes of the P. syringae genome are temperature sensitive in expression. Genes involved in polysaccharide synthesis and regulation, phage and IS elements, type VI secretion, chemosensing and chemotaxis, translation, flagellar synthesis and motility, and phytotoxin synthesis and transport were generally repressed at 30 °C, while genes involved in transcriptional regulation, quaternary ammonium compound metabolism and transport, chaperone/heat shock proteins, and hypothetical genes were generally induced at 30 °C. Deletion of flgM, a key regulator in the transition from class III to class IV gene expression, led to elevated and constitutive expression of fliC regardless of temperature, but did not affect thermo-regulation of syfA. This work highlights the importance of temperature in the biology of P. syringae, as many genes encoding traits important for plant-microbe interactions were thermo-regulated.

  9. Hfq regulates the expression of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene in Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masayuki; Takahashi, Akira; Su, Zehong; Harada, Nagakatsu; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Nakaya, Yutaka

    2008-09-21

    The hfq gene is conserved in a wide variety of bacteria and Hfq is involved in many cellular functions such as stress responses and the regulation of gene expression. It has also been reported that Hfq is involved in bacterial pathogenicity. However, it is not clear whether Hfq regulates virulence in Vibrio parahaemolyticus. To evaluate this, we investigated the effect of Hfq on the expression of virulence-associated genes including thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), which is considered to be an important virulence factor in V. parahaemolyticus, using an hfq deletion mutant. The production of TDH in the hfq deletion mutant was much higher than in the parental strain. Quantification of tdh promoter activity and mRNA demonstrated that transcription of the tdh gene was up-regulated in the mutant strain. The hfq-complemented strain had a normal (parental) amount of tdh expression. The transcriptional activity of tdhA was particularly increased in the mutant strain. These results indicate that Hfq is closely associated with the expression level of the tdh gene. Interestingly, other genes involved in the pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus, such as VP1680, vopC, and vopT, were also up-regulated in the mutant strain. Hfq regulates the expression of virulence-associated factors such as TDH and may be involved in the pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus.

  10. Hfq regulates the expression of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene in Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mawatari Kazuaki

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hfq gene is conserved in a wide variety of bacteria and Hfq is involved in many cellular functions such as stress responses and the regulation of gene expression. It has also been reported that Hfq is involved in bacterial pathogenicity. However, it is not clear whether Hfq regulates virulence in Vibrio parahaemolyticus. To evaluate this, we investigated the effect of Hfq on the expression of virulence-associated genes including thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH, which is considered to be an important virulence factor in V. parahaemolyticus, using an hfq deletion mutant. Results The production of TDH in the hfq deletion mutant was much higher than in the parental strain. Quantification of tdh promoter activity and mRNA demonstrated that transcription of the tdh gene was up-regulated in the mutant strain. The hfq-complemented strain had a normal (parental amount of tdh expression. The transcriptional activity of tdhA was particularly increased in the mutant strain. These results indicate that Hfq is closely associated with the expression level of the tdh gene. Interestingly, other genes involved in the pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus, such as VP1680, vopC, and vopT, were also up-regulated in the mutant strain. Conclusion Hfq regulates the expression of virulence-associated factors such as TDH and may be involved in the pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus.

  11. Expression profile of genes regulated by activity of the Na-H exchanger NHE1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putney Luanna K

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mammalian cells changes in intracellular pH (pHi, which are predominantly controlled by activity of plasma membrane ion exchangers, regulate a diverse range of normal and pathological cellular processes. How changes in pHi affect distinct cellular processes has primarily been determined by evaluating protein activities and we know little about how pHi regulates gene expression. Results A global profile of genes regulated in mammalian fibroblasts by decreased pHi induced by impaired activity of the plasma membrane Na-H exchanger NHE1 was characterized by using cDNA microarrays. Analysis of selected genes by quantitative RT-PCR, TaqMan, and immunoblot analyses confirmed results obtained from cDNA arrays. Consistent with established roles of pHi and NHE1 activity in cell proliferation and oncogenic transformation, grouping regulated genes into functional categories and biological pathways indicated a predominant number of genes with altered expression were associated with growth factor signaling, oncogenesis, and cell cycle progression. Conclusion A comprehensive analysis of genes selectively regulated by pHi provides insight on candidate targets that might mediate established effects of pHi on a number of normal and pathological cell functions.

  12. The ASK1 gene regulates B function gene expression in cooperation with UFO and LEAFY in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, D; Yu, Q; Chen, M; Ma, H

    2001-07-01

    The Arabidopsis floral regulatory genes APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI) are required for the B function according to the ABC model for floral organ identity. AP3 and PI expression are positively regulated by the LEAFY (LFY) and UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) genes. UFO encodes an F-box protein, and we have shown previously that UFO genetically interacts with the ASK1 gene encoding a SKP1 homologue; both the F-box containing protein and SKP1 are subunits of ubiquitin ligases. We show here that the ask1-1 mutation can enhance the floral phenotypes of weak lfy and ap3 mutants; therefore, like UFO, ASK1 also interacts with LFY and AP3 genetically. Furthermore, our results from RNA in situ hybridizations indicate that ASK1 regulates early AP3 and PI expression. These results support the idea that UFO and ASK1 together positively regulate AP3 and PI expression. We propose that the UFO and ASK1 proteins are components of a ubiquitin ligase that mediates the proteolysis of a repressor of AP3 and PI expression. Our genetic studies also indicate that ASK1 and UFO play a role in regulating the number of floral organ primordia, and we discuss possible mechanisms for such a regulation.

  13. Hormonal regulation of platypus Beta-lactoglobulin and monotreme lactation protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjapoori, Ashwantha Kumar; Lefèvre, Christophe M; Nicholas, Kevin R; Sharp, Julie A

    2017-02-01

    Endocrine regulation of milk protein gene expression in marsupials and eutherians is well studied. However, the evolution of this complex regulation that began with monotremes is unknown. Monotremes represent the oldest lineage of extant mammals and the endocrine regulation of lactation in these mammals has not been investigated. Here we characterised the proximal promoter and hormonal regulation of two platypus milk protein genes, Beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a whey protein and monotreme lactation protein (MLP), a monotreme specific milk protein, using in vitro reporter assays and a bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME-UV1). Insulin and dexamethasone alone provided partial induction of MLP, while the combination of insulin, dexamethasone and prolactin was required for maximal induction. Partial induction of BLG was achieved by insulin, dexamethasone and prolactin alone, with maximal induction using all three hormones. Platypus MLP and BLG core promoter regions comprised transcription factor binding sites (e.g. STAT5, NF-1 and C/EBPα) that were conserved in marsupial and eutherian lineages that regulate caseins and whey protein gene expression. Our analysis suggests that insulin, dexamethasone and/or prolactin alone can regulate the platypus MLP and BLG gene expression, unlike those of therian lineage. The induction of platypus milk protein genes by lactogenic hormones suggests they originated before the divergence of marsupial and eutherians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An atlas of gene expression and gene co-regulation in the human retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Michele; Carissimo, Annamaria; Cutillo, Luisa; Lai, Ching-Hung; Mutarelli, Margherita; Moretti, Maria Nicoletta; Singh, Marwah Veer; Karali, Marianthi; Carrella, Diego; Pizzo, Mariateresa; Russo, Francesco; Ferrari, Stefano; Ponzin, Diego; Angelini, Claudia; Banfi, Sandro; di Bernardo, Diego

    2016-07-08

    The human retina is a specialized tissue involved in light stimulus transduction. Despite its unique biology, an accurate reference transcriptome is still missing. Here, we performed gene expression analysis (RNA-seq) of 50 retinal samples from non-visually impaired post-mortem donors. We identified novel transcripts with high confidence (Observed Transcriptome (ObsT)) and quantified the expression level of known transcripts (Reference Transcriptome (RefT)). The ObsT included 77 623 transcripts (23 960 genes) covering 137 Mb (35 Mb new transcribed genome). Most of the transcripts (92%) were multi-exonic: 81% with known isoforms, 16% with new isoforms and 3% belonging to new genes. The RefT included 13 792 genes across 94 521 known transcripts. Mitochondrial genes were among the most highly expressed, accounting for about 10% of the reads. Of all the protein-coding genes in Gencode, 65% are expressed in the retina. We exploited inter-individual variability in gene expression to infer a gene co-expression network and to identify genes specifically expressed in photoreceptor cells. We experimentally validated the photoreceptors localization of three genes in human retina that had not been previously reported. RNA-seq data and the gene co-expression network are available online (http://retina.tigem.it). © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Multiple oscillators regulate circadian gene expression in Neurospora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Alejandro; Lewis, Zachary A.; Greene, Andrew V.; March, Irene J.; Gomer, Richard H.; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    High-density microarrays were used to profile circadian gene expression in Neurospora crassa cultures grown in constant darkness. We identified 145 clock-controlled genes (ccgs). The ccgs peaked in mRNA accumulation at all phases of the day, with the majority peaking in the late night to early morning. The predicted or known functions of the ccgs demonstrate that the clock contributes to a wide range of cellular processes, including cell signaling, development, metabolism, and stress responses. Although the period of rhythm of most of the ccgs was found to depend on the well characterized frequency (FRQ)-based oscillator, three ccgs appeared to have a rhythm that was significantly short in the long period (29-h) frq7 mutant strain. These ccgs accumulate mRNA rhythmically with a circadian period in a frq-null strain, confirming the existence of a second oscillator in N. crassa. PMID:14597725

  16. Sex-biased genetic effects on gene regulation in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimas, Antigone S.; Nica, Alexandra C.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Stranger, Barbara E.; Raj, Towfique; Buil, Alfonso; Giger, Thomas; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; McCarthy, Mark I.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.

    2012-01-01

    Human regulatory variation, reported as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), contributes to differences between populations and tissues. The contribution of eQTLs to differences between sexes, however, has not been investigated to date. Here we explore regulatory variation in females and males and demonstrate that 12%–15% of autosomal eQTLs function in a sex-biased manner. We show that genes possessing sex-biased eQTLs are expressed at similar levels across the sexes and highlight cases of genes controlling sexually dimorphic and shared traits that are under the control of distinct regulatory elements in females and males. This study illustrates that sex provides important context that can modify the effects of functional genetic variants. PMID:22960374

  17. Signaling pathways in PACAP regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falktoft, Birgitte; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Ganglia expressing the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) innervate vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) containing neurons suggesting a role of PACAP in regulating VIP expression. Human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells were applied to study PACAP regulated VIP gene...... in PACAP regulation of the FOS and VIP gene expressions suggest for the first time a role of FOS in PACAP-induced VIP gene expression in human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells....... expression aiming to identify the receptor and the signaling proteins involved. The PACAP receptor subtype PAC1 induced VIP gene expression as (i) PACAP and the PAC1 receptor agonist maxadilan were equally efficient and approximately 200-fold more potent than VIP, and (ii) PACAP6-38 and PG99-465, antagonists...

  18. Signaling pathways in PACAP regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falktoft, B.; Georg, B.; Fahrenkrug, J.

    2009-01-01

    Ganglia expressing the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) innervate vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) containing neurons suggesting a role of PACAP in regulating VIP expression. Human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells were applied to study PACAP regulated VIP gene...... in PACAP regulation of the FOS and VIP gene expressions suggest for the first time a role of FOS in PACAP-induced VIP gene expression in human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2009/10...... expression aiming to identify the receptor and the signaling proteins involved. The PACAP receptor subtype PAC1 induced VIP gene expression as (i) PACAP and the PAC1 receptor agonist maxadilan were equally efficient and similar to 200-fold more potent than VIP, and (ii) PACAP6-38 and PG99-465, antagonists...

  19. Transcriptional regulation of the prolactin gene in turkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Kurima, Kiyoto

    1996-01-01

    Poor reproductive performance by turkey hens compared with chickens is partially due to the early cessation of egg production associated with the onset of incubation behavior. Prolactin (Prl) is involved in the induction and maintenance of incubation behavior in birds, and understanding the regulatory mechanism(s) of Prl gene expression will provide fundamental information to manipulate Prl production for better reproductive performance in turkey hens.

  20. Network Centrality Analysis in Fungi Reveals Complex Regulation of Lost and Gained Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulombe-Huntington, Jasmin; Xia, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Gene gain and loss shape both proteomes and the networks they form. The increasing availability of closely related sequenced genomes and of genome-wide network data should enable a better understanding of the evolutionary forces driving gene gain, gene loss and evolutionary network rewiring. Using orthology mappings across 23 ascomycete fungi genomes, we identified proteins that were lost, gained or universally conserved across the tree, enabling us to compare genes across all stages of their life-cycle. Based on a collection of genome-wide network and gene expression datasets from baker's yeast, as well as a few from fission yeast, we found that gene loss is more strongly associated with network and expression features of closely related species than that of distant species, consistent with the evolutionary modulation of gene loss propensity through network rewiring. We also discovered that lost and gained genes, as compared to universally conserved "core" genes, have more regulators, more complex expression patterns and are much more likely to encode for transcription factors. Finally, we found that the relative rate of network integration of new genes into the different types of networks agrees with experimentally measured rates of network rewiring. This systems-level view of the life-cycle of eukaryotic genes suggests that the gain and loss of genes is tightly coupled to the gain and loss of network interactions, that lineage-specific adaptations drive regulatory complexity and that the relative rates of integration of new genes are consistent with network rewiring rates.

  1. Alternative Splicing in Plant Genes: A Means of Regulating the Environmental Fitness of Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xudong; Cao, Ying; Ma, Ligeng

    2017-02-20

    Gene expression can be regulated through transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Transcription in eukaryotes produces pre-mRNA molecules, which are processed and spliced post-transcriptionally to create translatable mRNAs. More than one mRNA may be produced from a single pre-mRNA by alternative splicing (AS); thus, AS serves to diversify an organism's transcriptome and proteome. Previous studies of gene expression in plants have focused on the role of transcriptional regulation in response to environmental changes. However, recent data suggest that post-transcriptional regulation, especially AS, is necessary for plants to adapt to a changing environment. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of AS during plant development in response to environmental changes. We suggest that alternative gene splicing is a novel means of regulating the environmental fitness of plants.

  2. Modeling the Drosophila gene cluster regulation network for muscle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haye, Alexandre; Albert, Jaroslav; Rooman, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The development of accurate and reliable dynamical modeling procedures that describe the time evolution of gene expression levels is a prerequisite to understanding and controlling the transcription process. We focused on data from DNA microarray time series for 20 Drosophila genes involved in muscle development during the embryonic stage. Genes with similar expression profiles were clustered on the basis of a translation-invariant and scale-invariant distance measure. The time evolution of these clusters was modeled using coupled differential equations. Three model structures involving a transcription term and a degradation term were tested. The parameters were identified in successive steps: network construction, parameter optimization, and parameter reduction. The solutions were evaluated on the basis of the data reproduction and the number of parameters, as well as on two biology-based requirements: the robustness with respect to parameter variations and the values of the expression levels not being unrealistically large upon extrapolation in time. Various solutions were obtained that satisfied all our evaluation criteria. The regulatory networks inferred from these solutions were compared with experimental data. The best solution has half of the experimental connections, which compares favorably with previous approaches. Biasing the network toward the experimental connections led to the identification of a model that is only slightly less good on the basis of the evaluation criteria. The non-uniqueness of the solutions and the variable agreement with experimental connections were discussed in the context of the different hypotheses underlying this type of approach.

  3. Regulation of Inflammatory Gene Expression in PBMCs by Immunostimulatory Botanicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzler, Karen L.; Waters, Robert; Jacobs, Bertram L.; Rochon, Yvan; Langland, Jeffrey O.

    2010-01-01

    Many hundreds of botanicals are used in complementary and alternative medicine for therapeutic use as antimicrobials and immune stimulators. While there exists many centuries of anecdotal evidence and few clinical studies on the activity and efficacy of these botanicals, limited scientific evidence exists on the ability of these botanicals to modulate the immune and inflammatory responses. Using botanogenomics (or herbogenomics), this study provides novel insight into inflammatory genes which are induced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells following treatment with immunomodulatory botanical extracts. These results may suggest putative genes involved in the physiological responses thought to occur following administration of these botanical extracts. Using extracts from immunostimulatory herbs (Astragalus membranaceus, Sambucus cerulea, Andrographis paniculata) and an immunosuppressive herb (Urtica dioica), the data presented supports previous cytokine studies on these herbs as well as identifying additional genes which may be involved in immune cell activation and migration and various inflammatory responses, including wound healing, angiogenesis, and blood pressure modulation. Additionally, we report the presence of lipopolysaccharide in medicinally prepared extracts of these herbs which is theorized to be a natural and active component of the immunostimulatory herbal extracts. The data presented provides a more extensive picture on how these herbs may be mediating their biological effects on the immune and inflammatory responses. PMID:20838436

  4. Transcriptional regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana chalcone synthase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinbaum, R.L.; Ausubel, F.M.

    1988-05-01

    The authors cloned an Arabiodpsis thaliana chalcone synthase (CHS) gene on the basis of cross-hybridization with a Petroselinum hortense CHS cDNA clone. The protein sequence deduced from the A. thaliana CHS DNA sequence is at least 85% homologous to the CHS sequences from P. hortense, Antirrhinum majus, and Petunia hybrida. Southern blot analysis indicated that CHS is a single-copy gene in A. thaliana. High-intensity light treatment of A. thaliana plants for 24 h caused a 50-fold increase in CHS enzyme activity and an accumulation of visibly detectable levels of anthocyanin pigments in the vegetative structures of these plants. A corresponding increase in the steady-state level of CHS mRNA was detected after high-intensity light treatment for the same period of time. The accumulation of CHS mRNA in response to high-intensity light was due, at least in part, to an increased rate of transcription of the CHS gene as demonstrated by nuclear runoff experiment.

  5. Regulation of inflammatory gene expression in PBMCs by immunostimulatory botanicals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Denzler

    Full Text Available Many hundreds of botanicals are used in complementary and alternative medicine for therapeutic use as antimicrobials and immune stimulators. While there exists many centuries of anecdotal evidence and few clinical studies on the activity and efficacy of these botanicals, limited scientific evidence exists on the ability of these botanicals to modulate the immune and inflammatory responses. Using botanogenomics (or herbogenomics, this study provides novel insight into inflammatory genes which are induced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells following treatment with immunomodulatory botanical extracts. These results may suggest putative genes involved in the physiological responses thought to occur following administration of these botanical extracts. Using extracts from immunostimulatory herbs (Astragalus membranaceus, Sambucus cerulea, Andrographis paniculata and an immunosuppressive herb (Urtica dioica, the data presented supports previous cytokine studies on these herbs as well as identifying additional genes which may be involved in immune cell activation and migration and various inflammatory responses, including wound healing, angiogenesis, and blood pressure modulation. Additionally, we report the presence of lipopolysaccharide in medicinally prepared extracts of these herbs which is theorized to be a natural and active component of the immunostimulatory herbal extracts. The data presented provides a more extensive picture on how these herbs may be mediating their biological effects on the immune and inflammatory responses.

  6. Regulation of gene expression in adeno-associated virus vectors in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberman, Rebecca P; McCown, Thomas J

    2002-10-01

    Regulated adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have broad utility in both experimental and applied gene therapy, and to date, several regulation systems have exhibited a capability to control gene expression from viral vectors over two orders of magnitude. The tetracycline responsive system has been the most used in AAV, although other regulation systems such as RU486- and rapamycin-responsive systems are reasonable options. AAV vectors influence how regulation systems function by several mechanisms, leading to increased background gene expression and restricted induction. Methods to reduce background expression continue to be explored and systems not yet tried in AAV may prove quite functional. Although regulated promoters are often assumed to exhibit ubiquitous expression, the tropism of different neuronal subtypes can be altered dramatically by changing promoters in recombinant AAV vectors. Differences in promoter-directed tropism have significant consequences for proper expression of gene products as well as the utility of dual vector regulation. Thus regulated vector systems must be carefully optimized for each application. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA)

  7. Androgen regulated genes in human prostate xenografts in mice: relation to BPH and prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold D Love

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate carcinoma (CaP are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1 highly expressed in prostate, 2 had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3 encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues.

  8. A new method for simultaneous gene deletion and down-regulation in Brucella melitensis Rev.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedinia, Ali Reza; Zeinoddini, Mehdi; Soleimani, Masoud; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2015-01-01

    In this study, our aim was to integrate an antisense expression cassette in bacterial chromosome for providing a long-term expression down-regulation in a bid to develop a new approach for simultaneous deletion and down-regulation of target genes in bacterial system. Therefore, we were used this approach for simultaneous deletion of the perosamine synthetase (per) gene and down-regulation of the virB1 expression in Brucella melitensis Rev.1. The per gene, which is one of the LPS O-chain coding genes, was replaced by homologous recombination with an antisense virB1 expression cassette together with kanamycin resistance cassette (kan(R)). Deletion of the per gene was characterized by PCR analysis and DNA sequencing. The expression of antisense virB1 cassette was confirmed by RT-PCR. Down-regulation of the virB1 mRNA expression was quantified by real-time RT-PCR using virB1 specific primers relative to the groEL reference gene. The survival rate of mutant strain was evaluated by CFU count in the BALB/c mice. The virB1 mRNA expression was down-regulated on average 10-fold in mutant strain as compared to parental strain. The loss of per gene function and decrease of the virB1 mRNA expression resulted in reduced entry and survival of the mutant Rev.1 strain in BALB/c mice splenocytes. We propose that this method can be used for simultaneous regulation of multiple genes expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Systematic identification of genes that regulate neuronal wiring in the Drosophila visual system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürg Berger

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Forward genetic screens in model organisms are an attractive means to identify those genes involved in any complex biological process, including neural circuit assembly. Although mutagenesis screens are readily performed to saturation, gene identification rarely is, being limited by the considerable effort generally required for positional cloning. Here, we apply a systematic positional cloning strategy to identify many of the genes required for neuronal wiring in the Drosophila visual system. From a large-scale forward genetic screen selecting for visual system wiring defects with a normal retinal pattern, we recovered 122 mutations in 42 genetic loci. For 6 of these loci, the underlying genetic lesions were previously identified using traditional methods. Using SNP-based mapping approaches, we have now identified 30 additional genes. Neuronal phenotypes have not previously been reported for 20 of these genes, and no mutant phenotype has been previously described for 5 genes. The genes encode a variety of proteins implicated in cellular processes such as gene regulation, cytoskeletal dynamics, axonal transport, and cell signalling. We conducted a comprehensive phenotypic analysis of 35 genes, scoring wiring defects according to 33 criteria. This work demonstrates the feasibility of combining large-scale gene identification with large-scale mutagenesis in Drosophila, and provides a comprehensive overview of the molecular mechanisms that regulate visual system wiring.

  10. Investigation of epigenetic gene regulation in Arabidopsis modulated by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Hye Ryun; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Myung Jin; Lee, Dong Joon; Kim, Young Min; Jung, Joon Yong; Han, Wan Keun; Kang, Soo Jin [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    To investigate epigenetic gene regulation in Arabidopsis modulated by gamma radiation, we examined the changes in DNA methylation and histone modification after gamma radiation and investigated the effects of gamma radiation on epigenetic information and gene expression. We have selected 14 genes with changes in DNA methylation by gamma radiation, analyzed the changes of histone modification in the selected genes to reveal the relationship between DNA methylation and histone modification by gamma radiation. We have also analyzed the effects of gamma radiation on gene expression to investigate the relationship between epigenetic information and gene expression by gamma radiation. The results will be useful to reveal the effects of gamma radiation on DNA methylation, histone modification and gene expression. We anticipate that the information generated in this proposal will help to find out the mechanism underlying the changes in epigenetic information by gamma radiation

  11. Gene up-regulation in response to predator kairomones in the water flea, Daphnia pulex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okada Yasukazu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous cases of predator-induced polyphenisms, in which alternate phenotypes are produced in response to extrinsic stimuli, have been reported in aquatic taxa to date. The genus Daphnia (Branchiopoda, Cladocera provides a model experimental system for the study of the developmental mechanisms and evolutionary processes associated with predator-induced polyphenisms. In D. pulex, juveniles form neckteeth in response to predatory kairomones released by Chaoborus larvae (Insecta, Diptera. Results Previous studies suggest that the timing of the sensitivity to kairomones in D. pulex can generally be divided into the embryonic and postembryonic developmental periods. We therefore examined which of the genes in the embryonic and first-instar juvenile stages exhibit different expression levels in the presence or absence of predator kairomones. Employing a candidate gene approach and identifying differentially-expressed genes revealed that the morphogenetic factors, Hox3, extradenticle and escargot, were up-regulated by kairomones in the postembryonic stage and may potentially be responsible for defense morph formation. In addition, the juvenile hormone pathway genes, JHAMT and Met, and the insulin signaling pathway genes, InR and IRS-1, were up-regulated in the first-instar stage. It is well known that these hormonal pathways are involved in physiological regulation following morphogenesis in many insect species. During the embryonic stage when morphotypes were determined, one of the novel genes identified by differential display was up-regulated, suggesting that this gene may be related to morphotype determination. Biological functions of the up-regulated genes are discussed in the context of defense morph formation. Conclusions It is suggested that, following the reception of kairomone signals, the identified genes are involved in a series of defensive phenotypic alterations and the production of a defensive phenotype.

  12. Dynamics of chromatin accessibility and gene regulation by MADS-domain transcription factors in flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajoro, Alice; Madrigal, Pedro; Muiño, Jose M; Matus, José Tomás; Jin, Jian; Mecchia, Martin A; Debernardi, Juan M; Palatnik, Javier F; Balazadeh, Salma; Arif, Muhammad; Ó'Maoiléidigh, Diarmuid S; Wellmer, Frank; Krajewski, Pawel; Riechmann, José-Luis; Angenent, Gerco C; Kaufmann, Kerstin

    2014-03-03

    Development of eukaryotic organisms is controlled by transcription factors that trigger specific and global changes in gene expression programs. In plants, MADS-domain transcription factors act as master regulators of developmental switches and organ specification. However, the mechanisms by which these factors dynamically regulate the expression of their target genes at different developmental stages are still poorly understood. We characterized the relationship of chromatin accessibility, gene expression, and DNA binding of two MADS-domain proteins at different stages of Arabidopsis flower development. Dynamic changes in APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 DNA binding correlated with changes in gene expression, and many of the target genes could be associated with the developmental stage in which they are transcriptionally controlled. We also observe dynamic changes in chromatin accessibility during flower development. Remarkably, DNA binding of APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 is largely independent of the accessibility status of their binding regions and it can precede increases in DNA accessibility. These results suggest that APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 may modulate chromatin accessibility, thereby facilitating access of other transcriptional regulators to their target genes. Our findings indicate that different homeotic factors regulate partly overlapping, yet also distinctive sets of target genes in a partly stage-specific fashion. By combining the information from DNA-binding and gene expression data, we are able to propose models of stage-specific regulatory interactions, thereby addressing dynamics of regulatory networks throughout flower development. Furthermore, MADS-domain TFs may regulate gene expression by alternative strategies, one of which is modulation of chromatin accessibility.

  13. Growth hormone regulation of rat liver gene expression assessed by SSH and microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardmo, Cissi; Swerdlow, Harold; Mode, Agneta

    2002-04-25

    The sexually dimorphic secretion of growth hormone (GH) that prevails in the rat leads to a sex-differentiated expression of GH target genes, particularly in the liver. We have used subtractive suppressive hybridization (SSH) to search for new target genes induced by the female-characteristic, near continuous, pattern of GH secretion. Microarrays and dot-blot hybridizations were used in an attempt to confirm differential ratios of expression of obtained SSH clones. Out of 173 unique SSH clones, 41 could be verified as differentially expressed. Among these, we identified 17 known genes not previously recognized as differentially regulated by the sex-specific GH pattern. Additional SSH clones may also represent genes subjected to sex-specific GH regulation since only transcripts abundantly expressed could be verified. Optimized analyses, specific for each gene, are required to fully characterize the degree of differential expression.

  14. Synergistic and Dose-Controlled Regulation of Cellulase Gene Expression in Penicillium oxalicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhonghai; Yao, Guangshan; Wu, Ruimei; Gao, Liwei; Kan, Qinbiao; Liu, Meng; Yang, Piao; Liu, Guodong; Qin, Yuqi; Song, Xin; Zhong, Yaohua; Fang, Xu; Qu, Yinbo

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungus Penicillium oxalicum produces diverse lignocellulolytic enzymes, which are regulated by the combinations of many transcription factors. Here, a single-gene disruptant library for 470 transcription factors was constructed and systematically screened for cellulase production. Twenty transcription factors (including ClrB, CreA, XlnR, Ace1, AmyR, and 15 unknown proteins) were identified to play putative roles in the activation or repression of cellulase synthesis. Most of these regulators have not been characterized in any fungi before. We identified the ClrB, CreA, XlnR, and AmyR transcription factors as critical dose-dependent regulators of cellulase expression, the core regulons of which were identified by analyzing several transcriptomes and/or secretomes. Synergistic and additive modes of combinatorial control of each cellulase gene by these regulatory factors were achieved, and cellulase expression was fine-tuned in a proper and controlled manner. With one of these targets, the expression of the major intracellular β-glucosidase Bgl2 was found to be dependent on ClrB. The Bgl2-deficient background resulted in a substantial gene activation by ClrB and proved to be closely correlated with the relief of repression mediated by CreA and AmyR during cellulase induction. Our results also signify that probing the synergistic and dose-controlled regulation mechanisms of cellulolytic regulators and using it for reconstruction of expression regulation network (RERN) may be a promising strategy for cellulolytic fungi to develop enzyme hyper-producers. Based on our data, ClrB was identified as focal point for the synergistic activation regulation of cellulase expression by integrating cellulolytic regulators and their target genes, which refined our understanding of transcriptional-regulatory network as a “seesaw model” in which the coordinated regulation of cellulolytic genes is established by counteracting activators and repressors. PMID:26360497

  15. Lineage-Specific Evolutionary Histories and Regulation of Major Starch Metabolism Genes during Banana Ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourda, Cyril; Cardi, Céline; Gibert, Olivier; Giraldo Toro, Andrès; Ricci, Julien; Mbéguié-A-Mbéguié, Didier; Yahiaoui, Nabila

    2016-01-01

    Starch is the most widespread and abundant storage carbohydrate in plants. It is also a major feature of cultivated bananas as it accumulates to large amounts during banana fruit development before almost complete conversion to soluble sugars during ripening. Little is known about the structure of major gene families involved in banana starch metabolism and their evolution compared to other species. To identify genes involved in banana starch metabolism and investigate their evolutionary history, we analyzed six gene families playing a crucial role in plant starch biosynthesis and degradation: the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases (AGPases), starch synthases (SS), starch branching enzymes (SBE), debranching enzymes (DBE), α-amylases (AMY) and β-amylases (BAM). Using comparative genomics and phylogenetic approaches, these genes were classified into families and sub-families and orthology relationships with functional genes in Eudicots and in grasses were identified. In addition to known ancestral duplications shaping starch metabolism gene families, independent evolution in banana and grasses also occurred through lineage-specific whole genome duplications for specific sub-families of AGPase, SS, SBE, and BAM genes; and through gene-scale duplications for AMY genes. In particular, banana lineage duplications yielded a set of AGPase, SBE and BAM genes that were highly or specifically expressed in banana fruits. Gene expression analysis highlighted a complex transcriptional reprogramming of starch metabolism genes during ripening of banana fruits. A differential regulation of expression between banana gene duplicates was identified for SBE and BAM genes, suggesting that part of starch metabolism regulation in the fruit evolved in the banana lineage. PMID:27994606

  16. Lineage-specific Evolutionary Histories and Regulation of Major Starch Metabolism Genes during Banana Ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Jourda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Starch is the most widespread and abundant storage carbohydrate in plants. It is also a major feature of cultivated bananas as it accumulates to large amounts during banana fruit development before almost complete conversion to soluble sugars during ripening. Little is known about the structure of major gene families involved in banana starch metabolism and their evolution compared to other species. To identify genes involved in banana starch metabolism and investigate their evolutionary history, we analyzed six gene families playing a crucial role in plant starch biosynthesis and degradation: the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases (AGPases, starch synthases (SS, starch branching enzymes (SBE, debranching enzymes (DBE, -amylases (AMY and -amylases (BAM. Using comparative genomics and phylogenetic approaches, these genes were classified into families and sub-families and orthology relationships with functional genes in Eudicots and in grasses were identified. In addition to known ancestral duplications shaping starch metabolism gene families, independent evolution in banana and grasses also occurred through lineage-specific whole genome duplications for specific sub-families of AGPases, SS, SBE and BAM genes; and through gene-scale duplications for AMY genes. In particular, banana lineage duplications yielded a set of AGPases, SBE and BAM genes that were highly or specifically expressed in banana fruits. Gene expression analysis highlighted a complex transcriptional reprogramming of starch metabolism genes during ripening of banana fruits. A differential regulation of expression between banana gene duplicates was identified for SBE and BAM genes, suggesting that part of starch metabolism regulation in the fruit evolved in the banana lineage

  17. Lineage-Specific Evolutionary Histories and Regulation of Major Starch Metabolism Genes during Banana Ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourda, Cyril; Cardi, Céline; Gibert, Olivier; Giraldo Toro, Andrès; Ricci, Julien; Mbéguié-A-Mbéguié, Didier; Yahiaoui, Nabila

    2016-01-01

    Starch is the most widespread and abundant storage carbohydrate in plants. It is also a major feature of cultivated bananas as it accumulates to large amounts during banana fruit development before almost complete conversion to soluble sugars during ripening. Little is known about the structure of major gene families involved in banana starch metabolism and their evolution compared to other species. To identify genes involved in banana starch metabolism and investigate their evolutionary history, we analyzed six gene families playing a crucial role in plant starch biosynthesis and degradation: the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases (AGPases), starch synthases (SS), starch branching enzymes (SBE), debranching enzymes (DBE), α-amylases (AMY) and β-amylases (BAM). Using comparative genomics and phylogenetic approaches, these genes were classified into families and sub-families and orthology relationships with functional genes in Eudicots and in grasses were identified. In addition to known ancestral duplications shaping starch metabolism gene families, independent evolution in banana and grasses also occurred through lineage-specific whole genome duplications for specific sub-families of AGPase, SS, SBE, and BAM genes; and through gene-scale duplications for AMY genes. In particular, banana lineage duplications yielded a set of AGPase, SBE and BAM genes that were highly or specifically expressed in banana fruits. Gene expression analysis highlighted a complex transcriptional reprogramming of starch metabolism genes during ripening of banana fruits. A differential regulation of expression between banana gene duplicates was identified for SBE and BAM genes, suggesting that part of starch metabolism regulation in the fruit evolved in the banana lineage.

  18. Identification of pathogenic genes and upstream regulators in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Mengya; Xu, Jing; Li, Min; Yu, Yuhui

    2017-06-26

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in older individuals. Our study aims to identify the key genes and upstream regulators in AMD. To screen pathogenic genes of AMD, an integrated analysis was performed by using the microarray datasets in AMD derived from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. The functional annotation and potential pathways of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were further discovered by Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enrichment analysis. We constructed the AMD-specific transcriptional regulatory network to find the crucial transcriptional factors (TFs) which target the DEGs in AMD. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to verify the DEGs and TFs obtained by integrated analysis. From two GEO datasets obtained, we identified 1280 DEGs (730 up-regulated and 550 down-regulated genes) between AMD and normal control (NC). After KEGG analysis, steroid biosynthesis is a significantly enriched pathway for DEGs. The expression of 8 genes (TNC, GRP, TRAF6, ADAMTS5, GPX3, FAP, DHCR7 and FDFT1) was detected. Except for TNC and GPX3, the other 6 genes in qRT-PCR played the same pattern with that in our integrated analysis. The dysregulation of these eight genes may involve with the process of AMD. Two crucial transcription factors (c-rel and myogenin) were concluded to play a role in AMD. Especially, myogenin was associated with AMD by regulating TNC, GRP and FAP. Our finding can contribute to developing new potential biomarkers, revealing the underlying pathogenesis, and further raising new therapeutic targets for AMD.

  19. ApoM: gene regulation and effects on HDL metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars B; Christoffersen, Christina; Ahnström, Josefin

    2009-01-01

    and glucose metabolism. Although the concentration of plasma apoM correlates with that of cholesterol, apoM was not identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in two prospective studies. In genetically modified mice, however, changes in plasma apoM concentration caused quantitative and qualitative...... changes in HDLs, and overexpression of the apoM gene reduced atherosclerosis. In conclusion, it seems that apoM plays a part in lipoprotein metabolism; however, the biological impact of apoM in humans remains to be determined....

  20. Alu Elements as Novel Regulators of Gene Expression in Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility Genes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies implicating Alu repeat elements in various diseases, there is sparse information available with respect to the potential functional and biological roles of the repeat elements in Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Therefore, we performed a genome-wide sequence analysis of T1D candidate...... genes to identify embedded Alu elements within these genes. We observed significant enrichment of Alu elements within the T1D genes (p-value

  1. Profiling of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Cycle Regulating Genes Targeted by Calycosin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dongqing; Wang, Shufang; Zhu, Liguo; Tian, Yaping; Wang, Haibao; Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yu; Wang, Deqing

    2013-01-01

    We cocultured calycosin with human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (BEL-7402) to investigate the effect on cell proliferation. Calycosin can markedly block the cell growth in G1 phase (P < 0.01) on the IC50 concentration. There were seventeen genes involved in cell-cycle regulation showing differentially expressed in treated cells detected by gene chip. Eight genes were upregulated and nine genes were downregulated. Downregulated TFDP-1, CDKN2D, and SPK2 and upregulated CDC2 and CCNB1 migh...

  2. Paralogous Genes as a Tool to Study the Regulation of Gene Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Robert D

    new functions, or their gene products are in a dosage balance. Regulatory DNA elements - some of which are conserved across species and hence called conserved non-coding sequences (CNSs) - that control expression of duplicated genes are thus under similar purifying selection. In the present study, I...... regions. These results suggest that a concurrent purifying selection acts on coding and non-coding sequences of paralogous genes in A. thaliana. Mutational analyses of the promoters from a paralogous gene pair were performed in transgenic A. thaliana plants. The results revealed a 170-bp long DNA sequence...

  3. A rice gene of de novo origin negatively regulates pathogen-induced defense response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfei Xiao

    Full Text Available How defense genes originated with the evolution of their specific pathogen-responsive traits remains an important problem. It is generally known that a form of duplication can generate new genes, suggesting that a new gene usually evolves from an ancestral gene. However, we show that a new defense gene in plants may evolve by de novo origination, resulting in sophisticated disease-resistant functions in rice. Analyses of gene evolution showed that this new gene, OsDR10, had homologs only in the closest relative, Leersia genus, but not other subfamilies of the grass family; therefore, it is a rice tribe-specific gene that may have originated de novo in the tribe. We further show that this gene may evolve a highly conservative rice-specific function that contributes to the regulation difference between rice and other plant species in response to pathogen infections. Biologic analyses including gene silencing, pathologic analysis, and mutant characterization by transformation showed that the OsDR10-suppressed plants enhanced resistance to a broad spectrum of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae strains, which cause bacterial blight disease. This enhanced disease resistance was accompanied by increased accumulation of endogenous salicylic acid (SA and suppressed accumulation of endogenous jasmonic acid (JA as well as modified expression of a subset of defense-responsive genes functioning both upstream and downstream of SA and JA. These data and analyses provide fresh insights into the new biologic and evolutionary processes of a de novo gene recruited rapidly.

  4. Differential regulation of the foraging gene associated with task behaviors in harvester ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleeman Lindsay

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The division of labor in social insect colonies involves transitions by workers from one task to another and is critical to the organization and ecological success of colonies. The differential regulation of genetic pathways is likely to be a key mechanism involved in plasticity of social insect task behavior. One of the few pathways implicated in social organization involves the cGMP-activated protein kinase gene, foraging, a gene associated with foraging behavior in social insect species. The association of the foraging gene with behavior is conserved across diverse species, but the observed expression patterns and proposed functions of this gene vary across taxa. We compared the protein sequence of foraging across social insects and explored whether the differential regulation of this gene is associated with task behaviors in the harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis. Results Phylogenetic analysis of the coding region of the foraging gene reveals considerable conservation in protein sequence across insects, particularly among hymenopteran species. The absence of amino acid variation in key active and binding sites suggests that differences in behaviors associated with this gene among species may be the result of changes in gene expression rather than gene divergence. Using real time qPCR analyses with a harvester ant ortholog to foraging (Pofor, we found that the brains of harvester ant foragers have a daily fluctuation in expression of foraging with mRNA levels peaking at midday. In contrast, young workers inside the nest have low levels of Pofor mRNA with no evidence of daily fluctuations in expression. As a result, the association of foraging expression with task behavior within a species changes depending on the time of day the individuals are sampled. Conclusions The amino acid protein sequence of foraging is highly conserved across social insects. Differences in foraging behaviors associated with this gene among

  5. The plant nuclear envelope and regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Geraint

    2015-03-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) separates the key mechanisms of transcription and translation, and as such is a critical control point in all eukaryotic cells. In plants, the proteins of the NE influence a number of processes including the control of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of RNA and protein, chromatin localization to the nuclear periphery, and direct chromatin binding by members of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). In this review I attempt to bring these roles under the umbrella of their effect on gene expression, even though the complex nature of this cellular environment means there is considerable overlap of effects. Although the volume of research in plant cells has greatly improved over recent years, it is clear that our understanding of how the components of the NE either directly or indirectly influence gene expression is still in its infancy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The mouse Enhancer trap locus 1 (Etl-1): a novel mammalian gene related to Drosophila and yeast transcriptional regulator genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soininen, R; Schoor, M; Henseling, U; Tepe, C; Kisters-Woike, B; Rossant, J; Gossler, A

    1992-11-01

    A novel mouse gene, Enhancer trap locus 1 (Etl-1), was identified in close proximity to a lacZ enhancer trap integration in the mouse genome showing a specific beta-galactosidase staining pattern during development. In situ analysis revealed a widespread but not ubiquitous expression of Etl-1 throughout development with particularly high levels in the central nervous system and epithelial cells. The amino acid sequence of the Etl-1 protein deduced from the cDNA shows strong similarity, over a stretch of 500 amino acids, to the Drosophila brahma protein involved in the regulation of homeotic genes and to the yeast transcriptional activator protein SNF2/SWI2 as well as to the RAD54 protein and the recently described helicase-related yeast proteins STH1 and MOT1. Etl-1 is the first mammalian member of this group of proteins that are implicated in gene regulation and/or influencing chromatin structure. The homology to the regulatory proteins SNF2/SWI2 and brahma and the expression pattern during embryogenesis suggest that Etl-1 protein might be involved in gene regulating pathways during mouse development.

  7. Regulation of. beta. -cell glucose transporter gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ling; Alam, Tausif; Johnson, J.H.; Unger, R.H. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (USA) Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX (USA)); Hughes, S.; Newgard, C.B. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (USA))

    1990-06-01

    It has been postulated that a glucose transporter of {beta} cells (GLUT-2) may be important in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. To determine whether this transporter is constitutively expressed or regulated, the authors subjected conscious unrestrained Wistar rats to perturbations in glucose homeostasis and quantitated {beta}-cell GLUT-2 mRNA by in situ hybridization. After 3 hr of hypoglycemia, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA signal densities were reduced by 25% of the level in control rats. After 4 days, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA densities were reduced by 85% and 65%, respectively. After 12 days of hypoglycemia, the K{sub m} for 3-O-methyl-D-glucose transport in isolated rat islets, normally 18-20 mM, was 2.5 mM. This provides functional evidence of a profound reduction of high K{sub m} glucose transporter in {beta} cells. In contrast, GLUT-2 was only slightly reduced by hypoglycemia in liver. To determine the effect of prolonged hyperglycemia, they also infused animals with 50% (wt/vol) glucose for 5 days. Hyperglycemic clamping increased GLUT-2 mRNA by 46% whereas proinsulin mRNA doubled. They conclude that GLUT-2 expression in {beta} cells, but not liver, is subject to regulation by certain perturbations in blood glucose homeostasis.

  8. dPORE-miRNA: Polymorphic regulation of microRNA genes

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian

    2011-02-04

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNA molecules that act as post-transcriptional regulators and affect the regulation of protein-coding genes. Mostly transcribed by PolII, miRNA genes are regulated at the transcriptional level similarly to protein-coding genes. In this study we focus on human miRNAs. These miRNAs are involved in a variety of pathways and can affect many diseases. Our interest is on possible deregulation of the transcription initiation of the miRNA encoding genes, which is facilitated by variations in the genomic sequence of transcriptional control regions (promoters). Methodology: Our aim is to provide an online resource to facilitate the investigation of the potential effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on miRNA gene regulation. We analyzed SNPs overlapped with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in promoters of miRNA genes. We also accounted for the creation of novel TFBSs due to polymorphisms not present in the reference genome. The resulting changes in the original TFBSs and potential creation of new TFBSs were incorporated into the Dragon Database of Polymorphic Regulation of miRNA genes (dPORE-miRNA). Conclusions: The dPORE-miRNA database enables researchers to explore potential effects of SNPs on the regulation of miRNAs. dPORE-miRNA can be interrogated with regards to: a/miRNAs (their targets, or involvement in diseases, or biological pathways), b/SNPs, or c/transcription factors. dPORE-miRNA can be accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dpore and http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/dpore/. Its use is free for academic and non-profit users. © 2011 Schmeier et al.

  9. dPORE-miRNA: polymorphic regulation of microRNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeier, Sebastian; Schaefer, Ulf; MacPherson, Cameron R; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2011-02-04

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNA molecules that act as post-transcriptional regulators and affect the regulation of protein-coding genes. Mostly transcribed by PolII, miRNA genes are regulated at the transcriptional level similarly to protein-coding genes. In this study we focus on human miRNAs. These miRNAs are involved in a variety of pathways and can affect many diseases. Our interest is on possible deregulation of the transcription initiation of the miRNA encoding genes, which is facilitated by variations in the genomic sequence of transcriptional control regions (promoters). Our aim is to provide an online resource to facilitate the investigation of the potential effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on miRNA gene regulation. We analyzed SNPs overlapped with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in promoters of miRNA genes. We also accounted for the creation of novel TFBSs due to polymorphisms not present in the reference genome. The resulting changes in the original TFBSs and potential creation of new TFBSs were incorporated into the Dragon Database of Polymorphic Regulation of miRNA genes (dPORE-miRNA). The dPORE-miRNA database enables researchers to explore potential effects of SNPs on the regulation of miRNAs. dPORE-miRNA can be interrogated with regards to: a/miRNAs (their targets, or involvement in diseases, or biological pathways), b/SNPs, or c/transcription factors. dPORE-miRNA can be accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dpore and http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/dpore/. Its use is free for academic and non-profit users.

  10. Regulation of gene expression by FSP27 in white and brown adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Bofu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brown and white adipose tissues (BAT and WAT play critical roles in controlling energy homeostasis and in the development of obesity and diabetes. The mouse Fat-Specific protein 27 (FSP27, a member of the cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector (CIDE family, is expressed in both BAT and WAT and is associated with lipid droplets. Over-expression of FSP27 promotes lipid storage, whereas FSP27 deficient mice have improved insulin sensitivity and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. In addition, FSP27-deficient white adipocytes have reduced lipid storage, smaller lipid droplets, increased mitochondrial activity and a higher expression of several BAT-selective genes. To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which FSP27 controls lipid storage and gene expression in WAT and BAT, we systematically analyzed the gene expression profile of FSP27-deficient WAT by microarray analysis and compared the expression levels of a specific set of genes in WAT and BAT by semi-quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Results BAT-selective genes were significantly up-regulated, whereas WAT-selective genes were down-regulated in the WAT of FSP27-deficient mice. The expression of the BAT-selective genes was also dramatically up-regulated in the WAT of leptin/FSP27 double deficient mice. In addition, the expression levels of genes involved in multiple metabolic pathways, including oxidative phosphorylation, the TCA cycle, fatty acid synthesis and fatty acid oxidation, were increased in the FSP27-deficient WAT. In contrast, the expression levels for genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, the classic complement pathway and TGF-β signaling were down-regulated in the FSP27-deficient WAT. Most importantly, the expression levels of regulatory factors that determine BAT identity, such as CEBPα/β, PRDM16 and major components of the cAMP pathway, were markedly up-regulated in the WAT of FSP27-deficient mice. The expression levels of these regulatory

  11. Regulation of gene expression by FSP27 in white and brown adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, De; Zhang, Yinxin; Xu, Li; Zhou, Linkang; Wang, Yue; Xue, Bofu; Wen, Zilong; Li, Peng; Sang, Jianli

    2010-07-22

    Brown and white adipose tissues (BAT and WAT) play critical roles in controlling energy homeostasis and in the development of obesity and diabetes. The mouse Fat-Specific protein 27 (FSP27), a member of the cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector (CIDE) family, is expressed in both BAT and WAT and is associated with lipid droplets. Over-expression of FSP27 promotes lipid storage, whereas FSP27 deficient mice have improved insulin sensitivity and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. In addition, FSP27-deficient white adipocytes have reduced lipid storage, smaller lipid droplets, increased mitochondrial activity and a higher expression of several BAT-selective genes. To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which FSP27 controls lipid storage and gene expression in WAT and BAT, we systematically analyzed the gene expression profile of FSP27-deficient WAT by microarray analysis and compared the expression levels of a specific set of genes in WAT and BAT by semi-quantitative real-time PCR analysis. BAT-selective genes were significantly up-regulated, whereas WAT-selective genes were down-regulated in the WAT of FSP27-deficient mice. The expression of the BAT-selective genes was also dramatically up-regulated in the WAT of leptin/FSP27 double deficient mice. In addition, the expression levels of genes involved in multiple metabolic pathways, including oxidative phosphorylation, the TCA cycle, fatty acid synthesis and fatty acid oxidation, were increased in the FSP27-deficient WAT. In contrast, the expression levels for genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, the classic complement pathway and TGF-beta signaling were down-regulated in the FSP27-deficient WAT. Most importantly, the expression levels of regulatory factors that determine BAT identity, such as CEBP alpha/beta, PRDM16 and major components of the cAMP pathway, were markedly up-regulated in the WAT of FSP27-deficient mice. The expression levels of these regulatory factors were also up-regulated in

  12. Integrative analysis of a cross-loci regulation network identifies App as a gene regulating insulin secretion from pancreatic islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhidong Tu

    Full Text Available Complex diseases result from molecular changes induced by multiple genetic factors and the environment. To derive a systems view of how genetic loci interact in the context of tissue-specific molecular networks, we constructed an F2 intercross comprised of >500 mice from diabetes-resistant (B6 and diabetes-susceptible (BTBR mouse strains made genetically obese by the Leptin(ob/ob mutation (Lep(ob. High-density genotypes, diabetes-related clinical traits, and whole-transcriptome expression profiling in five tissues (white adipose, liver, pancreatic islets, hypothalamus, and gastrocnemius muscle were determined for all mice. We performed an integrative analysis to investigate the inter-relationship among genetic factors, expression traits, and plasma insulin, a hallmark diabetes trait. Among five tissues under study, there are extensive protein-protein interactions between genes responding to different loci in adipose and pancreatic islets that potentially jointly participated in the regulation of plasma insulin. We developed a novel ranking scheme based on cross-loci protein-protein network topology and gene expression to assess each gene's potential to regulate plasma insulin. Unique candidate genes were identified in adipose tissue and islets. In islets, the Alzheimer's gene App was identified as a top candidate regulator. Islets from 17-week-old, but not 10-week-old, App knockout mice showed increased insulin secretion in response to glucose or a membrane-permeant cAMP analog, in agreement with the predictions of the network model. Our result provides a novel hypothesis on the mechanism for the connection between two aging-related diseases: Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes.

  13. dBRWD3 Regulates Tissue Overgrowth and Ectopic Gene Expression Caused by Polycomb Group Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Tzu Shih

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To maintain a particular cell fate, a unique set of genes should be expressed while another set is repressed. One way to repress gene expression is through Polycomb group (PcG proteins that compact chromatin into a silent configuration. In addition to cell fate maintenance, PcG proteins also maintain normal cell physiology, for example cell cycle. In the absence of PcG, ectopic activation of the PcG-repressed genes leads to developmental defects and malignant tumors. Little is known about the molecular nature of ectopic gene expression; especially what differentiates expression of a given gene in the orthotopic tissue (orthotopic expression and the ectopic expression of the same gene due to PcG mutations. Here we present that ectopic gene expression in PcG mutant cells specifically requires dBRWD3, a negative regulator of HIRA/Yemanuclein (YEM-mediated histone variant H3.3 deposition. dBRWD3 mutations suppress both the ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth in PcG mutants through a YEM-dependent mechanism. Our findings identified dBRWD3 as a critical regulator that is uniquely required for ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth caused by PcG mutations.

  14. Dynamic patterns of expression for genes regulating cytokinin metabolism and signaling during rice inflorescence development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamburenko, Maria V.; Kieber, Joseph J.

    2017-01-01

    Inflorescence development in cereals, including such important crops as rice, maize, and wheat, directly affects grain number and size and is a key determinant of yield. Cytokinin regulates meristem size and activity and, as a result, has profound effects on inflorescence development and architecture. To clarify the role of cytokinin action in inflorescence development, we used the NanoString nCounter system to analyze gene expression in the early stages of rice panicle development, focusing on 67 genes involved in cytokinin biosynthesis, degradation, and signaling. Results point toward key members of these gene families involved in panicle development and indicate that the expression of many genes involved in cytokinin action differs between the panicle and vegetative tissues. Dynamic patterns of gene expression suggest that subnetworks mediate cytokinin action during different stages of panicle development. The variation of expression during panicle development is greater among genes encoding proteins involved in cytokinin metabolism and negative regulators of the pathway than for the genes in the primary response pathway. These results provide insight into the expression patterns of genes involved in cytokinin action during inflorescence development in a crop of agricultural importance, with relevance to similar processes in other monocots. The identification of subnetworks of genes expressed at different stages of early panicle development suggests that manipulation of their expression could have substantial effects on inflorescence architecture. PMID:28419168

  15. Dynamic patterns of expression for genes regulating cytokinin metabolism and signaling during rice inflorescence development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V Yamburenko

    Full Text Available Inflorescence development in cereals, including such important crops as rice, maize, and wheat, directly affects grain number and size and is a key determinant of yield. Cytokinin regulates meristem size and activity and, as a result, has profound effects on inflorescence development and architecture. To clarify the role of cytokinin action in inflorescence development, we used the NanoString nCounter system to analyze gene expression in the early stages of rice panicle development, focusing on 67 genes involved in cytokinin biosynthesis, degradation, and signaling. Results point toward key members of these gene families involved in panicle development and indicate that the expression of many genes involved in cytokinin action differs between the panicle and vegetative tissues. Dynamic patterns of gene expression suggest that subnetworks mediate cytokinin action during different stages of panicle development. The variation of expression during panicle development is greater among genes encoding proteins involved in cytokinin metabolism and negative regulators of the pathway than for the genes in the primary response pathway. These results provide insight into the expression patterns of genes involved in cytokinin action during inflorescence development in a crop of agricultural importance, with relevance to similar processes in other monocots. The identification of subnetworks of genes expressed at different stages of early panicle development suggests that manipulation of their expression could have substantial effects on inflorescence architecture.

  16. Long-range regulation of alpha globin gene expression during erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Douglas R; Wood, William G

    2008-05-01

    The analysis of globin gene expression during erythropoiesis has established many principles underlying normal mammalian gene expression. New aspects of gene regulation have been revealed by natural mutations that downregulate globin gene expression and cause thalassemia. Deletions involving sequences upstream of the alpha and beta clusters suggested that the globin genes might be controlled by remote regulatory elements. This was demonstrated experimentally and suggested that many mammalian genes may be controlled in a similar manner. Completion of the Human Genome Project and the associated encyclopaedia of DNA elements (ENCODE) project confirmed that human gene expression is commonly controlled by long-range, cis-acting elements. The development of chromatin immunoprecipitation has allowed us to identify binding of transcription factors and chromatin modifications at the key cis-acting sequences in vivo. In addition, chromosome conformation capture has enabled us to address the topological models proposed to mediate long-range interactions. Together, these methods have given us some insight into how long-range elements may influence gene expression and how this process may be subverted in thalassemia. The review asks how remote elements regulate alpha globin expression and how natural mutations interfere with this mechanism to cause alpha thalassemia. We also speculate as to why long-range control of gene expression may have evolved in higher organisms.

  17. Dynamic patterns of expression for genes regulating cytokinin metabolism and signaling during rice inflorescence development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamburenko, Maria V; Kieber, Joseph J; Schaller, G Eric

    2017-01-01

    Inflorescence development in cereals, including such important crops as rice, maize, and wheat, directly affects grain number and size and is a key determinant of yield. Cytokinin regulates meristem size and activity and, as a result, has profound effects on inflorescence development and architecture. To clarify the role of cytokinin action in inflorescence development, we used the NanoString nCounter system to analyze gene expression in the early stages of rice panicle development, focusing on 67 genes involved in cytokinin biosynthesis, degradation, and signaling. Results point toward key members of these gene families involved in panicle development and indicate that the expression of many genes involved in cytokinin action differs between the panicle and vegetative tissues. Dynamic patterns of gene expression suggest that subnetworks mediate cytokinin action during different stages of panicle development. The variation of expression during panicle development is greater among genes encoding proteins involved in cytokinin metabolism and negative regulators of the pathway than for the genes in the primary response pathway. These results provide insight into the expression patterns of genes involved in cytokinin action during inflorescence development in a crop of agricultural importance, with relevance to similar processes in other monocots. The identification of subnetworks of genes expressed at different stages of early panicle development suggests that manipulation of their expression could have substantial effects on inflorescence architecture.

  18. Enhancer-core-promoter specificity separates developmental and housekeeping gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabidi, Muhammad A; Arnold, Cosmas D; Schernhuber, Katharina; Pagani, Michaela; Rath, Martina; Frank, Olga; Stark, Alexander

    2015-02-26

    Gene transcription in animals involves the assembly of RNA polymerase II at core promoters and its cell-type-specific activation by enhancers that can be located more distally. However, how ubiquitous expression of housekeeping genes is achieved has been less clear. In particular, it is unknown whether ubiquitously active enhancers exist and how developmental and housekeeping gene regulation is separated. An attractive hypothesis is that different core promoters might exhibit an intrinsic specificity to certain enhancers. This is conceivable, as various core promoter sequence elements are differentially distributed between genes of different functions, including elements that are predominantly found at either developmentally regulated or at housekeeping genes. Here we show that thousands of enhancers in Drosophila melanogaster S2 and ovarian somatic cells (OSCs) exhibit a marked specificity to one of two core promoters--one derived from a ubiquitously expressed ribosomal protein gene and another from a developmentally regulated transcription factor--and confirm the existence of these two classes for five additional core promoters from genes with diverse functions. Housekeeping enhancers are active across the two cell types, while developmental enhancers exhibit strong cell-type specificity. Both enhancer classes differ in their genomic distribution, the functions of neighbouring genes, and the core promoter elements of these neighbouring genes. In addition, we identify two transcription factors--Dref and Trl--that bind and activate housekeeping versus developmental enhancers, respectively. Our results provide evidence for a sequence-encoded enhancer-core-promoter specificity that separates developmental and housekeeping gene regulatory programs for thousands of enhancers and their target genes across the entire genome.

  19. Expression profiles of Fsh-regulated ovarian genes during oogenesis in coho salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, José M; Luckenbach, J Adam; Yamamoto, Yoji; Swanson, Penny

    2014-01-01

    The function of follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh) during oogenesis in fishes is poorly understood. Using coho salmon as a fish model, we recently identified a suite of genes regulated by Fsh in vitro and involved in ovarian processes mostly unexplored in fishes, like cell proliferation, differentiation, survival or extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. To better understand the role of these Fsh-regulated genes during oocyte growth in fishes, we characterized their mRNA levels at discrete stages of the ovarian development in coho salmon. While most of the transcripts were expressed at low levels during primary growth (perinucleolus stage), high expression of genes associated with cell proliferation (pim1, pcna, and mcm4) and survival (ddit4l) was found in follicles at this stage. The transition to secondary oocyte growth (cortical alveolus and lipid droplet stage ovarian follicles) was characterized by a marked increase in the expression of genes related to cell survival (clu1, clu2 and ivns1abpa). Expression of genes associated with cell differentiation and growth (wt2l and adh8l), growth factor signaling (inha), steroidogenesis (cyp19a1a) and the ECM (col1a1, col1a2 and dcn) peaked in vitellogenic follicles, showing a strong and positive correlation with transcripts for fshr. Other genes regulated by Fsh and associated with ECM function (ctgf, wapl and fn1) and growth factor signaling (bmp16 and smad5l) peaked in maturing follicles, along with increases in steroidogenesis-related gene transcripts. In conclusion, ovarian genes regulated by Fsh showed marked differences in their expression patterns during oogenesis in coho salmon. Our results suggest that Fsh regulates different ovarian processes at specific stages of development, likely through interaction with other intra- or extra-ovarian factors.

  20. Expression Profiles of Fsh-Regulated Ovarian Genes during Oogenesis in Coho Salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, José M.; Luckenbach, J. Adam; Yamamoto, Yoji; Swanson, Penny

    2014-01-01

    The function of follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh) during oogenesis in fishes is poorly understood. Using coho salmon as a fish model, we recently identified a suite of genes regulated by Fsh in vitro and involved in ovarian processes mostly unexplored in fishes, like cell proliferation, differentiation, survival or extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. To better understand the role of these Fsh-regulated genes during oocyte growth in fishes, we characterized their mRNA levels at discrete stages of the ovarian development in coho salmon. While most of the transcripts were expressed at low levels during primary growth (perinucleolus stage), high expression of genes associated with cell proliferation (pim1, pcna, and mcm4) and survival (ddit4l) was found in follicles at this stage. The transition to secondary oocyte growth (cortical alveolus and lipid droplet stage ovarian follicles) was characterized by a marked increase in the expression of genes related to cell survival (clu1, clu2 and ivns1abpa). Expression of genes associated with cell differentiation and growth (wt2l and adh8l), growth factor signaling (inha), steroidogenesis (cyp19a1a) and the ECM (col1a1, col1a2 and dcn) peaked in vitellogenic follicles, showing a strong and positive correlation with transcripts for fshr. Other genes regulated by Fsh and associated with ECM function (ctgf, wapl and fn1) and growth factor signaling (bmp16 and smad5l) peaked in maturing follicles, along with increases in steroidogenesis-related gene transcripts. In conclusion, ovarian genes regulated by Fsh showed marked differences in their expression patterns during oogenesis in coho salmon. Our results suggest that Fsh regulates different ovarian processes at specific stages of development, likely through interaction with other intra- or extra-ovarian factors. PMID:25485989

  1. A compendium of antibiotic-induced transcription profiles reveals broad regulation of Pasteurella multocida virulence genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikow, E; Schoenfeld, C; Spehr, V; Warrass, R; Gunkel, N; Duszenko, M; Selzer, P M; Ullrich, H J

    2008-10-15

    The transcriptional responses of Pasteurella multocida to eight antibiotics with known mode of actions (MoAs) and one novel antibiotic compound with an unknown MoA were collected to create a compendium of transcriptional profiles for MoA studies. At minimal inhibitory concentration the three bactericidal compounds enrofloxacin, cefquinome and the novel compound had a minor impact on gene regulation with approximately 1% of the P. multocida genome affected, whilst the bacteriostatic compounds florfenicol, tilmicosin, rifampin, trimethoprim and brodimoprim regulated 20% of the genome. Novobiocin was special in that it regulated 40% of all P. multocida genes. Regulation of target genes was observed for novobiocin, rifampin, florfenicol and tilmicosin and signature genes were identified for most antibiotics. The transcriptional profile induced by the novel compound was unrelated to the compendium profiles suggesting a new MoA. The transcription of many P. multocida virulence factors, particularly genes involved in capsule synthesis and export, LPS synthesis, competence, adherence and iron transport were altered in the presence of antibiotics. Virulence gene transcription was mainly negatively affected, however the opposite effect was also observed in the case of rifampin where the up-regulation of the tad locus involved in tight adherence was seen. Novobiocin and trimethoprim caused a marked reduction in the transcription of capsule genes, which correlated with a concomitant reduction of the capsular layer on the surface of P. multocida. The broad negative impact on virulence gene transcription supports the notion that the therapeutic effect of some antibiotics could be a combination of growth and virulence inhibition.

  2. Epigenome mapping highlights chromatin-mediated gene regulation in the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min-Ji; Kim, Mikyoung; Choi, Yeeun; Yi, Myung-hee; Kim, Juri; Park, Soon-Jung; Yong, Tai-Soon; Kim, Hyoung-Pyo

    2017-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular flagellated protozoan parasite that causes trichomoniasis, one of the most common non-viral sexually transmitted diseases. To survive and to maintain infection, T. vaginalis adapts to a hostile host environment by regulating gene expression. However, the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation are poorly understood for this parasite. Histone modification has a marked effect on chromatin structure and directs the recruitment of transcriptional machinery, thereby regulating essential cellular processes. In this study, we aimed to outline modes of chromatin-mediated gene regulation in T. vaginalis. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) alters global transcriptional responses and induces hyperacetylation of histones and hypermethylation of H3K4. Analysis of the genome of T. vaginalis revealed that a number of enzymes regulate histone modification, suggesting that epigenetic mechanisms are important to controlling gene expression in this organism. Additionally, we describe the genome-wide localization of two histone H3 modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K27Ac), which we found to be positively associated with active gene expression in both steady and dynamic transcriptional states. These results provide the first direct evidence that histone modifications play an essential role in transcriptional regulation of T. vaginalis, and may help guide future epigenetic research into therapeutic intervention strategies against this parasite. PMID:28345651

  3. Epigenome mapping highlights chromatin-mediated gene regulation in the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min-Ji; Kim, Mikyoung; Choi, Yeeun; Yi, Myung-Hee; Kim, Juri; Park, Soon-Jung; Yong, Tai-Soon; Kim, Hyoung-Pyo

    2017-03-27

    Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular flagellated protozoan parasite that causes trichomoniasis, one of the most common non-viral sexually transmitted diseases. To survive and to maintain infection, T. vaginalis adapts to a hostile host environment by regulating gene expression. However, the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation are poorly understood for this parasite. Histone modification has a marked effect on chromatin structure and directs the recruitment of transcriptional machinery, thereby regulating essential cellular processes. In this study, we aimed to outline modes of chromatin-mediated gene regulation in T. vaginalis. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) alters global transcriptional responses and induces hyperacetylation of histones and hypermethylation of H3K4. Analysis of the genome of T. vaginalis revealed that a number of enzymes regulate histone modification, suggesting that epigenetic mechanisms are important to controlling gene expression in this organism. Additionally, we describe the genome-wide localization of two histone H3 modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K27Ac), which we found to be positively associated with active gene expression in both steady and dynamic transcriptional states. These results provide the first direct evidence that histone modifications play an essential role in transcriptional regulation of T. vaginalis, and may help guide future epigenetic research into therapeutic intervention strategies against this parasite.

  4. Candida albicans response regulator gene SSK1 regulates a subset of genes whose functions are associated with cell wall biosynthesis and adaptation to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Neeraj; Inglis, Diane; Roman, Elvira; Pla, Jesus; Li, Dongmei; Calera, Jose A; Calderone, Richard

    2003-10-01

    Ssk1p of Candida albicans is a putative response regulator protein of the Hog1 two-component signal transduction system. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the phosphorylation state of Ssk1p determines whether genes that promote the adaptation of cells to osmotic stress are activated. We have previously shown that C. albicans SSK1 does not complement the ssk1 mutant of S. cerevisiae and that the ssk1 mutant of C. albicans is not sensitive to sorbitol. In this study, we show that the C. albicans ssk1 mutant is sensitive to several oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide, t-butyl hydroperoxide, menadione, and potassium superoxide when each is incorporated in yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) agar medium. We used DNA microarrays to identify genes whose regulation is affected by the ssk1 mutation. RNA from mutant cells (strain CSSK21) grown in YPD medium for 3 h at 30 degrees C was reverse transcribed and then compared with similarly prepared RNA from wild-type cells (CAF2). We observed seven genes from mutant cells that were consistently up regulated (three-fold or greater compared to CAF2). In S. cerevisiae, three (AHP1, HSP12, and PYC2) of the seven genes that were up regulated provide cells with an adaptation function in response to oxidative stress; another gene (GPH1) is regulated under stress conditions by Hog1p. Three other genes that are up regulated encode a cell surface protein (FLO1), a mannosyl transferase (MNN4-4), and a putative two-component histidine kinase (CHK1) that regulates cell wall biosynthesis in C. albicans. Of the down-regulated genes, ALS1 is a known cell adhesin in C. albicans. Verification of the microarray data was obtained by reverse transcription-PCR for HSP12, AHP1, CHK1, PYC2, GPH1, ALS1, MNN4-4, and FLO1. To further determine the function of Ssk1p in the Hog1p signal transduction pathway in C. albicans, we used Western blot analysis to measure phosphorylation of Hog1p in the ssk1 mutant of C. albicans when grown under either osmotic or

  5. Key gene regulating cell wall biosynthesis and recalcitrance in Populus, gene Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jay; Engle, Nancy; Gunter, Lee E.; Jawdy, Sara; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2015-12-08

    This disclosure provides methods and transgenic plants for improved production of renewable biofuels and other plant-derived biomaterials by altering the expression and/or activity of Gene Y, an O-acetyltransferase. This disclosure also provides expression vectors containing a nucleic acid (Gene Y) which encodes the polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 1 and is operably linked to a heterologous promoter.

  6. Inducible gene expression and environmentally regulated genes in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jan

    1996-01-01

    Relatively recently, a number of genes and operons have been identified in lactic acid bacteria that are inducible and respond to environmental factors. Some of these genes/operons had been isolated and analysed because of their importance in the fermentation industry and, consequently, their

  7. MDM2 negatively regulates the human telomerase RNA gene promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith W Nicol

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously demonstrated that NF-Y and Sp1 interact with the human telomerase RNA (hTR promoter and play a central role in its regulation. We have also shown that pRB activates the hTR promoter, but the mechanism of pRb directed activation is unknown. It has recently been reported that pRB induces Sp1 activity by relieving inhibition mediated by mdm2. The aim was to investigate possible roles for mdm2 in hTR promoter regulation. Methods Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to determine binding of mdm2 to the hTR promoter. Transfection and luciferase assays were used to investigate mdm2 repression of the promoter activity and interaction with known transcriptional modulators. Results Here we show using chromatin immunoprecipitation that mdm2 specifically binds the hTR promoter in vivo. Transient co-transfection experiments using an hTR promoter luciferase reporter construct show that hTR promoter activity is inhibited by over-expression of mdm2 in 5637 bladder carcinoma cells (p53 and pRB negative, low mdm2. Titration of mdm2 was able to antagonise activation of hTR promoter activity mediated by pRB or Sp1 over-expression, although in the presence of pRB, mdm2 could not repress promoter activity below basal levels. Using an Sp1 binding site mutation construct we showed that mdm2 repression did not absolutely require Sp1 binding sites in the hTR promoter, suggesting the possibility of pRB/Sp1 independent mechanisms of repression. Finally, we show that NF-Y mediated transactivation of the hTR promoter was also suppressed by mdm2 in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions These studies suggest that mdm2 may inhibit the hTR promoter by multiple mechanisms. Mdm2 may directly repress activation by both pRB and Sp1, or activation by NF-Y. Furthermore, the ability of mdm2 to interact and interfere with components of the general transcription machinery might partly explain the general repressive effect seen here. Elucidation of

  8. [Two Elovl5-like elongase genes in Cyprinus carpio var. Jian: Gene characterization, mRNA expression, and nutritional regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, H-T; Huang, Y; Tang, Y-K; Yu, J-H; Xu, P

    2015-01-01

    Elovl5 elongase is a critical enzyme involved in the highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA) biosynthesis. There is very little information on the evolution and functional characterization of Elovl5-a and Elovl5-b genes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). In the present study, the genomic sequences and structures of two putative Elovl5-like elongase genes in the common carp genome were obtained. The mRNA expression patterns of Elovl5-a and Elovl5-b in tissues, hatching carp embryos, and juveniles under nutritional regulation were investigated. The results show that the two Elovl5 elongase genes have similar organization, coding 8 exons of high identity and introns of distinct size and sequence composition. They are not allelic variants of a single gene. Both Elovl5 elongase genes are highly expressed in liver, intestine (pyloric caeca) and brain. Elovl5-a and Elovl5-b mRNAs showed increased expression from newly hatched to 20 days after hatching. The regulation of Elovl5-a and Elovl5-b in response to dietary fatty acid composition was determined in liver, brain and intestine (pyloric caeca) of common carp fed with diets: (i) fish oil (FO) rich in n-3 HUFA, (ii) corn oil (CO, 18:2n-6) or (iii) linseed oil (LO, 18:3n-3). Also the differential expression of Elovl5-a and Elovl5-b genes in liver, brain and intestine in common carps fed with different oil sources was studied. Further work aimed at the determination of the mechanisms of differential expression of the Elovl5-a and Elovl5-b in different tissues and the roles of transcription factors in regulating HUFA synthesis is in progress.

  9. DNA context represents transcription regulation of the gene in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Misook; Hong, Soondo

    2016-04-01

    Understanding gene regulatory information in DNA remains a significant challenge in biomedical research. This study presents a computational approach to infer gene regulatory programs from primary DNA sequences. Using DNA around transcription start sites as attributes, our model predicts gene regulation in the gene. We find that H3K27ac around TSS is an informative descriptor of the transcription program in mouse embryonic stem cells. We build a computational model inferring the cell-type-specific H3K27ac signatures in the DNA around TSS. A comparison of embryonic stem cell and liver cell-specific H3K27ac signatures in DNA shows that the H3K27ac signatures in DNA around TSS efficiently distinguish the cell-type specific H3K27ac peaks and the gene regulation. The arrangement of the H3K27ac signatures inferred from the DNA represents the transcription regulation of the gene in mESC. We show that the DNA around transcription start sites is associated with the gene regulatory program by specific interaction with H3K27ac.

  10. Orphan nuclear receptor ERRγ is a key regulator of human fibrinogen gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lu, Yan; Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-min; Kim, Young-Hoon; Lee, Yong Soo; Kim, Jina; Dewidar, Bedair; Jeong, Won-IL; Lee, In-Kyu; Cho, Sung Jin; Dooley, Steven; Lee, Chul-Ho; Li, Xiaoying

    2017-01-01

    Fibrinogen, 1 of 13 coagulation factors responsible for normal blood clotting, is synthesized by hepatocytes. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating fibrinogen gene expression have not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we identified estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) as a novel transcriptional regulator of human fibrinogen gene expression. Overexpression of ERRγ specially increased fibrinogen expression in human hepatoma cell line. Cannabinoid receptor types 1(CB1R) agonist arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) up-regulated transcription of fibrinogen via induction of ERRγ, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated fibrinogen expression. Deletion analyses of the fibrinogen γ (FGG) gene promoter and ChIP assays revealed binding sites of ERRγ on human fibrinogen γ gene promoter. Moreover, overexpression of ERRγ was sufficient to increase fibrinogen gene expression, whereas treatment with GSK5182, a selective inverse agonist of ERRγ led to its attenuation in cell culture. Finally, fibrinogen and ERRγ gene expression were elevated in liver tissue of obese patients suggesting a conservation of this mechanism. Overall, this study elucidates a molecular mechanism linking CB1R signaling, ERRγ expression and fibrinogen gene transcription. GSK5182 may have therapeutic potential to treat hyperfibrinogenemia. PMID:28750085

  11. Genetics and evolution of MIXTA genes regulating cotton lint fiber development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huaitong; Tian, Yue; Wan, Qun; Fang, Lei; Guan, Xueying; Chen, Jiedan; Hu, Yan; Ye, Wenxue; Zhang, Hua; Guo, Wangzhen; Chen, Xiaoya; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2017-10-16

    Cotton, with cellulose-enriched mature fibers, is the largest source of natural textiles. Through a map-based cloning strategy, we isolated an industrially important lint fiber development gene (Li3 ) that encodes an MYB-MIXTA-like transcription factor (MML) on chromosome D12 (GhMML4_D12). Virus-induced gene silencing or decreasing the expression of the GhMML4_D12 gene in n2 NSM plants resulted in a significant reduction in epidermal cell prominence and lint fiber production. GhMML4_D12 is arranged in tandem with GhMML3, another MIXTA gene responsible for fuzz fiber development. These two very closely related MIXTA genes direct fiber initiation production in two specialized cell forms: lint and fuzz fibers. They may control the same metabolic pathways in different cell types. The MIXTAs expanded in Malvaceae during their evolution and produced a Malvaceae-specific family that regulates epidermal cell differentiation, different from the gene family that regulates leaf hair trichome development. Cotton has developed a unique transcriptional regulatory network for fiber development. Characterization of target genes regulating fiber production has provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying cotton fiber development and has allowed the use of genetic engineering to increase lint yield by inducing more epidermal cells to develop into lint rather than fuzz fibers. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Multi-dimensional histone methylations for coordinated regulation of gene expression under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seongyeol; Lee, Jieon; Chae, Sehyun; Moon, Yunwon; Lee, Ho-Youl; Park, Bongju; Yang, Eun Gyeong; Hwang, Daehee; Park, Hyunsung

    2017-11-16

    Hypoxia increases both active and repressive histone methylation levels via decreased activity of histone demethylases. However, how such increases coordinately regulate induction or repression of hypoxia-responsive genes is largely unknown. Here, we profiled active and repressive histone tri-methylations (H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and H3K27me3) and analyzed gene expression profiles in human adipocyte-derived stem cells under hypoxia. We identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and differentially methylated genes (DMGs) by hypoxia and clustered the DEGs and DMGs into four major groups. We found that each group of DEGs was predominantly associated with alterations in only one type among the three histone tri-methylations. Moreover, the four groups of DEGs were associated with different TFs and localization patterns of their predominant types of H3K4me3, H3K9me3 and H3K27me3. Our results suggest that the association of altered gene expression with prominent single-type histone tri-methylations characterized by different localization patterns and with different sets of TFs contributes to regulation of particular sets of genes, which can serve as a model for coordinated epigenetic regulation of gene expression under hypoxia. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Eos negatively regulates human γ-globin gene transcription during erythroid differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Chuan Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human globin gene expression is precisely regulated by a complicated network of transcription factors and chromatin modifying activities during development and erythropoiesis. Eos (Ikaros family zinc finger 4, IKZF4, a member of the zinc finger transcription factor Ikaros family, plays a pivotal role as a repressor of gene expression. The aim of this study was to examine the role of Eos in globin gene regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR detected a gradual decrease in Eos expression during erythroid differentiation of hemin-induced K562 cells and Epo-induced CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HPCs. DNA transfection and lentivirus-mediated gene transfer demonstrated that the enforced expression of Eos significantly represses the expression of γ-globin, but not other globin genes, in K562 cells and CD34+ HPCs. Consistent with a direct role of Eos in globin gene regulation, chromatin immunoprecipitaion and dual-luciferase reporter assays identified three discrete sites located in the DNase I hypersensitivity site 3 (HS3 of the β-globin locus control region (LCR, the promoter regions of the Gγ- and Aγ- globin genes, as functional binding sites of Eos protein. A chromosome conformation capture (3C assay indicated that Eos may repress the interaction between the LCR and the γ-globin gene promoter. In addition, erythroid differentiation was inhibited by enforced expression of Eos in K562 cells and CD34+ HPCs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that Eos plays an important role in the transcriptional regulation of the γ-globin gene during erythroid differentiation.

  14. Computational characterization of modes of transcriptional regulation of nuclear receptor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Yogita; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Bakke, Marit; Lenhard, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are a large structural class of transcription factors that act with their co-regulators and repressors to maintain a variety of biological and physiological processes such as metabolism, development and reproduction. They are activated through the binding of small ligands, which can be replaced by drug molecules, making nuclear receptors promising drug targets. Transcriptional regulation of the genes that encode them is central to gaining a deeper understanding of the diversity of their biochemical and biophysical roles and their role in disease and therapy. Even though they share evolutionary history, nuclear receptor genes have fundamentally different expression patterns, ranging from ubiquitously expressed to tissue-specific and spatiotemporally complex. However, current understanding of regulation in nuclear receptor gene family is still nascent. In this study, we investigate the relationship between long-range regulation of nuclear receptor family and their known functionality. Towards this goal, we identify the nuclear receptor genes that are potential targets based on counts of highly conserved non-coding elements. We validate our results using publicly available expression (RNA-seq) and histone modification (ChIP-seq) data from the ENCODE project. We find that nuclear receptor genes involved in developmental roles show strong evidence of long-range mechanism of transcription regulation with distinct cis-regulatory content they feature clusters of highly conserved non-coding elements distributed in regions spanning several Megabases, long and multiple CpG islands, bivalent promoter marks and statistically significant higher enrichment of enhancer mark around their gene loci. On the other hand nuclear receptor genes that are involved in tissue-specific roles lack these features, having simple transcriptional controls and a greater variety of mechanisms for producing paralogs. We further examine the combinatorial patterns of histone maps

  15. Computational characterization of modes of transcriptional regulation of nuclear receptor genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogita Sharma

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptors are a large structural class of transcription factors that act with their co-regulators and repressors to maintain a variety of biological and physiological processes such as metabolism, development and reproduction. They are activated through the binding of small ligands, which can be replaced by drug molecules, making nuclear receptors promising drug targets. Transcriptional regulation of the genes that encode them is central to gaining a deeper understanding of the diversity of their biochemical and biophysical roles and their role in disease and therapy. Even though they share evolutionary history, nuclear receptor genes have fundamentally different expression patterns, ranging from ubiquitously expressed to tissue-specific and spatiotemporally complex. However, current understanding of regulation in nuclear receptor gene family is still nascent.In this study, we investigate the relationship between long-range regulation of nuclear receptor family and their known functionality. Towards this goal, we identify the nuclear receptor genes that are potential targets based on counts of highly conserved non-coding elements. We validate our results using publicly available expression (RNA-seq and histone modification (ChIP-seq data from the ENCODE project. We find that nuclear receptor genes involved in developmental roles show strong evidence of long-range mechanism of transcription regulation with distinct cis-regulatory content they feature clusters of highly conserved non-coding elements distributed in regions spanning several Megabases, long and multiple CpG islands, bivalent promoter marks and statistically significant higher enrichment of enhancer mark around their gene loci. On the other hand nuclear receptor genes that are involved in tissue-specific roles lack these features, having simple transcriptional controls and a greater variety of mechanisms for producing paralogs. We further examine the combinatorial patterns of

  16. Genetic and epigenetic regulation of human lincRNA gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popadin, Konstantin; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2013-12-05

    Large intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are still poorly functionally characterized. We analyzed the genetic and epigenetic regulation of human lincRNA expression in the GenCord collection by using three cell types from 195 unrelated European individuals. We detected a considerable number of cis expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTLs) and demonstrated that the genetic regulation of lincRNA expression is independent of the regulation of neighboring protein-coding genes. lincRNAs have relatively more cis-eQTLs than do equally expressed protein-coding genes with the same exon number. lincRNA cis-eQTLs are located closer to transcription start sites (TSSs) and their effect sizes are higher than cis-eQTLs found for protein-coding genes, suggesting that lincRNA expression levels are less constrained than that of protein-coding genes. Additionally, lincRNA cis-eQTLs can influence the expression level of nearby protein-coding genes and thus could be considered as QTLs for enhancer activity. Enrichment of expressed lincRNA promoters in enhancer marks provides an additional argument for the involvement of lincRNAs in the regulation of transcription in cis. By investigating the epigenetic regulation of lincRNAs, we observed both positive and negative correlations between DNA methylation and gene expression (expression quantitative trait methylation [eQTMs]), as expected, and found that the landscapes of passive and active roles of DNA methylation in gene regulation are similar to protein-coding genes. However, lincRNA eQTMs are located closer to TSSs than are protein-coding gene eQTMs. These similarities and differences in genetic and epigenetic regulation between lincRNAs and protein-coding genes contribute to the elucidation of potential functions of lincRNAs. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Regulation, overexpression, and target gene identification of Potato Homeobox 15 (POTH15) ? a class-I KNOX gene in potato

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan, Ameya S.; Kondhare, Kirtikumar R.; Rajabhoj, Mohit P.; Kumar, Amit; Ghate, Tejashree; Ravindran, Nevedha; Habib, Farhat; Siddappa, Sundaresha; Banerjee, Anjan K.

    2016-01-01

    Potato Homeobox 15 (POTH15) is a KNOX-I (Knotted1-like homeobox) family gene in potato that is orthologous to Shoot Meristemless (STM) in Arabidopsis. Despite numerous reports on KNOX genes from different species, studies in potato are limited. Here, we describe photoperiodic regulation of POTH15, its overexpression phenotype, and identification of its potential targets in potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp. andigena). qRT-PCR analysis showed a higher abundance of POTH15 mRNA in shoot tips and sto...

  18. A hierarchy of ECM-mediated signalling tissue-specific gene expression regulates tissue-specific gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskelley, Calvin D; Srebrow, Anabella; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-10-07

    A dynamic and reciprocal flow of information between cells and the extracellular matrix contributes significantly to the regulation of form and function in developing systems. Signals generated by the extracellular matrix do not act in isolation. Instead, they are processed within the context of global signalling hierarchies whose constituent inputs and outputs are constantly modulated by all the factors present in the cell's surrounding microenvironment. This is particularly evident in the mammary gland, where the construction and subsequent destruction of such a hierarchy regulates changes in tissue-specific gene expression, morphogenesis and apoptosis during each developmental cycle of pregnancy, lactation and involution.

  19. Computing and Applying Atomic Regulons to Understand Gene Expression and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pedro Faria

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding gene function and regulation is essential for the interpretation prediction and ultimate design of cell responses to changes in the environment. An important step toward meeting the challenge of understanding gene function and regulation is the identification of sets of genes that are always co-expressed. These gene sets Atomic Regulons ARs represent fundamental units of function within a cell and could be used to associate genes of unknown function with cellular processes and to enable rational genetic engineering of cellular systems. Here we describe an approach for inferring ARs that leverages large-scale expression data sets gene context and functional relationships among genes. We computed ARs for Escherichia coli based on 907 gene expression experiments and compared our results with gene clusters produced by two prevalent data-driven methods: hierarchical clustering and k-means clustering. We compared ARs and purely data-driven gene clusters to the curated set of regulatory interactions for E. coli found in RegulonDB showing that ARs are more consistent with gold standard regulons than are data-driven gene clusters. We further examined the consistency of ARs and data-driven gene clusters in the context of gene interactions predicted by Context Likelihood of Relatedness CLR analysis finding that the ARs show better agreement with CLR predicted interactions. We determined the impact of increasing amounts of expression data on AR construction and find that while more data improve ARs it is not necessary to use the full set of gene expression experiments available for E. coli to produce high quality ARs. In order to explore the conservation of co-regulated gene sets across different organisms we computed ARs for Shewanella oneidensis Pseudomonas aeruginosa Thermus thermophilus and Staphylococcus aureus each of which represents increasing degrees of phylogenetic distance from E. coli. Comparison of the organism-specific ARs showed

  20. Studying Individual Plant AOX Gene Functionality in Early Growth Regulation: A New Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit; Patil, Vinod Kumar

    2017-01-01

    AOX1 and AOX2 genes are thought to play different physiological roles. Whereas AOX1 is typically expected to associate to stress and growth responses, AOX2 was more often found to be linked to development and housekeeping functions. However, this view is questioned by several adverse observations. For example, co-regulated expression for DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a genes was recently reported during growth induction in carrot (Daucus carota L.). Early expression peaks for both genes during the lag phase of growth coincided with a critical time point for biomass prediction, a result achieved by applying calorespirometry. The effect of both AOX family member genes cannot easily be separated. However, separate functional analysis is required in order to identify important gene-specific polymorphisms or patterns of polymorphisms for functional marker development and its use in breeding. Specifically, a methodology is missing that enables studying functional effects of individual genes or polymorphisms/polymorphic patterns on early growth regulation.This protocol aims to provide the means for identifying plant alternative oxidase (AOX) gene variants as functional markers for early growth regulation. Prerequisite for applying this protocol is available Schizosaccharomyces pombe strains that were transformed with individual AOX genes following published protocols from Anthony Moore's group (Albury et al., J Biol Chem 271:17062-17066, 1996; Affourtit et al., J Biol Chem 274:6212-6218, 1999). The novelty of the present protocol comes by modifying yeast cell densities in a way that allows studying critical qualitative and quantitative effects of AOX gene variants (isoenzymes or polymorphic genes) during the early phase of growth. Calorimetry is used as a novel tool to confirm differences obtained by optical density measurements in early growth regulation by metabolic phenotyping (released heat rates). This protocol enables discriminating between AOX genes that inhibit growth and

  1. Transcription factors from Sox family regulate expression of zebrafish Gla-rich protein 2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazenda, C; Conceição, N; Cancela, M L

    2015-11-01

    GRP is a vitamin K-dependent protein with orthologs in all vertebrate taxonomic groups and two paralogs in teleosts. However, no data is available about GRP transcriptional gene regulation. We report a functional promoter for zebrafish grp2 gene regulated by Sox9b, Sox10, Ets1 and Mef2ca as determined by in vitro assays. This was confirmed in vivo for Sox9b and Sox10. Due to the high conservation between human GRP and grp2, its zebrafish ortholog, our results are relevant for the study of human GRP gene regulation and provide new insights towards understanding GRP function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulation of chromatin organization and inducible gene expression by a Drosophila insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ashley M.; Van Bortle, Kevin; Ramos, Edward; Takenaka, Naomi; Rohrbaugh, Margaret; Jones, Brian C.; Jones, Keith C.; Corces, Victor G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Insulators are multi-protein-DNA complexes thought to affect gene expression by mediating inter- and intra-chromosomal interactions. Drosophila insulators contain specific DNA binding proteins plus common components, such as CP190, that facilitate these interactions. Here we examine changes in the distribution of Drosophila insulator proteins during the heat-shock and ecdysone responses. We find that CP190 recruitment to insulator sites is the main regulatable step in controlling insulator function during heat shock. In contrast, both CP190 and DNA binding protein recruitment are regulated during the ecdysone response. CP190 is necessary to stabilize specific chromatin loops and for proper activation of transcription of genes regulated by this hormone. These findings suggest that cells may regulate recruitment of insulator proteins to the DNA in order to activate insulator activity at specific sites and create distinct patterns of nuclear organization that are necessary to achieve proper gene expression in response to different stimuli. PMID:21981916

  3. Molecular characterization and transcriptional regulation of the renin-angiotensin system genes in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858): differential gene regulation by salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armesto, Paula; Cousin, Xavier; Salas-Leiton, Emilio; Asensio, Esther; Manchado, Manuel; Infante, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the complete cDNA sequence encoding angiotensinogen (agt) in the euryhaline flatfish Senegalese sole was obtained. Additionally, putative coding sequences belonging to other renin-angiotensin system (RAS) genes including renin (ren), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ace), angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ace2), as well as angiotensin II receptor type I (agtr1) and type II (agtr2), were also identified. In juvenile tissues, agt transcripts were mainly detected in liver, ren in kidney, ace and ace2 in intestine, agtr1 in kidney and brain, and agtr2 in liver and kidney. Expression analysis of the six RAS genes after a salinity shift revealed a clear increase of agt mRNA abundance in liver just after transferring soles to high salinity water (60 ppt) with a peak at 48 h. Moreover, gene expression analysis in gills showed transcriptional regulation of ace and agtr1 at 48 h and agtr2 at 96 h after transferring soles to 60 ppt. Incubation of larvae before mouth opening (until 3 days post hatch; dph) at low salinity (10 ppt) resulted in a coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of RAS genes. Nevertheless, no differences in mRNA abundance between salinities were observed when larvae were cultivated to low salinity after mouth opening. Whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) signal for agt and ace in 3 dph larvae incubated at 10 ppt and 35 ppt confirmed that the former gene was mainly expressed in liver whereas the later gene was mainly located in pharynx and posterior gut, without pronounced differences in intensity between salinities. Possible physiological significance of all these results is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulation of gene expression with thyroid hormone in rats with myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Feng Chen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The expression of hundreds of genes is altered in response to left ventricular (LV remodeling following large transmural myocardial infarction (MI. Thyroid hormone (TH improves LV remodeling and cardiac performance after MI. However, the molecular basis is unknown. METHODS: MI was produced by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in female SD rats. Rats were divided into the following groups: (1 Sham MI, (2 MI, and (3 MI+T4 treatment (T4 pellet 3.3 mg, 60 days release, implanted subcutaneously immediately following MI. Four weeks after surgery, total RNA was isolated from LV non-infarcted areas for microarray analysis using the Illumina RatRef-12 Expression BeadChip Platform. RESULTS: Signals were detected in 13,188 genes (out of 22,523, of which the expression of 154 genes were decreased and the expression of 200 genes were increased in MI rats compared with Sham MI rats (false discovery rate (FDR <0.05. Compared to MI rats, T4 treatment decreased expression of 27 genes and increased expression of 28 genes. In particular, 6 genes down-regulated by MI and 12 genes up-regulated by MI were reversed by T4. Most of the 55 genes altered by T4 treatment are in the category of molecular function under binding (24 and biological processes which includes immune system process (9, multi-organism process (5 and biological regulation (19 nonexclusively. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that altered expression of genes for molecular function and biological process may be involved in the beneficial effects of thyroid hormone treatment following MI in rats.

  5. Downstream of identity genes: muscle-type-specific regulation of the fusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataillé, Laetitia; Delon, Isabelle; Da Ponte, Jean Philippe; Brown, Nicholas H; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2010-08-17

    In all metazoan organisms, the diversification of cell types involves determination of cell fates and subsequent execution of specific differentiation programs. During Drosophila myogenesis, identity genes specify the fates of founder myoblasts, from which derive all individual larval muscles. Here, to understand how cell fate information residing within founders is translated during differentiation, we focus on three identity genes, eve, lb, and slou, and how they control the size of individual muscles by regulating the number of fusion events. They achieve this by setting expression levels of Mp20, Pax, and mspo, three genes that regulate actin dynamics and cell adhesion and, as we show here, modulate the fusion process in a muscle-specific manner. Thus, these data show how the identity information implemented by transcription factors is translated via target genes into cell-type-specific programs of differentiation. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Microarray Analysis on Gene Regulation by Estrogen, Progesterone and Tamoxifen in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-E Ren

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial stromal cells represent a major cellular component of human uterine endometrium that is subject to tight hormonal regulation. Through cell-cell contacts and/or paracrine mechanisms, stromal cells play a significant role in the malignant transformation of epithelial cells. We isolated stromal cells from normal human endometrium and investigated the morphological and transcriptional changes induced by estrogen, progesterone and tamoxifen. We demonstrated that stromal cells express appreciable levels of estrogen and progesterone receptors and undergo different morphological changes upon hormonal stimulation. Microarray analysis indicated that both estrogen and progesterone induced dramatic alterations in a variety of genes associated with cell structure, transcription, cell cycle, and signaling. However, divergent patterns of changes, and in some genes opposite effects, were observed for the two hormones. A large number of genes are identified as novel targets for hormonal regulation. These hormone-responsive genes may be involved in normal uterine function and the development of endometrial malignancies.

  7. URC Fuzzy Modeling and Simulation of Gene Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokhansanj, B A; Fitch, J P

    2001-05-01

    Recent technological advances in high-throughput data collection give biologists the ability to study increasingly complex systems. A new methodology is needed to develop and test biological models based on experimental observations and predict the effect of perturbations of the network (e.g. genetic engineering, pharmaceuticals, gene therapy). Diverse modeling approaches have been proposed, in two general categories: modeling a biological pathway as (a) a logical circuit or (b) a chemical reaction network. Boolean logic models can not represent necessary biological details. Chemical kinetics simulations require large numbers of parameters that are very difficult to accurately measure. Based on the way biologists have traditionally thought about systems, we propose that fuzzy logic is a natural language for modeling biology. The Union Rule Configuration (URC) avoids combinatorial explosion in the fuzzy rule base, allowing complex system models. We demonstrate the fuzzy modeling method on the commonly studied lac operon of E. coli. Our goal is to develop a modeling and simulation approach that can be understood and applied by biologists without the need for experts in other fields or ''black-box'' software.

  8. Bacterial expression system with tightly regulated gene expression and plasmid copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Lisa M; Lapoint, Kathleen; Anthony, Larry; Pluciennik, Anna; Filutowicz, Marcin

    2004-09-29

    A new Escherichia coli host/vector system has been engineered to allow tight and uniform modulation of gene expression and gamma origin (ori) plasmid copy number. Regulation of gamma ori plasmid copy number is achieved through arabinose-inducible expression of the necessary Rep protein, pi, whose gene was integrated into the chromosome of the host strain under control of the P(BAD) promoter. gamma ori replication can be uniformly modulated over 100-fold by changing the concentration of l-arabinose in the growth medium. This strain avoids the problem of all-or-nothing induction of P(BAD) because it is deficient in both arabinose uptake and degradation genes. Arabinose enters the cell by a mutant LacY transporter, LacYA177C, which is expressed from the host chromosome. Although this strain could be compatible with any gamma ori plasmid, we describe the utility of a gamma ori expression vector that allows especially tight regulation of gene expression. With this host/vector system, it is possible to independently modulate gene expression and gene dosage, facilitating the cloning and overproduction of toxic gene products. We describe the successful use of this system for cloning a highly potent toxin, Colicin E3, in the absence of its cognate immunity protein. This system could be useful for cloning genes encoding other potent toxins, screening libraries for potential toxins, and maintaining any gamma ori vector at precise copy levels in a cell.

  9. Unraveling the evolution and regulation of the alternative oxidase gene family in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xiao-jun; Lv, Xin; Lin, Hong-hui

    2015-11-01

    Alternative oxidase (AOX) is a diiron carboxylate protein present in all plants examined to date that couples the oxidation of ubiquinol with the reduction of oxygen to water. The predominant structure of AOX genes is four exons interrupted by three introns. In this study, by analyzing the genomic sequences of genes from different plant species, we deduced that intron/exon loss/gain and deletion of fragments are the major mechanisms responsible for the generation and evolution of AOX paralogous genes. Integrating gene duplication and structural information with expression profiles for various AOXs revealed that tandem duplication/block duplication contributed greatly to the generation and maintenance of the AOX gene family. Notably, the expression profiles based on public microarray database showed highly diverse expression patterns among AOX members in different developmental stages and tissues and that both orthologous and paralogous genes did not have the same expression profiles due to their divergence in regulatory regions. Comparative analysis of genes in six plant species under various perturbations indicated a large number of protein kinases, transcription factors and antioxidant enzymes are co-expressed with AOX. Of these, four sets of transcription factors--WRKY, NAC, bZIP and MYB--are likely involved in the regulating the differential responses of AOX1 genes to specific stresses. Furthermore, divergence of AOX1 and AOX2 subfamilies in regulation might be the main reason for their differential stress responses.

  10. Network analysis of genes regulated in renal diseases: implications for a molecular-based classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish HV

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic renal diseases are currently classified based on morphological similarities such as whether they produce predominantly inflammatory or non-inflammatory responses. However, such classifications do not reliably predict the course of the disease and its response to therapy. In contrast, recent studies in diseases such as breast cancer suggest that a classification which includes molecular information could lead to more accurate diagnoses and prediction of treatment response. This article describes how we extracted gene expression profiles from biopsies of patients with chronic renal diseases, and used network visualizations and associated quantitative measures to rapidly analyze similarities and differences between the diseases. Results The analysis revealed three main regularities: (1 Many genes associated with a single disease, and fewer genes associated with many diseases. (2 Unexpected combinations of renal diseases that share relatively large numbers of genes. (3 Uniform concordance in the regulation of all genes in the network. Conclusion The overall results suggest the need to define a molecular-based classification of renal diseases, in addition to hypotheses for the unexpected patterns of shared genes and the uniformity in gene concordance. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the utility of network analyses to rapidly understand complex relationships between diseases and regulated genes.

  11. Basal transcription of APOBEC3G is regulated by USF1 gene in hepatocyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yanli [Department of Infectious Diseases, Zhengzhou University People' s Hospital (Henan Provincial People' s Hospital), Zhengzhou, 450003 (China); Li, Hui [The Central Hospital of Wuhan, Tongji Medical College Huazhong University of Science Technology, Wuhan, 430000 (China); Zhang, Xiaoju [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Zhengzhou University People' s Hospital (Henan Provincial People' s Hospital), Zhengzhou, 450003 (China); Shang, Jia [Department of Infectious Diseases, Zhengzhou University People' s Hospital (Henan Provincial People' s Hospital), Zhengzhou, 450003 (China); Kang, Yi, E-mail: kykangyi@163.com [Department of Infectious Diseases, Zhengzhou University People' s Hospital (Henan Provincial People' s Hospital), Zhengzhou, 450003 (China)

    2016-01-29

    Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G, A3G) exert antiviral defense as an important factor of innate immunity. A variety of cytokines such as IFN-γ,IL2,IL15,IL7 could induce the transcription of A3G. However, the regulation of other nuclear factor on the transcription of A3G have not been reported at the present. To gain new insights into the transcriptional regulation of this restriction factor, we cloned and characterized the promoter region of A3G and investigate the modulation of USF1 gene on the transcription of A3G. We identified a 232 bp region that was sufficient to regulate the activity of full promoter. Transcriptional start sites (TSS) were identified by the luciferase reporter assays of plasmids containing full or shorter fragments of the A3G promoter. The results demonstrated that the core promoter of A3G is located within the region -159/-84 relative to the TSS. Transcriptional activity of A3G core promoter regulated by USF1 was dependent on an E-box (located at position -91/-86 relative to the major TSS) and was abolished after mutation of this DNA element. USF1 gene can take part in basal transcription regulation of the human A3G gene in hepatocyte, and the identified E-box represented a binding site for the USF1. - Highlights: • The core promoter of A3G is located within the region −159/−84 relative to the TSS. • Transcriptional activity of A3G core promoter regulated by USF1 was dependent on an E-box (located at position −91/−86 relative to the major TSS). • USF1 gene can take part in basal transcription regulation of the human A3G gene in hepatocyte.

  12. Genes with high penetrance for syndromic and non-syndromic autism typically function within the nucleus and regulate gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Emily L; Sharp, Julia L; Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Sumi, Nahid Sultana; Casanova, Manuel F

    2016-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID), autism, and epilepsy share frequent yet variable comorbidities with one another. In order to better understand potential genetic divergence underlying this variable risk, we studied genes responsible for monogenic IDs, grouped according to their autism and epilepsy comorbidities. Utilizing 465 different forms of ID with known molecular origins, we accessed available genetic databases in conjunction with gene ontology (GO) to determine whether the genetics underlying ID diverge according to its comorbidities with autism and epilepsy and if genes highly penetrant for autism or epilepsy share distinctive features that set them apart from genes that confer comparatively variable or no apparent risk. The genetics of ID with autism are relatively enriched in terms associated with nervous system-specific processes and structural morphogenesis. In contrast, we find that ID with highly comorbid epilepsy (HCE) is modestly associated with lipid metabolic processes while ID without autism or epilepsy comorbidity (ID only) is enriched at the Golgi membrane. Highly comorbid autism (HCA) genes, on the other hand, are strongly enriched within the nucleus, are typically involved in regulation of gene expression, and, along with IDs with more variable autism, share strong ties with a core protein-protein interaction (PPI) network integral to basic patterning of the CNS. According to GO terminology, autism-related gene products are integral to neural development. While it is difficult to draw firm conclusions regarding IDs unassociated with autism, it is clear that the majority of HCA genes are tightly linked with general dysregulation of gene expression, suggesting that disturbances to the chronology of neural maturation and patterning may be key in conferring susceptibility to autism spectrum conditions.

  13. RKIP Suppresses Breast Cancer Metastasis to the Bone by Regulating Stroma-Associated Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bevilacqua

    2012-01-01

    genes. Conceptually, the approach we developed uses a master regulator and expression arrays from breast cancer patients to formulate hypotheses based on clinical data. Experimental validation is followed by further bioinformatic analysis to establish the clinical significance of discoveries. Using RKIP as an example we show here that this multi-step approach can be used to identify gene regulatory mechanisms that affect tumor-stroma interactions that in turn influence metastasis to the bone or other organs.

  14. Increased fat oxidation and regulation of metabolic genes with ultraendurance exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff; Rehrer, N J; Pilegaard, H

    2007-01-01

    AIM: Regular endurance exercise stimulates muscle metabolic capacity, but effects of very prolonged endurance exercise are largely unknown. This study examined muscle substrate availability and utilization during prolonged endurance exercise, and associated metabolic genes. METHODS: Data were...... exercise markedly increases plasma fatty acid availability and fat utilization during exercise. Exercise-induced regulation of genes encoding proteins involved in fatty acid recruitment and oxidation may contribute to these changes....

  15. Genome architecture and global gene regulation in bacteria: making progress towards a unified model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Charles J

    2013-05-01

    Data obtained with advanced imaging techniques, chromosome conformation capture methods, bioinformatics and molecular genetics, together with insights from polymer physics and mechanobiology, are helping to refine our understanding of the spatiotemporal organization of the bacterial nucleoid and its gene expression programmes. Here, I discuss the proposal that, in addition to DNA topology and nucleoid-associated proteins, gene regulation is an important organizing principle of nucleoid architecture.

  16. Comparative genomic sequence analysis of the human and mouse cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator genes

    OpenAIRE

    Ellsworth, Rachel E.; Jamison, D. Curtis; Touchman, Jeffrey W.; Chissoe, Stephanie L.; Braden Maduro, Valerie V.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; Dietrich, Nicole L.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Iyer, Leslie M.; Weintraub, Lauren A.; Cotton, Marc; Courtney, Laura; Edwards, Jennifer; Maupin, Rachel; Ozersky, Philip

    2000-01-01

    The identification of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) in 1989 represents a landmark accomplishment in human genetics. Since that time, there have been numerous advances in elucidating the function of the encoded protein and the physiological basis of cystic fibrosis. However, numerous areas of cystic fibrosis biology require additional investigation, some of which would be facilitated by information about the long-range sequence context of the CFTR gene. Fo...

  17. The prima donna of epigenetics: the regulation of gene expression by DNA methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.F. Santos

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the mechanisms of DNA methylation, DNA methylation pattern formation and their involvement in gene regulation. Association of DNA methylation with imprinting, embryonic development and human diseases is discussed. Furthermore, besides considering changes in DNA methylation as mechanisms of disease, the role of epigenetics in general and DNA methylation in particular in transgenerational carcinogenesis, in memory formation and behavior establishment are brought about as mechanisms based on the cellular memory of gene expression patterns.

  18. Studies of Neuronal Gene Regulation Controlling the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Neural Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Mamoru

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of the development and function of the nervous system is not preprogramed but responds to environmental stimuli to change neural development and function flexibly. This neural plasticity is a characteristic property of the nervous system. For example, strong synaptic activation evoked by environmental stimuli leads to changes in synaptic functions (known as synaptic plasticity). Long-lasting synaptic plasticity is one of the molecular mechanisms underlying long-term learning and memory. Since discovering the role of the transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein in learning and memory, it has been widely accepted that gene regulation in neurons contributes to long-lasting changes in neural functions. However, it remains unclear how synaptic activation is converted into gene regulation that results in long-lasting neural functions like long-term memory. We continue to address this question. This review introduces our recent findings on the gene regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and discusses how regulation of the gene participates in long-lasting changes in neural functions.

  19. The role of RNA structure at 5' untranslated region in microRNA-mediated gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wanjun; Xu, Yuming; Xie, Xueying; Wang, Ting; Ko, Jae-Hong; Zhou, Tong

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the secondary structure of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of messenger RNA (mRNA) is important for microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene regulation in humans. mRNAs that are targeted by miRNA tend to have a higher degree of local secondary structure in their 5' UTR; however, the general role of the 5' UTR in miRNA-mediated gene regulation remains unknown. We systematically surveyed the secondary structure of 5' UTRs in both plant and animal species and found a universal trend of increased mRNA stability near the 5' cap in mRNAs that are regulated by miRNA in animals, but not in plants. Intra-genome comparison showed that gene expression level, GC content of the 5' UTR, number of miRNA target sites, and 5' UTR length may influence mRNA structure near the 5' cap. Our results suggest that the 5' UTR secondary structure performs multiple functions in regulating post-transcriptional processes. Although the local structure immediately upstream of the start codon is involved in translation initiation, RNA structure near the 5' cap site, rather than the structure of the full-length 5' UTR sequences, plays an important role in miRNA-mediated gene regulation. © 2014 Gu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  20. Epigenome mapping highlights chromatin-mediated gene regulation in the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis

    OpenAIRE

    Min-Ji Song; Mikyoung Kim; Yeeun Choi; Myung-hee Yi; Juri Kim; Soon-Jung Park; Tai-Soon Yong; Hyoung-Pyo Kim

    2017-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular flagellated protozoan parasite that causes trichomoniasis, one of the most common non-viral sexually transmitted diseases. To survive and to maintain infection, T. vaginalis adapts to a hostile host environment by regulating gene expression. However, the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation are poorly understood for this parasite. Histone modification has a marked effect on chromatin structure and directs the recruitment of transcriptional machine...

  1. E2Fs regulate the expression of genes involved in differentiation, development, proliferation, and apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, H; Bracken, A P; Vernell, R

    2001-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and its two relatives, p107 and p130, regulate development and cell proliferation in part by inhibiting the activity of E2F-regulated promoters. We have used high-density oligonucleotide arrays to identify genes in which expression changed in response to activation...... to the variety of phenotypes observed as a consequence of a deregulated pRB/E2F pathway....

  2. Modelling epigenetic regulation of gene expression in 12 human cell types reveals combinatorial patterns of cell-type-specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yiming; Qu, Wubin; Min, Bo; Liu, Zheyan; Chen, Changsheng; Zhang, Chenggang

    2014-06-01

    The maintenance of the diverse cell types in a multicellular organism is one of the fundamental mysteries of biology. Modelling the dynamic regulatory relationships between the histone modifications and the gene expression across the diverse cell types is essential for the authors to understand the mechanisms of the epigenetic regulation. Here, the authors thoroughly assessed the histone modification enrichment profiles at the promoters and constructed quantitative models between the histone modification abundances and the gene expression in 12 human cell types. The author's results showed that the histone modifications at the promoters exhibited remarkably cell-type-dependent variability in the cell-type-specific (CTS) genes. They demonstrated that the variable profiles of the modifications are highly predictive for the dynamic changes of the gene expression across all the cell types. Their findings revealed the close relationship between the combinatorial patterns of the histone modifications and the CTS gene expression. They anticipate that the findings and the methods they used in this study could provide useful information for the future studies of the regulatory roles of the histone modifications in the CTS genes.

  3. SET1A/COMPASS and shadow enhancers in the regulation of homeotic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kaixiang; Collings, Clayton K; Marshall, Stacy A; Morgan, Marc A; Rendleman, Emily J; Wang, Lu; Sze, Christie C; Sun, Tianjiao; Bartom, Elizabeth T; Shilatifard, Ali

    2017-04-15

    The homeotic (Hox) genes are highly conserved in metazoans, where they are required for various processes in development, and misregulation of their expression is associated with human cancer. In the developing embryo, Hox genes are activated sequentially in time and space according to their genomic position within Hox gene clusters. Accumulating evidence implicates both enhancer elements and noncoding RNAs in controlling this spatiotemporal expression of Hox genes, but disentangling their relative contributions is challenging. Here, we identify two cis-regulatory elements (E1 and E2) functioning as shadow enhancers to regulate the early expression of the HoxA genes. Simultaneous deletion of these shadow enhancers in embryonic stem cells leads to impaired activation of HoxA genes upon differentiation, while knockdown of a long noncoding RNA overlapping E1 has no detectable effect on their expression. Although MLL/COMPASS (complex of proteins associated with Set1) family of histone methyltransferases is known to activate transcription of Hox genes in other contexts, we found that individual inactivation of the MLL1-4/COMPASS family members has little effect on early Hox gene activation. Instead, we demonstrate that SET1A/COMPASS is required for full transcriptional activation of multiple Hox genes but functions independently of the E1 and E2 cis-regulatory elements. Our results reveal multiple regulatory layers for Hox genes to fine-tune transcriptional programs essential for development. © 2017 Cao et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  4. Developmental gene regulation during tomato fruit ripening and in-vitro sepal morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishida Betty K

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Red ripe tomatoes are the result of numerous physiological changes controlled by hormonal and developmental signals, causing maturation or differentiation of various fruit tissues simultaneously. These physiological changes affect visual, textural, flavor, and aroma characteristics, making the fruit more appealing to potential consumers for seed dispersal. Developmental regulation of tomato fruit ripening has, until recently, been lacking in rigorous investigation. We previously indicated the presence of up-regulated transcription factors in ripening tomato fruit by data mining in TIGR Tomato Gene Index. In our in-vitro system, green tomato sepals cultured at 16 to 22°C turn red and swell like ripening tomato fruit while those at 28°C remain green. Results Here, we have further examined regulation of putative developmental genes possibly involved in tomato fruit ripening and development. Using molecular biological methods, we have determined the relative abundance of various transcripts of genes during in vitro sepal ripening and in tomato fruit pericarp at three stages of development. A number of transcripts show similar expression in fruits to RIN and PSY1, ripening-associated genes, and others show quite different expression. Conclusions Our investigation has resulted in confirmation of some of our previous database mining results and has revealed differences in gene expression that may be important for tomato cultivar variation. We present new and intriguing information on genes that should now be studied in a more focused fashion.

  5. Regulating Hypothalamus Gene Expression in Food Intake: Dietary Composition or Calorie Density?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Jang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe proportion of saturated fatty acids/unsaturated fatty acids in the diet seems to act as a physiological regulation on obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Differently composed fatty acid diets may induce satiety of the hypothalamus in different ways. However, the direct effect of the different fatty acid diets on satiety in the hypothalamus is not clear.MethodsThree experiments in mice were conducted to determine whether: different compositions of fatty acids affects gene mRNA expression of the hypothalamus over time; different types of fatty acids administered into the stomach directly affect gene mRNA expression of the hypothalamus; and fat composition changes in the diet affects gene mRNA expression of the hypothalamus.ResultsThe type of fat in cases of purified fatty acid administration directly into the stomach may cause changes of gene expressions in the hypothalamus. Gene expression by dietary fat may be regulated by calorie amount ingested rather than weight amount or type of fat.ConclusionTherefore, the calorie density factor of the diet in regulating hypothalamic gene in food intake may be detrimental, although the possibility of type of fat cannot be ruled out.

  6. PERP regulates enamel formation via effects on cell–cell adhesion and gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jheon, Andrew H.; Mostowfi, Pasha; Snead, Malcolm L.; Ihrie, Rebecca A.; Sone, Eli; Pramparo, Tiziano; Attardi, Laura D.; Klein, Ophir D.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the role of cell–cell adhesion in the development of mineralized tissues. Here we report that PERP, a tetraspan membrane protein essential for epithelial integrity, regulates enamel formation. PERP is necessary for proper cell attachment and gene expression during tooth development, and its expression is controlled by P63, a master regulator of stratified epithelial development. During enamel formation, PERP is localized to the interface between the enamel-producing ameloblasts and the stratum intermedium (SI), a layer of cells subjacent to the ameloblasts. Perp-null mice display dramatic enamel defects, which are caused, in part, by the detachment of ameloblasts from the SI. Microarray analysis comparing gene expression in teeth of wild-type and Perp-null mice identified several differentially expressed genes during enamel formation. Analysis of these genes in ameloblast-derived LS8 cells upon knockdown of PERP confirmed the role for PERP in the regulation of gene expression. Together, our data show that PERP is necessary for the integrity of the ameloblast–SI interface and that a lack of Perp causes downregulation of genes that are required for proper enamel formation. PMID:21285247

  7. Regulation of the scp Genes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803--What is New?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheregi, Otilia; Funk, Christiane

    2015-08-12

    In the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 there are five genes encoding small CAB-like (SCP) proteins, which have been shown to be up-regulated under stress. Analyses of the promoter sequences of the scp genes revealed the existence of an NtcA binding motif in two scp genes, scpB and scpE. Binding of NtcA, the key transcriptional regulator during nitrogen stress, to the promoter regions was shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The metabolite 2-oxoglutarate did not increase the affinity of NtcA for binding to the promoters of scpB and scpE. A second motif, the HIP1 palindrome 5' GGCGATCGCC 3', was detected in the upstream regions of scpB and scpC. The transcription factor encoded by sll1130 has been suggested to recognize this motif to regulate heat-responsive genes. Our data suggest that HIP1 is not a regulatory element within the scp genes. Further, the presence of the high light regulatory (HLR1) motif was confirmed in scpB-E, in accordance to their induced transcriptions in cells exposed to high light. The HLR1 motif was newly discovered in eight additional genes.

  8. Regulating Hypothalamus Gene Expression in Food Intake: Dietary Composition or Calorie Density?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mi; Park, So Young; Kim, Yong Woon; Jung, Seung Pil; Kim, Jong Yeon

    2017-04-01

    The proportion of saturated fatty acids/unsaturated fatty acids in the diet seems to act as a physiological regulation on obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Differently composed fatty acid diets may induce satiety of the hypothalamus in different ways. However, the direct effect of the different fatty acid diets on satiety in the hypothalamus is not clear. Three experiments in mice were conducted to determine whether: different compositions of fatty acids affects gene mRNA expression of the hypothalamus over time; different types of fatty acids administered into the stomach directly affect gene mRNA expression of the hypothalamus; and fat composition changes in the diet affects gene mRNA expression of the hypothalamus. The type of fat in cases of purified fatty acid administration directly into the stomach may cause changes of gene expressions in the hypothalamus. Gene expression by dietary fat may be regulated by calorie amount ingested rather than weight amount or type of fat. Therefore, the calorie density factor of the diet in regulating hypothalamic gene in food intake may be detrimental, although the possibility of type of fat cannot be ruled out.

  9. Cistrome Cancer: A Web Resource for Integrative Gene Regulation Modeling in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Shenglin; Meyer, Clifford A; Zheng, Rongbin; Qin, Qian; Wu, Qiu; Jiang, Peng; Li, Bo; Shi, Xiaohui; Wang, Binbin; Fan, Jingyu; Shih, Celina; Brown, Myles; Zang, Chongzhi; Liu, X Shirley

    2017-11-01

    Cancer results from a breakdown of normal gene expression control, so the study of gene regulation is critical to cancer research. To gain insight into the transcriptional and epigenetic factors regulating abnormal gene expression patterns in cancers, we developed the Cistrome Cancer web resource (http://cistrome.org/CistromeCancer/). We conducted the systematic integration and modeling of over 10,000 tumor molecular profiles from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) with over 23,000 ChIP-seq and chromatin accessibility profiles from our Cistrome collection. The results include reconstruction of functional enhancer profiles, "super-enhancer" target genes, as well as predictions of active transcription factors and their target genes for each TCGA cancer type. Cistrome Cancer reveals novel insights from integrative analyses combining chromatin profiles with tumor molecular profiles and will be a useful resource to the cancer gene regulation community. Cancer Res; 77(21); e19-22. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Short Exogenous Peptides Regulate Expression of CLE, KNOX1, and GRF Family Genes in Nicotiana tabacum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoreyeva, L I; Dilovarova, T A; Ashapkin, V V; Martirosyan, Yu Ts; Khavinson, V Kh; Kharchenko, P N; Vanyushin, B F

    2017-04-01

    Exogenous short biologically active peptides epitalon (Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly), bronchogen (Ala-Glu-Asp-Leu), and vilon (Lys-Glu) at concentrations 10(-7)-10(-9) M significantly influence growth, development, and differentiation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) callus cultures. Epitalon and bronchogen, in particular, both increase growth of calluses and stimulate formation and growth of leaves in plant regenerants. Because the regulatory activity of the short peptides appears at low peptide concentrations, their action to some extent is like that of the activity of phytohormones, and it seems to have signaling character and epigenetic nature. The investigated peptides modulate in tobacco cells the expression of genes including genes responsible for tissue formation and cell differentiation. These peptides differently modulate expression of CLE family genes coding for known endogenous regulatory peptides, the KNOX1 genes (transcription factor genes) and GRF (growth regulatory factor) genes coding for respective DNA-binding proteins such as topoisomerases, nucleases, and others. Thus, at the level of transcription, plants have a system of short peptide regulation of formation of long-known peptide regulators of growth and development. The peptides studied here may be related to a new generation of plant growth regulators. They can be used in the experimental botany, plant molecular biology, biotechnology, and practical agronomy.

  11. Inducible, tunable and multiplex human gene regulation using CRISPR-Cpf1-based transcription factors | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targeted and inducible regulation of mammalian gene expression is a broadly important research capability that may also enable development of novel therapeutics for treating human diseases. Here we demonstrate that a catalytically inactive RNA-guided CRISPR-Cpf1 nuclease fused to transcriptional activation domains can up-regulate endogenous human gene expression. We engineered drug-inducible Cpf1-based activators and show how this system can be used to tune the regulation of endogenous gene transcription in human cells.

  12. Global gene analysis identifying genes commonly regulated by the Ras/Raf/MEK and type I IFN pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Y; Hirasawa, K; Christian, S L

    2015-06-01

    Oncolytic viruses exploit alterations in cancer cells to specifically infect cancer cells but not normal healthy cells. Previous work has shown that oncogenic Ras interferes with interferon (IFN) signaling to promote viral replication. Furthermore, inhibition of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway at the level of Ras, MEK, or ERK was sufficient to restore IFN signaling. In order to identify genes that were commonly regulated by the inhibition of the Ras pathway and the IFN pathway, we treated NIH/3T3 cells that overexpress oncogenic Ras with the MEK inhibitor, U0126, or IFN-α for 6 h, and performed DNA microarray analysis (Gene Expression Omnibus accession number GSE49469). Here, we also provide additional information on the experimental and functional analysis of the genes responsive to U0126 and IFN.

  13. The inner nuclear membrane protein Src1 associates with subtelomeric genes and alters their regulated gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grund, Stefanie E; Fischer, Tamás; Cabal, Ghislain G; Antúnez, Oreto; Pérez-Ortín, José E; Hurt, Ed

    2008-09-08

    Inner nuclear membrane proteins containing a LEM (LAP2, emerin, and MAN1) domain participate in different processes, including chromatin organization, gene expression, and nuclear envelope biogenesis. In this study, we identify a robust genetic interaction between transcription export (TREX) factors and yeast Src1, an integral inner nuclear membrane protein that is homologous to vertebrate LEM2. DNA macroarray analysis revealed that the expression of the phosphate-regulated genes PHO11, PHO12, and PHO84 is up-regulated in src1Delta cells. Notably, these PHO genes are located in subtelomeric regions of chromatin and exhibit a perinuclear location in vivo. Src1 spans the nuclear membrane twice and exposes its N and C domains with putative DNA-binding motifs to the nucleoplasm. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip analyses indicated that Src1 is highly enriched at telomeres and subtelomeric regions of the yeast chromosomes. Our data show that the inner nuclear membrane protein Src1 functions at the interface between subtelomeric gene expression and TREX-dependent messenger RNA export through the nuclear pore complexes.

  14. Regulation, overexpression, and target gene identification of Potato Homeobox 15 (POTH15) - a class-I KNOX gene in potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Ameya S; Kondhare, Kirtikumar R; Rajabhoj, Mohit P; Kumar, Amit; Ghate, Tejashree; Ravindran, Nevedha; Habib, Farhat; Siddappa, Sundaresha; Banerjee, Anjan K

    2016-07-01

    Potato Homeobox 15 (POTH15) is a KNOX-I (Knotted1-like homeobox) family gene in potato that is orthologous to Shoot Meristemless (STM) in Arabidopsis. Despite numerous reports on KNOX genes from different species, studies in potato are limited. Here, we describe photoperiodic regulation of POTH15, its overexpression phenotype, and identification of its potential targets in potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp. andigena). qRT-PCR analysis showed a higher abundance of POTH15 mRNA in shoot tips and stolons under tuber-inducing short-day conditions. POTH15 promoter activity was detected in apical and axillary meristems, stolon tips, tuber eyes, and meristems of tuber sprouts, indicating its role in meristem maintenance and leaf development. POTH15 overexpression altered multiple morphological traits including leaf and stem development, leaflet number, and number of nodes and branches. In particular, the rachis of the leaf was completely reduced and leaves appeared as a bouquet of leaflets. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of 35S::GUS and two POTH15 overexpression lines identified more than 6000 differentially expressed genes, including 2014 common genes between the two overexpression lines. Functional analysis of these genes revealed their involvement in responses to hormones, biotic/abiotic stresses, transcription regulation, and signal transduction. qRT-PCR of selected candidate target genes validated their differential expression in both overexpression lines. Out of 200 randomly chosen POTH15 targets, 173 were found to have at least one tandem TGAC core motif, characteristic of KNOX interaction, within 3.0kb in the upstream sequence of the transcription start site. Overall, this study provides insights to the role of POTH15 in controlling diverse developmental processes in potato. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. A simple comparison of the extrinsic noise in gene expression between native and foreign regulations in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Bei-Wen; Seno, Shigeto; Matsuda, Hideo; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2017-05-06

    Living cells reorganize their gene expression through regulatory machineries in response to external perturbations. The contribution of the regulation to the noise in gene expression is of great interest. In this study, we evaluate the contribution of both native and foreign regulations to the extrinsic noise in gene expression. We analyzed the gene expression data of a mini-library containing 70 genetic constructs of 136 clones into which the gfp gene had been chromosomally incorporated under the control of either native or foreign regulation. We found that the substitution of native by foreign regulation, i.e., the insertion of the Ptet promoter, triggered a decrease in the extrinsic noise, which was independent of the protein abundance. The reanalyses of varied genomic data sets verified that the noisy gene expression mediated by native regulations is a common feature, regardless of the diversity in the genetic approaches used. Disturbing native regulations by a synthetic promoter reduced the extrinsic noise in gene expression in Escherichia coli. It indicated that the extrinsic noise in gene expression caused by the native regulation could be further repressed. These results suggest a tendency of released regulation leading to reduced noise and a linkage between noise and plasticity in the regulation of gene expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Erythroid differentiation regulator 1, an interleukin 18-regulated gene, acts as a metastasis suppressor in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min Kyung; Park, Yoorim; Song, Seok Bean; Cheon, So Young; Park, Sunyoung; Houh, Younkyung; Ha, Soogyeong; Kim, Hee Jung; Park, Jung Min; Kim, Tae Sung; Lee, Wang Jae; Cho, Byung Joo; Bang, Sa Ik; Park, Hyunjeong; Cho, Daeho

    2011-10-01

    Erythroid differentiation regulator (Erdr1) was first discovered in mouse leukemia cell lines and functions as a stress-related survival factor. This study investigated whether Erdr1 regulates murine melanoma progression, as well as the mechanism involved in Erdr1-regulated metastasis. The expression of Erdr1 is negatively correlated with IL-18 expression, which has a pro-cancer effect in melanoma. To study the role of Erdr1 as an anti-cancer factor, cell migration, invasion, and proliferation were measured. Erdr1 overexpression markedly inhibited the level of cell migration, invasion, and proliferation in B16F10 cells in vitro. In addition, Erdr1 overexpression significantly suppressed melanoma lung colonization, metastasis, and tumor growth in vivo. To identify the factors involved in Erdr1-reduced metastasis, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), a well-known stress protein and contributor to tumor metastasis, was examined. We found that HSP90 was significantly decreased in Erdr1-overexpressing cells. Functional analysis demonstrated that HSP90 small-interfering RNA transfection reduced the migration ability and metastasis of melanoma. In conclusion, Erdr1 shows a powerful anti-metastasis effect that leads to the ability to reduce the metastatic potential of murine malignant melanoma cells. Erdr1 is an anti-metastatic factor that may be a possible therapeutic target for treatment of melanoma.

  17. Genotype-dependent regulation of drought-responsive genes in tolerant and sensitive sugarcane cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Manassés Daniel; de Oliveira Silva, Roberta Lane; Ferreira Neto, José Ribamar Costa; Benko-Iseppon, Ana Maria; Kido, Ederson Akio

    2017-10-30

    Drought is the most damaging among the major abiotic stresses. Transcriptomic studies allow a global overview of expressed genes, providing the basis for molecular markers development. Here, the HT-SuperSAGE technique allowed the evaluation of four drought-tolerant cultivars and four-sensitive cultivars, after 24h of irrigation suppression. We identified 9831 induced unitags from roots of the tolerant cultivars with different regulations by the -sensitive cultivars after the applied stress. These unitags allowed a proposal of 15 genes, whose expressed profiles were validated by RT-qPCR, evaluating each cultivar independently. These genes covered broad metabolic processes: ethylene stress attenuation (ACCD); root growth (β-EXP8); protein degradation [ubiquitination pathway (E2, 20SPβ4); plant proteases (AP, C13)]; oxidative detoxification (TRX); fatty acid synthesis (ACC); amino acid transport (AAT), and carbohydrate metabolism [glycolysis (PFK, TPI, FBA); TCA cycle (LDP, MDH); pentose phosphate pathway (TKT)]. The expressed profiles showed a genotype-dependent regulation of the target genes. Two drought-tolerant cultivars (SP83-2847; CTC6) presented each one, nine of the induced genes. Among the -sensitive cultivars, CTC13 induced only one, while SP90-1636 induced two genes. These genes should help breeders to identify accessions managing drought stress tolerance responses, showing better ethylene stress attenuation, energy allocation, amino acid transport, and protein homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Methylobacterium-plant interaction genes regulated by plant exudate and quorum sensing molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega; Bogas, Andrea Cristina; Pomini, Armando M; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Marsaioli, Anita J; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria from the genus Methylobacterium interact symbiotically (endophytically and epiphytically) with different plant species. These interactions can promote plant growth or induce systemic resistance, increasing plant fitness. The plant colonization is guided by molecular communication between bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-plants, where the bacteria recognize specific exuded compounds by other bacteria (e.g. homoserine molecules) and/or by the plant roots (e.g. flavonoids, ethanol and methanol), respectively. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing molecules (N-acyl-homoserine lactones) and plant exudates (including ethanol) in the expression of a series of bacterial genes involved in Methylobacterium-plant interaction. The selected genes are related to bacterial metabolism (mxaF), adaptation to stressful environment (crtI, phoU and sss), to interactions with plant metabolism compounds (acdS) and pathogenicity (patatin and phoU). Under in vitro conditions, our results showed the differential expression of some important genes related to metabolism, stress and pathogenesis, thereby AHL molecules up-regulate all tested genes, except phoU, while plant exudates induce only mxaF gene expression. In the presence of plant exudates there is a lower bacterial density (due the endophytic and epiphytic colonization), which produce less AHL, leading to down regulation of genes when compared to the control. Therefore, bacterial density, more than plant exudate, influences the expression of genes related to plant-bacteria interaction.

  19. Expression Analysis of Sound Vibration-Regulated Genes by Touch Treatment inArabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Ritesh; Gururani, Mayank A; Ponpandian, Lakshmi N; Mishra, Ratnesh C; Park, Soo-Chul; Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Bae, Hanhong

    2017-01-01

    Sound vibration (SV) is considered to be a mechanical stimulus which gives rise to various physiological and molecular changes in plants. Previously, we identified 17 SV-regulated genes (SRGs) which were up-regulated by SV treatments in Arabidopsis . Here, we analyzed the expression pattern of similar genes after an exposure of 500 Hertz at 80 decibels, for various time periods. Simultaneously, we confirmed the SV-mediated expression of these genes under lighted condition as many of them were reported to be dark-induced. For this, we designed an improved SV treatment chamber. Additionally, we checked the electrolyte leakage (EL), photosynthetic performance and expression of mechanosensitive (MS) ion channel genes after 5 days of SV treatment in the illuminated chamber. EL was higher, and the photosynthetic performance index was lower in the SV-treated plants compared to control. Seven out of the 13 MS ion channel genes were differentially expressed after the SV treatment. Simultaneously, we checked the touch-mediated expression pattern of 17 SRGs and 13 MS ion channel genes. The distinct expression pattern of 6 SRGs and 1 MS ion channel gene generate an idea that SV as a stimulus is different from touch. Developmental stage-specific expression profiling suggested that the majority of the SRGs were expressed spatiotemporally in different developmental stages of Arabidopsis , especially in imbibed seed, seedlings and leaves.

  20. Gene Expression Regulation by Agonist-Independent Constitutive Signaling of Melanocortin-1 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikjoo Seong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMelanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r, a key signaling receptor for melanogenesis, has been reported to mediate migration of B16F10 melanoma cells. Interestingly, this activity appears to be a part of the constitutive signaling of Mc1r.MethodsWe carried out small interfering RNA-mediated knock-down of Mc1r on murine melanoma B16F10 cells and performed microarray analysis to characterize changes in the gene expression profile.ResultsWe isolated 22 and four genes whose expression decreased and increased, respectively, by 2.5-fold or higher as the result of Mc1r knock-down. Several down-regulated genes have been proposed to be involved in cell migration. Among these genes are several members of the chemokine gene family.ConclusionWe provide a gene set for further functional analyses of Mc1r. The Mc1r target genes we present may be particularly relevant for understanding the ligand-independent activity of Mc1r. Further examination of the mode of action may lead to novel strategies in regulating the migration and metastasis of melanoma cells.

  1. Role of type II protein arginine methyltransferase 5 in the regulation of Circadian Per1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungtae Na

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are the endogenous oscillators that regulate rhythmic physiological and behavioral changes to correspond to daily light-dark cycles. Molecular dissections have revealed that transcriptional feedback loops of the circadian clock genes drive the molecular oscillation, in which PER/CRY complexes inhibit the transcriptional activity of the CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer to constitute a negative feedback loop. In this study, we identified the type II protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5 as an interacting molecule of CRY1. Although the Prmt5 gene was constitutively expressed, increased interaction of PRMT5 with CRY1 was observed when the Per1 gene was repressed both in synchronized mouse liver and NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, rhythmic recruitment of PRMT5 and CRY1 to the Per1 gene promoter was found to be associated with an increased level of histone H4R3 dimethylation and Per1 gene repression. Consistently, decreased histone H4R3 dimethylation and altered rhythmic Per1 gene expression were observed in Prmt5-depleted cells. Taken together, these findings provide an insight into the link between histone arginine methylation by PRMT5 and transcriptional regulation of the circadian Per1 gene.

  2. Methylobacterium-plant interaction genes regulated by plant exudate and quorum sensing molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuella Nóbrega Dourado

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria from the genus Methylobacterium interact symbiotically (endophytically and epiphytically with different plant species. These interactions can promote plant growth or induce systemic resistance, increasing plant fitness. The plant colonization is guided by molecular communication between bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-plants, where the bacteria recognize specific exuded compounds by other bacteria (e.g. homoserine molecules and/or by the plant roots (e.g. flavonoids, ethanol and methanol, respectively. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing molecules (N-acyl-homoserine lactones and plant exudates (including ethanol in the expression of a series of bacterial genes involved in Methylobacterium-plant interaction. The selected genes are related to bacterial metabolism (mxaF, adaptation to stressful environment (crtI, phoU and sss, to interactions with plant metabolism compounds (acdS and pathogenicity (patatin and phoU. Under in vitro conditions, our results showed the differential expression of some important genes related to metabolism, stress and pathogenesis, thereby AHL molecules up-regulate all tested genes, except phoU, while plant exudates induce only mxaF gene expression. In the presence of plant exudates there is a lower bacterial density (due the endophytic and epiphytic colonization, which produce less AHL, leading to down regulation of genes when compared to the control. Therefore, bacterial density, more than plant exudate, influences the expression of genes related to plant-bacteria interaction.

  3. High-Throughput Screening to Identify Regulators of Meiosis-Specific Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassir, Yona

    2017-01-01

    Meiosis and gamete formation are processes that are essential for sexual reproduction in all eukaryotic organisms. Multiple intracellular and extracellular signals feed into pathways that converge on transcription factors that induce the expression of meiosis-specific genes. Once triggered the meiosis-specific gene expression program proceeds in a cascade that drives progress through the events of meiosis and gamete formation. Meiosis-specific gene expression is tightly controlled by a balance of positive and negative regulatory factors that respond to a plethora of signaling pathways. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be an outstanding model for the dissection of gametogenesis owing to the sophisticated genetic manipulations that can be performed with the cells. It is possible to use a variety selection and screening methods to identify genes and their functions. High-throughput screening technology has been developed to allow an array of all viable yeast gene deletion mutants to be screened for phenotypes and for regulators of gene expression. This chapter describes a protocol that has been used to screen a library of homozygous diploid yeast deletion strains to identify regulators of the meiosis-specific IME1 gene.

  4. RNA Sequencing Reveals Xyr1 as a Transcription Factor Regulating Gene Expression beyond Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Xyr1 has been demonstrated to be the main transcription activator of (hemicellulases in the well-known cellulase producer Trichoderma reesei. This study comprehensively investigates the genes regulated by Xyr1 through RNA sequencing to produce the transcription profiles of T. reesei Rut-C30 and its xyr1 deletion mutant (Δxyr1, cultured on lignocellulose or glucose. xyr1 deletion resulted in 467 differentially expressed genes on inducing medium. Almost all functional genes involved in (hemicellulose degradation and many transporters belonging to the sugar porter family in the major facilitator superfamily (MFS were downregulated in Δxyr1. By contrast, all differentially expressed protease, lipase, chitinase, some ATP-binding cassette transporters, and heat shock protein-encoding genes were upregulated in Δxyr1. When cultured on glucose, a total of 281 genes were expressed differentially in Δxyr1, most of which were involved in energy, solute transport, lipid, amino acid, and monosaccharide as well as secondary metabolism. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that the intracellular β-glucosidase bgl2, the putative nonenzymatic cellulose-attacking gene cip1, the MFS lactose transporter lp, the nmrA-like gene, endo T, the acid protease pepA, and the small heat shock protein hsp23 were probable Xyr1-targets. These results might help elucidate the regulation system for synthesis and secretion of (hemicellulases in T. reesei Rut-C30.

  5. [Transposon expression and potential effects on gene regulation of Brassica rapa and B. oleracea genomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei-Xia; Zhang, Biao; Liu, Sheng-Yi; Ma, Jian-Xin

    2013-08-01

    Transposons or transposable elements (TEs) are ubiquitous and most abundant DNA components in higher eukaryotes. Recent sequencing of the Brassica rapa and B. oleracea genomes revealed that the amplification of TEs is one of the main factors inducing the difference in genome size. However, the expressions of TEs and the TE effects on gene regulation and functions of these two Brassica diploid species were unclear. Here, we analyzed the RNA sequencing data of leaves, roots, and stems from B. rapa and B. oleracea. Our data showed that overall TEs in either genome expressed at very low levels, and the expression levels of different TE categories and families varied among different organs. Moreover, even for the same TE category or family, the expression activities were distinct between the two Brassica diploids. Forty-one and nine LTR retrotransposons with the transcripts that read into their adjacent sequences have the distances shorter than 2 kb and 100 bp compared to the downstream genes. These LTR retrotransposon readout transcriptions may produce sense or antisense transcripts of nearby genes, with the effects on activating or silencing corresponding genes. Meanwhile, intact LTRs were detected at stronger readout activities than solo LTRs. Of the TEs inserted into genes, the frequencies were ob-served at a higher level in B. rapa than in B. oleracea. In addition, DNA transposons were prone to insert or retain in the intronic regions of genes in either Brassica genomes. These results revealed that the TEs may have potential effects on regulating protein coding genes.

  6. Two differentially regulated Arabidopsis genes define a new branch of the DFR superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, L; Lauvergeat, V; Naested, H

    2001-01-01

    resembling the expression pattern of late embryogenic abundant ABA-responsive genes. Differential expression of the two genes during plant development was confirmed in plants expressing transcriptional fusions between the two promoters and the Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. This showed......Two tandem genes were identified on Arabidopsis chromosome II (AtCRL1 and AtCRL2) encoding proteins with homology to members of the dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) superfamily. The encoded CRL1 and CRL2 proteins share 87% mutual amino acid sequence identity whereas their promoter regions...... are highly divergent, suggesting differential regulation of the CRL genes. Phylogenetic analysis placed CRL1 and CRL2 in a separate branch of the DFR superfamily. Northern blotting showed strong AtCRL1 induction by abscisic acid (ABA), drought, and heat shock, and high expression level in seeds, thus...

  7. Identification of genes regulated during mechanical load-induced cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnatty, S. E.; Dyck, J. R.; Michael, L. H.; Olson, E. N.; Abdellatif, M.; Schneider, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is associated with both adaptive and adverse changes in gene expression. To identify genes regulated by pressure overload, we performed suppressive subtractive hybridization between cDNA from the hearts of aortic-banded (7-day) and sham-operated mice. In parallel, we performed a subtraction between an adult and a neonatal heart, for the purpose of comparing different forms of cardiac hypertrophy. Sequencing more than 100 clones led to the identification of an array of functionally known (70%) and unknown genes (30%) that are upregulated during cardiac growth. At least nine of those genes were preferentially expressed in both the neonatal and pressure over-load hearts alike. Using Northern blot analysis to investigate whether some of the identified genes were upregulated in the load-independent calcineurin-induced cardiac hypertrophy mouse model, revealed its incomplete similarity with the former models of cardiac growth. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  8. Multiple Enhancers Regulate Hoxd Genes and the Hotdog LncRNA during Cecum Budding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Delpretti

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hox genes are required for the development of the intestinal cecum, a major organ of plant-eating species. We have analyzed the transcriptional regulation of Hoxd genes in cecal buds and show that they are controlled by a series of enhancers located in a gene desert flanking the HoxD cluster. The start site of two opposite long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs, Hotdog and Twin of Hotdog, selectively contacts the expressed Hoxd genes in the framework of a topological domain, coinciding with robust transcription of these genes during cecum budding. Both lncRNAs are specifically transcribed in the cecum, albeit bearing no detectable function in trans. Hedgehogs have kept this regulatory potential despite the absence of the cecum, suggesting that these mechanisms are used in other developmental situations. In this context, we discuss the implementation of a common “budding toolkit” between the cecum and the limbs.

  9. Post-transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein genes during serum starvation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Ojha, Sandeep; Srivastava, Ankita; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2015-06-01

    Ribosome synthesis involves all three RNA polymerases which are co-ordinately regulated to produce equimolar amounts of rRNAs and ribosomal proteins (RPs). Unlike model organisms where transcription of rRNA and RP genes slows down during stress, in E. histolytica rDNA transcription continues but pre-rRNA processing slows down and unprocessed pre-rRNA accumulates during serum starvation. To investigate the regulation of RP genes under stress we measured transcription of six selected RP genes from the small- and large-ribosomal subunits (RPS6, RPS3, RPS19, RPL5, RPL26, RPL30) representing the early-, mid-, and late-stages of ribosomal assembly. Transcripts of these genes persisted in growth-stressed cells. Expression of luciferase reporter under the control of two RP genes (RPS19 and RPL30) was studied during serum starvation and upon serum replenishment. Although luciferase transcript levels remained unchanged during starvation, luciferase activity steadily declined to 7.8% and 15% of control cells, respectively. After serum replenishment the activity increased to normal levels, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation of these genes. Mutations in the sequence -2 to -9 upstream of AUG in the RPL30 gene resulted in the phenotype expected of post-transcriptional regulation. Transcription of luciferase reporter was unaffected in this mutant, and luciferase activity did not decline during serum starvation, showing that this sequence is required to repress translation of RPL30 mRNA, and mutations in this region relieve repression. Our data show that during serum starvation E. histolytica blocks ribosome biogenesis post-transcriptionally by inhibiting pre-rRNA processing on the one hand, and the translation of RP mRNAs on the other. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamic regulation of gene expression using sucrose responsive promoters and RNA interference in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas C; Espinosa, Monica I; Nielsen, Lars K; Vickers, Claudia E

    2015-04-01

    Engineering dynamic, environmentally- and temporally-responsive control of gene expression is one of the principle objectives in the field of synthetic biology. Dynamic regulation is desirable because many engineered functions conflict with endogenous processes which have evolved to facilitate growth and survival, and minimising conflict between growth and production phases can improve product titres in microbial cell factories. There are a limited number of mechanisms that enable dynamic regulation in yeast, and fewer still that are appropriate for application in an industrial setting. To address this problem we have identified promoters that are repressed during growth on glucose, and activated during growth on sucrose. Catabolite repression and preferential glucose utilisation allows active growth on glucose before switching to production on sucrose. Using sucrose as an activator of gene expression circumvents the need for expensive inducer compounds and enables gene expression to be triggered during growth on a fermentable, high energy-yield carbon source. The ability to fine-tune the timing and population density at which gene expression is activated from the SUC2 promoter was demonstrated by varying the ratio of glucose to sucrose in the growth medium. Finally, we demonstrated that the system could also be used to repress gene expression (a process also required for many engineering projects). We used the glucose/sucrose system to control a heterologous RNA interference module and dynamically repress the expression of a constitutively regulated GFP gene. The low noise levels and high dynamic range of the SUC2 promoter make it a promising option for implementing dynamic regulation in yeast. The capacity to repress gene expression using RNA interference makes the system highly versatile, with great potential for metabolic engineering applications.

  11. Regulation of episomal gene expression by KRAB/KAP1-mediated histone modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barde, Isabelle; Laurenti, Elisa; Verp, Sonia; Groner, Anna Claire; Towne, Christopher; Padrun, Viviane; Aebischer, Patrick; Trumpp, Andreas; Trono, Didier

    2009-06-01

    KAP1 is an essential cofactor of KRAB zinc finger proteins, a family of vertebrate-specific epigenetic repressors of largely unknown functions encoded in the hundreds by the mouse and human genomes. So far, KRAB/KAP1-mediated gene regulation has been studied within the environment of chromosomal DNA. Here we demonstrate that KRAB/KAP1 regulation is fully functional within the context of episomal DNA, such as adeno-associated viral and nonintegrated lentiviral vectors, and is correlated with histone modifications typically associated with this epigenetic regulator.

  12. Homologues of Genetic Transformation DNA Import Genes Are Required for Rhodobacter capsulatus Gene Transfer Agent Recipient Capability Regulated by the Response Regulator CtrA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimacombe, Cedric A; Ding, Hao; Johnson, Jeanette A; Beatty, J Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Gene transfer agents (GTAs) morphologically resemble small, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophages; however, their only known role is to package and transfer random pieces of the producing cell genome to recipient cells. The best understood GTA is that of Rhodobacter capsulatus, termed RcGTA. We discovered that homologues of three genes involved in natural transformation in other bacteria, comEC, comF, and comM, are essential for RcGTA-mediated gene acquisition. This paper gives genetic and biochemical evidence that RcGTA-borne DNA entry into cells requires the ComEC and ComF putative DNA transport proteins and genetic evidence that putative cytoplasmic ComM protein of unknown function is required for recipient capability. Furthermore, the master regulator of RcGTA production in bacterial horizontal gene transfer mechanisms, where donor DNA is packaged in transducing phage-like particles and recipient cells take up DNA using natural transformation-related machinery. Both of these differentiated subsets of a culture population, donors and recipients, are dependent on the same response regulator, CtrA. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a major driver of bacterial evolution and adaptation to environmental stresses. Traits such as antibiotic resistance or metabolic properties can be transferred between bacteria via HGT; thus, HGT can have a tremendous effect on the fitness of a bacterial population. The three classically described HGT mechanisms are conjugation, transformation, and phage-mediated transduction. More recently, the HGT factor GTA was described, where random pieces of producing cell genome are packaged into phage-like particles that deliver DNA to recipient cells. In this report, we show that transport of DNA borne by the R. capsulatus RcGTA into recipient cells requires key genes previously thought to be specific to natural transformation pathways. These findings indicate that RcGTA combines central aspects of phage-mediated transduction and natural

  13. Spatial regulation of a common precursor from two distinct genes generates metabolite diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Sun, Wei-Wen; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Oakley, Berl R.; Keller, Nancy P.; Wang, Clay C.

    2015-07-13

    In secondary metabolite biosynthesis, core synthetic genes such as polyketide synthase genes or non-ribosomal peptide synthase genes usually encode proteins that generate various backbone precursors. These precursors are modified by other tailoring enzymes to yield a large variety of different secondary metabolites. The number of core synthesis genes in a given species correlates, therefore, with the number of types of secondary metabolites the organism can produce. In our study, heterologous expression of all the A. terreus NRPS-like genes showed that two NRPS-like proteins, encoded by atmelA and apvA, release the same natural product, aspulvinone E. More interestingly, further experiments revealed that the aspulvinone E produced by two different genes accumulates in different fungal compartments. And this spatial control of aspulvinone E production is likely to be regulated by their own specific promoters. Comparative genomics indicates that atmelA and apvA might share a same ancestral gene and the gene apvA is inserted in a highly conserved region in Aspergillus species that contains genes coding for life-essential proteins. The study also identified one trans-prenyltransferase AbpB which is capable of prenylating two different substrates aspulvinones and butyrolactones. In total, our study shows the first example in which the locally distribution of the same natural product could lead to its incorporation into different SM pathways.

  14. Array2BIO: from microarray expression data to functional annotation of co-regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasley Amy

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several isolated tools for partial analysis of microarray expression data. To provide an integrative, easy-to-use and automated toolkit for the analysis of Affymetrix microarray expression data we have developed Array2BIO, an application that couples several analytical methods into a single web based utility. Results Array2BIO converts raw intensities into probe expression values, automatically maps those to genes, and subsequently identifies groups of co-expressed genes using two complementary approaches: (1 comparative analysis of signal versus control and (2 clustering analysis of gene expression across different conditions. The identified genes are assigned to functional categories based on Gene Ontology classification and KEGG protein interaction pathways. Array2BIO reliably handles low-expressor genes and provides a set of statistical methods for quantifying expression levels, including Benjamini-Hochberg and Bonferroni multiple testing corrections. An automated interface with the ECR Browser provides evolutionary conservation analysis for the identified gene loci while the interconnection with Crème allows prediction of gene regulatory elements that underlie observed expression patterns. Conclusion We have developed Array2BIO – a web based tool for rapid comprehensive analysis of Affymetrix microarray expression data, which also allows users to link expression data to Dcode.org comparative genomics tools and integrates a system for translating co-expression data into mechanisms of gene co-regulation. Array2BIO is publicly available at http://array2bio.dcode.org.

  15. From genes to milk: genomic organization and epigenetic regulation of the mammary transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Danielle G; Pollard, Katherine S; Martin, William F; Freeman Zadrowski, Courtneay; Hernandez, Joseph; Korf, Ian; German, J Bruce; Rijnkels, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Even in genomes lacking operons, a gene's position in the genome influences its potential for expression. The mechanisms by which adjacent genes are co-expressed are still not completely understood. Using lactation and the mammary gland as a model system, we explore the hypothesis that chromatin state contributes to the co-regulation of gene neighborhoods. The mammary gland represents a unique evolutionary model, due to its recent appearance, in the context of vertebrate genomes. An understanding of how the mammary gland is regulated to produce milk is also of biomedical and agricultural importance for human lactation and dairying. Here, we integrate epigenomic and transcriptomic data to develop a comprehensive regulatory model. Neighborhoods of mammary-expressed genes were determined using expression data derived from pregnant and lactating mice and a neighborhood scoring tool, G-NEST. Regions of open and closed chromatin were identified by ChIP-Seq of histone modifications H3K36me3, H3K4me2, and H3K27me3 in the mouse mammary gland and liver tissue during lactation. We found that neighborhoods of genes in regions of uniquely active chromatin in the lactating mammary gland, compared with liver tissue, were extremely rare. Rather, genes in most neighborhoods were suppressed during lactation as reflected in their expression levels and their location in regions of silenced chromatin. Chromatin silencing was largely shared between the liver and mammary gland during lactation, and what distinguished the mammary gland was mainly a small tissue-specific repertoire of isolated, expressed genes. These findings suggest that an advantage of the neighborhood organization is in the collective repression of groups of genes via a shared mechanism of chromatin repression. Genes essential to the mammary gland's uniqueness are isolated from neighbors, and likely have less tolerance for variation in expression, properties they share with genes responsible for an organism's survival.

  16. A Precisely Regulated Gene Expression Cassette Potently Modulates Metastasis and Survival in Multiple Solid Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kun; Ganesan, Kumaresan; Tan, Lay Keng; Laban, Mirtha; Wu, Jeanie; Zhao, Xiao Dong; Li, Hongmin; Leung, Carol Ho Wing; Zhu, Yansong; Wei, Chia Lin; Hooi, Shing Chuan; Miller, Lance; Tan, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Successful tumor development and progression involves the complex interplay of both pro- and anti-oncogenic signaling pathways. Genetic components balancing these opposing activities are likely to require tight regulation, because even subtle alterations in their expression may disrupt this balance with major consequences for various cancer-associated phenotypes. Here, we describe a cassette of cancer-specific genes exhibiting precise transcriptional control in solid tumors. Mining a database of tumor gene expression profiles from six different tissues, we identified 48 genes exhibiting highly restricted levels of gene expression variation in tumors (n = 270) compared to nonmalignant tissues (n = 71). Comprising genes linked to multiple cancer-related pathways, the restricted expression of this “Poised Gene Cassette” (PGC) was robustly validated across 11 independent cohorts of ∼1,300 samples from multiple cancer types. In three separate experimental models, subtle alterations in PGC expression were consistently associated with significant differences in metastatic and invasive potential. We functionally confirmed this association in siRNA knockdown experiments of five PGC genes (p53CSV, MAP3K11, MTCH2, CPSF6, and SKIP), which either directly enhanced the invasive capacities or inhibited the proliferation of AGS cancer cells. In primary tumors, similar subtle alterations in PGC expression were also repeatedly associated with clinical outcome in multiple cohorts. Taken collectively, these findings support the existence of a common set of precisely controlled genes in solid tumors. Since inducing small activity changes in these genes may prove sufficient to potently influence various tumor phenotypes such as metastasis, targeting such precisely regulated genes may represent a promising avenue for novel anti-cancer therapies. PMID:18636107

  17. A precisely regulated gene expression cassette potently modulates metastasis and survival in multiple solid cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Yu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Successful tumor development and progression involves the complex interplay of both pro- and anti-oncogenic signaling pathways. Genetic components balancing these opposing activities are likely to require tight regulation, because even subtle alterations in their expression may disrupt this balance with major consequences for various cancer-associated phenotypes. Here, we describe a cassette of cancer-specific genes exhibiting precise transcriptional control in solid tumors. Mining a database of tumor gene expression profiles from six different tissues, we identified 48 genes exhibiting highly restricted levels of gene expression variation in tumors (n = 270 compared to nonmalignant tissues (n = 71. Comprising genes linked to multiple cancer-related pathways, the restricted expression of this "Poised Gene Cassette" (PGC was robustly validated across 11 independent cohorts of approximately 1,300 samples from multiple cancer types. In three separate experimental models, subtle alterations in PGC expression were consistently associated with significant differences in metastatic and invasive potential. We functionally confirmed this association in siRNA knockdown experiments of five PGC genes (p53CSV, MAP3K11, MTCH2, CPSF6, and SKIP, which either directly enhanced the invasive capacities or inhibited the proliferation of AGS cancer cells. In primary tumors, similar subtle alterations in PGC expression were also repeatedly associated with clinical outcome in multiple cohorts. Taken collectively, these findings support the existence of a common set of precisely controlled genes in solid tumors. Since inducing small activity changes in these genes may prove sufficient to potently influence various tumor phenotypes such as metastasis, targeting such precisely regulated genes may represent a promising avenue for novel anti-cancer therapies.

  18. EST analysis in Ginkgo biloba: an assessment of conserved developmental regulators and gymnosperm specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Eric D; Katari, Manpreet S; Stevenson, Dennis W; Rudd, Stephen A; Douglas, Andrew W; Moss, Walter N; Twigg, Richard W; Runko, Suzan J; Stellari, Giulia M; McCombie, W R; Coruzzi, Gloria M

    2005-10-15

    Ginkgo biloba L. is the only surviving member of one of the oldest living seed plant groups with medicinal, spiritual and horticultural importance worldwide. As an evolutionary relic, it displays many characters found in the early, extinct seed plants and extant cycads. To establish a molecular base to understand the evolution of seeds and pollen, we created a cDNA library and EST dataset from the reproductive structures of male (microsporangiate), female (megasporangiate), and vegetative organs (leaves) of Ginkgo biloba. RNA from newly emerged male and female reproductive organs and immature leaves was used to create three distinct cDNA libraries from which 6,434 ESTs were generated. These 6,434 ESTs from Ginkgo biloba were clustered into 3,830 unigenes. A comparison of our Ginkgo unigene set against the fully annotated genomes of rice and Arabidopsis, and all available ESTs in Genbank revealed that 256 Ginkgo unigenes match only genes among the gymnosperms and non-seed plants--many with multiple matches to genes in non-angiosperm plants. Conversely, another group of unigenes in Gingko had highly significant homology to transcription factors in angiosperms involved in development, including MADS box genes as well as post-transcriptional regulators. Several of the conserved developmental genes found in Ginkgo had top BLAST homology to cycad genes. We also note here the presence of ESTs in G. biloba similar to genes that to date have only been found in gymnosperms and an additional 22 Ginkgo genes common only to genes from cycads. Our analysis of an EST dataset from G. biloba revealed genes potentially unique to gymnosperms. Many of these genes showed homology to fully sequenced clones from our cycad EST dataset found in common only with gymnosperms. Other Ginkgo ESTs are similar to developmental regulators in higher plants. This work sets the stage for future studies on Ginkgo to better understand seed and pollen evolution, and to resolve the ambiguous phylogenetic

  19. Genes regulated by the Escherichia coli SOS repressor LexA exhibit heterogenous expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillor Osnat

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenotypic heterogeneity may ensure that a small fraction of a population survives environmental perturbations or may result in lysis in a subpopulation, to increase the survival of siblings. Genes involved in DNA repair and population dynamics play key roles in rapid responses to environmental conditions. In Escherichia coli the transcriptional repressor LexA controls a coordinated cellular response to DNA damage designated the SOS response. Expression of LexA regulated genes, e.g. colicin encoding genes, recA, lexA and umuDC, was examined utilizing transcription fusions with the promoterless gfp at the single cell level. Results The investigated LexA regulated genes exhibited heterogeneity, as only in a small fraction of the population more intense fluorescence was observed. Unlike recA and lexA, the pore forming and nuclease colicin activity genes as well as umuDC, exhibited no basal level activity. However, in a lexA defective strain high level expression of the gene fusions was observed in the large majority of the cells. All of the investigated genes were expressed in a recA defective strain, albeit at lower levels, revealing expression in the absence of a spontaneous SOS response. In addition, the simultaneous expression of cka, encoding the pore forming colicin K, and lexA, investigated at the single cell level revealed high level expression of only cka in rare individual cells. Conclusion LexA regulated genes exhibit phenotypic heterogeneity as high level expression is observed in only a small subpopulation of cells. Heterogenous expression is established primarily by stochastic factors and the binding affinity of LexA to SOS boxes.

  20. Comparative genomic sequence analysis of the human and mouse cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Rachel E.; Jamison, D. Curtis; Touchman, Jeffrey W.; Chissoe, Stephanie L.; Braden Maduro, Valerie V.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; Dietrich, Nicole L.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Iyer, Leslie M.; Weintraub, Lauren A.; Cotton, Marc; Courtney, Laura; Edwards, Jennifer; Maupin, Rachel; Ozersky, Philip; Rohlfing, Theresa; Wohldmann, Patricia; Miner, Tracie; Kemp, Kimberley; Kramer, Jason; Korf, Ian; Pepin, Kimberlie; Antonacci-Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert S.; Minx, Patrick; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Wilson, Richard K.; Waterston, Robert H.; Miller, Webb; Green, Eric D.

    2000-01-01

    The identification of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) in 1989 represents a landmark accomplishment in human genetics. Since that time, there have been numerous advances in elucidating the function of the encoded protein and the physiological basis of cystic fibrosis. However, numerous areas of cystic fibrosis biology require additional investigation, some of which would be facilitated by information about the long-range sequence context of the CFTR gene. For example, the latter might provide clues about the sequence elements responsible for the temporal and spatial regulation of CFTR expression. We thus sought to establish the sequence of the chromosomal segments encompassing the human CFTR and mouse Cftr genes, with the hope of identifying conserved regions of biologic interest by sequence comparison. Bacterial clone-based physical maps of the relevant human and mouse genomic regions were constructed, and minimally overlapping sets of clones were selected and sequenced, eventually yielding ≈1.6 Mb and ≈358 kb of contiguous human and mouse sequence, respectively. These efforts have produced the complete sequence of the ≈189-kb and ≈152-kb segments containing the human CFTR and mouse Cftr genes, respectively, as well as significant amounts of flanking DNA. Analyses of the resulting data provide insights about the organization of the CFTR/Cftr genes and potential sequence elements regulating their expression. Furthermore, the generated sequence reveals the precise architecture of genes residing near CFTR/Cftr, including one known gene (WNT2/Wnt2) and two previously unknown genes that immediately flank CFTR/Cftr. PMID:10655503

  1. Thyroid hormone signalling genes are regulated by photoperiod in the hypothalamus of F344 rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander W Ross

    Full Text Available Seasonal animals adapt their physiology and behaviour in anticipation of climate change to optimise survival of their offspring. Intra-hypothalamic thyroid hormone signalling plays an important role in seasonal responses in mammals and birds. In the F344 rat, photoperiod stimulates profound changes in food intake, body weight and reproductive status. Previous investigations of the F344 rat have suggested a role for thyroid hormone metabolism, but have only considered Dio2 expression, which was elevated in long day photoperiods. Microarray analysis was used to identify time-dependent changes in photoperiod responsive genes, which may underlie the photoperiod-dependent phenotypes of the juvenile F344 rat. The most significant changes are those related to thyroid hormone metabolism and transport. Using photoperiod manipulations and melatonin injections into long day photoperiod (LD rats to mimic short day (SD, we show photoinduction and photosuppression gene expression profiles and melatonin responsiveness of genes by in situ hybridization; TSHβ, CGA, Dio2 and Oatp1c1 genes were all elevated in LD whilst in SD, Dio3 and MCT-8 mRNA were increased. NPY was elevated in SD whilst GALP increased in LD. The photoinduction and photosuppression profiles for GALP were compared to that of GHRH with GALP expression following GHRH temporally. We also reveal gene sets involved in photoperiodic responses, including retinoic acid and Wnt/ß-catenin signalling. This study extends our knowledge of hypothalamic regulation by photoperiod, by revealing large temporal changes in expression of thyroid hormone signalling genes following photoperiod switch. Surprisingly, large changes in hypothalamic thyroid hormone levels or TRH expression were not detected. Expression of NPY and GALP, two genes known to regulate GHRH, were also changed by photoperiod. Whether these genes could provide links between thyroid hormone signalling and the regulation of the growth axis

  2. Local regulation of gene expression by lncRNA promoters, transcription and splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engreitz, Jesse M; Haines, Jenna E; Perez, Elizabeth M; Munson, Glen; Chen, Jenny; Kane, Michael; McDonel, Patrick E; Guttman, Mitchell; Lander, Eric S

    2016-11-17

    Mammalian genomes are pervasively transcribed to produce thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). A few of these lncRNAs have been shown to recruit regulatory complexes through RNA-protein interactions to influence the expression of nearby genes, and it has been suggested that many other lncRNAs can also act as local regulators. Such local functions could explain the observation that lncRNA expression is often correlated with the expression of nearby genes. However, these correlations have been challenging to dissect and could alternatively result from processes that are not mediated by the lncRNA transcripts themselves. For example, some gene promoters have been proposed to have dual functions as enhancers, and the process of transcription itself may contribute to gene regulation by recruiting activating factors or remodelling nucleosomes. Here we use genetic manipulation in mouse cell lines to dissect 12 genomic loci that produce lncRNAs and find that 5 of these loci influence the expression of a neighbouring gene in cis. Notably, none of these effects requires the specific lncRNA transcripts themselves and instead involves general processes associated with their production, including enhancer-like activity of gene promoters, the process of transcription, and the splicing of the transcript. Furthermore, such effects are not limited to lncRNA loci: we find that four out of six protein-coding loci also influence the expression of a neighbour. These results demonstrate that cross-talk among neighbouring genes is a prevalent phenomenon that can involve multiple mechanisms and cis-regulatory signals, including a role for RNA splice sites. These mechanisms may explain the function and evolution of some genomic loci that produce lncRNAs and broadly contribute to the regulation of both coding and non-coding genes.

  3. Single-cell epigenomics: powerful new methods for understanding gene regulation and cell identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Stephen J; Lee, Heather J; Smallwood, Sébastien A; Kelsey, Gavin; Reik, Wolf

    2016-04-18

    Emerging single-cell epigenomic methods are being developed with the exciting potential to transform our knowledge of gene regulation. Here we review available techniques and future possibilities, arguing that the full potential of single-cell epigenetic studies will be realized through parallel profiling of genomic, transcriptional, and epigenetic information.

  4. A FTH1 gene:pseudogene:microRNA network regulates tumorigenesis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jia Jia; Kwok, Zhi Hao; Chew, Xiao Hong; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Chao; Soong, Tuck Wah; Yang, Henry; Tay, Yvonne

    2017-12-12

    Non-coding RNAs play a vital role in diverse cellular processes. Pseudogenes, which are non-coding homologs of protein-coding genes, were once considered non-functional evolutional relics. However, recent studies have shown that pseudogene transcripts can regulate their parental transcripts by sequestering shared microRNAs (miRNAs), thus acting as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs). In this study, we utilize an unbiased screen to identify the ferritin heavy chain 1 (FTH1) transcript and multiple FTH1 pseudogenes as targets of several oncogenic miRNAs in prostate cancer (PCa). We characterize the critical role of this FTH1 gene:pseudogene:miRNA network in regulating tumorigenesis in PCa, whereby oncogenic miRNAs downregulate the expression of FTH1 and its pseudogenes to drive oncogenesis. We further show that impairing miRNA binding and subsequent ceRNA crosstalk completely rescues the slow growth phenotype in vitro and in vivo. Our results also demonstrate the reciprocal regulation between the pseudogenes and intracellular iron levels, which are crucial for multiple physiological and pathophysiological processes. In summary, we describe an extensive gene:pseudogene network comprising multiple miRNAs and multiple pseudogenes derived from a single parental gene. The network could be regulated through multiple mechanisms to modulate iron storage in various signaling pathways, the deregulation of which results in PCa development and progression. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. KNOX1 genes regulate lignin deposition and composition in monocots and dicots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad T Townsley

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant secondary cell walls are deposited mostly in vascular tissues such as xylem vessels, tracheids, and fibers. These cell walls are composed of a complex matrix of compounds including cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Lignin functions primarily to maintain the structural and mechanical integrity of both the transport vessel and the entire plant itself. Since lignin has been identified as a major source of biomass for biofuels, regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis has been a topic of much recent investigation. Biosynthesis and patterning of lignin involves many developmental and environmental cues including evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulatory modules and hormonal signals. Here, we investigate the role of the class I KNOX genes and gibberellic acid in the lignin biosynthetic pathway in a representative monocot and a representative eudicot. Knotted1 overexpressing mutant plants showed a reduction in lignin content in both maize and tobacco. Expression of four key lignin biosynthesis genes was analyzed and revealed that KNOX1 genes regulate at least two steps in the lignin biosynthesis pathway. The negative regulation of lignin both in a monocot and a eudicot by the maize Kn1 gene suggests that lignin biosynthesis may be preserved across large phylogenetic distances. The evolutionary implications of regulation of lignification across divergent species are discussed.

  6. Identification of 2 novel genes developmentally regulated in the mouse aorta-gonad-mesonephros region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio; E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe first adult-repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge in the mouse aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region at embryonic day 10.5 prior to their appearance in the yolk sac and fetal liver. Although several genes are implicated in the regulation of HSCs, there

  7. MDP Up-Regulates the Gene Expression of Type I Interferons in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiumei Xie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Muramyldipeptide (MDP, the minimum essential structure responsible for the immuno-adjuvant activity of peptidoglycan, is recognized by intracellular nuclear-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2. Here, we obtained evidence that the treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs with MDP up-regulated the gene expression of type I interferons in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MDP also up-regulated the expression of the receptor NOD2, suggesting that MDP may induce a positive feedback response. The up-regulation of interferons was not dependent on the TNFa signaling, as HAECs did not express TNFa with the stimulation of MDP, and TNFa neutralizing antibody did not decrease the induction of IFNs induced by MDP. RT-PCR results showed that HAECs expressed the gene transcripts of interferon regulatory factor (IRF 1, 2, 3, 9. The western blot results showed that MDP induced the phosphorylation of IRF3. These results suggested that MDP induced the up-regulation of gene transcript of interferons through the activation of IRF3 signaling pathway. Meanwhile, MDP induced the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1ß, IL-8, and MCP-1. Taken together, these results suggested that HAECs may play roles in the anti-infection immune response and in the induction of innate immunity.

  8. Mouse Protocadherin-1 Gene Expression Is Regulated by Cigarette Smoke Exposure In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Henk; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Brouwer, Uilke; den Boef, Lisette E.; Gras, Renee; Reinders-Luinge, Marjan; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; van der Toorn, Marco; Hylkema, Machteld N.; Willemse, Brigitte W. M.; Sayers, Ian; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Nawijn, Martijn C.

    2014-01-01

    Protocadherin-1 (PCDH1) is a novel susceptibility gene for airway hyperresponsiveness, first identified in families exposed to cigarette smoke and is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells. Here, we asked how mouse Pcdh1 expression is regulated in lung structural cells in vivo under physiological

  9. Characterization of human FHL2 transcript variants and gene expression regulation in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chor-Fung; Zhou, Wayne Jun-Wei; Ng, Patrick Kwok-Shing; Li, Man-Shan; Ng, Yuen-Keng; Lai, Paul Bo-San; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing

    2011-07-15

    The four-and-a-half LIM protein 2 (FHL2) was originally identified to be expressed abundantly in the heart, as well as in a wide range of tissues demonstrated in various studies. The human FHL2 gene expresses different transcripts which are known to differ only in the 5'UTR region. However, little is known about the functional role of the different variants and the mechanism of gene regulation. In the present study, we characterized the different alternative spliced transcripts of FHL2 by in silico analysis and RT-PCR analysis. A novel transcript variant was identified. The FHL2 gene produces transcripts by different 5' exons, which may be responsible for tissue-specific regulation. To study the mechanism of FHL2 gene regulation, the potential promoter region was investigated. We have identified a functional promoter region upstream of the transcription start site. Deletion mutation analysis of 5' flanking region showed that the fragment from -138 to +292 bp have positive regulatory effect. We identified the binding sites of Pax-5/ZF5 in this region and found that Pax-5 and ZF5 expression in HCC samples had a significant positive correlation with FHL2 expression, suggesting a possible role for these transcription factors in the regulation of FHL2 expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Distinct C/EBPalpha motifs regulate lipogenic and gluconeogenic gene expression in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas A; Bereshchenko, Oxana; Garcia-Silva, Susana

    2007-01-01

    gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis. In vivo deletion of a proline-histidine rich domain (PHR), dephosphorylated at S193 by insulin signaling, dysregulated genes involved in the generation of acetyl-CoA and NADPH for triglyceride synthesis and led to increased hepatic lipogenesis. These promoters bound SREBP-1....../EBPalpha phosphorylation as a PGC-1alpha-independent mechanism for regulating hepatic gluconeogenesis....

  11. The pseudokinase NIPI-4 is a novel regulator of antimicrobial peptide gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sid Ahmed Labed

    Full Text Available Hosts have developed diverse mechanisms to counter the pathogens they face in their natural environment. Throughout the plant and animal kingdoms, the up-regulation of antimicrobial peptides is a common response to infection. In C. elegans, infection with the natural pathogen Drechmeria coniospora leads to rapid induction of antimicrobial peptide gene expression in the epidermis. Through a large genetic screen we have isolated many new mutants that are incapable of upregulating the antimicrobial peptide nlp-29 in response to infection (i.e. with a Nipi or 'no induction of peptide after infection' phenotype. More than half of the newly isolated Nipi mutants do not correspond to genes previously associated with the regulation of antimicrobial peptides. One of these, nipi-4, encodes a member of a nematode-specific kinase family. NIPI-4 is predicted to be catalytically inactive, thus to be a pseudokinase. It acts in the epidermis downstream of the PKC∂ TPA-1, as a positive regulator of nlp antimicrobial peptide gene expression after infection. It also controls the constitutive expression of antimicrobial peptide genes of the cnc family that are targets of TGFß regulation. Our results open the way for a more detailed understanding of how host defense pathways can be molded by environmental pathogens.

  12. The ERK1/2 pathway regulates testosterone synthesis by coordinately regulating the expression of steroidogenic genes in Leydig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzkin, Maria Eugenia; Yamashita, Soichi; Ascoli, Mario

    2013-05-06

    Adult mice with a Leydig cell specific deletion of MAPK kinase (MEK) 1 and 2 (Mek1(f)(/)(f);Mek2(-/-);Cre(+)) mice display Leydig cell hypoplasia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. We used radioimmunoassays and quantitative PCR to evaluate the function and expression of the Leydig cell genes involved in the conversion of cholesterol to testosterone (Star, Cyp11a1, Hsd3b6, Cyp17a1 and Hsd17b3), androgen metabolism (Srda1 and Dhrs9), and four transcription factors (Creb1, Nr5a1, Nr4a1 and Nr0b1) that regulate the expression of steroidogenic genes. We show that Star, Hsd3b6, Cyp17a1 and Hsd17b3 are downregulated in Ledyig cells of adult Mek1(f)(/)(f);Mek2(-/-);Cre(+) mice whereas Srda1 and Dhrs9 are upregulated and Creb1, Nr5a1, Nr4a1 and Nr0b1 are unchanged or upregulated. Functionally, all the downregulated genes but none of the upregulated genes contribute to the decrease in testosterone synthesis in Leydig cells of adult Mek1(f)(/)(f);Mek2(-/-);Cre(+) mice because they produce low testosterone and dihydrotestosterone when stimulated with hCG or when incubated with testosterone precursors such as progesterone or androstenedione. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Distinguishing the Transcription Regulation Patterns in Promoters of Human Genes with Different Function or Evolutionary Age

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir

    2012-07-01

    Distinguishing transcription regulatory patterns of different gene groups is a common problem in various bioinformatics studies. In this work we developed a methodology to deal with such a problem based on machine learning techniques. We applied our method to two biologically important problems related to detecting a difference in transcription regulation of: a/ protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human, as well as b/ a difference between primate-specific and non-primate-specific long non-coding RNAs. Our method is capable to classify RNAs using various regulatory features of genes that transcribe into these RNAs, such as nucleotide frequencies, transcription factor binding sites, de novo sequence motifs, CpG islands, repetitive elements, histone modification marks, and others. Ten-fold cross-validation tests suggest that our model can distinguish protein-coding and non-coding RNAs with accuracy above 80%. Twenty-fold cross-validation tests suggest that our model can distinguish primate-specific from non-primate-specific promoters of lncRNAs with accuracy above 80%. Consequently, we can hypothesize that transcription of the groups of genes mentioned above are regulated by different mechanisms. Feature selection techniques allowed us to reduce the number of features significantly while keeping the accuracy around 80%. Consequently, we can conclude that selected features play significant role in transcription regulation of coding and non-coding genes, as well as primate-specific and non-primate-specific lncRNA genes.

  14. [Mechanism of GLI3 gene transcription regulation in idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dong-hua; Lin, Chang-kun; Jin, Chun-lian

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the mechanism of transcription regulation of GLI3 gene in idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus. pGL3-Gli3 luciferase report vectors were constructed, and the activity of Gli3 promoter was explored. A P-Match software was used to analyze the sequence upstream of the transcription start site of rat Gli3 gene, which was subsequently verified with chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (CHIP) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Expression of the Gli3 gene was analyzed in L6 cells transfected with Hoxd13 small interference RNA(siRNA) and Hoxd13 expression vectors. The 5' region of rat Gli3 gene contains two potential binding sites for the Hoxd13 protein. CHIP and EMSA assays both confirmed that Hoxd13 can directly bind with site 2. As shown in L6 cells, expression of Gli3 may be enhanced with silencing of Hoxd13, whilst exogenous expression of Hoxd13 can down-regulate transcription of Gli3. Hoxd13 can directly regulate the expression of Gli3 gene through a Hoxd13 binding site in the limb of rat embryo.

  15. Expression profiling identifies novel Hh/Gli-regulated genes in developing zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Sadie A; Milla, Luis A; Villegas, Rosario; Shen, Meng-Chieh; Burgess, Shawn M; Allende, Miguel L; Karlstrom, Rolf O; Palma, Verónica

    2008-02-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays critical instructional roles during embryonic development. Misregulation of Hh/Gli signaling is a major causative factor in human congenital disorders and in a variety of cancers. The zebrafish is a powerful genetic model for the study of Hh signaling during embryogenesis, as a large number of mutants that affect different components of the Hh/Gli signaling system have been identified. By performing global profiling of gene expression in different Hh/Gli gain- and loss-of-function scenarios we identified known (e.g., ptc1 and nkx2.2a) and novel Hh-regulated genes that are differentially expressed in embryos with altered Hh/Gli signaling function. By uncovering changes in tissue-specific gene expression, we revealed new embryological processes that are influenced by Hh signaling. We thus provide a comprehensive survey of Hh/Gli-regulated genes during embryogenesis and we identify new Hh-regulated genes that may be targets of misregulation during tumorigenesis.

  16. Understanding the role of ETS-mediated gene regulation in complex biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Victoria J; LaRue, Amanda C; Turner, David P; Watson, Patricia M; Watson, Dennis K

    2013-01-01

    Ets factors are members of one of the largest families of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors, regulating critical functions in normal cell homeostasis, which when perturbed contribute to tumor progression. The well-documented alterations in ETS factor expression and function during cancer progression result in pleiotropic effects manifested by the downstream effect on their target genes. Multiple ETS factors bind to the same regulatory sites present on target genes, suggesting redundant or competitive functions. The anti- and prometastatic signatures obtained by examining specific ETS regulatory networks will significantly improve our ability to accurately predict tumor progression and advance our understanding of gene regulation in cancer. Coordination of multiple ETS gene functions also mediates interactions between tumor and stromal cells and thus contributes to the cancer phenotype. As such, these new insights may provide a novel view of the ETS gene family as well as a focal point for studying the complex biological control involved in tumor progression. One of the goals of molecular biology is to elucidate the mechanisms that contribute to the development and progression of cancer. Such an understanding of the molecular basis of cancer will provide new possibilities for: (1) earlier detection, as well as better diagnosis and staging of disease; (2) detection of minimal residual disease recurrences and evaluation of response to therapy; (3) prevention; and (4) novel treatment strategies. Increased understanding of ETS-regulated biological pathways will directly impact these areas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential Regulation of Orthologous Chitinase Genes in Mycoparasitic Trichoderma Species ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Sabine; Kubicek, Christian P.; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena

    2011-01-01

    Mycoparasitic Trichoderma species have expanded numbers of fungal subgroup C chitinases that contain multiple carbohydrate binding modules and could thus be important for fungal cell wall degradation during the mycoparasitic attack. In this study, we analyzed the gene regulation of subgroup C chitinases in the mycoparasite Trichoderma virens. In addition to regulation by nutritional stimuli, we found complex expression patterns in different parts of the fungal colony, and also, the mode of cultivation strongly influenced subgroup C chitinase transcript levels. Thus, the regulation of these genes is governed by a combination of colony-internal and -external signals. Our results showed completely different expression profiles of subgroup C chitinase genes in T. virens than in a previous study with T. atroviride, although both fungi are potent mycoparasites. Only a few subgroup C chitinase orthologues were found in T. atroviride and T. virens, and even those showed substantially divergent gene expression patterns. Microscopic analysis revealed morphogenetic differences between T. atroviride and T. virens, which could be connected to differential subgroup C chitinase gene expression. The biological function of fungal subgroup C chitinases therefore might not be as clear-cut as previously anticipated. They could have pleiotropic roles and might be involved in both degradation of exogenous chitinous carbon sources, including other fungal cell walls, and recycling of their own cell walls during hyphal development and colony formation. PMID:21856825

  18. Achilles is a circadian clock-controlled gene that regulates immune function in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiajia; Terry, Erin E; Fejer, Edith; Gamba, Diana; Hartmann, Natalie; Logsdon, Joseph; Michalski, Daniel; Rois, Lisa E; Scuderi, Maria J; Kunst, Michael; Hughes, Michael E

    2017-03-01

    The circadian clock is a transcriptional/translational feedback loop that drives the rhythmic expression of downstream mRNAs. Termed "clock-controlled genes," these molecular outputs of the circadian clock orchestrate cellular, metabolic, and behavioral rhythms. As part of our on-going work to characterize key upstream regulators of circadian mRNA expression, we have identified a novel clock-controlled gene in Drosophila melanogaster, Achilles (Achl), which is rhythmic at the mRNA level in the brain and which represses expression of antimicrobial peptides in the immune system. Achilles knock-down in neurons dramatically elevates expression of crucial immune response genes, including IM1 (Immune induced molecule 1), Mtk (Metchnikowin), and Drs (Drosomysin). As a result, flies with knocked-down Achilles expression are resistant to bacterial challenges. Meanwhile, no significant change in core clock gene expression and locomotor activity is observed, suggesting that Achilles influences rhythmic mRNA outputs rather than directly regulating the core timekeeping mechanism. Notably, Achilles knock-down in the absence of immune challenge significantly diminishes the fly's overall lifespan, indicating a behavioral or metabolic cost of constitutively activating this pathway. Together, our data demonstrate that (1) Achilles is a novel clock-controlled gene that (2) regulates the immune system, and (3) participates in signaling from neurons to immunological tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Genome wide gene expression regulation by HIP1 Protein Interactor, HIPPI: Prediction and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahiri Ansuman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIP1 Protein Interactor (HIPPI is a pro-apoptotic protein that induces Caspase8 mediated apoptosis in cell. We have shown earlier that HIPPI could interact with a specific 9 bp sequence motif, defined as the HIPPI binding site (HBS, present in the upstream promoter of Caspase1 gene and regulate its expression. We also have shown that HIPPI, without any known nuclear localization signal, could be transported to the nucleus by HIP1, a NLS containing nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein. Thus our present work aims at the investigation of the role of HIPPI as a global transcription regulator. Results We carried out genome wide search for the presence of HBS in the upstream sequences of genes. Our result suggests that HBS was predominantly located within 2 Kb upstream from transcription start site. Transcription factors like CREBP1, TBP, OCT1, EVI1 and P53 half site were significantly enriched in the 100 bp vicinity of HBS indicating that they might co-operate with HIPPI for transcription regulation. To illustrate the role of HIPPI on transcriptome, we performed gene expression profiling by microarray. Exogenous expression of HIPPI in HeLa cells resulted in up-regulation of 580 genes (p HIP1 was knocked down. HIPPI-P53 interaction was necessary for HIPPI mediated up-regulation of Caspase1 gene. Finally, we analyzed published microarray data obtained with post mortem brains of Huntington's disease (HD patients to investigate the possible involvement of HIPPI in HD pathogenesis. We observed that along with the transcription factors like CREB, P300, SREBP1, Sp1 etc. which are already known to be involved in HD, HIPPI binding site was also significantly over-represented in the upstream sequences of genes altered in HD. Conclusions Taken together, the results suggest that HIPPI could act as an important transcription regulator in cell regulating a vast array of genes, particularly transcription factors and at least, in part, play a

  20. Detecting coordinated regulation of multi-protein complexes using logic analysis of gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeates Todd O

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many of the functional units in cells are multi-protein complexes such as RNA polymerase, the ribosome, and the proteasome. For such units to work together, one might expect a high level of regulation to enable co-appearance or repression of sets of complexes at the required time. However, this type of coordinated regulation betw