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Sample records for hvc neural sleep

  1. Orthogonal topography in the parallel input architecture of songbird HVC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kevin C; Wu, Wei; Bertram, Richard; Hyson, Richard L; Johnson, Frank

    2017-06-15

    Neural activity within the cortical premotor nucleus HVC (acronym is name) encodes the learned songs of adult male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). HVC activity is driven and/or modulated by a group of five afferent nuclei (the Medial Magnocellular nucleus of the Anterior Nidopallium, MMAN; Nucleus Interface, NIf; nucleus Avalanche, Av; the Robust nucleus of the Arcopallium, RA; the Uvaeform nucleus, Uva). While earlier evidence suggested that HVC receives a uniformly distributed and nontopographic pattern of afferent input, recent evidence suggests this view is incorrect (Basista et al., ). Here, we used a double-labeling strategy (varying both the distance between and the axial orientation of dual tracer injections into HVC) to reveal a massively parallel and in some cases topographic pattern of afferent input. Afferent neurons target only one rostral or caudal location within medial or lateral HVC, and each HVC location receives convergent input from each afferent nucleus in parallel. Quantifying the distributions of single-labeled cells revealed an orthogonal topography in the organization of afferent input from MMAN and NIf, two cortical nuclei necessary for song learning. MMAN input is organized across the lateral-medial axis whereas NIf input is organized across the rostral-caudal axis. To the extent that HVC activity is influenced by afferent input during the learning, perception, or production of song, functional models of HVC activity may need revision to account for the parallel input architecture of HVC, along with the orthogonal input topography of MMAN and NIf. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Sleep scoring using artificial neural networks.

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    Ronzhina, Marina; Janoušek, Oto; Kolářová, Jana; Nováková, Marie; Honzík, Petr; Provazník, Ivo

    2012-06-01

    Rapid development of computer technologies leads to the intensive automation of many different processes traditionally performed by human experts. One of the spheres characterized by the introduction of new high intelligence technologies substituting analysis performed by humans is sleep scoring. This refers to the classification task and can be solved - next to other classification methods - by use of artificial neural networks (ANN). ANNs are parallel adaptive systems suitable for solving of non-linear problems. Using ANN for automatic sleep scoring is especially promising because of new ANN learning algorithms allowing faster classification without decreasing the performance. Both appropriate preparation of training data as well as selection of the ANN model make it possible to perform effective and correct recognizing of relevant sleep stages. Such an approach is highly topical, taking into consideration the fact that there is no automatic scorer utilizing ANN technology available at present.

  3. Neural Markers of Responsiveness to the Environment in Human Sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrillon, Thomas; Poulsen, Andreas Trier; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2016-01-01

    could be related to modulation in sleep depth. InREMsleep, however, this relationship was reversed.Wetherefore propose that, in REM sleep, endogenously generated processes compete with the processing of external input. Sleep can thus be seen as a self-regulated process in which external information can......Sleep is characterized by a loss of behavioral responsiveness. However, recent research has shown that the sleeping brain is not completely disconnected from its environment. How neural activity constrains the ability to process sensory information while asleep is yet unclear. Here, we instructed...... by Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZc), a measure shown to track arousal in sleep and anesthesia. Neural activity related to the semantic content of stimuli was conserved in light non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. However, these processes were suppressed in deep NREM sleep and, importantly, also in REM sleep...

  4. HVC contributes toward conspecific contact call responding in male Bengalese finches.

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    Urbano, Catherine M; Aston, Avery E; Cooper, Brenton G

    2016-05-04

    The processes of producing and acquiring birdsong, like human speech, utilize interdependent neural systems for vocal learning and production. In addition to song, these brain areas are undoubtedly used for other affiliative behaviors. Oscine sound production is lateralized because their vocal organ contains two independently controlled sound sources. Therefore, songbirds offer a unique opportunity to study the biological relevance of lateralized behavioral control. Bengalese finches (Lonchura striata domestica) produce different types of sound with each sound source: the left sound generator produces tonal frequencies from 1 to 4 kHz and the right sound source produces the lower frequency (<2 kHz) tonal and broadband sounds. We sought to investigate whether the premotor nucleus HVC contributes toward lateralized auditory processing of conspecific vocalizations. We ablated either the left or the right HVC and tested birds with the callback paradigm using female contact calls that were filtered to accentuate particular frequency ranges. The results show that (a) the acoustic frequency of call stimuli drives different patterns of calling behavior and that (b) both HVC nuclei contribute toward contact call production, but HVC ablation does not alter the number of short calls produced upon hearing a female contact call. These data are consistent with the emerging view that the motor production and auditory processing are linked and suggest that HVC may contribute toward affiliative behaviors by promoting the production of contact call responses.

  5. Neural Consequences of Chronic Short Sleep: Reversible or Lasting?

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    Zhengqing Zhao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Approximately one-third of adolescents and adults in developed countries regularly experience insufficient sleep across the school and/or work week interspersed with weekend catch up sleep. This common practice of weekend recovery sleep reduces subjective sleepiness, yet recent studies demonstrate that one weekend of recovery sleep may not be sufficient in all persons to fully reverse all neurobehavioral impairments observed with chronic sleep loss, particularly vigilance. Moreover, recent studies in animal models demonstrate persistent injury to and loss of specific neuron types in response to chronic short sleep (CSS with lasting effects on sleep/wake patterns. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the effects of chronic sleep disruption on neurobehavioral performance and injury to neurons, astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes and discuss what is known and what is not yet established for reversibility of neural injury. Recent neurobehavioral findings in humans are integrated with animal model research examining long-term consequences of sleep loss on neurobehavioral performance, brain development, neurogenesis, neurodegeneration, and connectivity. While it is now clear that recovery of vigilance following short sleep requires longer than one weekend, less is known of the impact of CSS on cognitive function, mood, and brain health long term. From work performed in animal models, CSS in the young adult and short-term sleep loss in critical developmental windows can have lasting detrimental effects on neurobehavioral performance.

  6. The neural substrates of infant sleep in rats.

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    Karl A E Karlsson

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is a poorly understood behavior that predominates during infancy but is studied almost exclusively in adults. One perceived impediment to investigations of sleep early in ontogeny is the absence of state-dependent neocortical activity. Nonetheless, in infant rats, sleep is reliably characterized by the presence of tonic (i.e., muscle atonia and phasic (i.e., myoclonic twitching components; the neural circuitry underlying these components, however, is unknown. Recently, we described a medullary inhibitory area (MIA in week-old rats that is necessary but not sufficient for the normal expression of atonia. Here we report that the infant MIA receives projections from areas containing neurons that exhibit state-dependent activity. Specifically, neurons within these areas, including the subcoeruleus (SubLC, pontis oralis (PO, and dorsolateral pontine tegmentum (DLPT, exhibit discharge profiles that suggest causal roles in the modulation of muscle tone and the production of myoclonic twitches. Indeed, lesions in the SubLC and PO decreased the expression of muscle atonia without affecting twitching (resulting in "REM sleep without atonia", whereas lesions of the DLPT increased the expression of atonia while decreasing the amount of twitching. Thus, the neural substrates of infant sleep are strikingly similar to those of adults, a surprising finding in light of theories that discount the contribution of supraspinal neural elements to sleep before the onset of state-dependent neocortical activity.

  7. Increased sleep depth in developing neural networks: new insights from sleep restriction in children

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    Salome Kurth

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain networks respond to sleep deprivation or restriction with increased sleep depth, which is quantified as slow-wave activity (SWA in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG. When adults are sleep deprived, this homeostatic response is most pronounced over prefrontal brain regions. However, it is unknown how children’s developing brain networks respond to acute sleep restriction, and whether this response is linked to myelination, an ongoing process in childhood that is critical for brain development and cortical integration. We implemented a bedtime delay protocol in 5- to 12-year-old children to obtain partial sleep restriction (1-night; 50% of their habitual sleep. High-density sleep EEG was assessed during habitual and restricted sleep and brain myelin content was obtained using mcDESPOT magnetic resonance imaging. The effect of sleep restriction was analyzed using statistical non-parametric mapping with supra-threshold cluster analysis. We observed a localized homeostatic SWA response following sleep restriction in a specific parieto-occipital region. The restricted/habitual SWA ratio was negatively associated with myelin water fraction (MWF in the optic radiation, a developing fiber bundle. This relationship occurred bilaterally over parieto-temporal areas and was adjacent to, but did not overlap with the parieto-occipital region showing the most pronounced homeostatic SWA response. These results provide evidence for increased sleep need in posterior neural networks in children. Sleep need in parieto-temporal areas is related to myelin content, yet it remains speculative whether age-related myelin growth drives the fading of the posterior homeostatic SWA response during the transition to adulthood. Whether chronic insufficient sleep in the sensitive period of early life alters the anatomical generators of deep sleep slow-waves is an important unanswered question.

  8. Neural reactivations during sleep determine network credit assignment.

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    Gulati, Tanuj; Guo, Ling; Ramanathan, Dhakshin S; Bodepudi, Anitha; Ganguly, Karunesh

    2017-09-01

    A fundamental goal of motor learning is to establish the neural patterns that produce a desired behavioral outcome. It remains unclear how and when the nervous system solves this 'credit assignment' problem. Using neuroprosthetic learning, in which we could control the causal relationship between neurons and behavior, we found that sleep-dependent processing was required for credit assignment and the establishment of task-related functional connectivity reflecting the casual neuron-behavior relationship. Notably, we observed a strong link between the microstructure of sleep reactivations and credit assignment, with downscaling of non-causal activity. Decoupling of spiking to slow oscillations using optogenetic methods eliminated rescaling. Thus, our results suggest that coordinated firing during sleep is essential for establishing sparse activation patterns that reflect the causal neuron-behavior relationship.

  9. The Effect of Castration on the Synaptic Plasticity of HVC-RA in Adult Male Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia Guttata)%去势对成年雄性斑胸草雀HVC-RA突触可塑性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小鑫; 王松华; 李东风

    2016-01-01

    应用在体电生理方法研究了去势前后成年雄性斑胸草雀发声运动通路中HVC-RA 突触的可塑性变化,进一步探讨雄激素在调节鸣唱行为中的作用和机制。结果表明:低频刺激可引起 HVC-RA突触群体峰电位幅度的短时程抑制( Short-term depression, STD),高频刺激可引起群体峰电位幅度的长时程抑制( Long-term depression, LTD)。而去势后30 d,鸣曲稳定时再给予同样的条件刺激,发现无论低频或高频刺激,HVC-RA 突触的短时程抑制和长时程抑制现象同时消失。研究结果显示:鸣曲稳定性可能依赖于HVC-RA通路的突触可塑性,雄激素在维持鸣曲稳定过程中发挥重要作用。%Songbirds are animal with the ability of vocal learning like human, and the neural basis of vocal learning is similar to the language learning of human. This study investigated the changes in synaptic plasticity of HVC-RA synapses in adult male zebra finches after castration with in vivo electrophysiology technique, analysed the potential functions and mechanisms of androgen in the process of modulating courtship song and song maintaining. The re-sults showed that low frequency stimulation induced short-term depression, high frequency stimulation induced long-term depression in HVC-RA synapses of adult male zebra finches. When the singing was stable after castration, we found that low or high frequency stimulation could not induce long-term or short-term synaptic depression. These re-sults suggested that the stability of singing may depend on HVC-RA synaptic plasticity, and androgens may play an important role in the song stability.

  10. Learning-related neuronal activation in the zebra finch song system nucleus HVC in response to the bird's own song.

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    Johan J Bolhuis

    Full Text Available Like many other songbird species, male zebra finches learn their song from a tutor early in life. Song learning in birds has strong parallels with speech acquisition in human infants at both the behavioral and neural levels. Forebrain nuclei in the 'song system' are important for the sensorimotor acquisition and production of song, while caudomedial pallial brain regions outside the song system are thought to contain the neural substrate of tutor song memory. Here, we exposed three groups of adult zebra finch males to either tutor song, to their own song, or to novel conspecific song. Expression of the immediate early gene protein product Zenk was measured in the song system nuclei HVC, robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA and Area X. There were no significant differences in overall Zenk expression between the three groups. However, Zenk expression in the HVC was significantly positively correlated with the strength of song learning only in the group that was exposed to the bird's own song, not in the other two groups. These results suggest that the song system nucleus HVC may contain a neural representation of a memory of the bird's own song. Such a representation may be formed during juvenile song learning and guide the bird's vocal output.

  11. Neural Basis of Brain Dysfunction Produced by Early Sleep Problems

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    Jun Kohyama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a wealth of evidence that disrupted sleep and circadian rhythms, which are common in modern society even during the early stages of life, have unfavorable effects on brain function. Altered brain function can cause problem behaviors later in life, such as truancy from or dropping out of school, quitting employment, and committing suicide. In this review, we discuss findings from several large cohort studies together with recent results of a cohort study using the marshmallow test, which was first introduced in the 1960s. This test assessed the ability of four-year-olds to delay gratification and showed how this ability correlated with success later in life. The role of the serotonergic system in sleep and how this role changes with age are also discussed. The serotonergic system is involved in reward processing and interactions with the dorsal striatum, ventral striatum, and the prefrontal cortex are thought to comprise the neural basis for behavioral patterns that are affected by the quantity, quality, and timing of sleep early in life.

  12. Is Sleep Essential for Neural Plasticity in Humans, and How Does It Affect Motor and Cognitive Recovery?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gorgoni, Maurizio; D'Atri, Aurora; Lauri, Giulia; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Ferlazzo, Fabio; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    ... exists today that sleep is strictly linked to memory, learning and, in general, to the mechanisms of neural plasticity. Indeed, cognitive impairments, especially in learning, and memory tasks [57], are one of the main consequences of sleep deprivation. Although the link between sleep, memory, and neural plasticity has been widely investigated, such...

  13. Coordinated infraslow neural and cardiac oscillations mark fragility and offline periods in mammalian sleep.

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    Lecci, Sandro; Fernandez, Laura M J; Weber, Frederik D; Cardis, Romain; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Born, Jan; Lüthi, Anita

    2017-02-01

    Rodents sleep in bouts lasting minutes; humans sleep for hours. What are the universal needs served by sleep given such variability? In sleeping mice and humans, through monitoring neural and cardiac activity (combined with assessment of arousability and overnight memory consolidation, respectively), we find a previously unrecognized hallmark of sleep that balances two fundamental yet opposing needs: to maintain sensory reactivity to the environment while promoting recovery and memory consolidation. Coordinated 0.02-Hz oscillations of the sleep spindle band, hippocampal ripple activity, and heart rate sequentially divide non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep into offline phases and phases of high susceptibility to external stimulation. A noise stimulus chosen such that sleeping mice woke up or slept through at comparable rates revealed that offline periods correspond to raising, whereas fragility periods correspond to declining portions of the 0.02-Hz oscillation in spindle activity. Oscillations were present throughout non-REM sleep in mice, yet confined to light non-REM sleep (stage 2) in humans. In both species, the 0.02-Hz oscillation predominated over posterior cortex. The strength of the 0.02-Hz oscillation predicted superior memory recall after sleep in a declarative memory task in humans. These oscillations point to a conserved function of mammalian non-REM sleep that cycles between environmental alertness and internal memory processing in 20- to 25-s intervals. Perturbed 0.02-Hz oscillations may cause memory impairment and ill-timed arousals in sleep disorders.

  14. Estimation of sleep stages by an artificial neural network employing EEG, EMG and EOG.

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    Tagluk, M Emin; Sezgin, Necmettin; Akin, Mehmet

    2010-08-01

    Analysis and classification of sleep stages is essential in sleep research. In this particular study, an alternative system which estimates sleep stages of human being through a multi-layer neural network (NN) that simultaneously employs EEG, EMG and EOG. The data were recorded through polisomnography device for 7 h for each subject. These collective variant data were first grouped by an expert physician and the software of polisomnography, and then used for training and testing the proposed Artificial Neural Network (ANN). A good scoring was attained through the trained ANN, so it may be put into use in clinics where lacks of specialist physicians.

  15. Automatic sleep stage classification based on EEG signals by using neural networks and wavelet packet coefficients.

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    Ebrahimi, Farideh; Mikaeili, Mohammad; Estrada, Edson; Nazeran, Homer

    2008-01-01

    Currently in the world there is an alarming number of people who suffer from sleep disorders. A number of biomedical signals, such as EEG, EMG, ECG and EOG are used in sleep labs among others for diagnosis and treatment of sleep related disorders. The usual method for sleep stage classification is visual inspection by a sleep specialist. This is a very time consuming and laborious exercise. Automatic sleep stage classification can facilitate this process. The definition of sleep stages and the sleep literature show that EEG signals are similar in Stage 1 of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Therefore, in this work an attempt was made to classify four sleep stages consisting of Awake, Stage 1 + REM, Stage 2 and Slow Wave Stage based on the EEG signal alone. Wavelet packet coefficients and artificial neural networks were deployed for this purpose. Seven all night recordings from Physionet database were used in the study. The results demonstrated that these four sleep stages could be automatically discriminated from each other with a specificity of 94.4 +/- 4.5%, a of sensitivity 84.2+3.9% and an accuracy of 93.0 +/- 4.0%.

  16. Modeling the effect of sleep regulation on a neural mass model.

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    Costa, Michael Schellenberger; Born, Jan; Claussen, Jens Christian; Martinetz, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    In mammals, sleep is categorized by two main sleep stages, rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep that are known to fulfill different functional roles, the most notable being the consolidation of memory. While REM sleep is characterized by brain activity similar to wakefulness, the EEG activity changes drastically with the emergence of K-complexes, sleep spindles and slow oscillations during NREM sleep. These changes are regulated by circadian and ultradian rhythms, which emerge from an intricate interplay between multiple neuronal populations in the brainstem, forebrain and hypothalamus and the resulting varying levels of neuromodulators. Recently, there has been progress in the understanding of those rhythms both from a physiological as well as theoretical perspective. However, how these neuromodulators affect the generation of the different EEG patterns and their temporal dynamics is poorly understood. Here, we build upon previous work on a neural mass model of the sleeping cortex and investigate the effect of those neuromodulators on the dynamics of the cortex and the corresponding transition between wakefulness and the different sleep stages. We show that our simplified model is sufficient to generate the essential features of human EEG over a full day. This approach builds a bridge between sleep regulatory networks and EEG generating neural mass models and provides a valuable tool for model validation.

  17. Sleep modulates the neural substrates of both spatial and contextual memory consolidation.

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    Géraldine Rauchs

    Full Text Available It is known that sleep reshapes the neural representations that subtend the memories acquired while navigating in a virtual environment. However, navigation is not process-pure, as manifold learning components contribute to performance, notably the spatial and contextual memory constituents. In this context, it remains unclear whether post-training sleep globally promotes consolidation of all of the memory components embedded in virtual navigation, or rather favors the development of specific representations. Here, we investigated the effect of post-training sleep on the neural substrates of the consolidation of spatial and contextual memories acquired while navigating in a complex 3D, naturalistic virtual town. Using fMRI, we mapped regional cerebral activity during various tasks designed to tap either the spatial or the contextual memory component, or both, 72 h after encoding with or without sleep deprivation during the first post-training night. Behavioral performance was not dependent upon post-training sleep deprivation, neither in a natural setting that engages both spatial and contextual memory processes nor when looking more specifically at each of these memory representations. At the neuronal level however, analyses that focused on contextual memory revealed distinct correlations between performance and neuronal activity in frontal areas associated with recollection processes after post-training sleep, and in the parahippocampal gyrus associated with familiarity processes in sleep-deprived participants. Likewise, efficient spatial memory was associated with posterior cortical activity after sleep whereas it correlated with parahippocampal/medial temporal activity after sleep deprivation. Finally, variations in place-finding efficiency in a natural setting encompassing spatial and contextual elements were associated with caudate activity after post-training sleep, suggesting the automation of navigation. These data indicate that post

  18. Differential modulation of global and local neural oscillations in REM sleep by homeostatic sleep regulation

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    Kim, Bowon; Kocsis, Bernat; Hwang, Eunjin; Kim, Youngsoo; Strecker, Robert E.; McCarley, Robert W.; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Homeostatic rebound in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep normally occurs after acute sleep deprivation, but REM sleep rebound settles on a persistently elevated level despite continued accumulation of REM sleep debt during chronic sleep restriction (CSR). Using high-density EEG in mice, we studied how this pattern of global regulation is implemented in cortical regions with different functions and network architectures. We found that across all areas, slow oscillations repeated the behavioral pattern of persistent enhancement during CSR, whereas high-frequency oscillations showed progressive increases. This pattern followed a common rule despite marked topographic differences. The findings suggest that REM sleep slow oscillations may translate top-down homeostatic control to widely separated brain regions whereas fast oscillations synchronizing local neuronal ensembles escape this global command. These patterns of EEG oscillation changes are interpreted to reconcile two prevailing theories of the function of sleep, synaptic homeostasis and sleep dependent memory consolidation. PMID:28193862

  19. Comparing neural correlates of REM sleep in posttraumatic stress disorder and depression: a neuroimaging study.

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    Ebdlahad, Sommer; Nofzinger, Eric A; James, Jeffrey A; Buysse, Daniel J; Price, Julie C; Germain, Anne

    2013-12-30

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep disturbances predict poor clinical outcomes in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). In MDD, REM sleep is characterized by activation of limbic and paralimbic brain regions compared to wakefulness. The neural correlates of PTSD during REM sleep remain scarcely explored, and comparisons of PTSD and MDD have not been conducted. The present study sought to compare brain activity patterns during wakefulness and REM sleep in 13 adults with PTSD and 12 adults with MDD using [¹⁸F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (PET). PTSD was associated with greater increase in relative regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglc) in limbic and paralimbic structures in REM sleep compared to wakefulness. Post-hoc comparisons indicated that MDD was associated with greater limbic and paralimbic rCMRglc during wakefulness but not REM sleep compared to PTSD. Our findings suggest that PTSD is associated with increased REM sleep limbic and paralimbic metabolism, whereas MDD is associated with wake and REM hypermetabolism in these areas. These observations suggest that PTSD and MDD disrupt REM sleep through different neurobiological processes. Optimal sleep treatments between the two disorders may differ: REM-specific therapy may be more effective in PTSD.

  20. Disease and degeneration of aging neural systems that integrate sleep drive and circadian oscillations

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    Kris eSingletary

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Sleep and circadian activity rhythms become irregular with age which are characterized by fragmented sleep during the night and increased daytime sleepiness. These changes lead to a reduction in the quality of life due to cognitive impairments and emotional stress. More importantly, severely disrupted sleep and circadian rhythms have been associated with an increase in disease susceptibility. Many of the same brain areas affected by neurodegenerative diseases include the sleep and wake promoting systems. Any advances in our knowledge of these sleep/wake networks are necessary to target neural areas or connections for therapy. This review will discuss research that uses molecular, behavioral, genetic and anatomical methods to further our understanding of the interaction of these systems.

  1. Chronic sleep disturbance and neural injury: links to neurodegenerative disease

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    Abbott SM

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sabra M Abbott,1 Aleksandar Videnovic21Department of Neurology, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Sleep–wake disruption is frequently observed and often one of the earliest reported symptoms of many neurodegenerative disorders. This provides insight into the underlying pathophysiology of these disorders, as sleep–wake abnormalities are often accompanied by neurodegenerative or neurotransmitter changes. However, in addition to being a symptom of the underlying neurodegenerative condition, there is also emerging evidence that sleep disturbance itself may contribute to the development and facilitate the progression of several of these disorders. Due to its impact both as an early symptom and as a potential factor contributing to ongoing neurodegeneration, the sleep–wake cycle is an ideal target for further study for potential interventions not only to lessen the burden of these diseases but also to slow their progression. In this review, we will highlight the sleep phenotypes associated with some of the major neurodegenerative disorders, focusing on the circadian disruption associated with Alzheimer’s disease, the rapid eye movement behavior disorder and sleep fragmentation associated with Parkinson’s disease, and the insomnia and circadian dysregulation associated with Huntington’s disease. Keywords: sleep, neurodegeneration, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease

  2. Learning-related brain hemispheric dominance in sleeping songbirds.

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    Moorman, Sanne; Gobes, Sharon M H; van de Kamp, Ferdinand C; Zandbergen, Matthijs A; Bolhuis, Johan J

    2015-03-12

    There are striking behavioural and neural parallels between the acquisition of speech in humans and song learning in songbirds. In humans, language-related brain activation is mostly lateralised to the left hemisphere. During language acquisition in humans, brain hemispheric lateralisation develops as language proficiency increases. Sleep is important for the formation of long-term memory, in humans as well as in other animals, including songbirds. Here, we measured neuronal activation (as the expression pattern of the immediate early gene ZENK) during sleep in juvenile zebra finch males that were still learning their songs from a tutor. We found that during sleep, there was learning-dependent lateralisation of spontaneous neuronal activation in the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM), a secondary auditory brain region that is involved in tutor song memory, while there was right hemisphere dominance of neuronal activation in HVC (used as a proper name), a premotor nucleus that is involved in song production and sensorimotor learning. Specifically, in the NCM, birds that imitated their tutors well were left dominant, while poor imitators were right dominant, similar to language-proficiency related lateralisation in humans. Given the avian-human parallels, lateralised neural activation during sleep may also be important for speech and language acquisition in human infants.

  3. Effect of Feature Extraction on Automatic Sleep Stage Classification by Artificial Neural Network

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    Prucnal Monika

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available EEG signal-based sleep stage classification facilitates an initial diagnosis of sleep disorders. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of three methods for feature extraction: power spectral density (PSD, discrete wavelet transform (DWT and empirical mode decomposition (EMD in the automatic classification of sleep stages by an artificial neural network (ANN. 13650 30-second EEG epochs from the PhysioNet database, representing five sleep stages (W, N1-N3 and REM, were transformed into feature vectors using the aforementioned methods and principal component analysis (PCA. Three feed-forward ANNs with the same optimal structure (12 input neurons, 23 + 22 neurons in two hidden layers and 5 output neurons were trained using three sets of features, obtained with one of the compared methods each. Calculating PSD from EEG epochs in frequency sub-bands corresponding to the brain waves (81.1% accuracy for the testing set, comparing with 74.2% for DWT and 57.6% for EMD appeared to be the most effective feature extraction method in the analysed problem.

  4. No phylogeny without ontogeny: a comparative and developmental search for the sources of sleep-like neural and behavioral rhythms.

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    Corner, Michael; van der Togt, Chris

    2012-02-01

    A comprehensive review is presented of reported aspects and putative mechanisms of sleep-like motility rhythms throughout the animal kingdom. It is proposed that 'rapid eye movement (REM) sleep' be regarded as a special case of a distinct but much broader category of behavior, 'rapid body movement (RBM) sleep', defined by intrinsically-generated and apparently non-purposive movements. Such a classification completes a 2 × 2 matrix defined by the axes sleep versus waking and active versus quiet. Although 'paradoxical' arousal of forebrain electrical activity is restricted to warm-blooded vertebrates, we urge that juvenile or even infantile stages of development be investigated in cold-blooded animals, in view of the many reports of REM-like spontaneous motility (RBMs) in a wide range of species during sleep. The neurophysiological bases for motorically active sleep at the brainstem level and for slow-wave sleep in the forebrain appear to be remarkably similar, and to be subserved in both cases by a primitive diffuse mode of neuronal organization. Thus, the spontaneous synchronous burst discharges which are characteristics of the sleeping brain can be readily simulated even by highly unstructured neural network models. Neuromotor discharges during active sleep appear to reflect a hierarchy of simple relaxation oscillation mechanisms, spanning a wide range of spike-dependent relaxation times, whereas the periodic alternation of active and quiet sleep states more likely results from the entrainment of intrinsic cellular rhythms and/or from activity-dependent homeostatic changes in network excitability.

  5. Quantitative differences among EMG activities of muscles innervated by subpopulations of hypoglossal and upper spinal motoneurons during non-REM sleep - REM sleep transitions: a window on neural processes in the sleeping brain.

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    Rukhadze, I; Kamani, H; Kubin, L

    2011-12-01

    In the rat, a species widely used to study the neural mechanisms of sleep and motor control, lingual electromyographic activity (EMG) is minimal during non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep and then phasic twitches gradually increase after the onset of REM sleep. To better characterize the central neural processes underlying this pattern, we quantified EMG of muscles innervated by distinct subpopulations of hypoglossal motoneurons and nuchal (N) EMG during transitions from non-REM sleep to REM sleep. In 8 chronically instrumented rats, we recorded cortical EEG, EMG at sites near the base of the tongue where genioglossal and intrinsic muscle fibers predominate (GG-I), EMG of the geniohyoid (GH) muscle, and N EMG. Sleep-wake states were identified and EMGs quantified relative to their mean levels in wakefulness in successive 10 s epochs. During non-REM sleep, the average EMG levels differed among the three muscles, with the order being N>GH>GG-I. During REM sleep, due to different magnitudes of phasic twitches, the order was reversed to GG-I>GH>N. GG-I and GH exhibited a gradual increase of twitching that peaked at 70-120 s after the onset of REM sleep and then declined if the REM sleep episode lasted longer. We propose that a common phasic excitatory generator impinges on motoneuron pools that innervate different muscles, but twitching magnitudes are different due to different levels of tonic motoneuronal hyperpolarization. We also propose that REM sleep episodes of average durations are terminated by intense activity of the central generator of phasic events, whereas long REM sleep episodes end as a result of a gradual waning of the tonic disfacilitatory and inhibitory processes.

  6. What Is Lost During Dreamless Sleep: The Relationship Between Neural Connectivity Patterns and Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Klimova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep is characterised by reduced consciousness; thus, studying its neural characteristics acts as a useful indication of what is needed for conscious experience. The integrated information theory (Tononi, 2008 states that the ability of different thalamocortical regions to interact is crucial for consciousness, thereby motivating research concerning connectivity changes in the thalamocortical system that accompany changing consciousness levels. This review aims to discuss investigations of functional connectivity of resting-state and large-scale brain networks, applying correlational approaches to neuroimaging data as well as studies that used brain stimulation to investigate effective connectivity. Most findings suggest a reorganisation of functional brain networks where inter-region connectivity is reduced and intra-region connectivity is stronger in deep sleep than wakefulness.

  7. Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Sleep: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is sleep? Sleep is a period of unconsciousness during which ...

  8. Automotic Recognition of Sleep Spindles Based on Two-Stage Classifier with Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MohammadHoseyn Khaksar

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindles are one of the most important transient waveforms found in the sleep EEG signal. Here, we introduce a two-stage procedure based on artificial neural networks for the automatic recognition of sleep spindles (SS in a 19-channel electroencephalographic signal. In the first stage, a pre-processing perception is used for enhancing overall detection and also reducing computation time. In the second stage, the selected Sleep spindles (SS, classified with neural network post-classifier. Classifying tools in post-processing procedure were MLP and RBSVM that their operations are compared in the last section of the report. Visual inspection of 19-channel EEG from six subjects by one expert in this theme, showed that RBSVM operation is better than MLP with BP (Back propagation training, that SVM provided 91.4% average sensitivity and 3.85% average false detection rate.

  9. A thalamo-cortical neural mass model for the simulation of brain rhythms during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cona, F; Lacanna, M; Ursino, M

    2014-08-01

    Cortico-thalamic interactions are known to play a pivotal role in many brain phenomena, including sleep, attention, memory consolidation and rhythm generation. Hence, simple mathematical models that can simulate the dialogue between the cortex and the thalamus, at a mesoscopic level, have a great cognitive value. In the present work we describe a neural mass model of a cortico-thalamic module, based on neurophysiological mechanisms. The model includes two thalamic populations (a thalamo-cortical relay cell population, TCR, and its related thalamic reticular nucleus, TRN), and a cortical column consisting of four connected populations (pyramidal neurons, excitatory interneurons, inhibitory interneurons with slow and fast kinetics). Moreover, thalamic neurons exhibit two firing modes: bursting and tonic. Finally, cortical synapses among pyramidal neurons incorporate a disfacilitation mechanism following prolonged activity. Simulations show that the model is able to mimic the different patterns of rhythmic activity in cortical and thalamic neurons (beta and alpha waves, spindles, delta waves, K-complexes, slow sleep waves) and their progressive changes from wakefulness to deep sleep, by just acting on modulatory inputs. Moreover, simulations performed by providing short sensory inputs to the TCR show that brain rhythms during sleep preserve the cortex from external perturbations, still allowing a high cortical activity necessary to drive synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. In perspective, the present model may be used within larger cortico-thalamic networks, to gain a deeper understanding of mechanisms beneath synaptic changes during sleep, to investigate the specific role of brain rhythms, and to explore cortical synchronization achieved via thalamic influences.

  10. Organization of the sleep-related neural systems in the brain of the minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Leigh-Anne; Karlsson, Karl Ae; Patzke, Nina; Spocter, Muhammad A; Siegel, Jerome M; Manger, Paul R

    2016-07-01

    The current study analyzed the nuclear organization of the neural systems related to the control and regulation of sleep and wake in the basal forebrain, diencephalon, midbrain, and pons of the minke whale, a mysticete cetacean. While odontocete cetaceans sleep in an unusual manner, with unihemispheric slow wave sleep (USWS) and suppressed REM sleep, it is unclear whether the mysticete whales show a similar sleep pattern. Previously, we detailed a range of features in the odontocete brain that appear to be related to odontocete-type sleep, and here present our analysis of these features in the minke whale brain. All neural elements involved in sleep regulation and control found in bihemispheric sleeping mammals and the harbor porpoise were present in the minke whale, with no specific nuclei being absent, and no novel nuclei being present. This qualitative similarity relates to the cholinergic, noradrenergic, serotonergic and orexinergic systems, and the GABAergic elements of these nuclei. Quantitative analysis revealed that the numbers of pontine cholinergic (274,242) and noradrenergic (203,686) neurons, and hypothalamic orexinergic neurons (277,604), are markedly higher than other large-brained bihemispheric sleeping mammals. Small telencephalic commissures (anterior, corpus callosum, and hippocampal), an enlarged posterior commissure, supernumerary pontine cholinergic and noradrenergic cells, and an enlarged peripheral division of the dorsal raphe nuclear complex of the minke whale, all indicate that the suite of neural characteristics thought to be involved in the control of USWS and the suppression of REM in the odontocete cetaceans are present in the minke whale. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2018-2035, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A Thalamocortical Neural Mass Model of the EEG during NREM Sleep and Its Response to Auditory Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Hong-Viet V.; Marshall, Lisa; Born, Jan; Martinetz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Few models exist that accurately reproduce the complex rhythms of the thalamocortical system that are apparent in measured scalp EEG and at the same time, are suitable for large-scale simulations of brain activity. Here, we present a neural mass model of the thalamocortical system during natural non-REM sleep, which is able to generate fast sleep spindles (12–15 Hz), slow oscillations (sleep study in humans, where closed-loop auditory stimulation was applied. The model output relates directly to the EEG, which makes it a useful basis to develop new stimulation protocols. PMID:27584827

  12. Automatic sleep stage classification of single-channel EEG by using complex-valued convolutional neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junming; Wu, Yan

    2017-02-21

    Many systems are developed for automatic sleep stage classification. However, nearly all models are based on handcrafted features. Because of the large feature space, there are so many features that feature selection should be used. Meanwhile, designing handcrafted features is a difficult and time-consuming task because the feature designing needs domain knowledge of experienced experts. Results vary when different sets of features are chosen to identify sleep stages. Additionally, many features that we may be unaware of exist. However, these features may be important for sleep stage classification. Therefore, a new sleep stage classification system, which is based on the complex-valued convolutional neural network (CCNN), is proposed in this study. Unlike the existing sleep stage methods, our method can automatically extract features from raw electroencephalography data and then classify sleep stage based on the learned features. Additionally, we also prove that the decision boundaries for the real and imaginary parts of a complex-valued convolutional neuron intersect orthogonally. The classification performances of handcrafted features are compared with those of learned features via CCNN. Experimental results show that the proposed method is comparable to the existing methods. CCNN obtains a better classification performance and considerably faster convergence speed than convolutional neural network. Experimental results also show that the proposed method is a useful decision-support tool for automatic sleep stage classification.

  13. Degradation of neural representations in higher visual cortex by sleep deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Jia-Hou; Chee, Michael W. L.

    2017-01-01

    A night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) impairs selective attention and is accompanied by attenuated activation within ventral visual cortex (VVC). However, finer details of how TSD compromises selectivity of visual processing remain unclear. Drawing from prior work in cognitive aging, we predicted that TSD would result in dedifferentiation of neural responses for faces and houses within the VVC. Instead, we found preservation of category selectivity. This was observed both in voxels highly selective for each category, and also across multiple voxels evaluated using MVPA. Based on prior findings of impaired attentional modulation following TSD, we also predicted reduced biasing of neural representations towards the attended category when participants viewed ambiguous face/house images. When participants were well rested, attention to houses (or faces) caused activation patterns to more closely resemble those elicited by isolated house (face) images than face (house) images. During TSD, attention to faces enhanced neural similarity to both target (face) and distractor (house) representations, signifying reduced suppression of irrelevant information. Degraded sensory processing reflected in reduced VVC activation following TSD, thus appears to be a result of impaired top-down modulation of sensory representations instead of degraded selectivity of maximally category sensitive voxels, or the dedifferentiation of neural activation patterns. PMID:28361948

  14. Simulation study on dynamics transition in neuronal activity during sleep cycle by using asynchronous and symmetry neural network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, M; Takahashi, T; Mizutani, Y; Yamamoto, M

    1990-01-01

    We have found that single neuronal activities in different regions in the brain commonly exhibit the distinct dynamics transition during sleep-waking cycle in cats. Especially, power spectral densities of single neuronal activities change their profiles from the white to the 1/f along with sleep cycle from slow wave sleep (SWS) to paradoxical sleep (PS). Each region has different neural network structure and physiological function. This suggests a globally working mechanism may be underlying the dynamics transition we concern. Pharmacological studies have shown that a change in a wide-spread serotonergic input to these regions possibly causes the neuronal dynamics transition during sleep cycle. In this paper, based on these experimental results, an asynchronous and symmetry neural network model including inhibitory input, which represents the role of the serotonergic system, is utilized to examine the reality of our idea that the inhibitory input level varying during sleep cycle induce that transition. Simulation results show that the globally applied inhibitory input can control the dynamics of single neuronal state evolution in the artificial neural network: 1/f-like power spectral density profiles result under weak inhibition, which possibly corresponds to PS, and white profiles under strong inhibition, which possibly corresponds to SWS. An asynchronous neural network is known to change its state according to its energy function. The geometrical structure of network energy function is thought to vary along with the change in inhibitory level, which is expected to cause the dynamics transition of neuronal state evolution in the network model. These simulation results support the possibility that the serotonergic system is essential for the dynamics transition of single neuronal activities during sleep cycle.

  15. Evidence for COMPTEL detections of low-energy gamma rays from HVC complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, J. J.; Bloemen, H.; Bykov, A. M.; Burton, W. B.; Hartmann, Dap; Hermsen, W.; Iyudin, A. F.; Ryan, J.; Schoenfelder, V.; Strong, A. W.; hide

    1997-01-01

    Observational evidence of extended MeV emissions that may be associated with high velocity clouds (HVCs) is reported on. Based on observations acquired between 1991 and 1996 with the Compton telescope (COMPTEL), evidence is found for intense gamma ray radiation at 0.75 to 3 MeV from the general direction of two HVC regions. One bright gamma ray excess is located between the HVC complexes M and A, adjacent to the Lockman hole and is seen to approximately cover a sky area of exceptionally low H I column densities. A second source is detected at the high velocity end of complex C near the Draco Nebula. Both gamma ray excesses appear to consist of a time variable source and a diffuse emission component. The enhanced diffuse soft X-rays seen by Rosat from both HVC regions may be closely related to the gamma ray emission in terms of bremsstrahlung arising from HVC interactions with the galactic disk or lower halo.

  16. Is Sleep Essential for Neural Plasticity in Humans, and How Does It Affect Motor and Cognitive Recovery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Gorgoni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a general consensus that sleep is strictly linked to memory, learning, and, in general, to the mechanisms of neural plasticity, and that this link may directly affect recovery processes. In fact, a coherent pattern of empirical findings points to beneficial effect of sleep on learning and plastic processes, and changes in synaptic plasticity during wakefulness induce coherent modifications in EEG slow wave cortical topography during subsequent sleep. However, the specific nature of the relation between sleep and synaptic plasticity is not clear yet. We reported findings in line with two models conflicting with respect to the underlying mechanisms, that is, the “synaptic homeostasis hypothesis” and the “consolidation” hypothesis, and some recent results that may reconcile them. Independently from the specific mechanisms involved, sleep loss is associated with detrimental effects on plastic processes at a molecular and electrophysiological level. Finally, we reviewed growing evidence supporting the notion that plasticity-dependent recovery could be improved managing sleep quality, while monitoring EEG during sleep may help to explain how specific rehabilitative paradigms work. We conclude that a better understanding of the sleep-plasticity link could be crucial from a rehabilitative point of view.

  17. Is sleep essential for neural plasticity in humans, and how does it affect motor and cognitive recovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgoni, Maurizio; D'Atri, Aurora; Lauri, Giulia; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Ferlazzo, Fabio; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    There is a general consensus that sleep is strictly linked to memory, learning, and, in general, to the mechanisms of neural plasticity, and that this link may directly affect recovery processes. In fact, a coherent pattern of empirical findings points to beneficial effect of sleep on learning and plastic processes, and changes in synaptic plasticity during wakefulness induce coherent modifications in EEG slow wave cortical topography during subsequent sleep. However, the specific nature of the relation between sleep and synaptic plasticity is not clear yet. We reported findings in line with two models conflicting with respect to the underlying mechanisms, that is, the "synaptic homeostasis hypothesis" and the "consolidation" hypothesis, and some recent results that may reconcile them. Independently from the specific mechanisms involved, sleep loss is associated with detrimental effects on plastic processes at a molecular and electrophysiological level. Finally, we reviewed growing evidence supporting the notion that plasticity-dependent recovery could be improved managing sleep quality, while monitoring EEG during sleep may help to explain how specific rehabilitative paradigms work. We conclude that a better understanding of the sleep-plasticity link could be crucial from a rehabilitative point of view.

  18. No phylogeny without ontogeny - a comparative and developmental search for the sources of sleep-like neural and behavioral rhythms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Corner; Chris van der Togt

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive review is presented of reported aspects and putative mechanisms of sleep-like motility rhythms throughout the animal kingdom.It is proposed that ‘rapid eye movement (REM) sleep' be regarded as a special case of a distinct but much broader category of behavior,‘rapid body movement (RBM) sleep',defined by intrinsicallygenerated and apparently non-purposive movements.Such a classification completes a 2 × 2 matrix defined by the axes sleep versus waking and active versus quiet.Although ‘paradoxical' arousal of forebrain electrical activity is restricted to warm-blooded vertebrates,we urge that juvenile or even infantile stages of development be investigated in cold-blooded animals,in view of the many reports of REM-like spontaneous motility (RBMs) in a wide range of species during sleep.The neurophysiological bases for motorically active sleep at the brainstem level and for slow-wave sleep in the forebrain appear to be remarkably similar,and to be subserved in both cases by a primitive diffuse mode of neuronal organization.Thus,the spontaneous synchronous burst discharges which are characteristics of the sleeping brain can be readily simulated even by highly unstructured neural network models.Neuromotor discharges during active sleep appear to reflect a hierarchy of simple relaxation oscillation mechanisms,spanning a wide range of spike-dependent relaxation times,whereas the periodic alternation of active and quiet sleep states more likely results from the entrainment of intrinsic cellular rhythms and/or from activity-dependent homeostatic changes in network excitability.

  19. A new approach for automatic sleep scoring: Combining Taguchi based complex-valued neural network and complex wavelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peker, Musa

    2016-06-01

    Automatic classification of sleep stages is one of the most important methods used for diagnostic procedures in psychiatry and neurology. This method, which has been developed by sleep specialists, is a time-consuming and difficult process. Generally, electroencephalogram (EEG) signals are used in sleep scoring. In this study, a new complex classifier-based approach is presented for automatic sleep scoring using EEG signals. In this context, complex-valued methods were utilized in the feature selection and classification stages. In the feature selection stage, features of EEG data were extracted with the help of a dual tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT). In the next phase, five statistical features were obtained. These features are classified using complex-valued neural network (CVANN) algorithm. The Taguchi method was used in order to determine the effective parameter values in this CVANN. The aim was to develop a stable model involving parameter optimization. Different statistical parameters were utilized in the evaluation phase. Also, results were obtained in terms of two different sleep standards. In the study in which a 2nd level DTCWT and CVANN hybrid model was used, 93.84% accuracy rate was obtained according to the Rechtschaffen & Kales (R&K) standard, while a 95.42% accuracy rate was obtained according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) standard. Complex-valued classifiers were found to be promising in terms of the automatic sleep scoring and EEG data.

  20. A power spectrum based backpropagation artificial neural network model for classification of sleep-wake stages in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Ray

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Three layered feed-forward backpropagation artificial neural network architecture is designed to classify sleep-wake stages in rats. Continuous three channel polygraphic signals such as electroencephalogram, electrooculogram and electromyogram were recorded from conscious rats for eight hours during day time. Signals were also stored in computer hard disk with the help of analog to digital converter and its compatible data acquisition software. The power spectra (in dB scale of the digitized signals in three sleep-wake stages were calculated. Selected power spectrum data of all three simultaneously recorded polygraphic signals were used for training the network and to classify slow wave sleep, rapid eye movement sleep and awake stages. The ANN architecture used in present study shows a very good agreement with manual sleep stage scoring with an average of 94.83% for all the 1200 samples tested from SWS, REM and AWA stages. The high performance observed with the system based on ANN highlights the need of this computational tool into the field of sleep research.

  1. Cooperation of deterministic dynamics and random noise in production of complex syntactical avian song sequences: a neural network model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi eYamashita

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available How the brain learns and generates temporal sequences is a fundamental issue in neuroscience. The production of birdsongs, a process which involves complex learned sequences, provides researchers with an excellent biological model for this topic. The Bengalese finch in particular learns a highly complex song with syntactical structure. The nucleus HVC (HVC, a premotor nucleus within the avian song system, plays a key role in generating the temporal structures of their songs. From lesion studies, the nucleus interfacialis (NIf projecting to the HVC is considered one of the essential regions that contribute to the complexity of their songs. However, the types of interaction between the HVC and the NIf that can produce complex syntactical songs remain unclear. In order to investigate the function of interactions between the HVC and NIf, we have proposed a neural network model based on previous biological evidence. The HVC is modeled by a recurrent neural network (RNN that learns to generate temporal patterns of songs. The NIf is modeled as a mechanism that provides auditory feedback to the HVC and generates random noise that feeds into the HVC. The model showed that complex syntactical songs can be replicated by simple interactions between deterministic dynamics of the RNN and random noise. In the current study, the plausibility of the model is tested by the comparison between the changes in the songs of actual birds induced by pharmacological inhibition of the NIf and the changes in the songs produced by the model resulting from modification of parameters representing NIf functions. The efficacy of the model demonstrates that the changes of songs induced by pharmacological inhibition of the NIf can be interpreted as a trade-off between the effects of noise and the effects of feedback on the dynamics of the RNN of the HVC. These facts suggest that the current model provides a convincing hypothesis for the functional role of NIf-HVC interaction.

  2. Coexistence of OSA may compensate for sleep related reduction in neural respiratory drive in patients with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bai-Ting; Lu, Gan; Xiao, Si-Chang; Chen, Rui; Steier, Joerg; Moxham, John; Polkey, Michael I; Luo, Yuan-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Background The mechanisms underlying sleep-related hypoventilation in patients with coexisting COPD and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), an overlap syndrome, are incompletely understood. We compared neural respiratory drive expressed as diaphragm electromyogram (EMGdi) and ventilation during stage 2 sleep in patients with COPD alone and patients with overlap syndrome. Methods EMGdi and airflow were recorded during full polysomnography in 14 healthy subjects, 14 patients with OSA and 39 consecutive patients with COPD. The ratio of tidal volume to EMGdi was measured to indirectly assess upper airway resistance. Results Thirty-five patients with COPD, 12 healthy subjects and 14 patients with OSA completed the study. Of 35 patients with COPD, 19 had COPD alone (FEV1 38.5%±16.3%) whereas 16 had an overlap syndrome (FEV1 47.5±16.2%, AHI 20.5±14.1 events/hour). Ventilation (VE) was lower during stage 2 sleep than wakefulness in both patients with COPD alone (8.6±2.0 to 6.5±1.5 L/min, pCOPD alone (29.5±13.3% to 23.0±8.9% of maximal, pCOPD alone and healthy subjects but was significantly reduced in patients with OSA or overlap syndrome (pCOPD alone is due to reduction of neural respiratory drive, but in overlap syndrome it is due to increased upper airway resistance. PMID:27807016

  3. Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Families & Friendships Military Sexual Trauma Depression mild Traumatic Brain Injury Life Stress Health & Wellness Anger Stigma Suicide Prevention ... Post-Traumatic Stress Sleep Alcohol & Drugs mild Traumatic Brain Injury Resilience Families with Kids Depression Families & Friendships Tobacco ...

  4. The effect of exogenous cortisol during sleep on the behavioral and neural correlates of emotional memory consolidation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Marle, Hein J F; Hermans, Erno J; Qin, Shaozheng; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Fernández, Guillén

    2013-09-01

    A host of animal work demonstrates that the retention benefit for emotionally aversive over neutral memories is regulated by glucocorticoid action during memory consolidation. Particularly, glucocorticoids may affect systems-level processes that promote the gradual reorganization of emotional memory traces. These effects remain largely uninvestigated in humans. Therefore, in this functional magnetic resonance imaging study we administered hydrocortisone during a polysomnographically monitored night of sleep directly after healthy volunteers studied negative and neutral pictures in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design. The following evening memory consolidation was probed during a recognition memory test in the MR scanner by assessing the difference in brain activity associated with memory for the consolidated items studied before sleep and new, unconsolidated items studied shortly before test (remote vs. recent memory paradigm). Hydrocortisone administration resulted in elevated cortisol levels throughout the experimental night with no group difference at recent encoding or test. Behaviorally, we showed that cortisol enhanced the difference between emotional and neutral consolidated memory, effectively prioritizing emotional memory consolidation. On a neural level, we found that cortisol reduced amygdala reactivity related to the retrieval of these same consolidated, negative items. These findings show that cortisol administration during first post-encoding sleep had a twofold effect on the first 24h of emotional memory consolidation. While cortisol prioritized recognition memory for emotional items, it reduced reactivation of the neural circuitry underlying emotional responsiveness during retrieval. These findings fit recent theories on emotional depotentiation following consolidation during sleep, although future research should establish the sleep-dependence of this effect. Moreover, our data may shed light on mechanisms underlying

  5. A neural network method for detection of obstructive sleep apnea and narcolepsy based on pupil size and EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D; Pang, Z; Lloyd, S R

    2008-02-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) is able to indicate states of mental activity ranging from concentrated cognitive efforts to sleepiness. Such mental activity can be reflected by EEG energy. In particular, intrusion of EEG theta wave activity into the beta activity of active wakefulness has been interpreted as ensuing sleepiness. Pupil behavior can also provide information regarding alertness. This paper develops an innovative signal classification method that is capable of differentiating subjects with sleep disorders which cause excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) from normal control subjects who do not have a sleep disorder based on EEG and pupil size. Subjects with sleep disorders include persons with untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and narcolepsy. The Yoss pupil staging rule is used to scale levels of wakefulness and at the same time theta energy ratios are calculated from the same 2-s sliding windows by Fourier or wavelet transforms. Then, an artificial neural network (NN) of modified adaptive resonance theory (ART2) is utilized to identify the two groups within a combined group of subjects including those with OSA and healthy controls. This grouping from the NN is then compared with the actual diagnostic classification of subjects as OSA or controls and is found to be 91% accurate in differentiating between the two groups. The same algorithm results in 90% correct differentiation between narcoleptic and control subjects.

  6. Nonlinear Statistical Data Assimilation for HVC RA Neurons in the Avian Song System

    CERN Document Server

    Kadakia, Nirag; Breen, Daniel; Morone, Uriel; Daou, Arij; Margoliash, Daniel; DI Abarbanel, Henry

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of building a model of the HVC nucleus in the avian song system, we discuss in detail a model of HVC\\textsubscript{RA} projection neurons comprised of a somatic compartment with fast Na$^+$ and K$^+$ currents and a dendritic compartment with slower Ca$^{2+}$ dynamics. We show this model qualitatively exhibits many observed electrophysiological behaviors. We then show in numerical procedures how one can design and analyze feasible laboratory experiments that allow the estimation of all of the many parameters and unmeasured dynamical variables, give observations of the somatic voltage $V_s(t)$ alone. A key to this procedure is to initially estimate the slow dynamics associated with Ca, blocking the fast Na and K variations, and then with the Ca parameters fixed, estimate the fast Na and K dynamics. This separation of time scales provides a numerically robust method for completing the full neuron model, and the efficacy of the method is tested by prediction when observations are complete. The simul...

  7. Less Efficient Neural Processing Related to Irregular Sleep and Less Sustained Attention in Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyniak, Caroline P; Petersen, Isaac T; McQuillan, Maureen E; Staples, Angela D; Bates, John E

    2015-01-01

    The current study used event-related potentials to examine a candidate process through which sleep difficulties affect attentional processing in toddlers. Fifteen toddlers participated in an auditory Oddball task while neurophysiological data were collected. Sleep deficits were assessed using actigraphs, and attention was examined with a sustained attention task. A P3-like component was elicited from the toddlers, and longer target P3 latencies were associated with poorer sustained attention and irregular sleep. Findings suggest that irregular sleep is associated with less efficient attentional processing as reflected by the P3 component, and that longer target P3 latencies are associated with poorer sustained attention.

  8. Neural correlates of dream lucidity obtained from contrasting lucid versus non-lucid REM sleep: a combined EEG/fMRI case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresler, Martin; Wehrle, Renate; Spoormaker, Victor I; Koch, Stefan P; Holsboer, Florian; Steiger, Axel; Obrig, Hellmuth; Sämann, Philipp G; Czisch, Michael

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the neural correlates of lucid dreaming. Parallel EEG/fMRI recordings of night sleep. Sleep laboratory and fMRI facilities. Four experienced lucid dreamers. N/A. Out of 4 participants, one subject had 2 episodes of verified lucid REM sleep of sufficient length to be analyzed by fMRI. During lucid dreaming the bilateral precuneus, cuneus, parietal lobules, and prefrontal and occipito-temporal cortices activated strongly as compared with non-lucid REM sleep. In line with recent EEG data, lucid dreaming was associated with a reactivation of areas which are normally deactivated during REM sleep. This pattern of activity can explain the recovery of reflective cognitive capabilities that are the hallmark of lucid dreaming.

  9. A Framework for Quantitative Modeling of Neural Circuits Involved in Sleep-to-Wake Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak eSorooshyari

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the neuronal circuits and dynamics of sleep-to-wake transition is essential to understanding brain regulation of behavioral states, including sleep-wake cycles, arousal, and hyperarousal. Recent work by different laboratories has used optogenetics to determine the role of individual neuromodulators in state transitions. The optogenetically-driven data does not yet provide a multi-dimensional schematic of the mechanisms underlying changes in vigilance states. This work presents a modeling framework to interpret, assist, and drive research on the sleep-regulatory network. We identify feedback, redundancy, and gating hierarchy as three fundamental aspects of this model. The presented model is expected to expand as additional data on the contribution of each transmitter to a vigilance state becomes available. Incorporation of conductance-based models of neuronal ensembles into this model and existing models of cortical excitability will provide more comprehensive insight into sleep dynamics as well as sleep and arousal-related disorders.

  10. The Metallicity of HVC Complex C: Observational Evidence for the Accretion of Low-Metallicity Gas onto the Milky Way

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, Bart P.; Howk, J. Chris; Savage, Blair D.; Tufte, Steve L.; Reynolds, Ron J.; van Woerden, Hugo; Schwarz, Ulrich J.

    1999-01-01

    We present observations of the (field of the) Seyfert galaxy Mark 290, which probes the high-velocity cloud (HVC) complex C, one of the largest HVCs (Wakker & van Woerden 1991). We find that this object has a metallicity of 0.094+/-0.020^{+0.022}_{-0.019} times solar. A semi-theoretical upper limit

  11. Spherical Harmonics Reveal Standing EEG Waves and Long-Range Neural Synchronization during Non-REM Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Siddharth S.; Namath, Amalia G.; Galán, Roberto F.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work from our lab has demonstrated how the connectivity of brain circuits constrains the repertoire of activity patterns that those circuits can display. Specifically, we have shown that the principal components of spontaneous neural activity are uniquely determined by the underlying circuit connections, and that although the principal components do not uniquely resolve the circuit structure, they do reveal important features about it. Expanding upon this framework on a larger scale of neural dynamics, we have analyzed EEG data recorded with the standard 10–20 electrode system from 41 neurologically normal children and adolescents during stage 2, non-REM sleep. We show that the principal components of EEG spindles, or sigma waves (10–16 Hz), reveal non-propagating, standing waves in the form of spherical harmonics. We mathematically demonstrate that standing EEG waves exist when the spatial covariance and the Laplacian operator on the head's surface commute. This in turn implies that the covariance between two EEG channels decreases as the inverse of their relative distance; a relationship that we corroborate with empirical data. Using volume conduction theory, we then demonstrate that superficial current sources are more synchronized at larger distances, and determine the characteristic length of large-scale neural synchronization as 1.31 times the head radius, on average. Moreover, consistent with the hypothesis that EEG spindles are driven by thalamo-cortical rather than cortico-cortical loops, we also show that 8 additional patients with hypoplasia or complete agenesis of the corpus callosum, i.e., with deficient or no connectivity between cortical hemispheres, similarly exhibit standing EEG waves in the form of spherical harmonics. We conclude that spherical harmonics are a hallmark of spontaneous, large-scale synchronization of neural activity in the brain, which are associated with unconscious, light sleep. The analogy with spherical harmonics

  12. A Framework for Quantitative Modeling of Neural Circuits Involved in Sleep-to-Wake Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorooshyari, Siamak; Huerta, Ramón; de Lecea, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the neuronal circuits and dynamics of sleep-to-wake transition is essential to understanding brain regulation of behavioral states, including sleep–wake cycles, arousal, and hyperarousal. Recent work by different laboratories has used optogenetics to determine the role of individual neuromodulators in state transitions. The optogenetically driven data do not yet provide a multi-dimensional schematic of the mechanisms underlying changes in vigilance states. This work presents a modeling framework to interpret, assist, and drive research on the sleep-regulatory network. We identify feedback, redundancy, and gating hierarchy as three fundamental aspects of this model. The presented model is expected to expand as additional data on the contribution of each transmitter to a vigilance state becomes available. Incorporation of conductance-based models of neuronal ensembles into this model and existing models of cortical excitability will provide more comprehensive insight into sleep dynamics as well as sleep and arousal-related disorders. PMID:25767461

  13. Common Features of Neural Activity during Singing and Sleep Periods in a Basal Ganglia Nucleus Critical for Vocal Learning in a Juvenile Songbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, Shin; Hessler, Neal A.

    2011-01-01

    Reactivations of waking experiences during sleep have been considered fundamental neural processes for memory consolidation. In songbirds, evidence suggests the importance of sleep-related neuronal activity in song system motor pathway nuclei for both juvenile vocal learning and maintenance of adult song. Like those in singing motor nuclei, neurons in the basal ganglia nucleus Area X, part of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuit essential for vocal plasticity, exhibit singing-related activity. It is unclear, however, whether Area X neurons show any distinctive spiking activity during sleep similar to that during singing. Here we demonstrate that, during sleep, Area X pallidal neurons exhibit phasic spiking activity, which shares some firing properties with activity during singing. Shorter interspike intervals that almost exclusively occurred during singing in awake periods were also observed during sleep. The level of firing variability was consistently higher during singing and sleep than during awake non-singing states. Moreover, deceleration of firing rate, which is considered to be an important firing property for transmitting signals from Area X to the thalamic nucleus DLM, was observed mainly during sleep as well as during singing. These results suggest that songbird basal ganglia circuitry may be involved in the off-line processing potentially critical for vocal learning during sensorimotor learning phase. PMID:21991379

  14. Common features of neural activity during singing and sleep periods in a basal ganglia nucleus critical for vocal learning in a juvenile songbird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Yanagihara

    Full Text Available Reactivations of waking experiences during sleep have been considered fundamental neural processes for memory consolidation. In songbirds, evidence suggests the importance of sleep-related neuronal activity in song system motor pathway nuclei for both juvenile vocal learning and maintenance of adult song. Like those in singing motor nuclei, neurons in the basal ganglia nucleus Area X, part of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuit essential for vocal plasticity, exhibit singing-related activity. It is unclear, however, whether Area X neurons show any distinctive spiking activity during sleep similar to that during singing. Here we demonstrate that, during sleep, Area X pallidal neurons exhibit phasic spiking activity, which shares some firing properties with activity during singing. Shorter interspike intervals that almost exclusively occurred during singing in awake periods were also observed during sleep. The level of firing variability was consistently higher during singing and sleep than during awake non-singing states. Moreover, deceleration of firing rate, which is considered to be an important firing property for transmitting signals from Area X to the thalamic nucleus DLM, was observed mainly during sleep as well as during singing. These results suggest that songbird basal ganglia circuitry may be involved in the off-line processing potentially critical for vocal learning during sensorimotor learning phase.

  15. A Neural Network Underlying Circadian Entrainment and Photoperiodic Adjustment of Sleep and Activity in Drosophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlichting, Matthias; Menegazzi, Pamela; Lelito, Katharine R.; Yao, Zepeng; Buhl, Edgar; Dalla Benetta, Elena; Bahle, Andrew; Denike, Jennifer; Hodge, James John; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte; Shafer, Orie Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A sensitivity of the circadian clock to light/dark cycles ensures that biological rhythms maintain optimal phase relationships with the external day. In animals, the circadian clock neuron network (CCNN) driving sleep/activity rhythms receives light input from multiple photoreceptors, but how these

  16. Pollutants increase song complexity and the volume of the brain area HVC in a songbird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Markman

    Full Text Available Environmental pollutants which alter endocrine function are now known to decrease vertebrate reproductive success. There is considerable evidence for endocrine disruption from aquatic ecosystems, but knowledge is lacking with regard to the interface between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Here, we show for the first time that birds foraging on invertebrates contaminated with environmental pollutants, show marked changes in both brain and behaviour. We found that male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris exposed to environmentally relevant levels of synthetic and natural estrogen mimics developed longer and more complex songs compared to control males, a sexually selected trait important in attracting females for reproduction. Moreover, females preferred the song of males which had higher pollutant exposure, despite the fact that experimentally dosed males showed reduced immune function. We also show that the key brain area controlling male song complexity (HVC is significantly enlarged in the contaminated birds. This is the first evidence that environmental pollutants not only affect, but paradoxically enhance a signal of male quality such as song. Our data suggest that female starlings would bias their choice towards exposed males, with possible consequences at the population level. As the starling is a migratory species, our results suggest that transglobal effects of pollutants on terrestrial vertebrate physiology and reproduction could occur in birds.

  17. Sleep: A Health Imperative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyster, Faith S.; Strollo, Patrick J.; Zee, Phyllis C.; Walsh, James K.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic sleep deficiency, defined as a state of inadequate or mistimed sleep, is a growing and underappreciated determinant of health status. Sleep deprivation contributes to a number of molecular, immune, and neural changes that play a role in disease development, independent of primary sleep disorders. These changes in biological processes in response to chronic sleep deficiency may serve as etiological factors for the development and exacerbation of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases and, ultimately, a shortened lifespan. Sleep deprivation also results in significant impairments in cognitive and motor performance which increase the risk of motor vehicle crashes and work-related injuries and fatal accidents. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society have developed this statement to communicate to national health stakeholders the current knowledge which ties sufficient sleep and circadian alignment in adults to health. Citation: Luyster FS; Strollo PJ; Zee PC; Walsh JK. Sleep: a health imperative. SLEEP 2012;35(6):727-734. PMID:22654183

  18. Neural mechanisms of vocal imitation: The role of sleep replay in shaping mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giret, Nicolas; Edeline, Jean-Marc; Del Negro, Catherine

    2017-03-10

    Learning by imitation involves not only perceiving another individual's action to copy it, but also the formation of a memory trace in order to gradually establish a correspondence between the sensory and motor codes, which represent this action through sensorimotor experience. Memory and sensorimotor processes are closely intertwined. Mirror neurons, which fire both when the same action is performed or perceived, have received considerable attention in the context of imitation. An influential view of memory processes considers that the consolidation of newly acquired information or skills involves an active offline reprocessing of memories during sleep within the neuronal networks that were initially used for encoding. Here, we review the recent advances in the field of mirror neurons and offline processes in the songbird. We further propose a theoretical framework that could establish the neurobiological foundations of sensorimotor learning by imitation. We propose that the reactivation of neuronal assemblies during offline periods contributes to the integration of sensory feedback information and the establishment of sensorimotor mirroring activity at the neuronal level.

  19. Sleep Sleeping Patch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Sleep Sleeping Patch is a new kind of external patch based on modern sleep medicine research achievements, which uses the internationally advanced transdermal therapeutic system (TTS). The Sleep Sleeping Patch transmits natural sleep inducers such as peppermint and liquorice extracts and melatonin through the skin to induce sleep. Clinical research proves that the Sleep Sleeping Patch can effectively improve insomnia and the quality of sleep. Highly effective: With the modern TTS therapy,

  20. Neural respiratory drive in patients with obstructive sleep apnea%阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停患者的呼吸中枢驱动

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱志辉; 黎锐发; 张栋; 罗远明

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the variability of neural respiratory drive in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) upon neural respiratory drive.Methods We recorded diaphragm electromyogram (EMGdi) with multi-pair esophageal electrodes and its variability during wakefulness,sleep and treatment with CPAP in 13 patients with moderate to severe OSA diagnosed by an overnight full polysomnography (OSA group).Six normal subjects (control group) were also studied.Results Coefficient of variation of EMGdi (CV-EMGdi) during wakefulness (15.4%±3.8%) was similar to that during sleep (17.3%±5.2,P>0.05) in the control group.The CV-EMGdi during wakefulness,sleep,sleep apnea events and treatment with CPAP in OSA group was 14.7%±1.9%,40.7%±12.0%,29.1%±7.5% and 15.4%±4.6% respectively,CV-EMGdi during sleep or sleep apnea events was larger than that during wakefulness (P<0.01).However,there was no difference in the CV-EMGdi during wakefulness and during treatment with CPAP (P>0.05).Conclusion The variability of neural respiratory drive in patients with OSA is higher than that in normal subjects,and CPAP can reduce the variability of neural respiratory drive in patients with OSA.%目的 探讨阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停(OSA)患者呼吸中枢驱动的变异性以及持续气道正压通气(CPAP)对OSA患者呼吸中枢驱动的作用.方法 以13例经多导睡眠图(PSG)检查确诊为中重度OSA的患者(OSA组)和6名健康人(对照组)为研究对象.在PSG监测下记录2组受试者睡前清醒期和睡眠期以及OSA组患者睡眠呼吸事件发生和CPAP治疗时食管膈肌肌电,并分析其变异性.结果 对照组清醒期和睡眠期食管膈肌肌电变异系数分别为15.4%±3.8%和17.3%±5.2%,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).OSA组患者清醒期、睡眠期、睡眠呼吸事件发生和CPAP治疗时食管膈肌肌电变异系数分别为14.7%±1.9%、40.7%±12.0%、29.1%±7.5%和15.4%±4

  1. Unihemispheric sleep and asymmetrical sleep: behavioral, neurophysiological, and functional perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascetti GG

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gian Gastone Mascetti Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy Abstract: Sleep is a behavior characterized by a typical body posture, both eyes' closure, raised sensory threshold, distinctive electrographic signs, and a marked decrease of motor activity. In addition, sleep is a periodically necessary behavior and therefore, in the majority of animals, it involves the whole brain and body. However, certain marine mammals and species of birds show a different sleep behavior, in which one cerebral hemisphere sleeps while the other is awake. In dolphins, eared seals, and manatees, unihemispheric sleep allows them to have the benefits of sleep, breathing, thermoregulation, and vigilance. In birds, antipredation vigilance is the main function of unihemispheric sleep, but in domestic chicks, it is also associated with brain lateralization or dominance in the control of behavior. Compared to bihemispheric sleep, unihemispheric sleep would mean a reduction of the time spent sleeping and of the associated recovery processes. However, the behavior and health of aquatic mammals and birds does not seem at all impaired by the reduction of sleep. The neural mechanisms of unihemispheric sleep are unknown, but assuming that the neural structures involved in sleep in cetaceans, seals, and birds are similar to those of terrestrial mammals, it is suggested that they involve the interaction of structures of the hypothalamus, basal forebrain, and brain stem. The neural mechanisms promoting wakefulness dominate one side of the brain, while those promoting sleep predominates the other side. For cetaceans, unihemispheric sleep is the only way to sleep, while in seals and birds, unihemispheric sleep events are intermingled with bihemispheric and rapid eye movement sleep events. Electroencephalogram hemispheric asymmetries are also reported during bihemispheric sleep, at awakening, and at sleep onset, as well as being associated with a use

  2. Studies of HVC Plasticity in Adult Canaries Reveal Social Effects and Sex Differences as Well as Limitations of Multiple Markers Available to Assess Adult Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchouk, Olesya T.; Ball, Gregory F.; Cornil, Charlotte A.

    2017-01-01

    In songbirds, neurogenesis in the song control nucleus HVC is sensitive to the hormonal and social environment but the dynamics of this process is difficult to assess with a single exogenous marker of new neurons. We simultaneously used three independent markers to investigate HVC neurogenesis in male and female canaries. Males were castrated, implanted with testosterone and housed either alone (M), with a female (M-F) or with another male (M-M) while females were implanted with 17β-estradiol and housed with a male (F-M). All subjects received injections of the two thymidine analogues, BrdU and of EdU, respectively 21 and 10 days before brain collection. Cells containing BrdU or EdU or expressing doublecortin (DCX), which labels newborn neurons, were quantified. Social context and sex differentially affected total BrdU+, EdU+, BrdU+EdU- and DCX+ populations. M-M males had a higher density of BrdU+ cells in the ventricular zone adjacent to HVC and of EdU+ in HVC than M-F males. M birds had a higher ratio of BrdU+EdU- to EdU+ cells than M-F subjects suggesting higher survival of newer neurons in the former group. Total number of HVC DCX+ cells was lower in M-F than in M-M males. Sex differences were also dependent of the type of marker used. Several technical limitations associated with the use of these multiple markers were also identified. These results indicate that proliferation, recruitment and survival of new neurons can be independently affected by environmental conditions and effects can only be fully discerned through the use of multiple neurogenesis markers. PMID:28141859

  3. Studies of HVC Plasticity in Adult Canaries Reveal Social Effects and Sex Differences as Well as Limitations of Multiple Markers Available to Assess Adult Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchouk, Olesya T; Ball, Gregory F; Cornil, Charlotte A; Balthazart, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    In songbirds, neurogenesis in the song control nucleus HVC is sensitive to the hormonal and social environment but the dynamics of this process is difficult to assess with a single exogenous marker of new neurons. We simultaneously used three independent markers to investigate HVC neurogenesis in male and female canaries. Males were castrated, implanted with testosterone and housed either alone (M), with a female (M-F) or with another male (M-M) while females were implanted with 17β-estradiol and housed with a male (F-M). All subjects received injections of the two thymidine analogues, BrdU and of EdU, respectively 21 and 10 days before brain collection. Cells containing BrdU or EdU or expressing doublecortin (DCX), which labels newborn neurons, were quantified. Social context and sex differentially affected total BrdU+, EdU+, BrdU+EdU- and DCX+ populations. M-M males had a higher density of BrdU+ cells in the ventricular zone adjacent to HVC and of EdU+ in HVC than M-F males. M birds had a higher ratio of BrdU+EdU- to EdU+ cells than M-F subjects suggesting higher survival of newer neurons in the former group. Total number of HVC DCX+ cells was lower in M-F than in M-M males. Sex differences were also dependent of the type of marker used. Several technical limitations associated with the use of these multiple markers were also identified. These results indicate that proliferation, recruitment and survival of new neurons can be independently affected by environmental conditions and effects can only be fully discerned through the use of multiple neurogenesis markers.

  4. Unihemispheric sleep and asymmetrical sleep: behavioral, neurophysiological, and functional perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascetti, Gian Gastone

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is a behavior characterized by a typical body posture, both eyes’ closure, raised sensory threshold, distinctive electrographic signs, and a marked decrease of motor activity. In addition, sleep is a periodically necessary behavior and therefore, in the majority of animals, it involves the whole brain and body. However, certain marine mammals and species of birds show a different sleep behavior, in which one cerebral hemisphere sleeps while the other is awake. In dolphins, eared seals, and manatees, unihemispheric sleep allows them to have the benefits of sleep, breathing, thermoregulation, and vigilance. In birds, antipredation vigilance is the main function of unihemispheric sleep, but in domestic chicks, it is also associated with brain lateralization or dominance in the control of behavior. Compared to bihemispheric sleep, unihemispheric sleep would mean a reduction of the time spent sleeping and of the associated recovery processes. However, the behavior and health of aquatic mammals and birds does not seem at all impaired by the reduction of sleep. The neural mechanisms of unihemispheric sleep are unknown, but assuming that the neural structures involved in sleep in cetaceans, seals, and birds are similar to those of terrestrial mammals, it is suggested that they involve the interaction of structures of the hypothalamus, basal forebrain, and brain stem. The neural mechanisms promoting wakefulness dominate one side of the brain, while those promoting sleep predominates the other side. For cetaceans, unihemispheric sleep is the only way to sleep, while in seals and birds, unihemispheric sleep events are intermingled with bihemispheric and rapid eye movement sleep events. Electroencephalogram hemispheric asymmetries are also reported during bihemispheric sleep, at awakening, and at sleep onset, as well as being associated with a use-dependent process (local sleep). PMID:27471418

  5. Spikes and bursts in two types of thalamic projection neurons differentially shape sleep patterns and auditory responses in a songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnloser, Richard H R; Wang, Claude Z-H; Nager, Aymeric; Naie, Katja

    2008-05-07

    In mammals, the thalamus plays important roles for cortical processing, such as relay of sensory information and induction of rhythmical firing during sleep. In neurons of the avian cerebrum, in analogy with cortical up and down states, complex patterns of regular-spiking and dense-bursting modes are frequently observed during sleep. However, the roles of thalamic inputs for shaping these firing modes are largely unknown. A suspected key player is the avian thalamic nucleus uvaeformis (Uva). Uva is innervated by polysensory input, receives indirect cerebral feedback via the midbrain, and projects to the cerebrum via two distinct pathways. Using pharmacological manipulation, electrical stimulation, and extracellular recordings of Uva projection neurons, we study the involvement of Uva in zebra finches for the generation of spontaneous activity and auditory responses in premotor area HVC (used as a proper name) and the downstream robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA). In awake and sleeping birds, we find that single Uva spikes suppress and spike bursts enhance spontaneous and auditory-evoked bursts in HVC and RA neurons. Strong burst suppression is mediated mainly via tonically firing HVC-projecting Uva neurons, whereas a fast burst drive is mediated indirectly via Uva neurons projecting to the nucleus interface of the nidopallium. Our results reveal that cerebral sleep-burst epochs and arousal-related burst suppression are both shaped by sophisticated polysynaptic thalamic mechanisms.

  6. The neural dynamics of song syntax in songbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Dezhe

    2010-03-01

    Songbird is ``the hydrogen atom'' of the neuroscience of complex, learned vocalizations such as human speech. Songs of Bengalese finch consist of sequences of syllables. While syllables are temporally stereotypical, syllable sequences can vary and follow complex, probabilistic syntactic rules, which are rudimentarily similar to grammars in human language. Songbird brain is accessible to experimental probes, and is understood well enough to construct biologically constrained, predictive computational models. In this talk, I will discuss the structure and dynamics of neural networks underlying the stereotypy of the birdsong syllables and the flexibility of syllable sequences. Recent experiments and computational models suggest that a syllable is encoded in a chain network of projection neurons in premotor nucleus HVC (proper name). Precisely timed spikes propagate along the chain, driving vocalization of the syllable through downstream nuclei. Through a computational model, I show that that variable syllable sequences can be generated through spike propagations in a network in HVC in which the syllable-encoding chain networks are connected into a branching chain pattern. The neurons mutually inhibit each other through the inhibitory HVC interneurons, and are driven by external inputs from nuclei upstream of HVC. At a branching point that connects the final group of a chain to the first groups of several chains, the spike activity selects one branch to continue the propagation. The selection is probabilistic, and is due to the winner-take-all mechanism mediated by the inhibition and noise. The model predicts that the syllable sequences statistically follow partially observable Markov models. Experimental results supporting this and other predictions of the model will be presented. We suggest that the syntax of birdsong syllable sequences is embedded in the connection patterns of HVC projection neurons.

  7. Model predictive combustion control based on neural nets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, D. [Powitec Intelligent Technologies GmbH, Essen (Germany); Kampschreuer, T. [AVR Afvalverwerking B.V., Duiven/Arnheim (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    The first closed-loop Neural Net combustion controller in the Netherlands has been installed at the HVC plant in Alkmaar. During the summer 2006 the first of the 'old' three lines was equipped with an individually controllable primary air distribution. As 'fire controller' the combustion optimiser from Powitec, the PiT Navigator, was selected, a system using digital image processing and neural nets. This paper shows the results from operating the plant with and without the NMPC optimiser and from the performance tests. (orig.)

  8. Neural and behavioral correlates of extended training during sleep deprivation in humans: evidence for local, task-specific effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Giulio; Siclari, Francesca; Yu, Xiaoqian; Zennig, Corinna; Bellesi, Michele; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Cirelli, Chiara; Ghilardi, Maria Felice; Pietrini, Pietro; Tononi, Giulio

    2015-03-18

    Recent work has demonstrated that behavioral manipulations targeting specific cortical areas during prolonged wakefulness lead to a region-specific homeostatic increase in theta activity (5-9 Hz), suggesting that theta waves could represent transient neuronal OFF periods (local sleep). In awake rats, the occurrence of an OFF period in a brain area relevant for behavior results in performance errors. Here we investigated the potential relationship between local sleep events and negative behavioral outcomes in humans. Volunteers participated in two prolonged wakefulness experiments (24 h), each including 12 h of practice with either a driving simulation (DS) game or a battery of tasks based on executive functions (EFs). Multiple high-density EEG recordings were obtained during each experiment, both in quiet rest conditions and during execution of two behavioral tests, a response inhibition test and a motor test, aimed at assessing changes in impulse control and visuomotor performance, respectively. In addition, fMRI examinations obtained at 12 h intervals were used to investigate changes in inter-regional connectivity. The EF experiment was associated with a reduced efficiency in impulse control, whereas DS led to a relative impairment in visuomotor control. A specific spatial and temporal correlation was observed between EEG theta waves occurring in task-related areas and deterioration of behavioral performance. The fMRI connectivity analysis indicated that performance impairment might partially depend on a breakdown in connectivity determined by a "network overload." Present results demonstrate the existence of an association between theta waves during wakefulness and performance errors and may contribute explaining behavioral impairments under conditions of sleep deprivation/restriction.

  9. Adult Neurogenesis Leads to the Functional Reconstruction of a Telencephalic Neural Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo-Lima, Matheus; Miller, Kimberly E.; Brenowitz, Eliot A.

    2016-01-01

    Seasonally breeding songbirds exhibit pronounced annual changes in song behavior, and in the morphology and physiology of the telencephalic neural circuit underlying production of learned song. Each breeding season, new adult-born neurons are added to the pallial nucleus HVC in response to seasonal changes in steroid hormone levels, and send long axonal projections to their target nucleus, the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA). We investigated the role that adult neurogenesis plays in the seasonal reconstruction of this circuit. We labeled newborn HVC neurons with BrdU, and RA-projecting HVC neurons (HVCRA) with retrograde tracer injected in RA of adult male white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii) in breeding or nonbreeding conditions. We found that there were many more HVCRA neurons in breeding than nonbreeding birds. Furthermore, we observed that more newborn HVC neurons were back-filled by the tracer in breeding animals. Behaviorally, song structure degraded as the HVC-RA circuit degenerated, and recovered as the circuit regenerated, in close correlation with the number of new HVCRA neurons. These results support the hypothesis that the HVC-RA circuit degenerates in nonbreeding birds, and that newborn neurons reconstruct the circuit in breeding birds, leading to functional recovery of song behavior. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We investigated the role that adult neurogenesis plays in the seasonal reconstruction of a telencephalic neural circuit that controls song behavior in white-crowned sparrows. We showed that nonbreeding birds had a 36%–49% reduction in the number of projection neurons compared with breeding birds, and the regeneration of the circuit in the breeding season is due to the integration of adult-born projection neurons. Additionally, song structure degraded as the circuit degenerated and recovered as the circuit regenerated, in close correlation with new projection neuron number. This study demonstrates that steroid hormones

  10. Sleep Regulation, Physiology and Development, Sleep Duration and Patterns, and Sleep Hygiene in Infants, Toddlers, and Preschool-Age Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathory, Eleanor; Tomopoulos, Suzy

    2017-02-01

    Sleep problems are common, reported by a quarter of parents with children under the age of 5 years, and have been associated with poor behavior, worse school performance, and obesity, in addition to negative secondary effects on maternal and family well-being. Yet, it has been shown that pediatricians do not adequately address sleep in routine well-child visits, and underdiagnose sleep issues. Pediatricians receive little formal training in medical school or in residency regarding sleep medicine. An understanding of the physiology of sleep is critical to a pediatrician׳s ability to effectively and confidently counsel patients about sleep. The biological rhythm of sleep and waking is regulated through both circadian and homeostatic processes. Sleep also has an internal rhythmic organization, or sleep architecture, which includes sleep cycles of REM and NREM sleep. Arousal and sleep (REM and NREM) are active and complex neurophysiologic processes, involving both neural pathway activation and suppression. These physiologic processes change over the life course, especially in the first 5 years. Adequate sleep is often difficult to achieve, yet is considered very important to optimal daily function and behavior in children; thus, understanding optimal sleep duration and patterns is critical for pediatricians. There is little experimental evidence that guides sleep recommendations, rather normative data and expert recommendations. Effective counseling on child sleep must account for the child and parent factors (child temperament, parent-child interaction, and parental affect) and the environmental factors (cultural, geographic, and home environment, especially media exposure) that influence sleep. To promote health and to prevent and manage sleep problems, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that parents start promoting good sleep hygiene, with a sleep-promoting environment and a bedtime routine in infancy, and throughout childhood. Thus, counseling

  11. Vascular compliance limits during sleep deprivation and recovery sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Derrick J; Schei, Jennifer L; Rector, David M

    2013-10-01

    Our previous studies showed that evoked hemodynamic responses are smaller during wake compared to sleep; suggesting neural activity is associated with vascular expansion and decreased compliance. We explored whether prolonged activity during sleep deprivation may exacerbate vascular expansion and blunt hemodynamic responses. Evoked auditory responses were generated with periodic 65 dB speaker clicks over a 72-h period and measured with cortical electrodes. Evoked hemodynamic responses were measured simultaneously with optical techniques using three light-emitting diodes, and a photodiode. Animals were housed in separate 30×30×80 cm enclosures, tethered to a commutator system and maintained on a 12-h light/dark cycle. Food and water were available ad libitum. Seven adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. Following a 24-h baseline recording, sleep deprivation was initiated for 0 to 10 h by gentle handling, followed by a 24-h recovery sleep recording. Evoked electrical and hemodynamic responses were measured before, during, and after sleep deprivation. Following deprivation, evoked hemodynamic amplitudes were blunted. Steady-state oxyhemoglobin concentration increased during deprivation and remained high during the initial recovery period before returning to baseline levels after approximately 9-h. Sleep deprivation resulted in blood vessel expansion and decreased compliance while lower basal neural activity during recovery sleep may allow blood vessel compliance to recover. Chronic sleep restriction or sleep deprivation could push the vasculature to critical levels, limiting blood delivery, and leading to metabolic deficits with the potential for neural trauma.

  12. Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the day, even if you have had enough sleep? You might have a sleep disorder. The most common kinds are Insomnia - a hard time falling or staying asleep Sleep apnea - breathing interruptions during sleep Restless legs syndrome - ...

  13. Sleep Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Sleep Problems Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... PDF 474KB) En Español Medicines to Help You Sleep Tips for Better Sleep Basic Facts about Sleep ...

  14. Sleep spindles and hippocampal functional connectivity in human NREM sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Kátia C; Spoormaker, Victor I; Dresler, Martin; Wehrle, Renate; Holsboer, Florian; Sämann, Philipp G; Czisch, Michael

    2011-07-13

    We investigated human hippocampal functional connectivity in wakefulness and throughout non-rapid eye movement sleep. Young healthy subjects underwent simultaneous EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements at 1.5 T under resting conditions in the descent to deep sleep. Continuous 5 min epochs representing a unique sleep stage (i.e., wakefulness, sleep stages 1 and 2, or slow-wave sleep) were extracted. fMRI time series of subregions of the hippocampal formation (HF) (cornu ammonis, dentate gyrus, and subiculum) were extracted based on cytoarchitectonical probability maps. We observed sleep stage-dependent changes in HF functional coupling. The HF was integrated to variable strength in the default mode network (DMN) in wakefulness and light sleep stages but not in slow-wave sleep. The strongest functional connectivity between the HF and neocortex was observed in sleep stage 2 (compared with both slow-wave sleep and wakefulness). We observed a strong interaction of sleep spindle occurrence and HF functional connectivity in sleep stage 2, with increased HF/neocortical connectivity during spindles. Moreover, the cornu ammonis exhibited strongest functional connectivity with the DMN during wakefulness, while the subiculum dominated hippocampal functional connectivity to frontal brain regions during sleep stage 2. Increased connectivity between HF and neocortical regions in sleep stage 2 suggests an increased capacity for possible global information transfer, while connectivity in slow-wave sleep is reflecting a functional system optimal for segregated information reprocessing. Our data may be relevant to differentiating sleep stage-specific contributions to neural plasticity as proposed in sleep-dependent memory consolidation.

  15. Cardiovascular physiology and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Narayana S; Svatikova, Anna; Somers, Virend K

    2003-05-01

    effects of sleep could be objectively differentiated from the effects of rest and recumbency. Furthermore, the specific effects of sleep onset and termination, and the effects of different sleep stages, could be assessed. Technological advances, with consequently enhanced and relatively non-invasive approaches to cardiovascular regulation, have greatly broadened our understanding of the effects of sleep stage on cardiovascular function. Continuous monitoring of simultaneous measures of polysomnographic and cardiovascular variables enables characterization of the effects of dynamic changes and rapid transitions in sleep stage, such as arousals. The capacity for measuring acute and immediate changes in autonomic, EEG and hemodynamic responses to sleep and arousal on a continuous basis has played an important role in enabling us to understand the interplay between changes in EEG and changes in the more peripheral measurements of neural and circulatory variables, such as sympathetic nerve traffic, heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP). Measurements of heart rate variability (HRV) (8-10), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) (11-16), and intraneural measurement of sympathetic nerve traffic to muscle (MSNA) (17-22) and skin (SSNA) (23-24) have further advanced our understanding of mechanisms linking sleep and cardiovascular physiology.

  16. Sleep and Arousal Mechanisms in Experimental Epilepsy: Epileptic Components of NREM and Antiepileptic Components of REM Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouse, M. N.; Scordato, J. C.; Farber, P. R.

    2004-01-01

    Neural generators related to different sleep components have different effects on seizure discharge. These sleep-related systems can provoke seizure discharge propagation during nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and can suppress propagation during REM sleep. Experimental manipulations of discrete physiological components were conducted in feline…

  17. From neural plate to cortical arousal-a neuronal network theory of sleep derived from in vitro "model" systems for primordial patterns of spontaneous bioelectric activity in the vertebrate central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corner, Michael A

    2013-05-22

    In the early 1960s intrinsically generated widespread neuronal discharges were discovered to be the basis for the earliest motor behavior throughout the animal kingdom. The pattern generating system is in fact programmed into the developing nervous system, in a regionally specific manner, already at the early neural plate stage. Such rhythmically modulated phasic bursts were next discovered to be a general feature of developing neural networks and, largely on the basis of experimental interventions in cultured neural tissues, to contribute significantly to their morpho-physiological maturation. In particular, the level of spontaneous synchronized bursting is homeostatically regulated, and has the effect of constraining the development of excessive network excitability. After birth or hatching, this "slow-wave" activity pattern becomes sporadically suppressed in favor of sensory oriented "waking" behaviors better adapted to dealing with environmental contingencies. It nevertheless reappears periodically as "sleep" at several species-specific points in the diurnal/nocturnal cycle. Although this "default" behavior pattern evolves with development, its essential features are preserved throughout the life cycle, and are based upon a few simple mechanisms which can be both experimentally demonstrated and simulated by computer modeling. In contrast, a late onto- and phylogenetic aspect of sleep, viz., the intermittent "paradoxical" activation of the forebrain so as to mimic waking activity, is much less well understood as regards its contribution to brain development. Some recent findings dealing with this question by means of cholinergically induced "aroused" firing patterns in developing neocortical cell cultures, followed by quantitative electrophysiological assays of immediate and longterm sequelae, will be discussed in connection with their putative implications for sleep ontogeny.

  18. Sleep, sleep deprivation, autonomic nervous system and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobaldini, Eleonora; Costantino, Giorgio; Solbiati, Monica; Cogliati, Chiara; Kara, Tomas; Nobili, Lino; Montano, Nicola

    2017-03-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has become a relevant health problem in modern societies. We can be sleep deprived due to lifestyle habits or due to sleep disorders, such as insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and neurological disorders. One of the common element of sleep disorders is the condition of chronic SD, which has complex biological consequences. SD is capable of inducing different biological effects, such as neural autonomic control changes, increased oxidative stress, altered inflammatory and coagulatory responses and accelerated atherosclerosis. All these mechanisms links SD and cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Epidemiological studies have shown that short sleep duration is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases, such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, arrhythmias, diabetes and obesity, after adjustment for socioeconomic and demographic risk factors and comorbidities. Thus, an early assessment of a condition of SD and its treatment is clinically relevant to prevent the harmful consequences of a very common condition in adult population.

  19. Sleep Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PD / Coping with Symptoms & Side Effects / Sleep Disturbances Sleep Disturbances Many people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have ... stay awake during the day. Tips for Better Sleep People with PD — and their care partners too — ...

  20. Sleep Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek Kornum, Birgitte; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian sleep has evolved under the influence of the day-night cycle and in response to reproductive needs, food seeking, and predator avoidance, resulting in circadian (predictive) and homeostatic (reactive) regulation. A molecular clock characterized by transcription/translation feedback loops...... mediates circadian regulation of sleep. Misalignment with the rhythm of the sun results in circadian disorders and jet lag. The molecular basis of homeostatic sleep regulation is mostly unknown. A network of mutually inhibitory brain nuclei regulates sleep states and sleep-wake transitions. Abnormalities...... in these networks create sleep disorders, including rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, sleep walking, and narcolepsy. Physiological changes associated with sleep can be imbalanced, resulting in excess movements such as periodic leg movements during sleep or abnormal breathing in obstructive sleep apneas...

  1. 睡眠剥夺影响恐惧情绪加工的认知神经机制%Neural Mechanisms Underlying the Impact of Sleep Deprivation on Fear Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯攀; 郑涌

    2015-01-01

    睡眠剥夺与恐惧情绪加工的各个过程息息相关。睡眠剥夺损害了恐惧的习得过程,而且影响着杏仁核、内侧前额叶的活动及它们之间的功能连接;睡眠剥夺削弱了恐惧记忆的巩固和再巩固过程,不仅破坏了恐惧记忆再巩固过程相关蛋白质和酶的合成,同时也影响着海马、杏仁核、内侧前额叶的活动以及它们之间的功能连接;睡眠剥夺损害了恐惧的消退,同时也改变了海马、杏仁核等相关脑区的活动模式。未来的研究应从睡眠剥夺影响恐惧情绪加工的认知神经机制、睡眠剥夺与恐惧情绪相关障碍的关系等角度展开,力图深入理解睡眠剥夺影响恐惧情绪加工的认知神经机制。%Processing of a fear memory can be divided into four distinct phases: acquisition, consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction. Sleep deprivation has been shown to impair the process of fear acquisition as it affects activity of the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex, as well as the functional connectivity between them. Sleep deprivation also weakens fear memory consolidation by interfering with activities of the hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex, as well as the functional connectivity among them. In addition, sleep deprivation can attenuate fear memory reconsolidation, not only by impairing the synthesis of proteins and enzymes closely related to memory consolidation, but also by affecting activity in the amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Finally, sleep deprivation can impair extinction of a fear memory as it can alter activity patterns of the hippocampus and amygdala. Future studies should focus on the cognitive neural mechanisms underlying the impact of sleep deprivation on processing of a fear memory as well as the relationship between sleep deprivation and fear-related disorders.

  2. From Neural Plate to Cortical Arousal—A Neuronal Network Theory of Sleep Derived from in Vitro “Model” Systems for Primordial Patterns of Spontaneous Bioelectric Activity in the Vertebrate Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Corner

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the early 1960s intrinsically generated widespread neuronal discharges were discovered to be the basis for the earliest motor behavior throughout the animal kingdom. The pattern generating system is in fact programmed into the developing nervous system, in a regionally specific manner, already at the early neural plate stage. Such rhythmically modulated phasic bursts were next discovered to be a general feature of developing neural networks and, largely on the basis of experimental interventions in cultured neural tissues, to contribute significantly to their morpho-physiological maturation. In particular, the level of spontaneous synchronized bursting is homeostatically regulated, and has the effect of constraining the development of excessive network excitability. After birth or hatching, this “slow-wave” activity pattern becomes sporadically suppressed in favor of sensory oriented “waking” behaviors better adapted to dealing with environmental contingencies. It nevertheless reappears periodically as “sleep” at several species-specific points in the diurnal/nocturnal cycle. Although this “default” behavior pattern evolves with development, its essential features are preserved throughout the life cycle, and are based upon a few simple mechanisms which can be both experimentally demonstrated and simulated by computer modeling. In contrast, a late onto- and phylogenetic aspect of sleep, viz., the intermittent “paradoxical” activation of the forebrain so as to mimic waking activity, is much less well understood as regards its contribution to brain development. Some recent findings dealing with this question by means of cholinergically induced “aroused” firing patterns in developing neocortical cell cultures, followed by quantitative electrophysiological assays of immediate and longterm sequelae, will be discussed in connection with their putative implications for sleep ontogeny.

  3. Automated sleep scoring and sleep apnea detection in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraglia, David P.; Berryman, Matthew J.; Coussens, Scott W.; Pamula, Yvonne; Kennedy, Declan; Martin, A. James; Abbott, Derek

    2005-12-01

    This paper investigates the automated detection of a patient's breathing rate and heart rate from their skin conductivity as well as sleep stage scoring and breathing event detection from their EEG. The software developed for these tasks is tested on data sets obtained from the sleep disorders unit at the Adelaide Women's and Children's Hospital. The sleep scoring and breathing event detection tasks used neural networks to achieve signal classification. The Fourier transform and the Higuchi fractal dimension were used to extract features for input to the neural network. The filtered skin conductivity appeared visually to bear a similarity to the breathing and heart rate signal, but a more detailed evaluation showed the relation was not consistent. Sleep stage classification was achieved with and accuracy of around 65% with some stages being accurately scored and others poorly scored. The two breathing events hypopnea and apnea were scored with varying degrees of accuracy with the highest scores being around 75% and 30%.

  4. Sleep deprivation and neurobehavioral functioning in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maski, Kiran P; Kothare, Sanjeev V

    2013-08-01

    Sleep deprivation can result in significant impairments in daytime neurobehavioral functioning in children. Neural substrates impacted by sleep deprivation include the prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia and amygdala and result in difficulties with executive functioning, reward anticipation and emotional reactivity respectively. In everyday life, such difficulties contribute to academic struggles, challenging behaviors and public health concerns of substance abuse and suicidality. In this article, we aim to review 1) core neural structures impacted by sleep deprivation; 2) neurobehavioral problems associated with sleep deprivation; 3) specific mechanisms that may explain the relationship between sleep disturbances and neurobehavioral dysfunction; and 4) sleep problems reported in common neurodevelopmental disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs).

  5. Circadian Rhythms, Sleep Deprivation, and Human Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Namni; Basner, Mathias; Rao, Hengyi; Dinges, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Much of the current science on, and mathematical modeling of, dynamic changes in human performance within and between days is dominated by the two-process model of sleep–wake regulation, which posits a neurobiological drive for sleep that varies homeostatically (increasing as a saturating exponential during wakefulness and decreasing in a like manner during sleep), and a circadian process that neurobiologically modulates both the homeostatic drive for sleep and waking alertness and performance. Endogenous circadian rhythms in neurobehavioral functions, including physiological alertness and cognitive performance, have been demonstrated using special laboratory protocols that reveal the interaction of the biological clock with the sleep homeostatic drive. Individual differences in circadian rhythms and genetic and other components underlying such differences also influence waking neurobehavioral functions. Both acute total sleep deprivation and chronic sleep restriction increase homeostatic sleep drive and degrade waking neurobehavioral functions as reflected in sleepiness, attention, cognitive speed, and memory. Recent evidence indicating a high degree of stability in neurobehavioral responses to sleep loss suggests that these trait-like individual differences are phenotypic and likely involve genetic components, including circadian genes. Recent experiments have revealed both sleep homeostatic and circadian effects on brain metabolism and neural activation. Investigation of the neural and genetic mechanisms underlying the dynamically complex interaction between sleep homeostasis and circadian systems is beginning. A key goal of this work is to identify biomarkers that accurately predict human performance in situations in which the circadian and sleep homeostatic systems are perturbed. PMID:23899598

  6. THD Reduction of Distribution System Based on ASRFC and HVC Method for SVC under EV Charger Condition for Power Factor Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Gholami Farkoush

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Electric vehicles (EVs have been gaining popularity in recent years due to growing concerns about fuel depletion and increasing petrol prices. Random uncoordinated charging of multiple EVs at residential distribution feeders with moderate penetration levels is expected in the near future. This paper describes a high performance voltage controller for the EVs charging system, and proposes a scheme of asymmetric synchronous reference frame controller (ASRFC in order to compensate for the voltage distortions and unbalance distribution system due to EVs charger. This paper explores the power factor of distribution and residential network under random EVs charger on the bus load. ASRFC and harmonic voltage compensator (HVC are employed for static VAR compensator (SVC in this paper. The proposed scheme can improve the power factor and total harmonic distortion (THD of the smart grid due to the EVs charger in grid. The effectiveness of the scheme was investigated and verified through computer simulations of a 22.9-kV grid.

  7. Meditation and Its Regulatory Role on Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Nagendra, Ravindra P.; Maruthai, Nirmala; Kutty, Bindu M.

    2012-01-01

    Intense meditation practices help to achieve a harmony between body and mind. Meditation practices influence brain functions, induce various intrinsic neural plasticity events, modulate autonomic, metabolic, endocrine, and immune functions and thus mediate global regulatory changes in various behavioral states including sleep. This brief review focuses on the effect of meditation as a self regulatory phenomenon on sleep.

  8. Meditation and its regulatory role on sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra P. Nagendra

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Intense meditation practices help to achieve a harmony between body and mind. Meditation practices influence brain functions, induce various intrinsic neural plasticity events, modulate autonomic, metabolic, endocrine and immune functions and thus mediate global regulatory changes in various behavioural states including sleep. This brief review focuses on the effect of meditation as a self regulatory phenomenon on sleep.

  9. Meditation and its regulatory role on sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagendra, Ravindra P; Maruthai, Nirmala; Kutty, Bindu M

    2012-01-01

    Intense meditation practices help to achieve a harmony between body and mind. Meditation practices influence brain functions, induce various intrinsic neural plasticity events, modulate autonomic, metabolic, endocrine, and immune functions and thus mediate global regulatory changes in various behavioral states including sleep. This brief review focuses on the effect of meditation as a self regulatory phenomenon on sleep.

  10. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious ... to find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious ...

  11. Healthy Sleep Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep Apnea Testing CPAP Healthy Sleep Habits Healthy Sleep Habits Your behaviors during the day, and especially ... team at an AASM accredited sleep center . Quick Sleep Tips Follow these tips to establish healthy sleep ...

  12. Mechanisms of REM sleep in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraigne, Jimmy J; Grace, Kevin P; Horner, Richard L; Peever, John

    2014-11-01

    Our understanding of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and how it is generated remains a topic of debate. Understanding REM sleep mechanisms is important because several sleep disorders result from disturbances in the neural circuits that control REM sleep and its characteristics. This review highlights recent work concerning how the central nervous system regulates REM sleep, and how the make up and breakdown of these REM sleep-generating circuits contribute to narcolepsy, REM sleep behaviour disorder and sleep apnea. A complex interaction between brainstem REM sleep core circuits and forebrain and hypothalamic structures is necessary to generate REM sleep. Cholinergic activation and GABAergic inhibition trigger the activation of subcoeruleus neurons, which form the core of the REM sleep circuit. Untimely activation of REM sleep circuits leads to cataplexy - involuntary muscle weakness or paralysis - a major symptom of narcolepsy. Degeneration of the REM circuit is associated with excessive muscle activation in REM sleep behaviour disorder. Inappropriate arousal from sleep during obstructive sleep apnea repeatedly disturbs the activity of sleep circuits, particularly the REM sleep circuit.

  13. Sleep Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time and to get into the deep restful stages of sleep decreases with age. Older people have more fragile sleep and are more easily disturbed by light, noise, and pain. They also may have medical ...

  14. Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea is a common disorder that causes your breathing to stop or get very shallow. Breathing ... an hour. The most common type is obstructive sleep apnea. It causes your airway to collapse or ...

  15. Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... air or choking that awakens you from sleep Intermittent pauses in your breathing during sleep Excessive daytime ... disease, these multiple episodes of low blood oxygen (hypoxia or hypoxemia) can lead to sudden death from ...

  16. Evidence for sleep-dependent memory consolidation in human and mice

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Denise Jade

    2010-01-01

    Sleep has been implicated as playing an important role in memory consolidation. Considerable indirect evidence suggests a role for sleep in hippocampus-dependent memory in rodents. Hippocampal "place cells" that were active during maze running were more likely to be activated during subsequent sleep, a phenomenon known as neural replay. In addition to hippocampal neural replay, it has been asserted that the hippocampus and cortex communicate during sleep by means of hippocampal generated high...

  17. Total sleep deprivation, chronic sleep restriction and sleep disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Amy C; Banks, Siobhan

    2010-01-01

    Sleep loss may result from total sleep deprivation (such as a shift worker might experience), chronic sleep restriction (due to work, medical conditions or lifestyle) or sleep disruption (which is common in sleep disorders such as sleep apnea or restless legs syndrome). Total sleep deprivation has been widely researched, and its effects have been well described. Chronic sleep restriction and sleep disruption (also known as sleep fragmentation) have received less experimental attention. Recently, there has been increasing interest in sleep restriction and disruption as it has been recognized that they have a similar impact on cognitive functioning as a period of total sleep deprivation. Sleep loss causes impairments in cognitive performance and simulated driving and induces sleepiness, fatigue and mood changes. This review examines recent research on the effects of sleep deprivation, restriction and disruption on cognition and neurophysiologic functioning in healthy adults, and contrasts the similarities and differences between these three modalities of sleep loss.

  18. Mammalian sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Hugh

    2005-05-01

    This review examines the biological background to the development of ideas on rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep), so-called paradoxical sleep (PS), and its relation to dreaming. Aspects of the phenomenon which are discussed include physiological changes and their anatomical location, the effects of total and selective sleep deprivation in the human and animal, and REM sleep behavior disorder, the latter with its clinical manifestations in the human. Although dreaming also occurs in other sleep phases (non-REM or NREM sleep), in the human, there is a contingent relation between REM sleep and dreaming. Thus, REM is taken as a marker for dreaming and as REM is distributed ubiquitously throughout the mammalian class, it is suggested that other mammals also dream. It is suggested that the overall function of REM sleep/dreaming is more important than the content of the individual dream; its function is to place the dreamer protagonist/observer on the topographical world. This has importance for the developing infant who needs to develop a sense of self and separateness from the world which it requires to navigate and from which it is separated for long periods in sleep. Dreaming may also serve to maintain a sense of ‘I’ness or “self” in the adult, in whom a fragility of this faculty is revealed in neurological disorders.

  19. The role of thyroid hormone in sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, José Carlos; Andersen, Mônica Levy

    2014-03-01

    Sleep deprivation is a stressful condition, as the subject experiences feelings of inadequate well-being and exhibits impairments in his/her functioning. However, in some circumstances sleep deprivation may be crucial for survival of the individual. Most likely, complex neural circuits and hormones play a role in allowing sleep deprivation to occur. For instance, thyroid hormone activity sharply increases when an individual is in a state of sleep deprivation. We believe that this increase is central to sleep deprivation physiology. During sleep deprivation, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis initially increases as a consequence of increased release of thyroid stimulating hormone from the pituitary. Subsequently, as sleep deprivation continues, the sympathetic nervous system is recruited through its anatomical connection with the thyroid gland. While thyroid stimulating hormone levels markedly increase during sleep deprivation, it has been suggested that these increases are secondary to sleep deprivation. However, there is little evidence to support this assumption. We believe that the physiology of the thyroid axis during sleep deprivation and the actions of the effector hormone thyroid hormone suggest that thyroid hormone inhibits sleep and not the contrary. To our knowledge, few studies have addressed the possible neural functions that enable sleep deprivation. In this article, we discuss the hypothesis that an augmentation in the thyroid hormone axis is central to a subject's ability to curtail sleep.

  20. Aging changes in sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep normally occurs in several stages. The sleep cycle includes: Dreamless periods of light and deep sleep Some periods of active dreaming (REM sleep) The sleep cycle is repeated several times during the night. AGING ...

  1. Sleep and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hygiene sleep length Sleep Movement Disorders Sleep Need Sleep talking Sleeping Pills sleepwalking Snoring stress Stroke Suicide Supplements surgery Technology Teens Telemedicine television The internet Time change Transportation trauma travel Treatments ...

  2. Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency? Sleep deprivation (DEP-rih-VA- ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: June 7, 2017 Sleep Infographic Sleep Disorders & Insufficient Sleep: Improving Health through ...

  3. Sleep disorders - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insomnia; Narcolepsy; Hypersomina; Daytime sleepiness; Sleep rhythm; Sleep disruptive behaviors; Jet lag ... excessive daytime sleepiness) Problems sticking to a regular sleep schedule (sleep rhythm problem) Unusual behaviors during sleep ( ...

  4. American Sleep Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep Disorders Book Join ASA Press Room American Sleep Association Improving public health by increasing awareness about ... Members Username or Email Password Remember Me Register Sleep Blog Changing Bad Sleep Habits Asthma and Sleep ...

  5. Sleep and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Sleep About Us About Sleep Key Sleep Disorders Sleep ... Sheets Data & Statistics Projects and Partners Resources Events Sleep and Chronic Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ...

  6. Neural imaging in songbirds using fiber optic fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Hearn, Gentry; Lints, Thierry; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2012-02-01

    The song control system of juvenile songbirds is an important model for studying the developmental acquisition and generation of complex learned vocal motor sequences, two processes that are fundamental to human speech and language. To understand the neural mechanisms underlying song production, it is critical to characterize the activity of identified neurons in the song control system when the bird is singing. Neural imaging in unrestrained singing birds, although technically challenging, will advance our understanding of neural ensemble coding mechanisms in this system. We are exploring the use of a fiber optic microscope for functional imaging in the brain of behaving and singing birds in order to better understand the contribution of a key brain nucleus (high vocal center nucleus; HVC) to temporal aspects of song motor control. We have constructed a fluorescence microscope with LED illumination, a fiber bundle for transmission of fluorescence excitation and emission light, a ~2x GRIN lens, and a CCD for image acquisition. The system has 2 μm resolution, 375 μm field of view, 200 μm working distance, and 1 mm outer diameter. As an initial characterization of this setup, neurons in HVC were imaged using the fiber optic microscope after injection of quantum dots or fluorescent retrograde tracers into different song nuclei. A Lucid Vivascope confocal microscope was used to confirm the imaging results. Long-term imaging of the activity of these neurons in juvenile birds during singing may lead us to a better understanding of the central motor codes for song and the central mechanism by which auditory experience modifies song motor commands to enable vocal learning and imitation.

  7. REM sleep instability--a new pathway for insomnia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann, D; Spiegelhalder, K; Nissen, C; Hirscher, V; Baglioni, C; Feige, B

    2012-07-01

    Chronic insomnia afflicts approximately 10% of the adult population and is associated with daytime impairments and an elevated risk for developing somatic and mental disorders. Current pathophysiological models propose a persistent hyperarousal on the cognitive, emotional and physiological levels. However, the marked discrepancy between minor objective alterations in standard parameters of sleep continuity and the profound subjective impairment in patients with insomnia is unresolved. We propose that "instability" of REM sleep contributes to the experience of disrupted and non-restorative sleep and to the explanation of this discrepancy. This concept is based on evidence showing increased micro- and macro-arousals during REM sleep in insomnia patients. As REM sleep represents the most highly aroused brain state during sleep it seems particularly prone to fragmentation in individuals with persistent hyperarousal. The continuity hypothesis of dream production suggests that pre-sleep concerns of patients with insomnia, i. e., worries about poor sleep and its consequences, dominate their dream content. Enhanced arousal during REM sleep may render these wake-like cognitions more accessible to conscious perception, memory storage and morning recall, resulting in the experience of disrupted and non-restorative sleep. Furthermore, chronic fragmentation of REM sleep might lead to dysfunction in a ventral emotional neural network, including limbic and paralimbic areas that are specifically activated during REM sleep. This dysfunction, along with attenuated functioning in a dorsal executive neural network, including frontal and prefrontal areas, might contribute to emotional and cognitive alterations and an elevated risk of developing depression.

  8. Research on the Cultivating Mode of Students ’ Innovative Capability in HVC%高职院校加强学生创新能力培养模式研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程勤华

    2013-01-01

    高职作为我国经济建设一线人才培养的高等教育机构,创新性人才培育是其根本任务。针对高职教育存在课程缺乏针对性、实践教学环节少、教师创新能力不足、创新教育缺少导向性等方面的问题,高职院校应完善学校的考核机制、鼓励师生创新、以创新能力为核心合理设置课程、加大对教师的创新能力培养。%As the higher institute of cultivating talents for first -line in economic construction ,HVC bears the fundamental task of cultivating creative talents .T here are some problems in this regard such as :curriculum lack of pertinence and practical content ,poor in teachers’ innovation and no orientation of innovative education .HVC should improve the evaluation system and encourage the students and teachers ’ innovation .We should also set the curriculum center on innovative skills cultivating and to speed the cultivation of teachers ’ innovative skills .

  9. Sleep Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get up in the middle of the night. Sleep in a cool dark place and use the bed only for sleeping and sexual activity. Do not read or watch television in bed. Avoid “screen time” — television, phones, tablets ...

  10. Ancestral sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Moreno, Claudia; Lowden, Arne; Louzada, Fernando; Marqueze, Elaine; Levandovski, Rosa; Pilz, Luisa K; Valeggia, Claudia; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Golombek, Diego A; Czeisler, Charles A; Skene, Debra J; Duffy, Jeanne F; Roenneberg, Till

    2016-04-01

    While we do not yet understand all the functions of sleep, its critical role for normal physiology and behaviour is evident. Its amount and temporal pattern depend on species and condition. Humans sleep about a third of the day with the longest, consolidated episode during the night. The change in lifestyle from hunter-gatherers via agricultural communities to densely populated industrialized centres has certainly affected sleep, and a major concern in the medical community is the impact of insufficient sleep on health [1,2]. One of the causal mechanisms leading to insufficient sleep is altered exposure to the natural light-dark cycle. This includes the wide availability of electric light, attenuated exposure to daylight within buildings, and evening use of light-emitting devices, all of which decrease the strength of natural light-dark signals that entrain circadian systems [3].

  11. Medicines for sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzodiazepines; Sedatives; Hypnotics; Sleeping pills; Insomnia - medicines; Sleep disorder - medicines ... are commonly used to treat allergies. While these sleep aids are not addictive, your body becomes used ...

  12. Medical Imaging for Understanding Sleep Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kenneth

    2011-10-01

    Sleep is essential for the health of the nervous system. Lack of sleep has a profound negative effect on cognitive ability and task performance. During sustained military operations, soldiers often suffer from decreased quality and quantity of sleep, increasing their susceptibility to neurological problems and limiting their ability to perform the challenging mental tasks that their missions require. In the civilian sector, inadequate sleep and overt sleep pathology are becoming more common, with many detrimental impacts. There is a strong need for new, in vivo studies of human brains during sleep, particularly the initial descent from wakefulness. Our research team is investigating sleep using a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and electroencephalography (EEG). High resolution MRI combined with PET enables localization of biochemical processes (e.g., metabolism) to anatomical structures. MRI methods can also be used to examine functional connectivity among brain regions. Neural networks are dynamically reordered during different sleep stages, reflecting the disconnect with the waking world and the essential yet unconscious brain activity that occurs during sleep.[4pt] In collaboration with Linda Larson-Prior, Washington University; Alpay Ozcan, Virginia Tech; Seong Mun, Virginia Tech; and Zang-Hee Cho, Gachon University.

  13. Circadian Rhythms, Sleep, and Disorders of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattis, Joanna; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-04-01

    Sleep-wake cycles are known to be disrupted in people with neurodegenerative disorders. These findings are now supported by data from animal models for some of these disorders, raising the question of whether the disrupted sleep/circadian regulation contributes to the loss of neural function. As circadian rhythms and sleep consolidation also break down with normal aging, changes in these may be part of what makes aging a risk factor for disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mechanisms underlying the connection between circadian/sleep dysregulation and neurodegeneration remain unclear, but several recent studies provide interesting possibilities. While mechanistic analysis is under way, it is worth considering treatment of circadian/sleep disruption as a means to alleviate symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders.

  14. Sleep Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body and brain shut down for rest and relaxation True False Correct! Incorrect! Although it is a time when your body rests and restores its energy levels, sleep is an active state that affects both your physical and mental ...

  15. Sleep Terrors (Night Terrors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sleepwalking. Like sleepwalking, sleep terrors are considered a parasomnia — an undesired occurrence during sleep. Although sleep terrors are more common in children, they can also affect adults. A sleep terror ...

  16. American Sleep Apnea Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Sleep Apnea Association Learn About the CPAP Assistance Program About ASAA News about ASAA Who we are Leadership Team Supporting the ASAA Financials Learn Healthy sleep Sleep apnea Other sleep disorders Personal stories Treat Test Yourself ...

  17. Pediatric sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... During sleep, all of the muscles in the body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep ...

  18. Sleep and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Sleep and Aging About Sleep We all look forward to a good night's ... health and quality of life. Two Types of Sleep There are two types of sleep: non-rapid ...

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  20. Sleep Apnea (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Obstructive Sleep Apnea KidsHealth > For Parents > Obstructive Sleep Apnea Print ... kids and teens can develop it, too. About Sleep Apnea Sleep apnea happens when a person stops ...

  1. Sleep aspnea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008057 A multi-center study on the association between sleep apnea and prevalence of hypertension. CHEN Baoyuan(陈宝元), et al. Dept Respir Med, Tianjin Med Univ General Hosp, Tianjin 300052. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis, 2007;30(12):894-897. Objective To investigate the prevalence of hypertension among sleep apnea patients and the associated factors. Methods A total of 2297 patients (male 1310, female 211) from 20 teaching hospita

  2. Sleep Tips: 7 Steps to Better Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn every night. Consider simple tips for better sleep, from setting a sleep schedule to including physical activity in your daily ... simply worn out? Perhaps the solution is better sleep. Think about all the factors that can interfere ...

  3. Sleep in Othello

    OpenAIRE

    Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2009-01-01

    Some of our best descriptions of sleep disorders come from literature. While Shakespeare is well known for his references to insomnia and sleep walking, his works also demonstrate a keen awareness of many other sleep disorders. This paper examines sleep themes in Shakespeare's play Othello. The play indicates Shakespeare's astute eye for sleep deprivation, sexual parasomnias, and effects of stress and drugs on sleep.

  4. Sleep and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margoliash, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    The neural basis of cognition represents a grand challenge problem involving multiple disciplines and approaches to the analysis of behavior. Song learning by juvenile songbirds such as zebra finches has proven to have considerable utility for exploring how behavior is represented at multiple levels of brain function. As classically described, young birds are exposed to a ``tutor'' (adult) song and commit that song to memory early in life, then engage in an extended period (weeks) of plastic singing as they slowly learn to match vocal output to the tutor song memory via auditory feedback. In recent years, the role of sleep in learning processes has been actively explored. Young birds isolated from adult songs, then suddenly given access to such songs at circa 40 days of age, show a sudden change in their singing behavior starting on the day following first exposure. Such birds sing songs that have less structure in the mornings than do the songs sung in the afternoons before or after that morning. This fluctuation is directly the result of sleep (not circadian rhythm), and the magnitude of fluctuation is positively correlated with the ultimate similarity to the tutor song. Examining spontaneous neuronal activity in certain brain structures during the night in sleeping adults shows ``replay'' of the patterns of activity the same neurons exhibit during daytime singing, and ``preplay'' of new patterns that will first be incorporated into daytime singing the following day. In experiments on juveniles, nighttime neuronal activity shows dramatic changes associated with song learning, even on the night after the first day of tutor song exposure (preceding changes in singing behavior). Offline processing, especially sleep, has been well documented to participate in memory consolidation in a very broad range of behaviors including in humans. Placing the bird song results in a theoretical framework thereby helps to inform a very broad range of phenomena.

  5. The Yin and Yang of Sleep and Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirszenblat, Leonie; van Swinderen, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Sleep is not a single state, but a complex set of brain processes that supports several physiological needs. Sleep deprivation is known to affect attention in many animals, suggesting that a key function of sleep is to regulate attention. Conversely, tasks that require more attention drive sleep need and sleep intensity. Attention involves the ability to filter incoming stimuli based on their relative salience, and this is likely to require coordinated synaptic activity across the brain. This capacity may have only become possible with the evolution of related neural mechanisms that support two key sleep functions: stimulus suppression and synaptic plasticity. We argue here that sleep and attention may have coevolved as brain states that regulate each other.

  6. 神经电活动辅助通气模式对患者睡眠质量的影响%Effect of neurally adjusted ventilatory assist modes on sleep quality of patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘红; 李国宏; 朱艳萍; 黄琴红

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨压力支持通气(PSV)模式和神经电活动辅助通气(NAVA)模式对重症患者睡眠质量的影响.方法 筛选2013年10月20日至2014年2月28日东南大学附属中大医院重症医学科内有自主呼吸的机械通气患者,排除了颅脑疾病、中枢神经系统疾病、慢性精神疾病患者.研究分为两个连续的3h时段:11 pm~2 am为第一时段,3 am~6 am为第二时段,2 am~3 am为洗脱期.10 pm将起始通气模式随机分配为PSV模式或NAVA模式,2 am更换通气模式(即第一时段为PSV模式的改用NAVA模式;第一时段为NAVA模式的改用PSV模式).机械通气参数由临床医师设置:FiO2≤60%,PS使得VT:6~8 ml/kg,RR<35次/min,SPO2≥90%,NAVA吸气触发灵敏度:0.5 mV.采用脑电双频指数持续监测机械通气患者的睡眠.提取11 pm~2 am(第一时段)和3 am~6 am(第二时段)机械通气患者的睡眠数据进行分析.结果 NAVA模式下重症患者的总睡眠时间明显长于PSV模式下重症患者的总睡眠时间[(159±13) min vs (147±31) min,F=5.655,P=0.030];睡眠效率提高[(89±8)% vs (82±17)%,F=5.655,P=0.030].非快速眼球运动睡眠的第1、2期睡眠时间基本一致[(105±37) min vs (115±37) min,F=0.022,P=0.883];慢波睡眠无明显改变,差异无统计学意义[67 min(23~79) vs 31 min(4~56),U=26.5,W=71.5,P=0.215].PSV模式和NAVA模式下均未监测到快速眼球运动睡眠.结论 机械通气患者睡眠效率低、慢波睡眠缩短、快速眼球运动睡眠丧失,遭受严重的睡眠剥夺.NAVA模式下重症患者的睡眠质量优于PSV模式下重症患者的睡眠质量.%Objective To compare the effects of pressure support ventilation (PSV) and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) modes on sleep quality in critically ill patients with mechanical ventilation.Methods Comparative crossover study in 9 mechanically ventilated adult patients.NAVA and PSV were delivered in a randomized order using a closed

  7. Sleep spindles and intelligence: evidence for a sexual dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujma, Péter P; Konrad, Boris Nikolai; Genzel, Lisa; Bleifuss, Annabell; Simor, Péter; Pótári, Adrián; Körmendi, János; Gombos, Ferenc; Steiger, Axel; Bódizs, Róbert; Dresler, Martin

    2014-12-03

    Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in nonrapid eye movement sleep, which play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Sleep spindle features are stable within and vary between individuals, with, for example, females having a higher number of spindles and higher spindle density than males. Sleep spindles have been associated with learning potential and intelligence; however, the details of this relationship have not been fully clarified yet. In a sample of 160 adult human subjects with a broad IQ range, we investigated the relationship between sleep spindle parameters and intelligence. In females, we found a positive age-corrected association between intelligence and fast sleep spindle amplitude in central and frontal derivations and a positive association between intelligence and slow sleep spindle duration in all except one derivation. In males, a negative association between intelligence and fast spindle density in posterior regions was found. Effects were continuous over the entire IQ range. Our results demonstrate that, although there is an association between sleep spindle parameters and intellectual performance, these effects are more modest than previously reported and mainly present in females. This supports the view that intelligence does not rely on a single neural framework, and stronger neural connectivity manifesting in increased thalamocortical oscillations in sleep is one particular mechanism typical for females but not males.

  8. The Neurobiology of Orofacial Pain and Sleep and Their Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, G J; Sessle, B J

    2016-09-01

    This article provides an overview of the neurobiology of orofacial pain as well as the neural processes underlying sleep, with a particular focus on the mechanisms that underlie pain and sleep interactions including sleep disorders. Acute pain is part of a hypervigilance system that alerts the individual to injury or potential injury of tissues. It can also disturb sleep. Disrupted sleep is often associated with chronic pain states, including those that occur in the orofacial region. The article presents many insights that have been gained in the last few decades into the peripheral and central mechanisms involved in orofacial pain and its modulation, as well as the circuits and processes in the central nervous system that underlie sleep. Although it has become clear that sleep is essential to preserve and maintain health, it has also been found that pain, particularly chronic pain, is commonly associated with disturbed sleep. In the presence of chronic pain, a circular relationship may prevail, with mutual deleterious influences causing an increase in pain and a disruption of sleep. This article also reviews findings that indicate that reducing orofacial pain and improving sleep need to be targeted together in the management of acute to chronic orofacial pain states in order to improve an orofacial pain patient's quality of life, to prevent mood alterations or exacerbation of sleep disorder (e.g., insomnia, sleep-disordered breathing) that can negatively affect their pain, and to promote healing and optimize their health.

  9. Sleep deprivation and interference by emotional distracters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Lisa Y M; Dolcos, Florin; Chen, Annette K; Zheng, Hui; Parimal, Sarayu; Chee, Michael W L

    2010-10-01

    We determined if sleep deprivation would amplify the effect of negative emotional distracters on working memory. A crossover design involving 2 functional neuroimaging scans conducted at least one week apart. One scan followed a normal night of sleep and the other followed 24 h of sleep deprivation. Scanning order was counterbalanced across subjects. The study took place in a research laboratory. 24 young, healthy volunteers with no history of any sleep, psychiatric, or neurologic disorders. N/A. Study participants were scanned while performing a delayed-response working memory task. Two distracters were presented during the maintenance phase, and these differed in content: highly arousing, negative emotional scenes; low-arousing, neutral scenes; and digitally scrambled versions of the pictures. Irrespective of whether volunteers were sleep deprived, negative emotional (relative to neutral) distracters elicited greater maintenance-related activity in the amygdala, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, and fusiform gyri, while concurrently depressing activity in cognitive control regions. Individuals who maintained or increased distracter-related amygdala activation after sleep deprivation showed increased working memory disruptions by negative emotional distracters. These individuals also showed reduced functional connectivity between the amygdala and the ventromedial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, regions postulated to mediate cognitive control against emotional distraction. Increased distraction by emotional stimuli following sleep deprivation is accompanied by increases in amygdala activation and reduced functional connectivity between the amygdala and prefrontal cognitive control regions. These findings shed light on the neural basis for interindividual variation in how negative emotional stimuli might distract sleep deprived persons.

  10. Neuroimmunologic aspects of sleep and sleep loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, N. L.; Szuba, M. P.; Staab, J. P.; Evans, D. L.; Dinges, D. F.

    2001-01-01

    The complex and intimate interactions between the sleep and immune systems have been the focus of study for several years. Immune factors, particularly the interleukins, regulate sleep and in turn are altered by sleep and sleep deprivation. The sleep-wake cycle likewise regulates normal functioning of the immune system. Although a large number of studies have focused on the relationship between the immune system and sleep, relatively few studies have examined the effects of sleep deprivation on immune parameters. Studies of sleep deprivation's effects are important for several reasons. First, in the 21st century, various societal pressures require humans to work longer and sleep less. Sleep deprivation is becoming an occupational hazard in many industries. Second, to garner a greater understanding of the regulatory effects of sleep on the immune system, one must understand the consequences of sleep deprivation on the immune system. Significant detrimental effects on immune functioning can be seen after a few days of total sleep deprivation or even several days of partial sleep deprivation. Interestingly, not all of the changes in immune physiology that occur as a result of sleep deprivation appear to be negative. Numerous medical disorders involving the immune system are associated with changes in the sleep-wake physiology--either being caused by sleep dysfunction or being exacerbated by sleep disruption. These disorders include infectious diseases, fibromyalgia, cancers, and major depressive disorder. In this article, we will describe the relationships between sleep physiology and the immune system, in states of health and disease. Interspersed will be proposals for future research that may illuminate the clinical relevance of the relationships between sleeping, sleep loss and immune function in humans. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company.

  11. Sleep Deprivation Reveals Altered Brain Perfusion Patterns in Somnambulism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien Thanh Dang-Vu

    Full Text Available Despite its high prevalence, relatively little is known about the pathophysiology of somnambulism. Increasing evidence indicates that somnambulism is associated with functional abnormalities during wakefulness and that sleep deprivation constitutes an important drive that facilitates sleepwalking in predisposed patients. Here, we studied the neural mechanisms associated with somnambulism using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT with 99mTc-Ethylene Cysteinate Dimer (ECD, during wakefulness and after sleep deprivation.Ten adult sleepwalkers and twelve controls with normal sleep were scanned using 99mTc-ECD SPECT in morning wakefulness after a full night of sleep. Eight of the sleepwalkers and nine of the controls were also scanned during wakefulness after a night of total sleep deprivation. Between-group comparisons of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF were performed to characterize brain activity patterns during wakefulness in sleepwalkers.During wakefulness following a night of total sleep deprivation, rCBF was decreased bilaterally in the inferior temporal gyrus in sleepwalkers compared to controls.Functional neural abnormalities can be observed during wakefulness in somnambulism, particularly after sleep deprivation and in the inferior temporal cortex. Sleep deprivation thus not only facilitates the occurrence of sleepwalking episodes, but also uncovers patterns of neural dysfunction that characterize sleepwalkers during wakefulness.

  12. Sleep facilitates long-term face adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditye, Thomas; Javadi, Amir Homayoun; Carbon, Claus-Christian; Walsh, Vincent

    2013-10-22

    Adaptation is an automatic neural mechanism supporting the optimization of visual processing on the basis of previous experiences. While the short-term effects of adaptation on behaviour and physiology have been studied extensively, perceptual long-term changes associated with adaptation are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the integration of adaptation-dependent long-term shifts in neural function is facilitated by sleep. Perceptual shifts induced by adaptation to a distorted image of a famous person were larger in a group of participants who had slept (experiment 1) or merely napped for 90 min (experiment 2) during the interval between adaptation and test compared with controls who stayed awake. Participants' individual rapid eye movement sleep duration predicted the size of post-sleep behavioural adaptation effects. Our data suggest that sleep prevented decay of adaptation in a way that is qualitatively different from the effects of reduced visual interference known as 'storage'. In the light of the well-established link between sleep and memory consolidation, our findings link the perceptual mechanisms of sensory adaptation--which are usually not considered to play a relevant role in mnemonic processes--with learning and memory, and at the same time reveal a new function of sleep in cognition.

  13. Neuroimaging of sleep and sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A

    2006-03-01

    Herein are presented the results of research in the area of sleep neuroimaging over the past year. Significant work has been performed to clarify the basic mechanisms of sleep in humans. New studies also extend prior observations regarding altered brain activation in response to sleep deprivation by adding information regarding vulnerability to sleep deprivation and regarding the influence of task difficulty on aberrant responses. Studies in sleep disorder medicine have yielded significant findings in insomnia, depression, and restless legs syndrome. Extensive advances have been made in the area of sleep apnea where physiologic challenges have been used to probe brain activity in the pathophysiology of sleep apnea syndrome.

  14. Sleep Applications to Assess Sleep Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietze, Ingo

    2016-12-01

    This article highlights the potential uses that smartphone applications may have for helping those with sleep problems. Applications in smartphones offer the promised possibility of detection of sleep. From the author's own experience, one can also conclude that sleep applications are approximately as good as polysomnography in detection of sleep time, similar to the conventional wearable actimeters. In the future, sleep applications will help to further enhance awareness of sleep health and to distinguish those who actually poorly and only briefly sleep from those who suffer more likely from paradox insomnia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Sleep: regulation and phenomenology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchierini, M-F

    2013-12-01

    This article describes the two-process model of sleep regulation. The 24-hour sleep-wake cycle is regulated by a homeostatic process and an endogenous, 2 oscillators, circadian process, under the influence of external synchronisers. These two processes are partially independent but influence each other, as shown in the two-sleep-process auto-regulation model. A reciprocal inhibition model of two interconnected neuronal groups, "SP on" and "SP off", explains the regular recurrence of paradoxical sleep. Sleep studies have primarily depended on observation of the subject and have determined the optimal conditions for sleep (position, external conditions, sleep duration and need) and have studied the consequences of sleep deprivation or modifications of sleep schedules. Then, electrophysiological recordings permitted the classification of sleep stages according to the observed EEG patterns. The course of a night's sleep is reported on a "hypnogram". The adult subject falls asleep in non-REM sleep (N1), then sleep deepens progressively to stages N2 and N3 with the appearance of spindles and slow waves (N2). Slow waves become more numerous in stage N3. Every 90minutes REM sleep recurs, with muscle atonia and rapid eye movements. These adult sleep patterns develop progressively during the 2 first years of life as total sleep duration decreases, with the reduction of diurnal sleep and of REM sleep. Around 2 to 4 months, spindles and K complexes appear on the EEG, with the differentiation of light and deep sleep with, however, a predominance of slow wave sleep.

  16. Diagnosing Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Sleep Disorders Diagnosing Sleep Disorders Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents Depending ... several possible tests when trying to diagnose a sleep disorder: Sleep history and sleep log If you believe ...

  17. Sleep Quality Prediction From Wearable Data Using Deep Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayana, Aarti; Joty, Shafiq; Fernandez-Luque, Luis; Ofli, Ferda; Srivastava, Jaideep; Elmagarmid, Ahmed; Arora, Teresa; Taheri, Shahrad

    2016-11-04

    The importance of sleep is paramount to health. Insufficient sleep can reduce physical, emotional, and mental well-being and can lead to a multitude of health complications among people with chronic conditions. Physical activity and sleep are highly interrelated health behaviors. Our physical activity during the day (ie, awake time) influences our quality of sleep, and vice versa. The current popularity of wearables for tracking physical activity and sleep, including actigraphy devices, can foster the development of new advanced data analytics. This can help to develop new electronic health (eHealth) applications and provide more insights into sleep science. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of predicting sleep quality (ie, poor or adequate sleep efficiency) given the physical activity wearable data during awake time. In this study, we focused on predicting good or poor sleep efficiency as an indicator of sleep quality. Actigraphy sensors are wearable medical devices used to study sleep and physical activity patterns. The dataset used in our experiments contained the complete actigraphy data from a subset of 92 adolescents over 1 full week. Physical activity data during awake time was used to create predictive models for sleep quality, in particular, poor or good sleep efficiency. The physical activity data from sleep time was used for the evaluation. We compared the predictive performance of traditional logistic regression with more advanced deep learning methods: multilayer perceptron (MLP), convolutional neural network (CNN), simple Elman-type recurrent neural network (RNN), long short-term memory (LSTM-RNN), and a time-batched version of LSTM-RNN (TB-LSTM). Deep learning models were able to predict the quality of sleep (ie, poor or good sleep efficiency) based on wearable data from awake periods. More specifically, the deep learning methods performed better than traditional logistic regression. “CNN had the highest specificity and

  18. Sleep Deprivation Impairs the Accurate Recognition of Human Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Helm, Els; Gujar, Ninad; Walker, Matthew P.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Investigate the impact of sleep deprivation on the ability to recognize the intensity of human facial emotions. Design: Randomized total sleep-deprivation or sleep-rested conditions, involving between-group and within-group repeated measures analysis. Setting: Experimental laboratory study. Participants: Thirty-seven healthy participants, (21 females) aged 18–25 y, were randomly assigned to the sleep control (SC: n = 17) or total sleep deprivation group (TSD: n = 20). Interventions: Participants performed an emotional face recognition task, in which they evaluated 3 different affective face categories: Sad, Happy, and Angry, each ranging in a gradient from neutral to increasingly emotional. In the TSD group, the task was performed once under conditions of sleep deprivation, and twice under sleep-rested conditions following different durations of sleep recovery. In the SC group, the task was performed twice under sleep-rested conditions, controlling for repeatability. Measurements and Results: In the TSD group, when sleep-deprived, there was a marked and significant blunting in the recognition of Angry and Happy affective expressions in the moderate (but not extreme) emotional intensity range; differences that were most reliable and significant in female participants. No change in the recognition of Sad expressions was observed. These recognition deficits were, however, ameliorated following one night of recovery sleep. No changes in task performance were observed in the SC group. Conclusions: Sleep deprivation selectively impairs the accurate judgment of human facial emotions, especially threat relevant (Anger) and reward relevant (Happy) categories, an effect observed most significantly in females. Such findings suggest that sleep loss impairs discrete affective neural systems, disrupting the identification of salient affective social cues. Citation: van der Helm E; Gujar N; Walker MP. Sleep deprivation impairs the accurate recognition of human

  19. 界面核和高级发声中枢与鸣禽鸣曲的学习和维持%Connections of NIf-HVC and Vocal Learning and Maintenance in Songbirds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李东风; 冯理; 刘少艺; 张萌

    2013-01-01

    Birdsong and human languages are both acquired by learning .During sensory period , templates are formed in the brain after juveniles heard tutor songs and stored in the related areas and in the motor-learning phase , juveniles compare their own songs to the templates and modify them to match the templates in their memories . When the songs are crystallized in the adult stage , auditory feedback is required to maintain the features and stabili-ty of their own songs.Hence, the sensory-motor integration of auditory and motor systems is vitally important to the formation of templates and the maintenance of crystallized songs .In the recent years , it is found that NIf-HVC syn-apses are related with the formation of templates memory and the maintenance of spatial features of plastic songs in the juveniles while this projection is crucial for the grammar structure of crystallized songs in the Bengalese finches . In songbirds , HVC if homologous to human Broca's Area and NIf has many similarities with Area Spt in the human speech processing circuit .Therefore the research on the function of NIf-HVC synapses in the speech circuit is not only helpful for the study of Area Broca and Spt of human but also advantageous for exploring the mechanism con -cerning sense and motion information integration involved in vocal learning .%鸣禽鸣唱和人类语言都是经过后天学习而获得的.幼鸟在学习鸣唱时先记住教习曲模板,再通过发声反馈比较自鸣曲和模板并调整发声输出,成年后同样需要听觉反馈来维持自鸣曲的特征和稳定.因此,鸣禽听觉系统和运动系统对刺激的感觉运动整合非常重要.近年研究发现,感觉期幼鸟编码并记忆模板的过程需要NIf-HVC投射的参与;这一突触联系与维持成年鸣禽可塑性鸣曲空间特征和鸣曲节律至关重要.其中,NMDAR、AchR和NE可能参与调节NIf-HVC突触的效能.HVC类似于人类的Broca's Area,而NIf类似

  20. Employees with Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cataplexy (a weakness or paralysis of the muscles), sleep paralysis, and hallucinations are common symptoms of narcolepsy (Neurology Channel, 2005). Hypersomnia: Hypersomnia’s symptoms include excessive ... by extended sleep episodes or by daytime sleep episodes that occur ...

  1. Isolated sleep paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep paralysis - isolated; Parasomnia - isolated sleep paralysis ... Episodes of isolated sleep paralysis last from a few seconds to 1 or 2 minutes. During these episodes the person is unable to move ...

  2. Employees with Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cataplexy (a weakness or paralysis of the muscles), sleep paralysis, and hallucinations are common symptoms of narcolepsy (Neurology Channel, 2005). Hypersomnia: Hypersomnia’s symptoms include excessive ... by extended sleep episodes or by daytime sleep episodes that occur ...

  3. Sleep Terrors (Night Terrors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep terrors (night terrors) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Sleep terrors are episodes of screaming, intense fear and flailing while still asleep. Also known as night terrors, sleep terrors often are paired with sleepwalking. Like ...

  4. Sleep Apnea Information Page

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Sleep Apnea Information Page Sleep Apnea Information Page Search Disorders Search NINDS SEARCH ... Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct research related to sleep apnea in laboratories at the NIH, and also ...

  5. Sleep and your health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000871.htm Sleep and your health To use the sharing features ... in a number of ways. Why You Need Sleep Sleep gives your body and brain time to ...

  6. Sleep Issues and Sundowning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... We will not sell or share your name. Sleep Issues and Sundowning Tweet Bookmark this page | Email | ... Sleep Changes Back to top Coping strategies for sleep issues and sundowning If the person is awake ...

  7. Energy expenditure during sleep, sleep deprivation and sleep following sleep deprivation in adult humans

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Christopher M.; Melanson, Edward L.; Frydendall, Emily J; Perreault, Leigh; Eckel, Robert H.; Wright, Kenneth P

    2010-01-01

    Sleep has been proposed to be a physiological adaptation to conserve energy, but little research has examined this proposed function of sleep in humans. We quantified effects of sleep, sleep deprivation and recovery sleep on whole-body total daily energy expenditure (EE) and on EE during the habitual day and nighttime. We also determined effects of sleep stage during baseline and recovery sleep on EE. Seven healthy participants aged 22 ± 5 years (mean ± s.d.) maintained ∼8 h per night sleep s...

  8. Sleep Eduction: Treatment & Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview Testing Process & Results CPAP Overview Benefits Side Effects Variations Tips Healthy Sleep Habits Sleep Disorders by Category Insomnias Insomnia Child Insomnia Short Sleeper Hypersomnias Narcolepsy Insufficient ...

  9. Sleep Talking (Somniloquy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview Testing Process & Results CPAP Overview Benefits Side Effects Variations Tips Healthy Sleep Habits Sleep Disorders by Category Insomnias Insomnia Child Insomnia Short Sleeper Hypersomnias Narcolepsy Insufficient ...

  10. Activity-based sleep-wake identification in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonov, Edward; Sazonova, Nadezhda; Schuckers, Stephanie; Neuman, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Actigraphy offers one of the best-known alternatives to polysomnography for sleep-wake identification. The advantages of actigraphy include high accuracy, simplicity of use and low intrusiveness. These features allow the use of actigraphy for determining sleep-wake states in such highly sensitive groups as infants. This study utilizes a motion sensor (accelerometer) for a dual purpose: to determine an infant's position in the crib and to identify sleep-wake states. The accelerometer was positioned over the sacral region on the infant's diaper, unlike commonly used attachment to an ankle. Opposed to broadly used discriminant analysis, this study utilized logistic regression and neural networks as predictors. The accuracy of predicted sleep-wake states was established in comparison to the sleep-wake states recorded by technicians in a polysomnograph study. Both statistical and neural predictors of this study provide an accuracy of approximately 77-92% which is comparable to similar studies achieving prediction rates of 85-95%, thus validating the suggested methodology. The results support the use of body motion as a simple and reliable method for determining sleep-wake states in infants. Nonlinear mapping capabilities of the neural network benefit the accuracy of sleep-wake state identification. Utilization of the accelerometer for the dual purpose allows us to minimize intrusiveness of home infant monitors.

  11. Sleep problems in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baweja, R; Calhoun, S; Baweja, R; Singareddy, R

    2013-10-01

    Sleep complaints and sleep disorders are common during childhood and adolescence. The impact of not getting enough sleep may affect children's' physical health as well emotional, cognitive and social development. Insomnia, sleep-disordered breathing, parasomnias and sleep disturbances associated with medical and psychiatric disorders are some of the commonly encountered sleep disorders in this age group. Changes in sleep architecture and the amount of sleep requirement associated with each stage of development should be considered during an evaluation of sleep disorders in children. Behavioral treatments should be used initially wherever possible especially considering that most pharmacologic agents used to treat pediatric sleep disorders are off-label. In this review we address the most common sleep problems in children/adolescents as they relate to prevalence, presentation and symptoms, evaluation and management.

  12. SLEEP DISORDERS, SLEEP APNEA. AND STROKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ANTONIO CULEBRAS, M.D

    2000-01-01

    @@Sleep is the natural suspension of consciousness during which the powers of the body are restored Sleep recurs with remarkable periodicity in alliance with the geocosmic cycle and in compliance with the circadian rhythms of the body.

  13. Control of REM sleep by ventral medulla GABAergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Franz; Chung, Shinjae; Beier, Kevin T; Xu, Min; Luo, Liqun; Dan, Yang

    2015-10-15

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a distinct brain state characterized by activated electroencephalogram and complete skeletal muscle paralysis, and is associated with vivid dreams. Transection studies by Jouvet first demonstrated that the brainstem is both necessary and sufficient for REM sleep generation, and the neural circuits in the pons have since been studied extensively. The medulla also contains neurons that are active during REM sleep, but whether they play a causal role in REM sleep generation remains unclear. Here we show that a GABAergic (γ-aminobutyric-acid-releasing) pathway originating from the ventral medulla powerfully promotes REM sleep in mice. Optogenetic activation of ventral medulla GABAergic neurons rapidly and reliably initiated REM sleep episodes and prolonged their durations, whereas inactivating these neurons had the opposite effects. Optrode recordings from channelrhodopsin-2-tagged ventral medulla GABAergic neurons showed that they were most active during REM sleep (REMmax), and during wakefulness they were preferentially active during eating and grooming. Furthermore, dual retrograde tracing showed that the rostral projections to the pons and midbrain and caudal projections to the spinal cord originate from separate ventral medulla neuron populations. Activating the rostral GABAergic projections was sufficient for both the induction and maintenance of REM sleep, which are probably mediated in part by inhibition of REM-suppressing GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey. These results identify a key component of the pontomedullary network controlling REM sleep. The capability to induce REM sleep on command may offer a powerful tool for investigating its functions.

  14. Sleep deprivation of rats: the hyperphagic response is real.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koban, Michael; Sita, Luciane V; Le, Wei Wei; Hoffman, Gloria E

    2008-07-01

    Chronic sleep deprivation of rats causes hyperphagia without body weight gain. Sleep deprivation hyperphagia is prompted by changes in pathways governing food intake; hyperphagia may be adaptive to sleep deprivation hypermetabolism. A recent paper suggested that sleep deprivation might inhibit ability of rats to increase food intake and that hyperphagia may be an artifact of uncorrected chow spillage. To resolve this, a palatable liquid diet (Ensure) was used where spillage is insignificant. Sleep deprivation of male Sprague Dawley rats was enforced for 10 days by the flowerpot/platform paradigm. Daily food intake and body weight were measured. On day 10, rats were transcardially perfused for analysis of hypothalamic mRNA expression of the orexigen, neuropeptide Y (NPY). Morgan State University, sleep deprivation and transcardial perfusion; University of Maryland, NPY in situ hybridization and analysis. Using a liquid diet for accurate daily measurements, there was no change in food intake in the first 5 days of sleep deprivation. Importantly, from days 6-10 it increased significantly, peaking at 29% above baseline. Control rats steadily gained weight but sleep-deprived rats did not. Hypothalamic NPY mRNA levels were positively correlated to stimulation of food intake and negatively correlated with changes in body weight. Sleep deprivation hyperphagia may not be apparent over the short term (i.e., weight and food intake suggests that the negative energy balance induced by sleep deprivation prompts the neural changes that evoke hyperphagia.

  15. Sleep for cognitive enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne eDiekelmann

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is essential for effective cognitive functioning. Loosing even a few hours of sleep can have detrimental effects on a wide variety of cognitive processes such as attention, language, reasoning, decision making, learning and memory. While sleep is necessary to ensure normal healthy cognitive functioning, it can also enhance performance beyond the boundaries of the normal condition. This article discusses the enhancing potential of sleep, mainly focusing on the domain of learning and memory. Sleep is known to facilitate the consolidation of memories learned before sleep as well as the acquisition of new memories to be learned after sleep. According to a widely held model this beneficial effect of sleep relies on the neuronal reactivation of memories during sleep that is associated with sleep-specific brain oscillations (slow oscillations, spindles, ripples as well as a characteristic neurotransmitter milieu. Recent research indicates that memory processing during sleep can be boosted by (i cueing memory reactivation during sleep, (ii stimulating sleep-specific brain oscillations, and (iii targeting specific neurotransmitter systems pharmacologically. Olfactory and auditory cues can be used, for example, to increase reactivation of associated memories during post-learning sleep. Intensifying neocortical slow oscillations (the hallmark of slow wave sleep by electrical or auditory stimulation and modulating specific neurotransmitters such as noradrenaline and glutamate likewise facilitates memory processing during sleep. With this evidence in mind, this article concludes by discussing different methodological caveats and ethical issues that should be considered when thinking about using sleep for cognitive enhancement in everyday applications.

  16. Is sleep's 'supreme mystery' unraveling? An evolutionary analysis of sleep encounters no mystery; nor does life's earliest sleep, recently discovered in jellyfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanau, J Lee

    2006-01-01

    Biotelemetry has revealed daily 15-h behavioral sleep periods in a cubomedusan jellyfish, Chironex fleckeri. Its sleep is expected to be phylogenetically most primitive, since jellyfish possess only two germ layers. They belong to the phylum Cnidaria, the 'simplest' multicellular organisms with an organized nervous system. Cubomedusae have a complex visual system with 24 eyes of four different types, each type specialized for a different task. Input to these eyes during visually guided fast-swimming predation requires enormous amounts of neural processing, possibly nearly saturating the capacity of their comparatively simple nervous system. These heavy neural demands may account for the need for fifteen hours of sleep. C. fleckeri is the only animal known for which sleep may be either present or absent, dependent on lifestyle. Limited knowledge of behavior of some other cubomedusae suggests that they also possess this faculty. The finding of sleep in C. fleckeri supports current proposals of sleep's origin and basic function. Evolutionary analyses link sleep to a conflict produced by excessive processing demands on multifunctional neural circuitry for detailed focal vision by complex lensed eyes. The conflict arises between the enormous demands of complex visual analysis and needs for split-second control of actions, on the one hand, and non-urgent processing of memories of ongoing and stored events, on the other. Conflict is resolved by deferring the non-urgent processing to periods of sleep. Without sleep, selection would favor the evolution of circuitry 'dedicated' to single or but few tasks, with corresponding lesser efficiency. Had complex lensed eyes of medusae originated as a consequence of selection for increased mating success of males pursuing females, it could have occurred before the evolution of fast-swimming bilateral (three-germ-layered) prey. But if it was a consequence of selection for increased prey-hunting success, the origin of such eyes

  17. A Neural Code That Is Isometric to Vocal Output and Correlates with Its Sensory Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyssotski, Alexei L.; Stepien, Anna E.; Keller, Georg B.; Hahnloser, Richard H. R.

    2016-01-01

    What cortical inputs are provided to motor control areas while they drive complex learned behaviors? We study this question in the nucleus interface of the nidopallium (NIf), which is required for normal birdsong production and provides the main source of auditory input to HVC, the driver of adult song. In juvenile and adult zebra finches, we find that spikes in NIf projection neurons precede vocalizations by several tens of milliseconds and are insensitive to distortions of auditory feedback. We identify a local isometry between NIf output and vocalizations: quasi-identical notes produced in different syllables are preceded by highly similar NIf spike patterns. NIf multiunit firing during song precedes responses in auditory cortical neurons by about 50 ms, revealing delayed congruence between NIf spiking and a neural representation of auditory feedback. Our findings suggest that NIf codes for imminent acoustic events within vocal performance. PMID:27723764

  18. A Neural Code That Is Isometric to Vocal Output and Correlates with Its Sensory Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyssotski, Alexei L; Stepien, Anna E; Keller, Georg B; Hahnloser, Richard H R

    2016-10-01

    What cortical inputs are provided to motor control areas while they drive complex learned behaviors? We study this question in the nucleus interface of the nidopallium (NIf), which is required for normal birdsong production and provides the main source of auditory input to HVC, the driver of adult song. In juvenile and adult zebra finches, we find that spikes in NIf projection neurons precede vocalizations by several tens of milliseconds and are insensitive to distortions of auditory feedback. We identify a local isometry between NIf output and vocalizations: quasi-identical notes produced in different syllables are preceded by highly similar NIf spike patterns. NIf multiunit firing during song precedes responses in auditory cortical neurons by about 50 ms, revealing delayed congruence between NIf spiking and a neural representation of auditory feedback. Our findings suggest that NIf codes for imminent acoustic events within vocal performance.

  19. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  20. ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ACTIVITY AT THE BASE AND TIP OF THE TONGUE ACROSS SLEEP-WAKE STATES IN RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jackie W.; Kubin, Leszek

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients have elevated tonic and phasic inspiratory activity in the genioglossus and other upper airway muscles during wakefulness; this protects their upper airway from collapse. In this group, sleep-related decrements of upper airway motor tone result in sleep-related upper airway obstructions. We previously reported that in the rat, a species widely used to study the neural mechanisms of both sleep and breathing, lingual electromyographic activity (EMG) is min...

  1. Optical imaging of neural and hemodynamic brain activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schei, Jennifer Lynn

    Optical imaging technologies can be used to record neural and hemodynamic activity. Neural activity elicits physiological changes that alter the optical tissue properties. Specifically, changes in polarized light are concomitant with neural depolarization. We measured polarization changes from an isolated lobster nerve during action potential propagation using both reflected and transmitted light. In transmission mode, polarization changes were largest throughout the center of the nerve, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the inner nerve bundle. In reflection mode, polarization changes were largest near the edges, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the outer sheath. To overcome irregular cell orientation found in the brain, we measured polarization changes from a nerve tied in a knot. Our results show that neural activation produces polarization changes that can be imaged even without regular cell orientations. Neural activation expends energy resources and elicits metabolic delivery through blood vessel dilation, increasing blood flow and volume. We used spectroscopic imaging techniques combined with electrophysiological measurements to record evoked neural and hemodynamic responses from the auditory cortex of the rat. By using implantable optics, we measured responses across natural wake and sleep states, as well as responses following different amounts of sleep deprivation. During quiet sleep, evoked metabolic responses were larger compared to wake, perhaps because blood vessels were more compliant. When animals were sleep deprived, evoked hemodynamic responses were smaller following longer periods of deprivation. These results suggest that prolonged neural activity through sleep deprivation may diminish vascular compliance as indicated by the blunted vascular response. Subsequent sleep may allow vessels to relax, restoring their ability to deliver blood. These results also suggest that severe sleep deprivation or chronic

  2. On the Bi-lingual Teaching Material Construction of HVC International Economy and Trade Majors%高职国际经济与贸易专业双语教学内容体系构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许红妹; 申厚坤

    2015-01-01

    双语教学是培养“精外贸、熟英语、善沟通、懂网络、能创业”的复合型外贸人才的重要方式和渠道。为了充分发挥双语教学在人才培养上的独特功能,本文以国际经济与贸易专业课程为例,分析目前高职双语教学存在的问题,提出了重构高职国际经济与贸易专业双语教学内容体系的方法。%Bilingual teaching is an important way of cultivating compound talents with fluent in English ,skilled in foreign trade ,good at communicating ,skilled in working with computer and setting up businesses .In order to give full play of this function ,based on the courses of international economy and trade majors ,this paper analyzed the main problems of bilingual teaching in HVC and put forward some methods in resetting the teaching material system .

  3. Adolescents' Sleep Behaviors and Perceptions of Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Heather; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph; Telljohann, Susan K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Sleep duration affects the health of children and adolescents. Shorter sleep durations have been associated with poorer academic performance, unintentional injuries, and obesity in adolescents. This study extends our understanding of how adolescents perceive and deal with their sleep issues. Methods: General education classes were…

  4. Sleep as spatiotemporal integration of biological processes that evolved to periodically reinforce neurodynamic and metabolic homeostasis: The 2m3d paradigm of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Edward Claro; Mader, Annie Cielo Llave

    2016-08-15

    Sleep continues to perplex scientists and researchers. Despite decades of sleep research, we still lack a clear understanding of the biological functions and evolution of sleep. In this review, we will examine sleep from a functional and phylogenetic perspective and describe some important conceptual gaps in understanding sleep. Classical theories of the biology and evolution of sleep emphasize sensory activation, energy balance, and metabolic homeostasis. Advances in electrophysiology, functional neuroimaging, and neuroplasticity allow us to view sleep within the framework of neural dynamics. With this paradigm shift, we have come to realize the importance of neurodynamic homeostasis in shaping the biology of sleep. Evidently, animals sleep to achieve neurodynamic and metabolic homeostasis. We are not aware of any framework for understanding sleep where neurodynamic, metabolic, homeostatic, chronophasic, and afferent variables are all taken into account. This motivated us to propose the two-mode three-drive (2m3d) paradigm of sleep. In the 2m3d paradigm, local neurodynamic/metabolic (N/M) processes switch between two modes-m0 and m1-in response to three drives-afferent, chronophasic, and homeostatic. The spatiotemporal integration of local m0/m1 operations gives rise to the global states of sleep and wakefulness. As a framework of evolution, the 2m3d paradigm allows us to view sleep as a robust adaptive strategy that evolved so animals can periodically reinforce neurodynamic and metabolic homeostasis while remaining sensitive to their internal and external environment.

  5. Astrocyte regulation of sleep circuits: experimental and modeling perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso eFellin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Integrated within neural circuits, astrocytes have recently been shown to modulate brain rhythms thought to mediate sleep function. Experimental evidence suggests that local impact of astrocytes on single synapses translates into global modulation of neuronal networks and behavior. We discuss these findings in the context of current conceptual models of sleep generation and function, each of which have historically focused on neural mechanisms. We highlight the implications and the challenges introduced by these results from a conceptual and computational perspective. We further provide modeling directions on how these data might extend our knowledge of astrocytic properties and sleep function. Given our evolving understanding of how local cellular activities during sleep lead to functional outcomes for the brain, further mechanistic and theoretical understanding of astrocytic contribution to these dynamics will undoubtedly be of great basic and translational benefit.

  6. Sleeping with an Android

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Sleep quality and duration are strong indicators of an individual’s health and quality of lifebut they are difficult to track in everyday life. Mobile apps such as Sleep as Android leverage smartphone sensors to track sleep patterns and make recommendations to improve sleeping habits. PMID:28293622

  7. Sleep and Infant Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarullo, Amanda R.; Balsam, Peter D.; Fifer, William P.

    2011-01-01

    Human neonates spend the majority of their time sleeping. Despite the limited waking hours available for environmental exploration, the first few months of life are a time of rapid learning about the environment. The organization of neonate sleep differs qualitatively from adult sleep, and the unique characteristics of neonatal sleep may promote…

  8. Sleep and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mims, Kimberly Nicole; Kirsch, Douglas

    2016-03-01

    Evidence increasingly suggests sleep disorders are associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events, including stroke. Strong data correlate untreated sleep apnea with poorer stroke outcomes and more recent evidence implicates sleep disruption as a possible etiology for increased cerebrovascular events. Also, sleep duration may affect incidence of cardiovascular events. In addition, sleep-disordered breathing, insomnia, restless legs syndrome, and parasomnias can occur as a result of cerebrovascular events. Treatment of sleep disorders improve sleep-related symptoms and may also improve stroke recovery and risk of future events.

  9. Movement disorders and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver-Dunckley, Erika D; Adler, Charles H

    2012-11-01

    This article summarizes what is currently known about sleep disturbances in several movement disorders including Parkinson disease, essential tremor, parkinsonism, dystonia, Huntington disease, myoclonus, and ataxias. There is an association between movement disorders and sleep. In some cases the prevalence of sleep disorders is much higher in patients with movement disorder, such as rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson disease. In other cases, sleep difficulties worsen the involuntary movements. In many cases the medications used to treat patients with movement disorder disturb sleep or cause daytime sleepiness. The importance of discussing sleep issues in patients with movement disorders cannot be underestimated.

  10. Correlative microscopy of densely labeled projection neurons using neural tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberti, Daniele; Kirschmann, Moritz A; Hahnloser, Richard H R

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional morphological information about neural microcircuits is of high interest in neuroscience, but acquiring this information remains challenging. A promising new correlative technique for brain imaging is array tomography (Micheva and Smith, 2007), in which series of ultrathin brain sections are treated with fluorescent antibodies against neurotransmitters and synaptic proteins. Treated sections are repeatedly imaged in the fluorescence light microscope (FLM) and then in the electron microscope (EM). We explore a similar correlative imaging technique in which we differentially label distinct populations of projection neurons, the key routers of electrical signals in the brain. In songbirds, projection neurons can easily be labeled using neural tracers, because the vocal control areas are segregated into separate nuclei. We inject tracers into areas afferent and efferent to the main premotor area for vocal production, HVC, to retrogradely and anterogradely label different classes of projection neurons. We optimize tissue preparation protocols to achieve high fluorescence contrast in the FLM and good ultrastructure in the EM (using osmium tetroxide). Although tracer fluorescence is lost during EM preparation, we localize the tracer molecules after fixation and embedding by using fluorescent antibodies against them. We detect signals mainly in somata and dendrites, allowing us to classify synapses within a single ultrathin section as belonging to a particular type of projection neuron. The use of our method will be to provide statistical information about connectivity among different neuron classes, and to elucidate how signals in the brain are processed and routed among different areas.

  11. Correlative microscopy of densely labeled projection neurons using neural tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Oberti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional morphological information about neural microcircuits is of high interest in neuroscience, but acquiring this information remains challenging. A promising new correlative technique for brain imaging is array tomography (Micheva and Smith, 2007, in which series of ultrathin brain sections are treated with fluorescent antibodies against neurotransmitters and synaptic proteins. Treated sections are repeatedly imaged in the fluorescence light microscope (FLM and then in the electron microscope (EM. We explore a similar correlative imaging technique in which we differentially label distinct populations of projection neurons, the key routers of electrical signals in the brain. In songbirds, projection neurons can easily be labeled using neural tracers, because the vocal control areas are segregated into separate nuclei. We inject tracers into areas afferent and efferent to the main premotor area for vocal production, HVC, to retrogradely and anterogradely label different classes of projection neurons. We optimize tissue preparation protocols to achieve high fluorescence contrast in the FLM and good ultrastructure in the EM (using osmium tetroxide. Although tracer fluorescence is lost during EM preparation, we localize the tracer molecules after fixation and embedding by using fluorescent antibodies against them. We detect signals mainly in somata and dendrites, allowing us to classify synapses within a single ultrathin section as belonging to a particular type of projection neuron. The use of our method will be to provide statistical information about connectivity among different neuron classes, and to elucidate how signals in the brain are processed and routed among different areas.

  12. Isolated sleep paralysis elicited by sleep interruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T; Miyasita, A; Sasaki, Y; Inugami, M; Fukuda, K

    1992-06-01

    We elicited isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) from normal subjects by a nocturnal sleep interruption schedule. On four experimental nights, 16 subjects had their sleep interrupted for 60 minutes by forced awakening at the time when 40 minutes of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep had elapsed from the termination of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in the first or third sleep cycle. This schedule produced a sleep onset REM period (SOREMP) after the interruption at a high rate of 71.9%. We succeeded in eliciting six episodes of ISP in the sleep interruptions performed (9.4%). All episodes of ISP except one occurred from SOREMP, indicating a close correlation between ISP and SOREMP. We recorded verbal reports about ISP experiences and recorded the polysomnogram (PSG) during ISP. All of the subjects with ISP experienced inability to move and were simultaneously aware of lying in the laboratory. All but one reported auditory/visual hallucinations and unpleasant emotions. PSG recordings during ISP were characterized by a REM/W stage dissociated state, i.e. abundant alpha electroencephalographs and persistence of muscle atonia shown by the tonic electromyogram. Judging from the PSG recordings, ISP differs from other dissociated states such as lucid dreaming, nocturnal panic attacks and REM sleep behavior disorders. We compare some of the sleep variables between ISP and non-ISP nights. We also discuss the similarities and differences between ISP and sleep paralysis in narcolepsy.

  13. Context-specific comparison of sleep acquisition systems in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Garbe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is conserved across phyla and can be measured through electrophysiological or behavioral characteristics. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, provides an excellent model for investigating the genetic and neural mechanisms that regulate sleep. Multiple systems exist for measuring fly activity, including video analysis and single-beam (SB or multi-beam (MB infrared (IR-based monitoring. In this study, we compare multiple sleep parameters of individual flies using a custom-built video-based acquisition system, and commercially available SB- or MB-IR acquisition systems. We report that all three monitoring systems appear sufficiently sensitive to detect changes in sleep duration associated with diet, age, and mating status. Our data also demonstrate that MB-IR detection appeared more sensitive than the SB-IR for detecting baseline nuances in sleep architecture, while architectural changes associated with varying life-history and environment were generally detected across all acquisition types. Finally, video recording of flies in an arena allowed us to measure the effect of ambient environment on sleep. These experiments demonstrate a robust effect of arena shape and size as well as light levels on sleep duration and architecture, and highlighting the versatility of tracking-based sleep acquisition. These findings provide insight into the context-specific basis for choosing between Drosophila sleep acquisition systems, describe a novel cost-effective system for video tracking, and characterize sleep analysis using the MB-IR sleep analysis. Further, we describe a modified dark-place preference sleep assay using video tracking, confirming that flies prefer to sleep in dark locations.

  14. Sleep, sleep disturbance, and fertility in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloss, Jacqueline D; Perlis, Michael L; Zamzow, Jessica A; Culnan, Elizabeth J; Gracia, Clarisa R

    2015-08-01

    Sleep and sleep disturbances are increasingly recognized as determinants of women's health and well-being, particularly in the context of the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and menopause. At present, however, little is known about whether fertility is affected by sleep quantity and quality. That is, to what degree, and by what mechanisms, do sleep and/or its disturbances affect fertility? The purpose of this review is to synthesize what is known about sleep disturbances in relation to reproductive capacity. A model is provided, whereby stress, sleep dysregulation, and circadian misalignment are delineated for their potential relevance to infertility. Ultimately, if it is the case that sleep disturbance is associated with infertility, new avenues for clinical intervention may be possible.

  15. Sleep and Student Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Eric R. Eide; Mark H. Showalter

    2012-01-01

    We explore the relationship between sleep and student performance on standardized tests. We model test scores as a nonlinear function of sleep, which allows us to compute the hours of sleep associated with maximum test scores. We refer to this as “optimal” hours of sleep. We also evaluate how the sleep and student performance relationship changes with age. We use the Panel Study of Income Dynamics-Child Development Supplement, which includes excellent control variables that are not usually av...

  16. Childhood epilepsy and sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Biltagi, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and epilepsy are two well recognized conditions that interact with each other in a complex bi-directional way. Some types of epilepsies have increased activity during sleep disturbing it; while sleep deprivation aggravates epilepsy due to decreased seizure threshold. Epilepsy can deteriorate the sleep-related disorders and at the same time; the parasomnias can worsen the epilepsy. The secretion of sleep-related hormones can also be affected by the occurrence of seizures and supplementat...

  17. Functional neuroimaging of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A

    2005-03-01

    Sleep and sleep disorders have traditionally been viewed from a polysomnographic perspective. Although these methods provide information on the timing of various stages of sleep and wakefulness, they do not provide information regarding function in brain structures that have been implicated in the generation of sleep and that may be abnormal in different sleep disorders. Functional neuroimaging methods provide information regarding changes in brain function across the sleep-wake cycle that provides information for models of sleep dysregulation in a variety of sleep disorders. Early studies show reliable increases in function in limbic and anterior paralimbic cortex in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and decreases in function in higher-order cortical regions in known thalamocortical networks during non-REM sleep. Although most of the early work in this area has been devoted to the study of normal sleep mechanisms, a collection of studies in diverse sleep disorders such as sleep deprivation, depression, insomnia, dyssomnias, narcolepsy, and sleep apnea suggest that functional neuroimaging methods have the potential to clarify the pathophysiology of sleep disorders and to guide treatment strategies.

  18. Energy expenditure during sleep, sleep deprivation and sleep following sleep deprivation in adult humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christopher M; Melanson, Edward L; Frydendall, Emily J; Perreault, Leigh; Eckel, Robert H; Wright, Kenneth P

    2011-01-01

    Sleep has been proposed to be a physiological adaptation to conserve energy, but little research has examined this proposed function of sleep in humans. We quantified effects of sleep, sleep deprivation and recovery sleep on whole-body total daily energy expenditure (EE) and on EE during the habitual day and nighttime. We also determined effects of sleep stage during baseline and recovery sleep on EE. Seven healthy participants aged 22 ± 5 years (mean ± s.d.) maintained ∼8 h per night sleep schedules for 1 week before the study and consumed a weight-maintenance diet for 3 days prior to and during the laboratory protocol. Following a habituation night, subjects lived in a whole-room indirect calorimeter for 3 days. The first 24 h served as baseline – 16 h wakefulness, 8 h scheduled sleep – and this was followed by 40 h sleep deprivation and 8 h scheduled recovery sleep. Findings show that, compared to baseline, 24 h EE was significantly increased by ∼7% during the first 24 h of sleep deprivation and was significantly decreased by ∼5% during recovery, which included hours awake 25-40 and 8 h recovery sleep. During the night time, EE was significantly increased by ∼32% on the sleep deprivation night and significantly decreased by ∼4% during recovery sleep compared to baseline. Small differences in EE were observed among sleep stages, but wakefulness during the sleep episode was associated with increased energy expenditure. These findings provide support for the hypothesis that sleep conserves energy and that sleep deprivation increases total daily EE in humans.

  19. Energy expenditure during sleep, sleep deprivation and sleep following sleep deprivation in adult humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christopher M; Melanson, Edward L; Frydendall, Emily J; Perreault, Leigh; Eckel, Robert H; Wright, Kenneth P

    2011-01-01

    Sleep has been proposed to be a physiological adaptation to conserve energy, but little research has examined this proposed function of sleep in humans. We quantified effects of sleep, sleep deprivation and recovery sleep on whole-body total daily energy expenditure (EE) and on EE during the habitual day and nighttime. We also determined effects of sleep stage during baseline and recovery sleep on EE. Seven healthy participants aged 22 ± 5 years (mean ± s.d.) maintained ∼8 h per night sleep schedules for 1 week before the study and consumed a weight-maintenance diet for 3 days prior to and during the laboratory protocol. Following a habituation night, subjects lived in a whole-room indirect calorimeter for 3 days. The first 24 h served as baseline – 16 h wakefulness, 8 h scheduled sleep – and this was followed by 40 h sleep deprivation and 8 h scheduled recovery sleep. Findings show that, compared to baseline, 24 h EE was significantly increased by ∼7% during the first 24 h of sleep deprivation and was significantly decreased by ∼5% during recovery, which included hours awake 25–40 and 8 h recovery sleep. During the night time, EE was significantly increased by ∼32% on the sleep deprivation night and significantly decreased by ∼4% during recovery sleep compared to baseline. Small differences in EE were observed among sleep stages, but wakefulness during the sleep episode was associated with increased energy expenditure. These findings provide support for the hypothesis that sleep conserves energy and that sleep deprivation increases total daily EE in humans. PMID:21059762

  20. The role of sleep in pain and fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Ernest H S

    2015-09-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common cause of chronic widespread pain, characterized by reduced pressure pain thresholds with hyperalgesia and allodynia. In addition to pain, common symptoms include nonrestorative sleep, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, stiffness and mood disturbances. The latest research indicates that the dominant pathophysiology in fibromyalgia is abnormal pain processing and central sensitization. Neuroimaging studies have shown that patients with fibromyalgia have similar neural activation to healthy age-matched and gender-matched individuals; however, they have a lower pressure-pain threshold. Polysomnography data has demonstrated that these patients have reduced short-wave sleep and abnormal α-rhythms, suggestive of wakefulness during non-REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. Sleep deprivation in healthy individuals can cause symptoms of fibromyalgia, including myalgia, tenderness and fatigue, suggesting that sleep dysfunction might be not only a consequence of pain, but also pathogenic. Epidemiological studies indicate that poor sleep quality is a risk factor for the development of chronic widespread pain among an otherwise healthy population. Mechanistically, sleep deprivation impairs descending pain-inhibition pathways that are important in controlling and coping with pain. Clinical trials of pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies have shown that improving sleep quality can reduce pain and fatigue, further supporting the hypothesis that sleep dysfunction is a pathogenic stimulus of fibromyalgia.

  1. What can neuroimaging findings tell us about sleep disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A

    2004-06-01

    Models of the pathophysiology of human sleep disorders have only recently been tested using nuclear medicine assessments, which have greatly increased our understanding of the brain mechanisms involved in the human sleep-wake cycle. Dramatic changes in function have been observed in large-scale neuronal networks during sleep. Broad declines in heteromodal-association-cortical function, and relative increases in limbic and paralimbic function have been observed. These cortical areas are responsible for essential aspects of human behavior, allowing us to interact with the world around us and to evaluate the significance of important events in our lives. Preliminary findings suggest that fundamental alterations in the function of these neural systems occur in sleep disorders. In depression, alterations in rapid-eye-movement and slow-wave sleep appear linked to a sleep-related dysfunctional arousal in primary limbic and paralimbic structures (amygdala), and hypofunction in frontal cortical areas. Pharmacologic interventions partially reverse these alterations. Preliminary studies in insomia indicate a subcortical hyperarousal and a failure of sleep to provide normal restoration of function in the prefrontal cortex, leading to chronic sleep deprivation. This review discusses functional neuroimaging data on normal sleep, and on the pathophysiology of insomnia related to depression and primary insomnia.

  2. Basal forebrain thermoregulatory mechanism modulates auto-regulated sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hruda N Mallick

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of body temperature and sleep are two physiological mechanisms that are vital for our survival. Interestingly neural structures implicated in both these functions are common. These areas include the medial preoptic area, the lateral preoptic area, the ventrolateral preoptic area, the median preoptic nucleus and the medial septum, which form part of the basal forebrain.When given a choice, rats prefer to stay at an ambient temperature of 270C, though the maximum sleep was observed when they were placed at 300C. Ambient temperature around 270C should be considered as the thermoneutral temperature for rats in all sleep studies. At this temperature the diurnal oscillations of sleep and body temperature are properly expressed. The warm sensitive neurons of the preoptic area mediate the increase in sleep at 300C. Promotion of sleep during the rise in ambient temperature from 270C to 300C, serve a thermoregulatory function. Autonomous thermoregulatory changes in core body temperature and skin temperature could act as an input signal to modulate neuronal activity in sleep-promoting brain areas. The studies presented here show that the neurons of the basal forebrain play a key role in regulating sleep. Basal forebrain thermoregulatory system is a part of the global homeostatic sleep regulatory mechanism, which is auto-regulated.

  3. Why sleep is important for health: a psychoneuroimmunology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Michael R

    2015-01-03

    Sleep has a critical role in promoting health. Research over the past decade has documented that sleep disturbance has a powerful influence on the risk of infectious disease, the occurrence and progression of several major medical illnesses including cardiovascular disease and cancer, and the incidence of depression. Increasingly, the field has focused on identifying the biological mechanisms underlying these effects. This review highlights the impact of sleep on adaptive and innate immunity, with consideration of the dynamics of sleep disturbance, sleep restriction, and insomnia on (a) antiviral immune responses with consequences for vaccine responses and infectious disease risk and (b) proinflammatory immune responses with implications for cardiovascular disease, cancer, and depression. This review also discusses the neuroendocrine and autonomic neural underpinnings linking sleep disturbance and immunity and the reciprocal links between sleep and inflammatory biology. Finally, interventions are discussed as effective strategies to improve sleep, and potential opportunities are identified to promote sleep health for therapeutic control of chronic infectious, inflammatory, and neuropsychiatric diseases.

  4. Effects of sleep on memory for conditioned fear and fear extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Pace-Schott, Edward F.; Germain, Anne; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2015-01-01

    Learning and memory for extinction of conditioned fear is a basic mammalian mechanism for regulating negative emotion. Sleep promotes both the consolidation of memory and the regulation of emotion. Sleep can influence consolidation and modification of memories associated with both fear and its extinction. After brief overviews of the behavior and neural circuitry associated with fear conditioning, extinction learning and extinction memory in the rodent and human, interactions of sleep with th...

  5. Relations Between Toddler Sleep Characteristics, Sleep Problems, and Temperament

    OpenAIRE

    Molfese, Victoria J.; Rudasill, Kathleen M.; Prokasky, Amanda; Champagne, Carly; Holmes, Molly; Molfese, Dennis; Bates, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Two sources of information (parent reported sleep diaries and actigraph records) were used to investigate how toddler sleep characteristics (bed time/sleep onset, wake time/sleep offset, total nighttime sleep and total sleep time) are related to sleep problems and temperament. There were 64 toddler participants in the study. Consistent with studies of older children, parent reports differed from actigraph based records. The findings that parent reported and actigraph recorded sleep characteri...

  6. Memory stabilization with targeted reactivation during human slow-wave sleep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, E.V. van; Takashima, A.; Barth, M.; Zapp, J.; Schad, L.R.; Paller, K.A.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2012-01-01

    It is believed that neural representations of recent experiences become reactivated during sleep, and that this process serves to stabilize associated memories in long-term memory. Here, we initiated this reactivation process for specific memories during slow-wave sleep. Participants studied 50 obje

  7. Functional connectivity during light sleep is correlated with memory performance for face-location associations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, E.V. van; Takashima, A.; Barth, M.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2011-01-01

    The consolidation of declarative memories benefits from sleep. The neural mechanisms involved in sleep-dependent consolidation, however, are largely unknown. Here, we used a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging, polysomnography and a face-location associative memory task to target ne

  8. Functional connectivity during light sleep is correlated with memory performance for face-location associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, E.V. van; Takashima, A.; Barth, M.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2011-01-01

    The consolidation of declarative memories benefits from sleep. The neural mechanisms involved in sleep-dependent consolidation, however, are largely unknown. Here, we used a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging, polysomnography and a face–location associative memory task to target ne

  9. Calcineurin and its regulator sra/DSCR1 are essential for sleep in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Yasuhiro; Horiuchi, Junjiro; Tsuda, Manabu; Takeo, Satomi; Akahori, Shin; Matsuo, Takashi; Kume, Kazuhiko; Aigaki, Toshiro

    2011-09-07

    Sleep is a fundamental biological process for all animals. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate sleep are still poorly understood. Here we report that sleep-like behavior in Drosophila is severely impaired by mutations in sarah (sra), a member of the Regulator of Calcineurin (RCAN) family of genes. Sleep reduction in sra mutants is highly correlated with decreases in Sra protein levels. Pan-neural expression of sra rescues this behavioral phenotype, indicating that neuronal sra function is required for normal sleep. Since Sra regulates calcineurin (CN), we generated and examined the behavior of knock-out mutants for all Drosophila CN genes: CanA-14F, Pp2B-14D, and CanA1 (catalytic subunits), and CanB and CanB2 (regulatory subunits). While all mutants show at least minor changes in sleep, CanA-14F(KO) and CanB(KO) have striking reductions, suggesting that these are the major CN subunits regulating sleep. In addition, neuronal expression of constitutively active forms of CN catalytic subunits also significantly reduces sleep, demonstrating that both increases and decreases in CN activity inhibit sleep. sra sleep defects are suppressed by CN mutations, indicating that sra and CN affect sleep through a common mechanism. Our results demonstrate that CN and its regulation by Sra are required for normal sleep in Drosophila and identify a critical role of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent signaling in sleep regulation.

  10. Methylxanthines and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine is widely used to promote wakefulness and counteract fatigue induced by restriction of sleep, but also to counteract the effects of caffeine abstinence. Adenosine is a physiological molecule, which in the central nervous system acts predominantly as an inhibitory neuromodulator. Adenosine is also a sleep-promoting molecule. Caffeine binds to adenosine receptors, and the antagonism of the adenosinergic system is believed to be the mechanism through which caffeine counteracts sleep in humans as well as in other species. The sensitivity for caffeine varies markedly among individuals. Recently, genetic variations in genes related to adenosine metabolism have provided at least a partial explanation for this variability. The main effects of caffeine on sleep are decreased sleep latency, shortened total sleep time, decrease in power in the delta range, and sleep fragmentation. Caffeine may also decrease the accumulation of sleep propensity during waking, thus inducing long-term harmful effects on sleep quality.

  11. Are You Getting Enough Sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Emails CDC Features Are you getting enough sleep? Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Sleep is ... sleep guidelines for different age groups. How much sleep do you need? Newborns 16-18 hours Preschool- ...

  12. Shift Work: Improving Daytime Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sleeping during the day. Do you have any sleep tips for shift workers? Answers from Timothy Morgenthaler, ... to be awake during the day and to sleep at night. Good daytime sleep is possible, though, ...

  13. The Phenomenon of Sleep Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of sleep where vivid dreams occur (known as REM sleep), your arms and legs are temporarily paralyzed so ... alien abductions." Since breathing can be irregular during REM sleep, those experiencing sleep paralysis may feel like they' ...

  14. Sleep neuroimaging and models of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo eTagliazucchi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Human deep sleep is characterized by reduced or absent sensory activity, responsiveness to stimuli and conscious awareness. Given its ubiquity and reversible nature, it represents an attractive paradigm to study the neural changes which accompany the loss of consciousness in humans. In particular, the deepest stages of sleep can serve as an empirical test for the predictions of theoretical models relating the phenomenology of consciousness with underlying neural activity. A relatively recent shift of attention from the analysis of evoked responses towards spontaneous (or ``resting state'' activity has taken place in the neuroimaging community, together with the development of tools suitable to study distributed functional interactions. In this review we focus on recent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI studies of spontaneous activity during sleep and their relationship with theoretical models for human consciousness generation, considering the global workspace theory, the information integration theory and the dynamical core hypothesis. We discuss the venues of research opened by these results, emphasizing the need to extend the analytic methodology in order to obtain a dynamical picture of how functional interactions change over time and how their evolution is modulated during different conscious states. Finally, we discuss the need to experimentally establish absent or reduced conscious content, even when studying the deepest sleep stages.

  15. Sleep from an Islamic perspective

    OpenAIRE

    BaHammam, Ahmed S.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep medicine is a relatively new scientific specialty. Sleep is an important topic in Islamic literature, and the Quran and Hadith discuss types of sleep, the importance of sleep, and good sleep practices. Islam considers sleep as one of the signs of the greatness of Allβh (God) and encourages followers to explore this important sign. The Quran describes different types of sleep, and these correspond with sleep stages identified by modern science. The Quran discusses the beneficial effects ...

  16. Sleep deprivation impairs consolidation of cued fear memory in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tankesh Kumar

    Full Text Available Post-learning sleep facilitates negative memory consolidation and also helps preserve it over several years. It is believed, therefore, that sleep deprivation may help prevent consolidation of fearful memory. Its effect, however, on consolidation of negative/frightening memories is not known. Cued fear-conditioning (CuFC is a widely used model to understand the neural basis of negative memory associated with anxiety disorders. In this study, we first determined the suitable circadian timing for consolidation of CuFC memory and changes in sleep architecture after CuFC. Thereafter, we studied the effect of sleep deprivation on CuFC memory consolidation. Three sets of experiments were performed in male Wistar rat (n=51. In experiment-I, animals were conditioned to cued-fear by presenting ten tone-shock paired stimuli during lights-on (7 AM (n=9 and lights-off (7 PM (n=9 periods. In experiment-II, animals were prepared for polysomnographic recording (n=8 and changes in sleep architecture after CuFC was determined. Further in experiment-III, animals were cued fear-conditioned during the lights-off period and were randomly divided into four groups: Sleep-Deprived (SD (n=9, Non-Sleep Deprived (NSD (n=9, Stress Control (SC (n=9 and Tone Control (n=7. Percent freezing amount, a hallmark of fear, was compared statistically in these groups. Rats trained during the lights-off period exhibited significantly more freezing compared to lights-on period. In CuFC trained animals, total sleep amount did not change, however, REM sleep decreased significantly. Further, out of total sleep time, animals spent proportionately more time in NREM sleep. Nevertheless, SD animals exhibited significantly less freezing compared to NSD and SC groups. These data suggest that sleep plays an important role in the consolidation of cued fear-conditioned memory.

  17. [Actigraphy in sleep medicine and sleep research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Yoshiyuki; Matsuda, Mika; Chiba, Shigeru

    2009-08-01

    Actigraphy is a method that utilizes a miniaturized computerized wristwatch-like device to monitor and collect data generated by body movements over extended periods of time. It allows estimation of sleep and wakefulness based on motor activity. It provides a noninvasive, objective, and longitudinal method for the diagnostic and post-treatment evaluation of patients with sleep disorders in the ambulatory setting. It has been used for researchers to study sleep disturbances in a variety of populations, most frequently for the evaluation of insomnia, paradoxical insomnia, and circadian rhythm sleep disorders. In addition, it is particularly useful in populations where polysomnography would be difficult to record, such as in patients with dementia and delirium. Actigraphy should be extensively carried out in sleep medicine as well as sleep research.

  18. Sleep and sleep disorders in Don Quixote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, Alex; Santamaria, Joan; de Riquer, Martín

    2004-01-01

    In Don Quijote de la Mancha, Miguel de Cervantes presents Don Quixote as an amazing character of the 17th century who suffers from delusions and illusions, believing himself to be a medieval knight errant. Besides this neuropsychiatric condition, Cervantes included masterful descriptions of several sleep disorders such as insomnia, sleep deprivation, disruptive loud snoring and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. In addition, he described the occurrence of physiological, vivid dreams and habitual, post-prandial sleepiness--the siesta. Cervantes' concept of sleep as a passive state where all cerebral activities are almost absent is in conflict with his description of abnormal behaviours during sleep and vivid, fantastic dreams. His concept of sleep was shared by his contemporary, Shakespeare, and could have been influenced by the reading of the classical Spanish book of psychiatry Examen de Ingenios (1575).

  19. Sleep disturbances in Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, J J M

    2003-02-01

    The present article is meant to suggest an approach to the guidelines for the therapy of sleep disturbances in Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients.The factors affecting the quality of life in PD patients are depression, sleep disturbances and dependence. A large review of the literature on sleep disturbances in PD patients, provided the basis for the following classification of the sleep-arousal disturbances in PD patients. We suggest a model based on 3 steps in the treatment of sleep disturbances in PD patients. This model allowing the patient, the spouse or the caregiver a quiet sleep at night, may postpone the retirement and the institutionalization of the PD patient. I. Correct diagnosis of sleep disorders based on detailed anamnesis of the patient and of the spouse or of the caregiver. One week recording on a symptom diary (log) by the patient or the caregiver. Correct diagnosis of sleep disorders co morbidities. Selection of the most appropriate sleep test among: polysomnography (PSG), multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), multiple wake latency test (MWLT), Epworth Sleepiness Scale, actigraphy or video-PSG. II. The nonspecific therapeutic approach consists in: a) Checking the sleep effect on motor performance, is it beneficial, worse or neutral. b) Psycho-physical assistance. c) Dopaminergic adjustment is necessary owing to the progression of the nigrostriatal degeneration and the increased sensitivity of the terminals, which alter the normal modulator mechanisms of the motor centers in PD patients. Among the many neurotransmitters of the nigro-striatal pathway one can distinguish two with a major influence on REM and NonREM sleep. REM sleep corresponds to an increased cholinergic receptor activity and a decreased dopaminergic activity. This is the reason why REM sleep deprivation by suppressing cholinergic receptor activity ameliorates PD motor symptoms. L-Dopa and its agonists by suppressing cholinergic receptors suppress REM sleep. The permanent adjustment

  20. Sleep recalibrates homeostatic and associative synaptic plasticity in the human cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Marion; Wolf, Elias; Maier, Jonathan G; Mainberger, Florian; Feige, Bernd; Schmid, Hanna; Bürklin, Jan; Maywald, Sarah; Mall, Volker; Jung, Nikolai H; Reis, Janine; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Klöppel, Stefan; Sterr, Annette; Eckert, Anne; Riemann, Dieter; Normann, Claus; Nissen, Christoph

    2016-08-23

    Sleep is ubiquitous in animals and humans, but its function remains to be further determined. The synaptic homeostasis hypothesis of sleep-wake regulation proposes a homeostatic increase in net synaptic strength and cortical excitability along with decreased inducibility of associative synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) due to saturation after sleep deprivation. Here we use electrophysiological, behavioural and molecular indices to non-invasively study net synaptic strength and LTP-like plasticity in humans after sleep and sleep deprivation. We demonstrate indices of increased net synaptic strength (TMS intensity to elicit a predefined amplitude of motor-evoked potential and EEG theta activity) and decreased LTP-like plasticity (paired associative stimulation induced change in motor-evoked potential and memory formation) after sleep deprivation. Changes in plasma BDNF are identified as a potential mechanism. Our study indicates that sleep recalibrates homeostatic and associative synaptic plasticity, believed to be the neural basis for adaptive behaviour, in humans.

  1. The beneficial role of memory reactivation for language learning during sleep: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Thomas; Rasch, Björn

    2017-04-01

    Sleep is essential for diverse aspects of language learning. According to a prominent concept these beneficial effects of sleep rely on spontaneous reactivation processes. A series of recent studies demonstrated that inducing such reactivation processes by re-exposure to memory cues during sleep enhances foreign vocabulary learning. Building upon these findings, the present article reviews recent models and empirical findings concerning the beneficial effects of sleep on language learning. Consequently, the memory function of sleep, its neural underpinnings and the role of the sleeping brain in language learning will be summarized. Finally, we will propose a working model concerning the oscillatory requirements for successful reactivation processes and future research questions to advance our understanding of the role of sleep on language learning and memory processes in general.

  2. [Sleep changes with aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbus, Christophe; Cochen, Valérie

    2010-03-01

    Many factors contribute to the alteration of sleep in older adults. Most of their complaints can be explained by the modifications of the sleep organisation observed in this population. Sleep architecture is altered with aging. Insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness can reflect an alteration of the circadian rhythm. This population is also frequently exposed to specific sleep disorders such as the restless leg syndrome, periodic limb movements or obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Sleep disorders in patients with Alzheimer's disease is a daily preoccupation at home or in institution. Circadian rhythm modifications and sleep disorders are frequent in this frail population and can induce disturbing behavior disorders. Before the prescription of hypnotics and psychotropic drugs, facing a sleep complaint practitioners should take into account the risks induced by these treatments that should no longer be the unique and reflex treatment in these situations.

  3. Teenagers and sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and with their health , including: Depression and low self esteem Sleepiness and trouble concentrating Decline in school performance ... associated with improved sleep and daytime functioning in adolescents. Sleep . 2011;34(6):797-800. PMID: 21629368 ...

  4. Sleep Disorders (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time. A sleep disorder assessment includes a physical exam, health history, and sleep history. Your doctor will ... before bedtime. Avoid foods and drinks that have caffeine , including dietary supplements to control appetite . Other habits ...

  5. Sleep and Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kelly C; Spaeth, Andrea; Hopkins, Christina M

    2016-10-01

    Insomnia is related to an increased risk of eating disorders, while eating disorders are related to more disrupted sleep. Insomnia is also linked to poorer treatment outcomes for eating disorders. However, over the last decade, studies examining sleep and eating disorders have relied on surveys, with no objective measures of sleep for anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, and only actigraphy data for binge eating disorder. Sleep disturbance is better defined for night eating syndrome, where sleep efficiency is reduced and melatonin release is delayed. Studies that include objectively measured sleep and metabolic parameters combined with psychiatric comorbidity data would help identify under what circumstances eating disorders and sleep disturbance produce an additive effect for symptom severity and for whom poor sleep would increase risk for an eating disorder. Cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia may be a helpful addition to treatment of those with both eating disorder and insomnia.

  6. Sleep in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigeta, Sônia Maria Garcia; Hachul, Helena; Tufik, Sergio; de Oliveira, Eleonora Menicucci

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors that most influence the perception of sleep quality in postmenopausal women. We used the methodological strategy of the Collective Subject Discourse (CSD), which is based on a theoretical framework of social representations theory. We obtained the data by interviewing 22 postmenopausal Brazilian women who were experiencing insomnia. The women gave accounts of their difficulties with sleep; a variety of dimensions were identified within the data. The onset of sleep disorders might have occurred during childhood or in situations considered to be stressful, and were not necessarily associated with menopause. We found that hormonal alterations occurring during menopause, psychosocial factors, and sleep-breathing disorders triggered occasional sleep disturbances during this time of life. Participants were aware of the consequences of sleep deprivation. In addition, inadequate sleep hygiene habits figured prominently as determinants in the persistence of sleep disturbances.

  7. Central sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diagnose an underlying medical condition. A sleep study (polysomnography) can confirm sleep apnea. Other tests that may ... MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright Privacy ...

  8. Polysomnography (Sleep Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make symptoms of some sleep disorders worse. During polysomnography You arrive at the sleep center in the ... t required to obtain accurate polysomnography results. After polysomnography In the morning, the sensors are removed, and ...

  9. Sleep and Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AAP introduced this recommendation in 1992. Use a firm sleep surface. Cover the mattress with a sheet ... Sleep and Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Communication and Your Newborn Medical Care and Your Newborn ...

  10. Metformin and sleep disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug. Deterioration of sleep is an important unwanted side effect of metformin. Here, the authors review and present the details on metformin and sleep problem.

  11. Sleep & the metabolic syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lam, Jamie C M; Ip, Mary S M

    2010-01-01

    Sleep is an essential part of our daily living, and sleep disturbances may intervene with the biological and physiological processes in human body leading to the development of metabolic dysfunction...

  12. Sleep and Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 12-Month-Old Bed-Sharing All About Sleep Sleep and Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Communication and Your Newborn Medical Care and Your Newborn Your Newborn's Growth Choosing Safe Baby Products: Cribs Flat Head Syndrome ( ...

  13. Plasticity during Sleep Is Linked to Specific Regulation of Cortical Circuit Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Niethard

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is thought to be involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity in two ways: by enhancing local plastic processes underlying the consolidation of specific memories and by supporting global synaptic homeostasis. Here, we briefly summarize recent structural and functional studies examining sleep-associated changes in synaptic morphology and neural excitability. These studies point to a global down-scaling of synaptic strength across sleep while a subset of synapses increases in strength. Similarly, neuronal excitability on average decreases across sleep, whereas subsets of neurons increase firing rates across sleep. Whether synapse formation and excitability is down or upregulated across sleep appears to partly depend on the cell’s activity level during wakefulness. Processes of memory-specific upregulation of synapse formation and excitability are observed during slow wave sleep (SWS, whereas global downregulation resulting in elimination of synapses and decreased neural firing is linked to rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep. Studies of the excitation/inhibition balance in cortical circuits suggest that both processes are connected to a specific inhibitory regulation of cortical principal neurons, characterized by an enhanced perisomatic inhibition via parvalbumin positive (PV+ cells, together with a release from dendritic inhibition by somatostatin positive (SOM+ cells. Such shift towards increased perisomatic inhibition of principal cells appears to be a general motif which underlies the plastic synaptic changes observed during sleep, regardless of whether towards up or downregulation.

  14. Sleep hygiene and sleep quality in Italian and American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBourgeois, Monique K; Giannotti, Flavia; Cortesi, Flavia; Wolfson, Amy; Harsh, John

    2004-06-01

    This study investigated cross-cultural differences in adolescent sleep hygiene and sleep quality. Participants were 1348 students (655 males; 693 females) aged 12-17 years from public school systems in Rome, Italy (n = 776) and Southern Mississippi (n = 572). Participants completed the Adolescent Sleep-Wake Scale and the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale. Reported sleep hygiene and sleep quality were significantly better for Italian than American adolescents. A moderate linear relationship was observed between sleep hygiene and sleep quality in both samples (Italians: R =.40; Americans: R =.46). Separate hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that sleep hygiene accounted for significant variance in sleep quality, even after controlling for demographic and health variables (Italians: R(2) =.38; Americans: R(2) =.44). The results of this study suggest that there are cultural differences in sleep quality and sleep hygiene practices, and that sleep hygiene practices are importantly related to adolescent sleep quality.

  15. Sleep disorders - resistant forms

    OpenAIRE

    Koláčková, Pavla

    2016-01-01

    Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové Department of Biological and Medical Sciences Candidate: Pavla Koláčková Supervisor: Doc. RNDr. Vladimír Semecký, CSc. Name of dissertation: Sleep disorders - resistant forms The diploma thesis is about sleep disorders. Sleep disorders are a global problem, lots of people have these problems. This diploma thesis focuses on American International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD) and its application in clinical practice...

  16. Sleep hygiene and actigraphically evaluated sleep characteristics in children with ADHD and chronic sleep onset insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Kristiaan B; Smits, Marcel G; Gunning, W Boudewijn

    2006-03-01

    In the present study we investigated sleep hygiene and actigraphically evaluated sleep in 74 medication-naïve children, aged 6-12 years, with rigorously diagnosed attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and chronic sleep onset insomnia (ADHD-SOI) and 23 ADHD controls without insomnia (ADHD-noSOI). Between-group differences were analysed for lights out (sleep log), actigraphically evaluated sleep onset, sleep latency, total sleep duration, actual sleep time and sleep hygiene as measured with the Children's Sleep Hygiene Scale. We found a significant difference (P sleep hygiene score between the ADHD-SOI (56.4 +/- 10.5) and ADHD-noSOI groups (53.0 +/- 10.6). We conclude that there were differences in sleep onset and sleep latency in ADHD children with chronic SOI and those without insomnia; however, sleep hygiene practices were similar and did not relate to sleep characteristics.

  17. Sleep and Metabolism: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep and its disorders are increasingly becoming important in our sleep deprived society. Sleep is intricately connected to various hormonal and metabolic processes in the body and is important in maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Research shows that sleep deprivation and sleep disorders may have profound metabolic and cardiovascular implications. Sleep deprivation, sleep disordered breathing, and circadian misalignment are believed to cause metabolic dysregulation through myriad pathways involving sympathetic overstimulation, hormonal imbalance, and subclinical inflammation. This paper reviews sleep and metabolism, and how sleep deprivation and sleep disorders may be altering human metabolism.

  18. Effects of sleep on memory for conditioned fear and fear extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace-Schott, Edward F.; Germain, Anne; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2015-01-01

    Learning and memory for extinction of conditioned fear is a basic mammalian mechanism for regulating negative emotion. Sleep promotes both the consolidation of memory and the regulation of emotion. Sleep can influence consolidation and modification of memories associated with both fear and its extinction. After brief overviews of the behavior and neural circuitry associated with fear conditioning, extinction learning and extinction memory in the rodent and human, interactions of sleep with these processes will be examined. Animal and human studies suggest that sleep can serve to consolidate both fear and extinction memory. In humans, sleep also promotes generalization of extinction memory. Time-of-day effects on extinction learning and generalization are also seen. REM may be a sleep stage of particular importance for the consolidation of both fear and extinction memory as evidenced by selective REM deprivation experiments. REM sleep is accompanied by selective activation of the same limbic structures implicated in the learning and memory of fear and extinction. Preliminary evidence also suggests extinction learning can take place during slow wave sleep. Study of low-level processes such as conditioning, extinction and habituation may allow sleep effects on emotional memory to be identified and inform study of sleep’s effects on more complex, emotionally salient declarative memories. Anxiety disorders are marked by impairments of both sleep and extinction memory. Improving sleep quality may ameliorate anxiety disorders by strengthening naturally acquired extinction. Strategically timed sleep may be used to enhance treatment of anxiety by strengthening therapeutic extinction learned via exposure therapy. PMID:25894546

  19. Resiliency as a mediator of the impact of sleep on child and adolescent behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatburn A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Alex Chatburn,1,2 Scott Coussens,1,2 Mark J Kohler1,3 1School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 2Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Women’s and Children’s Health Network, North Adelaide, SA, Australia; 3Children’s Research Centre, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia Background: Disturbed sleep is detrimental to child behavior; however, the precise means by which this association occurs is unclear. Sleep and resilience can theoretically share an underlying neural mechanism and therefore influence one another. However, the role of resilience in the association between sleep and behavior is not known. The associations between sleep, resilience, and problematic behavior in children and adolescents aged 7–18 years were investigated in this study. Methods: A correlational design was used to determine the relationships between total sleep problems, indices of resilience, and internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Results: Sleep problems and resiliency variables were strongly correlated, and further, sleep problems were found to be predictive of resiliency scores. Resiliency significantly mediated the relationship between increased sleep problems and both overall internalizing and externalizing behavior problems, and specifically, measures of depression and anxiety. Conclusion: Sleep impacted levels of resilience such that greater sleep disturbance reduced resilience and consequently increased problematic behavior, potentially predisposing individuals to psychopathology. Keywords: resilience, behavior, internalizing, externalizing, anxiety, depression, sleep

  20. Estimating individual optimal sleep duration and potential sleep debt

    OpenAIRE

    Shingo Kitamura; Yasuko Katayose; Kyoko Nakazaki; Yuki Motomura; Kentaro Oba; Ruri Katsunuma; Yuri Terasawa; Minori Enomoto; Yoshiya Moriguchi; Akiko Hida; Kazuo Mishima

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that dynamics of sleep time obtained over consecutive days of extended sleep in a laboratory reflect an individual’s optimal sleep duration (OSD) and that the difference between OSD and habitual sleep duration (HSD) at home represents potential sleep debt (PSD). We found that OSD varies among individuals and PSD showed stronger correlation with subjective/objective sleepiness than actual sleep time, interacting with individual’s vulnerability of sleep loss. Furt...

  1. Neuroimaging and sleep medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A

    2005-06-01

    In sleep medicine, patients with sleep disorders are evaluated and treated. The primary assessment tool of the field has traditionally been polysomnography. While polysomnography has been helpful in the evaluation of some sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder, it has been less helpful in others, such as the insomnias, or sleep disorders secondary to mental disorders. These disorders are presumed to stem from some alteration in brain function that disrupts sleep. The development of functional neuroimaging methods provides a means to understand brain function in patients with sleep disorders in a manner not accessible to polysomnography. This paper summarizes functional neuroimaging findings during healthy sleep, then, reviews available studies in sleep disorders patients, and studies addressing the pharmacology of sleep and sleep disorders. Areas in which functional neuroimaging methods may be helpful in sleep medicine, and in which future development is advised, include: (1) clarification of pathophysiology; (2) aid in differential diagnosis; (3) assessment of treatment response; (4) guiding new drug development; and (5) monitoring treatment response.

  2. The Functions of Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samson Z Assefa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is a ubiquitous component of animal life including birds and mammals. The exact function of sleep has been one of the mysteries of biology. A considerable number of theories have been put forward to explain the reason(s for the necessity of sleep. To date, while a great deal is known about what happens when animals sleep, there is no definitive comprehensive explanation as to the reason that sleep is an inevitable part of animal functioning. It is well known that sleep is a homeostatically regulated body process, and that prolonged sleep deprivation is fatal in animals. In this paper, we present some of the theories as to the functions of sleep and provide a review of some hypotheses as to the overall physiologic function of sleep. To better understand the purpose for sleeping, we review the effects of sleep deprivation on physical, neurocognitive and psychic function. A better understanding of the purpose for sleeping will be a great advance in our understanding of the nature of the animal kingdom, including our own.

  3. Treatments for Sleep Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use the bed only for sleep Discourage watching television during periods of wakefulness Medications for sleep changes In some cases, non-drug approaches fail to work or the sleep changes are accompanied by disruptive nighttime behaviors. For those individuals who do require medication, experts ...

  4. Sleep and Your Preschooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Sleep and Your Preschooler KidsHealth > For Parents > Sleep and Your Preschooler Print A A A What's ... Preschoolers need about 11 to 12 hours of sleep each day, which can include a nap. There's ...

  5. Physiology of Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, David W; Farabi, Sarah S

    2016-02-01

    IN BRIEF Far from a simple absence of wakefulness, sleep is an active, regulated, and metabolically distinct state, essential for health and well-being. In this article, the authors review the fundamental anatomy and physiology of sleep and its regulation, with an eye toward interactions between sleep and metabolism.

  6. What Is Sleep Apnea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Sleep Apnea? Español Sleep apnea (AP-ne-ah) is ... many people. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Sleep Apnea Research: The HeartBeat Study 06/07/2012 ...

  7. Reduced visual processing capacity in sleep deprived persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Danyang; Soon, Chun Siong; Chee, Michael W L

    2011-03-15

    Multiple experiments have found sleep deprivation to lower task-related parietal and extrastriate visual activation, suggesting a reduction of visual processing capacity in this state. The perceptual load theory of attention (Lavie, 1995) predicts that our capacity to process unattended distractors will be reduced by increasing perceptual difficulty of task-relevant stimuli. Here, we evaluated the effects of sleep deprivation and perceptual load on visual processing capacity by measuring neural repetition-suppression to unattended scenes while healthy volunteers attended to faces embedded in face-scene pictures. Perceptual load did not affect repetition suppression after a normal night of sleep. Sleep deprivation reduced repetition suppression in the parahippocampal place area (PPA) in the high but not low perceptual load condition. Additionally, the extent to which task-related fusiform face area (FFA) activation was reduced after sleep deprivation correlated with behavioral performance and lowered repetition suppression in the PPA. The findings concerning correct responses indicate that a portion of stimulus related activation following a normal night of sleep contributes to potentially useful visual processing capacity that is attenuated following sleep deprivation. Finally, when unattended stimuli are not highly intrusive, sleep deprivation does not appear to increase distractibility.

  8. Fragmentation of Rapid Eye Movement and Nonrapid Eye Movement Sleep without Total Sleep Loss Impairs Hippocampus-Dependent Fear Memory Consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael L; Katsuyama, Ângela M; Duge, Leanne S; Sriram, Chaitra; Krushelnytskyy, Mykhaylo; Kim, Jeansok J; de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2016-11-01

    Sleep is important for consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memories. It is hypothesized that the temporal sequence of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is critical for the weakening of nonadaptive memories and the subsequent transfer of memories temporarily stored in the hippocampus to more permanent memories in the neocortex. A great body of evidence supporting this hypothesis relies on behavioral, pharmacological, neural, and/or genetic manipulations that induce sleep deprivation or stage-specific sleep deprivation. We exploit an experimental model of circadian desynchrony in which intact animals are not deprived of any sleep stage but show fragmentation of REM and NREM sleep within nonfragmented sleep bouts. We test the hypothesis that the shortening of NREM and REM sleep durations post-training will impair memory consolidation irrespective of total sleep duration. When circadian-desynchronized animals are trained in a hippocampus-dependent contextual fear-conditioning task they show normal short-term memory but impaired long-term memory consolidation. This impairment in memory consolidation is positively associated with the post-training fragmentation of REM and NREM sleep but is not significantly associated with the fragmentation of total sleep or the total amount of delta activity. We also show that the sleep stage fragmentation resulting from circadian desynchrony has no effect on hippocampus-dependent spatial memory and no effect on hippocampus-independent cued fear-conditioning memory. Our findings in an intact animal model, in which sleep deprivation is not a confounding factor, support the hypothesis that the stereotypic sequence and duration of sleep stages play a specific role in long-term hippocampus-dependent fear memory consolidation.

  9. Optogenetic deconstruction of sleep-wake circuitry in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Adamantidis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available How does the brain regulate the sleep-wake cycle? What are the temporal codes of sleep- and wake-promoting neural circuits? How do these circuits interact with each other across the light/dark cycle? Over the past few decades, many studies from a variety of disciplines have made substantial progress in answering these fundamental questions. For example, neurobiologists have identified multiple, redundant wake-promoting circuits in the brainstem, hypothalamus, and basal forebrain. Sleep-promoting circuits have been found in the preoptic area and hypothalamus. One of the greatest challenges in recent years has been to selectively record and manipulate these sleep-wake centers in vivo with high spatial and temporal resolution. Recent developments in microbial opsin-based neuromodulation tools, collectively referred to as “optogenetics,” have provided a novel method to demonstrate causal links between neural activity and specific behaviors. Here, we propose to use optogenetics as a fundamental tool to probe the necessity, sufficiency, and connectivity of defined neural circuits in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness.

  10. Sleep and sleep disorders in menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidozzi, F

    2013-04-01

    Sleep disorders in the menopause are common. Although these disorders may be due to the menopause itself and/or the associated vasomotor symptoms, the etiology is multifactorial and includes a number of other associated conditions. They may simply arise as part of the aging process and not be specifically related to the decrease in estrogen levels or, alternatively, because of breathing or limb movement syndromes, depression, anxiety, co-morbid medical diseases, medication, pain and/or psychosocial factors. The most commonly encountered sleep disorders in menopausal women include insomnia, nocturnal breathing disturbances and the associated sleep disorders that accompany the restless leg syndrome, periodic leg movement syndrome, depression and anxiety. This review article addresses sleep and the sleep disorders associated with menopause and briefly the role that hormone therapy may play in alleviating these disorders.

  11. Menopause related sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichling, Philip S; Sahni, Jyotsna

    2005-07-15

    Sleep difficulty is one of the hallmarks of menopause. Following recent studies showing no cardiac benefit and increased breast cancer, the question of indications for hormonal therapy has become even more pertinent. Three sets of sleep disorders are associated with menopause: insomnia/depression, sleep disordered breathing and fibromyalgia. The primary predictor of disturbed sleep architecture is the presence of vasomotor symptoms. This subset of women has lower sleep efficiency and more sleep complaints. The same group is at higher risk of insomnia and depression. The "domino theory" of sleep disruption leading to insomnia followed by depression has the most scientific support. Estrogen itself may also have an antidepressant as well as a direct sleep effect. Treatment of insomnia in responsive individuals may be a major remaining indication for hormone therapy. Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) increases markedly at menopause for reasons that include both weight gain and unclear hormonal mechanisms. Due to the general under-recognition of SDB, health care providers should not assume sleep complaints are due to vasomotor related insomnia/depression without considering SDB. Fibromyalgia has gender, age and probably hormonal associations. Sleep complaints are almost universal in FM. There are associated polysomnogram (PSG) findings. FM patients have increased central nervous system levels of the nociceptive neuropeptide substance P (SP) and lower serotonin levels resulting in a lower pain threshold to normal stimuli. High SP and low serotonin have significant potential to affect sleep and mood. Treatment of sleep itself seems to improve, if not resolve FM. Menopausal sleep disruption can exacerbate other pre-existing sleep disorders including RLS and circadian disorders.

  12. Sleep-related hippocampo-cortical interplay during emotional memory recollection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Sterpenich

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Emotional events are usually better remembered than neutral ones. This effect is mediated in part by a modulation of the hippocampus by the amygdala. Sleep plays a role in the consolidation of declarative memory. We examined the impact of sleep and lack of sleep on the consolidation of emotional (negative and positive memories at the macroscopic systems level. Using functional MRI (fMRI, we compared the neural correlates of successful recollection by humans of emotional and neutral stimuli, 72 h after encoding, with or without total sleep deprivation during the first post-encoding night. In contrast to recollection of neutral and positive stimuli, which was deteriorated by sleep deprivation, similar recollection levels were achieved for negative stimuli in both groups. Successful recollection of emotional stimuli elicited larger responses in the hippocampus and various cortical areas, including the medial prefrontal cortex, in the sleep group than in the sleep deprived group. This effect was consistent across subjects for negative items but depended linearly on individual memory performance for positive items. In addition, the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex were functionally more connected during recollection of either negative or positive than neutral items, and more so in sleeping than in sleep-deprived subjects. In the sleep-deprived group, recollection of negative items elicited larger responses in the amygdala and an occipital area than in the sleep group. In contrast, no such difference in brain responses between groups was associated with recollection of positive stimuli. The results suggest that the emotional significance of memories influences their sleep-dependent systems-level consolidation. The recruitment of hippocampo-neocortical networks during recollection is enhanced after sleep and is hindered by sleep deprivation. After sleep deprivation, recollection of negative, potentially dangerous, memories recruits an alternate

  13. Sleep-related hippocampo-cortical interplay during emotional memory recollection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpenich, Virginie; Albouy, Geneviève; Boly, Mélanie; Vandewalle, Gilles; Darsaud, Annabelle; Balteau, Evelyne; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Desseilles, Martin; D'Argembeau, Arnaud; Gais, Steffen; Rauchs, Géraldine; Schabus, Manuel; Degueldre, Christian; Luxen, André; Collette, Fabienne; Maquet, Pierre

    2007-10-23

    Emotional events are usually better remembered than neutral ones. This effect is mediated in part by a modulation of the hippocampus by the amygdala. Sleep plays a role in the consolidation of declarative memory. We examined the impact of sleep and lack of sleep on the consolidation of emotional (negative and positive) memories at the macroscopic systems level. Using functional MRI (fMRI), we compared the neural correlates of successful recollection by humans of emotional and neutral stimuli, 72 h after encoding, with or without total sleep deprivation during the first post-encoding night. In contrast to recollection of neutral and positive stimuli, which was deteriorated by sleep deprivation, similar recollection levels were achieved for negative stimuli in both groups. Successful recollection of emotional stimuli elicited larger responses in the hippocampus and various cortical areas, including the medial prefrontal cortex, in the sleep group than in the sleep deprived group. This effect was consistent across subjects for negative items but depended linearly on individual memory performance for positive items. In addition, the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex were functionally more connected during recollection of either negative or positive than neutral items, and more so in sleeping than in sleep-deprived subjects. In the sleep-deprived group, recollection of negative items elicited larger responses in the amygdala and an occipital area than in the sleep group. In contrast, no such difference in brain responses between groups was associated with recollection of positive stimuli. The results suggest that the emotional significance of memories influences their sleep-dependent systems-level consolidation. The recruitment of hippocampo-neocortical networks during recollection is enhanced after sleep and is hindered by sleep deprivation. After sleep deprivation, recollection of negative, potentially dangerous, memories recruits an alternate amygdalo

  14. Making Sense of Oxidative Stress in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Mediator or Distracter in Brain Injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eZhang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea is increasingly recognized as an important contributor to cognitive impairment, metabolic derangements and cardiovascular disease and mortality. Identifying the mechanisms by which this prevalent disorder influences health outcomes is now of utmost importance. As the prevalence of this disorder steadily increases, therapies are needed to prevent or reverse sleep apnea morbidities now more than ever before. Oxidative stress is implicated in cardiovascular morbidities of sleep apnea. What role oxidative stress plays in neural injury and cognitive impairments has been difficult to understand without readily accessible tissue to biopsy in persons with and without sleep apnea. An improved understanding of the role oxidative stress plays in neural injury in sleep apnea may be developed by integrating information gained examining neural tissue in animal models of sleep apnea with key features of redox biochemistry and clinical sleep apnea studies where extra-neuronal oxidative stress characterizations have been performed. Collectively, this information sets the stage for developing and testing novel therapeutic approaches to treat and prevent, not only central nervous system injury and dysfunction in sleep apnea, but also the cardiovascular and potentially metabolic conditions associated with this prevalent, disabling disorder.

  15. [Sleep and sexuality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, G; Vlatkovic, D

    2006-03-22

    Our knowledge about the multiple aspects of sleep functions are still insufficient. Concerning the relationship between sleep and sexuality there are four points of view to take into account. Two observations: a spontaneous sexual excitement during REM sleep and that some anxious dreams can produce also sexual arousal. Two hypotheses: the erotic pleasure could be easier to perceive in a sleeping or dreaming state than in a waking state and some sleeping troubles could have an important influence on the sexual life of a couple.

  16. The neurology of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Todd J

    2005-11-01

    Neurology, by virtue of its study of the brain, is the primary medical science for the elucidation of the anatomy, physiology, pathology and, ultimately, the function of sleep. There has been nothing short of a revolution in the science of sleep over the past 50 years. From the discovery of REM sleep to the identification of Hypocretin/Orexin the basic science and clinical field of sleep medicine has blossomed. This article will explore the anatomy, physiology, biochemistry and, to a limited extent, pathophysiology of the sleep/wake centers of the brain. The field of chronobiology will also be touched upon.

  17. The consolidation of implicit sequence memory in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eszter Csabi

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA Syndrome is a relatively frequent sleep disorder characterized by disrupted sleep patterns. It is a well-established fact that sleep has beneficial effect on memory consolidation by enhancing neural plasticity. Implicit sequence learning is a prominent component of skill learning. However, the formation and consolidation of this fundamental learning mechanism remains poorly understood in OSA. In the present study we examined the consolidation of different aspects of implicit sequence learning in patients with OSA. We used the Alternating Serial Reaction Time task to measure general skill learning and sequence-specific learning. There were two sessions: a learning phase and a testing phase, separated by a 10-hour offline period with sleep. Our data showed differences in offline changes of general skill learning between the OSA and control group. The control group demonstrated offline improvement from evening to morning, while the OSA group did not. In contrast, we did not observe differences between the groups in offline changes in sequence-specific learning. Our findings suggest that disrupted sleep in OSA differently affects neural circuits involved in the consolidation of sequence learning.

  18. Altered salience network connectivity predicts macronutrient intake after sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhuo; Spaeth, Andrea M; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Senhua; Hu, Siyuan; Goel, Namni; Detre, John A; Dinges, David F; Rao, Hengyi

    2015-02-03

    Although insufficient sleep is a well-recognized risk factor for overeating and weight gain, the neural mechanisms underlying increased caloric (particularly fat) intake after sleep deprivation remain unclear. Here we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and examined brain connectivity changes associated with macronutrient intake after one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Compared to the day following baseline sleep, healthy adults consumed a greater percentage of calories from fat and a lower percentage of calories from carbohydrates during the day following TSD. Subjects also exhibited increased brain connectivity in the salience network from the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) to bilateral putamen and bilateral anterior insula (aINS) after TSD. Moreover, dACC-putamen and dACC-aINS connectivity correlated with increased fat and decreased carbohydrate intake during the day following TSD, but not during the day following baseline sleep. These findings provide a potential neural mechanism by which sleep loss leads to increased fat intake.

  19. Human regional cerebral blood flow during rapid-eye-movement sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Holm, S; Vorstrup, S;

    1991-01-01

    Owing to the coupling between CBF and neuronal activity, regional CBF is a reflection of neural activity in different brain regions. In this study we measured regional CBF during polysomnographically well-defined rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep by the use of single photon emission computerized...... tomography and the new tracer 99mTc-dl-hexamethylpropyleneamine. Eleven healthy volunteers aged between 22 and 27 years were studied. CBF was measured on separate nights during REM sleep and during EEG-verified wakefulness. On awakening from REM sleep, all subjects reported visual dreams. During REM sleep...

  20. 网络环境下高职商务英语视听说教学模式的改革%Discussion on Business English Viewing,Listening and Speaking Teaching Modes of HVC in the Network Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢荣

    2011-01-01

    随着中国对外开放力度的不断加大,特别是在商贸活动日益全球化及中国加入WTO这一国际性商贸组织的大背景下,英语学习已从单纯的语言交流走向多元化,对既熟悉国际商务又熟练掌握英语的高级复合型人才的需求也越来越大。因此,随着现代科学技术的飞速发展,如何整合高职院校商务英语视听说教学与现代教育技术以提高相关教学质量是值得探讨的一个课题。本文以建构主义学习理论为依据,结合我院近几年的商务英语专业教学实践,提出了将传统面授教学和多媒体教学相结合的教学思路,同时也提出了构建中需要注意的相关问题。%With the increasing strength of China's opening up,especially the increasing globalization of business activities in China's accession to WTO,English learning emphasizes diversification rather than learning about language.The demand for those who have the knowledge of international business and a good command of English is also growing.With the rapid development of modern science and technology,how to integrate modern educational technology with HVC Business English Audio-visual teaching and improve the quality of the relative teaching has been a topic worth discussing.This paper tends to make a survey of the construction of dimensional learning system of Business English Audio-visual teaching in the writer's university.While pointing out the advantages and effect of this dimensional learning system,the writer also puts forward some suggestions.

  1. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgenthaler TI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bhanu P Kolla,1,2 R Robert Auger,1,2 Timothy I Morgenthaler11Mayo Center for Sleep Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Misalignment between endogenous circadian rhythms and the light/dark cycle can result in pathological disturbances in the form of erratic sleep timing (irregular sleep–wake rhythm, complete dissociation from the light/dark cycle (circadian rhythm sleep disorder, free-running type, delayed sleep timing (delayed sleep phase disorder, or advanced sleep timing (advanced sleep phase disorder. Whereas these four conditions are thought to involve predominantly intrinsic mechanisms, circadian dysrhythmias can also be induced by exogenous challenges, such as those imposed by extreme work schedules or rapid transmeridian travel, which overwhelm the ability of the master clock to entrain with commensurate rapidity, and in turn impair approximation to a desired sleep schedule, as evidenced by the shift work and jet lag sleep disorders. This review will focus on etiological underpinnings, clinical assessments, and evidence-based treatment options for circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Topics are subcategorized when applicable, and if sufficient data exist. The length of text associated with each disorder reflects the abundance of associated literature, complexity of management, overlap of methods for assessment and treatment, and the expected prevalence of each condition within general medical practice.Keywords: circadian rhythm sleep disorders, assessment, treatment

  2. Autism and sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti A Devnani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available “Autism Spectrum Disorders” (ASDs are neurodevelopment disorders and are characterized by persistent impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication. Sleep problems in ASD, are a prominent feature that have an impact on social interaction, day to day life, academic achievement, and have been correlated with increased maternal stress and parental sleep disruption. Polysomnography studies of ASD children showed most of their abnormalities related to rapid eye movement (REM sleep which included decreased quantity, increased undifferentiated sleep, immature organization of eye movements into discrete bursts, decreased time in bed, total sleep time, REM sleep latency, and increased proportion of stage 1 sleep. Implementation of nonpharmacotherapeutic measures such as bedtime routines and sleep-wise approach is the mainstay of behavioral management. Treatment strategies along with limited regulated pharmacotherapy can help improve the quality of life in ASD children and have a beneficial impact on the family. PubMed search was performed for English language articles from January 1995 to January 2015. Following key words: Autism spectrum disorder, sleep disorders and autism, REM sleep and autism, cognitive behavioral therapy, sleep-wise approach, melatonin and ASD were used. Only articles reporting primary data relevant to the above questions were included.

  3. Family Disorganization, Sleep Hygiene, and Adolescent Sleep Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billows, Michael; Gradisar, Michael; Dohnt, Hayley; Johnston, Anna; McCappin, Stephanie; Hudson, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The link between sleep hygiene and adolescent sleep is well documented, though evidence suggests contributions from other factors, particularly the family environment. The present study examined whether sleep hygiene mediated the relationship between family disorganization and self-reported sleep onset latency, total sleep time, and daytime…

  4. Sleep and Sleep Problems: From Birth to 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Mond, Courtney; Mindell, Jodi A.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep is an important aspect of a child's early development and is essential to family well-being. During their first 3 years, infants and toddlers spend more than 50% of their lives sleeping. However, concerns about sleep and sleep problems are among the most common issues brought to the attention of pediatricians. Although sleep is one of the…

  5. Sleep and Sleep Problems: From Birth to 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Mond, Courtney; Mindell, Jodi A.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep is an important aspect of a child's early development and is essential to family well-being. During their first 3 years, infants and toddlers spend more than 50% of their lives sleeping. However, concerns about sleep and sleep problems are among the most common issues brought to the attention of pediatricians. Although sleep is one of the…

  6. Study of Sleep Habits and Sleep Problems Among Medical Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, sleep efficiency, ... Sleep duration of less than. 6 hours was seen in ... Regular exercise was done by 36/150 (24%) students, of .... Jean‑Louis G, Von Gizycky H, Zizi F, Nunes J. Mood states and.

  7. Sleep and Salivary Cortisol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Anne Helene; Karlson, Bernt; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present chapter was to analyze whether measures of cortisol in saliva were associated with measures of sleep and to explore if divergent results were related to underlying differences in theoretic assumptions and methods. Measures of sleep quality included sleep duration, overall...... sleep quality, difficulty falling asleep, disturbed sleep, and sleep deprivation. Twenty-three papers were found to fulfill the inclusion criteria. Cortisol measures were grouped into single time points at different times during the day, deviations at different time periods during the day, reactivity...... and recovery after a standardized laboratory test, area under the curve and response to dexamethasone test. A large proportion of the studies included showed non-significant findings, which, in several cases, may be a result of low power. The most consistent results were a positive association between sleep...

  8. Functional connectivity during light sleep is correlated with memory performance for face-location associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Eelco V; Takashima, Atsuko; Barth, Markus; Fernández, Guillén

    2011-07-01

    The consolidation of declarative memories benefits from sleep. The neural mechanisms involved in sleep-dependent consolidation, however, are largely unknown. Here, we used a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging, polysomnography and a face-location associative memory task to target neural connectivity of a face sensitive area during an afternoon nap. Fusiform connectivity was substantially greater during sleep stage 1 than in wake in a network extending from early visual areas bilaterally to the fusiform gyrus, ventrally and into the posterior parietal cortices, dorsally. In sleep stage 2, fusiform connectivity was found to be larger in the precuneus, bilateral middle temporal gyrus and medial prefrontal cortex. Specific functional connectivity increases observed during light sleep were positively correlated with memory performance for face-location associations. A distinction could be made between fusiform-medial prefrontal connectivity during sleep stage 1 and 2 that was positively correlated with retention of associations learned prior to sleep and fusiform-hippocampal connectivity during sleep stage 1 that was correlated with better acquisition of new associations learned after sleep. Our results suggest that fusiform-medial prefrontal connectivity during sleep has a stabilizing effect on recently learned associative memories, possibly due to the existence of a task-related schema that allows rapid consolidation of related information. Our data further indicate that sleep-dependent connectivity between the fusiform gyrus and hippocampus correlated with new learning after sleep. Thus, our study provides correlational evidence for the behavioral relevance of specific medial prefrontal and hippocampal interactions with the fusiform gyrus during light sleep.

  9. Genetic Dissociation of Daily Sleep and Sleep Following Thermogenetic Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowy, Christine; Moravcevic, Katarina; Yue, Zhifeng; Wan, Joy Y; Van Dongen, Hans P A; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-05-01

    Sleep rebound-the increase in sleep that follows sleep deprivation-is a hallmark of homeostatic sleep regulation that is conserved across the animal kingdom. However, both the mechanisms that underlie sleep rebound and its relationship to habitual daily sleep remain unclear. To address this, we developed an efficient thermogenetic method of inducing sleep deprivation in Drosophila that produces a substantial rebound, and applied the newly developed method to assess sleep rebound in a screen of 1,741 mutated lines. We used data generated by this screen to identify lines with reduced sleep rebound following thermogenetic sleep deprivation, and to probe the relationship between habitual sleep amount and sleep following thermogenetic sleep deprivation in Drosophila. To develop a thermogenetic method of sleep deprivation suitable for screening, we thermogenetically stimulated different populations of wake-promoting neurons labeled by Gal4 drivers. Sleep rebound following thermogenetically-induced wakefulness varies across the different sets of wake-promoting neurons that were stimulated, from very little to quite substantial. Thermogenetic activation of neurons marked by the c584-Gal4 driver produces both strong sleep loss and a substantial rebound that is more consistent within genotypes than rebound following mechanical or caffeine-induced sleep deprivation. We therefore used this driver to induce sleep deprivation in a screen of 1,741 mutagenized lines generated by the Drosophila Gene Disruption Project. Flies were subjected to 9 h of sleep deprivation during the dark period and released from sleep deprivation 3 h before lights-on. Recovery was measured over the 15 h following sleep deprivation. Following identification of lines with reduced sleep rebound, we characterized baseline sleep and sleep depth before and after sleep deprivation for these hits. We identified two lines that consistently exhibit a blunted increase in the duration and depth of sleep after

  10. Sleep from an islamic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed S BaHammam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep medicine is a relatively new scientific specialty. Sleep is an important topic in Islamic literature, and the Quran and Hadith discuss types of sleep, the importance of sleep, and good sleep practices. Islam considers sleep as one of the signs of the greatness of Allβh (God and encourages followers to explore this important sign. The Quran describes different types of sleep, and these correspond with sleep stages identified by modern science. The Quran discusses the beneficial effects of sleep and emphasizes the importance of maintaining a pattern of light and darkness. A mid-day nap is an important practice for Muslims, and the Prophet Muhammad peace be upon him (pbuh promoted naps as beneficial. In accordance with the practice and instructions of Muhammad (pbuh, Muslims have certain sleep habits and these sleep habits correspond to some of the sleep hygiene rules identified by modern science. Details during sleep include sleep position, like encouraging sleep on the right side and discouraging sleep in the prone position. Dream interpretation is an established science in the Islamic literature and Islamic scholars have made significant contributions to theories of dream interpretation. We suggest that sleep scientists examine religious literature in general and Islamic literature in particular, to understand the views, behaviors, and practices of ancient people about the sleep and sleep disorders. Such studies may help to answer some unresolved questions in sleep science or lead to new areas of inquiry.

  11. Sleep from an Islamic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahammam, Ahmed S

    2011-10-01

    Sleep medicine is a relatively new scientific specialty. Sleep is an important topic in Islamic literature, and the Quran and Hadith discuss types of sleep, the importance of sleep, and good sleep practices. Islam considers sleep as one of the signs of the greatness of Allνh (God) and encourages followers to explore this important sign. The Quran describes different types of sleep, and these correspond with sleep stages identified by modern science. The Quran discusses the beneficial effects of sleep and emphasizes the importance of maintaining a pattern of light and darkness. A mid-day nap is an important practice for Muslims, and the Prophet Muhammad peace be upon him (pbuh) promoted naps as beneficial. In accordance with the practice and instructions of Muhammad (pbuh), Muslims have certain sleep habits and these sleep habits correspond to some of the sleep hygiene rules identified by modern science. Details during sleep include sleep position, like encouraging sleep on the right side and discouraging sleep in the prone position. Dream interpretation is an established science in the Islamic literature and Islamic scholars have made significant contributions to theories of dream interpretation. We suggest that sleep scientists examine religious literature in general and Islamic literature in particular, to understand the views, behaviors, and practices of ancient people about the sleep and sleep disorders. Such studies may help to answer some unresolved questions in sleep science or lead to new areas of inquiry.

  12. Chronic sleep reduction in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewald-Kaufmann, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the results of this thesis, it can be concluded that sleep problems and chronic sleep reduction have a high impact on adolescents’ daytime functioning. Additionally, this research shows that gradual sleep extension can improve adolescents’ sleep and especially their chronic sleep reduction.

  13. Sleep, Plasticity and the Pathophysiology of Neurodevelopmental Disorders: The Potential Roles of Protein Synthesis and Other Cellular Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dante Picchioni

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is important for neural plasticity, and plasticity underlies sleep-dependent memory consolidation. It is widely appreciated that protein synthesis plays an essential role in neural plasticity. Studies of sleep-dependent memory and sleep-dependent plasticity have begun to examine alterations in these functions in populations with neurological and psychiatric disorders. Such an approach acknowledges that disordered sleep may have functional consequences during wakefulness. Although neurodevelopmental disorders are not considered to be sleep disorders per se, recent data has revealed that sleep abnormalities are among the most prevalent and common symptoms and may contribute to the progression of these disorders. The main goal of this review is to highlight the role of disordered sleep in the pathology of neurodevelopmental disorders and to examine some potential mechanisms by which sleep-dependent plasticity may be altered. We will also briefly attempt to extend the same logic to the other end of the developmental spectrum and describe a potential role of disordered sleep in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. We conclude by discussing ongoing studies that might provide a more integrative approach to the study of sleep, plasticity, and neurodevelopmental disorders.

  14. REM Sleep and Endothermy: Potential Sites and Mechanism of a Reciprocal Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Cerri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous data show a reciprocal interaction between REM sleep and thermoregulation. During REM sleep, the function of thermoregulation appears to be impaired; from the other hand, the tonic activation of thermogenesis, such as during cold exposure, suppresses REM sleep occurrence. Recently, both the central neural network controlling REM sleep and the central neural network controlling thermoregulation have been progressively unraveled. Thermoregulation was shown to be controlled by a central “core” circuit, responsible for the maintenance of body temperature, modulated by a set of accessory areas. REM sleep was suggested to be controlled by a group of hypothalamic neurons overlooking at the REM sleep generating circuits within the brainstem. The two networks overlap in a few areas, and in this review, we will suggest that in such overlap may reside the explanation of the reciprocal interaction between REM sleep and thermoregulation. Considering the peculiar modulation of thermoregulation by REM sleep the result of their coincidental evolution, REM sleep may therefore be seen as a period of transient heterothermy.

  15. Enhanced emotional reactivity after selective REM sleep deprivation in humans: an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra eRosales-Lagarde

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Converging evidence from animal and human studies suggest that REM sleep modulates emotional processing. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of selective REM sleep deprivation on emotional responses to threatening visual stimuli and their brain correlates using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Twenty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: selective REM sleep deprivation (REM-D, by awakening them at each REM sleep onset, or NREM sleep interruptions (NREM-I as control for potential non-specific effects of awakenings and lack of sleep. In a within-subject design, a visual emotional-reactivity task was performed in the scanner before and 24 hours after sleep manipulation. Behaviorally, emotional reactivity was enhanced relative to baseline in the REM deprived group only. In terms of fMRI signal, there was an overall decrease in activity in the NREM-I group the second time subjects performed the task, particularly in regions involved in emotional processing, such as occipital and temporal areas, as well as in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, involved in top-down emotion regulation. In contrast, activity in these areas remained the same level or even increased in the REM-D group, compared to their baseline level.Taken together, these results suggest that lack of REM sleep in humans is associated with enhanced emotional reactivity, both at behavioral and neural levels, and thus highlight the specific role of REM sleep in regulating the neural substrates for emotional responsiveness.

  16. Consolidation of vocabulary during sleep: The rich get richer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Emma; Gaskell, M Gareth; Weighall, Anna; Henderson, Lisa

    2017-06-01

    Sleep plays a role in strengthening new words and integrating them with existing vocabulary knowledge, consistent with neural models of learning in which sleep supports hippocampal transfer to neocortical memory. Such models are based on adult research, yet neural maturation may mean that the mechanisms supporting word learning vary across development. Here, we propose a model in which children may capitalise on larger amounts of slow-wave sleep to support a greater demand on learning and neural reorganisation, whereas adults may benefit from a richer knowledge base to support consolidation. Such an argument is reinforced by the well-reported "Matthew effect", whereby rich vocabulary knowledge is associated with better acquisition of new vocabulary. We present a meta-analysis that supports this association between children's existing vocabulary knowledge and their integration of new words overnight. Whilst multiple mechanisms likely contribute to vocabulary consolidation and neural reorganisation across the lifespan, we propose that contributions of existing knowledge should be rigorously examined in developmental studies. Such research has potential to greatly enhance neural models of learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Immune stimulation reduces sleep and memory ability in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Eamonn B; Alghamdi, Akram; Holdbrook, Robert T K; Rosato, Ezio

    2014-01-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology studies the increasing number of connections between neurobiology, immunology and behaviour. We demonstrate the effects of the immune response on two fundamental behaviours: sleep and memory ability in Drosophila melanogaster. We used the Geneswitch system to upregulate peptidoglycan receptor protein (PGRP) expression, thereby stimulating the immune system in the absence of infection. Geneswitch was activated by feeding the steroid RU486, to the flies. We used an aversive classical conditioning paradigm to quantify memory and measures of activity to infer sleep. Immune stimulated flies exhibited reduced levels of sleep, which could not be explained by a generalised increase in waking activity. Immune stimulated flies also showed a reduction in memory abilities. These results lend support to Drosophila as a model for immune-neural interactions and provide a possible role for sleep in the interplay between the immune response and memory.

  18. Immune stimulation reduces sleep and memory ability in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamonn B. Mallon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Psychoneuroimmunology studies the increasing number of connections between neurobiology, immunology and behaviour. We demonstrate the effects of the immune response on two fundamental behaviours: sleep and memory ability in Drosophila melanogaster. We used the Geneswitch system to upregulate peptidoglycan receptor protein (PGRP expression, thereby stimulating the immune system in the absence of infection. Geneswitch was activated by feeding the steroid RU486, to the flies. We used an aversive classical conditioning paradigm to quantify memory and measures of activity to infer sleep. Immune stimulated flies exhibited reduced levels of sleep, which could not be explained by a generalised increase in waking activity. Immune stimulated flies also showed a reduction in memory abilities. These results lend support to Drosophila as a model for immune–neural interactions and provide a possible role for sleep in the interplay between the immune response and memory.

  19. Altered sleep in Borderline Personality Disorder in relation to the core dimensions of psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simor, Péter; Horváth, Klára

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to review the literature regarding sleep disturbances in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and to relate the reported sleep alterations to the underlying core dimensions of BPD pathology. We present a qualitative and theoretical review regarding the empirical studies that investigated objective and subjective sleep quality in BPD and in different psychiatric conditions showing high co-morbidity with this disorder. We show that disturbed sleep including sleep fragmentation, alterations in Slow Wave Sleep and REM sleep, and dysphoric dreaming are prevalent symptoms in BPD. We provide a framework relating the specific sleep alterations to the core dimensions of BPD pathology in order to clarify the inconsistencies of the different findings. The specific sleep disturbances in BPD seem to be related to different dimensions of psychopathological functioning and may have detrimental consequences on waking affect and cognition. Investigating disturbed sleep in BPD in relation to waking symptoms and underlying neural functioning would shed more light on the nature of this complex disorder. Moreover, a stronger emphasis on sleep disturbances would enrich the treatment protocols of BPD.

  20. The effects of sleep extension on sleep and cognitive performance in adolescents with chronic sleep reduction: an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewald-Kaufmann, J.F.; Oort, F.J.; Meijer, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of gradual sleep extension in adolescents with chronic sleep reduction. Outcome variables were objectively measured sleep and cognitive performance. Methods: Participants were randomly assigned to either a sleep extension group (gradual sleep extension by advanc

  1. A "Sleep 101" Program for College Students Improves Sleep Hygiene Knowledge and Reduces Maladaptive Beliefs about Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloss, Jacqueline D; Nash, Christina O; Walsh, Colleen M; Culnan, Elizabeth; Horsey, Sarah; Sexton-Radek, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Sensitizing young adults about sleep hygiene knowledge and helpful sleep attitudes may have the potential to instill long-lasting healthy sleep practices. Towards these ends, evaluation of psychoeducational program "Sleep 101" tailored to college students was undertaken. Following two weeks of sleep-log recordings, participants were randomly assigned to a Sleep 101 (experimental) condition or a sleep monitoring (control) condition. The Sleep 101 condition was comprised of two 90-minute workshops aimed to educate students about healthy sleep practices, helpful thoughts about sleep, and ways to improve sleep. The sleep monitoring group received a sleep hygiene handout and completed sleep logs for the study duration. Sleep 101 participants endorsed fewer maladaptive beliefs and attitudes about sleep, increased sleep hygiene knowledge, and reduced sleep onset latency compared to the sleep monitoring participants. Brief psychoeducational courses may be a cost-effective way to alleviate current, and/or prevent future, sleep problems in young adults.

  2. The effects of sleep extension on sleep and cognitive performance in adolescents with chronic sleep reduction: an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewald-Kaufmann, J.F.; Oort, F.J.; Meijer, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of gradual sleep extension in adolescents with chronic sleep reduction. Outcome variables were objectively measured sleep and cognitive performance. Methods: Participants were randomly assigned to either a sleep extension group (gradual sleep extension by

  3. Headache, drugs and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Alexander D; Leschziner, Guy D; Peatfield, Richard C

    2014-09-01

    Headache and sleep mechanisms share multiple levels of physiological interaction. Pharmacological treatment of headache syndromes may be associated with a broad range of sleep disturbances, either as a direct result of the pharmacology of the drug used, or by unmasking physiological alterations in sleep propensity seen as part of the headache symptom complex. This review summarises known sleep and circadian effects of various drugs commonly used in the management of headache disorders, with particular attention paid to abnormal sleep function emerging as a result of treatment. Literature searches were performed using MEDLINE, PubMed, and the Cochrane database using search terms and strings relating to generic drug names of commonly used compounds in the treatment of headache and their effect on sleep in humans with review of additional pre-clinical evidence where theoretically appropriate. Medications used to treat headache disorders may have a considerable impact on sleep physiology. However, greater attention is needed to characterise the direction of the changes of these effects on sleep, particularly to avoid exacerbating detrimental sleep complaints, but also to potentially capitalise on homeostatically useful properties of sleep which may reduce the individual burden of headache disorders on patients. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Sleeping on the wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattenborg, Niels C

    2017-02-06

    Wakefulness enables animals to interface adaptively with the environment. Paradoxically, in insects to humans, the efficacy of wakefulness depends on daily sleep, a mysterious, usually quiescent state of reduced environmental awareness. However, several birds fly non-stop for days, weeks or months without landing, questioning whether and how they sleep. It is commonly assumed that such birds sleep with one cerebral hemisphere at a time (i.e. unihemispherically) and with only the corresponding eye closed, as observed in swimming dolphins. However, the discovery that birds on land can perform adaptively despite sleeping very little raised the possibility that birds forgo sleep during long flights. In the first study to measure the brain state of birds during long flights, great frigatebirds (Fregata minor) slept, but only during soaring and gliding flight. Although sleep was more unihemispheric in flight than on land, sleep also occurred with both brain hemispheres, indicating that having at least one hemisphere awake is not required to maintain the aerodynamic control of flight. Nonetheless, soaring frigatebirds appeared to use unihemispheric sleep to watch where they were going while circling in rising air currents. Despite being able to engage in all types of sleep in flight, the birds only slept for 0.7 h d(-1) during flights lasting up to 10 days. By contrast, once back on land they slept 12.8 h d(-1). This suggests that the ecological demands for attention usually exceeded that afforded by sleeping unihemispherically. The ability to interface adaptively with the environment despite sleeping very little challenges commonly held views regarding sleep, and therefore serves as a powerful system for examining the functions of sleep and the consequences of its loss.

  5. Association Between Sleep Hygiene and Sleep Quality in Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Brick, Cameron A.; Seely, Darbi L.; Palermo, Tonya M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether subjective sleep quality was reduced in medical students, and whether demographics and sleep hygiene behaviors were associated with sleep quality. A Web-based survey was completed by 314 medical students, containing questions about demographics, sleep habits, exercise habits, caffeine, tobacco and alcohol use, and subjective sleep quality (using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index). Correlation and regression analyses tested for associations among...

  6. Sleep Hygiene and Sleep Quality in Italian and American Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated cross-cultural differences in adolescent sleep hygiene and sleep quality. Participants were 1348 students (655 males; 693 females) aged 12–17 years from public school systems in Rome, Italy (n = 776) and Southern Mississippi (n = 572). Participants completed the Adolescent Sleep-Wake Scale and the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale. Reported sleep hygiene and sleep quality were significantly better for Italian than American adolescents. A moderate linear relationship was o...

  7. SLEEP TIMING AND CIRCADIAN PHASE IN DELAYED SLEEP PHASE

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder in which the timing of the sleep episode occurs later than desired and is associated with difficulty falling asleep, problems awakening on time (e.g., to meet work or school obligations), and daytime sleepiness. The phase relationship between the timing of sleep and endogenous circadian rhythms is critical to the initiation and maintenance of sleep, and significant alteration leads to impairment of sleep quality and dura...

  8. The effects of sleep and sleep deprivation on task-switching performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couyoumdjian, Alessandro; Sdoia, Stefano; Tempesta, Daniela; Curcio, Giuseppe; Rastellini, Elisabetta; DE Gennaro, Luigi; Ferrara, Michele

    2010-03-01

    Neural systems of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) involved in executive functions are particularly vulnerable to sleep deprivation (SD). In this study, we investigated whether SD selectively affects specific components of the executive control processes involved in task-switching performance. Two different tasks are performed in rapid and random succession in this procedure, so that the to-be-executed task may change from one trial to the next (switch trial), or may be repeated (repetition trial). Task-switches are usually slower than task repetitions, giving way to the 'switch cost'. One hundred and eight university students were assigned randomly to the sleep (S) or the SD group. Each of them was tested on a task-switching paradigm before and after an experimental night (S or SD), and after one recovery night. SD impaired both task-switching accuracy and speed. A higher proportion of errors and increased switch costs after SD have been observed, compared to normal sleep. Control analyses on switch and repetition trials showed that the SD group was significantly worse only on the switch trials. The effects of SD are reverted by one night of recovery sleep. It is concluded that the ability to adjust behaviour rapidly and flexibly to changing environmental demands, which relies on the functional integrity of the PFC, is impacted negatively by sleep loss.

  9. Pathology of sleep, hormones and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steiger, A.; Dresler, M.; Kluge, M.; Schussler, P.

    2013-01-01

    In patients with depression, characteristic changes of sleep electroencephalogram and nocturnal hormone secretion occur including rapid eye movement (REM) sleep disinhibition, reduced non-REM sleep and impaired sleep continuity. Neuropeptides are common regulators of the sleep electroencephalogram (

  10. Sleep Health: Reciprocal Regulation of Sleep and Innate Immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Irwin, Michael R; Opp, Mark R

    2017-01-01

    ...://www.neuropsychopharmacologyreviews.org Web End =www.neuropsychopharmacologyreviews.org 129 Sleep Health: Reciprocal Regulation of Sleep and Innate Immunity [notdef][notdef][notdef][notdef][notdef...

  11. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    and is seen in both central sleep apnea (CSA) and obstructive sleep apnea .... weight.[1]. Perioperative and postoperative. Patients with OSAHS may have an increased perioperative risks. ... deprivation, and adjustment of sleeping positions.

  12. Cutaneous warming promotes sleep onset

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy J. E. M. Raymann; Dick F. Swaab; Eus J. W. Van Someren

    2005-01-01

    Sleep occurs in close relation to changes in body temperature. Both the monophasic sleep period in humans and the polyphasic sleep periods in rodents tend to be initiated when core body temperature is declining...

  13. Common Sleep Problems (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sleep when a person has the most vivid dreams. Why Do Teens Have Trouble Sleeping? Research shows ... will look at your overall health and sleep habits. In addition to doing a physical examination, the ...

  14. American Academy of Sleep Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the field of sleep medicine. Join the American Academy of Sleep Medicine to further your career and ... MD Sept. 21 - As president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, I am keenly aware of ...

  15. Sleep Changes in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the chemicals and hormones that help us sleep well (growth hormone and melatonin).Some lifestyle habits (such as smoking and drinking alcohol or caffeinated drinks) can cause sleep problems.Sleep problems may be caused by illness, ...

  16. Sites of action of sleep and wake drugs: insights from model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihel, Jason; Schier, Alexander F

    2013-10-01

    Small molecules have been used since antiquity to regulate our sleep. Despite the explosion of diverse drugs to treat problems of too much or too little sleep, the detailed mechanisms of action and especially the neuronal targets by which these compounds alter human behavioural states are not well understood. Research efforts in model systems such as mouse, zebrafish and fruit fly are combining conditional genetics and optogenetics with pharmacology to map the effects of sleep-promoting drugs onto neural circuits. Recent studies raise the possibility that many small molecules alter sleep and wake via specific sets of critical neurons rather than through the global modulation of multiple brain targets. These findings also uncover novel brain areas as sleep/wake regulators and indicate that the development of circuit-selective drugs might alleviate sleep disorders with fewer side effects. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Sleep recalibrates homeostatic and associative synaptic plasticity in the human cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Marion; Wolf, Elias; Maier, Jonathan G.; Mainberger, Florian; Feige, Bernd; Schmid, Hanna; Bürklin, Jan; Maywald, Sarah; Mall, Volker; Jung, Nikolai H.; Reis, Janine; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Klöppel, Stefan; Sterr, Annette; Eckert, Anne; Riemann, Dieter; Normann, Claus; Nissen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is ubiquitous in animals and humans, but its function remains to be further determined. The synaptic homeostasis hypothesis of sleep–wake regulation proposes a homeostatic increase in net synaptic strength and cortical excitability along with decreased inducibility of associative synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) due to saturation after sleep deprivation. Here we use electrophysiological, behavioural and molecular indices to non-invasively study net synaptic strength and LTP-like plasticity in humans after sleep and sleep deprivation. We demonstrate indices of increased net synaptic strength (TMS intensity to elicit a predefined amplitude of motor-evoked potential and EEG theta activity) and decreased LTP-like plasticity (paired associative stimulation induced change in motor-evoked potential and memory formation) after sleep deprivation. Changes in plasma BDNF are identified as a potential mechanism. Our study indicates that sleep recalibrates homeostatic and associative synaptic plasticity, believed to be the neural basis for adaptive behaviour, in humans. PMID:27551934

  18. Sleep in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, M C J; Jennum, P J; Lund, N T

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache disorder characterized by severe attacks of unilateral pain following a chronobiological pattern. There is a close connection with sleep as most attacks occur during sleep. Hypothalamic involvement and a particular association...... with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep have been suggested. Sleep in a large, well-characterized population of CH patients was investigated. METHODS: Polysomnography (PSG) was performed on two nights in 40 CH patients during active bout and one night in 25 age, sex and body mass index matched controls...... in hospital. Macrostructure and other features of sleep were analyzed and related to phenotype. Clinical headache characterization was obtained by semi-structured interview. RESULTS: Ninety-nine nights of PSG were analyzed. Findings included a reduced percentage of REM sleep (17.3% vs. 23.0%, P = 0...

  19. Iii. Sleep assessment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Avi

    2015-03-01

    Sleep is a complex phenomenon that could be understood and assessed at many levels. Sleep could be described at the behavioral level (relative lack of movements and awareness and responsiveness) and at the brain level (based on EEG activity). Sleep could be characterized by its duration, by its distribution during the 24-hr day period, and by its quality (e.g., consolidated versus fragmented). Different methods have been developed to assess various aspects of sleep. This chapter covers the most established and common methods used to assess sleep in infants and children. These methods include polysomnography, videosomnography, actigraphy, direct observations, sleep diaries, and questionnaires. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are highlighted.

  20. Heart rate variability, sleep and sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Phyllis K; Pu, Yachuan

    2012-02-01

    Heart rate (HR) is modulated by the combined effects of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. Therefore, measurement of changes in HR over time (heart rate variability or HRV) provides information about autonomic functioning. HRV has been used to identify high risk people, understand the autonomic components of different disorders and to evaluate the effect of different interventions, etc. Since the signal required to measure HRV is already being collected on the electrocardiogram (ECG) channel of the polysomnogram (PSG), collecting data for research on HRV and sleep is straightforward, but applications have been limited. As reviewed here, HRV has been applied to understand autonomic changes during different sleep stages. It has also been applied to understand the effect of sleep-disordered breathing, periodic limb movements and insomnia both during sleep and during the daytime. HRV has been successfully used to screen people for possible referral to a Sleep Lab. It has also been used to monitor the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). A novel HRV measure, cardiopulmonary coupling (CPC) has been proposed for sleep quality. Evidence also suggests that HRV collected during a PSG can be used in risk stratification models, at least for older adults. Caveats for accurate interpretation of HRV are also presented.

  1. Dynamic detection of wake-sleep transition with reaction time-magnitude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuang Gao; Bin Chen; Wei Wei

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: According to observable behaviors, sleep and wakefulness are two fundamentally different behavioral states. Although electroencephalogram (EEG) is traditionally used to define sleep stage, it is difficult to detect or to quantify microarousals or disruptions during sleep. In addition,initial sleep cannot be defined. It is thought that the wake-sleep transition cannot be defined by EEG patterns.OBJECTIVE: To observe the behavioral response magnitude during wake-sleep transition by EEG monitoring and to define the wake-sleep transition.DESIGN, TIME AND SE'n'ING: A behavioral and neural network study was performed at the Key Lab of Human Being Development and Mental Health of Central China Normal University, and Lab of Brain and Cognitive Science of South Central University for Nationalities, China in July 2007.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 30 healthy volunteers, of equal gender and aged (19.7+1.1) years, were recruited from the Central China Normal University, China for this study. None of the subjects had undergone EEG recording prior to this study or received any medication for sleep disturbances.METHODS: A novel adaptive approach was applied to detect wake-sleep transition, which avoided stimulus-induced waking. To test the difference between wake state and wake-sleep transition, the amount of self-information and mutual-information were effective parameters to analyze wake-sleep transition.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The following parameters were measured: morphological changes in reaction time-magnitude, as well as correlation between phase changes and sleep, and wake and wake-sleep transition.RESULTS: There were three typical phases in morphological changes of reaction time-magnitude.With regard to the behavioral definition and criterion for sleep, the phase morphological characteristics displayed good correlation with behavioral states, such as sleep, wakefulness, and sleep onset. Entropy as an indicator of brain cognitive processes was introduced to test

  2. Sleep Deprivation and Neurobehavioral Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Basner, Mathias; Rao, Hengyi; Goel, Namni; David F. Dinges

    2013-01-01

    Lifestyles involving sleep deprivation are common, despite mounting evidence that both acute total sleep deprivation and chronically restricted sleep degrade neurobehavioral functions associated with arousal, attention, memory and state stability. Current research suggests dynamic differences in the way the central nervous system responds to acute versus chronic sleep restriction, which is reflected in new models of sleep-wake regulation. Chronic sleep restriction likely induces long-term neu...

  3. Perspective on Sleep and Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Monjan, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    There is a strong body of data directly interrelating sleep problems with mood disorders. There is a growing data base directly associating sleep disorders with attention and memory problems. Motor disorders, especially involving the dopaminergic system, may produce sleep problems, including a possible association between disordered sleep and nocturnal falls. Sleep disorders may be causal conditions for metabolic diseases and increased risk for morbidity and mortality. Sleep and health ar...

  4. Perspective on Sleep and Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Monjan, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    There is a strong body of data directly interrelating sleep problems with mood disorders. There is a growing data base directly associating sleep disorders with attention and memory problems. Motor disorders, especially involving the dopaminergic system, may produce sleep problems, including a possible association between disordered sleep and nocturnal falls. Sleep disorders may be causal conditions for metabolic diseases and increased risk for morbidity and mortality. Sleep and health are di...

  5. Isolated sleep paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sawant, Neena S.; Parkar, Shubhangi R.; Tambe, Ravindra

    2005-01-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a cardinal symptom of narcolepsy. However, little is available in the literature about isolated sleep paralysis. This report discusses the case of a patient with isolated sleep paralysis who progressed from mild to severe SP over 8 years. He also restarted drinking alcohol to be able to fall asleep and allay his anxiety symptoms. The patient was taught relaxation techniques and he showed complete remission of the symptoms of SP on follow up after 8 months.

  6. Stress, Sleep, and Allergy

    OpenAIRE

    Jernelöv, Susanna

    2010-01-01

    Allergic diseases have recently increased dramatically in the western world, now affecting about 30% of the Swedish population. The reasons for this increase are unclear, but some of the suspects are behavioral factors, such as stress and sleep. Problems with stress are also common today, and stress may change the set-points for the functioning of the body, for instance in the immune system. Sleep, on the other hand, is important for recuperation, and disturbed sleep acts a ...

  7. Isolated sleep paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sawant, Neena S.; Shubhangi R Parkar; Tambe, Ravindra

    2005-01-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a cardinal symptom of narcolepsy. However, little is available in the literature about isolated sleep paralysis. This report discusses the case of a patient with isolated sleep paralysis who progressed from mild to severe SP over 8 years. He also restarted drinking alcohol to be able to fall asleep and allay his anxiety symptoms. The patient was taught relaxation techniques and he showed complete remission of the symptoms of SP on follow up after 8 months.

  8. [Controlling sleep/wakefulness using optogenetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Akihiro

    2015-08-01

    Optogenetics is a recently developed experimental technique to control the activity of neurons using light. Optogenetics shows its power to reveal the physiological role of specific neural circuits in the brain. In particular, manipulation of a specific type of neurons using optogenetics with high accuracy timing enables us to analyze causality between neural activity and initiation of animal behaviors. However, to manipulate the activity of specific neurons in vivo, there are two critical steps to succeed in manipulation of the neural activity and control of the behavior of individual animals. The first step is an adequate number of molecules of light-activated protein that has to be expressed in the cell membrane of the neurons of interest. The second step is the optical system to illuminate the targeted neurons with enough intensity of light to activate the light-activated protein. We applied optogenetics to hypothalamic peptidergic neurons such as orexin/hypocretin neurons or melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons. These neurons are implicated in sleep/wakefulness regulation. In this mini review, I will show the regulatory mechanism of sleep/wakefulness by these neurons using optogenetics.

  9. Cystic fibrosis and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Eliot S

    2014-09-01

    Sleep disturbances are frequently observed in cystic fibrosis (CF). The resultant sleep fragmentation, short sleep duration, and gas-exchange abnormalities are postulated to contribute to the neurocognitive, cardiovascular, and metabolic abnormalities associated with CF. There are no outcomes data to establish the optimal procedure for screening and treating CF patients for sleep-related respiratory abnormalities. Therapy with supplemental oxygen and bilevel ventilation are widely considered to be effective in the short term, but there are few evidence-based data to support long-term improvements in morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nonepileptic paroxysmal sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenette, Eric; Guilleminault, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Events occurring during nighttime sleep in children can be easily mislabeled, as witnesses are usually not immediately available. Even when observers are present, description of the events can be sketchy, as these individuals are frequently aroused from their own sleep. Errors of perception are thus common and can lead to diagnosis of epilepsy where other sleep-related conditions are present, sometimes initiating unnecessary therapeutic interventions, especially with antiepileptic drugs. Often not acknowledged, paroxysmal nonepileptic behavioral and motor episodes in sleep are encountered much more frequently than their epileptic counterpart. The International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD) 2nd edition displays an extensive list of such conditions that can be readily mistaken for epilepsy. The most prevalent ones are reviewed, such as nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep parasomnias, comprised of sleepwalking, confusional arousals and sleep terrors, periodic leg movements of sleep, repetitive movement disorders, benign neonatal myoclonus, and sleep starts. Apnea of prematurity is also briefly reviewed. Specific issues regarding management of these selected disorders, both for diagnostic consideration and for therapeutic intervention, are addressed.

  11. The Association of Testosterone Levels with Overall Sleep Quality, Sleep Architecture, and Sleep-Disordered Breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Dam, Thuy-Tien; Stone, Katie; Harrison, Stephanie Litwack; Redline, Susan; Orwoll, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Context: Little is known about the association of low endogenous testosterone levels and abnormal sleep patterns in older men, although pharmacological doses of testosterone are associated with increased severity of sleep apnea and other sleep disturbances.

  12. Association between sleep hygiene and sleep quality in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brick, Cameron A; Seely, Darbi L; Palermo, Tonya M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether subjective sleep quality was reduced in medical students, and whether demographics and sleep hygiene behaviors were associated with sleep quality. A Web-based survey was completed by 314 medical students, containing questions about demographics, sleep habits, exercise habits, caffeine, tobacco and alcohol use, and subjective sleep quality (using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index). Correlation and regression analyses tested for associations among demographics, sleep hygiene behaviors, and sleep quality. As hypothesized, medical students' sleep quality was significantly worse than a healthy adult normative sample (t = 5.13, p sleep quality in medical students was predicted by several demographic and sleep hygiene variables, and future research directions are proposed.

  13. To sleep or not to sleep: The ecology of sleep in artificial organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Nunn Charles L; McNamara Patrick; Acerbi Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background All animals thus far studied sleep, but little is known about the ecological factors that generate differences in sleep characteristics across species, such as total sleep duration or division of sleep into multiple bouts across the 24-hour period (i.e., monophasic or polyphasic sleep activity). Here we address these questions using an evolutionary agent-based model. The model is spatially explicit, with food and sleep sites distributed in two clusters on the landscape. Ag...

  14. Neuroticism relates to daytime wakefulness and sleep devaluation via high neurophysiological efficiency in the bilateral prefrontal cortex: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiike, Takuya; Kuriyama, Kenichi; Honma, Motoyasu; Ikeda, Hiroki; Kim, Yoshiharu

    2014-04-01

    Higher wake promotion against sleep drive boosts cognitive processing, but it also seems to increase the risk of insomnia by reinforcing an obsession with sleep in neurotic patients. To explore whether a personality trait of neuroticism simultaneously facilitates wake-promoting ability and sleep devaluation via a common regional prefrontal function under a sleep-restricted condition, working memory tasks were administered to 49 healthy humans after a 2-h sleep restriction. Higher wake-promoting ability demonstrated in a high-load task was correlated with lower bilateral prefrontal activation, as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy. Structural equation modeling revealed that neuroticism predicts sleep devaluation and wake-promoting ability via left and right regional prefrontal efficiency, respectively. Our results indicate that neuroticism-related neural efficiency increases resilience to sleepiness, but decreases sleep satisfaction.

  15. Nonlinear signal processing of electroencephalograms for automated sleep monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D.; Rowlands, D. D.; James, Daniel A.; Cutmore, T.

    2005-02-01

    An automated classification technique is desirable to identify the different stages of sleep. In this paper a technique for differentiating the characteristics of each sleep phase has been developed. This is an ideal pre-processor stage for classifying systems such as neural networks. A wavelet based continuous Morlet transform was developed to analyse the EEG signal in both the time and frequency domain. Test results using two 100 epoch EEG test data sets from pre-recorded EEG data are presented. Key rhythms in the EEG signal were identified and classified using the continuous wavelet transform. The wavelet results indicated each sleep phase contained different rhythms and artefacts (noise from muscle movement in the EEG); providing proof that an EEG can be classified accordingly. The coefficients founded by the wavelet transform have been emphasised by statistical techniques. Hypothesis testing was used to highlight major differences between adjacent sleep stages. Various signal processing methods such as power spectrum density and the discrete wavelet transform have been used to emphasise particular characteristics in an EEG. By implementing signal processing methods on an EEG data set specific rules for each sleep stage have been developed suitable for a neural network classification solution.

  16. Evaluating the evidence surrounding pontine cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin P Grace

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement (REM sleep - characterized by vivid dreaming, motor paralysis, and heightened neural activity - is one of the fundamental states of the mammalian central nervous system. Initial theories of rapid eye movement (REM sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the ‘pontine REM sleep generator’ by cholinergic inputs. Here we review and evaluate the evidence surrounding cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation. We submit that: (i the capacity of pontine cholinergic neurotransmission to generate REM sleep has been firmly established by gain-of-function experiments, (ii the function of endogenous cholinergic input to REM sleep generating sites cannot be determined by gain-of-function experiments; rather, loss-of-function studies are required, (iii loss-of-function studies show that endogenous cholinergic input to the PFT is not required for REM sleep generation, and (iv Cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generating sites serve an accessory role in REM sleep generation: reinforcing non-REM-to-REM sleep transitions making them quicker and less likely to fail.

  17. Sleep fragmentation alters brain energy metabolism without modifying hippocampal electrophysiological response to novelty exposure

    KAUST Repository

    Baud, Maxime O.

    2016-05-03

    © 2016 European Sleep Research Society. Sleep is viewed as a fundamental restorative function of the brain, but its specific role in neural energy budget remains poorly understood. Sleep deprivation dampens brain energy metabolism and impairs cognitive functions. Intriguingly, sleep fragmentation, despite normal total sleep duration, has a similar cognitive impact, and in this paper we ask the question of whether it may also impair brain energy metabolism. To this end, we used a recently developed mouse model of 2 weeks of sleep fragmentation and measured 2-deoxy-glucose uptake and glycogen, glucose and lactate concentration in different brain regions. In order to homogenize mice behaviour during metabolic measurements, we exposed them to a novel environment for 1 h. Using an intra-hippocampal electrode, we first showed that hippocampal electroencephalograph (EEG) response to exploration was unaltered by 1 or 14 days of sleep fragmentation. However, after 14 days, sleep fragmented mice exhibited a lower uptake of 2-deoxy-glucose in cortex and hippocampus and lower cortical lactate levels than control mice. Our results suggest that long-term sleep fragmentation impaired brain metabolism to a similar extent as total sleep deprivation without affecting the neuronal responsiveness of hippocampus to a novel environment.

  18. Evaluating the Evidence Surrounding Pontine Cholinergic Involvement in REM Sleep Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Kevin P; Horner, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep - characterized by vivid dreaming, motor paralysis, and heightened neural activity - is one of the fundamental states of the mammalian central nervous system. Initial theories of REM sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the "pontine REM sleep generator" by cholinergic inputs. Here, we review and evaluate the evidence surrounding cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation. We submit that: (i) the capacity of pontine cholinergic neurotransmission to generate REM sleep has been firmly established by gain-of-function experiments, (ii) the function of endogenous cholinergic input to REM sleep generating sites cannot be determined by gain-of-function experiments; rather, loss-of-function studies are required, (iii) loss-of-function studies show that endogenous cholinergic input to the PTF is not required for REM sleep generation, and (iv) cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generating sites serve an accessory role in REM sleep generation: reinforcing non-REM-to-REM sleep transitions making them quicker and less likely to fail.

  19. Sleep-dependent synaptic down-selection (I): modeling the benefits of sleep on memory consolidation and integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nere, Andrew; Hashmi, Atif; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Sleep can favor the consolidation of both procedural and declarative memories, promote gist extraction, help the integration of new with old memories, and desaturate the ability to learn. It is often assumed that such beneficial effects are due to the reactivation of neural circuits in sleep to further strengthen the synapses modified during wake or transfer memories to different parts of the brain. A different possibility is that sleep may benefit memory not by further strengthening synapses, but rather by renormalizing synaptic strength to restore cellular homeostasis after net synaptic potentiation in wake. In this way, the sleep-dependent reactivation of neural circuits could result in the competitive down-selection of synapses that are activated infrequently and fit less well with the overall organization of memories. By using computer simulations, we show here that synaptic down-selection is in principle sufficient to explain the beneficial effects of sleep on the consolidation of procedural and declarative memories, on gist extraction, and on the integration of new with old memories, thereby addressing the plasticity-stability dilemma.

  20. Post Learning Sleep Improves Cognitive-Emotional Decision-Making: Evidence for a ‘Deck B Sleep Effect’ in the Iowa Gambling Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Corrine J.; Beninger, Richard J.; Smith, Carlyle T.

    2014-01-01

    The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) is widely used to assess real life decision-making impairment in a wide variety of clinical populations. Our study evaluated how IGT learning occurs across two sessions, and whether a period of intervening sleep between sessions can enhance learning. Furthermore, we investigate whether pre-sleep learning is necessary for this improvement. A 200-trial version of the IGT was administered at two sessions separated by wake, sleep or sleep and wake (time-of-day control). Participants were categorized as learners and non-learners based on initial performance in session one. In session one, participants initially preferred the high-frequency reward decks B and D, however, a subset of learners decreased choice from negative expected value ‘bad’ deck B and increased choices towards with a positive expected value ‘good’ decks (decks C and D). The learners who had a period of sleep (sleep and sleep/wake control conditions) between sessions showed significantly larger reduction in choices from deck B and increase in choices from good decks compared to learners that had intervening wake. Our results are the first to show that post-learning sleep can improve performance on a complex decision-making task such as the IGT. These results provide new insights into IGT learning and have important implications for understanding the neural mechanisms of “sleeping on” a decision. PMID:25409323

  1. Post learning sleep improves cognitive-emotional decision-making: evidence for a 'deck B sleep effect' in the Iowa Gambling Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Corrine J; Beninger, Richard J; Smith, Carlyle T

    2014-01-01

    The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) is widely used to assess real life decision-making impairment in a wide variety of clinical populations. Our study evaluated how IGT learning occurs across two sessions, and whether a period of intervening sleep between sessions can enhance learning. Furthermore, we investigate whether pre-sleep learning is necessary for this improvement. A 200-trial version of the IGT was administered at two sessions separated by wake, sleep or sleep and wake (time-of-day control). Participants were categorized as learners and non-learners based on initial performance in session one. In session one, participants initially preferred the high-frequency reward decks B and D, however, a subset of learners decreased choice from negative expected value 'bad' deck B and increased choices towards with a positive expected value 'good' decks (decks C and D). The learners who had a period of sleep (sleep and sleep/wake control conditions) between sessions showed significantly larger reduction in choices from deck B and increase in choices from good decks compared to learners that had intervening wake. Our results are the first to show that post-learning sleep can improve performance on a complex decision-making task such as the IGT. These results provide new insights into IGT learning and have important implications for understanding the neural mechanisms of "sleeping on" a decision.

  2. Post learning sleep improves cognitive-emotional decision-making: evidence for a 'deck B sleep effect' in the Iowa Gambling Task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrine J Seeley

    Full Text Available The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT is widely used to assess real life decision-making impairment in a wide variety of clinical populations. Our study evaluated how IGT learning occurs across two sessions, and whether a period of intervening sleep between sessions can enhance learning. Furthermore, we investigate whether pre-sleep learning is necessary for this improvement. A 200-trial version of the IGT was administered at two sessions separated by wake, sleep or sleep and wake (time-of-day control. Participants were categorized as learners and non-learners based on initial performance in session one. In session one, participants initially preferred the high-frequency reward decks B and D, however, a subset of learners decreased choice from negative expected value 'bad' deck B and increased choices towards with a positive expected value 'good' decks (decks C and D. The learners who had a period of sleep (sleep and sleep/wake control conditions between sessions showed significantly larger reduction in choices from deck B and increase in choices from good decks compared to learners that had intervening wake. Our results are the first to show that post-learning sleep can improve performance on a complex decision-making task such as the IGT. These results provide new insights into IGT learning and have important implications for understanding the neural mechanisms of "sleeping on" a decision.

  3. The development of sleep-wake rhythms and the search for elemental circuits in the infant brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Mark S; Gall, Andrew J; Todd, William D

    2014-06-01

    Despite the predominance of sleep in early infancy, developmental science has yet to play a major role in shaping concepts and theories about sleep and its associated ultradian and circadian rhythms. Here we argue that developmental analyses help us to elucidate the relative contributions of the brainstem and forebrain to sleep-wake control and to dissect the neural components of sleep-wake rhythms. Developmental analysis also makes it clear that sleep-wake processes in infants are the foundation for those of adults. For example, the infant brainstem alone contains a fundamental sleep-wake circuit that is sufficient to produce transitions among wakefulness, quiet sleep, and active sleep. In addition, consistent with the requirements of a "flip-flop" model of sleep-wake processes, this brainstem circuit supports rapid transitions between states. Later in development, strengthening bidirectional interactions between the brainstem and forebrain contribute to the consolidation of sleep and wake bouts, the elaboration of sleep homeostatic processes, and the emergence of diurnal or nocturnal circadian rhythms. The developmental perspective promoted here critically constrains theories of sleep-wake control and provides a needed framework for the creation of fully realized computational models. Finally, with a better understanding of how this system is constructed developmentally, we will gain insight into the processes that govern its disintegration due to aging and disease.

  4. Disrupted Nighttime Sleep in Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Thomas; Dauvilliers, Yves; Mignot, Emmanuel; Montplaisir, Jacques; Paul, Josh; Swick, Todd; Zee, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Characterize disrupted nighttime sleep (DNS) in narcolepsy, an important symptom of narcolepsy. Methods: A panel of international narcolepsy experts was convened in 2011 to build a consensus characterization of DNS in patients with narcolepsy. A literature search of the Medline (1965 to date), Medline In-Process (latest weeks), Embase (1974 to date), Embase Alert (latest 8 weeks), and Biosis (1965 to date) databases was conducted using the following search terms: narcolepsy and disrupted nighttime sleep, disturbed nighttime sleep, fragmented sleep, consolidated sleep, sleep disruption, and narcolepsy questionnaire. The purpose of the literature search was to identify publications characterizing the nighttime sleep of patients with narcolepsy. The panel reviewed the literature. Nocturnal sleep can also be disturbed by REM sleep abnormalities such as vivid dreaming and REM sleep behavior disorder; however, these were not reviewed in the current paper, as we were evaluating for idiopathic sleep disturbances. Results: The literature reviewed provide a consistent characterization of nighttime sleep in patients with narcolepsy as fragmented, with reports of frequent, brief nightly awakenings with difficulties returning to sleep and associated reports of poor sleep quality. Polysomnographic studies consistently report frequent awakenings/arousals after sleep onset, more stage 1 (S1) sleep, and more frequent shifts to S1 sleep or wake from deeper stages of sleep. The consensus of the International Experts' Panel on Narcolepsy was that DNS can be distressing for patients with narcolepsy and that treatment of DNS warrants consideration. Conclusions: Clinicians involved in the management of patients with narcolepsy should investigate patients' quality of nighttime sleep, give weight and consideration to patient reports of nighttime sleep experience, and consider DNS a target for treatment. Citation: Roth T; Dauvilliers Y; Mignot E; Montplaisir J; Paul J

  5. BDNF in sleep, insomnia, and sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Karen; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Eckert, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The protein brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors involved in plasticity of neurons in several brain regions. There are numerous evidence that BDNF expression is decreased by experiencing psychological stress and that, accordingly, a lack of neurotrophic support causes major depression. Furthermore, disruption in sleep homeostatic processes results in higher stress vulnerability and is often associated with stress-related mental disorders. Recently, we reported, for the first time, a relationship between BDNF and insomnia and sleep deprivation (SD). Using a biphasic stress model as explanation approach, we discuss here the hypothesis that chronic stress might induce a deregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system. In the long-term it leads to sleep disturbance and depression as well as decreased BDNF levels, whereas acute stress like SD can be used as therapeutic intervention in some insomniac or depressed patients as compensatory process to normalize BDNF levels. Indeed, partial SD (PSD) induced a fast increase in BDNF serum levels within hours after PSD which is similar to effects seen after ketamine infusion, another fast-acting antidepressant intervention, while traditional antidepressants are characterized by a major delay until treatment response as well as delayed BDNF level increase. Key messages Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in the pathophysiology of stress-related mood disorders. The interplay of stress and sleep impacts on BDNF level. Partial sleep deprivation (PSD) shows a fast action on BDNF level increase.

  6. Learning within bounds and dream sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geszti, T.; Pazmandi, F.

    1987-12-01

    In a bounded-synapses version of Hopfield's model (1984) for neural networks the quasienergy of a given memory, which is approximately equal to the depth of the corresponding energy well is calculated exactly by treating the change of a synaptic strength on learning as a random walk within bounds. Attractors corresponding to stored memories are found to be considerably flattened before serious retrieval errors arise. This allows dream sleep to be interpreted as random recall and relearning of fresh strong memories, in order to stack them on top of weak incidental memory imprints of a day.

  7. [The NHG guideline 'Sleep problems and sleeping pills'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen-van Beek, Z.; Lucassen, P.L.; Gorgels, W.J.M.J.; Smelt, A.F.; Knuistingh Neven, A.; Bouma, M.

    2015-01-01

    - The Dutch College of General Practitioners' (NHG) guideline 'Sleep problems and sleeping pills' provides recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of the most prevalent sleep problems and for the management of chronic users of sleeping pills.- The preferred approach for sleeplessness is not

  8. [The NHG guideline 'Sleep problems and sleeping pills'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen-van Beek, Z.; Lucassen, P.L.; Gorgels, W.J.M.J.; Smelt, A.F.; Knuistingh Neven, A.; Bouma, M.

    2015-01-01

    - The Dutch College of General Practitioners' (NHG) guideline 'Sleep problems and sleeping pills' provides recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of the most prevalent sleep problems and for the management of chronic users of sleeping pills.- The preferred approach for sleeplessness is not

  9. [Chronobiologic organization of sleep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiberge, M; Arbus, L

    1989-01-01

    Interrelations between sleep and chronobiology as been studied in isolated experimental situations. A succession of hormonal regulations has been described to explain these mechanisms. Some disruptions of these regulations might be at the beginning of a lot of sleep pathologies (jet lag syndrome, burn out syndrome, insomnia...).

  10. Changing your sleep habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... effects they may have on your sleep. Find ways to manage stress. Learn about relaxation techniques, such as guided imagery, listening to music, or practicing yoga or meditation. Listen to your body when it tells you to slow down or take a break. Change Your Bedtime Habits Your bed is for sleeping. ...

  11. Sleep Terrors in Twins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to clarify the genetic and environmental causes of sleep terrors in childhood, reasearchers in Canada followed 390 pairs of monozygotic and dizygotic twins by assessing the frequency of sleep terrors at 18 and 30 months of age using a questionnaire administered to the biological mothers.

  12. Stress, arousal, and sleep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanford, Larry D.; Suchecki, Deborah; Meerlo, Peter; Meerlo, Peter; Benca, Ruth M.; Abel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Stress is considered to be an important cause of disrupted sleep and insomnia. However, controlled and experimental studies in rodents indicate that effects of stress on sleep-wake regulation are complex and may strongly depend on the nature of the stressor. While most stressors are associated with

  13. Schizophrenia, Sleep and Acupuncture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.P.C.; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den

    2008-01-01

    This book is an introduction for professionals in Western medicine and for acupuncturists on the use of acupuncture in treatment of schizophrenia and sleep disorders. Acupuncture has long been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) in mental health and sleep disorders. This book aims to build a

  14. Sleep deprivation and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsenga, Simon

    1992-01-01

    The association between depression and sleep disturbances is perhaps as old as makind. In view of the longstanding experience with this association it is amazing that only some 20 years ago, a few depressed patients attracted attention to the fact that Total Sleep Deprivation (TSD) had

  15. Sleep deprivation and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsenga, Simon

    1992-01-01

    The association between depression and sleep disturbances is perhaps as old as makind. In view of the longstanding experience with this association it is amazing that only some 20 years ago, a few depressed patients attracted attention to the fact that Total Sleep Deprivation (TSD) had antidepressan

  16. Adenosine and sleep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanik, G.M. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Behavioral and biochemical approaches have been used to determine the relative contribution of endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors to the sleep-wake cycle in the rat. Adenosine concentrations in specific areas of the rat brain were not affected by 24 hours of total sleep deprivation, or by 24 or 48 hours of REM sleep deprivation. In order to assess the effect of REM sleep deprivation on adenosine A/sub 1/ receptors, /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding was measured. The Bmax values for /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding to membrane preparations of the cortices and corpus striata from 48 hour REM sleep-deprived animals were increased 14.8% and 23%, respectively. These increases were not maintained following the cessation of sleep deprivation and recovered within 2 hours. The results of a 96 hour REM deprivation experiment were similar to those of the 48 hour REM sleep deprivation experiment. However, these increases were not evident in similar structures taken from stress control animals, and conclusively demonstrated that the changes in /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding resulted from REM sleep deprivation and not from stress.

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, A.; Stegenga, B.; Wijkstra, P. J.; van der Hoeven, J. H.; Meinesz, A. F.; de Bont, L. G. M.

    2008-01-01

    In clinical practice, oral appliances are used primarily for obstructive sleep apnea patients who do not respond to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. We hypothesized that an oral appliance is not inferior to CPAP in treating obstructive sleep apnea effectively. We randomly assigned

  18. Sleep, Exercise, and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrelson, Orvis A.; And Others

    The first part of this booklet concerns why sleep and exercise are necessary. It includes a discussion of what occurs during sleep and what dreams are. It also deals with the benefits of exercise, fatigue, posture, and the correlation between exercise and personality. The second part concerns nutrition and the importance of food. This part covers…

  19. Total sleep deprivation study in delayed sleep-phase syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Dilshad Manzar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed sleep-phase syndrome (DSPS is characterized by delayed sleep onset against the desired clock time. It often presents with symptoms of sleep-onset insomnia or difficulty in awakening at the desired time. We report the finding of sleep studies after 24 h total sleep deprivation (TSD in a 28-year-old DSPS male patient. He had characteristics of mild chronic DSPS, which may have been precipitated by his frequent night shift assignments. The TSD improved the patients sleep latency and efficiency but all other sleep variables showed marked differences.

  20. Sleep debt and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayon, Virginie; Leger, Damien; Gomez-Merino, Danielle; Vecchierini, Marie-Françoise; Chennaoui, Mounir

    2014-08-01

    Short sleep duration has been shown to be associated with elevated body mass index (BMI) in many epidemiological studies. Several pathways could link sleep deprivation to weight gain and obesity, including increased food intake, decreased energy expenditure, and changes in levels of appetite-regulating hormones, such as leptin and ghrelin. A relatively new factor that is contributing to sleep deprivation is the use of multimedia (e.g. television viewing, computer, and internet), which may aggravate sedentary behavior and increase caloric intake. In addition, shift-work, long working hours, and increased time commuting to and from work have also been hypothesized to favor weight gain and obesity-related metabolic disorders, because of their strong link to shorter sleep times. This article reviews the epidemiological, biological, and behavioral evidence linking sleep debt and obesity.

  1. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Akinci

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The circadian rhythm sleep disorders define the clinical conditions where sleep and ndash;wake rhythm is disrupted despite optimum environmental and social conditions. They occur as a result of the changes in endogenous circadian hours or non-compatibility of environmental factors or social life with endogenous circadian rhythm. The sleep and ndash;wake rhythm is disrupted continuously or in repeating phases depending on lack of balance between internal and external cycles. This condition leads to functional impairments which cause insomnia, excessive sleepiness or both in people. Application of detailed sleep anamnesis and sleep diary with actigraphy record, if possible, will be sufficient for diagnosis. The treatment aims to align endogenous circadian rhythm with environmental conditions. The purpose of this article is to review pathology, clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of circadian rhythm disorder. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 178-189

  2. Sleep effects on breathing and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary Sumer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand normal sleep pattern and physiological changes during sleep, sleep and breathing interaction, nomenclature and scales used in sleep study, discuss the effect of rapid eye movements and non-rapid eye movements while sleep and to review the effects of obstructive and restrictive lung disease on gas exchange during sleep and sleep architecture.

  3. Nonequilibrium landscape theory of neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Han; Zhao, Lei; Hu, Liang; Wang, Xidi; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2013-11-05

    The brain map project aims to map out the neuron connections of the human brain. Even with all of the wirings mapped out, the global and physical understandings of the function and behavior are still challenging. Hopfield quantified the learning and memory process of symmetrically connected neural networks globally through equilibrium energy. The energy basins of attractions represent memories, and the memory retrieval dynamics is determined by the energy gradient. However, the realistic neural networks are asymmetrically connected, and oscillations cannot emerge from symmetric neural networks. Here, we developed a nonequilibrium landscape-flux theory for realistic asymmetrically connected neural networks. We uncovered the underlying potential landscape and the associated Lyapunov function for quantifying the global stability and function. We found the dynamics and oscillations in human brains responsible for cognitive processes and physiological rhythm regulations are determined not only by the landscape gradient but also by the flux. We found that the flux is closely related to the degrees of the asymmetric connections in neural networks and is the origin of the neural oscillations. The neural oscillation landscape shows a closed-ring attractor topology. The landscape gradient attracts the network down to the ring. The flux is responsible for coherent oscillations on the ring. We suggest the flux may provide the driving force for associations among memories. We applied our theory to rapid-eye movement sleep cycle. We identified the key regulation factors for function through global sensitivity analysis of landscape topography against wirings, which are in good agreements with experiments.

  4. Nonequilibrium landscape theory of neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Han; Zhao, Lei; Hu, Liang; Wang, Xidi; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    The brain map project aims to map out the neuron connections of the human brain. Even with all of the wirings mapped out, the global and physical understandings of the function and behavior are still challenging. Hopfield quantified the learning and memory process of symmetrically connected neural networks globally through equilibrium energy. The energy basins of attractions represent memories, and the memory retrieval dynamics is determined by the energy gradient. However, the realistic neural networks are asymmetrically connected, and oscillations cannot emerge from symmetric neural networks. Here, we developed a nonequilibrium landscape–flux theory for realistic asymmetrically connected neural networks. We uncovered the underlying potential landscape and the associated Lyapunov function for quantifying the global stability and function. We found the dynamics and oscillations in human brains responsible for cognitive processes and physiological rhythm regulations are determined not only by the landscape gradient but also by the flux. We found that the flux is closely related to the degrees of the asymmetric connections in neural networks and is the origin of the neural oscillations. The neural oscillation landscape shows a closed-ring attractor topology. The landscape gradient attracts the network down to the ring. The flux is responsible for coherent oscillations on the ring. We suggest the flux may provide the driving force for associations among memories. We applied our theory to rapid-eye movement sleep cycle. We identified the key regulation factors for function through global sensitivity analysis of landscape topography against wirings, which are in good agreements with experiments. PMID:24145451

  5. Sleep and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Dionne; Tsai, Sheila C

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the effect of sleep and sleep disorders on endocrine function and the influence of endocrine abnormalities on sleep are discussed. Sleep disruption and its associated endocrine consequences in the critically ill patient are also reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrempf, Wiebke; Brandt, Moritz D; Storch, Alexander; Reichmann, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disorders in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are very common and have an immense negative impact on their quality of life. Insomnia, daytime sleepiness with sleep attacks, restless-legs syndrome (RLS) and REM-sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) are the most frequent sleep disorders in PD. Neurodegenerative processes within sleep regulatory brain circuitries, antiparkinsonian (e.g., levodopa and dopamine agonists) and concomitant medication (e.g., antidepressants) as well as comorbidities or other non-motor symptoms (such as depression) are discussed as causative factors. For the diagnosis of sleep disturbances we recommend regular screening using validated questionnaires such as the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) or the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (MOS), for evaluating daytime sleepiness we would suggest to use the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), the inappropriate sleep composite score (ISCS) or the Stanford sleepiness scale (SSS). All of these questionnaires should be used in combination with a detailed medical history focusing on common sleep disorders and medication. If necessary, patients should be referred to sleep specialists or sleep laboratories for further investigations. Management of sleep disorders in PD patients usually starts with optimization of (dopaminergic) antiparkinsonian therapy followed by specific treatment of the sleep disturbances. Aside from these clinical issues of sleep disorders in PD, the concept of REM-sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) as an early sign for emerging neurodegenerative diseases is of pivotal interest for future research on biomarkers and neuroprotective treatment strategies of neurodegenerative diseases, and particularly PD.

  7. The Neuroprotective Aspects of Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugene, Andy R; Masiak, Jolanta

    2015-03-01

    Sleep is an important component of human life, yet many people do not understand the relationship between the brain and the process of sleeping. Sleep has been proven to improve memory recall, regulate metabolism, and reduce mental fatigue. A minimum of 7 hours of daily sleep seems to be necessary for proper cognitive and behavioral function. The emotional and mental handicaps associated with chronic sleep loss as well as the highly hazardous situations which can be contributed to the lack of sleep is a serious concern that people need to be aware of. When one sleeps, the brain reorganizes and recharges itself, and removes toxic waste byproducts which have accumulated throughout the day. This evidence demonstrates that sleeping can clear the brain and help maintain its normal functioning. Multiple studies have been done to determine the effects of total sleep deprivation; more recently some have been conducted to show the effects of sleep restriction, which is a much more common occurrence, have the same effects as total sleep deprivation. Each phase of the sleep cycle restores and rejuvenates the brain for optimal function. When sleep is deprived, the active process of the glymphatic system does not have time to perform that function, so toxins can build up, and the effects will become apparent in cognitive abilities, behavior, and judgment. As a background for this paper we have reviewed literature and research of sleep phases, effects of sleep deprivation, and the glymphatic system of the brain and its restorative effect during the sleep cycle.

  8. Models of human sleep regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, Domien G.M.

    1998-01-01

    Non-REM sleep deprivation and REM sleep deprivation both lead to specific rebounds, suggesting that these states fulfil physiological needs. In view of impaired performance after sleep deprivation, a recovery function of sleep seems likely. The timing of this recovery is restricted to a narrow time

  9. Differential impact of REM sleep deprivation on cytoskeletal proteins of brain regions involved in sleep regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jennifer; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is involved in memory consolidation, which implies synaptic plasticity. This process requires protein synthesis and the reorganization of the neural cytoskeleton. REM sleep deprivation (REMSD) has an impact on some neuronal proteins involved in synaptic plasticity, such as glutamate receptors and postsynaptic density protein 95, but its effects on cytoskeletal proteins is unknown. In this study, the effects of REMSD on the content of the cytoskeletal proteins MAP2 and TAU were analyzed. Adult female rats were submitted to selective REMSD by using the multiple platform technique. After 24, 48 or 72 h of REMSD, rats were decapitated and the following brain areas were dissected: pons, preoptic area, hippocampus and frontal cortex. Protein extraction and Western blot were performed. Results showed an increase in TAU content in the pons, preoptic area and hippocampus after 24 h of REMSD, while in the frontal cortex a significant increase in TAU content was observed after 72 h of REMSD. A TAU content decrease was observed in the hippocampus after 48 h of REMSD. Interestingly, a marked increase in TAU content was observed after 72 h of REMSD. MAP2 content only increased in the preoptic area at 24 h, and in the frontal cortex after 24 and 72 h of REMSD, without significant changes in the pons and hippocampus. These results support the idea that REM sleep plays an important role in the organization of neural cytoskeleton, and that this effect is tissue-specific.

  10. The large-scale functional connectivity correlates of consciousness and arousal during the healthy and pathological human sleep cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliazucchi, Enzo; van Someren, Eus J W

    2017-06-12

    Advances in neuroimaging have greatly improved our understanding of human sleep from a systems neuroscience perspective. However, cognition and awareness are reduced during sleep, hindering the applicability of standard task-based paradigms. Methods recently developed to study spontaneous brain activity fluctuations have proven useful to overcome this limitation. In this review, we focus on the concept of functional connectivity (FC, i.e. statistical covariance between brain activity signals) and its application to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired during sleep. We discuss how FC analyses of endogenous brain activity during sleep have contributed towards revealing the large-scale neural networks associated with arousal and conscious awareness. We argue that the neuroimaging of deep sleep can be used to evaluate the predictions of theories of consciousness; at the same time, we highlight some apparent limitations of deep sleep as an experimental model of unconsciousness. In resting state fMRI experiments, the onset of sleep can be regarded as the object of interest but also as an undesirable confound. We discuss a series of articles contributing towards the disambiguation of wakefulness from sleep on the basis of fMRI-derived dynamic FC, and then outline a plan for the development of more general and data-driven sleep classifiers. To complement our review of studies investigating the brain systems of arousal and consciousness during healthy sleep, we then turn to pathological and abnormal sleep patterns. We review the current literature on sleep deprivation studies and sleep disorders, adopting the critical stance that lack of independent vigilance monitoring during fMRI experiments is liable for false positives related to atypical sleep propensity in clinical and sleep-deprived populations. Finally, we discuss multimodal neuroimaging as a promising future direction to achieve a better understanding of the large-scale FC of the brain during

  11. Sleep debt elicits negative emotional reaction through diminished amygdala-anterior cingulate functional connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Motomura

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Sleep debt reportedly increases emotional instability, such as anxiety and confusion, in addition to sleepiness and psychomotor impairment. However, the neural basis of emotional instability due to sleep debt has yet to be elucidated. This study investigated changes in emotional responses that are elicited by the simulation of short-term sleep loss and the brain regions responsible for these changes. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Fourteen healthy adult men aged 24.1±3.3 years (range, 20-32 years participated in a within-subject crossover study consisting of 5-day sessions of both sleep debt (4 h for time in bed and sleep control (8 h for time in bed. On the last day of each session, participants underwent polysomnography and completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Profile of Mood States questionnaires. In addition, functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while performing an emotional face viewing task. RESULTS: Restricted sleep over the 5-day period increased the activity of the left amygdala in response to the facial expression of fear, whereas a happy facial expression did not change the activity. Restricted sleep also resulted in a significant decrease in the functional connectivity between the amygdala and the ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC in proportion to the degree of sleep debt (as indicated by the percentage of slow wave sleep and δ wave power. This decrease was significantly correlated with activation of the left amygdala and deterioration of subjective mood state. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that continuous and accumulating sleep debt that can be experienced in everyday life can downregulate the functional suppression of the amygdala by the vACC and consequently enhance the response of the amygdala to negative emotional stimuli. Such functional alteration in emotional control may, in part, be attributed to the neural basis of emotional instability during sleep debt.

  12. Sleep Disturbances in Mood Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumble, Meredith E; White, Kaitlin Hanley; Benca, Ruth M

    2015-12-01

    The article provides an overview of common and differentiating self-reported and objective sleep disturbances seen in mood-disordered populations. The importance of considering sleep disturbances in the context of mood disorders is emphasized, because a large body of evidence supports the notion that sleep disturbances are a risk factor for onset, exacerbation, and relapse of mood disorders. In addition, potential mechanisms for sleep disturbance in depression, other primary sleep disorders that often occur with mood disorders, effects of antidepressant and mood-stabilizing drugs on sleep, and the adjunctive effect of treating sleep in patients with mood disorders are discussed.

  13. 40-Hz ASSR fusion classification system for observing sleep patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuwaja, Gulzar A; Haghighi, Sahar Javaher; Hatzinakos, Dimitrios

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a fusion-based neural network (NN) classification algorithm for 40-Hz auditory steady state response (ASSR) ensemble averaged signals which were recorded from eight human subjects for observing sleep patterns (wakefulness W0 and deep sleep N3 or slow wave sleep SWS). In SWS, sensitivity to pain is the lowest relative to other sleep stages and arousal needs stronger stimuli. 40-Hz ASSR signals were extracted by averaging over 900 sweeps on a 30-s window. Signals generated during N3 deep sleep state show similarities to those produced when general anesthesia is given to patients during clinical surgery. Our experimental results show that the automatic classification system used identifies sleep states with an accuracy rate of 100% when the training and test signals come from the same subjects while its accuracy is reduced to 97.6%, on average, when signals are used from different training and test subjects. Our results may lead to future classification of consciousness and wakefulness of patients with 40-Hz ASSR for observing the depth and effects of general anesthesia (DGA).

  14. Artificial apnea classification with quantitative sleep EEG synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akṣahin, Mehmet; Aydın, Serap; Fırat, Hikmet; Eroǧul, Osman

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, both linear and nonlinear EEG synchronization methods so called Coherence Function (CF) and Mutual Information (MI) are performed to obtain high quality signal features in discriminating the Central Sleep Apnea (CSA) and Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) from controls. For this purpose, sleep EEG series recorded from patients and healthy volunteers are classified by using several Feed Forward Neural Network (FFNN) architectures with respect to synchronic activities between C3 and C4 recordings. Among the sleep stages, stage2 is considered in tests. The NN approaches are trained with several numbers of neurons and hidden layers. The results show that the degree of central EEG synchronization during night sleep is closely related to sleep disorders like CSA and OSA. The MI and CF give us cooperatively meaningful information to support clinical findings. Those three groups determined with an expert physician can be classified by addressing two hidden layers with very low absolute error where the average area of CF curves ranged form 0 to 10 Hz and the average MI values are assigned as two features. In a future work, these two features can be combined to create an integrated single feature for error free apnea classification.

  15. Sex-related differences in the effects of sleep habits on verbal and visuospatial working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seishu Nakagawa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sleep facilitates memory consolidation. Consequently, poor sleep quality negatively affects memory performance, and working memory in particular. We investigated sleep habits related to sleep quality including sleep duration, daytime nap duration, nap frequency, and dream content recall frequency (DCRF. Declarative working memory can be subdivided into verbal working memory (VWM and visuospatial working memory (VSWM. We hypothesized that sleep habits would have different effects on VWM and VSWM. To our knowledge, our study is the first to investigate differences between VWM and VSWM related to daytime nap duration, nap frequency, and DCRF. Furthermore, we tested the hypothesis that the effects of duration and frequency of daytime naps and DCRF on VWM and VSWM differed according to sex. We assessed 779 healthy right-handed individuals (434 males and 345 females; mean age: 20.7 ± 1.8 years using a digit span forward and backward VWM task, a forward and backward VSWM task, and sleep habits scales. A correlation analysis was used to test the relationships between VWM capacity (VWMC and VSWM capacity (VSWMC scores and sleep duration, nap duration, nap frequency, and DCRF. Furthermore, multiple regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with VWMC and VSWMC scores and to identify sex-related differences. We found significant positive correlations between VSWMC and nap duration and DCRF, and between VWMC and sleep duration in all subjects. Furthermore, we found that working memory capacity (WMC was positively correlated with nap duration in males and with sleep duration in females, and DCRF was positively correlated with VSWMC in females. Our finding of sex-related differences in the effects of sleep habits on WMC has not been reported previously. The associations between WMC and sleep habits differed according to sex because of differences in the underlying neural correlates of VWM and VSWM, and effectiveness of the sleep habits

  16. [Sleep disorders and their treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsboer-Trachsler, E

    1995-04-11

    Disturbed or inadequate sleep is a frequent complaint, often with a chronic course, requiring adequate treatment. To choose an appropriate therapy it is necessary to develop a useful, reliable valid and specific diagnostic procedure. Primary care physicians can recognize and treat most sleep disorders. For special diagnostic cases sleep centers are recommended. Sleep disorders may be managed by adequate pharmacological as well as nonpharmacological treatments. Besides specific pharmacological interventions, education in sleep/wake hygiene and several psychotherapeutic strategies may be valuable.

  17. Functional neuroimaging of sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging methods provide a means to understand brain function in patients with sleep disorders. This paper summarizes functional neuroimaging findings in sleep disorders patients, and studies addressing the pharmacology of sleep and sleep disorders. Areas in which functional neuroimaging methods may be helpful in sleep medicine, and in which future development is advised, include: 1) clarification of pathophysiology; 2) aid in differential diagnosis; 3) assessment of treatment response; 4) guiding new drug development; and 5) monitoring treatment response.

  18. Sleep in the Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Jonathan P; Paruthi, Shalini

    2016-03-01

    This article provides an overview of common pediatric sleep disorders encountered in the neurology clinic, including restless legs syndrome, narcolepsy, parasomnias, sleep-related epilepsy, and sleep and headaches. An overview of each is provided, with an emphasis on accurate diagnosis and treatment. It is important in comprehensive neurologic care to also obtain a sleep history, because treating the underlying sleep condition may improve the neurologic disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sleep, vigilance, and thermosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeijn, Nico; Raymann, Roy J E M; Møst, Els; Te Lindert, Bart; Van Der Meijden, Wisse P; Fronczek, Rolf; Gomez-Herrero, German; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of sleep and wakefulness is well modeled with two underlying processes: a circadian and a homeostatic one. So far, the parameters and mechanisms of additional sleep-permissive and wake-promoting conditions have been largely overlooked. The present overview focuses on one of these conditions: the effect of skin temperature on the onset and maintenance of sleep, and alertness. Skin temperature is quite well suited to provide the brain with information on sleep-permissive and wake-promoting conditions because it changes with most if not all of them. Skin temperature changes with environmental heat and cold, but also with posture, environmental light, danger, nutritional status, pain, and stress. Its effect on the brain may thus moderate the efficacy by which the clock and homeostat manage to initiate or maintain sleep or wakefulness. The review provides a brief overview of the neuroanatomical pathways and physiological mechanisms by which skin temperature can affect the regulation of sleep and vigilance. In addition, current pitfalls and possibilities of practical applications for sleep enhancement are discussed, including the recent finding of impaired thermal comfort perception in insomniacs.

  20. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Kazuo

    2013-12-01

    Primary pathophysiology of circadian rhythm sleep disorders(CRSDs) is a misalignment between the endogenous circadian rhythm phase and the desired or socially required sleep-wake schedule, or dysfunction of the circadian pacemaker and its afferent/efferent pathways. CRSDs consist of delayed sleep phase type, advanced sleep phase type, free-running type, irregular sleep-wake type, shift work type and jet lag type. Chronotherapy using strong zeitgebers (time cues), such as bright light and melatonin/ melatonin type 2 receptor agonist, is effective when administered with proper timing. Bright light is the strongest entraining agent of circadian rhythms. Bright light therapy (appropriately-timed exposure to bright light) for CRSDs is an effective treatment option, and can shift the sleep-wake cycle to earlier or later times, in order to correct for misalignment between the circadian system and the desired sleep-wake schedule. Timed administration of melatonin, either alone or in combination with light therapy has also been shown to be useful in the treatment of CRSDs.

  1. Insomnia and sleep misperception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, C H; Ceklic, T; St-Hilaire, P; Desmarais, F; Pérusse, A D; Lefrançois, J; Pedneault-Drolet, M

    2014-10-01

    Sleep misperception is often observed in insomnia individuals (INS). The extent of misperception varies between different types of INS. The following paper comprised sections which will be aimed at studying the sleep EEG and compares it to subjective reports of sleep in individuals suffering from either psychophysiological insomnia or paradoxical insomnia and good sleeper controls. The EEG can be studied without any intervention (thus using the raw data) via either PSG or fine quantitative EEG analyses (power spectral analysis [PSA]), identifying EEG patterns as in the case of cyclic alternating patterns (CAPs) or by decorticating the EEG while scoring the different transient or phasic events (K-Complexes or sleep spindles). One can also act on the on-going EEG by delivering stimuli so to study their impact on cortical measures as in the case of event-related potential studies (ERPs). From the paucity of studies available using these different techniques, a general conclusion can be reached: sleep misperception is not an easy phenomenon to quantify and its clinical value is not well recognized. Still, while none of the techniques or EEG measures defined in the paper is available and/or recommended to diagnose insomnia, ERPs might be the most indicated technique to study hyperarousal and sleep quality in different types of INS. More research shall also be dedicated to EEG patterns and transient phasic events as these EEG scoring techniques can offer a unique insight of sleep misperception.

  2. Relationship of sleep hygiene awareness, sleep hygiene practices, and sleep quality in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Franklin C; Buboltz, Walter C; Soper, Barlow

    2002-01-01

    College students are known for their variable sleep schedules. Such schedules, along with other common student practices (e.g., alcohol and caffeine consumption), are associated with poor sleep hygiene. Researchers have demonstrated in clinical populations that improving sleep hygiene knowledge and practices is an effective treatment for insomnia. However, researchers who have examined relationships between sleep hygiene and practices in nonclinical samples and overall sleep quality have produced inconsistent findings, perhaps because of questionable measures. In this study, the authors used psychometrically sound instruments to examine these variables and to counter the shortcomings in previous investigations. Their findings suggest that knowledge of sleep hygiene is related to sleep practices, which, in turn, is related to overall sleep quality. The data from their regression modeling indicated that variable sleep schedules, going to bed thirsty, environmental noise, and worrying while falling asleep contribute to poor sleep quality.

  3. Sleep-Dependent Oscillatory Synchronization: A Role in Fear Memory Consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Totty

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation through the facilitation of neuronal plasticity; however, how sleep accomplishes this remains to be completely understood. It has previously been demonstrated that neural oscillations are an intrinsic mechanism by which the brain precisely controls neural ensembles. Inter-regional synchronization of these oscillations is also known to facilitate long-range communication and long-term potentiation (LTP. In the present study, we investigated how the characteristic rhythms found in local field potentials (LFPs during non-REM and REM sleep play a role in emotional memory consolidation. Chronically implanted bipolar electrodes in the lateral amygdala (LA, dorsal and ventral hippocampus (DH, VH, and the infra-limbic (IL, and pre-limbic (PL prefrontal cortex were used to record LFPs across sleep-wake activity following each day of a Pavlovian cued fear conditioning paradigm. This resulted in three principle findings: (1 theta rhythms during REM sleep are highly synchronized between regions; (2 the extent of inter-regional synchronization during REM and non-REM sleep is altered by FC and EX; (3 the mean phase difference of synchronization between the LA and VH during REM sleep predicts changes in freezing after cued fear extinction. These results both oppose a currently proposed model of sleep-dependent memory consolidation and provide a novel finding which suggests that the role of REM sleep theta rhythms in memory consolidation may rely more on the relative phase-shift between neural oscillations, rather than the extent of phase synchronization.

  4. Sleep and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Bopparaju

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep apnea is clinically recognized as a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by recurrent apnea and/or hypopnea. Its prevalence ranges from 4% to 24%. It has been implicated as an independent risk factor for several conditions such as hypertension, stroke, arrhythmia, and myocardial infarction. Recently data has been emerging which suggests an independent association of obstructive sleep apnea with several components of the metabolic syndrome, particularly insulin resistance and abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We hereby review the salient features of the association between sleep and diabetes.

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Brass, Steven D.; Ho, Matthew L.

    2006-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects millions of Americans and is estimated to be as prevalent as asthma and diabetes. Given the fact that obesity is a major risk factor for OSA, and given the current global rise in obesity, the prevalence of OSA will increase in the future. Individuals with sleep apnea are often unaware of their sleep disorder. It is usually first recognized as a problem by family members who witness the apneic episodes or is suspected by their primary care doctor because o...

  6. Sleep Habits and Sleep Problems in Healthy Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, C L Srinivasa; Bharti, Bhavneet; Malhi, Prahbhjot; Khadwal, Alka

    2015-07-01

    To describe the sleep patterns and problems in children aged between 12 and 36 mo of age. This cross sectional survey was collected over a span of 1 y in Advanced Pediatric Centre, PGIMER, Chandigarh and crèches of Chandigarh. Children in the age group of 12 to 36 mo were included in study. Children with chronic illness, developmental delay, seizure disorder and lack of consent were excluded. A total of 368 children were enrolled. Main outcome measures were sleep duration over 1 to 3 y of life; sleep behavior at onset, during and waking of sleep and parent reported sleep problems and their predictors. The average duration of sleep was 12.5 h (S.D = 1.9). The mean total sleep duration and mean day time sleep duration decreased, while mean night time sleep increased as the age advanced from 12 to 36 mo. Following were the frequency of sleep habits seen in the index study; bed time routine was seen only in 68(18.5 %), a regular bed time ritual was seen in 281(76.4 %), 329(89.4 %) children frequently required 0-20 min time to fall asleep, 11(3 %) parents used sleep inducing drugs. Night waking (1 to 3 times a night) was seen in 297(80.7 %) and its frequency declined with age. Parent reported sleep problems were seen in 12.8 % (47/368). Lack of co-sleeping and night waking were considered as strongest predictors of parent reported sleep problems. Toddlers' sleep duration, night waking behavior, and day time naps decrease as the age progress while night time sleep duration increases with age. Lack of co-sleeping and night waking are considered as strongest predictors of parent reported sleep problems.

  7. Sleep-dependent memory consolidation in healthy aging and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace-Schott, Edward F; Spencer, Rebecca M C

    2015-01-01

    and their further decline with MCI may account for concomitant declines in SDC. Notably these same sleep features further markedly decline, in concert with declining cognitive function, with the progression to AD. Therefore, progressive changes in sleep quality, architecture, and neural regulation may constitute a contributing factor to cognitive decline that is seen both with healthy aging and, to a much greater extent, with neurodegenerative disease.

  8. Human gamma oscillations during slow wave sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Valderrama

    Full Text Available Neocortical local field potentials have shown that gamma oscillations occur spontaneously during slow-wave sleep (SWS. At the macroscopic EEG level in the human brain, no evidences were reported so far. In this study, by using simultaneous scalp and intracranial EEG recordings in 20 epileptic subjects, we examined gamma oscillations in cerebral cortex during SWS. We report that gamma oscillations in low (30-50 Hz and high (60-120 Hz frequency bands recurrently emerged in all investigated regions and their amplitudes coincided with specific phases of the cortical slow wave. In most of the cases, multiple oscillatory bursts in different frequency bands from 30 to 120 Hz were correlated with positive peaks of scalp slow waves ("IN-phase" pattern, confirming previous animal findings. In addition, we report another gamma pattern that appears preferentially during the negative phase of the slow wave ("ANTI-phase" pattern. This new pattern presented dominant peaks in the high gamma range and was preferentially expressed in the temporal cortex. Finally, we found that the spatial coherence between cortical sites exhibiting gamma activities was local and fell off quickly when computed between distant sites. Overall, these results provide the first human evidences that gamma oscillations can be observed in macroscopic EEG recordings during sleep. They support the concept that these high-frequency activities might be associated with phasic increases of neural activity during slow oscillations. Such patterned activity in the sleeping brain could play a role in off-line processing of cortical networks.

  9. Sleep after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg-Adamsen, S; Skarbye, M; Wildschiødtz, G

    1996-01-01

    The sleep pattern and oxygenation of 10 patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were studied on the night before operation and the first night after operation. Operations were performed during general anaesthesia and postoperative analgesia was achieved without the administration...... of opioids. There were no significant changes in the total time awake or the number of arousals on the postoperative night compared with the night before operation. During the postoperative night, we found a decrease (P = 0.02) in slow wave sleep (SWS) with a corresponding increase in stage 2 sleep (P = 0.......01). SWS was absent in four of the patients after operation, whereas in six patients it was within the normal range (5-20% of the night). The proportion of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was not significantly changed after operation. There were no changes in arterial oxygen saturation on the postoperative...

  10. Plasma Trytophan and Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. N.; Kalucy, R. S.; Hartmann, M. K.; Lacey, J. H.; Crisp, A. H.; Bailey, J. E.; Eccleston, E. G.; Coppen, A.

    1974-01-01

    Free, bound, and total plasma tryptophan (F.P.T., B.P.T., and T.P.T.) levels have been measured throughout the night in six young female volunteers. All-night polygraphic sleep recordings were also made. No direct temporal relationship was found between plasma tryptophan levels and specific sleep stages. The mean F.P.T. levels, however, were found to have a positive correlation with rapid-eye-movement (R.E.M.) sleep and a negative correlation with non-R.E.M. sleep. An inverse relationship existed between the F.P.T. and B.P.T. levels. There appeared to be a diurnal variation in F.P.T. levels, with high readings in the first half of the night. PMID:4373116

  11. National Sleep Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Irish Italian Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Macedonian Malay Maltese Norwegian Persian Polish ... Test your knowledge, take our symptom screener, and learn more about narcolepsy. Sleep and Melatonin It can ...

  12. Sleep apnea syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2012-10-10

    Oct 10, 2012 ... quality of life and also a diminished risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality [14]. ... concentration, depression, irritability) and nocturnal symptoms (snoring ..... O. Sleep-disordered breathing in community-dwelling elderly.

  13. Sleep and Aging: Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aging Insomnia Insomnia is the most common sleep complaint at any age. It affects almost half of ... A-Z | videos A-Z | training | about us | Customer Support | site map National Institute on Aging | U.S. ...

  14. Key sleep neurologic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Louis, Erik K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sleep disorders are frequent comorbidities in neurologic patients. This review focuses on clinical aspects and prognosis of 3 neurologic sleep disorders: narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED), and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Narcolepsy causes pervasive, enduring excessive daytime sleepiness, adversely affecting patients' daily functioning. RLS/WED is characterized by an uncomfortable urge to move the legs before sleep, often evolving toward augmentation and resulting in daylong bothersome symptoms. RBD causes potentially injurious dream enactment behaviors that often signify future evolution of overt synucleinopathy neurodegeneration in as many as 81% of patients. Timely recognition, referral for polysomnography, and longitudinal follow-up of narcolepsy, RLS/WED, and RBD patients are imperatives for neurologists in providing quality comprehensive patient care. PMID:24605270

  15. Problems sleeping during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trips to the bathroom. Increased heart rate. Your heart rate increases during pregnancy to pump more blood. This may make it harder to sleep. Shortness of breath. At first, pregnancy hormones can ...

  16. What Are Sleep Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a finger. These sensors record your brain waves, heart rate, breathing effort and rate, oxygen levels, and muscle movements before, during, and after sleep. There is a small risk of irritation from ...

  17. Functions and Mechanisms of Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Zielinski

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is a complex physiological process that is regulated globally, regionally, and locally by both cellular and molecular mechanisms. It occurs to some extent in all animals, although sleep expression in lower animals may be co-extensive with rest. Sleep regulation plays an intrinsic part in many behavioral and physiological functions. Currently, all researchers agree there is no single physiological role sleep serves. Nevertheless, it is quite evident that sleep is essential for many vital functions including development, energy conservation, brain waste clearance, modulation of immune responses, cognition, performance, vigilance, disease, and psychological state. This review details the physiological processes involved in sleep regulation and the possible functions that sleep may serve. This description of the brain circuitry, cell types, and molecules involved in sleep regulation is intended to further the reader’s understanding of the functions of sleep.

  18. Impaired sleep and allostatic load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Alice Jessie; Dich, Nadya; Lange, Theis

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Understanding the mechanisms linking sleep impairment to morbidity and mortality is important for future prevention, but these mechanisms are far from elucidated. We aimed to determine the relation between impaired sleep, both in terms of duration and disturbed sleep, and allostatic load...... Biobank with comprehensive information on sleep duration, disturbed sleep, objective measures of an extensive range of biological risk markers, and physical conditions. Results: Long sleep (mean difference 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13, 0.32) and disturbed sleep (0.14; 0.06, 0.22) were associated...... with higher AL as well as with high-risk levels of risk markers from the anthropometric, metabolic, and immune system. Sub-analyses suggested that the association between disturbed sleep and AL might be explained by underlying disorders. Whereas there was no association between short sleep and AL...

  19. Impaired sleep and allostatic load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Alice Jessie; Dich, Nadya; Lange, Theis

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Understanding the mechanisms linking sleep impairment to morbidity and mortality is important for future prevention, but these mechanisms are far from elucidated. We aimed to determine the relation between impaired sleep, both in terms of duration and disturbed sleep, and allostatic load...... Biobank with comprehensive information on sleep duration, disturbed sleep, objective measures of an extensive range of biological risk markers, and physical conditions. Results: Long sleep (mean difference 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13, 0.32) and disturbed sleep (0.14; 0.06, 0.22) were associated...... with higher AL as well as with high-risk levels of risk markers from the anthropometric, metabolic, and immune system. Sub-analyses suggested that the association between disturbed sleep and AL might be explained by underlying disorders. Whereas there was no association between short sleep and AL...

  20. Exercise Effects on Sleep Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunao eUchida

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review focuses on the effects of exercise on sleep. In its early days, sleep research largely focused on central nervous system (CNS physiology using standardized tabulations of several sleep-specific landmark electroencephalogram (EEG waveforms. Though coarse, this method has enabled the observation and inspection of numerous uninterrupted sleep phenomena. Thus, research on the effects of exercise on sleep began, in the 1960’s, with a focus primarily on sleep EEG (CNS sleep changes. Those early studies found only small effects of exercise on sleep. More recent sleep research has explored not only CNS functioning, but somatic physiology as well. As physical exercise mostly affects somatic functions, endocrine and autonomic nervous system (ANS changes that occur during sleep should be affected by daytime exercise. Since endocrinological, metabolic and autonomic changes can be measured during sleep, it should be possible to assess exercise effects on somatic physiology in addition to CNS sleep quality, building from standard polysomnographic (PSG techniques. Incorporating measures of somatic physiology in the quantitative assessment of sleep could further our understanding of sleep's function as an auto-regulatory, global phenomenon.

  1. Practical application of artificial neural networks in the neurosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinti, Antonio

    1995-04-01

    This article presents a practical application of artificial multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural networks in neurosciences. The data that are processed are labeled data from the visual analysis of electrical signals of human sleep. The objective of this work is to automatically classify into sleep stages the electrophysiological signals recorded from electrodes placed on a sleeping patient. Two large data bases were designed by experts in order to realize this study. One data base was used to train the network and the other to test its generalization capacity. The classification results obtained with the MLP network were compared to a type K nearest neighbor Knn non-parametric classification method. The MLP network gave a better result in terms of classification than the Knn method. Both classification techniques were implemented on a transputer system. With both networks in their final configuration, the MLP network was 160 times faster than the Knn model in classifying a sleep period.

  2. Do Fish Sleep?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    Most fish can’t shut their eyes, so it’s easy to think they don’t sleep. But that’s like assuming humans don’t sleep because we can’t shut our ears to drown out sound. In fact, many species of fish take time out during the day or (more often) at night to enter a sleeplike stage. Some of these fish float in place, others lie on the bottom。

  3. Sleep and psychoneuroimmunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opp, Mark R

    2009-05-01

    The brain uses a variety of mechanisms to survey the immune system constantly. Responses of the immune system to invading pathogens are detected by the central nervous system, which responds by orchestrating complex changes in behavior and physiology. Sleep is one of the behaviors altered in response to immune challenge. The role of cytokines as mediators of responses to infectious challenge and regulators and modulators of sleep is the focus of this article.

  4. Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwindling Jerome

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This course presents an overview of the concepts of the neural networks and their aplication in the framework of High energy physics analyses. After a brief introduction on the concept of neural networks, the concept is explained in the frame of neuro-biology, introducing the concept of multi-layer perceptron, learning and their use as data classifer. The concept is then presented in a second part using in more details the mathematical approach focussing on typical use cases faced in particle physics. Finally, the last part presents the best way to use such statistical tools in view of event classifers, putting the emphasis on the setup of the multi-layer perceptron. The full article (15 p. corresponding to this lecture is written in french and is provided in the proceedings of the book SOS 2008.

  5. Sleep Paralysis and Hallucinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Stores

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep paralysis is one of the many conditions of which visual hallucinations can be a part but has received relatively little attention. It can be associated with other dramatic symptoms of a psychotic nature likely to cause diagnostic uncertainty. Methods and results: These points are illustrated by the case of a young man with a severe bipolar affective disorder who independently developed terrifying visual, auditory and somatic hallucinatory episodes at sleep onset, associated with a sense of evil influence and presence. The episodes were not obviously related to his psychiatric disorder. Past diagnoses included nightmares and night terrors. Review provided no convincing evidence of various other sleep disorders nor physical conditions in which hallucinatory experiences can occur. A diagnosis of predormital isolated sleep paralysis was made and appropriate treatment recommended. Conclusions: Sleep paralysis, common in the general population, can be associated with dramatic auxiliary symptoms suggestive of a psychotic state. Less common forms are either part of the narcolepsy syndrome or (rarely they are familial in type. Interestingly, sleep paralysis (especially breathing difficulty features prominently in the folklore of various countries.

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Matthew L; Brass, Steven D

    2011-11-29

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects millions of Americans and is estimated to be as prevalent as asthma and diabetes. Given the fact that obesity is a major risk factor for OSA, and given the current global rise in obesity, the prevalence of OSA will increase in the future. Individuals with sleep apnea are often unaware of their sleep disorder. It is usually first recognized as a problem by family members who witness the apneic episodes or is suspected by their primary care doctor because of the individual's risk factors and symptoms. The vast majority remain undiagnosed and untreated, despite the fact that this serious disorder can have significant consequences. Individuals with untreated OSA can stop breathing hundreds of times a night during their sleep. These apneic events can lead to fragmented sleep that is of poor quality, as the brain arouses briefly in order for the body to resume breathing. Untreated, sleep apnea can have dire health consequences and can increase the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and heart failure. OSA management has also become important in a number of comorbid neurological conditions, including epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and headache. Diagnosis typically involves use of screening questionnaires, physical exam, and an overnight polysomnography or a portable home study. Treatment options include changes in lifestyle, positive airway pressure, surgery, and dental appliances.

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven D. Brass

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA affects millions of Americans and is estimated to be as prevalent as asthma and diabetes. Given the fact that obesity is a major risk factor for OSA, and given the current global rise in obesity, the prevalence of OSA will increase in the future. Individuals with sleep apnea are often unaware of their sleep disorder. It is usually first recognized as a problem by family members who witness the apneic episodes or is suspected by their primary care doctor because of the individual’s risk factors and symptoms. The vast majority remain undiagnosed and untreated, despite the fact that this serious disorder can have significant consequences. Individuals with untreated OSA can stop breathing hundreds of times a night during their sleep. These apneic events can lead to fragmented sleep that is of poor quality, as the brain arouses briefly in order for the body to resume breathing. Untreated, sleep apnea can have dire health consequences and can increase the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and heart failure. OSA management has also become important in a number of comorbid neurological conditions, including epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and headache. Diagnosis typically involves use of screening questionnaires, physical exam, and an overnight polysomnography or a portable home study. Treatment options include changes in lifestyle, positive airway pressure, surgery, and dental appliances.

  8. A sleep state during C. elegans development

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Matthew D.; Raizen, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is the simplest animal shown to sleep. It sleeps during lethargus, a larval transition stage. Behavior during lethargus has the sleep properties of a specific quiescent posture and elevated arousal threshold that are reversible to strong stimulation and of increased sleep drive following sleep deprivation. Genetic similarities between sleep regulation during C. elegans lethargus and sleep regulation in other animals point to a sleep state that was an evolutionarily ance...

  9. Sleep Patterns in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Meltzer, Lisa J.; Beck, Suzanne E.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined sleep patterns and the association between sleep and perceived health for children with and without CF. Ninety families (45 CF) completed questionnaires about the child’s sleep and health. Significant group differences were found for sleep patterns (bedtime, wake time, total sleep time), symptoms of sleep disordered breathing, and sleep disturbances. Poorer perceived health was associated with sleep disturbances among children with CF, but not for children without CF. This...

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea alters sleep stage transition dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt T Bianchi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Enhanced characterization of sleep architecture, compared with routine polysomnographic metrics such as stage percentages and sleep efficiency, may improve the predictive phenotyping of fragmented sleep. One approach involves using stage transition analysis to characterize sleep continuity. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed hypnograms from Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS participants using the following stage designations: wake after sleep onset (WASO, non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep, and REM sleep. We show that individual patient hypnograms contain insufficient number of bouts to adequately describe the transition kinetics, necessitating pooling of data. We compared a control group of individuals free of medications, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, medical co-morbidities, or sleepiness (n = 374 with mild (n = 496 or severe OSA (n = 338. WASO, REM sleep, and NREM sleep bout durations exhibited multi-exponential temporal dynamics. The presence of OSA accelerated the "decay" rate of NREM and REM sleep bouts, resulting in instability manifesting as shorter bouts and increased number of stage transitions. For WASO bouts, previously attributed to a power law process, a multi-exponential decay described the data well. Simulations demonstrated that a multi-exponential process can mimic a power law distribution. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: OSA alters sleep architecture dynamics by decreasing the temporal stability of NREM and REM sleep bouts. Multi-exponential fitting is superior to routine mono-exponential fitting, and may thus provide improved predictive metrics of sleep continuity. However, because a single night of sleep contains insufficient transitions to characterize these dynamics, extended monitoring of sleep, probably at home, would be necessary for individualized clinical application.

  11. Estimating individual optimal sleep duration and potential sleep debt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Shingo; Katayose, Yasuko; Nakazaki, Kyoko; Motomura, Yuki; Oba, Kentaro; Katsunuma, Ruri; Terasawa, Yuri; Enomoto, Minori; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Hida, Akiko; Mishima, Kazuo

    2016-10-24

    In this study, we hypothesized that dynamics of sleep time obtained over consecutive days of extended sleep in a laboratory reflect an individual's optimal sleep duration (OSD) and that the difference between OSD and habitual sleep duration (HSD) at home represents potential sleep debt (PSD). We found that OSD varies among individuals and PSD showed stronger correlation with subjective/objective sleepiness than actual sleep time, interacting with individual's vulnerability of sleep loss. Furthermore, only 1 h of PSD takes four days to recover to their optimal level. Recovery from PSD was also associated with the improvement in glycometabolism, thyrotropic activity and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis. Additionally, the increase (rebound) in total sleep time from HSD at the first extended sleep would be a simple indicator of PSD. These findings confirmed self-evaluating the degree of sleep debt at home as a useful clinical marker. To establish appropriate sleep habits, it is necessary to evaluate OSD, vulnerability to sleep loss, and sleep homeostasis characteristics on an individual basis.

  12. Perspective on Sleep and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A Monjan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a strong body of data directly interrelating sleep problems with mood disorders. There is a growing data base directly associating sleep disorders with attention and memory problems. Motor disorders, especially involving the dopaminergic system, may produce sleep problems, including a possible association between disordered sleep and nocturnal falls. Sleep disorders may be causal conditions for metabolic diseases and increased risk for morbidity and mortality. Sleep and health are directly interrelated. To further probe these issues, especially as related to the aging process, investigators need to utilize tools and concepts from genomics and epigenetics, proteomics, metabolomics, any future ...omics, molecular neuroimaging, and cognitive neuroscience.

  13. Headache and sleep in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Benedetta; Panunzi, Sara; Bruni, Oliviero; Guidetti, Vincenzo

    2013-06-01

    Several scientific studies report a close relationship between sleep and headache: sleep changes may reflect the onset and increase of both duration and frequency of headache attacks. Variations in sleep architecture, together with a poor sleep hygiene in children, may indeed be responsible for the onset of headache and its development into a chronic disease. For a correct clinical management of children with headache, it is therefore fundamental to investigate their sleep habits, architecture and potential disturbances, in order to develop adequate therapeutic plans for both sleep and headache.

  14. Adenosine, Energy Metabolism, and Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Porkka-Heiskanen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available While the exact function of sleep remains unknown, it is evident that sleep was developed early in phylogenesis and represents an ancient and vital strategy for survival. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the function of sleep is associated with energy metabolism, saving of energy, and replenishment of energy stores. Prolonged wakefulness induces signs of energy depletion in the brain, while experimentally induced, local energy depletion induces increase in sleep, similarly as would a period of prolonged wakefulness. The key molecule in the induction of sleep appears to be adenosine, which induces sleep locally in the basal forebrain.

  15. Sex-Related Differences in the Effects of Sleep Habits on Verbal and Visuospatial Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Seishu; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Nouchi, Rui; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Miyauchi, Carlos M; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Poor sleep quality negatively affects memory performance, and working memory in particular. We investigated sleep habits related to sleep quality including sleep duration, daytime nap duration, nap frequency, and dream content recall frequency (DCRF). Declarative working memory can be subdivided into verbal working memory (VWM) and visuospatial working memory (VSWM). We hypothesized that sleep habits would have different effects on VWM and VSWM. To our knowledge, our study is the first to investigate differences between VWM and VSWM related to daytime nap duration, nap frequency, and DCRF. Furthermore, we tested the hypothesis that the effects of duration and frequency of daytime naps and DCRF on VWM and VSWM differed according to sex. We assessed 779 healthy right-handed individuals (434 males and 345 females; mean age: 20.7 ± 1.8 years) using a digit span forward and backward VWM task, a forward and backward VSWM task, and sleep habits scales. A correlation analysis was used to test the relationships between VWM capacity (VWMC) and VSWM capacity (VSWMC) scores and sleep duration, nap duration, nap frequency, and DCRF. Furthermore, multiple regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with VWMC and VSWMC scores and to identify sex-related differences. We found significant positive correlations between VSWMC and nap duration and DCRF, and between VWMC and sleep duration in all subjects. Furthermore, we found that working memory capacity (WMC) was positively correlated with nap duration in males and with sleep duration in females, and DCRF was positively correlated with VSWMC in females. Our finding of sex-related differences in the effects of sleep habits on WMC has not been reported previously. The associations between WMC and sleep habits differed according to sex because of differences in the underlying neural correlates of VWM and VSWM, and effectiveness of the sleep habits in males and females.

  16. [How can an otolaryngologist benefit from artificial neural networks?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaleniec, Joanna; Składzień, Jacek; Tadeusiewicz, Ryszard; Oleś, Krzysztof; Konior, Marcin; Przeklasa, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Artificial neural networks are informatic systems that have unique computational capabilities. The principle of their functioning is based on the rules of data processing in the brain. This article discusses the most important features of the artificial neural networks with reference to their applications in otolaryngology. The cited studies concern the fields of rhinology, audiology, phoniatrics, vestibulology, oncology, sleep apnea and salivary gland diseases. The authors also refer to their own experience with predictive neural models designed in the Department of Otolaryngology of the Jagiellonian University Medical College in Krakow. The applications of artificial neural networks in clinical diagnosis, automated signal interpretation and outcome prediction are presented. Moreover, the article explains how the artificial neural networks work and how the otolaryngologists can use them in their clinical practice and research.

  17. FGF Signaling Transforms Non-neural Ectoderm into Neural Crest

    OpenAIRE

    Yardley, Nathan; García-Castro, Martín I.

    2012-01-01

    The neural crest arises at the border between the neural plate and the adjacent non-neural ectoderm. It has been suggested that both neural and non-neural ectoderm can contribute to the neural crest. Several studies have examined the molecular mechanisms that regulate neural crest induction in neuralized tissues or the neural plate border. Here, using the chick as a model system, we address the molecular mechanisms by which non-neural ectoderm generates neural crest. We report that in respons...

  18. Decrease in monocular sleep after sleep deprivation in the domestic chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerema, AS; Riedstra, B; Strijkstra, AM

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the trade-off between sleep need and alertness, by challenging chickens to modify their monocular sleep. We sleep deprived domestic chickens (Gallus domesticus) to increase their sleep need. We found that in response to sleep deprivation the fraction of monocular sleep within sleep

  19. Decrease in monocular sleep after sleep deprivation in the domestic chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerema, AS; Riedstra, B; Strijkstra, AM

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the trade-off between sleep need and alertness, by challenging chickens to modify their monocular sleep. We sleep deprived domestic chickens (Gallus domesticus) to increase their sleep need. We found that in response to sleep deprivation the fraction of monocular sleep within sleep d

  20. Altered sleep composition after traumatic brain injury does not affect declarative sleep-dependent memory consolidation

    OpenAIRE

    Janna eMantua; Keenan M Mahan; Owen S Henry; Rebecca M. C. Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) often report sleep disturbances, which may be caused by changes in sleep architecture or reduced sleep quality (greater time awake after sleep onset, poorer sleep efficiency, and sleep stage proportion alterations). Sleep is beneficial for memory formation, and herein we examine whether altered sleep physiology following TBI has deleterious effects on sleep-dependent declarative memory consolidation. Participants learned a list of wor...

  1. Sleep, its regulation and possible mechanisms of sleep disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porkka-Heiskanen, T; Zitting, K-M; Wigren, H-K

    2013-08-01

    The state of sleep consists of different phases that proceed in successive, tightly regulated order through the night forming a physiological program, which for each individual is different but stabile from one night to another. Failure to accomplish this program results in feeling of unrefreshing sleep and tiredness in the morning. The program core is constructed by genetic factors but regulated by circadian rhythm and duration and intensity of day time brain activity. Many environmental factors modulate sleep, including stress, health status and ingestion of vigilance-affecting nutrients or medicines (e.g. caffeine). Acute sleep loss results in compromised cognitive performance, memory deficits, depressive mood and involuntary sleep episodes during the day. Moreover, prolonged sleep curtailment has many adverse health effects, as evidenced by both epidemiological and experimental studies. These effects include increased risk for depression, type II diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular diseases. In addition to voluntary restriction of sleep, shift work, irregular working hours, jet lag and stress are important factors that induce curtailed or bad quality sleep and/or insomnia. This review covers the current theories on the function of normal sleep and describes current knowledge on the physiologic effects of sleep loss. It provides insights into the basic mechanisms of the regulation of wakefulness and sleep creating a theoretical background for understanding different disturbances of sleep.

  2. Sleep timing and circadian phase in delayed sleep phase syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anne-Marie; Reid, Kathryn J; Gourineni, Ramadevi; Zee, Phyllis C

    2009-08-01

    Delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder in which the timing of the sleep episode occurs later than desired and is associated with difficulty falling asleep, problems awakening on time (e.g., to meet work or school obligations), and daytime sleepiness. The phase relationship between the timing of sleep and endogenous circadian rhythms is critical to the initiation and maintenance of sleep, and significant alteration leads to impairment of sleep quality and duration. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the phase relationship between sleep-wake times and physiological markers of circadian timing in clinic patients with DSPS. Objective and subjective measures of sleep timing and circadian phase markers (core body temperature and melatonin) were measured in patients with DSPS and compared with age-matched controls. As expected, significant delays in the timing of the major sleep episode and circadian phase of body temperature and melatonin rhythms were seen in the DSPS group when allowed to sleep at their own habitual schedules, but the phase relationship between sleep-wake times and circadian phase was similar between the 2 groups. These results suggest that the symptoms of insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness in DSPS patients living under entrained real-life conditions cannot be explained by an alteration in the phase relationship between sleep-wake patterns and other physiological circadian rhythms.

  3. Rodent models of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eric M; O'Donnell, Christopher P

    2013-09-15

    Rodent models of sleep apnea have long been used to provide novel insight into the generation and predisposition to apneas as well as to characterize the impact of sleep apnea on cardiovascular, metabolic, and psychological health in humans. Given the significant body of work utilizing rodent models in the field of sleep apnea, the aims of this review are three-fold: first, to review the use of rodents as natural models of sleep apnea; second, to provide an overview of the experimental interventions employed in rodents to simulate sleep apnea; third, to discuss the refinement of rodent models to further our understanding of breathing abnormalities that occur during sleep. Given mounting evidence that sleep apnea impairs cognitive function, reduces quality of life, and exacerbates the course of multiple chronic diseases, rodent models will remain a high priority as a tool to interrogate both the pathophysiology and sequelae of breathing related abnormalities during sleep and to improve approaches to diagnosis and therapy.

  4. Sleep deprivation and false memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenda, Steven J; Patihis, Lawrence; Loftus, Elizabeth F; Lewis, Holly C; Fenn, Kimberly M

    2014-09-01

    Many studies have investigated factors that affect susceptibility to false memories. However, few have investigated the role of sleep deprivation in the formation of false memories, despite overwhelming evidence that sleep deprivation impairs cognitive function. We examined the relationship between self-reported sleep duration and false memories and the effect of 24 hr of total sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories. We found that under certain conditions, sleep deprivation can increase the risk of developing false memories. Specifically, sleep deprivation increased false memories in a misinformation task when participants were sleep deprived during event encoding, but did not have a significant effect when the deprivation occurred after event encoding. These experiments are the first to investigate the effect of sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories, which can have dire consequences.

  5. Sleep and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... activities also affect sleep, so regular exercise and avoidance of napping can greatly improve nighttime sleep. Unfortunately, ... helpful, please consider supporting IFFGD with a small tax- deductible donation. Make Donation Adapted from IFFGD Publication # ...

  6. Introduction to modern sleep technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, Rayleigh Ping-Ying

    2012-01-01

    This book offers a wide range of up-to-date insight on current research in sleep technology, covering advances in sleep medicine, clinical psychology, engineering, industrial design and technology management, all with the aim of improving people's daily lives.

  7. Sleep in High Stress Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn-Evans, Erin

    2014-01-01

    High stress occupations are associated with sleep restriction, circadian misalignment and demanding workload. This presentation will provide an overview of sleep duration, circadian misalignment and fatigue countermeasures and performance outcomes during spaceflight and commercial aviation.

  8. The homeostatic regulation of REM sleep: A role for localized expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subimal; Knapp, Clifford M; Koul-Tiwari, Richa; Barnes, Abigail

    2015-10-01

    Homeostatic regulation of REM sleep plays a key role in neural plasticity and deficits in this process are implicated in the development of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Little is known, however, about the molecular mechanisms that underlie this homeostatic regulation process. This study examined the hypothesis that, during selective REM sleep deprivation (RSD), increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in REM sleep regulating areas is critical for the development of homeostatic drive for REM sleep, as measured by an increase in the number of REM sleep transitions. Rats were assigned to RSD, non-sleep deprived (BSL), or total sleep deprivation (TSD) groups. Physiological recordings were obtained from cortical, hippocampal, and pontine EEG electrodes over a 6h period, in which sleep deprivation occurred during the first 3h. In the RSD, but not the other conditions, homeostatic drive for REM sleep increased progressively. BDNF protein expression was significantly greater in the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) and subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) in the RSD as compared to the TSD and BSL groups, areas that regulate REM sleep, but not in the medial preoptic area, which regulates non-REM sleep. There was a significant positive correlation between RSD-induced increases in number of REM sleep episodes and increased BDNF expression in the PPT and SubCD. These increases positively correlated with levels of homeostatic drive for REM sleep. These results, for the first time, suggest that selective RSD-induced increased expression of BDNF in the PPT and SubCD are determinant factors in the development of the homeostatic drive for REM sleep.

  9. Sleep and cortisol interact to support memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennion, Kelly A; Mickley Steinmetz, Katherine R; Kensinger, Elizabeth A; Payne, Jessica D

    2015-03-01

    Separate lines of research have demonstrated that rises in cortisol can benefit memory consolidation, as can the occurrence of sleep soon after encoding. For the first time, we demonstrate that pre-learning cortisol interacts with sleep to benefit memory consolidation, particularly for negative arousing items. Resting cortisol levels during encoding were positively correlated with subsequent memory, but only following a period of sleep. There was no such relation following a period of wakefulness. Using eye tracking, we further reveal that for negative stimuli, this facilitative effect may arise because cortisol strengthens the relationship between looking time at encoding and subsequent memory. We suggest that elevated cortisol may "tag" attended information as important to remember at the time of encoding, thus enabling sleep-based processes to optimally consolidate salient information in a selective manner. Neuroimaging data suggest that this optimized consolidation leads to a refinement of the neural processes recruited for successful retrieval of negative stimuli, with the retrieval of items attended in the presence of elevated cortisol and consolidated over a night of sleep associated with activity in the amygdala and vmPFC.

  10. Sleep-dependent directional coupling between human neocortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Tobias; Axmacher, Nikolai; Lehnertz, Klaus; Elger, Christian E; Fell, Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    Complex interactions between neocortex and hippocampus are the neural basis of memory formation. Two-step theories of memory formation suggest that initial encoding of novel information depends on the induction of rapid plasticity within the hippocampus, and is followed by a second sleep-dependent step of memory consolidation. These theories predict information flow from the neocortex into the hippocampus during waking state and in the reverse direction during sleep. However, experimental evidence that interactions between hippocampus and neocortex have a predominant direction which reverses during sleep rely on cross-correlation analysis of data from animal experiments and yielded inconsistent results. Here, we investigated directional coupling in intracranial EEG data from human subjects using a phase-modeling approach which is well suited to reveal functional interdependencies in oscillatory data. In general, we observed that the anterior hippocampus predominantly drives nearby and remote brain regions. Surprisingly, however, the influence of neocortical regions on the hippocampus significantly increased during sleep as compared to waking state. These results question the standard model of hippocampal-neocortical interactions and suggest that sleep-dependent consolidation is accomplished by an active retrieval of hippocampal information by the neocortex.

  11. Health Effects of Sleep Deprivation,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    The effects of REM deprivation on electrodermal - activity in human sleep . In Weitzman ED (ed): Adv Sleep Res 2:164-176, 1976. 21. Baust W, Moppeney H...and health consequences of total, selective, and partial sleep loss were documented in this paper by examining adrenimedullary activity ...kinds of sleep loss on the functional integrity of the human organism. The factors discussed include: adrenomedullary activity , adrenocortical activ - ity

  12. Sleep stages, memory and learning.

    OpenAIRE

    Dotto, L

    1996-01-01

    Learning and memory can be impaired by sleep loss during specific vulnerable "windows" for several days after new tasks have been learned. Different types of tasks are differentially vulnerable to the loss of different stages of sleep. Memory required to perform cognitive procedural tasks is affected by the loss of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep on the first night after learning occurs and again on the third night after learning. REM-sleep deprivation on the second night after learning does n...

  13. Neural Network Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, E.; Jain, L.C.; Veelenturf, L.P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Artificial neural networks, also called neural networks, have been used successfully in many fields including engineering, science and business. This paper presents the implementation of several neural network simulators and their applications in character recognition and other engineering areas

  14. Starting a sleep center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Lawrence J; Valentine, Paul S

    2010-05-01

    The demand for sleep medicine services has grown tremendously during the last decade and will likely continue. To date, growth in demand has been met by growth in the number of new sleep centers. The need for more new centers will be dependent on market drivers that include increasing regulatory requirements, personnel shortages, integration of home sleep testing, changes in reimbursement, a shift in emphasis from diagnostics to treatment, and an increased consumer focus on sleep. The decision to open a new center should be based on understanding the market dynamics, completing a market analysis, and developing a business plan. The business plan should include an overview of the facility, a personnel and organizational structure, an evaluation of the business environment, a financial plan, a description of services provided, and a strategy for obtaining, managing, and extending a referral base. Implementation of the business plan and successful operation require ongoing planning and monitoring of operational parameters. The need for new sleep centers will likely continue, but the shifting market dynamics indicate a greater need for understanding the marketplace and careful planning.

  15. Depression and poor sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez, Connie; Brennum, Lise T; Stórustovu, Signe í

    2007-01-01

    The effects of five antidepressants (escitalopram, paroxetine, duloxetine, venlafaxine, and reboxetine) on the sleep architecture were investigated in freely moving rats in the light phase of a 12:12 h light:dark cycle following a single i.p. dose of antidepressant. Overall, paroxetine and escita......The effects of five antidepressants (escitalopram, paroxetine, duloxetine, venlafaxine, and reboxetine) on the sleep architecture were investigated in freely moving rats in the light phase of a 12:12 h light:dark cycle following a single i.p. dose of antidepressant. Overall, paroxetine...... and escitalopram exhibited the least sleep disruptive profiles, whereas duloxetine, venlafaxine, and reboxetine increased the time spent awake and suppressed paradoxical sleep. Analysis of the EEG at 1 h intervals revealed only subtle differences from the overall picture. The effect of venlafaxine on disruption...... of sleep architecture could not be readily explained by its in vitro serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA) reuptake inhibitory potencies. In vivo microdialysis experiments in the ventral hippocampus of freely moving rats revealed that venlafaxine affected the 5-HT and NA systems equally at the doses...

  16. [Sleep related eating disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuichi; Komada, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Nighttime eating is categorized as either sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) or night eating syndrome (NES). Critical reviews of the literature on both disorders have suggested that they are situated at opposite poles of a disordered eating spectrum. The feeding behavior in SRED is characterized by recurrent episodes of eating after an arousal from nighttime sleep with amnesia. Conversely, NES could be considered as an abnormality in the circadian rhythm of meal timing with a normal circadian timing of sleep onset. Both conditions clearly concentrate to occur during young adulthood, and are often relentless and chronic. Misunderstanding and low awareness of SRED and NES have limited our ability to determine the exact prevalence of the two disorders. SRED is frequently associated with other sleep disorders, in particular parasomnias such as sleep walking. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is ineffective, but pharmacotherapy is very effective in controlling SRED. Especially, studies have shown that the anti-seizure medication topiramate may be an effective treatment for SRED.

  17. Sleep in thyrotoxicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G R Sridhar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pattern of sleep in hyperthyroid state / thyrotoxicosis has not been systematically studied. It is being characterized as poor without further elaboration. We analyzed the pattern of sleep in a large sample of individuals with thyrotoxicosis who came to our endocrine center in southern India. Materials and Methods: We identified individuals with the diagnosis of ′thyrotoxicosis′ from our electronic medical record database, and evaluated clinical parameters and pattern of their sleep: difficulty in falling asleep (DFA, difficulty in maintaining sleep (DMS, excess daytime sleepiness. In the first phase, univariate analysis with logistic regression was performed. Multivariate logistic regression was performed in the next phase on variables with a P-value < 0.1: these were considered as potential categories/ variables. Results: In model response variable with DFA, multivariate logistic regression predicted that subjects with abnormal appetite (more 1.7 or less 2.2, change in bowel motion (loose 1.5 or constipation 2.8, in mood (easy loss of temper 3.4, change of voice -- hoarse 7.4 or moderately hoarse 3.1, tended to have higher chances of difficulty in falling asleep (DFA. Patients with tremor (yes = 5.4 had greater likelihood of difficulty in maintaining sleep (DMS. Conclusions: Individuals with hyperthyroidism/thyrotoxicosis principally had difficulty in falling asleep DFA, which was related to hyperkinetic features.

  18. Sustained sleep fragmentation induces sleep homeostasis in mice

    KAUST Repository

    Baud, Maxime O.

    2015-04-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep fragmentation (SF) is an integral feature of sleep apnea and other prevalent sleep disorders. Although the effect of repetitive arousals on cognitive performance is well documented, the effects of long-term SF on electroencephalography (EEG) and molecular markers of sleep homeostasis remain poorly investigated. To address this question, we developed a mouse model of chronic SF and characterized its effect on EEG spectral frequencies and the expression of genes previously linked to sleep homeostasis including clock genes, heat shock proteins, and plasticity-related genes. Design: N/A. Setting: Animal sleep research laboratory. Participants : Sixty-six C57BL6/J adult mice. Interventions: Instrumental sleep disruption at a rate of 60/h during 14 days Measurements and Results: Locomotor activity and EEG were recorded during 14 days of SF followed by recovery for 2 days. Despite a dramatic number of arousals and decreased sleep bout duration, SF minimally reduced total quantity of sleep and did not significantly alter its circadian distribution. Spectral analysis during SF revealed a homeostatic drive for slow wave activity (SWA; 1-4 Hz) and other frequencies as well (4-40 Hz). Recordings during recovery revealed slow wave sleep consolidation and a transient rebound in SWA, and paradoxical sleep duration. The expression of selected genes was not induced following chronic SF. Conclusions: Chronic sleep fragmentation (SF) increased sleep pressure confirming that altered quality with preserved quantity triggers core sleep homeostasis mechanisms. However, it did not induce the expression of genes induced by sleep loss, suggesting that these molecular pathways are not sustainably activated in chronic diseases involving SF.

  19. [Evaluation of sleep apnea syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirrier, R

    1993-01-01

    The evaluation of sleep apnea syndrome is based on polysomnography. Different sensor and recording techniques are reported. Some widely used neurophysiological and cardiorespiratory analysis criteria are proposed. Many sleep laboratories develop ambulatory and automatized methods for screening breathing disorders associated with sleep. The main principles of these approaches are briefly reviewed.

  20. Your Guide to Healthy Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... REM Sleep REM Sleep Stage 1: Stage 2: Stage 3: Light sleep; easily l Usually first occurs awakened; muscles about 90 minutes relax with occasional after you fall asleep, twitches; eye and longer, ... non-REM stages throughout the night. Eyes move rapidly Occurs soon ...

  1. All about Sleep (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is very important to kids' well-being. The link between a lack of sleep and a child's behavior isn't always obvious. ... 8- to 12-Month-Old Obstructive Sleep Apnea Sleep Problems in Teens Separation Anxiety Sleepwalking Nightmares Time for Bed? Taking the Bite ...

  2. Cutaneous warming promotes sleep onset.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Swaab, D.F.; Someren, E.J.W. van

    2005-01-01

    Sleep occurs in close relation to changes in body temperature. Both the monophasic sleep period in humans and the polyphasic sleep periods in rodents tend to be initiated when core body temperature is declining. This decline is mainly due to an increase in skin blood flow and consequently skin

  3. Sleep disturbances and glucose homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barf, R. Paulien; Scheurink, Anton J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbances, induced by either lifestyle, shift work or sleeping disorders, have become more prevalent in our 24/7 Western society. Sleep disturbances are associated with impaired health including metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. The question remains whether there is a

  4. Sleep Disorders, Epilepsy, and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malow, Beth A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this review article is to describe the clinical data linking autism with sleep and epilepsy and to discuss the impact of treating sleep disorders in children with autism either with or without coexisting epileptic seizures. Studies are presented to support the view that sleep is abnormal in individuals with autistic spectrum…

  5. Cutaneous warming promotes sleep onset.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Swaab, D.F.; Someren, E.J.W. van

    2005-01-01

    Sleep occurs in close relation to changes in body temperature. Both the monophasic sleep period in humans and the polyphasic sleep periods in rodents tend to be initiated when core body temperature is declining. This decline is mainly due to an increase in skin blood flow and consequently skin warmi

  6. Sleep disturbances and glucose homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barf, R. Paulien; Scheurink, Anton J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbances, induced by either lifestyle, shift work or sleeping disorders, have become more prevalent in our 24/7 Western society. Sleep disturbances are associated with impaired health including metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. The question remains whether there is a

  7. Type 1 Diabetes and Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farabi, Sarah S

    2016-02-01

    IN BRIEF In people with type 1 diabetes, sleep may be disrupted as a result of both behavioral and physiological aspects of diabetes and its management. This sleep disruption may negatively affect disease progression and development of complications. This review highlights key research findings regarding sleep in people with type 1 diabetes.

  8. Sleep Tips for Sjogren's Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adequate sleep is especially important for those with Sjögren’s syndrome, saying that sleep deprivation exacerbates daytime fatigue and ... tips for better sleep. For more information on Sjögren’s syndrome, visit the SSF Web site at www.sjogrens. ...

  9. Alterations in Skin Temperature and Sleep in the Fear of Harm Phenotype of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J. Murphy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In children diagnosed with pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD, disturbances in the quality of sleep and wakefulness are prominent. A novel phenotype of PBD called Fear of Harm (FOH associated with separation anxiety and aggressive obsessions is associated with sleep onset insomnia, parasomnias (nightmares, night-terrors, enuresis, REM sleep-related problems, and morning sleep inertia. Children with FOH often experience thermal discomfort (e.g., feeling hot, excessive sweating in neutral ambient temperature conditions, as well as no discomfort during exposure to the extreme cold, and alternate noticeably between being excessively hot in the evening and cold in the morning. We hypothesized that these sleep- and temperature-related symptoms were overt symptoms of an impaired ability to dissipate heat, particularly in the evening hours near the time of sleep onset. We measured sleep/wake variables using actigraphy, and nocturnal skin temperature variables using thermal patches and a wireless device, and compared these data between children with PBD/FOH and a control sample of healthy children. The results are suggestive of a thermoregulatory dysfunction that is associated with sleep onset difficulties. Further, they are consistent with our hypothesis that alterations in neural circuitry common to thermoregulation and emotion regulation underlie affective and behavioral symptoms of the FOH phenotype.

  10. Reduced evoked motor and sensory potential amplitudes in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalj, Mario; Lušić, Linda; Đogaš, Zoran

    2016-06-01

    It is unknown to what extent chronic intermittent hypoxaemia in obstructive sleep apnea causes damage to the motor and sensory peripheral nerves. It was hypothesized that patients with obstructive sleep apnea would have bilaterally significantly impaired amplitudes of both motor and sensory peripheral nerve-evoked potentials of both lower and upper limbs. An observational study was conducted on 43 patients with obstructive sleep apnea confirmed by the whole-night polysomnography, and 40 controls to assess the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and peripheral neuropathy. All obstructive sleep apnea subjects underwent standardized electroneurographic testing, with full assessment of amplitudes of evoked compound muscle action potentials, sensory neural action potentials, motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities, and distal motor and sensory latencies of the median, ulnar, peroneal and sural nerves, bilaterally. All nerve measurements were compared with reference values, as well as between the untreated patients with obstructive sleep apnea and control subjects. Averaged compound muscle action potential and sensory nerve action potential amplitudes were significantly reduced in the nerves of both upper and lower limbs in patients with obstructive sleep apnea compared with controls (P motor and sensory peripheral nerves. Clinical/subclinical axonal damage exists in patients with obstructive sleep apnea to a greater extent than previously thought.

  11. Sleep-patterns, co-sleeping and parent's perception of sleep among school children: Comparison of domicile and gender

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi Gupta; Sunil Dutt Kandpal; Deepak Goel; Nidhi Mittal; Mohan Dhyani; Manish Mittal

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at assessment of sleep schedule, pre-sleep behavior, co-sleeping and parent’s perception of sleep of school going children. Method: Four schools each, from urban and rural area were included. Sleep patterns were assessed using the validated Hindi version of Childhood-Sleep-Habit-Questionnaire. Comparison was made between urban and rural group and between boys and girls. Interaction of gender, domicile and school-type was examined on the sleep patterns. Results: This...

  12. A sleep state during C. elegans development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew D; Raizen, David M

    2013-10-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is the simplest animal shown to sleep. It sleeps during lethargus, a larval transition stage. Behavior during lethargus has the sleep properties of a specific quiescent posture and elevated arousal threshold that are reversible to strong stimulation and of increased sleep drive following sleep deprivation. Genetic similarities between sleep regulation during C. elegans lethargus and sleep regulation in other animals point to a sleep state that was an evolutionarily ancestor to sleep both in C. elegans and other animals. Recent publications have shed light on key questions in sleep biology: First, How is sleep regulated? Second, How is sensory information gated during sleep? Third, How is sleep homeostasis mediated? Fourth, What is the core function of sleep?

  13. Psoriasis and Sleep Apnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Khalid, Usman; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Psoriasis and sleep apnea are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although both diseases have been linked with systemic inflammation, studies on their potential bidirectional association are lacking. We investigate the potential association between psoriasis...... and sleep apnea. METHODS: All Danish citizens age 18 y or older between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 2011 (n = 5,522,190) were linked at individual level in nationwide registries. Incidence rates (IRs) per 10,000 person-years were calculated and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) adjusted for age, sex......, socioeconomic status, smoking history, alcohol abuse, medication, and comorbidity were estimated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: There were 53,290, 6,885, 6,348, and 39,908 incident cases of mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and sleep apnea, respectively. IRRs (95% confidence interval...

  14. Sleep-related laryngospasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio S. Aloe

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Seven patients (mean age 46.6; range 33-58; 6M.1F presented with sleep-related choking episodes and were found to have features in common that distinguished them from other known causes of choking episodes during sleep. The characteristic features include: an awakening from sleep with an acute choking sensation, stridor, panic, tachycardia, short duration of episode Gess than 60 seconds, infrequent episodes (typically less than 1 per month, and absence of any known etiology. The disorder most commonly occurs in middle-aged males who are otherwise healthy. In one patient an episode of laryngospasm was polysomnographically documented to occur during stage 3. The clinical features and the polysomnographic findings suggest spasm of the vocal cords of unknown etiology.

  15. Psoriasis and Sleep Apnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Khalid, Usman; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Psoriasis and sleep apnea are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although both diseases have been linked with systemic inflammation, studies on their potential bidirectional association are lacking. We investigate the potential association between psoriasis...... and sleep apnea. METHODS: All Danish citizens age 18 y or older between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 2011 (n = 5,522,190) were linked at individual level in nationwide registries. Incidence rates (IRs) per 10,000 person-years were calculated and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) adjusted for age, sex......, socioeconomic status, smoking history, alcohol abuse, medication, and comorbidity were estimated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: There were 53,290, 6,885, 6,348, and 39,908 incident cases of mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and sleep apnea, respectively. IRRs (95% confidence interval...

  16. Ictal SPECT in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Geert; Bitterlich, Marion; Kuwert, Torsten; Ritt, Philipp; Stefan, Hermann

    2015-05-01

    -the neural activity generating movement during episodes of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder bypasses the basal ganglia, a mechanism that is shared by patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and narcolepsy patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder.

  17. Early and later life stress alter brain activity and sleep in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Mrdalj

    Full Text Available Exposure to early life stress may profoundly influence the developing brain in lasting ways. Neuropsychiatric disorders associated with early life adversity may involve neural changes reflected in EEG power as a measure of brain activity and disturbed sleep. The main aim of the present study was for the first time to characterize possible changes in adult EEG power after postnatal maternal separation in rats. Furthermore, in the same animals, we investigated how EEG power and sleep architecture were affected after exposure to a chronic mild stress protocol. During postnatal day 2-14 male rats were exposed to either long maternal separation (180 min or brief maternal separation (10 min. Long maternally separated offspring showed a sleep-wake nonspecific reduction in adult EEG power at the frontal EEG derivation compared to the brief maternally separated group. The quality of slow wave sleep differed as the long maternally separated group showed lower delta power in the frontal-frontal EEG and a slower reduction of the sleep pressure. Exposure to chronic mild stress led to a lower EEG power in both groups. Chronic exposure to mild stressors affected sleep differently in the two groups of maternal separation. Long maternally separated offspring showed more total sleep time, more episodes of rapid eye movement sleep and higher percentage of non-rapid eye movement episodes ending in rapid eye movement sleep compared to brief maternal separation. Chronic stress affected similarly other sleep parameters and flattened the sleep homeostasis curves in all offspring. The results confirm that early environmental conditions modulate the brain functioning in a long-lasting way.

  18. Mutual information analysis of sleep EEG in detecting psycho-physiological insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Serap; Tunga, M Alper; Yetkin, Sinan

    2015-05-01

    The primary goal of this study is to state the clear changes in functional brain connectivity during all night sleep in psycho-physiological insomnia (PPI). The secondary goal is to investigate the usefulness of Mutual Information (MI) analysis in estimating cortical sleep EEG arousals for detection of PPI. For these purposes, healthy controls and patients were compared to each other with respect to both linear (Pearson correlation coefficient and coherence) and nonlinear quantifiers (MI) in addition to phase locking quantification for six sleep stages (stage.1-4, rem, wake) by means of interhemispheric dependency between two central sleep EEG derivations. In test, each connectivity estimation calculated for each couple of epoches (C3-A2 and C4-A1) was identified by the vector norm of estimation. Then, patients and controls were classified by using 10 different types of data mining classifiers for five error criteria such as accuracy, root mean squared error, sensitivity, specificity and precision. High performance in a classification through a measure will validate high contribution of that measure to detecting PPI. The MI was found to be the best method in detecting PPI. In particular, the patients had lower MI, higher PCC for all sleep stages. In other words, the lower sleep EEG synchronization suffering from PPI was observed. These results probably stand for the loss of neurons that then contribute to less complex dynamical processing within the neural networks in sleep disorders an the functional central brain connectivity is nonlinear during night sleep. In conclusion, the level of cortical hemispheric connectivity is strongly associated with sleep disorder. Thus, cortical communication quantified in all existence sleep stages might be a potential marker for sleep disorder induced by PPI.

  19. Early and later life stress alter brain activity and sleep in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrdalj, Jelena; Pallesen, Ståle; Milde, Anne Marita; Jellestad, Finn Konow; Murison, Robert; Ursin, Reidun; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Grønli, Janne

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to early life stress may profoundly influence the developing brain in lasting ways. Neuropsychiatric disorders associated with early life adversity may involve neural changes reflected in EEG power as a measure of brain activity and disturbed sleep. The main aim of the present study was for the first time to characterize possible changes in adult EEG power after postnatal maternal separation in rats. Furthermore, in the same animals, we investigated how EEG power and sleep architecture were affected after exposure to a chronic mild stress protocol. During postnatal day 2-14 male rats were exposed to either long maternal separation (180 min) or brief maternal separation (10 min). Long maternally separated offspring showed a sleep-wake nonspecific reduction in adult EEG power at the frontal EEG derivation compared to the brief maternally separated group. The quality of slow wave sleep differed as the long maternally separated group showed lower delta power in the frontal-frontal EEG and a slower reduction of the sleep pressure. Exposure to chronic mild stress led to a lower EEG power in both groups. Chronic exposure to mild stressors affected sleep differently in the two groups of maternal separation. Long maternally separated offspring showed more total sleep time, more episodes of rapid eye movement sleep and higher percentage of non-rapid eye movement episodes ending in rapid eye movement sleep compared to brief maternal separation. Chronic stress affected similarly other sleep parameters and flattened the sleep homeostasis curves in all offspring. The results confirm that early environmental conditions modulate the brain functioning in a long-lasting way.

  20. Hypocretin/orexin antagonism enhances sleep-related adenosine and GABA neurotransmission in rat basal forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-DeRose, Jacqueline; Schwartz, Michael D; Nguyen, Alexander T; Warrier, Deepti R; Gulati, Srishti; Mathew, Thomas K; Neylan, Thomas C; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    Hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) neurons provide excitatory input to wake-promoting brain regions including the basal forebrain (BF). The dual HCRT receptor antagonist almorexant (ALM) decreases waking and increases sleep. We hypothesized that HCRT antagonists induce sleep, in part, through disfacilitation of BF neurons; consequently, ALM should have reduced efficacy in BF-lesioned (BFx) animals. To test this hypothesis, rats were given bilateral IgG-192-saporin injections, which predominantly targets cholinergic BF neurons. BFx and intact rats were then given oral ALM, the benzodiazepine agonist zolpidem (ZOL) or vehicle (VEH) at lights-out. ALM was less effective than ZOL at inducing sleep in BFx rats compared to controls. BF adenosine (ADO), γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA), and glutamate levels were then determined via microdialysis from intact, freely behaving rats following oral ALM, ZOL or VEH. ALM increased BF ADO and GABA levels during waking and mixed vigilance states, and preserved sleep-associated increases in GABA under low and high sleep pressure conditions. ALM infusion into the BF also enhanced cortical ADO release, demonstrating that HCRT input is critical for ADO signaling in the BF. In contrast, oral ZOL and BF-infused ZOL had no effect on ADO levels in either BF or cortex. ALM increased BF ADO (an endogenous sleep-promoting substance) and GABA (which is increased during normal sleep), and required an intact BF for maximal efficacy, whereas ZOL blocked sleep-associated BF GABA release, and required no functional contribution from the BF to induce sleep. ALM thus induces sleep by facilitating the neural mechanisms underlying the normal transition to sleep.

  1. Immediate postarousal sleep dynamics: an important determinant of sleep stability in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Magdy; Hanly, Patrick J

    2016-04-01

    Arousability from sleep is increasingly recognized as an important determinant of the clinical spectrum of sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Patients with SDB display a wide range of arousability. The reason for these differences is not known. We hypothesized that differences in the speed with which sleep deepens following arousals/awakenings (postarousal sleep dynamics) is a major determinant of these differences in arousability in patients with SDB. We analyzed 40 preexisting clinical polysomnography records from patients with a range of SDB severity (apnea-hypopnea index 5-135/h). Sleep depth was determined every 3 s using the odds ratio product (ORP) method, a continuous index of sleep depth (0 = deep sleep, 2.5 = full wakefulness) that correlates strongly (r = 0.98) with arousability (Younes M, Ostrowski M, Soiferman M, Younes H, Younes M, Raneri J, and Hanly P. Sleep 38: 641-654, 2015). Time course of ORP was determined from end of arousal until the next arousal. All arousals were analyzed (142 ± 65/polysomnogram). ORP increased from 0.58 ± 0.32 during sleep to 1.67 ± 0.35 during arousals. ORP immediately (first 9 s) following arousals/awakenings (ORP-9) ranged from 0.21(very deep sleep) to 1.71 (highly arousable state) in different patients. In patients with high ORP-9, sleep deepened slowly (over minutes) beyond 9 s but only if no arousals/awakenings recurred. ORP-9 correlated strongly with average non-rapid eye movement sleep depth (r = 0.87, P sleep architecture. We conclude that postarousal sleep dynamics are highly variable among patients with sleep-disordered breathing and largely determine average sleep depth and continuity.

  2. Optimizing sleep/wake schedules in space: Sleep during chronic nocturnal sleep restriction with and without diurnal naps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollicone, Daniel J.; Van Dongen, Hans P. A.; Dinges, David F.

    2007-02-01

    Effective sleep/wake schedules for space operations must balance severe time constraints with allocating sufficient time for sleep in order to sustain high levels of neurobehavioral performance. Developing such schedules requires knowledge about the relationship between scheduled "time in bed" (TIB) and actual physiological sleep obtained. A ground-based laboratory study in N=93 healthy adult subjects was conducted to investigate physiological sleep obtained in a range of restricted sleep schedules. Eighteen different conditions with restricted nocturnal anchor sleep, with and without diurnal naps, were examined in a response surface mapping paradigm. Sleep efficiency was found to be a function of total TIB per 24 h regardless of how the sleep was divided among nocturnal anchor sleep and diurnal nap sleep periods. The amounts of sleep stages 1+2 and REM showed more complex relationships with the durations of the anchor and nap sleep periods, while slow-wave sleep was essentially preserved among the different conditions of the experiment. The results of the study indicated that when sleep was chronically restricted, sleep duration was largely unaffected by whether the sleep was placed nocturnally or split between nocturnal anchor sleep periods and daytime naps. Having thus assessed that split-sleep schedules are feasible in terms of obtaining physiological sleep, further research will reveal whether these schedules and the associated variations in the distribution of sleep stages may be advantageous in mitigating neurobehavioral performance impairment in the face of limited time for sleep.

  3. Sleep and respiratory sleep disorders in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milioli, Giulia; Bosi, Marcello; Poletti, Venerino; Tomassetti, Sara; Grassi, Andrea; Riccardi, Silvia; Terzano, Mario Giovanni; Parrino, Liborio

    2016-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is an interstitial lung disease (ILD) characterized by inflammation and progressive scarring of the lung parenchyma. IPF profoundly affects the quality of life (QoL) and fatigue is a frequently disabling symptom. The cause of fatigue is not well understood but patients with IPF often report extremely poor sleep quality and sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD) that correlate with QoL. IPF patients present alterations in sleep architecture, including decreased sleep efficiency, slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and increased sleep fragmentation. Moreover, sleep related hypoventilation during the vulnerable REM sleep period and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) are frequent, but remain usually underdiagnosed. These SRBD in IPF are associated with alterations of the sleep structure, reduction of QoL and increased risk of mortality. In the absence of an effective therapy for IPF, optimizing the QoL could become the primary therapeutic goal. In this perspective the diagnosis and treatment of SRBD could significantly improve the QoL of IPF patients.

  4. Cetacean sleep: an unusual form of mammalian sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyamin, Oleg I; Manger, Paul R; Ridgway, Sam H; Mukhametov, Lev M; Siegel, Jerome M

    2008-10-01

    Our knowledge of the form of lateralized sleep behavior, known as unihemispheric slow wave sleep (USWS), seen in all members of the order Cetacea examined to date, is described. We trace the discovery of this phenotypically unusual form of mammalian sleep and highlight specific aspects that are different from sleep in terrestrial mammals. We find that for cetaceans sleep is characterized by USWS, a negligible amount or complete absence of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and a varying degree of movement during sleep associated with body size, and an asymmetrical eye state. We then compare the anatomy of the mammalian somnogenic system with what is known in cetaceans, highlighting areas where additional knowledge is needed to understand cetacean sleep. Three suggested functions of USWS (facilitation of movement, more efficient sensory processing and control of breathing) are discussed. Lastly, the possible selection pressures leading to this form of sleep are examined, leading us to the suggestion that the selection pressure necessitating the evolution of cetacean sleep was most likely the need to offset heat loss to the water from birth and throughout life. Aspects such as sentinel functions and breathing are likely to be proximate evolutionary phenomenon of this form of sleep.

  5. A Neural Code That Is Isometric to Vocal Output and Correlates with Its Sensory Consequences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vyssotski, Alexei L; Stepien, Anna E; Keller, Georg B; Hahnloser, Richard H. R

    2016-01-01

    ...? We study this question in the nucleus interface of the nidopallium (NIf), which is required for normal birdsong production and provides the main source of auditory input to HVC, the driver of adult song...

  6. Improving sleep: outcomes from a worksite healthy sleep program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Mark W; Hazelton, Angela C; Moore, Wendy R; Jenkins, Sarah M; Clark, Matthew M; Hagen, Philip T

    2015-01-01

    Unhealthy and inadequate sleep is a common and significant problem impacting absenteeism, presenteeism, health, and productivity. This study aimed at analyzing the effect of a worksite-based healthy sleep program. Retrospective analysis of 53 adult members of a worksite wellness center who participated in an 8-week healthy sleep program and completed pre- and postintervention health behavior questionnaires. Following the intervention participants felt significantly more rested, more confident in their ability to deal with sleep problems, and more knowledgeable about sleep. In addition, they reported a reduction in their stress level, improved quality of life, and increase energy level. These results support the effectiveness of worksite programs designed to promote healthy sleep. Future randomized studies are needed to further investigate the effectiveness and optimal delivery of healthy sleep promotion.

  7. Sleep paralysis and folklore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Ann M

    2015-07-01

    Sleep paralysis is a relatively new term to describe what for hundreds of years many believed to be a visitation by a malevolent creature which attacked its victims as they slept. The first clinical description of sleep paralysis was published in 1664 in a Dutch physician's case histories, where it was referred to as, 'Incubus or the Night-Mare [sic]'. In 1977, it was discovered more than 100 previously healthy people from various South East Asian communities had died mysteriously in their sleep. The individuals affected were dying at a rate of 92/100,000 from Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death Syndrome. No underlying cause was ever found, only that subsequent studies revealed a high rate of sleep paralysis and belief in the dab tsog (nightmare spirit) amongst members of the community. The nightmare/succubus is descended from Lilith. The earliest reference to Lilith is found in the Sumerian King list of 2400 BC known as Lilitu or she-demon, she bore children from her nocturnal unions with men. In other derivations, she was Adam's first wife who rather than 'obey' became a demon that preyed on women during childbirth. In modern Middle Eastern maternity wards, some women still wear amulets for protection. Today, clinical cause of these disturbances is sleep paralysis due to the unsuitable timing of REM sleep. During the 'Nightmare' episode, the sleeper becomes partially conscious during REM cycle, leaving the individual in a state between dream and wakefulness. For some, culture and the tradition of the nightmare is explanation enough.

  8. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Matthew Mahoney

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation.

  9. Update of sleep alterations in depression

    OpenAIRE

    Andrés Barrera Medina; DeboraYoaly Arana Lechuga; Oscar Sánchez Escandón; Javier Velázquez Moctezuma

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbances in depression are up to 70%. Patients frequently have difficulty in falling asleep, frequent awakenings during the night and non-restorative sleep. Sleep abnormalities in depression are mainly characterized by increased rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and reduced slow wave sleep. Among the mechanisms of sleep disturbances in depression are hyperactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, CLOCK gene polymorphism and primary sleep disorders. The habenula is a struct...

  10. Orbitofrontal Gray Matter Relates to Early Morning Awakening: A Neural Correlate of Insomnia Complaints?

    OpenAIRE

    Stoffers, Diederick; Moens, Sarah; Benjamins, Jeroen; van Tol, Marie-José; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Veltman, Dick J.; van der wee, Nic J. A.; Van Someren, Eus J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep complaints increase profoundly with age; prevalence estimates of insomnia in the elderly reach up to 37%. The three major types of nocturnal complaints are difficulties initiating (DIS) and maintaining (DMS) sleep and early morning awakening (EMA), of which the latter appears most characteristic for aging. The neural correlates associated with these complaints have hardly been investigated, hampering the development of rational treatment and prevention. A recent study on structural brai...

  11. [Sleep disorders: diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsboer-Trachsler, E; Kocher, R

    1995-12-02

    Disturbed or inadequate sleep is a frequent complaint with a great impact on daily functions and an often chronic course requiring adequate treatment. To choose an appropriate therapy it is necessary to develop a useful, reliable, valid and specific diagnostic procedure. Primary care physicians can recognize and treat most sleep disorders. For special diagnostic cases sleep centers are recommended. Sleep disorders may be managed by adequate pharmacological as well as nonpharmacological treatment. Besides specific pharmacological means, education in sleep/wake physiology and hygiene and several psychotherapeutic strategies may be valuable.

  12. Sleep disorders in cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Pedroso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias comprise a wide range of etiologies leading to central nervous system-related motor and non-motor symptoms. Recently, a large body of evidence has demonstrated a high frequency of non-motor manifestations in cerebellar ataxias, specially in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA. Among these non-motor dysfunctions, sleep disorders have been recognized, although still under or even misdiagnosed. In this review, we highlight the main sleep disorders related to cerebellar ataxias focusing on REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD, restless legs syndrome (RLS, periodic limb movement in sleep (PLMS, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, insomnia and sleep apnea.

  13. Memory consolidation in sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellini, Nicola

    2016-09-25

    In recent years sleep-related memory consolidation has become a central topic in the sleep research field. Several studies have shown that in healthy individuals sleep promotes memory consolidation. Notwithstanding this, the consequences of sleep disorders on offline memory consolidation remain poorly investigated. Research studies indicate that patients with insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, and narcolepsy often exhibit sleep-related impairment in the consolidation of declarative and procedural information. On the other hand, patients with parasomnias, such as sleep-walking, night terrors and rapid eye movement (REM) behavior disorder, do not present any memory impairment. These studies suggest that only sleep disorders characterized by increased post-learning arousal and disrupted sleep architecture seem to be associated with offline memory consolidation issues. Such impairments, arising already in childhood, may potentially affect the development and maintenance of an individual's cognitive abilities, reducing their quality of life and increasing the risk of accidents. However, promising findings suggest that successfully treating sleep symptoms can result in the restoration of memory functions and marked reduction of direct and indirect societal costs of sleep disorders.

  14. Objective and subjective sleep quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    and subjective sleep quality during benzodiazepine discontinuation and whether sleep variables were associated with benzodiazepine withdrawal. Eligible patients included adults with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder and long-term use of benzodiazepines in combination...... with antipsychotics. All participants gradually tapered the use of benzodiazepines after randomization to add-on treatment with melatonin versus placebo. Here we report a subsample of 23 patients undergoing sleep recordings (one-night polysomnography) and 55 patients participating in subjective sleep quality ratings....... Melatonin had no effect on objective sleep efficiency, but significantly improved self-reported sleep quality. Reduced benzodiazepine dosage at the 24-week follow-up was associated with a significantly decreased proportion of stage 2 sleep. These results indicate that prolonged-release melatonin has some...

  15. Sleep in trigeminal autonomic cephalagias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barløse, Mads; Lund, Nunu; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Sleep and cluster headache (CH) are believed to be interconnected but the precise relation to the other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) is uncertain and complex. A better understanding of these relations may eventually lead to a clarification of the underlying mechanisms...... and eventually to more effective therapeutic regimens. This review aims to evaluate the existing literature on the subject of TACs and sleep. An association between episodic CH and distinct macrostructural sleep phases, especially the relation to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, has been described in some older...... studies but could not be confirmed in other, more recent studies. Investigations into the microstructure of sleep in these patients are lacking. Only a few case reports exist on the relation between sleep and other TACs. SUMMARY: Recent studies do not find an association between CH and REM sleep. One...

  16. Cell adhesion molecules and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Emma Kate; Ballester Roig, Maria Neus; Mongrain, Valérie

    2017-03-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play essential roles in the central nervous system, where some families are involved in synaptic development and function. These synaptic adhesion molecules (SAMs) are involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity, and the formation of neuronal networks. Recent findings from studies examining the consequences of sleep loss suggest that these molecules are candidates to act in sleep regulation. This review highlights the experimental data that lead to the identification of SAMs as potential sleep regulators, and discusses results supporting that specific SAMs are involved in different aspects of sleep regulation. Further, some potential mechanisms by which SAMs may act to regulate sleep are outlined, and the proposition that these molecules may serve as molecular machinery in the two sleep regulatory processes, the circadian and homeostatic components, is presented. Together, the data argue that SAMs regulate the neuronal plasticity that underlies sleep and wakefulness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Leo Tolstoy's theory of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vein, Alla A

    2008-03-01

    Throughout his life, Leo Tolstoy was fascinated by the phenomena of sleep and dreams. He composed a series of observations and judgements that were brought together under "my theory of sleep". Tolstoy was constantly preoccupied with the basic principles of "the theory". It is hard to name a work by him where a description of sleep and/or a dream does not play a vital role in the unfolding of the plot. They testify to Tolstoy's interest in the mechanism of sleep and in the processes of falling asleep and waking up. Tolstoy viewed sleep as a specific state of consciousness, and he subsequently linked the concept of sleep with the concept of death. For him sleep and awakening were experiences emblematic of life and death.

  18. Sleep- and wake-dependent changes in neuronal activity and reactivity demonstrated in fly neurons using in vivo calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushey, Daniel; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2015-04-14

    Sleep in Drosophila shares many features with mammalian sleep, but it remains unknown whether spontaneous and evoked activity of individual neurons change with the sleep/wake cycle in flies as they do in mammals. Here we used calcium imaging to assess how the Kenyon cells in the fly mushroom bodies change their activity and reactivity to stimuli during sleep, wake, and after short or long sleep deprivation. As before, sleep was defined as a period of immobility of >5 min associated with a reduced behavioral response to a stimulus. We found that calcium levels in Kenyon cells decline when flies fall asleep and increase when they wake up. Moreover, calcium transients in response to two different stimuli are larger in awake flies than in sleeping flies. The activity of Kenyon cells is also affected by sleep/wake history: in awake flies, more cells are spontaneously active and responding to stimuli if the last several hours (5-8 h) before imaging were spent awake rather than asleep. By contrast, long wake (≥29 h) reduces both baseline and evoked neural activity and decreases the ability of neurons to respond consistently to the same repeated stimulus. The latter finding may underlie some of the negative effects of sleep deprivation on cognitive performance and is consistent with the occurrence of local sleep during wake as described in behaving rats. Thus, calcium imaging uncovers new similarities between fly and mammalian sleep: fly neurons are more active and reactive in wake than in sleep, and their activity tracks sleep/wake history.

  19. Interactions between sleep disorders and oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, N T; Emami, E; Helman, J I; Chervin, R D

    2014-04-01

    Dental sleep medicine is a rapidly growing field that is in close and direct interaction with sleep medicine and comprises many aspects of human health. As a result, dentists who encounter sleep health and sleep disorders may work with clinicians from many other disciplines and specialties. The main sleep and oral health issues that are covered in this review are obstructive sleep apnea, chronic mouth breathing, sleep-related gastroesophageal reflux, and sleep bruxism. In addition, edentulism and its impact on sleep disorders are discussed. Improving sleep quality and sleep characteristics, oral health, and oral function involves both pathophysiology and disease management. The multiple interactions between oral health and sleep underscore the need for an interdisciplinary clinical team to manage oral health-related sleep disorders that are commonly seen in dental practice.

  20. Sleep in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Victorova Strueva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of duration and individual characteristics of sleep and chronotype on body weight, eating behavior, anxiety, depression, life quality, metabolic and hormonal parameters of obese patients. Materials and methods: 200 patients with primary obesity were studied: 83 men and 117 women at age from 18 to 61 years old, median age 41,5 years [31,0; 50,0]; body weight 107 kg [94; 128,5], waist circumference 112 cm [102; 124]; neck circumference 41 cm [38; 46], body mass index (BMI 36,9 [32,8; 42,3]. Results: We found an association between sleep duration, chronotype and the emotional eating. Significant sleep reduction (to less than 6 hours was associated with high level of anxiety, depression, emotional eating and insomnia. Younger age, early onset and shorter duration of obesity and brisk weight gain during last is connected to the evening chronotype. The emotional eating associated with hypersomnolence in the absence of statistically significant increase of anxiety and depression in individuals with evening chronotype. Sleep duration and chronotype have no significant effect on the body weight, metabolic, hormonal parameters and the dynamics of body. weight after 7±1 months of treatment of obesity.

  1. Complex Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Talha Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex sleep apnea is the term used to describe a form of sleep disordered breathing in which repeated central apneas (>5/hour persist or emerge when obstructive events are extinguished with positive airway pressure (PAP and for which there is not a clear cause for the central apneas such as narcotics or systolic heart failure. The driving forces in the pathophysiology are felt to be ventilator instability associated oscillation in PaCO2 arterial partial pressure of Carbon Dioxide, continuous cositive airway pressure (CPAP related increased CO2 carbon dioxide elimination, and activation of airway and pulmonary stretch receptors triggering these central apneas. The prevalence ranges from 0.56% to 18% with no clear predictive characteristics as compared to simple obstructive sleep apnea. Prognosis is similar to obstructive sleep apnea. The central apnea component in most patients on followup using CPAP therap, has resolved. For those with continued central apneas on simple CPAP therapy, other treatment options include bilevel PAP, adaptive servoventilation, permissive flow limitation and/or drugs.

  2. Sleep No More

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈平

    1994-01-01

    It’s the weekend, and you’re looking forward to sleeping in. But when 7 a. m. rolls around, your eyes pop open. The reason, researchers are now saying, is that you have an alarm clock in your brain.

  3. Waking the Sleeping Giant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ollenburger, Mary H.; Descheemaeker, Katrien; Crane, Todd A.; Sanogo, Ousmane M.; Giller, Ken E.

    2016-01-01

    The World Bank argued that West Africa's Guinea Savannah zone forms part of “Africa's Sleeping Giant,” where increases in agricultural production could be an engine of economic growth, through expansion of cultivated land in sparsely populated areas. The district of Bougouni, in southern Mali,

  4. Sleep Disorders in Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王迪秋

    2002-01-01

    All the parents want their children to go to bed by themselves and sleep through the night. Unluckily, over 30% of today--s parents do not have such children. Instead, their kids are awake at night crying or resist going to bed in the evening.

  5. Brain Basics: Understanding Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in many parts of the brain become more active as we get ready for bed. Nerve-signaling chemicals called neurotransmitters can “switch off” or dampen the activity of cells that signal arousal or relaxation. GABA is associated with sleep, muscle relaxation, and ...

  6. Gifted Students and Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsh, John; Karnes, Frances; Eiers, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors emphasize that good sleep health is essential if gifted children are to gain the greatest benefit from opportunities to grow intellectually, socially, and spiritually while maintaining good psychological and physical health. The outstanding abilities that characterize these children and enable high levels of…

  7. Sleep on manned space flights: Zero gravity reduces sleep duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonfalone, Alain

    2016-12-01

    The success of a manned space mission depends on the well-being of the crew. Sleep in space has been the concern of researchers from the earliest days of manned space flight. In the new frontier of space exploration one of the great problems to be solved relates to sleep. Although many reports indicate that sleep in space differs only in minor ways from terrestrial sleep, such as being somewhat less comfortable, a consistent finding has been that sleep duration in space is shorter than that on the ground. This review considers the accumulating evidence that the main reason for the shorter duration of sleep in space is the absence of gravity. This evidence shows that, similar to the effect of many other environmental variables like light, sound and cold, gravity has a measurable impact on sleep structure. As opposed to ground, in zero gravity conditions the innate, permanent, and almost unconscious effort to maintain posture and equilibrium is reduced while simultaneously the vigilance against gravity or "the fear of falling" diminishes. These phenomena may potentially explain research findings that REM sleep latency and duration are shorter in space. This assumption also implies that sleep on ground is due in part to the effort to compensate for the presence of gravity and its effects on the posture and motion of the human body: an ignored and unsuspected contribution to sleep.

  8. Information processing during NREM sleep and sleep quality in insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceklic, Tijana; Bastien, Célyne H

    2015-12-01

    Insomnia sufferers (INS) are cortically hyperaroused during sleep, which seems to translate into altered information processing during nighttime. While information processing, as measured by event-related potentials (ERPs), during wake appears to be associated with sleep quality of the preceding night, the existence of such an association during nighttime has never been investigated. This study aims to investigate nighttime information processing among good sleepers (GS) and INS while considering concomitant sleep quality. Following a multistep clinical evaluation, INS and GS participants underwent 4 consecutive nights of PSG recordings in the sleep laboratory. Thirty nine GS (mean age 34.56±9.02) and twenty nine INS (mean age 43.03±9.12) were included in the study. ERPs (N1, P2, N350) were recorded all night on Night 4 (oddball paradigm) during NREM sleep. Regardless of sleep quality, INS presented a larger N350 amplitude during SWS (p=0.042) while GS showed a larger N350 amplitude during late-night stage 2 sleep (p=0.004). Regardless of diagnosis, those who slept objectively well showed a smaller N350 amplitude (p=0.020) while those who slept subjectively well showed a smaller P2 (pInformation processing seems to be associated with concomitant subjective and objective sleep quality for both GS and INS. However, INS show an alteration in information processing during sleep, especially for inhibition processes, regardless of their sleep quality.

  9. CAN NON-REM SLEEP BE DEPRESSOGENIC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEERSMA, DGM; VANDENHOOFDAKKER, RH

    Sleep and mood are clearly interrelated in major depression, as shown by the antidepressive effects of various experiments, such as total sleep deprivation, partial sleep deprivation, REM sleep deprivation, and temporal shifts of the sleep period. The prevailing hypotheses explaining these effects

  10. Can non-REM sleep be depressogenic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, Domien G.M.; Hoofdakker, Rutger H. van den

    1992-01-01

    Sleep and mood are clearly interrelated in major depression, as shown by the antidepressive effects of various experiments, such as total sleep deprivation, partial sleep deprivation, REM sleep deprivation, and temporal shifts of the sleep period. The prevailing hypotheses explaining these effects

  11. Nap sleep spindle correlates of intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ujma, P.P.; Bodizs, R.; Gombos, F.; Stintzing, J.; Konrad, B.N.; Genzel, L.; Steiger, A.; Dresler, M.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, that play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Several studies with full-night sleep recordings have reported a positive association between sleep spindles and fl

  12. Can non-REM sleep be depressogenic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, Domien G.M.; Hoofdakker, Rutger H. van den

    1992-01-01

    Sleep and mood are clearly interrelated in major depression, as shown by the antidepressive effects of various experiments, such as total sleep deprivation, partial sleep deprivation, REM sleep deprivation, and temporal shifts of the sleep period. The prevailing hypotheses explaining these effects c

  13. CAN NON-REM SLEEP BE DEPRESSOGENIC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEERSMA, DGM; VANDENHOOFDAKKER, RH

    1992-01-01

    Sleep and mood are clearly interrelated in major depression, as shown by the antidepressive effects of various experiments, such as total sleep deprivation, partial sleep deprivation, REM sleep deprivation, and temporal shifts of the sleep period. The prevailing hypotheses explaining these effects c

  14. Neural Induction, Neural Fate Stabilization, and Neural Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally A. Moody

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The promise of stem cell therapy is expected to greatly benefit the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. An underlying biological reason for the progressive functional losses associated with these diseases is the extremely low natural rate of self-repair in the nervous system. Although the mature CNS harbors a limited number of self-renewing stem cells, these make a significant contribution to only a few areas of brain. Therefore, it is particularly important to understand how to manipulate embryonic stem cells and adult neural stem cells so their descendants can repopulate and functionally repair damaged brain regions. A large knowledge base has been gathered about the normal processes of neural development. The time has come for this information to be applied to the problems of obtaining sufficient, neurally committed stem cells for clinical use. In this article we review the process of neural induction, by which the embryonic ectodermal cells are directed to form the neural plate, and the process of neural�fate stabilization, by which neural plate cells expand in number and consolidate their neural fate. We will present the current knowledge of the transcription factors and signaling molecules that are known to be involved in these processes. We will discuss how these factors may be relevant to manipulating embryonic stem cells to express a neural fate and to produce large numbers of neurally committed, yet undifferentiated, stem cells for transplantation therapies.

  15. To sleep or not to sleep: the ecology of sleep in artificial organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunn Charles L

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All animals thus far studied sleep, but little is known about the ecological factors that generate differences in sleep characteristics across species, such as total sleep duration or division of sleep into multiple bouts across the 24-hour period (i.e., monophasic or polyphasic sleep activity. Here we address these questions using an evolutionary agent-based model. The model is spatially explicit, with food and sleep sites distributed in two clusters on the landscape. Agents acquire food and sleep energy based on an internal circadian clock coded by 24 traits (one for each hour of the day that correspond to "genes" that evolve by means of a genetic algorithm. These traits can assume three different values that specify the agents' behavior: sleep (or search for a sleep site, eat (or search for a food site, or flexibly decide action based on relative levels of sleep energy and food energy. Individuals with higher fitness scores leave more offspring in the next generation of the simulation, and the model can therefore be used to identify evolutionarily adaptive circadian clock parameters under different ecological conditions. Results We systematically varied input parameters related to the number of food and sleep sites, the degree to which food and sleep sites overlap, and the rate at which food patches were depleted. Our results reveal that: (1 the increased costs of traveling between more spatially separated food and sleep clusters select for monophasic sleep, (2 more rapid food patch depletion reduces sleep times, and (3 agents spend more time attempting to acquire the "rarer" resource, that is, the average time spent sleeping is positively correlated with the number of food patches and negatively correlated with the number of sleep patches. "Flexible" genes, in general, do not appear to be advantageous, though their arrangements in the agents' genome show characteristic patterns that suggest that selection acts on their

  16. Sleep can reduce proactive interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Magdalena; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz T

    2014-01-01

    Sleep has repeatedly been connected to processes of memory consolidation. While extensive research indeed documents beneficial effects of sleep on memory, little is yet known about the role of sleep for interference effects in episodic memory. Although two prior studies reported sleep to reduce retroactive interference, no sleep effect has previously been found for proactive interference. Here we applied a study format differing from that employed by the prior studies to induce a high degree of proactive interference, and asked participants to encode a single list or two interfering lists of paired associates via pure study cycles. Testing occurred after 12 hours of diurnal wakefulness or nocturnal sleep. Consistent with the prior work, we found sleep in comparison to wake did not affect memory for the single list, but reduced retroactive interference. In addition we found sleep reduced proactive interference, and reduced retroactive and proactive interference to the same extent. The finding is consistent with the view that arising benefits of sleep are caused by the reactivation of memory contents during sleep, which has been suggested to strengthen and stabilise memories. Such stabilisation may make memories less susceptible to competition from interfering memories at test and thus reduce interference effects.

  17. Caffeine: sleep and daytime sleepiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrs, Timothy; Roth, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed psychoactive substances and it has profound effects on sleep and wake function. Laboratory studies have documented its sleep-disruptive effects. It clearly enhances alertness and performance in studies with explicit sleep deprivation, restriction, or circadian sleep schedule reversals. But, under conditions of habitual sleep the evidence indicates that caffeine, rather then enhancing performance, is merely restoring performance degraded by sleepiness. The sleepiness and degraded function may be due to basal sleep insufficiency, circadian sleep schedule reversals, rebound sleepiness, and/or a withdrawal syndrome after the acute, over-night, caffeine discontinuation typical of most studies. Studies have shown that caffeine dependence develops at relatively low daily doses and after short periods of regular daily use. Large sample and population-based studies indicate that regular daily dietary caffeine intake is associated with disturbed sleep and associated daytime sleepiness. Further, children and adolescents, while reporting lower daily, weight-corrected caffeine intake, similarly experience sleep disturbance and daytime sleepiness associated with their caffeine use. The risks to sleep and alertness of regular caffeine use are greatly underestimated by both the general population and physicians.

  18. Sleep disorders in kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santo, R M; Perna, A; Di Iorio, B R; Cirillo, M

    2010-03-01

    Sleep disorders are common in patients with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. However also a well functioning renal graft does not cure the poor sleep pattern which now emerges as a problem even in early chronic kidney disease (CKD). When patients are made aware for the first time of a disease such as CKD, which may brink to dialysis or at the best to a renal transplant patients begin to experience a disordered sleep. Sleeping disorders include insomnia (I), sleep apnoea (SAS), restless legs syndrome (RLS), periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), excessive daily sleeping (EDS), sleepwalking, nightmares, and narcolepsy. Disordered sleep did not meet the clinical and scientific interest it deserves, in addition and we do not have a well defined solution for sleeping complaints. However, awareness that a poor sleep is associated with poor quality of life and carries an increase in mortality risk has recently stimulated interest in the field. There are many putative causes for a disordered sleep in chronic kidney disease and in end-stage renal disease. For a unifying hypothesis demographic factors, lifestyles, disease related factors, psychological factors, treatment related factors, and social factor must be taken into consideration.

  19. Rotating waves during human sleep spindles organize global patterns of activity that repeat precisely through the night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Lyle; Piantoni, Giovanni; Koller, Dominik; Cash, Sydney S; Halgren, Eric; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2016-01-01

    During sleep, the thalamus generates a characteristic pattern of transient, 11-15 Hz sleep spindle oscillations, which synchronize the cortex through large-scale thalamocortical loops. Spindles have been increasingly demonstrated to be critical for sleep-dependent consolidation of memory, but the specific neural mechanism for this process remains unclear. We show here that cortical spindles are spatiotemporally organized into circular wave-like patterns, organizing neuronal activity over tens of milliseconds, within the timescale for storing memories in large-scale networks across the cortex via spike-time dependent plasticity. These circular patterns repeat over hours of sleep with millisecond temporal precision, allowing reinforcement of the activity patterns through hundreds of reverberations. These results provide a novel mechanistic account for how global sleep oscillations and synaptic plasticity could strengthen networks distributed across the cortex to store coherent and integrated memories. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17267.001 PMID:27855061

  20. Efficacy and safety of exogenous melatonin for secondary sleep disorders and sleep disorders accompanying sleep restriction: meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Objective To conduct a systematic review of the efficacy and safety of exogenous melatonin in managing secondary sleep disorders and sleep disorders accompanying sleep restriction, such as jet lag and shiftwork disorder.

  1. Long-term subjective and objective sleep analysis of total sleep time and sleep quality in real life settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merilahti, Juho; Saarinen, Ari; Parkka, Juha; Antila, Kari; Mattila, Elina; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2007-01-01

    Sleep quality is one of the key elements of the human health status. By observing sleep patterns we can gain information about personal wellbeing. Consumer electronic sleep analysis solutions are now available for use in long-term conditions. In this study we compare different measures for total sleep time and sleep quality. We analyzed visually long- term sleep data collected with actigraphy, sleep logs and ambient sensors to gain more reliable results and compared these results to each single method's output. Correlations of visually analyzed total sleep time between actigraphy total sleep time (correlation coefficient (r) = 0.662, p <0.01) and sleep log total sleep time (r = 0.787, p <0.01) were high. Also comparison between subjective and objective sleep quality was analyzed and small, but significant correlation was found (r = 0.270, p < 0.01).

  2. Cutaneous warming promotes sleep onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymann, Roy J E M; Swaab, Dick F; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2005-06-01

    Sleep occurs in close relation to changes in body temperature. Both the monophasic sleep period in humans and the polyphasic sleep periods in rodents tend to be initiated when core body temperature is declining. This decline is mainly due to an increase in skin blood flow and consequently skin warming and heat loss. We have proposed that these intrinsically occurring changes in core and skin temperatures could modulate neuronal activity in sleep-regulating brain areas (Van Someren EJW, Chronobiol Int 17: 313-54, 2000). We here provide results compatible with this hypothesis. We obtained 144 sleep-onset latencies while directly manipulating core and skin temperatures within the comfortable range in eight healthy subjects under controlled conditions. The induction of a proximal skin temperature difference of only 0.78 +/- 0.03 degrees C (mean +/- SE) around a mean of 35.13 +/- 0.11 degrees C changed sleep-onset latency by 26%, i.e., by 3.09 minutes [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.91 to 4.28] around a mean of 11.85 min (CI, 9.74 to 14.41), with faster sleep onsets when the proximal skin was warmed. The reduction in sleep-onset latency occurred despite a small but significant decrease in subjective comfort during proximal skin warming. The induction of changes in core temperature (delta = 0.20 +/- 0.02 degrees C) and distal skin temperature (delta = 0.74 +/- 0.05 degrees C) were ineffective. Previous studies have demonstrated correlations between skin temperature and sleep-onset latency. Also, sleep disruption by ambient temperatures that activate thermoregulatory defense mechanisms has been shown. The present study is the first to experimentally demonstrate a causal contribution to sleep-onset latency of skin temperature manipulations within the normal nocturnal fluctuation range. Circadian and sleep-appetitive behavior-induced variations in skin temperature might act as an input signal to sleep-regulating systems.

  3. Sleep spindle density in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Nikolic, Miki; Hvidtfelt, Mathias; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Jennum, Poul

    2017-06-01

    Patients with narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) show alterations in sleep stage transitions, rapid-eye-movement (REM) and non-REM sleep due to the loss of hypocretinergic signaling. However, the sleep microstructure has not yet been evaluated in these patients. We aimed to evaluate whether the sleep spindle (SS) density is altered in patients with NT1 compared to controls and patients with narcolepsy type 2 (NT2). All-night polysomnographic recordings from 28 NT1 patients, 19 NT2 patients, 20 controls (C) with narcolepsy-like symptoms, but with normal cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin levels and multiple sleep latency tests, and 18 healthy controls (HC) were included. Unspecified, slow, and fast SS were automatically detected, and SS densities were defined as number per minute and were computed across sleep stages and sleep cycles. The between-cycle trends of SS densities in N2 and NREM sleep were evaluated within and between groups. Between-group comparisons in sleep stages revealed no significant differences in any type of SS. Within-group analyses of the SS trends revealed significant decreasing trends for NT1, HC, and C between first and last sleep cycle. Between-group analyses of SS trends between first and last sleep cycle revealed that NT2 differ from NT1 patients in the unspecified SS density in NREM sleep, and from HC in the slow SS density in N2 sleep. SS activity is preserved in NT1, suggesting that the ascending neurons to thalamic activation of SS are not significantly affected by the hypocretinergic system. NT2 patients show an abnormal pattern of SS distribution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sleep disorders in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Alaa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of sleep disorders is higher in patients with kidney failure than the general population. We studied the prevalence of sleep disorders in 88 (mean age; 41.59 ± 16.3 years chronic hemodialysis (HD patients at the Urology and Nephrology Center, Mansoura Uni-versity, Egypt over 4-month period. The investigated sleep disorders included insomnia, restless leg syndrome (RLS, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, narcolepsy and sleep walking, and we used a questionnaire in accordance with those of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group, the Berlin questionnaire, Italian version of Epworth Sleepiness Scale, International Classification of Sleep Disorders, and the specific ques-tions of Hatoum′s sleep questionnaire. The prevalence of sleep disorders was 79.5% in our pa-tients, and the most common sleep abnormality was insomnia (65.9%, followed by RLS (42%, OSAS (31.8%, snoring (27.3%, EDS (27.3%, narcolepsy (15.9%, and sleep walking (3.4%. Insomnia correlated with anemia (r=0.31, P= 0.003, anxiety (r=0.279, P= 0.042, depression (r=0.298, P= 0.24 and RLS (r=0.327, P= 0.002. Also, RLS correlated with hypoalbuminemia (r=0.41, P= < 0.0001, anemia (r=0.301 and P= 0.046, hyperphosphatemia (r=0.343 and P= 0.001. EDS correlated with OSAS (r=0.5, P= < 0.0001, snoring (r=0.341, P= 0.001, and social worry (r=0.27, P= 0.011. Sleep disorders are quite common in the HD patients, especially those who are anemic and hypoalbuminemic. Assessment of sleep quality, preferably with polysomno-graphy, is necessary to confirm our results. Interventional studies for management of sleep disor-ders in HD patients are warranted.

  5. Use of personal EEG monitors in a behavioral neuroscience course to investigate natural setting sleep patterns and the factors affecting them in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jillian C; Malerba, Julie R; Schroeder, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Sleep is often a topic of avid interest to college students, yet it is one that does not yield itself well to hands-on, interactive learning modules. Supplementing classroom learning with interactive "real world" laboratory activities provides students with a deeper understanding of behavior and its neural control. The project described here was designed to supplement the teaching of EEGs, sleep and circadian rhythms and involved students in the empirical process from hypothesizing about the factors that affect sleep, to personal data collection, data analysis and writing in the style of a peer-reviewed manuscript. Students enrolled in Behavioral Neuroscience at Connecticut College were provided with a home-based personal EEG monitor used to collect sleep data in their natural sleep setting. Participants recorded sleep data with the use of the ZEO® Personal Sleep Coach system and completed a nightly sleep journal questionnaire for seven nights. The ZEO® system uses EEG patterns to define sleep stages including wakefulness, light, deep and REM sleep. The journal included questions about factors known to affect sleep such as stress, caffeine, academic activity, exercise and alcohol. A class data set was compiled and used by students to perform univariate correlations examining the relationships between ZEO® variables and sleep journal variables. The data set allowed students to choose specific variables to investigate, analyze and write a peer-reviewed style manuscript. Significant class-wide correlations were found between specific sleep stages and behavioral variables suggesting that the ZEO® system is sophisticated yet inexpensive enough to be used as an effective tool in the classroom setting. Overall student feedback on the exercise was positive with many students indicating that it significantly enhanced their understanding of sleep architecture and made them keenly aware of the factors that affect quality of sleep.

  6. Enhanced emotional reactivity after selective REM sleep deprivation in humans: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Lagarde, Alejandra; Armony, Jorge L; Del Río-Portilla, Yolanda; Trejo-Martínez, David; Conde, Ruben; Corsi-Cabrera, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Converging evidence from animal and human studies suggest that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep modulates emotional processing. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of selective REM sleep deprivation (REM-D) on emotional responses to threatening visual stimuli and their brain correlates using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: selective REM-D, by awakening them at each REM sleep onset, or non-rapid eye movement sleep interruptions (NREM-I) as control for potential non-specific effects of awakenings and lack of sleep. In a within-subject design, a visual emotional reactivity task was performed in the scanner before and 24 h after sleep manipulation. Behaviorally, emotional reactivity was enhanced relative to baseline (BL) in the REM deprived group only. In terms of fMRI signal, there was, as expected, an overall decrease in activity in the NREM-I group when subjects performed the task the second time, particularly in regions involved in emotional processing, such as occipital and temporal areas, as well as in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, involved in top-down emotion regulation. In contrast, activity in these areas remained the same level or even increased in the REM-D group, compared to their BL level. Taken together, these results suggest that lack of REM sleep in humans is associated with enhanced emotional reactivity, both at behavioral and neural levels, and thus highlight the specific role of REM sleep in regulating the neural substrates for emotional responsiveness.

  7. Enhanced emotional reactivity after selective REM sleep deprivation in humans: an fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Lagarde, Alejandra; Armony, Jorge L.; del Río-Portilla, Yolanda; Trejo-Martínez, David; Conde, Ruben; Corsi-Cabrera, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Converging evidence from animal and human studies suggest that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep modulates emotional processing. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of selective REM sleep deprivation (REM-D) on emotional responses to threatening visual stimuli and their brain correlates using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: selective REM-D, by awakening them at each REM sleep onset, or non-rapid eye movement sleep interruptions (NREM-I) as control for potential non-specific effects of awakenings and lack of sleep. In a within-subject design, a visual emotional reactivity task was performed in the scanner before and 24 h after sleep manipulation. Behaviorally, emotional reactivity was enhanced relative to baseline (BL) in the REM deprived group only. In terms of fMRI signal, there was, as expected, an overall decrease in activity in the NREM-I group when subjects performed the task the second time, particularly in regions involved in emotional processing, such as occipital and temporal areas, as well as in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, involved in top-down emotion regulation. In contrast, activity in these areas remained the same level or even increased in the REM-D group, compared to their BL level. Taken together, these results suggest that lack of REM sleep in humans is associated with enhanced emotional reactivity, both at behavioral and neural levels, and thus highlight the specific role of REM sleep in regulating the neural substrates for emotional responsiveness. PMID:22719723

  8. Sleep habits and sleep problems among Palestinian students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zyoud Sa'ed H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim The aim of this study was to describe sleep habits and sleep problems in a population of undergraduates in Palestine. Association between self-reported sleep quality and self-reported academic achievement was also investigated. Methods Sleep habits and problems were investigated using a convenience sample of students from An-Najah National University, Palestine. The study was carried out during spring semester, 2009. A self-administered questionnaire developed based on The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV criteria and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used. Results 400 students with a mean age of 20.2 ± 1.3 were studied. Reported mean duration of night sleep in the study sample was 6.4 ± 1.1 hours. The majority (58.3% of students went to bed before midnight and 18% of the total sample woke up before 6 am. Sleep latency of more than one hour was present in 19.3% of the students. Two thirds (64.8% of the students reported having at least one nocturnal awakening per night. Nightmares were the most common parasomnia reported by students. Daytime naps were common and reported in 74.5% of the study sample. Sleep quality was reported as "poor" in only 9.8% and was significantly associated with sleep latency, frequency of nocturnal awakenings, time of going to bed, nightmares but not with academic achievement. Conclusion Sleep habits among Palestinian undergraduates were comparable to those reported in European studies. Sleep problems were common and there was no significant association between sleep quality and academic achievement.

  9. Role of corticosterone on sleep homeostasis induced by REM sleep deprivation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Ricardo Borges; Tufik, Sergio; Suchecki, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Sleep is regulated by humoral and homeostatic processes. If on one hand chronic elevation of stress hormones impair sleep, on the other hand, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation induces elevation of glucocorticoids and time of REM sleep during the recovery period. In the present study we sought to examine whether manipulations of corticosterone levels during REM sleep deprivation would alter the subsequent sleep rebound. Adult male Wistar rats were fit with electrodes for sleep monitoring and submitted to four days of REM sleep deprivation under repeated corticosterone or metyrapone (an inhibitor of corticosterone synthesis) administration. Sleep parameters were continuously recorded throughout the sleep deprivation period and during 3 days of sleep recovery. Plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone were also evaluated. Metyrapone treatment prevented the elevation of corticosterone plasma levels induced by REM sleep deprivation, whereas corticosterone administration to REM sleep-deprived rats resulted in lower corticosterone levels than in non-sleep deprived rats. Nonetheless, both corticosterone and metyrapone administration led to several alterations on sleep homeostasis, including reductions in the amount of non-REM and REM sleep during the recovery period, although corticosterone increased delta activity (1.0-4.0 Hz) during REM sleep deprivation. Metyrapone treatment of REM sleep-deprived rats reduced the number of REM sleep episodes. In conclusion, reduction of corticosterone levels during REM sleep deprivation resulted in impairment of sleep rebound, suggesting that physiological elevation of corticosterone levels resulting from REM sleep deprivation is necessary for plentiful recovery of sleep after this stressful event.

  10. Benefits of Sleep Extension on Sustained Attention and Sleep Pressure Before and During Total Sleep Deprivation and Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, Pierrick J; Sauvet, Fabien; Leger, Damien; van Beers, Pascal; Bayon, Virginie; Bougard, Clément; Rabat, Arnaud; Millet, Guillaume Y; Chennaoui, Mounir

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effects of 6 nights of sleep extension on sustained attention and sleep pressure before and during total sleep deprivation and after a subsequent recovery sleep. Subjects participated in two experimental conditions (randomized cross-over design): extended sleep (EXT, 9.8 ± 0.1 h (mean ± SE) time in bed) and habitual sleep (HAB, 8.2 ± 0.1 h time in bed). In each condition, subjects performed two consecutive phases: (1) 6 nights of either EXT or HAB (2) three days in-laboratory: baseline, total sleep deprivation and after 10 h of recovery sleep. Residential sleep extension and sleep performance laboratory (continuous polysomnographic recording). 14 healthy men (age range: 26-37 years). EXT vs. HAB sleep durations prior to total sleep deprivation. Total sleep time and duration of all sleep stages during the 6 nights were significantly higher in EXT than HAB. EXT improved psychomotor vigilance task performance (PVT, both fewer lapses and faster speed) and reduced sleep pressure as evidenced by longer multiple sleep latencies (MSLT) at baseline compared to HAB. EXT limited PVT lapses and the number of involuntary microsleeps during total sleep deprivation. Differences in PVT lapses and speed and MSLT at baseline were maintained after one night of recovery sleep. Six nights of extended sleep improve sustained attention and reduce sleep pressure. Sleep extension also protects against psychomotor vigilance task lapses and microsleep degradation during total sleep deprivation. These beneficial effects persist after one night of recovery sleep. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  11. A functional clustering algorithm for the analysis of neural relationships

    CERN Document Server

    Feldt, S; Hetrick, V L; Berke, J D; Zochowski, M

    2008-01-01

    We formulate a novel technique for the detection of functional clusters in neural data. In contrast to prior network clustering algorithms, our procedure progressively combines spike trains and derives the optimal clustering cutoff in a simple and intuitive manner. To demonstrate the power of this algorithm to detect changes in network dynamics and connectivity, we apply it to both simulated data and real neural data obtained from the mouse hippocampus during exploration and slow-wave sleep. We observe state-dependent clustering patterns consistent with known neurophysiological processes involved in memory consolidation.

  12. Sleep and memory in healthy children and adolescents - a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasz, Marta; Loessl, Barbara; Hornyak, Magdolna; Riemann, Dieter; Nissen, Christoph; Piosczyk, Hannah; Voderholzer, Ulrich

    2010-06-01

    There is mounting evidence that sleep is important for learning, memory and the underlying neural plasticity. This article aims to review published studies that evaluate the association between sleep, its distinct stages and memory systems in healthy children and adolescents. Furthermore it intends to suggest directions for future research. A computerised search of the literature for relevant articles published between 1966 and March 2008 was performed using the keywords "sleep", "memory", "learn", "child", "adolescents", "adolescence" and "teenager". Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Published studies focused on the impact of sleep on working memory and memory consolidation. In summary, most studies support the hypothesis that sleep facilitates working memory as well as memory consolidation in children and adolescents. There is evidence that performance in abstract and complex tasks involving higher brain functions declines more strongly after sleep deprivation than the performance in simple memory tasks. Future studies are needed to better understand the impact of a variety of variables potentially modulating the interplay between sleep and memory, such as developmental stage, socioeconomic burden, circadian factors, or the level of post-learning sensory and motor activity (interference). This line of research can provide valuable input relevant to teaching, learning and public health policy.

  13. [Treatment of depression with sleep deprivation and sleep phase advancement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann, D; Vollmann, J; Hohagen, F; Lohner, H; König, A; Faller, C; Edali, N; Berger, M

    1995-07-01

    Total sleep deprivation (TSD) exerts beneficial but only transient effects on mood in approximately 60% of the patients with a major depressive disorder (MDD). The positive effect of TSD is generally reversed after the next night of sleep. A pilot study of our group indicated that a consecutive one week phase advance of the sleep phase stabilized mood in more than half of the patients who responded to TSD. However, the majority of patients in our pilot study had been treated concomitantly with antidepressive medication. To exclude a possible synergistic effect of simultaneous antidepressive medication and the sleep-wake manipulation in the present study eleven medicated and sixteen drug-free depressed patients were investigated. In two thirds of the patients relapse into depression after successful TSD could be prevented. This effect seemed to be independent of adjunct antidepressant pharmacotherapy. Ten of these patients were studied polysomnographically prior to and during the treatment. Data analysis revealed that during the advance of the sleep phase no prolonged partial sleep deprivation took place. At the end of the study REM % had even increased and REM latency was still short in spite of clinical improvement, thus contradicting the assumption that REM sleep suppression is a necessary prerequisite for antidepressive therapy. The results support the hypothesis of a "critical phase" in the morning hours during which sleep can reinduce depressive mood and, vice versa, prevention of sleep during this time may act antidepressively.

  14. Recognition of wake-sleep stage 1 multichannel eeg patterns using spectral entropy features for drowsiness detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriraam, N; Padma Shri, T K; Maheshwari, Uma

    2016-09-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) activity recorded during the entire sleep cycle reflects various complex processes associated with brain and exhibits a high degree of irregularity through various stages of sleep. The identification of transition from wakefulness to stage1 sleep is a challenging area of research for the biomedical community. In this paper, spectral entropy (SE) is used as a complexity measure to quantify irregularities in awake and stage1 sleep of 8-channel sleep EEG data from the polysomnographic recordings of ten healthy subjects. The SE measures of awake and stage1 sleep EEG data are estimated for each second and applied to a multilayer perceptron feed forward neural network (MLP-FF). The network is trained using back propagation algorithm for recognizing these two patterns. Initially, the MLP network is trained and tested for randomly chosen subject-wise combined datasets I and II and then for the combined large dataset III. In all cases, 60 % of the entire dataset is used for training while 20 % is used for testing and 20 % for validation. Results indicate that the MLP neural network learns with maximum testing accuracy of 95.9 % for dataset II. In the case of combined large dataset, the network performs with a maximum accuracy of 99.2 % with 100 hidden neurons. Results show that in channels O1, O2, F3 and F4 (A1, A2 as reference), the mean of the spectral entropy value is higher in awake state than in stage1 sleep indicating that the EEG becomes more regular and rhythmic as the subject attains stage1 sleep from wakefulness. However, in C3 and C4 the mean values of SE values are not very much discriminative of both groups. This may prove to be a very effective indicator for scoring the first two stages of sleep EEG and may be used to detect the transition from wakefulness to stage1 sleep.

  15. Sleep Problems in Asthma and COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mini Series #5 Sleep Problems in Asthma and COPD NORMAL AIRWAY Good quality sleep is important for ... with asthma and/or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) may have sleep issues that can lead to ...

  16. At-a-Glance: Healthy Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... insomnia, sleep apnea, rest- less legs syndrome, or narcolepsy. Learn More More information on healthy sleep and ... Conditions Index (DCI) has fact sheets on insomnia, narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome, and sleep apnea, as well ...

  17. The nature of spontaneous sleep across adulthood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    CAMPBELL, SCOTT S; MURPHY, PATRICIA J

    2007-01-01

    ...’ protocol, we studied such sleep in young, middle‐aged and older adults. All subjects exhibited polyphasic sleep patterns, characterized by relatively short intervals of both sleep and waking...

  18. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF MEN DURING SLEEP DEPRIVATION,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of 84 hours of sleep deprivation were examined in a group of six young men and compared with a group of six controls. Subjects were... sleep deprivation , physiological regulating systems are relatively unaffected by sleep loss. (Author)

  19. Globetrotting to a Good Night's Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is one of the most common and troubling sleep disorders. At least 1 in 10 older adults, and ... have sleep apnea. To Find Out More MedlinePlus Sleep Disorders medlineplus.gov/sleepdisorders.html NHLBI Your Guide to ...

  20. National Center on Sleep Disorders Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Register for Updates The National Center on Sleep Disorders Research (NCSDR) Located within the National Heart, Lung, ... 60 percent have a chronic disorder. Each year, sleep disorders, sleep deprivation, and sleepiness add an estimated $15. ...

  1. Infant Sleep Positioners Pose Suffocation Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Infant Sleep Positioners Pose Suffocation Risk Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Infant Sleep Positioner Example See more images of Infant Sleep ...

  2. Insufficient Sleep Is a Public Health Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Insufficient Sleep Is a Public Health Problem Language: English Español ( ... insufficient sleep is an important public health concern. Sleep-Related Unhealthy Behaviors The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance ...

  3. Endothelial function and sleep: associations of flow-mediated dilation with perceived sleep quality and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Denise C; Ziegler, Michael G; Milic, Milos S; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Mills, Paul J; Loredo, José S; Von Känel, Roland; Dimsdale, Joel E

    2014-02-01

    Endothelial function typically precedes clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease and provides a potential mechanism for the associations observed between cardiovascular disease and sleep quality. This study examined how subjective and objective indicators of sleep quality relate to endothelial function, as measured by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). In a clinical research centre, 100 non-shift working adults (mean age: 36 years) completed FMD testing and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, along with a polysomnography assessment to obtain the following measures: slow wave sleep, percentage rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, REM sleep latency, total arousal index, total sleep time, wake after sleep onset, sleep efficiency and apnea-hypopnea index. Bivariate correlations and follow-up multiple regressions examined how FMD related to subjective (i.e., Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores) and objective (i.e., polysomnography-derived) indicators of sleep quality. After FMD showed bivariate correlations with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores, percentage REM sleep and REM latency, further examination with separate regression models indicated that these associations remained significant after adjustments for sex, age, race, hypertension, body mass index, apnea-hypopnea index, smoking and income (Ps Quality Index increased (indicating decreased subjective sleep quality) and percentage REM sleep decreased, while REM sleep latency increased (Ps quality and adverse changes in REM sleep were associated with diminished vasodilation, which could link sleep disturbances to cardiovascular disease.

  4. Managing Sleep Disturbances in Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbances, particularly daytime sleepiness and insomnia, are common problems reported by patients suffering from liver cirrhosis. Poor sleep negatively impacts patients’ quality of life and cognitive functions and increases mortality. Although sleep disturbances can be an early sign of hepatic encephalopathy (HE, many patients without HE still complain of poor quality sleep. The pathophysiology of these disturbances is not fully understood but is believed to be linked to impaired hepatic melatonin metabolism. This paper provides an overview for the clinician of common comorbidities contributing to poor sleep in patients with liver disease, mainly restless leg syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea. It discusses nondrug and pharmacologic treatment options in these patients, such as the use of light therapy and histamine (H1 blockers.

  5. Maternal and infant sleep postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Elizabeth

    2013-07-01

    New parents should be aware that infants' sleep is unlike that of adults and that meeting their infant's needs is likely to disrupt their own sleep. They will need to adjust their routine to manage their own sleep needs. Parental sleep patterns in the postpartum period are tied to the infant's development of a circadian sleep-wake rhythm, and the infant's feeds. Close contact with the mother and exposure to light/dark cues appear to assist in the development of the infant's circadian rhythm. The composition of breastmilk varies over the course of 24 hours and some components produced at night are likely to contribute to the infant's day/night entrainment. There is no clear evidence that using artificial feeds improves maternal sleep. Most infants need night feeds but requirements for nighttime feeds vary with the individual.

  6. Sleep stages, memory and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotto, L

    1996-04-15

    Learning and memory can be impaired by sleep loss during specific vulnerable "windows" for several days after new tasks have been learned. Different types of tasks are differentially vulnerable to the loss of different stages of sleep. Memory required to perform cognitive procedural tasks is affected by the loss of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep on the first night after learning occurs and again on the third night after learning. REM-sleep deprivation on the second night after learning does not produce memory deficits. Declarative memory, which is used for the recall of specific facts, is not similarly affected by REM-sleep loss. The learning of procedural motor tasks, including those required in many sports, is impaired by the loss of stage 2 sleep, which occurs primarily in the early hours of the morning. These findings have implications for the academic and athletic performance of students and for anyone whose work involves ongoing learning and demands high standards of performance.

  7. Chronic sleep restriction induces long-lasting changes in adenosine and noradrenaline receptor density in the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    WEISSHAUPT, ANGELA; WEDEKIND, FRANZISKA; KROLL, TINA; MCCARLEY, ROBERT W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Although chronic sleep restriction frequently produces long-lasting behavioural and physiological impairments in humans, the underlying neural mechanisms are unknown. Here we used a rat model of chronic sleep restriction to investigate the role of brain adenosine and noradrenaline systems, known to regulate sleep and wakefulness, respectively. The density of adenosine A1 and A2a receptors and β-adrenergic receptors before, during and following 5 days of sleep restriction was assessed with autoradiography. Rats (n = 48) were sleep-deprived for 18 h day–1 for 5 consecutive days (SR1–SR5), followed by 3 unrestricted recovery sleep days (R1–R3). Brains were collected at the beginning of the light period, which was immediately after the end of sleep deprivation on sleep restriction days. Chronic sleep restriction increased adenosine A1 receptor density significantly in nine of the 13 brain areas analysed with elevations also observed on R3 (+18 to +32%). In contrast, chronic sleep restriction reduced adenosine A2a receptor density significantly in one of the three brain areas analysed (olfactory tubercle which declined 26–31% from SR1 to R1). A decrease in b-adrenergic receptors density was seen in substantia innominata and ventral pallidum which remained reduced on R3, but no changes were found in the anterior cingulate cortex. These data suggest that chronic sleep restriction can induce long-term changes in the brain adenosine and noradrenaline receptors, which may underlie the long-lasting neurocognitive impairments observed in chronic sleep restriction. PMID:25900125

  8. SLEEP HABITS AMONG FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Neera; Varun; Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is part of the rhythm of life; without a good sleep the mind is less adaptive, mood is altered and the body loses the ability to refresh. The sleep-wake cycle of medical students is quite different and sleep deprivation, poor sleep quality, occurrence of napping episodes during the day. This study was designed to assess sleep habits in first year medical students. MATERIAL AND METHODS Participants of this study were healthy medical students of first year MBBS course of S...

  9. Inter-Hemispheric Oscillations in Human Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Imbach, Lukas L.; Esther Werth; Ulf Kallweit; Johannes Sarnthein; Scammell, Thomas E.; Baumann, Christian R.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is generally categorized into discrete stages based on characteristic electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns. This traditional approach represents sleep architecture in a static way, but it cannot reflect variations in sleep across time and across the cortex. To investigate these dynamic aspects of sleep, we analyzed sleep recordings in 14 healthy volunteers with a novel, frequency-based EEG analysis. This approach enabled comparison of sleep patterns with low inter-individual variability....

  10. Inter-hemispheric oscillations in human sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Imbach, L L; Werth, E; Kallweit, U; Sarnthein, J.; SCAMMELL, T. E.; Baumann, C R

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is generally categorized into discrete stages based on characteristic electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns. This traditional approach represents sleep architecture in a static way, but it cannot reflect variations in sleep across time and across the cortex. To investigate these dynamic aspects of sleep, we analyzed sleep recordings in 14 healthy volunteers with a novel, frequency-based EEG analysis. This approach enabled comparison of sleep patterns with low inter-individual variability....

  11. Monetary value of undisturbed sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethmüller, Sebastian; Müller-Wenk, Ruedi; Knoblauch, Andreas; Schoch, Otto D

    2008-01-01

    To design a national antinoise policy, we need to know the monetary value that people attach to the reduction of sleep disturbance due to road traffic noise. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) controlled by nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) underwent one-to-one structured interviews to determine the monetary value of their resultant undisturbed sleep. This was then converted into a value for sleep undisturbed by noise, using a severity ratio. Outpatient interviews in 67 OSAS patients (54 males, 28 to 73 years old) managed by the Center for Sleep Medicine, Kantonsspital, St. Gallen, Switzerland. The interview questions addressed the outcome and difficulties of nCPAP therapy, the self-rated severity of pretreatment sleep disturbance and self-rated monetary value of sleep improvement. Thirteen OSAS patients who had also experienced noise-related sleep disturbance rated its severity on a visual analogue scale (VAS). The mean monetary value of nCPAP-controlled sleep disturbance was Swiss francs (CHF) 70/night (CHF1 = US$ 0.877, year end 2004; 25th and 75th percentiles: CHF 35 and CHF 100). Interviewees maintained this high estimate after learning that the actual treatment costs were only approximately 6 CHF/night. A severity ratio ranging from 2.3:1 to 4.7:1 for sleep disturbance resulting from OSAS or from noise was derived from patients' responses and literature. The value of noise-free sleep was CHF 7.45-23.81 per night. Sleep undisturbed by noise has a remarkably high monetary value for people, which should be considered in political decision-making.

  12. Electrodermal asymmetry during human sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixa i Baqué, E; de Bonis, M

    1983-01-01

    The bilateral spontaneous electrodermal activity (EDA) of four paid volunteer male students was recorded during three consecutive complete nights (after a habituation night). The results showed that: (a) there was a high proportion of electrodermal asymmetry (80%) during human sleep; (b) there were no significant differences in asymmetry between sleep stages; (c) electrodermal laterality during sleep seems to be under a random effects model; and (d) laterality appears to be an unreliable parameter. These results are discussed in terms of the activation theory.

  13. Polyphasic Sleep and Napping Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO10471 TITLE: Polyphasic Sleep and Napping Strategies DISTRIBUTION...report. UNCLASSIFIED hfollowing comonent part numbers A cnprie the 0com ilation report- ADP010453 thru. ADP010473 20-1 Polyphasic Sleep and Napping ... Strategies Per Kristian OPSTAD Norwegian Defence Research Establishment P 0 Box 25 2027 Kjeller Norway Sleep deprivation is the most detrimental The

  14. Does sleep improve memory organization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi eTakeuchi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sleep can integrate information into existing memory networks, look for common patterns and distill overarching rules, or simply stabilize and strengthen the memory exactly as it was learned. Recent research has shown that sleep facilitates abstraction of gist information as well as integration across multiple memories, insight into hidden solutions, and even the ability to make creative connections between distantly related ideas and concepts. To investigate the effect of sleep on memory organization, thirty-five normal volunteers were randomly assigned either to the sleep (n=17 or wake group (n=18. The sleep subjects performed the Japanese Verbal Learning Test (JVLT, a measure of learning and memory, three times in the evening, and slept. On the following morning (9 hours later, they were asked to recall the words on the list. The wake subjects took the same test in the morning, and were asked to recall the words in the same time interval as in the sleep group. The Semantic Clustering Ratio (SCR, divided by the total number of words recalled, was used as an index of memory organization. Our main interest was whether the sleep subjects elicit a greater increase in this measure from the third to the fourth assessments. Time-by-group interaction effect on SCR was not significant between the sleep group and wake group as a whole. Meanwhile, the change in the SCR between the third and fourth trials was negatively correlated with duration of nocturnal waking in the sleep group, but not other sleep indices. Based on this observation, further analysis was conducted for subjects in the sleep group who awoke nocturnally for less than 60 minutes for comparison with the wake group. A significant time-by-group interaction was noted; these good-sleepers showed a significantly greater improvement in the memory index compared with the wake subjects. These results provide the first suggestion that sleep may enhance memory organization, which requires further

  15. Sleep EEG in growth disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, B. J.; Brook, C. G.

    1986-01-01

    The sleep of 30 children with disorders of growth and development was studied because of the known association between sleep and the secretion of hormones. Thirty three normal children were studied for comparison. The sleep of two consecutive nights was monitored at home using a small portable electroencephalogram and electro-oculogram recorder. Within the normal group there were no significant differences between sexes nor between the first and second nights of recording. There was a signifi...

  16. Sleeping beauties in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Završnik, Jernej; Kokol, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Sleeping beauties (SBs) in science have been known for few decades; however, it seems that only recently have they become popular. An SB is a publication that "sleeps" for a long time and then almost suddenly awakes and becomes highly cited. SBs present interesting findings in science. Pediatrics research literature has not yet been analyzed for their presence, and 5 pediatrics SBs were discovered in this research. Their prevalence was approximately 0.011%. Some environments or periods are more "SB fertile" than others: 3 of 5 SBs were published in the journal Pediatrics, 4 originated from the United States, and 4 were published in the period from 1992 to 1993. No institutions or authors published more than 1 SB.

  17. Sleep and Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Padma Srivastav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian variations in conjunction with sleep-related heart rhythm changes and sleepdisordered breathing (SDB are contributing risk factors for stroke. Strong scientificevidence now exists indicating that SDB contributes to systemic hypertension, aprominent risk factor for stroke, and compelling circumstantial evidence is presentsuggesting that SDB raises the risk for development of stroke through other circulatorymechanisms as well. Preliminary evidence indicates that post-stroke patients have ahigher prevalence of SDB, which is likely to compromise their rehabilitation outcomes.Since SDB is modifiable with the application of CPAP and other treatment modalities,there is practical value in investigating patients at risk of stroke or post stroke forpresence of SDB. Successful application of CPAP or BiPAP therapy may improve theoutcome in both instances.Key words : Sleep, Stroke, SDB, CPAP

  18. Sleep dissolves illusion: sleep withstands learning of visuo-tactile-proprioceptive integration induced by repeated days of rubber hand illusion training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoyasu Honma

    Full Text Available Multisensory integration is a key factor in establishing bodily self-consciousness and in adapting humans to novel environments. The rubber hand illusion paradigm, in which humans can immediately perceive illusory ownership to an artificial hand, is a traditional technique for investigating multisensory integration and the feeling of illusory ownership. However, the long-term learning properties of the rubber hand illusion have not been previously investigated. Moreover, although sleep contributes to various aspects of cognition, including learning and memory, its influence on illusory learning of the artificial hand has not yet been assessed. We determined the effects of daily repetitive training and sleep on learning visuo-tactile-proprioceptive sensory integration and illusory ownership in healthy adult participants by using the traditional rubber hand illusion paradigm. Subjective ownership of the rubber hand, proprioceptive drift, and galvanic skin response were measured to assess learning indexes. Subjective ownership was maintained and proprioceptive drift increased with daily training. Proprioceptive drift, but not subjective ownership, was significantly attenuated after sleep. A significantly greater reduction in galvanic skin response was observed after wakefulness compared to after sleep. Our results suggest that although repetitive rubber hand illusion training facilitates multisensory integration and physiological habituation of a multisensory incongruent environment, sleep corrects illusional integration and habituation based on experiences in a multisensory incongruent environment. These findings may increase our understanding of adaptive neural processes to novel environments, specifically, bodily self-consciousness and sleep-dependent neuroplasticity.

  19. Sleep dissolves illusion: sleep withstands learning of visuo-tactile-proprioceptive integration induced by repeated days of rubber hand illusion training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Motoyasu; Yoshiike, Takuya; Ikeda, Hiroki; Kim, Yoshiharu; Kuriyama, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Multisensory integration is a key factor in establishing bodily self-consciousness and in adapting humans to novel environments. The rubber hand illusion paradigm, in which humans can immediately perceive illusory ownership to an artificial hand, is a traditional technique for investigating multisensory integration and the feeling of illusory ownership. However, the long-term learning properties of the rubber hand illusion have not been previously investigated. Moreover, although sleep contributes to various aspects of cognition, including learning and memory, its influence on illusory learning of the artificial hand has not yet been assessed. We determined the effects of daily repetitive training and sleep on learning visuo-tactile-proprioceptive sensory integration and illusory ownership in healthy adult participants by using the traditional rubber hand illusion paradigm. Subjective ownership of the rubber hand, proprioceptive drift, and galvanic skin response were measured to assess learning indexes. Subjective ownership was maintained and proprioceptive drift increased with daily training. Proprioceptive drift, but not subjective ownership, was significantly attenuated after sleep. A significantly greater reduction in galvanic skin response was observed after wakefulness compared to after sleep. Our results suggest that although repetitive rubber hand illusion training facilitates multisensory integration and physiological habituation of a multisensory incongruent environment, sleep corrects illusional integration and habituation based on experiences in a multisensory incongruent environment. These findings may increase our understanding of adaptive neural processes to novel environments, specifically, bodily self-consciousness and sleep-dependent neuroplasticity.

  20. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirrier, R

    1993-01-01

    Snoring and excessive sleepiness are the hallmarks of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome but other clinical manifestations are present and a precise assessment of the disease involves clear definitions of the various kinds of apnea. Several pathogenetic factors (functional, anatomical, neurological, genetical) are still being discussed. However new insights of the pathophysiology of apneas allow more reliable treatments. Central nervous and cardiovascular complications as well as the traumatic morbidity, associated with excessive daytime sleepiness, make it a major public health problem.