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Sample records for huygens atmospheric structure

  1. The Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument (HASI): Expected Results at Titan and Performance Verification in Terrestrial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, F.; Fulchignoni, M.; Colombatti, G.; Stoppato, P. F. Lion; Zarnecki, J. C.; Harri, A. M.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Hamelin, M.; Flamini, E.; Bianchini, G.; Angrilli, F.

    2005-01-01

    The Huygens ASI is a multi-sensor package resulting from an international cooperation, it has been designed to measure the physical quantities characterizing Titan's atmosphere during the Huygens probe mission. On 14th January, 2005, HASI will measure acceleration, pressure, temperature and electrical properties all along the Huygens probe descent on Titan in order to study Titan s atmospheric structure, dynamics and electric properties. Monitoring axial and normal accelerations and providing direct pressure and temperature measurements during the descent, HASI will mainly contribute to the Huygens probe entry and trajectory reconstruction. In order to simulate the Huygens probe descent and verify HASI sensors performance in terrestrial environment, stratospheric balloon flight experiment campaigns have been performed, in collaboration with the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The results of flight experiments have allowed to determine the atmospheric vertical profiles and to obtain a set of data for the analysis of probe trajectory and attitude reconstruction.

  2. Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument (HASI) test by a stratospheric balloon experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulchignoni, M.; Gaborit, V.; Aboudam, A.; Angrilli, F.; Antonello, M.; Bastianello, S.; Bettanini, C.; Bianchini, G.; Colombatti, G.; Ferri, F.; Lion Stoppato, P.

    2002-09-01

    We developped a series of balloon experiments parachuting a 1:1 scale mock up of the Huygens probe from an altitude larger than 30 km in order to simulate at planetary scale the final part of the descent of the probe in the Titan atmosphere. The Earth atmosphere represents a natural laboratory where most of the physical parameters meet quite well the bulk condition of Titan's environment, with the exception of temperature. A first balloon experiment has been carried out in June 2001 and the results have been reported at the last DPS (V. Gaborit et al., BAAS 33, 38.03) The mock up of the probe descending in the Titan atmosphere for the Huygens Cassini Mission has been successfully launched with stratospheric balloon from Italian Space Agency Base "Luigi Broglio" in Sicily and recovered on May 30th 2002. The probe has been lifted at 32 km altitude and then released to perform a 45 minutes descent decelerated by parachute, to simulate Huygens mission at Titan. Preliminary aerodynamics study of the probe has focused on the achievement of a descent velocity profile and a spin rate profile, satisfying the Huygens mission to Titan requirements. The descent velocity and spin rate have been calculated by solving a system of ODE describing the translational and rotational motion of the probe trough the earth atmosphere during parachute aided descent Results of these calculations have driven the choice of an appropriate angle of attack of the blades in the bottom of the probe and ballast weight during flight. The probe is hosting spares of HASI sensors, housekeeping sensors and other dedicated sensors, Beagle II UV Sensors and Huygens SSP Tilt Sensor, for a total of 77 acquired sensor channels, sampled during ascent, drift and descent phase. Main goals are i) to verify sensor performance and perform a realistic functional test in dynamical and environmental conditions similar to those during the descent in Titan atmosphere; ii) to investigate impact at ground to check the

  3. Titan from Cassini-Huygens

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Robert H; Waite, J. Hunter

    2010-01-01

    This book reviews our current knowledge of Saturn's largest moon Titan featuring the latest results obtained by the Cassini-Huygens mission. A global author team addresses Titan’s origin and evolution, internal structure, surface geology, the atmosphere and ionosphere as well as magnetospheric interactions. The book closes with an outlook beyond the Cassini-Huygens mission. Colorfully illustrated, this book will serve as a reference to researchers as well as an introduction for students.

  4. Chiral Huygens metasurfaces for nonlinear structuring of linearly polarized light

    CERN Document Server

    Lesina, A Calà; Ramunno, L

    2016-01-01

    We report on a chiral nanostructure, which we term a "butterfly nanoantenna," that, when used in a metasurface, allows the direct conversion of a linearly polarized beam into a nonlinear optical far-field of arbitrary complexity. The butterfly nanoantenna exhibits field enhancement in its gap for every incident linear polarization, which can be exploited to drive nonlinear optical emitters within the gap, for the structuring of light within a frequency range not accessible by linear plasmonics. As the polarization, phase and amplitude of the field in the gap are highly controlled, nonlinear emitters within the gap behave as an idealized Huygens source. A general framework is thereby proposed wherein the butterfly nanoantennas can be arranged on a surface to produce a highly structured far-field nonlinear optical beam with high purity. A third harmonic Laguerre-Gauss beam carrying an optical orbital angular momentum of 41 is demonstrated as an example, through large-scale simulations on a high-performance comp...

  5. Photochemical enrichment of deuterium in Titan's atmosphere: new insights from Cassini-Huygens

    CERN Document Server

    Cordier, D; Lunine, I J; Moudens, A; Vuitton, V

    2008-01-01

    Cassini-Huygens data are used to re-examine the potential sources of the D/H enhancement over solar, measured in methane, in Titan's atmosphere. Assuming that the system is closed with respect to carbon, the use of constraints from the Huygens probe for the determination of the current mass of atmospheric methane and the most up-to-date determination of D/H from Cassini/CIRS infrared spectra allow us to show that photochemical enrichment of deuterium is not sufficient to be the sole mechanism yielding the measured D/H value. A possible fractionation between CH3D and CH4 during the escape process may slightly enhance the deuterium enrichment, but is not sufficient to explain the observed D/H value over the range of escape values proposed in the literature. Hence, alternative mechanisms such as a primordial deuterium enrichment must be combined with the photochemical enrichment in Titan's atmosphere in order to explain its current D/H value.

  6. Temperature variations in Titan's upper atmosphere: Impact on Cassini/Huygens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kazeminejad

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature variations of Titan's upper atmosphere due to the plasma interaction of the satellite with Saturn's magnetosphere and Titan's high altitude monomer haze particles can imply an offset of up to ±30K from currently estimated model profiles. We incorporated these temperature uncertainties as an offset into the recently published Vervack et al. (2004 (Icarus, Vol. 170, 91-112 engineering model and derive extreme case (i.e. minimum and maximum profiles temperature, pressure, and density profiles. We simulated the Huygens probe hypersonic entry trajectory and obtain, as expected, deviations of the probe trajectory for the extreme atmosphere models compared to the simulation based on the nominal one. These deviations are very similar to the ones obtained with the standard Yelle et al. (1997 (ESA SP-1177 profiles. We could confirm that the difference in aerodynamic drag is of an order of magnitude that can be measured by the probe science accelerometer. They represent an important means for the reconstruction of Titan's upper atmospheric properties. Furthermore, we simulated a Cassini low Titan flyby trajectory. No major trajectory deviations were found. The atmospheric torques due to aerodynamic drag, however, are twice as high for our high temperature profile as the ones obtained with the Yelle maximum profile and more than 5 times higher than the worst case estimations from the Cassini project. We propose to use the Cassini atmospheric torque measurements during its low flybys to derive the atmospheric drag and to reconstruct Titan's upper atmosphere density, pressure, and temperature. The results could then be compared to the reconstructed profiles obtained from Huygens probe measurements. This would help to validate the probe measurements and decrease the error bars.

  7. VLBI experiment with the Huygens Probe during its descent in the atmosphere of Titan : An evidence for meridional wind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pogrebenko, Sergei; Gurvits, Leonid; Avruch, Ian; Cimo, Giuseppe; Team, Huygens VLBI Tracking

    Phase-referencing VLBI observations of the Huygens Probe were performed during its descent in the atmosphere of Titan on 14 January 2005 using a global network of 17 radio telescopes. The Probe's position in the Titanographic frame was determined with the accuracy of about 1 km relative to a priori

  8. New Results on Titan’s Atmosphere and Surface from Huygens Probe Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph

    2013-10-01

    The global Titan perspective afforded by ongoing Cassini observations, and prospects for future in-situ exploration, have prompted a re-examination of Huygens data, yielding new results in several areas. Gravity waves have been detected (Lorenz, Ferri and Young, submitted) in the HASI descent temperature data, with 2K amplitude. These waves are seen above about 60km, and analysis suggests they may therefore be controlled by interaction of upward-propagating waves with the zonal wind field. A curious cessation of detection of sound pulses by a Surface Science Package ultrasound instrument about 15 minutes after the probe landed appears to be best explained (Lorenz et al., submitted) by an accumulation of polyatomic vapors such as ethane, sweated out of the ground by the warm probe. Such gases have high acoustic attenuation, and were independently measured by the probe GCMS. A new integrated timeline product, which arranges second-by-second measurements from several Huygens sensors on a convenient, common tabulation, has been archived on the PDS Atmospheres node. Also archived is an independent retrieval of Doppler information from VLBI receivers that has a higher time resolution than the DWE archive product, and an expanded event summary product that documents when key observations, system events and anomalies occurred. Finally, a troubling discrepancy exists between radio occultation and infrared soundings from Cassini, and the lower stratospheric temperature retrieved from the HASI accelerometer record. Two factors may contribute to this discrepancy - the assumed probe mass history, and the assumed zonal wind profile. The sensitivity of the recovered temperature profile to these factors is examined : in particular it is noted that the speed relative to the atmosphere in the late part of entry, when the hypersonic entry speed has been largely bled away by drag, is particularly sensitive to assumed winds, and it is in this altitude region where the recovered density

  9. A model for the vertical sound speed and absorption profiles in Titan's atmosphere based on Cassini-Huygens data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petculescu, Andi; Achi, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Measurements of thermodynamic quantities in Titan's atmosphere during the descent of Huygens in 2005 are used to predict the vertical profiles for the speed and intrinsic attenuation (or absorption) of sound. The calculations are done using one author's previous model modified to accommodate non-ideal equations of state. The vertical temperature profile places the tropopause about 40 km above the surface. In the model, a binary nitrogen-methane composition is assumed for Titan's atmosphere, quantified by the methane fraction measured by the gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GCMS) onboard Huygens. To more accurately constrain the acoustic wave number, the variation of thermophysical properties (specific heats, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) with altitude is included via data extracted from the NIST Chemistry WebBook [URL webbook.nist.gov, National Institute of Standards and Technology Chemistry WebBook (Last accessed 10/20/2011)]. The predicted speed of sound profile fits well inside the spread of the data recorded by Huygens' active acoustic sensor. In the N(2)-dominated atmosphere, the sound waves have negligible relaxational dispersion and mostly classical (thermo-viscous) absorption. The cold and dense environment of Titan can sustain acoustic waves over large distances with relatively small transmission losses, as evidenced by the small absorption. A ray-tracing program is used to assess the bounds imposed by the zonal wind-measured by the Doppler Wind Experiment on Huygens-on long-range propagation.

  10. Saturn from Cassini-Huygens

    CERN Document Server

    Dougherty, Michele K; Krimigis, Stamatios M

    2009-01-01

    This book reviews our current knowledge of Saturn featuring the latest results obtained by the Cassini-Huygens mission. A global author team addresses the planet’s origin and evolution, internal structure, composition and chemistry, the atmosphere and ionosphere, the magnetosphere, as well as its ring system. Furthermore, Saturn's icy satellites are discussed. The book closes with an outlook beyond the Cassini-Huygens mission. Colorfully illustrated, this book will serve as a reference to researchers as well as an introduction for students.

  11. Structure and physical conditions in the Huygens region of the Orion nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, C. R.; Ferland, G. J.; Peimbert, M.

    2017-02-01

    Hubble Space Telescope images, MUSE maps of emission lines, and an atlas of high velocity resolution emission-line spectra have been used to establish for the first time correlations of the electron temperature, electron density, radial velocity, turbulence, and orientation within the main ionization front of the nebula. From the study of the combined properties of multiple features, it is established that variations in the radial velocity are primarily caused by the photoevaporating ionization front being viewed at different angles. There is a progressive increase of the electron temperature and density with decreasing distance from the dominant ionizing star θ1 Ori C. The product of these characteristics (ne × Te) is the most relevant parameter in modelling a blister-type nebula like the Huygens region, where this quantity should vary with the surface brightness in Hα. Several lines of evidence indicate that small-scale structure and turbulence exist down to the level of our resolution of a few arcseconds. Although photoevaporative flow must contribute at some level to the well-known non-thermal broadening of the emission lines, comparison of quantitative predictions with the observed optical line widths indicates that it is not the major additive broadening component. Derivation of Te values for H+ from radio+optical and optical-only ionized hydrogen emission showed that this temperature is close to that derived from [N II] and that the transition from the well-known flat extinction curve which applies in the Huygens region to a more normal steep extinction curve occurs immediately outside of the Bright Bar feature of the nebula.

  12. Structure and Physical Conditions in the Huygens Region of the Orion Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    O'Dell, C R; Peimbert, M

    2016-01-01

    HST images, MUSE maps of emission-lines, and an atlas of high velocity resolution emission-line spectra have been used to establish for the firrst time correlations of the electron temperature, electron density, radial velocity, turbulence, and orientation within the main ionization front of the nebula. From the study of the combined properties of multiple features, it is established that variations in the radial velocity are primarily caused by the photo-evaporating ionization front being viewed at different angles. There is a progressive increase of the electron temperature and density with decreasing distance from the dominant ionizing star Theta1 Ori C. The product of these characteristics (NexTe) is the most relevant parameter in modeling a blister-type nebula like the Huygens Region, where this quantity should vary with the surface brightness in Halpha. Several lines of evidence indicate that small-scale structure and turbulence exists down to the level of our resolution of a few arcseconds. Although ph...

  13. Huygens probe entry dynamic model and accelerometer data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombatti, Giacomo; Aboudan, Alessio; Ferri, Francesca; Angrilli, Francesco

    2008-04-01

    During the first phase of Huygens arrival into Titan's atmosphere the probe is subjected to gravitational and aerodynamic forces in aerodynamic hypersonic regime. Atmospheric drag exerts a strong deceleration on the capsule measured by Huygens atmospheric structure instrument (HASI) servo accelerometer. A 6 DOF (Degree of Freedom) model of the Huygens probe entry dynamics has been developed and used for data analysis. The accelerometer data are analysed and the model allows the retrieval of dynamics information of Huygens probe from 1545 km altitude down to end of the entry phase. Probe's initial conditions (velocity and position) were refined to match the measured deceleration profile resulting in a different altitude at interface epoch with respect to those of the Cassini Navigation Team. Velocity and position of probe at interface epoch are compatible with those used by Descent Trajectory Working Group (DTWG). Measurements acquired before atmosphere detection are used to estimate probe's angular rate, bound attitude and characterise the angle of attack profile which results to be lower than 4∘ during the whole entry. Probe's spin calculated (6.98 RPM) is slightly different with respect to DTWG of 7.28 RPM but considering a 2% error in the Inertia matrix these results are inside the 1-σ error band.

  14. Approach to atmospheric laser-propagation theory based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and a self-consistency concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochove, Erik J; Rao Gudimetla, V S

    2017-01-01

    We propose a self-consistency condition based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, which we apply to the propagation kernel of the mutual coherence function of a partially coherent laser beam propagating through a turbulent atmosphere. The assumption of statistical independence of turbulence in neighboring propagation segments leads to an integral equation in the propagation kernel. This integral equation is satisfied by a Gaussian function, with dependence on the transverse coordinates that is identical to the previous Gaussian formulation by Yura [Appl. Opt.11, 1399 (1972)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.11.001399], but differs in the transverse coherence length's dependence on propagation distance, so that this established version violates our self-consistency principle. Our formulation has one free parameter, which in the context of Kolmogorov's theory is independent of turbulence strength and propagation distance. We determined its value by numerical fitting to the rigorous beam propagation theory of Yura and Hanson [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A6, 564 (1989)JOAOD60740-323210.1364/JOSAA.6.000564], demonstrating in addition a significant improvement over other Gaussian models.

  15. Cassini-Huygens results on Titan's surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Athena Coustenis; Mathieu Hirtzig

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, has recently been consid-erably enhanced, thanks to the Cassini-Huygens mission. Since the Saturn Orbit Injection in July 2004, the probe has been harvesting new insights of the Kronian system. In par-ticular, this mission orchestrated a climax on January 14, 2005 with the descent of the Huygens probe into Titan's thick atmosphere. The orbiter and the lander have provided us with picturesque views of extraterrestrial landscapes, new in composition but reassuringly Earth-like in shape. Thus, Saturn's largest satellite displays chains of mountains, fields of dark and damp dunes, lakes and possibly geologic activity. As on Earth, landscapes on Titan are eroded and modeled by some alien hydrology: dendritic systems, hydrocarbon lakes, and methane clouds imply periods of heavy rainfalls, even though rain was never observed directly. Titan's surface also proved to be geologically active - today or in the recent past - given the small number of impact craters listed to date, as well as a few possible cryovolcanic features. We attempt hereafter a synthesis of the most significant results of the Cassini-Huygens endeavor, with emphasis on the surface.

  16. Europe reaches new frontier - Huygens lands on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The first scientific data arrived at the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) in Darmstadt, Germany, this afternoon at 17:19 CET. Huygens is mankind’s first successful attempt to land a probe on another world in the outer Solar System. “This is a great achievement for Europe and its US partners in this ambitious international endeavour to explore Saturn system,” said Jean-Jacques Dordain, ESA’s Director General. Following its release from the Cassini mothership on 25 December, Huygens reached Titan’s outer atmosphere after 20 days and a 4 million km cruise. The probe started its descent through Titan’s hazy cloud layers from an altitude of about 1270 km at 11:13 CET. During the following three minutes Huygens had to decelerate from 18 000 to 1400 km per hour. A sequence of parachutes then slowed it down to less than 300 km per hour. At a height of about 160 km the probe’s scientific instruments were exposed to Titan’s atmosphere. At about 120 km, the main parachute was replaced by a smaller one to complete the descent, with an expected touchdown at 13:34 CET. Preliminary data indicate that the probe landed safely, likely on a solid surface. The probe began transmitting data to Cassini four minutes into its descent and continued to transmit data after landing at least as long as Cassini was above Titan’s horizon. The certainty that Huygens was alive came already at 11:25 CET today, when the Green Bank radio telescope in West Virginia, USA, picked up a fain but unmistakable radio signal from the probe. Radio telescopes on Earth continued to receive this signal well past the expected lifetime of Huygens. Huygens data, relayed by Cassini, were picked up by NASA’s Deep Space Network and delivered immediately to ESA’s European Space Operation Centre in Darmstadt, Germany, where the scientific analysis is currently taking place. “Titan was always the target in the Saturn system where the need for ‘ground truth’ from a probe was critical. It

  17. Cassini at Saturn Huygens results

    CERN Document Server

    Harland, David M

    2007-01-01

    "Cassini At Saturn - Huygens Results" will bring the story of the Cassini-Huygens mission and their joint exploration of the Saturnian system right up to date. Cassini is due to enter orbit around Saturn on the 1 July 2004 and the author will have 8 months of scientific data available for review, including the most spectacular images of Saturn, its rings and satellites ever obtained by a space mission. As the Cassini spacecraft approached its destination in spring 2004, the quality of the images already being returned by the spacecraft clearly demonstrate the spectacular nature of the close-range views that will be obtained. The book will contain a 16-page colour section, comprising a carefully chosen selection of the most stunning images to be released during the spacecraft's initial period of operation. The Huygens craft will be released by Cassini in December 2004 and is due to parachute through the clouds of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, in January 2005.

  18. The Huygens Doppler Wind Experiment: Results from Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkner, W. M.; Bird, M. K.; Dutta-Roy, R.; Allison, M.; Asmar, S. W.; Atkinson, D. H.; Edenhofer, P.; Plettemeier, D.; Tyler, L. H.; Preston, R. A.; Gurvits, L.

    2005-05-01

    The ESA Huygens Probe entered and descended for nearly 2.5 hours through the atmosphere of Titan on 14 January 2005. Huygens survived impact on the surface and continued its telemetry broadcast to the NASA Cassini spacecraft on two separate radio links, denoted Channels A and B, respectively, for an additional 1.2 hours. The instrumentation for the Huygens Doppler Wind Experiment (DWE) consisting of two Ultra-Stable Oscillators in the transmitter (TUSO) and receiver (RUSO), were implemented only in Channel A. Whereas Channel B functioned flawlessly during the entire mission, the receiver for Channel A was never able to lock onto the Huygens signal because the DWE-RUSO had not been properly programmed into the critical probe radio relay sequence. All data on Channel A, including the DWE measurements and probe telemetry, were thus lost. In spite of this setback, the Channel A signal was successfully received at many radio telescopes on Earth. The precision of these Doppler measurements, considered as an aggregate, is roughly equivalent to that which had been foreseen from the measurements on board Cassini. We present an overview of the DWE ground-based observations and the Titan wind profile derived from them.

  19. The electrical properties of Titan's surface at the Huygens landing site measured with the PWA-HASI Mutual Impedance Probe. New approach and new findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, Michel; Lethuillier, Anthony; Le Gall, Alice; Grard, Réjean; Béghin, Christian; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Jernej, Irmgard; López-Moreno, José-Juan; Brown, Vic; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Ferri, Francesca; Ciarletti, Valérie

    2016-05-01

    Ten years after the successful landing of the Huygens Probe on the surface of Titan, we reassess the derivation of ground complex permittivity using the PWA-MIP/HASI measurements (Permittivity, Waves and Altimetry-Mutual Impedance Probe/Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument) at the frequencies 45, 90 and 360 Hz. For this purpose, we have developed a numerical method, namely "the capacity-influence matrix method", able to account for new insights on the Huygens Probe attitude at its final resting position. We find that the surface of Titan at the landing site has a dielectric constant of 2.5 ± 0.3 and a conductivity of 1.2 ± 0.6 nS/m, in agreement with previously published results but with much more reliable error estimates. These values speak in favour of a photochemical origin of the material in the first meter of the subsurface. We also propose, for the first time, a plausible explanation for the sudden change observed by PWA-MIP ∼11 min after landing: this change corresponds to a drop in the ground conductivity, probably due to the removal of a superficial conductive layer in association with the release of volatile materials warmed by the Huygens Probe.

  20. Watch Cassini-Huygens setting off for Saturn and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-01

    NASA's Cassini spacecraft, to which the Italian Space Agency ASI has made an important contribution, is crammed with instruments prepared by American and European scientists. It will spend four busy years in orbit around Saturn, and explore its famous rings and eighteen known moons. On its arrival at Saturn in 2004, the Cassini orbiter will release the European Space Agency's probe Huygens towards the largest moon, Titan.Also equipped by multinational scientific teams, Huygens will parachute through Titan's atmosphere to accomplish the most distant landing ever made, on the surface of another world. Television coverage of the launch for viewers in Europe On Monday 13 October the launch window for Cassini-Huygens opens at 4.55 a.m. Florida time (EDT). Starting at 4.00 a.m. Florida time (10.00 a.m. in most of western Europe and 9.00 a.m. in Great Britain and Ireland) ESA will provide a live TV transmission via satellite for European news organizations and other organizations wishing to receive it. Views of the launch will be accompanied by interviews with scientists and engineers of the Cassini-Huygens joint mission. A short news package will be transmitted near the end of transmission, and details will be announced on air. If the launch occurs promptly, ESA's TV operation will last until about 60 minutes after launch (i.e. about noon, European time). Technical details for TV reception Two satellites links are available, both carrying English on audio channel 1 and French on audio channel 2. Broadcasters and others with digital receivers will favour Intelsat K, while those with analogue receivers can use Eutelsat 2. Full information on transponders etc. is contained in an appendix to this press release. Paris press centre At ESA Headquarters in Paris, journalists will be able to view the TV transmission and to obtain news and background information about the Cassini-Huygens mission. The press centre will open at 10.00 a.m. on 13 October. If you wish to attend, please

  1. The Cassini-Huygens mission

    CERN Document Server

    The joint NASA-ESA Cassini-Huygens mission promises to return four (and possibly more) years of unparalleled scientific data from the solar system’s most exotic planet, the ringed, gas giant, Saturn. Larger than Galileo with a much greater communication bandwidth, Cassini can accomplish in a single flyby what Galileo returned in a series of passes. Cassini explores the Saturn environment in three dimensions, using gravity assists to climb out of the equatorial plane to look down on the rings from above, to image the aurora and to study polar magnetospheric processes such as field-aligned currents. Since the radiation belt particle fluxes are much more benign than those at Jupiter, Cassini can more safely explore the inner regions of the magnetosphere. The spacecraft approaches the planet closer than Galileo could, and explores the inner moons and the rings much more thoroughly than was possible at Jupiter. This book is the second volume, in a three volume set, that describes the Cassini/Huygens mission. Thi...

  2. Big data en handschriften van Christiaan Huygens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, J.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    In de achtste aflevering van een serie combinatiebesprekingen (digitaalandspeciaal) schenkt Jos Damen aandacht aan een onderzoek naar big data van bibliotheekcatalogi en een catalogus van het werk van het Nederlandse genie Christiaan Huygens.

  3. Saturn's Exploration Beyond Cassini-Huygens

    CERN Document Server

    Guillot, Tristan; Charnoz, Sébastien; Dougherty, Michele K; Read, Peter

    2009-01-01

    For its beautiful rings, active atmosphere and mysterious magnetic field, Saturn is a fascinating planet. It also holds some of the keys to understanding the formation of our Solar System and the evolution of giant planets in general. While the exploration by the Cassini-Huygens mission has led to great advances in our understanding of the planet and its moons, it has left us with puzzling questions: What is the bulk composition of the planet? Does it have a helium core? Is it enriched in noble gases like Jupiter? What powers and controls its gigantic storms? We have learned that we can measure an outer magnetic field that is filtered from its non-axisymmetric components, but what is Saturn's inner magnetic field? What are the rings made of and when were they formed? These questions are crucial in several ways: a detailed comparison of the compositions of Jupiter and Saturn is necessary to understand processes at work during the formation of these two planets and of the Solar System. This calls for the contin...

  4. Huygens Crater: Insights into Noachian Volcanism, Stratigraphy, and Aqueous Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackiss, S. E.; Wray, J. J.; Seelos, K. D.; Niles, P. B.

    2015-01-01

    Huygens crater is a well preserved peak ring structure on Mars centered at 13.5 deg S, 55.5 deg E in the Noachian highlands between Terras Tyrrhena and Sabaea near the NW rim of Hellas basin. With a diameter of approximately 470 km, it uplifted and exhumed pre-Noachian crustal materials from depths greater than 25 km, penetrating below the thick, ubiquitous layer of Hellas ejecta. In addition, Huygens served as a basin for subsequent aqueous activity, including erosion/deposition by fluvial valley networks and subsurface alteration that is now exposed by smaller impacts. Younger mafic-bearing plains that partially cover the basin floor and surrounding intercrater areas were likely emplaced by later volcanism.

  5. Titan Ground Complex Permittivity at the HUYGENS Landing Site; the PWA-HASI and Other Instruments Data Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, M.; Lethuillier, A.; Le Gall, A. A.; Grard, R.; Ciarletti, V.; Béghin, C.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Lorenz, R. D.; Lopez-Moreno, J. J.; Jernej, I.; Brown, V.; Ferri, F.

    2014-12-01

    Ten years after the successful landing of the HUYGENS probe on the surface of Titan, we reassess the complex permittivity measurements of the surface materials performed by the PWA-HASI experiment (Permittivity, Waves and Altimetry - Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument). The complex permittivity is inferred from the mutual impedance of a classical quadrupolar probe, ie. the ratio of the voltage measured by a receiving dipole over the current emitted by another dipole. Using a simple model of the quadrupole configuration, the dielectric constant of the material at the landing site was first estimated to be of the order of 1.8. A more realistic numerical model that took into account the influence of the HUYGENS gondola yielded a dielectric constant in the range 2-3 and a conductivity in the range 0.4 - 0.8 nS/m. due to uncertainties about the system geometry ( Grard et al., 2006). However, a puzzling experimental fact remains to be explained, namely a sudden variation of the amplitude and phase of the received voltage 11 mn after landing that cannot be associated with any lander mechanical disturbance. Permittivity estimations were based on the first 11 mn sequence. The present analysis takes advantage of a recent analysis of the landing process that provided more realistic final position and attitude for the HUYGENS lander (Schroder et al., 2012). The new results lie within former estimated ranges and attention is paid to their sensitivity to geometry and to the reference measurements collected immediately before landing. This point is particularly critical for the estimation of the conductivity. The complete data set has been analysed, including the sequence collected after the first 11 mn. We consider various scenarios that may explain the observed phase and amplitude discontinuity. We tested two layers ground models in order to investigate the possibility that the upper layer may have experienced a fast physical change due to deliquescence or outgasing

  6. Second space Christmas for ESA: Huygens to begin its final journey to Titan/ Media activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    At 1.25 billion km from Earth, after a 7-year journey through the Solar system, ESA’s Huygens probe is about to separate from the Cassini orbiter to enter a ballistic trajectory toward Titan, the largest and most mysterious moon of Saturn, in order to dive into its atmosphere on 14 January. This will be the first man-made object to explore in-situ this unique environment, whose chemistry is assumed to be very similar to that of the early Earth just before life began, 3.8 billion years ago. The Cassini-Huygens pair, a joint mission conducted by NASA, ESA and the Italian space agency (ASI), was launched into space on 15 October 1997. With the help of several gravity assist manoeuvres during flybys of Venus, Earth and Jupiter, it took almost 7 years for the spacecraft to reach Saturn. The Cassini orbiter, carrying Huygens on its flank, entered an orbit around Saturn on 1 July 2004, and began to investigate the ringed planet and its moons for a mission that will last at least four years. The first distant flyby of Titan took place on 2-3 July 2004. It provided data on Titan's atmosphere which were confirmed by the data obtained during the first close flyby on 26 October 2004 at an altitude of 1174 km. These data were used to validate the entry conditions of the Huygens probe. A second close flyby of Titan by Cassini-Huygens at an altitude of 1200 km is scheduled on 13 December and will provide additional data to further validate the entry conditions of the Huygens probe. On 17 December the orbiter will be placed on a controlled collision course with Titan in order to release Huygens on the proper trajectory, and on 21 December (some dates and times are subject to minor adjustment for operational reasons, except the entry time on 14 January which is know to within an accuracy of under 2 minutes) all systems will be set up for separation and the Huygens timers will be set to wake the probe a few hours before its arrival at Titan. The Huygens probe is due to separate on

  7. Radio Telescopes Will Add to Cassini-Huygens Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    When the European Space Agency's Huygens spacecraft makes its plunge into the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan on January 14, radio telescopes of the National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) will help international teams of scientists extract the maximum possible amount of irreplaceable information from an experiment unique in human history. Huygens is the 700-pound probe that has accompanied the larger Cassini spacecraft on a mission to thoroughly explore Saturn, its rings and its numerous moons. The Green Bank Telescope The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for GBT gallery) The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia and eight of the ten telescopes of the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), located at Pie Town and Los Alamos, NM, Fort Davis, TX, North Liberty, IA, Kitt Peak, AZ, Brewster, WA, Owens Valley, CA, and Mauna Kea, HI, will directly receive the faint signal from Huygens during its descent. Along with other radio telescopes in Australia, Japan, and China, the NRAO facilities will add significantly to the information about Titan and its atmosphere that will be gained from the Huygens mission. A European-led team will use the radio telescopes to make extremely precise measurements of the probe's position during its descent, while a U.S.-led team will concentrate on gathering measurements of the probe's descent speed and the direction of its motion. The radio-telescope measurements will provide data vital to gaining a full understanding of the winds that Huygens encounters in Titan's atmosphere. Currently, scientists know little about Titan's winds. Data from the Voyager I spacecraft's 1980 flyby indicated that east-west winds may reach 225 mph or more. North-south winds and possible vertical winds, while probably much weaker, may still be significant. There are competing theoretical models of Titan's winds, and the overall picture is best summarized as

  8. First Results From the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) Experiment on the Cassini-Huygens Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Hasso B.; Demick, J.; Haberman, J.; Harpold, D.; Kasprzak, W.; Raaen, E.; Way, S.; Atreya, S.; Carignan, G.; Bauer, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Huygens Probe of the Cassini Huygens Mission entered the atmosphere of the moon Titan on January 14,2005. The GCMS was part of the instrument complement on the Probe to measure in situ the chemical composition of the atmosphere during the probe descent and to support the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) experiment by serving as detector for the pyrolization products. The GCMS employed a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns. The mass spectrometer employed five electron impact ion sources with available electron energies of either 70 or 25 eV. Three ion sources served as detectors for the GC columns and two were dedicated to direct atmosphere sampling and ACP gas sampling, respectively. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and served to evaporate surface constituents after impact.

  9. Huygens file service and storage architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Peter; Mullender, Sape; Stabell-Kulo, Tage

    1993-01-01

    The Huygens file server is a high-performance file server which is able to deliver multi-media data in a timely manner while also providing clients with ordinary “Unix” like file I/O. The file server integrates client machines, file servers and tertiary storage servers in the same storage architectu

  10. Huygens file server and storage architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Peter; Mullender, Sape; Stabell-Kulo, Tage

    1993-01-01

    The Huygens file server is a high-performance file server which is able to deliver multi-media data in a timely manner while also providing clients with ordinary “Unix” like file I/O. The file server integrates client machines, file servers and tertiary storage servers in the same storage architectu

  11. Wind shear and turbulence on Titan: Huygens analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2017-10-01

    Wind shear measured by Doppler tracking of the Huygens probe is evaluated, and found to be within the range anticipated by pre-flight assessments (namely less than two times the Brunt-Väisälä frequency). The strongest large-scale shear encountered was ∼5 m/s/km, a level associated with 'Light' turbulence in terrestrial aviation. Near-surface winds (below 4 km) have small-scale fluctuations of ∼0.1 m/s on 1 s timescales, indicated both by probe tilt and Doppler tracking, and the characteristics of the fluctuation, of interest for future missions to Titan, can be reproduced with a simple autoregressive (AR(1)) model. The turbulent dissipation rate at an altitude of ∼500 m is found to be ∼0.2 cm2/s3, which may be a useful benchmark for atmospheric circulation models.

  12. Titan's interior from Cassini-Huygens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobie, G.; Baland, R.-M.; Lefevre, A.; Monteux, J.; Cadek, O.; Choblet, G.; Mitri, G.

    2013-09-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission has brought many informations about Titan that can be used to infer its interior structure: the gravity field coefficients (up to degree 3, [1]), the surface shape (up to degree 6, [2]), the tidal Love number [1], the electric field [3], and the orientation of its rotation axis [4]. The measured obliquity and gravity perturbation due to tides, as well as the electric field, are lines of evidence for the presence of an internal global ocean beneath the ice surface of Titan [5,1,3]. The observed surface shape and gravity can be used to further constrain the structure of the ice shell above the internal ocean. The presence of a significant topography associated with weak gravity anomalies indicates that deflections of internal interface or lateral density variations may exist to compensate the topography. To assess the sources of compensation, we consider interior models including interface deflections and/or density variations, which reproduces simultaneously the surface gravity and long-wavelength topography data [6]. Furthermore, in order to test the long-term mechanical stability of the internal mass anomalies, we compute the relaxation rate of each internal interface in response to surface mass load. We show that the topography can be explained either by defections of the ocean/ice interface or by density variations in an upper crust [6]. For non-perfectly compensated models of the outer ice shell, the present-day structure is stable only for a conductive layer above a relatively cold ocean (for bottom viscosity > 1016 Pa.s, T Love number and the obliquity. To derive the possible density profile, the obliquity is computed from a Cassini state model for a satellite with an internal liquid layer, each layer having an ellipsoidal shape consistent with the measured surface shape and gravity field [7]. We show that, once the observed surface flattening is taken into account, the measured obliquity can be reproduced only for internal models

  13. Christiaan Huygens and the Problem of the Hanging Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The seventeen-year-old Christiaan Huygens was the first to prove that a hanging chain did not take the form of the parabola, as was commonly thought in the early seventeenth century. We will examine Huygen's geometrical proof, and we will investigate the later history of the catenary.

  14. Christiaan Huygens and the Problem of the Hanging Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The seventeen-year-old Christiaan Huygens was the first to prove that a hanging chain did not take the form of the parabola, as was commonly thought in the early seventeenth century. We will examine Huygen's geometrical proof, and we will investigate the later history of the catenary.

  15. The Structure and Bifurcation of Atmospheric Motions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘式适; 刘式达; 付遵涛; 辛国君; 梁福明

    2004-01-01

    The 3-D spiral structure resulting from the balance between the pressure gradient force, Coriolis force, and viscous force is a common atmospheric motion pattern. If the nonlinear advective terms are considered, this typical pattern can be bifurcated. It is shown that the surface low pressure with convergent cyclonic vorticity and surface high pressure with divergent anticyclonic vorticity are all stable under certain conditions. The anomalous structure with convergent anticyclonic vorticity is always unstable. But the anomalous weak high pressure structure with convergent cyclonic vorticity can exist, and this denotes the cyclone's dying out.

  16. ESA and NASA agree new mission scenario for Cassini-Huygens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    After six months of investigations and analysis by a joint ESA/NASA Huygens Recovery Task Force (HRTF), senior management from the two space agencies and members of the Cassini-Huygens scientific community have endorsed several modifications to the mission. These will ensure a return close to 100% of the Huygens science data, with no impact on the nominal prime Cassini tour after the third Titan encounter. The modifications have been introduced because of a design flaw in the Huygens communication system. This problem meant that the Huygens receiver was unable to compensate for the frequency shift between the signal emitted by the Probe and the one received by the Orbiter, due to the Doppler shift (**). This would have resulted in the loss of most of the unique data returned from the Probe during its descent through Titan’s dense atmosphere. To ensure that as much data as possible is returned from the pioneering Probe, the HRTF proposed a new schedule for Cassini’s first orbits around Saturn. The agreed scenario involves shortening Cassini’s first two orbits around the ringed planet and adding a third which provides the required new geometry for the Huygens mission to Titan. In the new scenario, the arrival at Saturn on 1 July 2004 remains unchanged. However, Cassini’s first flyby of Titan will now occur on 26 October, followed by another on 13 December. The Huygens Probe will be released towards Titan on 25 December, for an entry into the moon’s atmosphere 22 days later, on 14 January 2005, seven weeks later than originally planned. To reduce the Doppler shift in the signal from Huygens, the Cassini Orbiter will fly over Titan’s cloud tops at a much higher altitude than originally planned - 65,000 km instead of 1,200 km. This higher orbit has the added advantage that Cassini will be able to preserve the four-year baseline tour through the Saturn system, by resuming its original orbital plan in mid-February 2005. “In any complex space mission problems

  17. Strong terahertz absorption in all-dielectric Huygens' metasurfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael A; Powell, David A; Shadrivov, Ilya V

    2016-09-19

    We propose an all dielectric metamaterial that acts as a perfect terahertz absorber without a ground plane. The unit cell consists of a dielectric cylinder embedded in a low index material. In order to achieve near-perfect terahertz absorption (99.5%) we employ impedance matching of the electric and magnetic resonances within the cylinders of the Huygens' metasurface. The impedance matching is controlled by changing the aspect ratio between the height and diameter of the cylinder. We show that the absorption resonance can be tuned to particular frequencies from 0.3 to 1.9 THz via changing the geometry of the structure while keeping a nearly constant aspect ratio of the cylinders.

  18. ICES ON TITAN: LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS THAT COMPLEMENT THE HUYGENS PROBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. ROBINSON; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The composition of the cold bodies in the outer solar system may hold some of the key molecular clues concerning the composition of the prestellax molecular cloud that gave rise to the solar system. We studied the physical chemistry and heterogeneous (gas/surface) reactivity of extraterrestrial ice analogs of the surfaces of Saturn's moon Titan. This program coupled our surface spectroscopic techniques with physical adsorption measurements. We addressed several of the pressing questions regarding Titan such as: Is storage of hydrocarbons in Titan's water ice crust feasible? Do heterogeneous processes influence the atmospheric chemical composition of Titan? Are phase transitions to be expected? These data can be incorporated into photochemical models with the goal of improved modeling of the chemical composition and meteorology of Titan's atmosphere. Titan will be probed by the Cassini-Huygens Mission. Our results on Titan ice analogs can be used to help interpret the mission data.

  19. Titan's meridional wind profile and Huygens' orientation and swing inferred from the geometry of DISR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkoschka, Erich

    2016-05-01

    The altitude and zonal motion of the Huygens probe descending through Titan's atmosphere was determined early under the assumption of no meridional motion (Bird et al. [2005]. Nature 438, 800-802). By comparing images taken during the descent, Karkoschka et al. (Karkoschka et al. [2007]. Planet. Space Sci. 55, 1895-1935) determined the meridional motion of Huygens, which was generally much smaller than its zonal motion. Here, we present a comprehensive geometrical analysis of all images taken during the descent that is four times more accurate than the previous study. The result is a meridional wind profile across Titan's troposphere with northward winds by up to 0.4 m/s with an average of 0.1 m/s above 1 km altitude, and southward winds below, peaking at 0.9 m/s near 0.4 km altitude. The imaging data extend down to 0.22 km altitude, although additional information came from the horizontal impact speed near 0.8 m/s southward (Schröder et al. [2012]. Planet. Space Sci. 73, 327-340). There is a region between 5 and 8 km altitude with no significant meridional wind. In the stratosphere, the average meridional wind was 1.2 ± 1.5 m/s northward, and zero meridional motion is possible down to 15 km altitude. We present the difference between the zonal speeds of Huygens and the wind that was ignored in previous publications and amounts to up to 7 m/s. We determined the three rotational angles of Huygens for the times of each exposure that showed surface features. During 26 exposures, the swing speed of Huygens was fast enough to smear images. Inferred swing speeds were up to 20°/s during the calm phase of the descent, consistent with up to 40°/s swings reported before during the rough phase. The improved geometric calibration of images allowed identification of many features also seen in Cassini radar images. This comparison yields the location of the Huygens LandingSite as 192.34 ± 02° West and 10.47 ± 0.02° South.

  20. Huygens-Fresnel Principle in Superspace

    CERN Document Server

    de Gomes, H A

    2006-01-01

    We first roughly present a summary of the optico-mechanical analogy, which has always been so profitable in physics. Then we put forward a geometrodynamical formulation of gravity suitable to our intentions, both formally and conceptually. We present difficulties in some approaches to canonically quantize gravity which can be ammended by the idea put forward in this paper, which we introduce in the last section. It consists basically in trying to find an intermediary between the quantization step going from the classical superhamiltonian constraint to the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. This is accomplished by inputing interference beyond the WKB approximation, through a sort of Huygens-Fresnel Principle (HFP) in superspace. It turns out that we can derive wave-like character for both domains from this principle by allowing backward angles of diffraction, and what is more, approximate to a high degree of accuracy Feynman's path integral method in any domain.

  1. Average intensity and spreading of a Lorentz-Gauss beam in turbulent atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guoquan; Chu, Xiuxiang

    2010-01-18

    The propagation of a Lorentz-Gauss beam in turbulent atmosphere is investigated. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral and the Hermite-Gaussian expansion of a Lorentz function, analytical formulae for the average intensity and the effective beam size of a Lorentz-Gauss beam are derived in turbulent atmosphere. The average intensity distribution and the spreading properties of a Lorentz-Gauss beam in turbulent atmosphere are numerically demonstrated. The influences of the beam parameters and the structure constant of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of a Lorentz-Gauss beam in turbulent atmosphere are also discussed in detail.

  2. Highly-efficient all-dielectric Huygens' surface holograms (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Katie; Wang, Lei; Staude, Isabelle; James, Anthony; Dominguez, Jason; Subramania, Ganapathi; Liu, Sheng; Decker, Manuel; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Brener, Igal; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2016-04-01

    Optical metasurfaces have developed as a breakthrough concept for advanced wave-front. Key to these "designer metasurfaces"[1] is that they provide full 360 degree phase coverage and that their local phase can be precisely controlled. The local control of phase, amplitude and polarization on an optically thin plane will lead to a new class of flat optical components in the areas of integrated optics, flat displays, energy harvesting and mid-infrared photonics, with increased performance and functionality. However, reflection and/or absorption losses as well as low polarization-conversion efficiencies pose a fundamental obstacle for achieving high transmission efficiencies that are required for practical applications. A promising way to overcome these limitations is the use of metamaterial Huygens' surfaces [2-4], i.e., reflection-less surfaces that can also provide full 360 degree phase coverage in transmission. Plasmonic implementations of Huygens' surfaces for microwave [2] and the mid-infrared spectral range [3], where the intrinsic losses of the metals are negligible, have been suggested, however, these designs cannot be transferred to near-infrared or even visible frequencies because of the high dissipative losses of plasmonic structures at optical frequencies. Here, we demonstrate the first holographic metasurface utilizing the concept of all-dielectric Huygens' surfaces thereby achieving record transmission efficiencies of approximately 82% at 1477nm wavelength. Our low-loss Huygens' surface is realized by two-dimensional subwavelength arrays of loss-less silicon nanodisks with both electric and magnetic dipole resonances [4]. By controlling the intrinsic properties of the resonances, i.e. their relative electric and magnetic polarizabilities, quality factors and spectral position, we can design silicon nanodisks to behave as near-ideal Huygens' particles. This allows us to realize all-dielectric Huygens' surfaces providing full 360 degree phase coverage

  3. How to handle a Huygens' box inside an enclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten; Bonev, Ivan Bonev; Franek, Ondrej;

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that it is possible to replace printed circuit boards with a Huygens' box (HB) representation obtained from a near-field scan in simulation of far-fields from an apparatus. However, the surface equivalence theorem requires that the environment outside HB is the same in the n......It has been suggested that it is possible to replace printed circuit boards with a Huygens' box (HB) representation obtained from a near-field scan in simulation of far-fields from an apparatus. However, the surface equivalence theorem requires that the environment outside HB is the same...

  4. Titan en Christiaan. Huygens in werk en leven

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksterhuis, Fokko J.

    2000-01-01

    In three respects Christiaan Huygens (1629-1695) poses a biographical problem. Unlike contemporaries he hardly ever reflected upon what he thought he was doing; his versatility makes it hard to gain a balanced view of what he was doing; his personality seems almost absent from his writings. In the

  5. Analytical pyrolysis experiments of Titan aerosol analogues in preparation for the Cassini Huygens mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenfreund, P.; Boon, J. J.; Commandeur, J.; Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B.

    1995-01-01

    Comparative pyrolysis mass spectrometric data of Titan aerosol analogs, called 'tholins', are presented. The Titan tholins were produced in the laboratory at Cornell by irradiation of simulated Titan atmospheres with high energy electrons in plasma discharge. Mass-spectrometry measurements were performed at FOM of the solid phase of various tholins by Curie-point pyrolysis Gas-Chromatography/Mass-Spectrometry (GCMS) and by temperature resolved in-source Pyrolysis Mass-Spectrometry to reveal the composition and evolution temperature of the dissociation products. The results presented here are used to further define the ACP (Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser)-GCMS experiment and provide a basis for modelling of aerosol composition on Titan and for the iterpretation of Titan atmosphere data from the Huygens probe in the future.

  6. Teaching Huygens in the Rue Huygens: Introducing the History of 17th-Century Mathematics in a Junior Secondary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallez, Maryvonne

    1992-01-01

    Recounts teaching mathematics to junior high school students in France in the context of seventeenth-century mathematics history. Examines extracts of original works by Leibniz on the origin of calculus and of Huygens on continued fractions. Investigates historical puzzles and a variety of mathematical problems arising out of the texts. (MDH)

  7. Structure formation of atmospheric pressure discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Alexey E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper it is shown, by analyzing the results of experimental studies, that the outer boundary of the atmospheric pressure discharge pinch is determined by the condition of equality of plasma flows based on the thermal and electric field energy. In most cases, the number of charged particles coming from near-electrode zones is sufficient to compensate for losses in the discharge bulk. At large currents and enhanced heating, plasma is in the diffusion mode of losses, with recombination of charged particles at the pinch boundary. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Recent Breakthroughs in Microplasma Science and Technology", edited by Kurt Becker, Jose Lopez, David Staack, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Wei Dong Zhu.

  8. On Huygens' principle for Dirac operators associated to electromagnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHALUB FABIO A.C.C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the behavior of massless Dirac particles, i.e., solutions of the Dirac equation with m = 0 in the presence of an electromagnetic field. Our main result (Theorem 1 is that for purely real or imaginary fields any Huygens type (in Hadamard's sense Dirac operators is equivalent to the free Dirac operator, equivalence given by changes of variables and multiplication (right and left by nonzero functions.

  9. Generalized Huygens principle with pulsed-beam wavelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Thorkild [Seknion Inc., Boston, MA (United States); Kaiser, Gerald [Signals and Waves, Austin, TX (United States)], E-mail: thorkild.hansen@att.net, E-mail: kaiser@wavelets.com

    2009-11-27

    Huygens' geometric construction explaining wave motion has a well-known problem with unphysical back-propagation due to the spherical nature of the secondary wavelets. We solve this by analytically continuing the surface of integration. If the surface is a sphere S{sub R} of radius R, this is done by complexifying R to {alpha} = R + ia. The resulting complex sphere S{sub {alpha}} is shown to be equivalent to the real tangent disk bundle with base S{sub R} consisting of all disks with radius a tangent to S{sub R}. Huygens' secondary source points are thus replaced by disks, and his secondary wavelets by well-focused pulsed beams propagating outward. This solves the back-propagation problem. The generalized Huygens principle is a completeness relation for these pulsed-beam wavelets enabling a pulsed-beam representation of all radiation fields. Furthermore, this yields a natural and extremely efficient way to compute radiation fields numerically because all pulsed beams missing a given observer can be ignored with minimal error. Increasing the disk radius a sharpens the focus of the pulsed beams, which in turn raises the compression ratio of the representation.

  10. Lenses and waves Christiaan Huygens and the mathematical science of optics in the seventeenth century

    CERN Document Server

    Dijksterhuis, Fokko Jan

    2004-01-01

    In 1690, Christiaan Huygens (1629-1695) published Traité de la Lumière, containing his renowned wave theory of light. It is considered a landmark in seventeenth-century science, for the way Huygens mathematized the corpuscular nature of light and his probabilistic conception of natural knowledge. This book discusses the development of Huygens' wave theory, reconstructing the winding road that eventually led to Traité de la Lumière. For the first time, the full range of manuscript sources is taken into account. In addition, the development of Huygens' thinking on the nature of light is put in t

  11. Structure of Small Magnetic Elements in the Solar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Domingo, V; Balmaceda, L A; Domínguez, S Vargas; Cabello, Iballa

    2012-01-01

    High resolution images at different wavelengths, spectrograms and magnetograms, representing different levels of the solar atmosphere obtained with Hinode have been combined to study the 3-dimensional structure of the small magnetic elements in relation to their radiance. A small magnetic element is described as example of the study.

  12. Cassini-Huygens Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer and the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. Hunter

    2014-05-01

    The Cassini-Huygens Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (Cassini INMS) designed and built by Hasso Niemann has revolutionized our understanding of the Saturn system and demonstrated the importance of mass spectrometry as a tool for understanding formation, evolution, and chemical processes. In this talk that honors the accomplishments of Hasso I will discuss: 1) the major discoveries of INMS at Titan, Enceladus, and the other icy moons of Saturn, 2) the new perspective this has given us on understanding the formation and evolution of the outer solar system, and 3) the implications for future studies in the outer solar system using mass spectrometry.

  13. Expressing oceanic turbulence parameters by atmospheric turbulence structure constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykal, Yahya

    2016-02-20

    The parameters composing oceanic turbulence are the wavelength, link length, rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid, rate of dissipation of mean-squared temperature, Kolmogorov microscale, and the ratio of temperature to salinity contributions to the refractive index spectrum. The required physical entities such as the average intensity and the scintillation index in the oceanic medium are formulated by using the power spectrum of oceanic turbulence, which is described by oceanic turbulence parameters. On the other hand, there exists a rich archive of formulations and results for the above-mentioned physical entities in atmospheric turbulence, where the parameters describing the turbulence are the wavelength, the link length, and the structure constant. In this paper, by equating the spherical wave scintillation index solutions in the oceanic and atmospheric turbulences, we have expressed the oceanic turbulence parameters by an equivalent structure constant used in turbulent atmosphere. Such equivalent structure constant will help ease reaching solutions of similar entities in an oceanic turbulent medium by employing the corresponding existing solutions, which are valid in an atmospheric turbulent medium.

  14. Exoplanet atmosphere. Thermal structure of an exoplanet atmosphere from phase-resolved emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kevin B; Désert, Jean-Michel; Line, Michael R; Bean, Jacob L; Fortney, Jonathan J; Showman, Adam P; Kataria, Tiffany; Kreidberg, Laura; McCullough, Peter R; Henry, Gregory W; Charbonneau, David; Burrows, Adam; Seager, Sara; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Williamson, Michael H; Homeier, Derek

    2014-11-14

    Exoplanets that orbit close to their host stars are much more highly irradiated than their solar system counterparts. Understanding the thermal structures and appearances of these planets requires investigating how their atmospheres respond to such extreme stellar forcing. We present spectroscopic thermal emission measurements as a function of orbital phase ("phase-curve observations") for the highly irradiated exoplanet WASP-43b spanning three full planet rotations using the Hubble Space Telescope. With these data, we construct a map of the planet's atmospheric thermal structure, from which we find large day-night temperature variations at all measured altitudes and a monotonically decreasing temperature with pressure at all longitudes. We also derive a Bond albedo of 0.18(-0.12)(+0.07) and an altitude dependence in the hot-spot offset relative to the substellar point.

  15. Lenses and Waves - Christiaan Huygens and the Mathematical Science of Optics in the Seventeenth Century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksterhuis, Fokko J.

    2004-01-01

    In 1690, Christiaan Huygens (1629-1695) published Traité de la Lumière, containing his renowned wave theory of light. It is considered a landmark in seventeenth-century science, for the way Huygens mathematized the corpuscular nature of light and his probabilistic conception of nature knowledge.

  16. Estimation of Radiation Limit from a Huygens' Box under Non-Free-Space Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, Ondrej; Sørensen, Morten; Bonev, Ivan Bonev

    2013-01-01

    The recently studied Huygens' box method has difficulties when radiation of an electronic module is to be determined under non-free-space conditions, i.e. with an enclosure. We propose an estimate on radiation limit under such conditions based only on the Huygens' box data from free...

  17. Exact Finite-Difference Time-Domain Modelling of Broadband Huygens' Metasurfaces with Lorentz Dispersions

    CERN Document Server

    Smy, Tom J

    2016-01-01

    An explicit time-domain finite-difference technique for modelling zero-thickness Huygens' metasurfaces based on Generalized Sheet Transition Conditions (GSTCs), is proposed and demonstrated using full-wave simulations. The Huygens' metasurface is modelled using electric and magnetic surface susceptibilities, which are found to follow a double-Lorentz dispersion profile. To solve zero-thickness Huygens' metasurface problems for general broadband excitations, the double-Lorentz dispersion profile is combined with GSTCs, leading to a set of first-order differential fields equations in time-domain. Identifying the exact equivalence between Huygens' metasurfaces and coupled RLC oscillator circuits, the field equations are then subsequently solved using standard circuit modelling techniques based on a finite-difference formulation. Several examples including generalized refraction are shown to illustrate the temporal evolution of scattered fields from the Huygens' metasurface under plane-wave normal incidence, in b...

  18. Sizes of the Smallest Particles at the Outer B Ring Edge, Huygens Ringlet, and Strange Ringlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Stephanie; Colwell, Josh E.; Becker, Tracy M.; Esposito, Larry W.

    2016-10-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS)'s High Speed Photometer (HSP) has observed stellar occultations of Saturn's rings that reveal ring structure at high resolution. We observe diffraction spikes at the sharp edges of some rings and ringlets where the observed signal exceeds the unocculted star signal, indicating that small particles are diffracting light into the detector. Becker et al. (2015 Icarus doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.11.001) analyzed data at the A ring edge and edges of the Encke gap. The smallest particle sizes were a few mm. We use the same technique to analyze the diffraction signal at the outer edge of the B ring and the edges of the so-called Strange ringlet near the outer edge of the Huygens Gap. While we see diffraction from sub-cm particles in the Strange Ringlet, detections from the wider Huygens Ringlet which resides in between the Strange Ringlet and the outer edge of the B ring are weaker and narrower, indicating a cutoff of the size distribution above 1 cm. At the outer edge of the B ring we find strong diffraction signals in 7 of 19 occultations for which the signal and geometry make the detection possible. The typical value of the smallest particle size (amin) is 4 mm and the derived slope of the power-law size distribution (q) is 2.9. The average amin is similar to the 4.5 mm average observed at the A ring outer edge while the q value is lower than the A ring outer edge value of 3.2. In the Strange Ringlet we find strong diffraction signals in 2 of 19 possible occultations for the outer edge and 1 of 17 possible occultations for the inner edge. The smallest particle size is ~5 mm and the derived slope of the power-law size distribution is 3.3. These values are similar to the average values at the A ring outer edge. The absence of a broad diffraction signal at the Huygens Ringlet suggests a different size distribution for that ring than for the Strange Ringlet and the outer several km of the B ring or perhaps less vigorous

  19. Solar and stellar magnetic fields and atmospheric structures - Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical understanding of the role of magnetic fields in the formation of solar atmospheric structure is reviewed. The origin of the solar magnetic field, the dynamical behavior of the azimuthal field in the convective zone, the fibril state of the field in the photosphere, the formation of sunspots and prominences, and the spontaneous formation of current sheets in the bipolar field above the solar surface are addressed. The relation of the latter to coronal heating and flare formation is considered.

  20. Saturn's Polar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Sayanagi, Kunio M; Dyudina, Ulyana A; Fletcher, Leigh N; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustin; West, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    This book chapter, Saturn's Polar Atmosphere, is to be published by Cambridge University Press as part of a multi-volume work edited by Kevin Baines, Michael Flasar, Norbert Krupp, and Thomas Stallard, entitled "Saturn in the 21st Century." This chapter reviews the state of our knowledge about Saturn's polar atmosphere that has been revealed through Earth- and space-based observation as well as theoretical and numerical modeling. In particular, the Cassini mission to Saturn, which has been in orbit around the ringed planet since 2004, has revolutionized our understanding of the planet. The current review updates a previous review by Del Genio et al (2009; Saturn Atmospheric Structure and Dynamics, Chapter 7 of "Saturn from Cassini-Huygens"), written after Cassini's primary mission phase that ended in 2008, by focusing on the north polar region of Saturn and comparing it to the southern high latitudes. Two prominent features in the northern high latitudes are the northern hexagon and the north polar vortex; we...

  1. Modelling Saturn's atmospheric circulations and cloud structure with OPUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchowski, L. C.; Read, P. L.; Yamazaki, Y. H.

    2009-04-01

    We are investigating Saturn's atmospheric circulations and cloud structure in the Northern and Southern hemisphere as initial value problems by use of the Oxford Planetary Unified model System (OPUS), a sophisticated GCM based on the UK Met Office Unified Model. Solving an extended form of the Hydrodynamic Primitive Equations, OPUS is capable of including 40 vertical levels from 0.1 bar to 100 bar. The model was initiated with temperature and balanced thermal wind profiles recently obtained by Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS). A simple cloud scheme for the Jovian planets has been added to OPUS and is employed to model the three major cloud decks (ammonia, ammonium-hydrosulfide and water) on Saturn and the advection of these clouds with the atmosphere. We have already conducted several numerical studies with OPUS, simulating jet scale meridional circulations, the formation of cloud bands and discrete turbulent features on Jupiter. By modelling the dynamics and clouds of Saturn in a similar way, we are hoping to gain further insight into the formation of circulation cells over the zonal jet streams as well as to examine the distribution of atmospheric condensates in response to these motions. The model will also be used to numerically investigate the characteristic features in Saturn's Northern hemisphere. It is envisioned to directly compare the atmospheric configurations obtained for Saturn with previous results from the Jupiter model.

  2. Giant Planets of Our Solar System Atmospheres, Composition, and Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Patrick G. J

    2009-01-01

    This book reviews the current state of knowledge of the atmospheres of the giant gaseous planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The current theories of their formation are reviewed and their recently observed temperature, composition and cloud structures are contrasted and compared with simple thermodynamic, radiative transfer and dynamical models. The instruments and techniques that have been used to remotely measure their atmospheric properties are also reviewed, and the likely development of outer planet observations over the next two decades is outlined. This second edition has been extensively updated following the Cassini mission results for Jupiter/Saturn and the newest ground-based measurements for Uranus/Neptune as well as on the latest development in the theories on planet formation.

  3. Structural studies of copper sulfide films: effect of ambient atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Kundu et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the structural properties of copper sulfide films as a function of the sulfurization time of 70-nm-thick Cu films. Copper sulfide films with various phases such as mixed metallic Cu-chalcocite, chalcocite, roxbyite, and covellite phases were formed with increasing sulfurization time. To evaluate the structural stability of various films, all the films were exposed to the ambient atmosphere for the same amount of time. Although the phase structure and stoichiometry of the films were maintained at a greater depth, the near-surface region of the films was oxidized and covered with overlayers of oxide, hydroxide, and/or sulfate species due to the exposure and reaction with the ambient atmosphere. The oxygen uptake and its reactivity with the copper sulfide film surfaces were enhanced with increasing sulfur content of the films. In addition, the type of divalent state of copper formed on the film surfaces depended on the phase structure, composition, and stoichiometry of the films.

  4. Discontinuous Electromagnetic Fields Using Huygens Sources For Wavefront Manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Selvanayagam, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the idea of discontinuous electric and magnetic fields at a boundary to design and shape wavefronts in an arbitrary manner. To create this discontinuity in the field we use electric and magnetic currents which act like a Huygens source to radiate the desired wavefront. These currents can be synthesized either by an array of electric and magnetic dipoles or by a combined impedance and admittance surface. A dipole array is an active implementation to impose discontinuous fields while the impedance/admittance surface acts as a passive one. We then expand on our previous work showing how electric and magnetic dipole arrays can be used to cloak an object demonstrating two novel cloaking schemes. We also show how to arbitrarily refract a beam using a set of impedance and admittance surfaces. Refraction using the idea of discontinuous fields is shown to be a more general case of refraction using phase discontinuities.

  5. Propagation of a radial phased-locked Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guoquan

    2011-11-21

    A radial phased-locked (PL) Lorentz beam array provides an appropriate theoretical model to describe a coherent diode laser array, which is an efficient radiation source for high-power beaming use. The propagation of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere is investigated. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral and some mathematical techniques, analytical formulae for the average intensity and the effective beam size of a radial PL Lorentz beam array are derived in turbulent atmosphere. The average intensity distribution and the spreading properties of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere are numerically calculated. The influences of the beam parameters and the structure constant of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere are discussed in detail.

  6. Using speed of sound measurements to constrain the Huygens probe descent profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedhem, Håkan; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Zarnecki, John; Hathi, Brijen

    2004-02-01

    The Acoustic Properties Investigation (API) is a set of sensors for acoustic measurements in gases or liquids, making a part of the Surface Science Package (SSP) on the Huygens probe. It consists of two units, API-V (Velocity of sound) and API-S (Sounding). The API-V has two ultrasonic transducers sending and receiving acoustic pulses over an unobstructed path of 15 cm. An accurate timing circuit is measuring the time it takes to propagate over the distance. Measurements are made in both directions to eliminate the effect of a constant drift of the medium. The transducers have been optimised to operate at low pressure (high altitude) and will operate from about 60 km down to the surface. They will also perform well in case of landing in a liquid. The API-S unit is an acoustic sounder, sending short pulses at 15 kHz every second and listening for echoes in between. It will detect droplets in the atmosphere and for the last 100 m it will characterise the acoustic scattering properties of the surface below. It will also give an accurate value for the descend velocity during the last 100 m. In case of landing in a (liquid) lake/ocean it will measure the depth of the late-ocean down to a maximum of about 1000 m. Accurate measurements of the velocity of sound will, together with knowledge on the temperature, enable the mean molecular weight to be calculated along the descent trajectory. The temperature will be measured by complementary sensors inside the SSP Top Hat, near the API-V, and to a high accuracy by the HASI instrument at the periphery of the Huygens probe. The API units and associated electronics has been designed and build at the Research and Scientific Support Department at ESTEC, where also the testing and initial calibration has been done. Detailed calibration has been performed with different gas mixtures and at different temperatures in the Titan simulation chamber at the University of Kent, Canterbury, UK. Further supporting studies are planned in the

  7. Implications of internal processes in the interpretation of Titan's volatile inventory measured by Cassini-Huygens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobie, Gabriel; Gautier, D.; Hersant, F.; Lunine, J. I.

    2010-04-01

    Based on a series of data collected by Cassini-Huygens, we constrain the composition of the primordial bricks that formed Titan and quantify the chemical exchanges that occurred on Titan between the interior and the atmosphere since its accretion. Assuming that the bricks that formed Titan had a composition close to that of Enceladus and that of the planetesimals in the feeding zone of Saturn, we show that accretional melting generate an CH4-CO2-H2S - dominated atmosphere of more than 10 bars in equilibrium with a water ocean. The partial atmospheric pressure of ammonia remains low (ammonia into nitrogen is possible just after accretion but requires the water ocean remains in contact with the atmosphere during at least 10-50 millions of years. We show that most of the gas species, except N2 and 36Ar, released during accretion are likely to be re-incorporated in the interior during the post-accretional cooling phase, owing to efficient clathration at the water/ocean interface. During this process, xenon is predicted to be almost entirely removed from the primitive atmosphere and to be stored in the form of clathrate hydrate in the interior. The composition of gases released during the rest of the evolution is determined by the stability of each gas species relative to the clathrate phase and is expected to be dominated by CH4 and CO2, and to contain small amounts of argon and CO. It can be anticipated from our analysis that flows and deposits of CO2-rich materials would be associated to cryovolcanic events. Although the detection of 40Ar clearly support that interaction with the silicate phase has occurred during Titan's history, it is still unclear if significant chemical exchanges has occurred with the rocky core. Only detection of 38Ar and of the other noble gas isotopes by a future mission will permit to determine how the silicate phase has contributed to the volatile budget of Titan. Isotopic ratios in the surface materials (H2O, CO2 ice, organic matters, gas

  8. CO2 ice structure and density under Martian atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, T. P.; Salzmann, C. G.; Plane, J. M. C.; Murray, B. J.

    2017-09-01

    Clouds composed of CO2 ice form throughout the Martian atmosphere. In the mesosphere, CO2 ice clouds are thought to form via heterogeneous ice nucleation on nanoparticles of meteoric origin at temperatures often below 100 K. Lower altitude CO2 ice clouds in the wintertime polar regions form up to around 145 K and lead to the build-up of the polar ice caps. However, the crystal structure and related fundamental properties of CO2 ice under Martian conditions are poorly characterised. Here we present X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of CO2 ice, grown via deposition from the vapour phase under temperature and pressure conditions analogous to the Martian mesosphere. A crystalline cubic structure was determined, consistent with the low-pressure polymorph (CO2-I, space group Pa-3 (No. 205)). CO2 deposited at temperatures of 80-130 K and pressures of 0.01-1 mbar was consistent with dry ice and previous literature measurements, thus removing the possibility of a more complicated phase diagram for CO2 in this region. At 80 K, a lattice parameter of 5.578 ± 0.002 Å, cell volume of 173.554 ± 0.19 Å3 and density of 1.684 ± 0.002 g cm-3 was determined. Using these measurements, we determined the thermal expansion of CO2 across 80-130 K that allowed for a fit of CO2 ice density measurements across a larger temperature range (80-195 K) when combined with literature data (CO2 density = 1.72391 - 2.53 × 10-4T - 2.87 × 10-6 T2). Temperature-dependent CO2 density values are used to estimate sedimentation velocities and heterogeneous ice nucleation rates, showing an increase in nucleation rate of up to a factor of 1000 when compared to commonly used literature values. This temperature-dependent equation of state is therefore suggested for use in future studies of Martian mesospheric CO2 clouds. Finally, we discuss the possible shapes of crystals of CO2 ice in the Martian atmosphere and show that a range of shapes including cubes and octahedra as well as a combination of the

  9. Saturn's Seasonally Changing Atmosphere: Thermal Structure, Composition and Aerosols

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, Leigh N; Moses, Julianne I; Guerlet, Sandrine; West, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    The longevity of Cassini's exploration of Saturn's atmosphere (a third of a Saturnian year) means that we have been able to track the seasonal evolution of atmospheric temperatures, chemistry and cloud opacity over almost every season, from solstice to solstice and from perihelion to aphelion. Cassini has built upon the decades-long ground-based record to observe seasonal shifts in atmospheric temperature, finding a thermal response that lags behind the seasonal insolation with a lag time that increases with depth into the atmosphere, in agreement with radiative climate models. Seasonal hemispheric contrasts are perturbed at smaller scales by atmospheric circulation, such as belt/zone dynamics, the equatorial oscillations and the polar vortices. Temperature asymmetries are largest in the middle stratosphere and become insignificant near the radiative-convective boundary. Cassini has also measured southern-summertime asymmetries in atmospheric composition, including ammonia (the key species for the topmost clo...

  10. Huygens landing site to be named after Hubert Curien

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    The naming ceremony for the Huygens landing site, which will be known as the "Hubert Curien Memorial Station", will be held at ESA’s Headquarters on 14 March, in the presence of ESA Council delegates and of Professor Curien’s wife, Mrs Perrine Curien, and one of their sons. Media interested in attending are invited to submit the reply form below. Huygens' landing on Saturn’s largest moon in January 2005 represented one of the greatest successes achieved by humankind in the history of space exploration. The part played by ESA, in cooperation with NASA and the Italian Space Agency (ASI), was made possible thanks to the commitment of a man who, for several decades, worked to promote and strengthen the role of scientific research in his home country - France - and in Europe. Among his numerous responsibilities, Hubert Curien was French Minister of Research and Space under four Prime Ministers. As Chairman of the ESA Council from 1981 to 1984, Professor Curien played a crucial part in setting up ESA's former long-term science programme, "Horizon 2000", which included the Huygens mission among its projects. Professor Roger Bonnet, current President of COSPAR, and former ESA Director of Science (1983-2001), commented: "Curien’s diplomatic skills were hugely influential in bringing about the birth of European space science. In 1985, his support was pivotal when the European ministers had to decide how to build a solid space science programme and ensure that it would be financially sustainable in the long term." "ESA's present science programme, Cosmic Vision, draws on the heritage left by Hubert Curien", said Professor David Southwood, ESA's current Director of Science. "He encouraged cooperation between nations in the belief that space research is fundamental to the progress and welfare of a knowledge-based society like ours. He also promoted the concept of long-term planning", he continued. "It would seem almost inconceivable today to initiate any space venture

  11. Mars Atmospheric History Derived from Upper-Atmospheric Structure of 38Ar/36Ar Measured From MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce; Slipski, Marek; Benna, Mehdi; Mahaffy, Paul; Elrod, Meredith K.; Yelle, Roger; Stone, Shane; Alsaeed, Noora

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the structure of the Martian upper atmosphere made from MAVEN observations allow us to derive homopause and exobase altitudes in the Mars upper atmosphere and to determine the isotopic fractionation that occurs between them. Fractionation in the ratio of 38Ar/36Ar occurs between the homopause and exobase due to diffusive separation. This fractionation, combined with measurements of the bulk atmospheric ratio, is used to determine the total amount of argon lost to space by pick-up-ion sputtering. Our analysis is based on Rayleigh distillation, modified by replenishment of gas to the atmosphere by outgassing, impact, and crustal weathering. Approximately 80 % of the 36Ar that was ever in the atmosphere has been removed through time. This high value requires that a major fraction of Mars atmospheric gas has been lost to space. It points strongly to loss to space as having been the dominant mechanism driving the transition in Martian climate from an early, warm, wet environment to today's cold, dry, thin atmosphere.

  12. Efficient polarization insensitive complex wavefront control using Huygens' metasurfaces based on dielectric resonant meta-atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Chong, Katie E; Staude, Isabelle; James, Anthony; Dominguez, Jason; Liu, Sheng; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Decker, Manuel; Neshev, Dragomir N; Brener, Igal; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-01-01

    Subwavelength-thin metasurfaces have shown great promises for the control of optical wavefronts, thus opening new pathways for the development of efficient flat optics. In particular, Huygens' metasurfaces based on all-dielectric resonant meta-atoms have already shown a huge potential for practical applications with their polarization insensitivity and high transmittance efficiency. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a polarization insensitive holographic Huygens' metasurface based on dielectric resonant meta-atoms capable of complex wavefront control at telecom wavelengths. Our metasurface produces a hologram image in the far-field with 82% transmittance efficiency and 40% imaging efficiency. Such efficient complex wavefront control shows that Huygens' metasurfaces based on resonant dielectric meta-atoms are a big step towards practical applications of metasurfaces in wavefront design related technologies, including computer-generated holograms, ultra-thin optics, security and data storage devices.

  13. On the Huygens principle for bianisotropic mediums with symmetric permittivity and permeability dyadics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faryad, Muhammad; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2017-02-01

    Mathematical statements of the Huygens principle relate the electric and magnetic field phasors at an arbitrary location in a source-free region enclosed by a surface to the tangential components of the electric and magnetic field phasors over that surface, via the dyadic Green functions applicable to the linear homogeneous medium occupying that region. We have mathematically formulated the Huygens principle for the electric and magnetic field phasors when the permittivity and permeability dyadics of the medium are symmetric, the symmetric parts of the two magnetoelectric dyadics of the medium are negative of each other, and both magnetoelectric dyadics also contain anti-symmetric terms. We have also formulated the Huygens principle for the electric (resp. magnetic) field phasor in a medium whose permittivity (resp. permeability) is scalar, the permeability (resp. permittivity) is symmetric, the symmetric parts of the two magnetoelectric dyadics reduce to dissimilar scalars, and anti-symmetric parts of the two magnetoelectric dyadics are identical.

  14. High-efficiency light-wave control with all-dielectric optical Huygens' metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Decker, Manuel; Falkner, Matthias; Dominguez, Jason; Neshev, Dragomir N; Brener, Igal; Pertsch, Thomas; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2014-01-01

    Optical metasurfaces have developed as a breakthrough concept for advanced wave-front engineering enabled by subwavelength resonant nanostructures. However, reflection and/or absorption losses as well as low polarisation-conversion efficiencies pose a fundamental obstacle for achieving high transmission efficiencies that are required for practical applications. Here we demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, highly efficient all-dielectric metasurfaces for near-infrared frequencies using arrays of silicon nanodisks as meta-atoms. We employ the main features of Huygens' sources, namely spectrally overlapping electric and magnetic dipole resonances of equal strength, to demonstrate Huygens' metasurfaces with a full transmission-phase coverage of 360 degrees and near-unity transmission, and we confirm experimentally full phase coverage combined with high efficiency in transmission. Based on these key properties, we show that all-dielectric Huygens' metasurfaces could become a new paradigm for flat opti...

  15. Twenty Years of Systems Engineering on the Cassini-Huygens Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor-Chapman, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, the Cassini-Huygens Mission has successfully utilized systems engineering to develop and execute a challenging prime mission and two mission extensions. Systems engineering was not only essential in designing the mission, but as knowledge of the system was gained during cruise and science operations, it was critical in evolving operational strategies and processes. This paper discusses systems engineering successes, challenges, and lessons learned on the Cassini-Huygens Mission gathered from a thorough study of mission plans and developed scenarios, and interviews with key project leaders across its twenty-year history.

  16. Effect of O3 on the atmospheric temperature structure of early Mars

    CERN Document Server

    von Paris, P; Godolt, M; Grenfell, J L; Stracke, B; Rauer, H

    2015-01-01

    Ozone is an important radiative trace gas in the Earth's atmosphere. The presence of ozone can significantly influence the thermal structure of an atmosphere, and by this e.g. cloud formation. Photochemical studies suggest that ozone can form in carbon dioxide-rich atmospheres. We investigate the effect of ozone on the temperature structure of simulated early Martian atmospheres. With a 1D radiative-convective model, we calculate temperature-pressure profiles for a 1 bar carbon dioxide atmosphere. Ozone profiles are fixed, parameterized profiles. We vary the location of the ozone layer maximum and the concentration at this maximum. The maximum is placed at different pressure levels in the upper and middle atmosphere (1-10 mbar). Results suggest that the impact of ozone on surface temperatures is relatively small. However, the planetary albedo significantly decreases at large ozone concentrations. Throughout the middle and upper atmospheres, temperatures increase upon introducing ozone due to strong UV absorpt...

  17. Propagation of Gaussian Schell-model Array beams in free space and atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yonghua; Mei, Zhangrong; Gu, Juguan

    2016-12-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, the evolution behavior of the spectral density and the spectral degree of coherence of the beam produced by a recently introduced novel class of Gaussian Schell-model Arrays (GSMA) source in free space and turbulence atmospheric are explored and comparatively analyzed. And the influence of the fractal constant of the atmospheric power spectrum and refractive-index structure constant on the spectral density and the spectral degree of coherence of beams are analyzed. It is shown that the optical lattice profile is stable when beams propagate in free space, but the spectral density eventually is suppressed and transformed into a Gaussian profiles when it passes at sufficiently large distances through the turbulent atmosphere. The distributions of the spectral degree of coherence in far field eventually transformed into a shrink Gaussian profile relative to free space which means that the degree of spatial coherence turns worse.

  18. Self-consistent modeling of induced magnetic field in Titan's atmosphere accounting for the generation of Schumann resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béghin, Christian

    2015-02-01

    This model is worked out in the frame of physical mechanisms proposed in previous studies accounting for the generation and the observation of an atypical Schumann Resonance (SR) during the descent of the Huygens Probe in the Titan's atmosphere on 14 January 2005. While Titan is staying inside the subsonic co-rotating magnetosphere of Saturn, a secondary magnetic field carrying an Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) modulation is shown to be generated through ion-acoustic instabilities of the Pedersen current sheets induced at the interface region between the impacting magnetospheric plasma and Titan's ionosphere. The stronger induced magnetic field components are focused within field-aligned arcs-like structures hanging down the current sheets, with minimum amplitude of about 0.3 nT throughout the ramside hemisphere from the ionopause down to the Moon surface, including the icy crust and its interface with a conductive water ocean. The deep penetration of the modulated magnetic field in the atmosphere is thought to be allowed thanks to the force balance between the average temporal variations of thermal and magnetic pressures within the field-aligned arcs. However, there is a first cause of diffusion of the ELF magnetic components, probably due to feeding one, or eventually several SR eigenmodes. A second leakage source is ascribed to a system of eddy-Foucault currents assumed to be induced through the buried water ocean. The amplitude spectrum distribution of the induced ELF magnetic field components inside the SR cavity is found fully consistent with the measurements of the Huygens wave-field strength. Waiting for expected future in-situ exploration of Titan's lower atmosphere and the surface, the Huygens data are the only experimental means available to date for constraining the proposed model.

  19. Properties of Ellipticity Correlation with Atmospheric Structure from Gemini South

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asztalos, S J; Treadway, T; de Vries, W H; Rosenberg, L J; Burke, D; Claver, C; Saha, A; Puxley, P

    2006-12-21

    Cosmic shear holds great promise for a precision independent measurement of {Omega}{sub m}, the mass density of the universe relative to the critical density. The signal is expected to be weak, so a thorough understanding of systematic effects is crucial. An important systematic effect is the atmosphere: shear power introduced by the atmosphere is larger than the expected signal. Algorithms exist to extract the cosmic shear from the atmospheric component, though a measure of their success applied to a range of seeing conditions is lacking. To gain insight into atmospheric shear, Gemini South imaging in conjunction with ground condition and satellite wind data were obtained. We find that under good seeing conditions Point-Spread-Function (PSF) correlations persist well beyond the separation typical of high-latitude stars. Under these conditions, ellipticity residuals based on a simple PSF interpolation can be reduced to within a factor of a few of the shot-noise induced ellipticity floor. We also find that the ellipticity residuals are highly correlated with wind direction. Finally, we correct stellar shapes using a more sophisticated procedure and generate shear statistics from stars. Under all seeing conditions in our data set the residual correlations lie everywhere below the target signal level. For good seeing we find that the systematic error attributable to atmospheric turbulence is comparable in magnitude to the statistical error (shape noise) over angular scales relevant to present lensing surveys.

  20. Properties of Ellipticity Correlation with Atmospheric Structure From Gemini South

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asztalos, Stephen J.; /LLNL, Livermore; de Vries, W.H.; /UC, Davis /LLNL, Livermore; Rosenberg, L.J; Treadway, T.; /LLNL, Livermore; Burke, D.; /SLAC; Claver, C.; Saha, A.; /NOAO, Tucson; Puxley, P.; /Gemini Observ., La Serena

    2007-01-17

    Cosmic shear holds great promise for a precision independent measurement of {Omega}{sub m}, the mass density of the universe relative to the critical density. The signal is expected to be weak, so a thorough understanding of systematic effects is crucial. An important systematic effect is the atmosphere: shear power introduced by the atmosphere is larger than the expected signal. Algorithms exist to extract the cosmic shear from the atmospheric component, though a measure of their success applied to a range of seeing conditions is lacking. To gain insight into atmospheric shear, Gemini South imaging in conjunction with ground condition and satellite wind data were obtained. We find that under good seeing conditions Point-Spread-Function (PSF) correlations persist well beyond the separation typical of high-latitude stars. Under these conditions, ellipticity residuals based on a simple PSF interpolation can be reduced to within a factor of a few of the shot-noise induced ellipticity floor. We also find that the ellipticity residuals are highly correlated with wind direction. Finally, we correct stellar shapes using a more sophisticated procedure and generate shear statistics from stars. Under all seeing conditions in our data set the residual correlations lie everywhere below the target signal level. For good seeing we find that the systematic error attributable to atmospheric turbulence is comparable in magnitude to the statistical error (shape noise) over angular scales relevant to present lensing surveys.

  1. Characterization of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, C.A.; Penteado, P.; Rodriguez, S.; Le, Mouelic S.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.; Clark, R.; Nicholson, P.; Jaumann, R.; Sotin, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Images of Titan's clouds, possible over the past 10 years, indicate primarily discrete convective methane clouds near the south and north poles and an immense stratiform cloud, likely composed of ethane, around the north pole. Here we present spectral images from Cassini's Visual Mapping Infrared Spectrometer that reveal the increasing presence of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere. Radiative transfer analyses indicate similarities between summer polar and tropical methane clouds. Like their southern counterparts, tropical clouds consist of particles exceeding 5 ??m. They display discrete structures suggestive of convective cumuli. They prevail at a specific latitude band between 8??-20?? S, indicative of a circulation origin and the beginning of a circulation turnover. Yet, unlike the high latitude clouds that often reach 45 km altitude, these discrete tropical clouds, so far, remain capped to altitudes below 26 km. Such low convective clouds are consistent with the highly stable atmospheric conditions measured at the Huygens landing site. Their characteristics suggest that Titan's tropical atmosphere has a dry climate unlike the south polar atmosphere, and despite the numerous washes that carve the tropical landscape. ?? 2009. The American Astronomical Society.

  2. Possible Niches For Extant Life On Titan In Light Of The First Six Years Of Cassini/Huygens Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinspoon, David H.; Schulze-Makuch, D.

    2010-10-01

    At the 2005 DPS meeting we presented an assessment of the possibility of extant life on Titan after the first year of the Cassini mission at Saturn. We suggested then that hydrogenation of photochemically produced acetylene could provide metabolic energy for near-surface organisms and also replenish atmospheric methane (Schulze-Makuch and Grinspoon, 2005). In this talk we will offer a brief reassessment of the possibility of extant life in light of five more years of the Cassini/Huygens results, including the recent reports suggesting a lack of acetylene on the surface (Clark et al., 2010) and a possible sink of H2 at the surface (Strobel, 2010). Both results are consistent with earlier predictions for the existence of an acetylene-powered biosphere on Titan (Schulze-Makuch and Grinspoon, 2005; McKay and Smith, 2005), but can potentially be explained by more prosaic phenomena. D. Schulze-Makuch and D. H. Grinspoon(2005), Biologically Enhanced Energy and Carbon Cycling on Titan? Astrobiology 5, 560-567; Clarke, R.N. et al. (2020), Detection and Mapping of Hydrocarbon Deposits on Titan, JGR-Planets; Strobel, D.F(2010) Molecular hydrogen in Titan's atmosphere: Implications of the measured tropospheric and thermospheric mole fractions. Icarus; McKay, C.P., Smith, H.D.( 2005) Possibilities for methanogenic life in liquid methane on the surface of Titan. Icarus 178, 274-276.

  3. Huygens' principle, the free Schrodinger particle and the quantum anti-centrifugal force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirone, M.A.; Dahl, Jens Peder; Fedorov, M.

    2002-01-01

    Huygens' principle following from the d'Alembert wave equation is not valid in two-dimensional space. A Schrodinger particle of vanishing angular momentum moving freely in two dimensions experiences an attractive force-the quantum anti-centrifugal force-towards its centre. We connect these two...

  4. Huygens-Feynman-Fresnel principle as the basis of applied optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitin, Andrey V

    2013-11-01

    The main relationships of wave optics are derived from a combination of the Huygens-Fresnel principle and the Feynman integral over all paths. The stationary-phase approximation of the wave relations gives the correspondent relations from the point of view of geometrical optics.

  5. Influence of nearby obstacles on the feasibility of a Huygens box as a field source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, Ondrej; Sørensen, Morten; Ebert, Hans;

    2012-01-01

    A method of substituting an electronic module with its Huygens box representation for the purpose of calculating the emitted field is discussed. It is pointed out that nearby obstacles may have harmful effect on the accuracy of such method. This is subsequently proven by performing finite-differe...

  6. Violation of the strong Huygen's principle and timelike signals from the early universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Ana; Garay, Luis J; Martín-Benito, Mercedes; Martín-Martínez, Eduardo

    2015-04-10

    We analyze the implications of the violations of the strong Huygen's principle in the transmission of information from the early Universe to the current era via massless fields. We show that much more information reaches us through timelike channels (not mediated by real photons) than is carried by rays of light, which are usually regarded as the only carriers of information.

  7. Huygens' principle, the free Schrodinger particle and the quantum anti-centrifugal force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirone, M.A.; Dahl, Jens Peder; Fedorov, M.

    2002-01-01

    Huygens' principle following from the d'Alembert wave equation is not valid in two-dimensional space. A Schrodinger particle of vanishing angular momentum moving freely in two dimensions experiences an attractive force-the quantum anti-centrifugal force-towards its centre. We connect these two ph...

  8. The Mars Pathfinder atmospheric structure investigation/meteorology (ASI/MET) experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schofield, J.T.; Barnes, J.R.; Crisp, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder atmospheric structure investigation/meteorology (ASI/MET) experiment measured the vertical density, pressure, and temperature structure of the martian atmosphere from the surface to 160 km, and monitored surface meteorology and climate for 83 sols (1 sol = 1 martian day = 24.......7 hours). The atmospheric structure and the weather record are similar to those observed by the Viking 1 lander (VL-1) at the same latitude, altitude, and season 21 years ago, but there are differences related to diurnal effects and the surface properties of the landing site. These include a cold...

  9. Venus - Atmospheric motion and structure from Mariner 10 pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B. C.; Belton, M. J. S.; Danielson, G. E.; Davies , M. E.; Gault, D.; Hapke, B.; O'Leary, B.; Strom, R. G.; Suomi , V.; Trask, N.

    1974-01-01

    The Mariner 10 television cameras imaged the planet Venus in the visible and near ultraviolet for a period of 8 days at resolutions ranging from 100 meters to 130 kilometers. The general pattern of the atmospheric circulation in the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric region is displayed in the pictures. Atmospheric flow is symmetrical between north and south hemispheres. The equatorial motions are zonal (east-west) at approximately 100 meters per second, consistent with the previously inferred 4-day retrograde rotation. Angular velocity increases with latitude. The subsolar region, and the region downwind from it, show evidence of large-scale convection that persists in spite of the main zonal motion. Dynamical interaction between the zonal motion and the relatively stationary region of convection is evidenced by bowlike waves.

  10. Venus: Atmospheric motion and structure from Mariner 10 pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B.C.; Belton, M.J.S.; Edward, Danielson G.; Davies, M.E.; Gault, D.; Hapke, B.; O'Leary, B.; Strom, R.G.; Suomi, V.; Trask, N.

    1974-01-01

    The Mariner 10 television cameras imaged the planet Venus in the visible and near ultraviolet for a period of 8 days at resolutions ranging from 100 meters to 130 kilometers. The general pattern of the atmospheric circulation in the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric region is displayed in the pictures. Atmospheric flow is symmetrical between north and south hemispheres. The equatorial motions are zonal (east-west) at approximately 100 meters per second, consistent with the previously inferred 4-day retrograde rotation. Angular velocity increases with latitude. The subsolar region, and the region downwind from it, show evidence of large-scale convection that persists in spite of the main zonal motion. Dynamical interaction between the zonal motion and the relatively stationary region of convection is evidenced by bowlike waves.

  11. Optical properties of Titan's aerosols: comparison between DISR/Huygens observations and VIMS/Cassini solar occultation observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmuse, Florian; Sotin, Christophe; Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Brown, Robert H.; Baines, Kevin; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Roger Nelson; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2016-10-01

    Titan, the only satellite with a dense atmosphere, presents a hydrocarbon cycle that includes the formation and sedimentation of organic aerosols. The optical properties of Titan's haze inferred from measurement of the Huygens probe were recently revisited by Doose et al. (Icarus, 2016). The present study uses the solar occultation observations in equatorial regions of Titan that have been acquired by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft to infer similar information in a broader wavelength range. Preliminary studies have proven the interest of those solar occultation data in the seven atmospheric windows to constrain the aerosol number density, but could not directly compare with the Descent Imager and Spectral Radiometer (DISR) data because models predict that the density profile vary with latitude. The present study compares the DISR measurements of aerosol extinction coefficients and the solar occultation data acquired by the VIMS instrument onboard Cassini. These sets of data differ in their acquisition method and time, spectral range, and altitude: the DISR measurements have been taken in 2005, along a vertical line of sight, in the visible spectral range (490-950nm) and under 140km of altitude. The relevant solar occultation data at equator have been acquired in 2009, along a horizontal line of sight, in the IR range (0.9-5.1µm), with sun light scanning all altitudes for a long enough wavelength, namely in the five-micron atmospheric window. These sets of data have been analyzed previously, separately and using different models. Here, we present a cross analysis of these sets of data, that allows us to test the different models describing the density profile of aerosols. In addition to providing wavelength dependence of the extinction coefficient, the comparison allows us to assess the impact of refraction in Titan's atmosphere. It also provides optical depth and scattering properties that are crucial information

  12. Project CONDOR: Middle atmosphere wind structure obtained with lightweight inflatable spheres near the equatorial electrojet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, F. J.

    1987-01-01

    Observed correlations between the atmospheric electric field and the neutral wind were studied using additional atmospheric measurements during Project CONDOR. Project CONDOR obtained measurements near the equatorial electrojet (12 S) during March 1983. Neutral atmosphere wind measurements were obtained using lightweight inflatable spheres and temperatures were obtained using a datasonde. The lightweight sphere technology, the wind structure, and temperature structure are described. Results show that the lightweight sphere gives higher vertical resolution of winds below 75 km compared with the standard sphere, but gives little or no improvement above 80 km, and no usable temperature and density data.

  13. Structure and dynamics of decadal anomalies in the wintertime midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiabei; Yang, Xiu-Qun

    2016-09-01

    The structure and dynamics of decadal anomalies in the wintertime midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere system are examined in this study, using the NCEP/NCAR atmospheric reanalysis, HadISST SST and Simple Ocean Data Assimilation data for 1960-2010. The midlatitude decadal anomalies associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation are identified, being characterized by an equivalent barotropic atmospheric low (high) pressure over a cold (warm) oceanic surface. Such a unique configuration of decadal anomalies can be maintained by an unstable ocean-atmosphere interaction mechanism in the midlatitudes, which is hypothesized as follows. Associated with a warm PDO phase, an initial midlatitude surface westerly anomaly accompanied with intensified Aleutian low tends to force a negative SST anomaly by increasing upward surface heat fluxes and driving southward Ekman current anomaly. The SST cooling tends to increase the meridional SST gradient, thus enhancing the subtropical oceanic front. As an adjustment of the atmospheric boundary layer to the enhanced oceanic front, the low-level atmospheric meridional temperature gradient and thus the low-level atmospheric baroclinicity tend to be strengthened, inducing more active transient eddy activities that increase transient eddy vorticity forcing. The vorticity forcing that dominates the total atmospheric forcing tends to produce an equivalent barotropic atmospheric low pressure north of the initial westerly anomaly, intensifying the initial anomalies of the midlatitude surface westerly and Aleutian low. Therefore, it is suggested that the midlatitude ocean-atmosphere interaction can provide a positive feedback mechanism for the development of initial anomaly, in which the oceanic front and the atmospheric transient eddy are the indispensable ingredients. Such a positive ocean-atmosphere feedback mechanism is fundamentally responsible for the observed decadal anomalies in the midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere

  14. Scaling structure of the velocity statistics in atmospheric boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Kurien, S; Procaccia, I; Sreenivasan, K R; Kurien, Susan; L'vov, Victor S.; Procaccia, Itamar

    2000-01-01

    The statistical objects characterizing turbulence in real turbulent flows differ from those of the ideal homogeneous isotropic model.They containcontributions from various 2d and 3d aspects, and from the superposition ofinhomogeneous and anisotropic contributions. We employ the recently introduceddecomposition of statistical tensor objects into irreducible representations of theSO(3) symmetry group (characterized by $j$ and $m$ indices), to disentangle someof these contributions, separating the universal and the asymptotic from the specific aspects of the flow. The different $j$ contributions transform differently under rotations and so form a complete basis in which to represent the tensor objects under study. The experimental data arerecorded with hot-wire probes placed at various heights in the atmospheric surfacelayer. Time series data from single probes and from pairs of probes are analyzed to compute the amplitudes and exponents of different contributions to the second order statistical objects characte...

  15. GCM simulations of Titan's middle and lower atmosphere and comparison to observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lora, Juan M; Russell, Joellen L

    2014-01-01

    Simulation results are presented from a new general circulation model (GCM) of Titan, the Titan Atmospheric Model (TAM), which couples the Flexible Modeling System (FMS) spectral dynamical core to a suite of external/sub-grid-scale physics. These include a new non-gray radiative transfer module that takes advantage of recent data from Cassini-Huygens, large-scale condensation and quasi-equilibrium moist convection schemes, a surface model with "bucket" hydrology, and boundary layer turbulent diffusion. The model produces a realistic temperature structure from the surface to the lower mesosphere, including a stratopause, as well as satisfactory superrotation. The latter is shown to depend on the dynamical core's ability to build up angular momentum from surface torques. Simulated latitudinal temperature contrasts are adequate, compared to observations, and polar temperature anomalies agree with observations. In the lower atmosphere, the insolation distribution is shown to strongly impact turbulent fluxes, and ...

  16. Characteristics of a partially coherent Gaussian Schell-model beam propagating in slanted atmospheric turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ya-Qing; Wu Zhen-Sen

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the extended Huygens Fresnel principle and the model of the refractive-index structure constant in the atmospheric turbulence proposed by the International Telecommunication Union-Radio Communication Sector,the characteristics of the partially coherent Gaussian Schell-model(GSM)beams propagating in slanted atmospheric turbulence are studied.Using the cross-spectral density function(CSDF),we derive the expressions for the effective beam radius,the spreading angle,and the average intersity.The variance of the angle-of-arrival fluctuation and the wander effect of the GSM beam in the turbulence are calculated numerically.The influences of the coherence degree,the propagation distance,the propagation height,and the waist radius on the propagation characteristics of the partially coherent beams are discussed and compared with those of the fully coherent Gaussian beams.

  17. Wigner distribution function and kurtosis parameter of vortex beams propagating through turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Qiangbo; Han, Yiping; Cui, Zhiwei

    2017-09-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral, the analytical expressions for the Wigner distribution function (WDF) and kurtosis parameter of partially coherent flat-topped vortex (PCFTV) beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence and free space are derived. The WDF and kurtosis parameter of PCFTV beams through turbulent atmosphere are discussed with numerical examples. The numerical results show that the beam quality depends on the structure constants, the inner scale turbulence, the outer scale turbulence, the spatial correlation length, the wave length and the beam order. PCFTV beams are less affected by turbulence than partially flat-topped coherent (PCFT) beams under the same conditions, and will be useful in free-space optical communications.

  18. Slant path average intensity of finite optical beam propagating in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yixin Zhang; Gaogang Wang

    2006-01-01

    The average intensity of finite laser beam propagating through turbulent atmosphere is calculated from the extended Huygens Fresnel principle. Formulas are presented for the slant path average intensity from an arbitrarily truncated Gaussian beam. The new expressions are derived from the modified von Karman spectrum for refractive-index fluctuations, quadratic approximation of the structure function,and Gaussian approximation for the product of Gaussian function and Bessel function. It is shown that the form of average intensity is not a Gaussian function but a polynomial of the power of the binomial function, Gaussian function, and the incomplete gamma function. The results also show that the mean irradiance of a finite optical beam propagating in slant path turbulent atmosphere not only depends on the effective beam radius at the transmitting aperture plane, propagation distance, and long-term lateral coherence length of spherical wave, but also on the radius of emit aperture.

  19. O tratado sobre a luz de Huygens: comentários

    OpenAIRE

    Krapas, Sonia; Departamento de Física – UFF Niterói – RJ; Queiroz, Glória Regina Pessôa Campello; Instituto de Física - UERJ Rio de Janeiro – RJ; Uzêda, Diego; Instituto de Ciências e Tecnologia Maria Thereza – FAMATh Niterói – RJ

    2011-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7941.2011v28n1p123Huygens é conhecido no ensino introdutório de Física por dar conta da refração segundo um modelo ondulatório. Livros didáticos lhe rendem homenagens atribuindo seu nome a um princípio, mas em sua obra máxima, Tratado sobre a luz, é possível se ver muito mais: sua inventividade na defesa de um modelo ondulatório para a luz como alternativo ao modelo corpuscular. Neste trabalho, tenta-se evidenciar o raciocínio de Huygens, mostrando que, apesar d...

  20. A Huygens Surface Approach to Antenna Implementation in Near-Field Radar Imaging System Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    critical geometrical details; re- casting the FDTD update equations on a grid conformal to a curvilinear coordinate system (e.g., cylindrical); and...Imaging System Simulations by Traian Dogaru and DaHan Liao Approved for public release; distribution unlimited...A Huygens Surface Approach to Antenna Implementation in Near-Field Radar Imaging System Simulations by Traian Dogaru and DaHan Liao Sensors

  1. Huygens-Fresnel principle for N-photon states of light

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    We show that the propagation of a N-photon field in space and time can be described by a generalized Huygens-Fresnel integral. Using two examples, we then demonstrate how familiar Fourier optics techniques applied to a N-photon wave function can be used to engineer the propagation of entanglement and to design the way the detection of one photon shapes the state of the others.

  2. Temperature Structure and Atmospheric Circulation of Dry, Tidally Locked Rocky Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Koll, Daniel D B

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation space telescopes will observe the atmospheres of rocky planets orbiting nearby M-dwarfs. Understanding these observations will require well-developed theory in addition to numerical simulations. Here we present theoretical models for the temperature structure and atmospheric circulation of dry, tidally locked rocky exoplanets with grey radiative transfer and test them using a general circulation model (GCM). First, we develop a radiative-convective model that captures surface temperatures of slowly rotating and cool atmospheres. Second, we show that the atmospheric circulation acts as a global heat engine, which places strong constraints on large-scale wind speeds. Third, we develop a radiative-convective-subsiding model which extends our radiative-convective model to hot and thin atmospheres. We find that rocky planets develop large day-night temperature gradients at a ratio of wave-to-radiative timescales up to two orders of magnitude smaller than the value suggested by work on hot Jupiters....

  3. Profile and Character of Atmospheric Structure Constant of Refractive Index C_n~2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Gang; WENG Ning-Quan; XIAO Li-Ming; WU Yi

    2012-01-01

    Random fluctuations of turbulence bring random fluctuations of the refractive index, making the atmosphere a random fluctuation medium that destroys the coherence of light-waves. Research in atmospheric turbulence is actually the investigation of the atmospheric refractive index. The atmospheric structure constant of refractive index, C n 2 , is an important parameter denoting atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, C n 2 is measured during the day and at night and in all four seasons using a high sensitivity micro-thermal meter QHTP-2. The vertical profile of C n 2 in Hefei (0-30 km) is investigated by the analysis of experimental data. The average profile of C n 2 in Hefei exhibits conspicuous day and night differences with increased altitude. The distribution of log(C n 2 ) is nearly normal and has conspicuous seasonal differences.

  4. Velocity structure in long period variable star atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilachowski, C.; Wallerstein, G.; Willson, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    A regression analysis of the dependence of absorption line velocities on wavelength, line strength, excitation potential, and ionization potential is presented. The method determines the region of formation of the absorption lines for a given data and wavelength region. It is concluded that the scatter which is frequently found in velocity measurements of absorption lines in long period variables is probably the result of a shock of moderate amplitude located in or near the reversing layer and that the frequently observed correlation of velocity with excitation and ionization are a result of the velocity gradients produced by this shock in the atmosphere. A simple interpretation of the signs of the coefficients of the regression analysis is presented in terms of preshock, post shock, or across the shock, together with criteria for evaluating the validity of the fit. The amplitude of the reversing layer shock is estimated from an analysis of a series of plates for four long period variable stars along with the most probable stellar velocity for these stars.

  5. Framing Space: UK Newspaper Reporting of the Beagle 2 and Cassini-Huygens Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jergovic, B.; Miller, S.

    2008-05-01

    Relatively little scholarly work has been done on looking at the portrayal of astronomy and space science in the media. This short article examines the UK press coverage of two space missions: the Beagle 2 mission to Mars and the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn and its moon Titan. In both cases, the leading scientists exerted a strong influence on what journalists reported, to the extent that some journalists appeared to be almost "embedded" in the mission. For the most part the coverage is positive in tone and the loss of the Beagle 2 spacecraft does not reflect badly on the (later) Cassini-Huygens coverage. Most journalists only covered the actual mission events and, in the case of Huygens, did not follow up to cover the peer-reviewed scientific articles that appeared later. Off-the-cuff comments made by scientists at the time of the missions were widely reported. There appears to be an appreciation by journalists and (by inference) their readership that this was science in the making, and that allowances should be made if these comments later turned out to be inaccurate.

  6. The atmospheric structure and dynamical properties of Neptune derived from ground-based and IUE spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Kevin H.; Smith, Wm. Hayden

    1990-01-01

    A wide range of recent full-disk spectral observations is used to constrain the atmospheric structure and dynamical properties of Neptune; analytical determinations are made of the abundances of such spectrally active gas species as the deep-atmosphere CH4 molar fraction and the mean ortho/para hydrogen ratio in the visible atmosphere, as well as stratospheric and tropospheric aerosol properties. Compared to Uranus, the greater abundance and shorter lifetimes of Neptunian particulates in the stratospheric region irradiated by the solar UV flux indicate that such radiation is the darkening agent of stratospheric aerosols on both planets.

  7. Assessment of thermal structure of boundary layer atmosphere of Western Siberia

    OpenAIRE

    Akhmetshina, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of frequency of temperature inversions makes it possible to investigate the probability of coincidence of unfavorable conditions of atmospheric stratification and the results of the intensive business activity. This paper is devoted to the study of thermal structure of the atmosphere boundary layer of Western Siberian territory in the period from 1990 to 2010 by using reanalysis of NCEP/NCAR data. The data of reanalysis is the only available information for similar research. Ba...

  8. Structural modifications under reactive atmosphere of cobalt catalysts; Modifications structurales sous atmospheres reactionnelles de catalyseurs a base de cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducreux, O.

    1999-11-23

    The purpose of this work was to develop in situ methods under reactive dynamic conditions (XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) to describe the active phase structure in order to understand Fischer-Tropsch catalyst behaviour and improve the natural gas conversion process performance. Experiments were designed to correlate structural modifications with catalytic results. The effect of ruthenium used as a promoter has also been studied. The impregnation process increases cobalt-support interaction. The presence of ruthenium promoter reduces this effect. Interactions between Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} oxide and support play an important role in the reducibility of cobalt and in the resulting metal structure. This in turn strongly influences the catalytic behaviour. Our results show a close correlation between structure modification and reactivity in the systems studied. Cobalt metal and CO can react to form a carbide Co{sub 2}C under conditions close to those of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. This carbide formation seems to be related to a deactivation process. The presence of interstitial carbon formed by dissociation of CO is proposed as a key to understanding the mechanism of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. A specific catalyst activation treatment was developed to increase the catalytic activity. This work permits correlation of materials structure with their chemical properties and demonstrates the contribution of in situ physico-chemical characterisation methods to describe solids under reactive atmosphere. (author)

  9. Turbulent Structures and Coherence in the Atmospheric Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Träumner, K.; Damian, Th.; Stawiarski, Ch.; Wieser, A.

    2015-01-01

    Organized structures in turbulent flow fields are a well-known and still fascinating phenomenon. Although these so-called coherent structures are obvious from visual inspection, quantitative assessment is a challenge and many aspects e.g., formation mechanisms and contribution to turbulent fluxes, are discussed controversially. During the "High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for Advancing Climate Prediction" Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) from April to May 2013, an advanced dual Doppler lidar technique was used to image the horizontal wind field near the surface for approximately 300 h. A visual inspection method, as well as a two-dimensional integral length scale analysis, were performed to characterize the observations qualitatively and quantitatively. During situations with forcing due to shear, the wind fields showed characteristic patterns in the form of clearly bordered, elongated areas of enhanced or reduced wind speed, which can be associated with near-surface streaks. During calm situations with strong buoyancy forcing, open cell patterns in the horizontal divergence field were observed. The measurement technique used enables the calculation of integral length scales of both horizontal wind components in the streamwise and cross-stream directions. The individual length scales varied considerably during the observation period but were on average shorter during situations with compared to strongly stable situations. During unstable situations, which were dominated by wind fields with structures, the streamwise length scales increased with increasing wind speed, whereas the cross-stream length scales decreased. Consequently, the anisotropy increased from 1 for calm situations to values of 2-3 for wind speeds of 8-10. During neutral to stable situations, the eddies were on average quite isotropic in the horizontal plane.

  10. Principles and criteria for the evaluation of the corrosivity of atmospheric environments on steel structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan PEPENAR

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the environmental impact on steel structures and the corrosivity of atmospheric environments. It defines the principles and criteria for the evaluation of atmospheric-corrosivity classes, according to European standard, which were introduced in the new technical national regulations in the field of corrosion protection of steel structures. It shows the equivalence between the new corrosivity classes and the old aggressivity classes according to Romanian standard, still in force. The examples of typical environments corresponding to the corrosivity classes are also presented.

  11. Comparative planetary nitrogen atmospheres: Density and thermal structures of Pluto and Triton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Darrell F.; Zhu, Xun

    2017-07-01

    Both atmospheres of Pluto and Neptune's largest satellite Triton have cold surfaces with surface gravitational accelerations and atmospheric surface pressures of comparable magnitude. To study their atmospheres we have updated Zhu et al. (2014) model for Pluto's atmosphere by adopting Voigt line profiles in the radiation module with the latest spectral database and extended the model to Triton's atmosphere by including additional parameterized heating due to the magnetospheric electron transport and energy deposition. The CH4 mixing ratio profiles play central roles in differentiating the atmospheres of Pluto and Triton. On Pluto the surface CH4 mole fraction is in the range of 0.3-0.8%, sufficiently high to ensure that it is well mixed in the lower atmosphere and not subject to photochemical destruction. Near the exobase CH4 attains comparable density to N2 due to gravitational diffusive separation and escapes at 500 times the N2 rate (= 1 × 1023 N2 s-1). In Triton's atmosphere, the surface CH4 mole fraction is on the order of 0.015%, sufficiently low to ensure that it is photochemically destroyed irreversibly in the lower atmosphere and that N2 remains the major species, even at the exobase. With solar EUV power only, Triton's upper thermosphere is too cold and magnetospheric heating, approximately comparable to the solar EUV power, is needed to bring the N2 tangential column number density in the 500-800 km range up to values derived from the Voyager 2 UVS observations (Broadfoot et al., 1989). Due to their cold exobase temperatures relative to the gravitational potential energy wells that N2 resides in, atmospheric escape from Triton and Pluto is not dominated by N2 Jeans escape but by CH4 from Pluto and H, C, N and H2 from Triton. The atmospheric thermal structure near the exobase is sensitive to the atmospheric escape rate only when it is significantly greater than 2 × 1027 amu s-1, above which enhanced Jeans escape and larger radial velocity adiabatically

  12. The shape of Saturn's Huygens ringlet viewed by Cassini ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitale, J. N.; Hahn, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    A new model for the shape of the prominent eccentric ringlet in the gap exterior to Saturn's B ring is developed based on Cassini imaging observations taken over about 8 years. Unlike previous analyses, the new model treats each edge of the ringlet separately. The Keplerian component of the model is consistent with results derived from Voyager observations, and m = 2 modes forced by the nearby Mimas 2:1 Lindblad resonance are seen. Additionally, a free m = 2 mode is seen on the outer edge of the ringlet. Significant irregular structure that cannot be described using normal-mode analysis is seen on the ringlet edges as well. Particularly on the inner edge, that structure remains coherent over multi-year intervals, moving at the local Keplerian rate. We interpret the irregular structure as the signature of embedded massive bodies. The long coherence time suggests the responsible bodies are concentrated near the edge of the ringlet. Long wake-like structures originate from two locations on the inner edge of the ringlet, revealing the locations of the two most massive embedded bodies in that region. As with the Voyager observations, the Cassini data sets showed no correlation between the width and the radius of the ringlet as would be expected for a self-gravitating configuration, except for a brief interval during late 2006, when the width-radius relation was similar to those seen in most other narrow eccentric ringlets in the Solar System.

  13. The Shape of Saturn's Huygens Ringlet Viewed by Cassini ISS

    CERN Document Server

    Spitale, Joseph N

    2015-01-01

    A new model for the shape of the prominent eccentric ringlet in the gap exterior to Saturn's B-ring is developed based on Cassini observations taken over about 8 years. Unlike previous treatments, the new model treats each edge of the ringlet separately. The Keplerian component of the model is consistent with results derived from Voyager observations, and $m=2$ modes forced by the nearby Mimas 2:1 Lindblad resonance are seen. Additionally, a free $m=2$ mode is seen on the outer edge of the ringlet. Significant irregular structure that cannot be described using normal-mode analysis is seen on the ringlet edges as well. Particularly on the inner edge, that structure remains coherent over multi-year intervals, moving at the local Keplerian rate. We interpret the irregular structure as the signature of embedded massive bodies. The long coherence time suggests the responsible bodies are concentrated near the edge of the ringlet. Long wake-like structures originate from two locations on the inner edge of the ringle...

  14. Temperature Structure and Atmospheric Circulation of Dry Tidally Locked Rocky Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koll, Daniel D. B.; Abbot, Dorian S.

    2016-07-01

    Next-generation space telescopes will observe the atmospheres of rocky planets orbiting nearby M-dwarfs. Understanding these observations will require well-developed theory in addition to numerical simulations. Here we present theoretical models for the temperature structure and atmospheric circulation of dry, tidally locked rocky exoplanets with gray radiative transfer and test them using a general circulation model (GCM). First, we develop a radiative-convective (RC) model that captures surface temperatures of slowly rotating and cool atmospheres. Second, we show that the atmospheric circulation acts as a global heat engine, which places strong constraints on large-scale wind speeds. Third, we develop an RC-subsiding model which extends our RC model to hot and thin atmospheres. We find that rocky planets develop large day-night temperature gradients at a ratio of wave-to-radiative timescales up to two orders of magnitude smaller than the value suggested by work on hot Jupiters. The small ratio is due to the heat engine inefficiency and asymmetry between updrafts and subsidence in convecting atmospheres. Fourth, we show, using GCM simulations, that rotation only has a strong effect on temperature structure if the atmosphere is hot or thin. Our models let us map out atmospheric scenarios for planets such as GJ 1132b, and show how thermal phase curves could constrain them. Measuring phase curves of short-period planets will require similar amounts of time on the James Webb Space Telescope as detecting molecules via transit spectroscopy, so future observations should pursue both techniques.

  15. Constraining hot Jupiter’s atmospheric structure and dynamics through Doppler shifted emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jisheng; Kempton, Eliza; Rauscher, Emily

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, astronomers have begun successfully observing the atmospheres of extrasolar planets using ground-based telescopes equipped with spectrographs capable of observing at high spectral resolution (R~105). Such studies are capable of diagnosing the atmospheric structure, composition, and dynamics (winds and rotation) of both transiting and non-transiting exoplanets. However, few studies have examined how the 3-D atmospheric dynamics could alter the emitted light of hot Jupiters at such high spectral resolution. Here, we present a model to explore such influence on the hot Jupiters’ thermal emission spectra. Our aim is to investigate the extent to which the effects of 3-D atmospheric dynamics are imprinted on planet-averaged thermal emission spectra. We couple together a 3-D general circulation model of hot Jupiter atmospheric dynamics (Rauscher & Menou, 2012) with a radiative transfer solver to predict the planet’s disk-integrated emission spectrum as a function of its orbital phase. For the first time, we self-consistently include the effects of the line-of-sight atmospheric motions (resulting from winds and rotation) in the calculation to produce Doppler-shifted spectral line profiles that result from the atmospheric dynamics. We focus our study on three benchmark hot Jupiters, HD 189733b, HD 209458b, and WASP-43b which have been the focus of previous detailed observational studies. We find that the high-resolution Doppler shifted thermal emission spectra can be used to diagnose key properties of the dynamical atmosphere - the planet’s longitudinal temperature and wind structure, and its rotation rate.

  16. Spatial structure and scale feature of the atmospheric pollution source impact of city agglomeration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Xiangde; ZHOU; Xiuji; SHI; Xiaohui

    2005-01-01

    The spatial structure and multi-scale feature of the atmospheric pollution influence domain of Beijing and its peripheral areas (a rapidly developed city agglomeration) is dissected and analyzed in this paper on the basis of the atmospheric pollution dynamic-chemical process observation data of the urban building ensemble boundary layer of the Beijing City Air Pollution Observation Experiment (BECAPEX) in winter (February) and summer (August) 2003, and relevant meteorological elements and satellite retrieval aerosol optical depth (AOD), etc. comprehensive data with the dynamic-statistical integrated analysis of "point-surface" spatial structure. Results show that there existed significant difference in the contribution of winter/summer different pollution emission sources to the component character of atmospheric pollution, and the principal component analysis (PCA) results of statistical model also indicate that SO2 and NOX dominated in the component structure of winter aerosol particle; instead, CO and NOX dominated in summer. Surface layer atmospheric dynamic and thermal structures and various pollutant species at the upper boundary of building ensembles at urban different observational sites of Beijing in winter and summer showed an "in-phase" variation and its spatial scale feature of "influence domain". The power spectrum analysis (PSA) shows that the period spectrum of winter/summer particle concentration accorded with those of atmospheric wind field: the longer period was dominative in winter, but the shorter period in summer, revealing the impact of the seasonal scale feature of winter/summer atmospheric general circulation on the period of atmospheric pollution variations. It is found that from analyzing urban area thermal heterogeneity that the multiscale effect of Beijing region urban heat island (UHI) was associated with the heterogeneous expansion of tall buildings area. In urban atmospheric dynamical and thermal characteristic spatial structures, the

  17. Magnetic Doppler imaging considering atmospheric structure modifications due to local abundances: a luxury or a necessity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochukhov, O.; Wade, G. A.; Shulyak, D.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic Doppler imaging is currently the most powerful method of interpreting high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of stars. This technique has provided the very first maps of stellar magnetic field topologies reconstructed from time series of full Stokes vector spectra, revealing the presence of small-scale magnetic fields on the surfaces of Ap stars. These studies were recently criticised by Stift et al., who claimed that magnetic inversions are not robust and are seriously undermined by neglecting a feedback on the Stokes line profiles from the local atmospheric structure in the regions of enhanced metal abundance. We show that Stift et al. misinterpreted published magnetic Doppler imaging results and consistently neglected some of the most fundamental principles behind magnetic mapping. Using state-of-the-art opacity sampling model atmosphere and polarized radiative transfer codes, we demonstrate that the variation of atmospheric structure across the surface of a star with chemical spots affects the local continuum intensity but is negligible for the normalized local Stokes profiles except for the rare situation of a very strong line in an extremely Fe-rich atmosphere. For the disc-integrated spectra of an Ap star with extreme abundance variations, we find that the assumption of a mean model atmosphere leads to moderate errors in Stokes I but is negligible for the circular and linear polarization spectra. Employing a new magnetic inversion code, which incorporates the horizontal variation of atmospheric structure induced by chemical spots, we reconstructed new maps of magnetic field and Fe abundance for the bright Ap star α2 CVn. The resulting distribution of chemical spots changes insignificantly compared to the previous modelling based on a single model atmosphere, while the magnetic field geometry does not change at all. This shows that the assertions by Stift et al. are exaggerated as a consequence of unreasonable assumptions and

  18. Magnetic Doppler imaging considering atmospheric structure modifications due to local abundances: a luxury or a necessity?

    CERN Document Server

    Kochukhov, O; Shulyak, D

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic Doppler imaging is currently the most powerful method of interpreting high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of stars. This technique has revealed the presence of unexpected small-scale magnetic fields on the surfaces of Ap stars. These studies were recently criticisied by Stift et al. (2012), who claimed that magnetic inversions are not robust and are undermined by neglecting a feedback on the Stokes line profiles from the local atmospheric structure in the regions of enhanced metal abundance. We show that Stift et al. misinterpreted published magnetic Doppler imaging results and neglected some of the most fundamental principles behind magnetic mapping. We demonstrate that the variation of atmospheric structure across the surface of a star with chemical spots affects the local continuum intensity but is negligible for the normalised local Stokes profiles. For the disk-integrated spectra of an Ap star with extreme abundance variations, we find that the assumption of a mean model atmosphere ...

  19. Huygens and Barrow, Newton and Hooke. Pioneers in mathematical analysis and catastrophe theory from evolvents to quasicrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnol'D, V. I.

    This book is an English translation of the Russian original of 1989. It is based on a college lecture commemorating the tercentenary of Newton's book Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica. The author retraces the beginnings of mathematical analysis and theoretical physics in the works of the great scientists of the 17th century, and recounts the history of the discovery of the law of gravitation, discussions Newton had with Hooke and Leibniz, and much more. Some of Huygens' and Newton's ideas, several centuries ahead of their time, were developed only recently. The author follows the link between their inception and the break-throughs in contemporary mathematics and physics. The book provides present-day generalizations of Newton's theorems on the elliptical shape of orbits, attraction of spheres, and on the transcendence of Abelian integrals; it offers a brief review of the theory of regular and chaotic movement in celestial mechanics, including, for example, the problem of ports in the distribution of smaller planets and a discussion of the structure of planetary rings.

  20. Vertical thermal structure of the Venus atmosphere from temperature and pressure measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkin, V.M.; Blamon, Z.; Lipatov, A.P.; Devyatkin, S.I.; Dyachkov, A.V.; Ignatova, S.I.; Kerzhanovich, V.V.; Malyk, K.; Stadny, V.I.; Sanotskiy, Y.V.

    1986-05-01

    Accurate temperature and pressure measurements were made on the Vega-2 lander during its entire descent. The temperature and pressure at the surface were 733 K and 89.3 bar, respectively. A strong temperature inversion was found in the upper troposphere. Several layers with differing static stability were visible in the atmospheric structure.

  1. Vertical thermal structure of the Venus atmosphere from temperature and pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkin, V. M.; Blamon, Z.; Lipatov, A. P.; Devyatkin, S. I.; Dyachkov, A. V.; Ignatova, S. I.; Kerzhanovich, V. V.; Malyk, K.; Stadny, V. I.; Sanotskiy, Y. V.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate temperature and pressure measurements were made on the Vega-2 lander during its entire descent. The temperature and pressure at the surface were 733 K and 89.3 bar, respectively. A strong temperature inversion was found in the upper troposphere. Several layers with differing static stability were visible in the atmospheric structure.

  2. Thermal structure, composition, atmospheric dynamics and long-term evolution of irradiated exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Vivien

    2014-06-01

    More than a thousand exoplanets have been discovered over the last decade. Perhaps more excitingly, probing their atmospheres has become possible. We now have spectra of hot Jupiters like HD 189733b and HD 209458b, of Neptune-like planets like GJ1214b and even smaller planets are within reach. Most exoplanet atmospheric observations are averaged spatially, often over a hemi- sphere (during secondary eclipse) or over the limb of the planet (during transit). For favorable targets, longitudinal and latitudinal resolution can also be obtained with phase curve and secondary eclipse mapping techniques respectively. The closer the planet orbits to its star, the easier it is to observe. These hot planets strongly differ from the examples we have in our solar-system. Proper models of their atmospheres are challenging yet necessary to understand current and future observations. In this thesis, I use a hierarchy of atmospheric models to understand the interactions between the thermal structure, the composition, the atmospheric circulation and the long-term evolution of irradiated planets. In these planets, the large stellar irradiation dominates the energy budget of the atmosphere. It powers a strong atmospheric circulation that transports heat and material around the planet, driving the atmosphere out of thermal and chemical equilibrium and affecting its long-term evolution. Future instruments (Gaia, SPIRou, CHEOPS, TESS, PLATO etc) will discover many more planets that the next generation of telescopes (GMT, TMT, E-ELT or JWST) will characterize with an unprecedented accuracy. Models will be tested on a large sample of planets, extending the study of climates to exoplanets.

  3. Reflection formulae for ray tracing in uniaxial anisotropic media using Huygens's principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán-Castañeda, Luis A; Rosete-Aguilar, Martha

    2016-11-01

    Ray tracing in uniaxial anisotropic materials is important because they are widely used for instrumentation, liquid-crystal displays, laser cavities, and quantum experiments. There are previous works regarding ray tracing refraction and reflection formulae using the common electromagnetic theory approach, but only the refraction formulae have been deduced using Huygens's principle. In this paper we obtain the reflection expressions using this unconventional approach with a specific coordinate system in which both refraction and reflection formulae are simplified as well as their deduction. We compute some numerical examples to compare them with the common expressions obtained using electromagnetic theory.

  4. Huygens' principle and radiation tails in a weak Schwarzschild fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piir, I. (Tartuskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    1983-01-01

    In approximation of a weak gravitational field the formula generalized Poisson formula for the wave equation is derived and the mechanism of tail aprearance of radial waves is discussed. It is shown that if the initial data of the Cauchy problem differ from zero in the two-connnected region of the initial hypersurface embracing by its internal boundary the Schwarzchild singularity there always arises the radiation tail through a linear approximation of the Huygens principle realized everywhere in a flat space-time.

  5. Gravitational waves in Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker cosmology, material perturbations and the Huygens principle

    CERN Document Server

    Kulczycki, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    We analyze propagation equations for the polar modes of gravitational waves in cosmological space-times. We prove that polar gravitational waves must perturb --- unlike axial modes --- the material content of the Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker spacetimes. The whole gravitational dynamics reduces to the single "master equation" that has the same form as for axial modes. That allows us to conclude that the status of the Huygens principle is the same for axial and gravitational waves. In particular, this principle is valid exactly in radiation spacetimes with the vanishing cosmological constant, and it is broken otherwise.

  6. Sea ice edge position impact on the atmospheric boundary layer temperature structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavina, Elena; Repina, Irina

    2016-04-01

    Processes happening in the Arctic region nowadays strongly influence global climate system; the polar amplification effect can be considered one of the main indicators of ongoing changes. Dramatic increase in amount of ice-free areas in the Arctic Ocean, which took place in 2000s, is one of the most significant examples of climate system dynamic in polar region. High amplitude of changes in Arctic climate, both observed and predicted, and existing inaccuracies of climate and weather forecasting models, enforce the development of a more accurate one. It is essential to understand the physics of the interaction between atmosphere and ocean in the Northern Polar area (particularly in boundary layer of the atmosphere) to improve the models. Ice conditions have a great influence on the atmospheric boundary layer in the Arctic. Sea ice inhibits the heat exchange between atmosphere and ocean water during the polar winter, while the heat exchange above the ice-free areas increases rapidly. Due to those significant temperature fluctuations, turbulence of heat fluxes grows greatly. The most intensive interaction takes place at marginal ice zones, especially in case of the cold outbreak - intrusion of cooled air mass from the ice to free water area. Still, thermal structure and dynamic of the atmosphere boundary layer are not researched and described thoroughly enough. Single radio sounding observations from the planes being done, bur they do not provide high-resolution data which is necessary for study. This research is based on continuous atmosphere boundary layer temperature and sea ice observation collected in the Arctic Ocean during the two NABOS expeditions in August and September in 2013 and 2015, as well as on ice conditions satellite data (NASA TEAM 2 and VASIA 2 data processing). Atmosphere temperature data has been obtained with Meteorological Temperature Profiler MTP-5 (ATTEX, Russia). It is a passive radiometer, which provides continuous data of atmospheric

  7. The Cassini-Huygens visit to Saturn an historic mission to the ringed planet

    CERN Document Server

    Meltzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cassini-Huygens was the most ambitious and successful space journey ever launched to the outer Solar System. This book examines all aspects of the journey: its conception and planning; the lengthy political processes needed to make it a reality; the engineering and development required to build the spacecraft; its 2.2-billion mile journey from Earth to the Ringed Planet; and the amazing discoveries from the mission. The author traces how the visions of a few brilliant scientists matured, gained popularity, and eventually became a reality. Innovative technical leaps were necessary to assemble such a multifaceted spacecraft and reliably operate it while it orbited a planet so far from our own. The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft design evolved from other deep space efforts, most notably the Galileo mission to Jupiter, enabling the voluminous, paradigm-shifting scientific data collected by the spacecraft.  Some of these discoveries are absolute gems. A small satellite that scientists once thought of as a dead pi...

  8. Concentric-ring structures in an atmospheric pressure helium dielectric barrier discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shang Wan-Li; Zhang Yuan-Tao; Wang De-Zhen; Sang Chao-Feng; Jiang shao-En; Yang Jia-Min; Liu shen-Ye; M.G.Kong

    2011-01-01

    This paper performs a numerical simulation of concentric-ring discharge structures within the scope of a two-dimensional diffusion-drift model at atmospheric pressure between two parallel circular electrodes covered with thin dielectric layers. With a relative high frequency the discharge structures present different appearances of ring structures within different radii in time due to the evolvement of the filaments. The spontaneous electron density distributions help understanding the formation and development of seff-organized discharge structures. During a cycle the electron avalanches are triggered by the electric field strengthened by the feeding voltage and the residual charged particles on the barrier surface deposited in the previous discharges. The accumulation of charges is shown to play a dominant role in the generation and annihilation of the discharge structures. Besides, the rings split and unify to bring and annihilate rings which form a new discharge structure.

  9. An Analysis of Cassini Observations Regarding the Structure of Jupiter's Equatorial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David S.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of intriguing atmospheric phenomena reside on both sides of Jupiter's equator. 5-micron bright hot spots and opaque plumes prominently exhibit dynamic behavior to the north, whereas compact, dark chevron-shaped features and isolated anticyclonic disturbances periodically occupy the southern equatorial latitudes. All of these phenomena are associated with the vertical and meridional perturbations of Rossby waves disturbing the mean atmospheric state. As previous observational analysis and numerical simulations have investigated the dynamics of the region, an examination of the atmosphere's vertical structure though radiative transfer analysis is necessary for improved understanding of this unique environment. Here we present preliminary analysis of a multispectral Cassini imaging data set acquired during the spacecraft's flyby of Jupiter in 2000. We evaluated multiple methane and continuum spectral channels at available viewing angles to improve constraints on the vertical structure of the haze and cloud layers comprising these interesting features. Our preliminary results indicate distinct differences in the structure for both hemispheres. Upper troposphere hazes and cloud layers are prevalent in the northern equatorial latitudes, but are not present in corresponding southern latitudes. Continued analysis will further constrain the precise structure present in these phenomena and the differences between them.

  10. An Analysis of Cassini Observations Regarding the Structure of Jupiter's Equatorial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David S.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of intriguing atmospheric phenomena reside on both sides of Jupiter's equator. 5-micron bright hot spots and opaque plumes prominently exhibit dynamic behavior to the north, whereas compact, dark chevron-shaped features and isolated anticyclonic disturbances periodically occupy the southern equatorial latitudes. All of these phenomena are associated with the vertical and meridional perturbations of Rossby waves disturbing the mean atmospheric state. As previous observational analysis and numerical simulations have investigated the dynamics of the region, an examination of the atmosphere's vertical structure though radiative transfer analysis is necessary for improved understanding of this unique environment. Here we present preliminary analysis of a multispectral Cassini imaging data set acquired during the spacecraft's flyby of Jupiter in 2000. We evaluated multiple methane and continuum spectral channels at available viewing angles to improve constraints on the vertical structure of the haze and cloud layers comprising these interesting features. Our preliminary results indicate distinct differences in the structure for both hemispheres. Upper troposphere hazes and cloud layers are prevalent in the northern equatorial latitudes, but are not present in corresponding southern latitudes. Continued analysis will further constrain the precise structure present in these phenomena and the differences between them.

  11. Spatial structure and scale feature of the atmospheric pollution source impact of city agglomeration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiangde; ZHOU Xiuji; SHI Xiaohui

    2005-01-01

    The spatial structure and multi-scale feature of the atmospheric pollution influence domain of Beijing and its peripheral areas (a rapidly developed city agglomeration) is dissected and analyzed in this paper on the basis of the atmospheric pollution dynamic-chemical process observation data of the urban building ensemble boundary layer of the Beijing City Air Pollution Observation Experiment (BECAPEX) in winter (February) and summer (August) 2003, and relevant meteorological elements and satellite retrieval aerosol optical depth (AOD), etc. comprehensive data with the dynamic-statistical integrated analysis of "point-surface" spatial structure. Results show that there existed significant difference in the contribution of winter/summer different pollution emission sources to the component character of atmospheric pollution, and the principal component analysis (PCA) results of statistical model also indicate that SO2 and NOX dominated in the component structure of winter aerosol particle; instead, CO and NOX dominated in summer. Surface layer atmospheric dynamic and thermal structures and various pollutant species at the upper boundary of building ensembles at urban different observational sites of Beijing in winter and summer showed an "in-phase" variation and its spatial scale feature of "influence domain". The power spectrum analysis (PSA) shows that the period spectrum of winter/summer particle concentration accorded with those of atmospheric wind field: the longer period was dominative in winter, but the shorter period in summer, revealing the impact of the seasonal scale feature of winter/summer atmospheric general circulation on the period of atmospheric pollution variations. It is found that from analyzing urban area thermal heterogeneity that the multiscale effect of Beijing region urban heat island (UHI) was associated with the heterogeneous expansion of tall buildings area. In urban atmospheric dynamical and thermal characteristic spatial structures, the

  12. Thermal structure of Venus upper atmosphere by a ground-to-thermosphere GCM: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilli, G.; Lebonnois, S.; Salmi, L.; Gonzalez-Galindo, F.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Eymet, V.; Forget, F.

    2014-04-01

    We present here preliminary results of the thermal structure of the upper atmosphere of Venus simulated by a ground-to thermosphere General Circulation Model (GCM). The GCM developed at the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (LMD) [1] has been recently improved and extended vertically from 100 to 150 km, with the inclusion of the physical processes which mostly contribute to the thermal balance in the mesosphere/thermosphere of Venus (i.e near IR heating by CO2, 15 μm thermal cooling, extreme UV heating, thermal conduction). We also focus on recent Venus Express and ground-based temperature measurements above 100 km, both at daytime and nighttime, and we interpret the observed main features with the help of model simulations. This ongoing study may indicate that both radiative and dynamical effects play a crucial role in determining the thermal structure of those upper layers of Venus atmosphere.

  13. Thermal structure of an exoplanet atmosphere from phase-resolved emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, Kevin B; Line, Michael R; Bean, Jacob L; Fortney, Jonathan J; Showman, Adam P; Kataria, Tiffany; Kreidberg, Laura; McCullough, Peter R; Henry, Gregory W; Charbonneau, David; Burrows, Adam; Seager, Sara; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Williamson, Michael H; Homeier, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Exoplanets that orbit close to their host stars are much more highly irradiated than their Solar System counterparts. Understanding the thermal structures and appearances of these planets requires investigating how their atmospheres respond to such extreme stellar forcing. We present spectroscopic thermal emission measurements as a function of orbital phase ("phase-curve observations") for the highly-irradiated exoplanet WASP-43b spanning three full planet rotations using the Hubble Space Telescope. With these data, we construct a map of the planet's atmospheric thermal structure, from which we find large day-night temperature variations at all measured altitudes and a monotonically decreasing temperature with pressure at all longitudes. We also derive a Bond albedo of 0.18 +0.07,-0.12 and an altitude dependence in the hot-spot offset relative to the substellar point.

  14. A bow-shaped thermal structure traveling upstream of the zonal wind flow of Venus atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Makoto; Fukuhara, Tetsuya; Imamura, Takeshi; Kouyama, Toru; Nakamura, Masato; Sato, Takao M.; Ueno, Munetaka; Suzuki, Makoto; Iwagami, Naomoto; Sato, Mitsuteru; Hashimoto, George L.; Takagi, Seiko; Akatsuki Science Team

    2016-10-01

    The Longwave Infrared Camera (LIR) onboard the Japanese Venus orbiter Akatsuki acquires a snap shot of Venus in the middle infrared region, and provides a brightness temperature distribution at the cloud-top altitudes of about 65 km. Hundreds of images taken by LIR have been transferred to the ground since the successful Venus orbit insertion of Akatsuki on Dec. 7, 2015. Here we report that a bow shaped thermal structure extending from the northern high latitudes to the southern high latitudes was found in the brightness temperature map on Dec. 7, 2015, and that it lasted for four days at least surprisingly at almost same geographical position. The bow shape structure looks symmetrical with the equator, and consists of a high temperature region in east or upstream of the background strong westward wind or the super rotation of the Venus atmosphere followed by a low temperature region in west with an amplitude of 5 K. It appeared close to the evening terminator in the dayside, and seems not to have stayed in the same local time rather to have co-rotated with the slowly rotating ground where the western part of Aphrodite Continent was below the center of the bow shape. Meridionally aligned dark filaments similar to the bow shape structure in shape but in much smaller scale were also identified in the brightness temperature map on Dec. 7, and they propagated upstream of the zonal wind as well. The bow shape structure disappeared when LIR observed the same local time and longitude in the earliest opportunity on Jan. 16, 2016. Similar events, though their amplitudes were less than 1 K, were found on Apr. 15 and 26, 2016, but they appeared in different local times and longitudes. A simulation of a gravity wave generated in the lower atmosphere and propagating upward reproduces the observed bow shape structure. The bow shape structure could be a signature of transferring momentum from the ground to the upper atmosphere.

  15. Towards a Self Consistent Model of the Thermal Structure of the Venus Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Sanjay; Vandaele, Ann C.; Wilson, Colin

    Nearly three decades ago, an international effort led to the adoption of the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) was published in 1985 after the significant data returned by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter and Probes and the earlier Venera missions (Kliore et al., 1985). The vertical thermal structure is one component of the reference model which relied primarily on the three Pioneer Venus Small Probes, the Large Probe profiles as well as several hundred retrieved temperature profiles from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter radio occultation data collected during 1978 - 1982. Since then a huge amount of thermal structure data has been obtained from multiple instruments on ESA’s Venus Express (VEX) orbiter mission. The VEX data come from retrieval of temperature profiles from SPICAV/SOIR stellar/solar occultations, VeRa radio occultations and from the passive remote sensing by the VIRTIS instrument. The results of these three experiments vary in their intrinsic properties - altitude coverage, spatial and temporal sampling and resolution and accuracy An international team has been formed with support from the International Space Studies Institute (Bern, Switzerland) to consider the observations of the Venus atmospheric structure obtained since the data used for the COSPAR Venus International Reference Atmosphere (Kliore et al., 1985). We report on the progress made by the comparison of the newer data with VIRA model and also between different experiments where there is overlap. Kliore, A.J., V.I. Moroz, and G.M. Keating, Eds. 1985, VIRA: Venus International Reference Atmosphere, Advances in Space Research, Volume 5, Number 11, 307 pages.

  16. Predicting the thermal/structural performance of the atmospheric trace molecules spectroscopy /ATMOS/ Fourier transform spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    ATMOS is a Fourier transform spectrometer to measure atmospheric trace molecules over a spectral range of 2-16 microns. Assessment of the system performance of ATMOS includes evaluations of optical system errors induced by thermal and structural effects. In order to assess the optical system errors induced from thermal and structural effects, error budgets are assembled during system engineering tasks and line of sight and wavefront deformations predictions (using operational thermal and vibration environments and computer models) are subsequently compared to the error budgets. This paper discusses the thermal/structural error budgets, modelling and analysis methods used to predict thermal/structural induced errors and the comparisons that show that predictions are within the error budgets.

  17. Could Nano-Structured Materials Enable the Improved Pressure Vessels for Deep Atmospheric Probes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, D.; Fuentes, A.; Bienstock, B.; Arnold, J. O.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the use of Nano-Structured Materials to enable pressure vessel structures for deep atmospheric probes is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature/Pressure in Key X-Environments; 2) The Case for Use of Nano-Structured Materials Pressure Vessel Design; 3) Carbon based Nanomaterials; 4) Nanotube production & purification; 5) Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes; 6) CNT-composites: Example (Polymer); 7) Effect of Loading sequence on Composite with 8% by volume; 8) Models for Particulate Reinforced Composites; 9) Fullerene/Ti Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 10) Fullerene/Epoxy Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 11) Models for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites; 12) Tensile Strength for Discontinuous Fiber Composite; 13) Ti + SWNT Composites: Thermal/Mechanical; 14) Ti + SWNT Composites: Tensile Strength; and 15) Nano-structured Shell for Pressure Vessels.

  18. Cavity-excited Huygens' metasurface antennas: near-unity aperture efficiency from arbitrarily-large apertures

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, Ariel; Eleftheriades, George V

    2015-01-01

    One of the long-standing problems in antenna engineering is the realization of highly-directive beams using low-profile devices. In this paper we provide a solution to this problem by means of Huygens' metasurfaces (HMSs), based on the equivalence principle. This principle states that a given excitation can be transformed to a desirable aperture field by inducing suitable electric and magnetic surface currents. Building on this concept, we propose and demonstrate cavity-excited HMS antennas, where the single-source cavity excitation is designed to optimize aperture illumination, while the HMS facilitates the current distribution that ensures phase purity of aperture fields. The HMS breaks the coupling between the excitation and radiation spectrum typical to standard partially-reflecting surfaces, allowing tailoring of the aperture properties to produce a desirable radiation pattern. As shown, a single semianalytical formalism can be followed to achieve control of a variety of radiation features, such as the d...

  19. Passive Lossless Huygens Metasurfaces for Conversion of Arbitrary Source Field to Directive Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    We present a semi-analytical formulation of the interaction between a given source field and a scalar Huygens metasurface (HMS), a recently introduced promising concept for wavefront manipulation based on a sheet of orthogonal electric and magnetic dipoles. Utilizing the equivalent surface impedance representation of these metasurfaces, we establish that an arbitrary source field can be converted into directive radiation via a passive lossless HMS if two physical conditions are met: local power conservation and local impedance equalization. Expressing the fields via their plane-wave spectrum and harnessing the slowly-varying envelope approximation we obtain semi-analytical formulae for the scattered fields, and prescribe the surface reactance required for the metasurface implementation. The resultant design procedure indicates that the local impedance equalization induces a Fresnel-like reflection, while local power conservation forms a radiating virtual aperture which follows the total excitation field magni...

  20. Dielectric Huygens' Metasurface for High-Efficiency Hologram Operating in Transmission Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenyu; Jiang, Huan; Liu, Bingyi; Song, Jie; Jiang, Yongyuan; Tang, Chengchun; Li, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Conventional metasurface holograms relying on metal antennas for phase manipulation suffer from strong Ohmic loss and incomplete polarization conversion. The efficiency is limited to rather small values when operating in transmission mode. Here, we implement a high-efficiency transmissive metasurface hologram by leveraging the recently developed Huygens' metasurface to construct an electric and magnetic sheet with a transmission efficiency up to 86% and optical efficiency of 23.6%. The high-efficiency originates from the simultaneous excitations of the Mie-type electric and magnetic dipole resonances in the meta-atoms composed of silicon nanodisks. Our hologram shows high fidelity over a wide spectral range and promises to be an outstanding alternative for display applications.

  1. The Meso-Structured Magnetic Atmosphere -- A Stochastic Polarized Radiative Transfer Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, T A

    2007-01-01

    We present a general radiative transfer model appropriate to diagnose the small scale and mostly unresolved magnetic field of the solar photosphere. Present modeling techniques still rely to a large extend on a-priori assumptions about the geometry of the underlying magnetic field. In an effort to obtain a more flexible and unbiased approach we pursue a rigorous statistical description of the underlying atmosphere. Based on a Markov random field model the atmospheric structures are characterized in terms of probability densities and spatial correlations. This approach allows us to derive a stochastic transport equation for polarized light valid in a regime with an arbitrary fluctuating magnetic field on finite scales. One of the key ingredients of the derived stochastic transfer equation is the correlation length which provides an additional degree of freedom to the transport equation and can therefore be used as a diagnostic parameter to estimate the characteristic length scale of the underlying magnetic fie...

  2. Electrochemical evaluation of the corrosion behaviour for structural steel SAE 1005 exposed to two different atmospheres (urban and industrial) and comparison with atmospheric corrosion gravimetric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Y.; Guerrero, L.; Castiblanco, H.; Torres, C.; Palacios, A.

    2016-02-01

    The Atmospheric corrosion is a phenomenon we see every day in our environment that arises due to environmental pollution we generate, there is currently very little information on atmospheric corrosion in the department of Boyacá and in general, in Colombia. The aim of this paper is to analyse which of these two environments is more aggressive and wherein the steel corrodes faster. To analyse these phenomenon specimens made in steel SAE 105 exposed for five months to the atmosphere in the municipalities of Tunja and Nobsa (an urban atmosphere and other industrial atmosphere) were installed, a control was carried to verify the amount of time that will be exposed each of these samples to the atmosphere, of Thus it may determine the lifetime of a structural steel. For the analysis of these samples electrochemical tests were carried out to calculate the rate of corrosion and resistance to polarization, also the gravimetric method be conducted to compare what was the amount of mass lost during the time of exposure to each of the samples.

  3. Titan's atmosphere from DISR

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert

    This abstract distills information about Titan's atmosphere described in detail in a paper by M. G. Tomasko, L. Doose, S. Engel, L. E. Dafoe, R. West, M. Lemmon, E. Karkoschka and C. See, ‘A model of Titan's aerosols based on measurements made inside the atmosphere', Planetary and Space Sciences, in press, 2008. The Descent Imager Spectral Radiometer (DISR) observed Titan's sky and surface during the descent of the Huygens Probe in January, 2005. Measurements were made over the altitude range 160 Km to the surface near latitude -10 degrees. The DISR instrument package included several components to measure the radiation state as a function of altitude. These include upward and downward-looking visible and near-infrared spectrometers covering the wavelength range 450 to 1600 nm, an ultraviolet photometer, a solar aureole camera with polarizers, and a sun sensor. Measurements were made at a variety of azimuthal angles relative to the sun azimuth. Due to unanticipated behavior of the probe (reverse spin and high-amplitude, chaotic tip and tilt) the retrieval process has required more effort than was planned and the total science return is less than expected. Nevertheless the data yielded unsurpassed and unique information which constrain the optical and physical properties of the photochemical haze aerosols and condensate particles. The principal findings are (1) between 80 Km and 160 Km the photochemical haze is well mixed with the gas with a scale height of about 65 Km, (2) between 80 Km and the surface the particle optical depth is a linear function of altitude with a break in slope near 30 Km altitude, (3) optical properties of the haze do not depend much on altitude above 80 Km although more recent work by Tomasko and colleagues suggest a gradient in the stratosphere; below 80 Km there are changes in optical behavior which suggest that condensation plays a role, (4) the data confirm previous results which proposed a particle structure of aggregates of small

  4. Atmospheric reaction systems as null-models to identify structural traces of evolution in metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petter Holme

    Full Text Available The metabolism is the motor behind the biological complexity of an organism. One problem of characterizing its large-scale structure is that it is hard to know what to compare it to. All chemical reaction systems are shaped by the same physics that gives molecules their stability and affinity to react. These fundamental factors cannot be captured by standard null-models based on randomization. The unique property of organismal metabolism is that it is controlled, to some extent, by an enzymatic machinery that is subject to evolution. In this paper, we explore the possibility that reaction systems of planetary atmospheres can serve as a null-model against which we can define metabolic structure and trace the influence of evolution. We find that the two types of data can be distinguished by their respective degree distributions. This is especially clear when looking at the degree distribution of the reaction network (of reaction connected to each other if they involve the same molecular species. For the Earth's atmospheric network and the human metabolic network, we look into more detail for an underlying explanation of this deviation. However, we cannot pinpoint a single cause of the difference, rather there are several concurrent factors. By examining quantities relating to the modular-functional organization of the metabolism, we confirm that metabolic networks have a more complex modular organization than the atmospheric networks, but not much more. We interpret the more variegated modular arrangement of metabolism as a trace of evolved functionality. On the other hand, it is quite remarkable how similar the structures of these two types of networks are, which emphasizes that the constraints from the chemical properties of the molecules has a larger influence in shaping the reaction system than does natural selection.

  5. Thermal structure of the upper atmosphere of Venus simulated by a ground-to-thermosphere GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilli, G.; Lebonnois, S.; González-Galindo, F.; López-Valverde, M. A.; Stolzenbach, A.; Lefèvre, F.; Chaufray, J. Y.; Lott, F.

    2017-01-01

    We present here the thermal structure of the upper atmosphere of Venus predicted by a full self-consistent Venus General Circulation Model (VGCM) developed at Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) and extended up to the thermosphere of the planet. Physical and photochemical processes relevant at those altitudes, plus a non-orographic GW parameterisation, have been added. All those improvements make the LMD-VGCM the only existing ground-to-thermosphere 3D model for Venus: a unique tool to investigate the atmosphere of Venus and to support the exploration of the planet by remote sounding. The aim of this paper is to present the model reference results, to describe the role of radiative, photochemical and dynamical effects in the observed thermal structure in the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere of the planet. The predicted thermal structure shows a succession of warm and cold layers, as recently observed. A cooling trend with increasing latitudes is found during daytime at all altitudes, while at nighttime the trend is inverse above about 110 km, with an atmosphere up to 15 K warmer towards the pole. The latitudinal variation is even smaller at the terminator, in agreement with observations. Below about 110 km, a nighttime warm layer whose intensity decreases with increasing latitudes is predicted by our GCM. A comparison of model results with a selection of recent measurements shows an overall good agreement in terms of trends and order of magnitude. Significant data-model discrepancies may be also discerned. Among them, thermospheric temperatures are about 40-50 K colder and up to 30 K warmer than measured at terminator and at nighttime, respectively. The altitude layer of the predicted mesospheric local maximum (between 100 and 120 km) is also higher than observed. Possible interpretations are discussed and several sensitivity tests performed to understand the data-model discrepancies and to propose future model improvements.

  6. VLTI/AMBER observations of cold giant stars: atmospheric structures and fundamental parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Arroyo-Torres, B; Marcaide, J M; Wittkowski, M; Guirado, J C; Hauschildt, P H; Quirrenbach, A; Fabregat, J

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this research is to determine the angular size and the atmospheric structures of cool giant stars and to compare them with hydrostatic stellar model atmospheres, to estimate the fundamental parameters, and to obtain a better understanding of the circumstellar environment. We conducted spectro-interferometric observations of epsilon Oct, beta Peg, NU Pav, and psi Peg in the near-infrared K band (2.13-2.47 microm), and gamma Hya (1.9-2.47 microm) with the VLTI/AMBER instrument at medium spectral resolution. To obtain the fundamental parameters, we compared our data with hydrostatic atmosphere models (PHOENIX). We estimated the Rosseland angular diameters of epsilon Oct, beta Peg, NU Pav, psi Peg, and gamma Hya. Together with distances and bolometric fluxes, we estimated radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities of our targets. In the beta Peg visibility, we observed a molecular layer of CO with a size similar to that modeled with PHOENIX. However, there is an additional slope in absorptio...

  7. Infrasonic ray tracing applied to mesoscale atmospheric structures: refraction by hurricanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Alfred J; Jones, R Michael

    2013-11-01

    A ray-tracing program is used to estimate the refraction of infrasound by the temperature structure of the atmosphere and by hurricanes represented by a Rankine-combined vortex wind plus a temperature perturbation. Refraction by the hurricane winds is significant, giving rise to regions of focusing, defocusing, and virtual sources. The refraction of infrasound by the temperature anomaly associated with a hurricane is small, probably no larger than that from uncertainties in the wind field. The results are pertinent to interpreting ocean wave generated infrasound in the vicinities of tropical cyclones.

  8. THERMODYNAMIC MODELING OF THE SURFACE LAYER STRUCTURE ON INCONEL 600 OXIDIZED IN A CONTROLLED ATMOSPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Haouam

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Samples of Inconel 600 were isothermally oxidized in a controlled atmosphere with a special mounting at high-temperature oxidation. Along with this experimental study, a simulation of thermodynamic behavior of the material in the same oxidation conditions was carried out using the Thermo-Calc code. The thermodynamic modeling is able to predict the phase nature and its distribution in the structure of the surface layer resulting from the corrosion of the material in thermodynamic equilibrium in the absence of mechanical stress. The results of this simulation are supplemented to results obtained from the analysis by glow discharge spectrometry (GDS which is performed on the samples tested.

  9. Observations of atmospheric structures in the Vipava valley based on Lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, Maruska; Wang, Longlong; Stanič, Samo; Gregorič, Asta; Bergant, Klemen; Eichinger, William E.; Vučković, Marko

    2016-04-01

    Located between the Trnovski gozd (1500 m a.s.l.) barrier and Karst (500 m a.s.l.) plateau, Vipava valley (100 m a.s.l.) is a natural laboratory for studies of strong, gusty North-East Bora winds. Being just 30 km away from the coastal line, the weather in the valley is affected by both the sub-mediterranean and sub-alpine climate, leading to abrupt weather changes within the valley. Due to its orography, there are only three prevailing wind directions (North-East, South-East and South-West), which were found to give rise to specific types of atmospheric structures, presented in this contribution. Atmospheric properties were measured at the floor of the Vipava valley, using twelve ultrasonic anemometers, two GPS ionospheric monitors, two meteorological stations and an infra-red Mie-scattering lidar operating at 1064 nm at Ajdovščina. These devices yielded continuous data on wind speed and direction, average absolute humidity within the valley, relative humidity, pressure and temperature. Lidar provided high temporal and spatial resolution backscatter data on aerosols, which were used as tracers for atmospheric flows. Selected time periods in 2015, when lidar data was available, were classified according to wind speed and direction in the valley and investigated in detail, in particular in term of appearance of atmospheric structures. In periods with low wind speeds (predominantly from South-West), vertical evolution of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) was found to be governed by solar radiation and clouds. In such conditions typical daily variations in PBL height with vertical mixing due to convection were observed. Periods with strong or moderate wind mainly correspond to Bora. Due to the airflow over the Trnovski gozd barrier in Bora cases, convection within the PBL was found to be much weaker due to strong turbulence close to the ground, which inhibited the mixing through the entire PBL. Above the PBL, gravity waves were observed. Periods with moderate South

  10. Influence of the soil-atmosphere exchange on the hydric profile induced in soil-structure system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Al Qadad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil-atmosphere exchange leads to a moisture change in the soil. This can cause major damage to engineering structures due to the soil expansion and shrinkage. The soil-atmosphere exchange is related to several parameters, in particular the soil characteristics and climate conditions. The presence of an engineering structure causes a variation of the hydraulic profile in the soil, which can lead to heterogeneous soil movement and consequently to structural damage. This paper presents a coupled numerical model based on the consideration of both water flow in unsaturated soils and soil-atmosphere exchange. After the validation of the model, the paper presents its use for the analysis of the influence of the presence of structures on moisture change induced under climatic conditions recorded in a semi-arid region. Analysis shows that the presence of the structure leads to important change in the moisture distribution, in particular in the vicinity of the structure.

  11. The Outer Planets and their Moons Comparative Studies of the Outer Planets prior to the Exploration of the Saturn System by Cassini-Huygens

    CERN Document Server

    Encrenaz, T; Owen, T. C; Sotin, C

    2005-01-01

    This volume gives an integrated summary of the science related to the four giant planets in our solar system. It is the result of an ISSI workshop on «A comparative study of the outer planets before the exploration of Saturn by Cassini-Huygens» which was held at ISSI in Bern on January 12-16, 2004. Representatives of several scientific communities, such as planetary scientists, astronomers, space physicists, chemists and astrobiologists have met with the aim to review the knowledge on four major themes: (1) the study of the formation and evolution processes of the outer planets and their satellites, beginning with the formation of compounds and planetesimals in the solar nebula, and the subsequent evolution of the interiors of the outer planets, (2) a comparative study of the atmospheres of the outer planets and Titan, (3) the study of the planetary magnetospheres and their interactions with the solar wind, and (4) the formation and properties of satellites and rings, including their interiors, surfaces, an...

  12. Asymptotics, structure, and integration of sound-proof atmospheric flow equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Rupert

    2009-07-01

    Relative to the full compressible flow equations, sound-proof models filter acoustic waves while maintaining advection and internal waves. Two well-known sound-proof models, an anelastic model by Bannon and Durran’s pseudo-incompressible model, are shown here to be structurally very close to the full compressible flow equations. Essentially, the anelastic model is obtained by suppressing ∂ t ρ in the mass continuity equation and slightly modifying the gravity term, whereas the pseudo-incompressible model results from dropping ∂ t p from the pressure equation. For length scales small compared to the density and pressure scale heights, the anelastic model reduces to the Boussinesq approximation, while the pseudo-incompressible model approaches the zero Mach number, variable density flow equations. Thus, for small scales, both models are asymptotically consistent with the full compressible flow equations, yet the pseudo-incompressible model is more general in that it remains valid in the presence of large density variations. For the relatively small density variations found in typical atmosphere-ocean flows, both models are found to yield very similar results, with deviations between models much smaller than deviations obtained when using different numerical schemes for the same model. This in agreement with Smolarkiewicz and Dörnbrack (Int J Numer Meth Fluids 56:1513-1519, 2007). Despite these useful properties, neither model can be derived by a low-Mach number asymptotic expansion for length scales comparable to the pressure scale height, i.e., for the regime they were originally designed for. Derivations of these models via scale analysis ignore an asymptotic time scale separation between advection and internal waves. In fact, only the classical Ogura and Phillips model, which assumes weak stratification of the order of the Mach number squared, can be obtained as a leading-order model from systematic low Mach number asymptotic analysis. Issues of formal

  13. Structure and dynamical effects of the thermal tide in the Venus atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Ando, Hiroki; Matsuda, Yoshihisa

    2016-10-01

    We investigate structure and dynamical effects of the thermal tide in the Venus atmosphere by using a general circulation model (GCM). The thermal tide is important for the Venus atmospheric dynamics (Fels and Lindzen, 1974; Plumb, 1975; Newman and Leovy, 1992; Takagi and Matsuda, 2007). However, its three-dimensional structure has not been fully investigated so far. It is expected that detailed wind distributions of the thermal tide will be obtained by the Venus Climate Orbiter Akatsuki in the near future. It is necessary to investigate its structure so that the observational results can be interpreted in terms of dynamics. The GCM used in the present study is AFES for Venus (Sugimoto et al., 2014a, b). The resolution is set to T64L120. The model atmosphere extends from the ground to ~120 km. The infrared radiative transfer process is simplified by the Newtonian cooling approximation. See Sugimoto et al. (2014a, b) for more model details. The initial state is an idealized superrotating flow in solid body rotation. The GCM is integrated for 5 Earth years. The result shows that the semidiurnal and diurnal tides are predominant in low and high latitudes poleward of 60 degrees, respectively. The diurnal tide is trapped at 55-75 km levels; the phase is almost unchanged in the vertical direction. This result indicates that the subsolar-antisolar (SS-AS) circulation is predominant at these levels. The strong upward wind is located at early afternoon and near the morning and evening terminators. The vertical velocity of the SS-AS circulation is 0.04 m/s, which is ~10 times as fast as that of the mean meridional circulation (MMC). Titov et al. (2012) pointed out that dark regions are observed in the evening region, suggesting that the dark material is transported from below. These results suggest that the SS-AS circulation is quite important to the material transport at the cloud levels in the Venus atmosphere. The preliminary analysis also shows that the MMC at 50-90 km

  14. Surface ozone-aerosol behaviour and atmospheric boundary layer structure in Saharan dusty scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adame, Jose; Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Sorrribas, Mar; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel; Toledo, Daniel; Yela, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    A research campaign was performed for the AMISOC (Atmospheric Minor Species relevant to the Ozone Chemistry) project at El Arenosillo observatory (southwest Spain) in May-June 2012. The campaign focused on the impact of Saharan dust intrusions at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and ozone-aerosol interactions. In-situ and remote-sensing techniques for gases and aerosols were used moreover to modelling analyses. Meteorology features, ABL structures and evolution, aerosol profiling distributions and aerosol-ozone interactions on the surface were analysed. Two four-day periods were selected according to non-dusty (clean conditions) and dusty (Saharan dust) situations. In both scenarios, sea-land breezes developed in the lower atmosphere, but differences were found in the upper levels. Results show that surface temperatures were greater than 3°C and humidity values were lower during dusty conditions than non-dusty conditions. Thermal structures on the surface layer (estimated using an instrument on a 100 m tower) show differences, mainly during nocturnal periods with less intense inversions under dusty conditions. The mixing layer during dusty days was 400-800 m thick, less than observed on non-dusty days. Dust also disturbed the typical daily ABL evolution. Stable conditions were observed during the early evening during intrusions. Aerosol extinction on dusty days was 2-3 times higher, and the dust was confined between 1500 and 5500 m. Back trajectory analyses confirmed that the dust had an African origin. On the surface, the particle concentration was approximately 3.5 times higher during dusty events, but the local ozone did not exhibit any change. The arrival of Saharan dust in the upper levels impacted the meteorological surface, inhibited the daily evolution of the ABL and caused an increase in aerosol loading on the surface and at higher altitudes; however, no dust influence was observed on surface ozone.

  15. Magnetospheric Structure and Atmospheric Joule Heating of Habitable Planets Orbiting M-dwarf Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, O; Glocer, A; Garraffo, C; Poppenhaeger, K; Bell, J M; Ridley, A J; Gombosi, T I

    2014-01-01

    We study the magnetospheric structure and the ionospheric Joule Heating of planets orbiting M-dwarf stars in the habitable zone using a set of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models. The stellar wind solution is used to drive a model for the planetary magnetosphere, which is coupled with a model for the planetary ionosphere. Our simulations reveal that the space environment around close-in habitable planets is extreme, and the stellar wind plasma conditions change from sub- to super-Alfvenic along the planetary orbit. As a result, the magnetospheric structure changes dramatically with a bow shock forming in the super-Alfvenic sectors, while no bow shock forms in the sub-Alfvenic sectors. The planets reside most of the time in the sub-Alfvenic sectors with poor atmospheric protection. A significant amount of Joule Heating is provided at the top of the atmosphere as a result of the planetary interaction with the stellar wind. For the steady-state solution, the heating is about 0.1-3\\% of the total incoming stellar ir...

  16. One-dimensional electromagnetic band gap plasma structure formed by atmospheric pressure plasma inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babitski, V. S.; Callegari, Th.; Simonchik, L. V.; Sokoloff, J.; Usachonak, M. S.

    2017-08-01

    The ability to use plasma columns of pulse discharges in argon at atmospheric pressure to form a one-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structure (or electromagnetic crystal) in the X-band waveguide is demonstrated. We show that a plasma electromagnetic crystal attenuates a microwave propagation in the stopband more than by 4 orders of magnitude. In order to obtain an effective control of the transmission spectrum comparable with a metallic regular structure, the electron concentration in plasma inhomogeneities should vary within the range from 1014 cm-3 to 1016 cm-3, while gas temperature and mean electron energy must be in the range of 2000 K and 0.5 eV, respectively, to lower electron collision frequency around 1010 s-1. We analyze in detail the time evolution response of the electromagnetic crystal according to the plasma parameters for the duration of the discharge. The interest of using atmospheric pressure discharges is to increase the microwave breakdown threshold in discharge volumes, whereby it becomes possible to perform dynamic control of high power microwaves.

  17. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Zhaoxia [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  18. Bayesian statistical modeling of spatially correlated error structure in atmospheric tracer inverse analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mukherjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverse modeling applications in atmospheric chemistry are increasingly addressing the challenging statistical issues of data synthesis by adopting refined statistical analysis methods. This paper advances this line of research by addressing several central questions in inverse modeling, focusing specifically on Bayesian statistical computation. Motivated by problems of refining bottom-up estimates of source/sink fluxes of trace gas and aerosols based on increasingly high-resolution satellite retrievals of atmospheric chemical concentrations, we address head-on the need for integrating formal spatial statistical methods of residual error structure in global scale inversion models. We do this using analytically and computationally tractable spatial statistical models, know as conditional autoregressive spatial models, as components of a global inversion framework. We develop Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to explore and fit these spatial structures in an overall statistical framework that simultaneously estimates source fluxes. Additional aspects of the study extend the statistical framework to utilize priors in a more physically realistic manner, and to formally address and deal with missing data in satellite retrievals. We demonstrate the analysis in the context of inferring carbon monoxide (CO sources constrained by satellite retrievals of column CO from the Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT instrument on the TERRA satellite, paying special attention to evaluating performance of the inverse approach using various statistical diagnostic metrics. This is developed using synthetic data generated to resemble MOPITT data to define a~proof-of-concept and model assessment, and then in analysis of real MOPITT data.

  19. Millimeter radiation from a 3D model of the solar atmosphere I. Diagnosing chromospheric thermal structure

    CERN Document Server

    Loukitcheva, Maria; Carlsson, Mats; White, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We use advanced 3D NLTE radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar atmosphere to carry out detailed tests of chromospheric diagnostics at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. Methods. We focused on the diagnostics of the thermal structure of the chromosphere in the wavelength bands from 0.4 mm up to 9.6 mm that can be accessed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) and investigated how these diagnostics are affected by the instrumental resolution. Results. We find that the formation height range of the millimeter radiation depends on the location in the simulation domain and is related to the underlying magnetic structure. Nonetheless, the brightness temperature is a reasonable measure of the gas temperature at the effective formation height at a given location on the solar surface. There is considerable scatter in this relationship, but this is significantly reduced when very weak magnetic fields are avoided. Our results indicate that although instrumental smearin...

  20. FIRST-PRINCIPLES APPROACHES TO THE STRUCTURE AND REACTIVITY OF ATMOSPHERICALLY RELEVANT AQUESOUS INTERFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundy, C; Kuo, I W

    2005-06-08

    successfully applied to studying the complex problems put forth by atmospheric chemists. To date, the majority of the molecular models of atmospherically relevant interfaces have been comprised of two genres of molecular models. The first is based on empirical interaction potentials. The use of an empirical interaction potential suffers from at least two shortcomings. First, empirical potentials are usually fit to reproduce bulk thermodynamic states, or gas phase spectroscopic data. Thus, without the explicit inclusion of charge transfer, it is not at all obvious that empirical potentials can faithfully reproduce the structure at a solid-vapor, or liquid-vapor interface where charge rearrangement is known to occur (see section 5). One solution is the empirical inclusion of polarization effects. These models are certainly an improvement, but still cannot offer insight into charge transfer processes and are usually difficult to parameterize. The other shortcoming of empirical models is that, in general, they cannot describe bond-making/breaking events, i.e. chemistry. In order to address chemistry one has to consider an ab initio (to be referred to as first-principles throughout the remaining text) approach to molecular modeling that explicitly treats the electronic degrees of freedom. First-principles modeling also give a direct link to spectroscopic data and chemistry, but at a large computational cost. The bottle-neck associated with first-principles modeling is usually determined by the level of electronic structure theory that one chooses to study a particular problem. High-level first-principles approaches, such as MP2, provide accurate representation of the electronic degrees of freedom but are only computationally tractable when applied to small system sizes (i.e. 10s of atoms). Nevertheless, this type of modeling has been extremely useful in deducing reaction mechanisms of atmospherically relevant chemistry that will be discussed in this review (see section 4). However

  1. A Fragment-Cloud Approach for Modeling Atmospheric Breakup of Asteroids with Varied Internal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Lorien; Mathias, Donovan; NASA Engineering Risk Assessment Team, NASA Asteroid Threat Assessment Project

    2016-10-01

    As an asteroid descends toward Earth, it deposits energy in the atmosphere through aerodynamic drag and ablation. Asteroid impact risk assessments rely on energy deposition estimates to predict blast overpressures and ground damage that may result from an airburst, such as the one that occurred over Chelyabinsk, Russia in 2013. The rates and altitudes at which energy is deposited along the entry trajectory depend upon how the bolide fragments, which in turn depends upon its internal structure and composition. In this work, an analytic asteroid fragmentation model has been developed to model the atmospheric breakup and resulting energy deposition of asteroids with a range of internal structures. The modeling approach combines successive fragmentation of larger independent pieces with aggregate debris clouds released with each fragmentation event. The model can vary the number and masses of fragments produced, the amount of mass released as debris clouds, and the size-strength scaling used to increase the robustness of smaller fragments. The initial asteroid body can be seeded with a distribution of independent fragment sizes amid a remaining debris mass to represent loose rubble pile conglomerations, or can be defined as a monolith with an outer regolith layer. This approach enables the model to represent a range of breakup behaviors and reproduce detailed energy deposition features such as multiple flares due to successive burst events, high-altitude regolith blow-off, or initial disruption of rubble piles followed by more energetic breakup of the constituent boulders. These capabilities provide a means to investigate sensitivities of ground damage to potential variations in asteroid structure.

  2. Identification of nitrogenous organic species in Titan aerosols analogs: Nitrogen fixation routes in early atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2013-09-01

    Titan, an icy world surrounded by auburn organic haze, is considered as one of the best targets for studying abiotic planetary organic chemistry. In spite of a great many efforts being made, the chemistry in Titan’s atmosphere and its resulting chemical structures are still not fully understood. In our previous work, we have investigated the structure of Titan aerosols analogs (tholin) by NMR and identified hexamethylenetetramine as a dominant small molecule in Titan tholin. Here we report a more complete and definitive structural investigation of the small molecule inventory in Titan tholin. We identified several nitrogenous organic molecules including cyanamide, guanidine, 2-cyanoguanidine, melamine, N‧-cyanoformamidine and 1,2,4-triazole in Titan tholin by using NMR and GC-MS and standard sample comparison. The structural characteristics of these molecules suggest a possible formation pathway from the reaction of HCN and NH3, both of which are known to exist in appreciable density in the atmosphere and were tentatively detected by the Huygens probe.

  3. Pool boiling of water on nano-structured micro wires at sub-atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Mahendra; Khandekar, Sameer; Pratap, Dheeraj; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2016-09-01

    Past decades have seen active research in enhancement of boiling heat transfer by surface modifications. Favorable surface modifications are expected to enhance boiling efficiency. Several interrelated mechanisms such as capillarity, surface energy alteration, wettability, cavity geometry, wetting transitions, geometrical features of surface morphology, etc., are responsible for change in the boiling behavior of modified surfaces. Not much work is available on pool boiling at low pressures on microscale/nanoscale geometries; low pressure boiling is attractive in many applications wherein low operating temperatures are desired for a particular working fluid. In this background, an experimental setup was designed and developed to investigate the pool boiling performance of water on (a) plain aluminum micro wire (99.999 % pure) and, (b) nano-porous alumina structured aluminum micro wire, both having diameter of 250 µm, under sub-atmospheric pressure. Nano-structuring on the plain wire surface was achieved via anodization. Two samples, A and B of anodized wires, differing by the degree of anodization were tested. The heater length scale (wire diameter) was much smaller than the capillary length scale. Pool boiling characteristics of water were investigated at three different sub-atmospheric pressures of 73, 123 and 199 mbar (corresponding to T sat = 40, 50 and 60 °C). First, the boiling characteristics of plain wire were measured. It was noticed that at sub-atmospheric pressures, boiling heat transfer performance for plain wire was quite low due to the increased bubble sizes and low nucleation site density. Subsequently, boiling performance of nano-structured wires (both Sample A and Sample B) was compared with plain wire and it was noted that boiling heat transfer for the former was considerably enhanced as compared to the plain wire. This enhancement is attributed to increased nucleation site density, change in wettability and possibly due to enhanced pore scale

  4. Procyon: Constraining Its Temperature Structure with High-Precision Interferometry and 3-D Model Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufdenberg, J. P.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Kervella, P.

    2004-12-01

    We have fit synthetic visibilities from 3-D (CO5BOLD + PHOENIX) and 1-D (PHOENIX, ATLAS12) model stellar atmospheres for Procyon (F5 IV) to high-precision interferometric data from the VINCI instrument at the VLT Interferometer (K-band) and from the Mark III interferometer (500 nm, 800 nm). These data provide a test of theoretical wavelength-dependent limb-darkening predictions, and therefore Procyon's atmospheric temperature structure. Earlier work (Allende Prieto et al. 2002 ApJ 567, 544) has shown that the temperature structure from a spatially and temporally averaged 3-D hydrodynamical model produces significantly less limb darkening at 500 nm relative to the temperature structure from a 1-D MARCS model atmosphere which uses a mixing-length approximation for convective flux transport. Our direct fits to the interferometric data confirm this prediction, however we find that not all 1-D models fail to reproduce the observations. The key to matching the interferometric data is a shallower temperature gradient than provided by the standard 1-D mixing-length approximation. We find that in addition to our best fitting 3-D hydrodynamical model, a 1-D ATLAS12 model, with an additional free parameter for ``approximate overshooting'', provides the required temperature gradient. We estimate that an interferometric precision better than 0.1% will be required to distinguish between the 3-D model and the ATLAS12 model. This overshooting approximation has been shown to match Solar limb-darkening observations reasonably well (Castelli et al 1997 A&A 324, 432), however published work since using Strömgren photometry of solar-type stars has cast doubt on the importance of overshooting. We have also compared synthetic spectral energy distributions for Procyon to ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared spectrophotometry and find differences from comparisons to Strömgren photometry alone. This work was performed in part contract with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) funded by

  5. Spatial structures in the heat budget of the Antarctic Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. van de Berg

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Output from the regional climate model RACMO2/ANT is used to calculate the heat budget of the Antarctic atmospheric boundary layer (ABL. The main feature of the wintertime Antarctic ABL is a persistent temperature deficit compared to the free atmosphere. The magnitude of this deficit is controlled by the heat budget. During winter, transport of heat towards the surface by turbulence and net longwave emission are the primary ABL cooling terms. These processes show horizontal spatial variability only on continental scales. Vertical and horizontal advection of heat are the main warming terms. Over regions with convex ice sheet topography, i.e. domes and ridges, warming by downward vertical advection is enhanced due to divergence of the ABL wind field. Horizontal advection balances any excess warming caused by vertical advection, hence the ABL over domes and ridges tends to have a relatively weak temperature deficit. Conversely, vertical advection is reduced in regions with concave topography, i.e. valleys, where the ABL temperature deficit is enlarged. Along the coast, horizontal and vertical advection is governed by the inability of the large-scale circulation to adapt to small scale topographic features. Meso-scale (~10 km topographic structures have thus a strong impact on the ABL winter temperature, besides latitude and surface elevation. During summer, this mechanism is much weaker; and the horizontal variability of ABL temperatures is smaller.

  6. High frequency glow discharges at atmospheric pressure with micro-structured electrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars-Hibbe, L.; Sichler, P.; Schrader, C.; Lucas, N.; Gericke, K.-H.; Büttgenbach, S.

    2005-02-01

    Micro-structured electrode (MSE) arrays allow the generation of large-area uniform glow discharges over a wide pressure range up to atmospheric pressure. The electrode widths, thicknesses and distances in the micrometre range are realized by means of modern micro-machining and galvanic techniques. The electrode distance, the gap width d, is small enough to generate sufficiently high electric field strengths to ignite gas discharges by applying only moderate radio frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) voltages (80-390 V in Ne, He, Ar, N2 and air). The non-thermal plasma system is characterized by a special probe measuring the electric parameters. We tested MSE arrays with d = 70, 25 and 15 µm. The MSE driven plasmas show a different behaviour from conventional RF discharge plasmas. Due to the very small electrode gap width we can describe the behaviour of the charged particles in the RF field of our system with the dc Townsend breakdown theory, depending on the pressure range and gas. With decreasing pressure, the gas discharges, especially in Ne and He, are increasingly dominated by field electron emission. With the MSE arrays as plasma sources several applications were developed and successfully tested, e.g. decomposition of waste gases and sterilization of food packaging materials at atmospheric pressure.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of the local concentration and structure in multicomponent aerosol nanoparticles under atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadima, Katerina S; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G; Pandis, Spyros N

    2017-06-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the local structure and local concentration in atmospheric nanoparticles consisting of an organic compound (cis-pinonic acid or n-C30H62), sulfate and ammonium ions, and water. Simulations in the isothermal-isobaric (NPT) statistical ensemble under atmospheric conditions with a prespecified number of molecules of the abovementioned compounds led to the formation of a nanoparticle. Calculations of the density profiles of all the chemical species in the nanoparticle, the corresponding radial pair distribution functions, and their mobility inside the nanoparticle revealed strong interactions developing between sulfate and ammonium ions. However, sulfate and ammonium ions prefer to populate the central part of the nanoparticle under the simulated conditions, whereas organic molecules like to reside at its outer surface. Sulfate and ammonium ions were practically immobile; in contrast, the organic molecules exhibited appreciable mobility at the outer surface of the nanoparticle. When the organic compound was a normal alkane (e.g. n-C30H62), a well-organized (crystalline-like) phase was rapidly formed at the free surface of the nanoparticle and remained separate from the rest of the species.

  8. Stable spatial Langmuir solitons as a model of long-lived atmospheric plasma structures

    CERN Document Server

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    I study stable spatial Langmuir solitons in plasma based on nonlinear radial oscillations of charged particles. I discuss two situations when a Langmuir soliton can be stable. In the former case the stability of solitons against the collapse is due to electron-electron interactions which result in the nonlocal terms in the nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation. In the latter situation I derive the new cubic-quintic nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation with accounts for the interaction of induced dipole moments of diatomic ions with a rapidly oscillating electric field and show that the collapse of Langmuir waves can be also arrested. In both cases I find the numerical solutions of the nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation and analyze their stability using the Vakhitov-Kolokolov criterion. I discuss the application of my results for the description of long-lived atmospheric plasma structures. I show that, using my model, one can explain the existence of atmospheric plasmoids in the upper ionosphere. It is also demonst...

  9. The atmospheric structure during episodes of open cellular convection observed in KonTur 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruspe, G.; Bakan, S. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (West Germany))

    1990-02-20

    The KonTur (Konvektion and Turbulenz) 1981 experiment was primarily dedicated to the study of organized boundary layer convection. While two research aircraft were used for detailed boundary layer measurements, an aerological network of four stations in the North Sea yielded information on the mean atmospheric structure in organized convective situations. During the second experiment phase in October 1981, cold air advection caused intense convective activity. Four periods of well-organized open convection cells could be determined from NOAA satellite images. The present paper contains the results from the aerological data set, which allowed the derivation of mean profiles of the dynamic and thermodynamic quantities. Finally, the evolution of the most pronounced cellular episode is presented in a case study. Cellular episodes appeared during rather cold and dry periods in which potential temperature, specific humidity, and equivalent potential temperature in the convection layer reached a relative minimum. However, none of the mean atmospheric profiles differ considerably from those found under convective conditions without cellular organization. During the cellular episodes, horizontal gradients show generally small values throughout the convection layer.

  10. The atmospheric structure during episodes of open cellular convection observed in KonTur 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruspe, G.; Bakan, S.

    1990-02-01

    The KonTur (Konvektion und Turbulenz) 1981 experiment was primarily dedicated to the study of organized boundary layer convection. While two research aircraft were used for detailed boundary layer measurements, an aerological network of four stations in the North Sea yielded information on the mean atmospheric structure in organized convective situations. During the second experiment phase in October 1981, cold air advection caused intense convective activity. Four periods of well-organized open convection cells could be determined from NOAA satellite images. The present paper contains the results from the aerological data set, which allowed the derivation of mean profiles of the dynamic and thermodynamic quantities with acceptable accuracy, but also of the horizontal gradients of thermodynamic quantities. Finally, the evolution of the most pronounced cellular episode is presented in a case study. Cellular episodes appeared during rather cold and dry periods in which potential temperature, specific humidity, and equivalent potential temperature in the convection layer reached a relative minimum. However, none of the mean atmospheric profiles differ considerably from those found under convective conditions without cellular organization. During the cellular episodes, horizontal gradients show generally small values throughout the convection layer.

  11. Variability of the Structure Parameters of Temperature and Humidity Observed in the Atmospheric Surface Layer Under Unstable Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, M.; Moene, A.F.; Beyrich, F.

    2014-01-01

    The structure parameters of temperature and humidity are important in scintillometry as they determine the structure parameter of the refractive index of air, the primary atmospheric variable obtained with scintillometers. In this study, we investigate the variability of the logarithm of the Monin-O

  12. What can High Resolution Inertial Rotation Sensing do for the Geosciences? (Christiaan Huygens Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Karl Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Strap-Down inertial gyroscopes are essential for the attitude control of aircrafts - they keep helicopters and planes in the sky. What if the same technology is strapped to the Earth? It will allow the observation and understanding of the geophysical processes behind minute changes of the rate of rotation as well as variations of the orientation of the instantaneous axis of rotation of the Earth. Unlike the highly dynamic aircraft motion geophysical signals are very small and act on much longer timescales. Therefore we have to make a suitable gyro for the application in the Geosciences significantly more sensitive and stable than aircraft gyros, improving them by many orders of magnitude. Large scale optical interferometers suggest themselves for this purpose, but the requirements are demanding. We have built and explored a variety of monolithic and heterolithic ring lasers, spanning areas between 1 and more than 800 m2. On this road of applying a locally installed high resolution active optical interferometer to a global measurement quantity (earth rotation), we have encountered a number of serious challenges some of which already puzzled Christiaan Huygens some 300 years ago.

  13. Turbulence Structure of the Unstable Atmospheric Surface Layer and Transition to the Outer Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, K. G.

    We present a new model of the structure of turbulence in the unstable atmospheric surface layer, and of the structural transition between this and the outer layer. The archetypal element of wall-bounded shear turbulence is the Theodorsen ejection amplifier (TEA) structure, in which an initial ejection of air from near the ground into an ideal laminar and logarithmic flow induces vortical motion about a hairpin-shaped core, which then creates a second ejection that is similar to, but larger than, the first. A series of TEA structures form a TEA cascade. In real turbulent flows TEA structures occur in distorted forms as TEA-like (TEAL) structures. Distortion terminates many TEAL cascades and only the best-formed TEAL structures initiate new cycles. In an extended log layer the resulting shear turbulence is a complex, self-organizing, dissipative system exhibiting self-similar behaviour under inner scaling. Spectral results show that this structure is insensitive to instability. This is contrary to the fundamental hypothesis of Monin--Obukhov similarity theory. All TEAL cascades terminate at the top of the surface layer where they encounter, and are severely distorted by, powerful eddies of similar size from the outer layer. These eddies are products of the breakdown of the large eddies produced by buoyancy in the outer layer. When the outer layer is much deeper than the surface layer the interacting eddies are from the inertial subrange of the outer Richardson cascade. The scale height of the surface layer, zs, is then found by matching the powers delivered to the creation of emerging TEAL structures to the power passing down the Richardson cascade in the outer layer. It is zs = u* 3ks, where u*s friction velocity, k is the von Káán constant and s is the rate of dissipation of turbulence kinetic energy in the outer layer immediately above the surface layer. This height is comparable to the Obukhov length in the fully convective boundary layer. Aircraft and tower

  14. An improved structure models to explain retention behavior of atmos-pheric nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmin Esmaeilpoor

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR of nanoparticles in roadside atmosphere against the comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography which was coupled to high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry was studied. The genetic algorithm (GA was employed to select the variables that resulted in the best-fitted models. After the variables were selected, the linear multivariate regressions [e.g. the partial least squares (PLS] as well as the nonlinear regressions [e.g. the kernel PLS (KPLS and Levenberg- Marquardt artificial neural network (L-M ANN] were utilized to construct the linear and nonlinear QSRR models. The correlation coefficient cross validation (Q2 and relative error for test set L-M ANN model are 0.939 and 4.89, respectively. The resulting data indicated that L-M ANN could be used as a powerful modeling tool for the QSPR studies.

  15. Hierarchical structures in Northern Hemispheric extratropical winter ocean-atmosphere interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedermann, Marc; Handorf, Dörthe; Kurths, Jürgen; Donner, Reik V

    2015-01-01

    In recent years extensive studies on the Earth's climate system have been carried out by means of advanced complex network statistics. The great majority of these studies, however, have been focusing on investigating interaction structures within single climatological fields directly on or parallel to the Earth's surface. In this work, we develop a novel approach of node weighted interacting network measures to study ocean-atmosphere coupling in the Northern Hemisphere and construct 18 coupled climate networks, each consisting of two subnetworks. In all cases, one subnetwork represents monthly sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies while the other is based on the monthly geopotential height (HGT) of isobaric surfaces at different pressure levels covering the troposphere as well as the lower stratosphere. The weighted cross-degree density proves to be consistent with the leading coupled pattern obtained from maximum covariance analysis, while network measures of higher order allow for a further analysis of th...

  16. Surface modification of cellulosic substrates via atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of acrylic acid: Structure and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Torres, Jose; Sylla, Dioulde; Molina, Laura; Crespo, Eulalia; Mota, Jordi; Bautista, Llorenç

    2014-06-01

    Surface chemical modification of cellulose-based substrates has been carried out by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD) of acrylic acid. The structure/properties relationship of the samples was studied as a function of the plasma experimental conditions. Acrylic acid monomer/helium ratio and treatment speed clearly influences the wettability properties of the paper substrate: advancing contact angle values were reduced to the half if compare to non-treated paper. Surface morphology of the films did not greatly vary at short polymerization times but fibers were covered by a poly(acrylic acid) film at longer times. FTIR and XPS techniques allowed detecting the retention of carboxylic acid groups/moieties. The possibility to quickly design architectures with tunable carboxylic functions by modifying the plasma processing parameters is shown.

  17. Vertical structure of atmospheric moisture in the Arctic and its linkages to the clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygård, Tiina; Vihma, Timo; Valkonen, Teresa

    2016-04-01

    Much of the moisture in the Arctic is transported from the lower latitudes as evaporation is typically small over snow and ice-covered surfaces. There has been a large uncertainty on the altitude at which the moisture transport peaks in the Arctic, although the peak altitude of moisture transport has presumably a remarkable importance for the cloud climatology and properties as well on the clear-sky radiation. Here we present results on the vertical structure of the atmospheric moisture and its transport to the Arctic, including seasonal and spatial differences, based on ERA-Interim and JRA-55 reanalysis data as well as on radiosoundings from 36 stations in the circumpolar Arctic. The study period is from 2000 to 2014. We investigate the vertical structure of horizontal moisture transport to the Arctic by dividing the atmosphere into several vertical layers and calculating moisture flux in each of them separately. Based on the variability of results between the data sets (two different reanalyses and radiosoundings), level of uncertainty in moisture transport estimates is also defined. We also present climatology and characteristics of humidity inversions, i.e., layers where specific humidity increases with height, in the Arctic, including their relationship with cloud cover. Vertically uneven moisture advection is probably a significant generator of very common humidity inversion layers observed in the Arctic lower troposphere. These humidity inversions have in recent studies been demonstrated to offer a potential moisture source aloft for cloud formation and maintenance. Considering the commonness of the elevated humidity inversions in the Arctic troposphere, there is a strong reason to believe that humidity inversions have a high importance for clouds in wide spatial and temporal scales, and they possibly largely contribute to the spatially extensive cloud cover in the Arctic. The results encourage for further studies on interactions between humidity inversions

  18. 100% N2 atmospheric-pressure microwave-line-plasma production with a modified waveguide structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Haruka; Tamura, Yuto; Itoh, Hitoshi; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2016-09-01

    Large-scale atmospheric pressure (AP) plasmas have been given much attention because of its high cost benefit and a variety of possibilities for industrial applications. Microwave discharge plasma using slot antenna is attractive due to its ability of high-density and stable plasma production, and we have developed a long-scale AP microwave plasma (AP microwave line plasma: AP-MLP) source using loop-structured waveguide and travelling wave and have reported spatially-uniform AP-MLP of 40 cm in length using Ar or He gas discharge. However, rare gas discharge is not always suitable for industrial applications because usage of large volume rare gas degrades the AP cost benefit. Furthermore, many industrial applications require chemically-reactive species and the AP-MLP using molecular gas will drastically increase the applications of the AP-MLP. In this study, we demonstrate 100% N2 discharge of the AP-MLP with a modified waveguide structure. Cross-sectional structure of the waveguide is improved to enhance the microwave electric field in the slot. 100% N2 plasma of 15 cm-long is successfully produced using CW microwave power of 2 kW. Low gas temperature of 1000 K is confirmed by optical emission spectroscopy, suggesting applications of the AP-MLP to low temperature processes. Part of this work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25286079.

  19. Implications of the atmosphere-soil interaction for the design of earth retaining structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruge Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of most geotechnical structures is highly governed by environmental factors, particularly in tropical regions where there are very pronounced dry and wet seasons. Design of earth retaining structures generally tend to be too conservative due to the uncertainty generated by the incorporation of environmental variables. Those variables control the soil unsaturated response and in addition to the known insufficiency of the basic models used in traditional designs they are responsible for conservative designs. Rainfall is the main aspect that affects the soil properties of a particular site. It modifies the soil suction potential, according to the degree of saturation caused by the soil-atmosphere interaction. Currently, state-of-the-art numerical tools allow to simulate the influence of those variables in the behaviour of earth retaining structures. This paper analyses the possible implications of the use of numerical simulations for the design, which include, in the mathematical formulation, the suction as a main parameter. The hypoplastic model for unsaturated response was used. Numerical simulations performed with the use of traditional and modern constitutive models obtained encouraging results that reveal the importance of include suction in design processes.

  20. Structure of microbial communities in Sphagnum peatlands and effect of atmospheric carbon dioxide enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, E A D; Gilbert, D; Buttler, A; Amblard, C; Grosvernier, P; Gobat, J M

    2003-08-01

    Little is known about the structure of microbial communities in Sphagnum peatlands, and the potential effects of the increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration on these communities are not known. We analyzed the structure of microbial communities in five Sphagnum-dominated peatlands across Europe and their response to CO2 enrichment using miniFACE systems. After three growing seasons, Sphagnum samples were analyzed for heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria, microalgae, heterotrophic flagellates, ciliates, testate amoebae, fungi, nematodes, and rotifers. Heterotrophic organisms dominated the microbial communities and together represented 78% to 97% of the total microbial biomass. Testate amoebae dominated the protozoan biomass. A canonical correspondence analysis revealed a significant correlation between the microbial community data and four environmental variables (Na+, DOC, water table depth, and DIN), reflecting continentality, hydrology, and nitrogen deposition gradients. Carbon dioxide enrichment modified the structure of microbial communities, but total microbial biomass was unaffected. The biomass of heterotrophic bacteria increased by 48%, and the biomass of testate amoebae decreased by 13%. These results contrast with the absence of overall effect on methane production or on the vegetation, but are in line with an increased below-ground vascular plant biomass at the same sites. We interpret the increase in bacterial biomass as a response to a CO2-induced enhancement of Sphagnum exudation. The causes for the decrease of testate amoebae are unclear but could indicate a top-down rather than a bottom-up control on their density.

  1. Titan's surface and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Alexander G.; Soderblom, Jason M.; Ádámkovics, Máté

    2016-05-01

    Since its arrival in late 2004, the NASA/ESA Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn has revealed Titan to be a world that is both strange and familiar. Titan is the only extraterrestrial body known to support standing bodies of stable liquid on its surface and, along with Earth and early Mars, is one of three places in the Solar System known to have had an active hydrologic cycle. With atmospheric pressures of 1.5 bar and temperatures of 90-95 K at the surface, methane and ethane condense out of Titan's nitrogen-dominated atmosphere and flow as liquids on the surface. Despite vast differences in environmental conditions and materials from Earth, Titan's methane-based hydrologic cycle drives climatic and geologic processes which generate landforms that are strikingly similar to their terrestrial counterparts, including vast equatorial dunes, well-organized channel networks that route material through erosional and depositional landscapes, and lakes and seas of liquid hydrocarbons. These similarities make Titan a natural laboratory for studying the processes that shape terrestrial landscapes and drive climates, probing extreme conditions impossible to recreate in earthbound laboratories. Titan's exotic environment ensures that even rudimentary measurements of atmospheric/surface interactions, such as wind-wave generation or aeolian dune development, provide valuable data to anchor physical models.

  2. Studies of Jovian atmospheric structure and coloring agents using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strycker, Paul Douglas

    The coloring agents, or chromophores, that are embedded within Jupiter's vertical aerosol structure have not been identified and are poorly characterized. In this dissertation, we present two studies of chromophores in the context of the jovian atmospheric structure. In the first study, we analyzed images acquired with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We employed a radiative transfer code to retrieve single scattering albedo spectra, o0(lambda), for particles in Jupiter's tropospheric haze at seven wavelengths in the near-UV and visible regimes. All o0 curves were absorbing in the blue, and o0(lambda) increased monotonically to approximately unity as wavelength increased. We found accurate fits to all o0(lambda) curves using an empirically derived functional form: o 0(lambda) = 1 -- A exp(--Blambda ). The best-fit parameters for the mean o 0(lambda) curve were A = 25.4 and B = 0.0149 for lambda in units of nm. We performed a principal component analysis (PCA) on our o0(lambda) results and found that one or two chromophores were sufficient to produce the variations in o0(lambda). A PCA of reflectance spectra, I/F(lambda) for the same jovian locations resulted in principal components (PCs) with roughly the same variances as the o0(lambda) PCA, but they did not result in a one-to-one mapping of PC amplitudes between the o 0(lambda) PCA and I/F(lambda) PCA. We suggest that statistical analyses performed on I/F(lambda) have limited applicability to the characterization of chromophores in the jovian atmosphere due to the sensitivity of I/F(lambda) to horizontal variations in the vertical aerosol distribution. In the second study, we collected and analyzed images of Jupiter from 470--900 nm in 2-nm increments. We acquired our data with the New Mexico State University Acousto-optic Imaging Camera using the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. We retrieved o0(lambda) for four jovian locations

  3. IAP RAS microwave radiometry complex: sounding atmospheric thermal structure from the ground up to 55km.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikovich, Mikhail; Shvetsov, Alexander; Ryskin, Vitaly; Mukhin, Dmitry; Kulikov, Mikhail; Feigin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Thermal structure is the key characteristic of the atmosphere. Depending on the altitude, it is measured by different methods. In troposphere a plethora of in-situ techniques exists while in middle atmosphere remote sensing is primary type of measurement. The remote sensing is conducted in different wavelengths: optical, infrared and microwave. Satellite based measurements are the most popular kind of remote sensing measurements as it provides global coverage. Ground based passive microwave remote sensing technique has its place when one need permanent monitoring with high time resolution in order to study short-term local events like gravity waves. Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS) develops multi-purpose radiometry complex for constant atmospheric monitoring. For now, it measures temperature profiles from ground to 55km, tropospheric water vapor and ozone. It consists of several radiometers with spectral bands ranging from 20 to 112 GHz. In 2015 two radiometers were added in order to measure thermal structure at surface level and troposphere: scanning device operating in 55-59GHz, and device at 50-55GHz. The change led to modifying the retrieval software. The work presents the description of the radiometry complex and corresponding retrieval software. The main part is devoted to new radiometers and enhancements in retrieval procedure. The retrieval algorithms are described: for each device separately and for the whole temperature retrieval part of the complex. The use of the single procedure for the group of radiometers helps to merge the profile with each other correctly. The main issue of the single procedure (numerical complexity aside) is dealing with the possible difference in calibration of the devices. Error analysis of the procedures is conducted. The characteristics of the complex and the retrieval algorithms are presented. The capabilities of the algorithms are shown on simulated and real data; the last one was

  4. Amino acid precursors from a simulated lower atmosphere of Titan, Experiments of cosmic ray energy source with 13C- and 18O-stable isotope probing mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Taniuchi, Toshinori; Kobayashi, Kensei

    2013-01-01

    The organic haze of aerosols that shrouds the Saturnian moon Titan has previously been studied by both observations and laboratory simulation experiments. Here we report the abiotic formation of amino acid precursors in complex organic molecules during experimental simulation of the environment near Titan's surface with proton irradiation. Pyrolysis of the organic molecules formed in the simulated Titan atmosphere by proton irradiation at 600 degree-C yielded compounds that contained HCN and NH3. These experimental results are consistent with the molecular information obtained by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (pyrolysis GC-MS) of samples collected by the Huygens probe to Titan. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of the irradiation products reveal nanometer-scale filaments and globules in complex amorphous structures (approximately 1000 Da). Isotope probing experiments by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass ...

  5. Fluid-structure interaction simulation of floating structures interacting with complex, large-scale ocean waves and atmospheric turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Calderer, Antoni; Shen, Lian; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-01-01

    We develop a numerical method for simulating coupled interactions of complex floating structures with large-scale ocean waves and atmospheric turbulence. We employ an efficient large-scale model to develop offshore wind and wave environmental conditions, which are then incorporated into a high resolution two-phase flow solver with fluid-structure interaction (FSI). The large-scale wind-wave interaction model is based on the two-fluid dynamically-coupled approach of Yang and Shen (2011), which employs a high-order spectral method for simulating the water motion and a viscous solver with undulatory boundaries for the air motion. The two-phase flow FSI solver, developed by Calderer, Kang, and Sotiropoulos (2014), is based on the level set method and is capable of simulating the coupled dynamic interaction of arbitrarily complex bodies with airflow and waves. The large-scale wave field solver is coupled with the near-field FSI solver by feeding into the latter waves via the pressure-forcing method of Guo and Shen...

  6. Spatial length scales of large-scale structures in atmospheric surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, HongYou; Wang, GuoHua; Zheng, XiaoJing

    2017-06-01

    Synchronous multipoint measurements were performed in the atmospheric surface layer at the Qingtu Lake Observation Array site to obtain high-Reynolds-number [Reτ˜O (106) ] data. Based on the selected high-quality data in the near-neutral surface layer, the spatial length scales of the large-scale dominant structures in the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer are investigated. The characteristic length scales are extracted from the two-point streamwise velocity correlations. Results show that the spatial length scales are invariant over a three order of magnitude change in Reynolds number [Reτ˜O (103) -O (106) ] . However, they increase significantly with the wall-normal distance, showing reasonable collapses on outer-scaled axes. The variation of the spanwise width scale in the logarithmic region follows a linear increase, with the rate of increase much larger than that in the wake region. Moreover, the variation of the wall-normal length scale is also revealed, which displays a qualitative behavior similar to that of the spanwise width scale. The universal laws revealed in the present work contribute to a better understanding of the dominant structures in the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers.

  7. Quantitation of 11 alkylamines in atmospheric samples: separating structural isomers by ion chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Bryan K.; Quilty, Aleya T.; Di Lorenzo, Robert A.; Ziegler, Susan E.; VandenBoer, Trevor C.

    2017-03-01

    Amines are important drivers in particle formation and growth, which have implications for Earth's climate. In this work, we developed an ion chromatographic (IC) method using sample cation-exchange preconcentration for separating and quantifying the nine most abundant atmospheric alkylamines (monomethylamine (MMAH+), dimethylamine (DMAH+), trimethylamine (TMAH+), monoethylamine (MEAH+), diethylamine (DEAH+), triethylamine (TEAH+), monopropylamine (MPAH+), isomonopropylamine (iMPAH+), and monobutylamine (MBAH+)) and two alkyl diamines (1, 4-diaminobutane (DABH+) and 1, 5-diaminopentane (DAPH+)). Further, the developed method separates the suite of amines from five common atmospheric inorganic cations (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+). All 16 cations are greater than 95 % baseline resolved and elute in a runtime of 35 min. This paper describes the first successful separation of DEAH+ and TMAH+ by IC and achieves separation between three sets of structural isomers, providing specificity not possible by mass spectrometry. The method detection limits for the alkylamines are in the picogram per injection range and the method precision (±1σ) analyzed over 3 months was within 16 % for all the cations. The performance of the IC method for atmospheric application was tested with biomass-burning (BB) particle extracts collected from two forest fire plumes in Canada. In extracts of a size-resolved BB sample from an aged plume, we detected and quantified MMAH+, DMAH+, TMAH+, MEAH+, DEAH+, and TEAH+ in the presence of Na+, NH4+, and K+ at molar ratios of amine to inorganic cation ranging from 1 : 2 to 1 : 1000. Quantities of DEAH+ and DMAH+ of 0.2-200 and 3-1200 ng m-3, respectively, were present in the extracts and an unprecedented amine-to-ammonium molar ratio greater than 1 was observed in particles with diameters spanning 56-180 nm. Extracts of respirable fine-mode particles (PM2. 5) from a summer forest fire in British Columbia in 2015 were found to contain iMPAH+, TMAH+, DEAH

  8. The vertical structure of the atmospheric boundary layer over the central Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Lingen; MA Yongfeng; LU Changgui; LIN Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The tropopause height and the atmospheric boundary layer (PBL) height as well as the variation of inversion layer above the floating ice surface are presented using GPS (global position system ) radiosonde sounding data and relevant data obtained by China’s fourth arctic scientific expedition team over the central Arctic Ocean (86◦-88◦N, 144◦-170◦W ) during the summer of 2010. The tropopause height is from 9.8 to 10.5 km, with a temperature range between-52.2 and-54.1◦C in the central Arctic Ocean. Two zones of maximum wind (over 12 m/s) are found in the wind profile, namely, low-and upper-level jets, located in the middle troposphere and the tropopause, respectively. The wind direction has a marked variation point in the two jets from the southeast to the southwest. The average PBL height determined by two methods is 341 and 453 m respectively. These two methods can both be used when the inversion layer is very low, but the results vary significantly when the inversion layer is very high. A significant logarithmic relationship exists between the PBL height and the inversion intensity, with a correlation coefficient of 0.66, indicating that the more intense the temperature inversion is, the lower the boundary layer will be. The observation results obviously differ from those of the third arctic expedition zone (80◦-85◦N). The PBL height and the inversion layer thickness are much lower than those at 87◦-88◦N, but the inversion temperature is more intense, meaning a strong ice-atmosphere interaction in the sea near the North Pole. The PBL structure is related to the weather system and the sea ice concentration, which affects the observation station.

  9. Structure and Optical Properties of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer over Dusty Hot Deserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalermthai, B.; Al Marzooqi, M.; Basha, G.; Ouarda, T.; Armstrong, P.; Molini, A.

    2014-12-01

    Strong sensible heat fluxes and deep turbulent mixing - together with marked dustiness and a low substrate water content - represent a characteristic signature of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over hot deserts, resulting in "thicker" mixing layers and peculiar optical properties. Beside these main common features however, desert boundary layers present extremely complex local structures that have been scarcely addressed in the literature, and whose understanding is essential in modeling processes such as transport and deposition of dust and pollutants, local wind fields, turbulent fluxes and their impacts on the sustainable development, human health and solar energy harvesting in these regions. In this study, we explore the potential of the joint usage of Lidar Ceilometer backscattering profiles and sun-photometer optical depth retrievals to quantitatively determine the vertical aerosol profile over dusty hot desert regions. Toward this goal, we analyze a continuous record of observations of the atmospheric boundary layer height from a single lens LiDAR ceilometer operated at Masdar Institute Field Station (24.4425N 54.6163E, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates), starting March 2013, and the concurrent measurements of aerosol optical depth derived independently from the Masdar Institute AERONET sun-photometer. The main features of the desert ABL are obtained from the ceilometer range corrected backscattering profiles through bi-dimensional clustering technique we developed as a modification of the recently proposed single-profile clustering method, and therefore "directly" and "indirectly" calibrated to obtain a full diurnal cycle climatology of the aerosol optical depth and aerosol profiles. The challenges and the advantages of applying a similar methodology to the monitoring of aerosols and dust over hyper-arid regions are also discussed, together with the issues related to the sensitivity of commercial ceilometers to changes in the solar background.

  10. Observations of Atmospheric Temperature Structure from an Airborne Microwave Temperature Profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, J. A.; Schick, K. E.; Young, K.; Lim, B.; Ahijevych, D.

    2014-12-01

    A newly-designed Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) was developed at JPL for the NSF-NCAR Gulfstream-V aircraft. The MTP is a scanning microwave radiometer that measures thermal emission in the 50-60 GHz oxygen complex. It scans from near-zenith to near-nadir, measuring brightness temperatures forward, above, and below the aircraft at 17 s intervals. A statistical retrieval method derives temperature profiles from the measurements, using proximate radiosonde profiles as a priori information. MTP data examples from recent experiments, comparisons with simultaneous temperature profiles from the Airborne Vertical Atmospheric Profiling System (AVAPS), and a method for blending MTP and AVAPS temperature profiles will be presented. The Mesoscale Predictability Experiment (MPEX; May-June, 2013) investigated the utility of sub-synoptic observations to extend convective-scale predictability and otherwise enhance skill in regional numerical weather prediction over short forecast periods. This project relied on MTP and AVAPS profiles to characterize atmospheric structure on fine spatial scales. Comparison of MTP profiles with AVAPS profiles confirms uncertainty specifications of MTP. A profile blending process takes advantage of the high resolution of AVAPS profiles below the aircraft while utilizing MTP profiles above the aircraft. Ongoing research with these data sets examines double tropopause structure in association with the sub-tropical jet, mountain lee waves, and fluxes at the tropopause. The attached figure shows a mountain lee wave signature in the MTP-derived isentrope field along the flight track during an east-west segment over the Rocky Mountains. A vertically propagating wave with westward tilt is evident on the leeward side of the mountains at around 38 ksec. The Deep Propagating Gravity Wave Experiment over New Zealand (DEEPWAVE; June-July, 2014) investigated the dynamics of gravity waves from the surface to the lower thermosphere. MTP and AVAPS

  11. Identification of Atmospheric Organic Matter in Fog Water: Exact Masses, Empirical Formulas, and Structural Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, L. R.; Collett, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    Aqueous processing of organic matter by clouds and fogs may significantly alter aerosol-climate properties. Heterogeneous chemical reactions that serve to promote oxidation of apolar primary emission components may result in an increase of hydrophilic organic compounds, while reactions that serve to promote oligomerization and/or formation of larger components, such as HULIS, may result in a decrease. Since aerosol organic matter is very complex and its identity is not well understood, we chose to study the detailed molecular composition of atmospheric organic matter (AOM) of polluted fogs by ultra-high resolution FT-Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). In all of our analyses, we found a high degree of complexity across the mass range of 100 to 400 u and in some of our analyses we observed our mass range to extend up to 1000 u. The detected negative organic ions were multifunctional compounds which include C, H, N, O, and S elements. We observed organic nitrogen (CHNO), organic sulfur (CHOS), and organic nitrooxy-sulfate compounds (CHNOS) as well as many masses with only CHO elemental composition. Analysis of the atomic valances by double bond equivalents (DBE) calculations suggests that these compound structures range from highly aliphatic to aromatic with DBE values of 1-11, suggesting a wide variety of precursor compounds with variable oxidation states. This resulted in a high degree of complexity in the low mass range which was greatly reduced by data filtering strategies that group assigned formulas into homologous series and oligomeric series with increasing chain lengths. The AOM oligomeric series with formula differences of C3H4O2 are very likely due to an aqueous esterification reaction, originally suggested by Altieri et al., 2008. We found over 400 oligomer series in our dataset, representing approximately 80% of the CHO and CHNO compounds combined. A very high number of homologous series of compounds and polyfunctional oligomers were

  12. Structure of the quasi-steady electromagnetic field of a high frequency industrial discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpichnikov, A. P.

    1994-02-01

    An approximate analytical solution of the Maxwell equations is obtained; this solution satisfactorily describes the structure of the quasi-steady electromagnetic field of a high-frequency atmospheric-pressure inductional discharge close to the axis of the plasma bunch.

  13. Micro-structured electrode arrays : high-frequency discharges at atmospheric pressure—characterization and new applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars-Hibbe, Lutz; Schrader, Christian; Sichler, Philipp; Cordes, Thorben; Gericke, Karl-Heinz; Büttgenbach, Stephanus; Draeger, Siegfried

    2004-01-01

    Micro-structured electrode (MSE) arrays allow to generate large-area uniform glow discharges over a wide pressure range up to atmospheric pressure. The electrode dimensions in the µm-range realized by means of modern micro-machining and galvanic techniques are small enough to generate sufficiently h

  14. Structure and dynamics of the summertime atmospheric boundary layer over the Antarctic plateau: 1. Measurements and model validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van As, D.; van den Broeke, M.R.; Helsen, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Profile mast, tethersonde and radiosonde measurements are used to describe the structure and dynamics of the summertime atmospheric boundary layer over the slightly sloping snow surface at Kohnen base (75°00'S, 0°04'E, 2892 m above sea level), located on the interior plateau of East Antarctica.

  15. Vertical variations in the turbulent structure of the surface boundary layer over vineyards under unstable atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to their highly-structured canopy, turbulent characteristics within and above vineyards, may not conform to those typically exhibited by other agricultural and natural ecosystems. Using data collected as a part of the Grape Remote sensing and Atmospheric Profiling and Evapotranspiration Experime...

  16. Built But Not Used, Needed But Not Built: Ground System Guidance Based On Cassini-Huygens Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Barbara S.

    2006-01-01

    These reflections share insight gleaned from Cassini-Huygens experience in supporting uplink operations tasks with software. Of particular interest are developed applications that were not widely adopted and tasks for which the appropriate application was not planned. After several years of operations, tasks are better understood providing a clearer picture of the mapping of requirements to applications. The impact on system design of the changing user profile due to distributed operations and greater participation of scientists in operations is also explored. Suggestions are made for improving the architecture, requirements, and design of future systems for uplink operations.

  17. Block-structured adaptive meshes and reduced grids for atmospheric general circulation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonowski, Christiane; Oehmke, Robert C; Stout, Quentin F

    2009-11-28

    Adaptive mesh refinement techniques offer a flexible framework for future variable-resolution climate and weather models since they can focus their computational mesh on certain geographical areas or atmospheric events. Adaptive meshes can also be used to coarsen a latitude-longitude grid in polar regions. This allows for the so-called reduced grid setups. A spherical, block-structured adaptive grid technique is applied to the Lin-Rood finite-volume dynamical core for weather and climate research. This hydrostatic dynamics package is based on a conservative and monotonic finite-volume discretization in flux form with vertically floating Lagrangian layers. The adaptive dynamical core is built upon a flexible latitude-longitude computational grid and tested in two- and three-dimensional model configurations. The discussion is focused on static mesh adaptations and reduced grids. The two-dimensional shallow water setup serves as an ideal testbed and allows the use of shallow water test cases like the advection of a cosine bell, moving vortices, a steady-state flow, the Rossby-Haurwitz wave or cross-polar flows. It is shown that reduced grid configurations are viable candidates for pure advection applications but should be used moderately in nonlinear simulations. In addition, static grid adaptations can be successfully used to resolve three-dimensional baroclinic waves in the storm-track region.

  18. Extreme Associated Functions: Optimally Linking Local Extremes to Large-scale Atmospheric Circulation Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Panja, Debabrata

    2007-01-01

    We present a new statistical method to optimally link local weather extremes to large-scale atmospheric circulation structures. The method is illustrated using July-August daily mean temperature at 2m height (T2m) time-series over the Netherlands and 500 hPa geopotential height (Z500) time-series over the Euroatlantic region of the ECMWF reanalysis dataset (ERA40). The method identifies patterns in the Z500 time-series that optimally describe, in a precise mathematical sense, the relationship with local warm extremes in the Netherlands. Two patterns are identified; the most important one corresponds to a blocking high pressure system leading to subsidence and calm, dry and sunny conditions over the Netherlands. The second one corresponds to a rare, easterly flow regime bringing warm, dry air into the region. The patterns are robust; they are also identified in shorter subsamples of the total dataset. The method is generally applicable and might prove useful in evaluating the performance of climate models in s...

  19. Structural characterization of synthetic polymers using thermal-assisted atmospheric pressure glow discharge mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Zhou, Yueming; Zhen, Cheng; Li, Yafeng; Xiong, Caiqiao; Wang, Jiyun; Li, Huayi; Nie, Zongxiu

    2012-11-07

    With the development of material science and the practical needs of the polymer industry, rapid characterization of synthetic polymers using mass spectrometry is of sustainable interest. Herein a new method for characterizing synthetic polymers using thermal-assisted atmospheric pressure glow discharge mass spectrometry (TA-APGD-MS) is established. After illustration of the mechanism of ion formation, typical polymer samples such as polystyrene (PS), polyoxymethylene (POM) and poly (butanediol succinate) (PBS) were directly characterized at the molecular level using TA-APGD-MS. The thermal degradation products of synthetic polymers including monomer units and/or other fragments were rapidly detected by tandem mass spectrometry, providing rich information about the chemical composition for the structural characterization of homo- and co-polymers. The result suggests that TA-APGD-MS allows direct and rapid analysis of both synthetic homo-polymers and co-polymers under ambient conditions without any sample pretreatment. This method features high throughput, high sensitivity and rich information, showing promising applications in polymer science.

  20. Vertical Structures of Atmospheric Properties in Southeast Tibet during the South Asian Summer Monsoon in 2013

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周立波; 李斐; 朱金焕; 邹捍; 马舒坡; 李鹏

    2016-01-01

    In June 2013, a field experiment was conducted in Southeast Tibet in which the air temperature, moisture, and wind were measured by using a GPS sounding system. In the present study, based on these observations and ERA-Interim reanalysis data, the vertical structures of these atmospheric properties and the possible influence of the South Asian summer monsoon (SASM) were investigated. On average, the temperature had a lapse rate of 6.8℃ km−1 below the tropopause of 18.0 km. A strong moisture inversion occurred at the near-surface, with a strength of 1.7 g kg−1 (100 m)−1 for specific humidity. During the observation period, the SASM experienced a south phase and a north phase in the middle and by the end of June, respectively. The monsoon’s evolution led to large changes in convection and circulation over Southeast Tibet, which further affected the local thermal, moisture, and circulation conditions. The strong convection resulted in an elevated tropopause height over Southeast Tibet during the north phase of the SASM, and the large-scale warm and wet air masses delivered by the monsoon caused high local temperature and moisture conditions.

  1. Impact of food model (micro)structure on the microbial inactivation efficacy of cold atmospheric plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smet, C; Noriega, E; Rosier, F; Walsh, J L; Valdramidis, V P; Van Impe, J F

    2017-01-02

    The large potential of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) for food decontamination has recently been recognized. Room-temperature gas plasmas can decontaminate foods without causing undesired changes. This innovative technology is a promising alternative for treating fresh produce. However, more fundamental studies are needed before its application in the food industry. The impact of the food structure on CAP decontamination efficacy of Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes was studied. Cells were grown planktonically or as surface colonies in/on model systems. Both microorganisms were grown in lab culture media in petri dishes at 20°C until cells reached the stationary phase. Before CAP treatment, cells were deposited in a liquid carrier, on a solid(like) surface or on a filter. A dielectric barrier discharge reactor generated helium-oxygen plasma, which was used to treat samples up to 10min. Although L. monocytogenes is more resistant to CAP treatment, similar trends in inactivation behavior as for S. Typhimurium are observed, with log reductions in the range [1.0-2.9] for S. Typhimurium and [0.2-2.2] for L. monocytogenes. For both microorganisms, cells grown planktonically are easily inactivated, as compared to surface colonies. More stressing growth conditions, due to cell immobilization, result in more resistant cells during CAP treatment. The main difference between the inactivation support systems is the absence or presence of a shoulder phase. For experiments in the liquid carrier, which exhibit a long shoulder, the plasma components need to diffuse and penetrate through the medium. This explains the higher efficacies of CAP treatment on cells deposited on a solid(like) surface or on a filter. This research demonstrates that the food structure influences the cell inactivation behavior and efficacy of CAP, and indicates that food intrinsic factors need to be accounted when designing plasma treatment.

  2. Cooperative Autonomous Observation of Coherent Atmospheric Structures using Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravela, S.

    2014-12-01

    Mapping the structure of localized atmospheric phenomena, from sea breeze and shallow cumuli to thunderstorms and hurricanes, is of scientific interest. Low-cost small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) open the possibility for autonomous "instruments" to map important small-scale phenomena (kilometers, hours) and serve as a testbed for for much larger scales. Localized phenomena viewed as coherent structures interacting with their large-scale environment are difficult to map. As simple simulations show, naive Eulerian or Lagrangian strategies can fail in mapping localized phenomena. Model-based techniques are needed. Meteorological targeting, where supplementary UAS measurements additionally constrain numerical models is promising, but may require many primary measurements to be successful. We propose a new, data-driven, field-operable, cooperative autonomous observing system (CAOS) framework. A remote observer (on a UAS) tracks tracers to identify an apparent motion model over short timescales. Motion-based predictions seed MCMC flight plans for other UAS to gather in-situ data, which is fused with the remote measurements to produce maps. The tracking and mapping cycles repeat, and maps can be assimilated into numerical models for longer term forecasting. CAOS has been applied to study small scale emissions. At Popocatepetl, in collaboration with CENAPRED and IPN, it is being applied map the plume using remote IR/UV UAS and in-situ SO2 sensing, with additional plans for water vapor, the electric field and ash. The combination of sUAS with autonomy appears to be highly promising methodology for environmental mapping. For more information, please visit http://caos.mit.edu

  3. Scaling laws of diffusion and time intermittency generated by coherent structures in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, P.; Cesari, R.; Donateo, A.; Contini, D.; Allegrini, P.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the time intermittency of turbulent transport associated with the birth-death of self-organized coherent structures in the atmospheric boundary layer. We apply a threshold analysis on the increments of turbulent fluctuations to extract sequences of rapid acceleration events, which is a marker of the transition between self-organized structures. The inter-event time distributions show a power-law decay ψ(τ) ~ 1/τμ, with a strong dependence of the power-law index μ on the threshold. A recently developed method based on the application of event-driven walking rules to generate different diffusion processes is applied to the experimental event sequences. At variance with the power-law index μ estimated from the inter-event time distributions, the diffusion scaling H, defined by ⟨ X2⟩ ~ t2H, is independent from the threshold. From the analysis of the diffusion scaling it can also be inferred the presence of different kind of events, i.e. genuinely transition events and spurious events, which all contribute to the diffusion process but over different time scales. The great advantage of event-driven diffusion lies in the ability of separating different regimes of the scaling H. In fact, the greatest H, corresponding to the most anomalous diffusion process, emerges in the long time range, whereas the smallest H can be seen in the short time range if the time resolution of the data is sufficiently accurate. The estimated diffusion scaling is also robust under the change of the definition of turbulent fluctuations and, under the assumption of statistically independent events, it corresponds to a self-similar point process with a well-defined power-law index μD ~ 2.1, where D denotes that μD is derived from the diffusion scaling. We argue that this renewal point process can be associated to birth and death of coherent structures and to turbulent transport near the ground, where the contribution of turbulent coherent structures becomes dominant.

  4. Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S

    2010-01-01

    At the dawn of the first discovery of exoplanets orbiting sun-like stars in the mid-1990s, few believed that observations of exoplanet atmospheres would ever be possible. After the 2002 Hubble Space Telescope detection of a transiting exoplanet atmosphere, many skeptics discounted it as a one-object, one-method success. Nevertheless, the field is now firmly established, with over two dozen exoplanet atmospheres observed today. Hot Jupiters are the type of exoplanet currently most amenable to study. Highlights include: detection of molecular spectral features; observation of day-night temperature gradients; and constraints on vertical atmospheric structure. Atmospheres of giant planets far from their host stars are also being studied with direct imaging. The ultimate exoplanet goal is to answer the enigmatic and ancient question, "Are we alone?" via detection of atmospheric biosignatures. Two exciting prospects are the immediate focus on transiting super Earths orbiting in the habitable zone of M-dwarfs, and u...

  5. Evolution of the atmospheric boundary-layer structure of an arid Andes Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodayar, S.; Kalthoff, N.; Fiebig-Wittmaack, M.; Kohler, M.

    2008-04-01

    The boundary-layer structure of the Elqui Valley is investigated, which is situated in the arid north of Chile and extends from the Pacific Ocean in the west to the Andes in the east. The climate is dominated by the south-eastern Pacific subtropical anticyclone and the cold Humboldt Current. This combination leads to considerable temperature and moisture gradients between the coast and the valley and results in the evolution of sea and valley wind systems. The contribution of these mesoscale wind systems to the heat and moisture budget of the valley atmosphere is estimated, based on radiosoundings performed near the coast and in the valley. Near the coast, a well-mixed cloud-topped boundary layer exists. Both, the temperature and the specific humidity do not change considerably during the day. In the stratus layer the potential temperature increases, while the specific humidity decreases slightly with height. The top of the thin stratus layer, about 300 m in depth, is marked by an inversion. Moderate sea breeze winds of 3-4 m s-1 prevail in the sub-cloud and cloud layer during daytime, but no land breeze develops during the night. The nocturnal valley atmosphere is characterized by a strong and 900 m deep stably stratified boundary layer. During the day, no pronounced well-mixed layer with a capping inversion develops in the valley. Above a super-adiabatic surface layer of about 150 m depth, a stably stratified layer prevails throughout the day. However, heating can be observed within a layer above the surface 800 m deep. Heat and moisture budget estimations show that sensible heat flux convergence exceeds cold air advection in the morning, while both processes compensate each other around noon, such that the temperature evolution stagnates. In the afternoon, cold air advection predominates and leads to net cooling of the boundary layer. Furthermore, the advection of moist air results in the accumulation of moisture during the noon and afternoon period, while

  6. The dynamic process of atmospheric water sorption in [BMIM][Ac]: quantifying bulk versus surface sorption and utilizing atmospheric water as a structure probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Cao, Yuanyuan; Yan, Chuanyu; Zhang, Yuwei; Mu, Tiancheng

    2014-06-19

    The dynamic process of the atmospheric water absorbed in acetate-based ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate ([BMIM][Ac]) within 360 min could be described with three steps by using two-dimensional correlation infrared (IR) spectroscopy technique. In Step 1 (0-120 min), only bulk sorption via hydrogen bonding interaction occurs. In Step 2 (120-320 min), bulk and surface sorption takes place simultaneously via both hydrogen bonding interaction and van der Waals force. In Step 3, from 320 min to steady state, only surface sorption via van der Waals force occurs. Specifically, Step 2 could be divided into three substeps. Most bulk sorption with little surface sorption takes place in Step 2a (120-180 min), comparative bulk and surface sorption happens in Step 2b (180-260 min), and most surface sorption while little bulk sorption occurs in Step 2c (260-320 min). Interestingly, atmospheric water is found for the first time to be able to be used as a probe to detect the chemical structure of [BMIM][Ac]. Results show that one anion is surrounded by three C4,5H molecules and two anions are surrounded by five C2H molecules via hydrogen bonds, which are very susceptible to moisture water especially for the former one. The remaining five anions form a multimer (equilibrating with one dimer and one trimer) via a strong hydrogen bonding interaction, which is not easily affected by the introduction of atmospheric water. The alkyl of the [BMIM][Ac] cation aggregates to some extent by van der Walls force, which is moderately susceptible to the water attack. Furthermore, the proportion of bulk sorption vs surface sorption is quantified as about 70% and 30% within 320 min, 63% and 37% within 360 min, and 11% and 89% until steady-state, respectively.

  7. Optimization of structures undergoing harmonic or stochastic excitation. Ph.D. Thesis; [atmospheric turbulence and white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    The optimal design was investigated of simple structures subjected to dynamic loads, with constraints on the structures' responses. Optimal designs were examined for one dimensional structures excited by harmonically oscillating loads, similar structures excited by white noise, and a wing in the presence of continuous atmospheric turbulence. The first has constraints on the maximum allowable stress while the last two place bounds on the probability of failure of the structure. Approximations were made to replace the time parameter with a frequency parameter. For the first problem, this involved the steady state response, and in the remaining cases, power spectral techniques were employed to find the root mean square values of the responses. Optimal solutions were found by using computer algorithms which combined finite elements methods with optimization techniques based on mathematical programming. It was found that the inertial loads for these dynamic problems result in optimal structures that are radically different from those obtained for structures loaded statically by forces of comparable magnitude.

  8. MAVEN's Imaging UV Spectrograph: Studying Atmospheric Structure and Escape at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nicholas M.; McClintock, W. E.; IUVS Science Team

    2012-10-01

    MAVEN (Mars Volatile and Atmosphere EvolutioN) is a Mars Scout mission slated for launch in November 2013. The key hardware and management partners are University of Colorado, Goddard Space Flight Center, University of California at Berkeley, Lockheed Martin, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. MAVEN carries a powerful suite of fields and particles instruments and a sophisticated Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS). In this presentation we will describe IUVS' science goals, instrument design, operational approach and data analysis strategy. IUVS supports the top-level MAVEN science goals: measure the present state of the atmosphere, observe its response to varying solar stimuli, and use the information to estimate loss from Mars' atmosphere over time. The instrument operates at low spectral resolution spanning the FUV and MUV ranges in separate channels, and at high resolution around the hydrogen Lyman alpha line to measure the D/H ratio in the upper atmosphere. MAVEN carries the instrument on an Articulated Payload Platform which orients the instrument for optimal observations during four segments of its 4.5 hr elliptical orbit. During periapse passage, IUVS uses a scan mirror to obtain vertical profiles of emissions from the atmosphere and ionosphere. Around apoapse, the instrument builds up low-resolution images of the atmosphere at multiple wavelengths. In between, the instrument measures emissions from oxygen, hydrogen and deuterium in the corona. IUVS also undertakes day-long stellar occultation campaigns at 2 month intervals, to measure the state of the atmosphere at altitudes below the airglow layer and in situ sampling. All data will be pipeline-processed from line brightnesses to column abundances, local densities and global 3-D maps and provided to the PDS Atmospheres Node. The combined results from all instruments on ion and neutral escape will bear on the central question of the history of Mars' atmosphere and climate change.

  9. Spectral structure of 5 year time series of horizontal wind speed at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Song-Lak; Won, Hoonill

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the spectral structures of 5 year, 1 min time series of horizontal wind speeds at 100 and 10 m heights at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory tower located in the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains, USA. In the full-scale spectra, the diurnal spectral peak, which is usually insignificant at a coastal or offshore site, is the most significant at both heights. The spectrum is enhanced on the low-frequency side of the diurnal peak during winter, but on the high-frequency side during summer, which indicates frequent synoptic weather events during winter supplanted by mesoscale events during summer. In terms of the spectral density in the spectral gap of Van der Hoven (1957), separating boundary layer turbulence from the synoptic-scale fluctuations, at a frequency between 10-4 and 10-3 Hz, we rank the daily time series at 100 m height and sample the summer top and winter bottom 10 percentile cases. The winter cases of the reduced spectral density in the gap region present the f-3 spectrum (f is frequency) and negatively skewed velocity increment distributions, which are the signatures of enstrophy (the integral of squared vorticity) cascade of turbulent two-dimensional (2-D) flows. In contrast, the summer cases of the enhanced spectral density present the f-5/3 spectrum and positively skewed velocity increment distributions, which are the signatures of upscale energy cascade of 2-D flows. In these mesoscale events that fill up the gap, the turbulence intensity-wind speed relationship is very sensitive to the choice of the averaging period.

  10. A Mechanism for Land-Atmosphere Feedback Involving Planetary Wave Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Randal D.; Chang, Yehui; Schubert, Siegfried D.

    2014-01-01

    While the ability of land surface conditions to influence the atmosphere has been demonstrated in various modeling and observational studies, the precise mechanisms by which land-atmosphere feedback occurs are still largely unknown particularly the mechanisms that allow land moisture state in one region to affect atmospheric conditions in another. Such remote impacts are examined here in the context of atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations, leading to the identification of one potential mechanism: the phase-locking and amplification of a planetary wave through the imposition of a spatial pattern of soil moisture at the land surface. This mechanism, shown here to be relevant in the AGCM, apparently also operates in nature, as suggested by supporting evidence found in reanalysis data.

  11. Planetary Entry Probes and Mass Spectroscopy: Tools and Science Results from In Situ Studies of Planetary Atmospheres and Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Hasso B.

    2007-01-01

    Probing the atmospheres and surfaces of the planets and their moons with fast moving entry probes has been a very useful and essential technique to obtain in situ or quasi in situ scientific data (ground truth) which could not otherwise be obtained from fly by or orbiter only missions and where balloon, aircraft or lander missions are too complex and costly. Planetary entry probe missions have been conducted successfully on Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Titan after having been first demonstrated in the Earth's atmosphere. Future missions will hopefully also include more entry probe missions back to Venus and to the outer planets. 1 he success of and science returns from past missions, the need for more and better data, and a continuously advancing technology generate confidence that future missions will be even more successful with respect to science return and technical performance. I'he pioneering and tireless work of Al Seiff and his collaborators at the NASA Ames Research Center had provided convincing evidence of the value of entry probe science and how to practically implement flight missions. Even in the most recent missions involving entry probes i.e. Galileo and Cassini/Huygens A1 contributed uniquely to the science results on atmospheric structure, turbulence and temperature on Jupiter and Titan.

  12. Music in Spain in the 1670s through the eyes of Sébastien Chièze and Constantijn Huygens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasch, Rudolf A.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution the various remarks about music in Spain that can be found in the correspondence between Sébastien Chièze (envoy on behalf of the Prince of Orange in Madrid and Constantijn Huygens (The Hague from 1672 to 1679 are discussed. Huygens asked Chièze to find for him a copy of Salinas’s De musica (1577, as well as Spanish airs and pieces for guitar. It took Chièze two years to find a copy of De musica in Spain and have it sent safely to Holland. Huygens did not like the Spanish airs sent by Chièze, by composers such as Juan del Vado, José Marín, Cristóbal Galán, and Juan Hidalgo. He found them too “African”. Nor did he like the guitar tablature, which turned the notation as he was used to seeing it upside down. Chièze also had a guitar made for Huygens in Madrid, but this instrument also met with disapproval. In the end, Chièze asked two Bolognese acquaintances, Giulio and Guido Bovio, to search for a suitable lute for Huygens in Bologna. They found two, but it is unknown whether these ever arrived in Holland. The contribution shows the importance of foreign (diplomatic contacts in the acquisition of musical articles, such as books about music, musical compositions and musical instruments.

    Este artículo trata de las diversas observaciones a propósito de la música en España, que se encuentran en la correspondencia entre Sébastien Chièze (embajador del Príncipe de Orange en Madrid y Constantijn Huygens (La Haya, entre 1672 y 1679. Huygens pidió a Chièze que le encontrara un ejemplar del De musica de Salinas (1577, así como tonadas españolas y piezas para guitarra. A Chièze le llevó dos años hallar una copia del De musica en territorio español y hacer que el libro llegara a Holanda sano y salvo. Las tonadas remitidas por Chièze (de compositores tales como Juan del Vado, José Marín, Cristóbal Galán y Juan Hidalgo, no gustaron nada a Huygens, que las halló demasiado “africanas”. Como

  13. Alternations of Structure and Functional Activity of Below Ground Microbial Communities at Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Zhili; Xu, Meiying; Deng, Ye; Kang, Sanghoon; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Reich, Peter B.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    The global atmospheric concentration of CO2 has increased by more than 30percent since the industrial revolution. Although the stimulating effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on plant growth and primary productivity have been well studied, its influences on belowground microbial communities are poorly understood and controversial. In this study, we showed a significant change in the structure and functional potential of soil microbial communities at eCO2 in a grassland ecosystem, the BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2 and Nitrogen) experimental site (http://www.biocon.umn.edu/) using a comprehensive functional gene array, GeoChip 3.0, which contains about 28,0000 probes and covers approximately 57,000 gene variants from 292 functional gene families involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycles as well as other functional processes. GeoChip data indicated that the functional structure of microbial communities was markedly different between ambient CO2 (aCO2) and eCO2 by detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all 5001 detected functional gene probes although no significant differences were detected in the overall microbial diversity. A further analysis of 1503 detected functional genes involved in C, N, P, and S cycles showed that a considerable portion (39percent) of them were only detected under either aCO2 (14percent) or eCO2 (25percent), indicating that the functional characteristics of the microbial community were significantly altered by eCO2. Also, for those shared genes (61percent) detected, some significantly (p<0.05) changed their abundance at eCO2. Especially, genes involved in labile C degradation, such as amyA, egl, and ara for starch, cellulose, and hemicelluloses, respectively, C fixation (e.g., rbcL, pcc/acc), N fixation (nifH), and phosphorus utilization (ppx) were significantly increased under eCO2, while those involved in decomposing recalcitrant C, such as glx, lip, and mnp for lignin degradation remained unchanged. This study provides insights

  14. Diffusion and thermal escape of CH4 and H2 from Titan's upper atmosphere: Direct Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, O. J.; Tenishev, V.; Combi, M. R.; Nagy, A. F.; Johnson, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    We expand on our previous studies using a similar Direct Monte Carlo Simulation (DSMC) technique to examine the role of thermal conduction and escape in Titan's upper atmosphere for comparison to Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) densities for N2, CH4 and H2 for the T43 encounter. Recent studies have shown the INMS N2 density measurements in Titan's upper atmosphere are indicative of a highly variable thermal structure, however the energy sources and sinks to the atmosphere that result in the large gradients remain unclear (e.g., Snowden et al., 2013a, b). In our previous study (Tucker et al., 2013) we showed that H2 escape from Titan's upper atmosphere adiabatically cools both N2 and CH4 resulting in density profiles that mimic outward flow. Furthermore, we found from steady state calculations that, over the range of temperatures suggested for Titan's upper atmosphere, the H2 densities in our simulations separated from background atmosphere at altitudes lower than in the Cassini data. In this study we include heating in the simulation domain and we model both CH4 and H2 in the background N2 atmosphere. At a lower boundary of the simulation domain, well below the exobase, we will use the INMS density data and a temperature obtained from published results (e.g., Snowden et al., 2013b, Westlake et al., 2011). In the simulation domain we will use typical energy deposition rates suggested for solar UV and precipitating ions from Saturn's magnetosphere into the upper atmosphere (e.g., Johnson et al., 2009), as well as, the heating rates suggested to reproduce the T43 temperature profile in Snowden et al, (2013b). For comparison the heating rates will be used for both steady state and temporal, over 1 Titan day, calculations. Support for this work was provided by grant NNH12ZDA001N-OPR from the NASA ROSES Outer Planets Research Program. Johnson, R.E., 2009. Titan from Cassini Huygens. Mass Loss Processes in Titan's Upper Atmosphere. Springer, New York (Chapter

  15. Atmospheric Entry Experiments at IRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Endlich, P.; Herdrich, G.; Kurtz, H.; Laux, T.; Löhle, S.; Nazina, N.; Pidan, S.

    2002-01-01

    Entering the atmosphere of celestial bodies, spacecrafts encounter gases at velocities of several km/s, thereby being subjected to great heat loads. The thermal protection systems and the environment (plasma) have to be investigated by means of computational and ground facility based simulations. For more than a decade, plasma wind tunnels at IRS have been used for the investigation of TPS materials. Nevertheless, ground tests and computer simulations cannot re- place space flights completely. Particularly, entry mission phases encounter challenging problems, such as hypersonic aerothermodynamics. Concerning the TPS, radiation-cooled materials used for reuseable spacecrafts and ablator tech- nologies are of importance. Besides the mentioned technologies, there is the goal to manage guidance navigation, con- trol, landing technology and inflatable technologies such as ballutes that aim to keep vehicles in the atmosphere without landing. The requirement to save mass and energy for planned interplanetary missions such as Mars Society Balloon Mission, Mars Sample Return Mission, Mars Express or Venus Sample Return mission led to the need for manoeuvres like aerocapture, aero-breaking and hyperbolic entries. All three are characterized by very high kinetic vehicle energies to be dissipated by the manoeuvre. In this field flight data are rare. The importance of these manoeuvres and the need to increase the knowledge of required TPS designs and behavior during such mission phases point out the need of flight experiments. As result of the experience within the plasma diagnostic tool development and the plasma wind tunnel data base, flight experiments like the PYrometric RE-entry EXperiment PYREX were developed, fully qualified and successfully flown. Flight experiments such as the entry spectrometer RESPECT and PYREX on HOPE-X are in the conceptual phase. To increase knowledge in the scope of atmospheric manoeuvres and entries, data bases have to be created combining both

  16. Chemical Bonding and Structural Information of Black CarbonReference Materials and Individual Carbonaceous AtmosphericAerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Marten, Bryan D.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2007-04-25

    The carbon-to-oxygen ratios and graphitic nature of a rangeof black carbon standard reference materials (BC SRMs), high molecularmass humic-like substances (HULIS) and atmospheric particles are examinedusing scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) coupled with nearedge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. UsingSTXM/NEXAFS, individual particles with diameter>100 nm are studied,thus the diversity of atmospheric particles collected during a variety offield missions is assessed. Applying a semi-quantitative peak fittingmethod to the NEXAFS spectra enables a comparison of BC SRMs and HULIS toparticles originating from anthropogenic combustion and biomass burns,thus allowing determination of the suitability of these materials forrepresenting atmospheric particles. Anthropogenic combustion and biomassburn particles can be distinguished from one another using both chemicalbonding and structural ordering information. While anthropogeniccombustion particles are characterized by a high proportion ofaromatic-C, the presence of benzoquinone and are highly structurallyordered, biomass burn particles exhibit lower structural ordering, asmaller proportion of aromatic-C and contain a much higher proportion ofoxygenated functional groups.

  17. Enhancement of cell growth on honeycomb-structured polylactide surface using atmospheric-pressure plasma jet modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kuang-Yao; Chang, Chia-Hsing; Yang, Yi-Wei; Liao, Guo-Chun; Liu, Chih-Tung; Wu, Jong-Shinn

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we compare the cell growth results of NIH-3T3 and Neuro-2A cells over 72 h on flat and honeycomb structured PLA films without and with a two-step atmospheric-pressure nitrogen-based plasma jet treatment. We developed a fabrication system used for forming of a uniform honeycomb structure on PLA surface, which can produce two different pore sizes, 3-4 μm and 7-8 μm, of honeycomb pattern. We applied a previously developed nitrogen-based atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet system to treat the PLA film without and with honeycomb structure. NIH-3T3 and a much smaller Neuro-2A cells were cultivated on the films under various surface conditions. The results show that the two-step plasma treatment in combination with a honeycomb structure can enhance cell growth on PLA film, should the cell size be not too smaller than the pore size of honeycomb structure, e.g., NIH-3T3. Otherwise, cell growth would be better on flat PLA film, e.g., Neuro-2A.

  18. Case Studies of the Structure of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Entrainment Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    geographical placement of the sensors. One of the unique features of BLX83 was the concurrent measurement of the atmosphere by a wide variety of in...Stephens (1980) used a conditional sampling criteria for thermals that any segement of thermal or non-thermal conditions had to persist for at least 25 m

  19. Effect of milling atmosphere on structural and magnetic properties of Ni Zn ferrite nanocrystalline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdollah Hajalilou; Mansor Hashim; Reza Ebrahimi-Kahrizsangi; Mohamad Taghi Masoudi

    2015-01-01

    Powder mixtures of Zn, NiO, and Fe2O3 are mechanically alloyed by high energy ball milling to produce Ni–Zn ferrite with a nominal composition of Ni0.36Zn0.64Fe2O4. The effects of milling atmospheres (argon, air, and oxygen), milling time (from 0 to 30 h) and heat treatment are studied. The products are characterized using x-ray diffractometry, field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and transmitted electron microscopy. The results indicate that the desired ferrite is not produced during the milling in the samples milled under either air or oxygen atmospheres. In those samples milled under argon, however, Zn/NiO/Fe2O3 reacts with a solid-state diffusion mode to produce Ni–Zn ferrite nanocrystalline in a size of 8 nm after 30-h-milling. The average crystallite sizes decrease to 9 nm and 10 nm in 30-h-milling samples under air and oxygen atmospheres, respectively. Annealing the 30-h-milling samples at 600 ◦C for 2 h leads to the formation of a single phase of Ni–Zn ferrite, an increase of crystallite size, and a reduction of internal lattice strain. Finally, the effects of the milling atmosphere and heating temperature on the magnetic properties of the 30-h-milling samples are investigated.

  20. Atmospheric structure and acoustic cut-off frequency of roAp stars

    CERN Document Server

    Audard, N; Morel, P; Provost, J P; Weiss, W W

    1998-01-01

    Some of the rapidly oscillating (CP2) stars, have frequencies which are larger than the theoretical acoustic cut-off frequency. As the cut-off frequency depends on the T(tau) relation in the atmosphere, we have computed models and adiabatic frequencies for pulsating Ap stars with T(tau) laws based on Kurucz model atmospheres and on Hopf's purely radiative relation. The frequency-dependent treatment of radiative transfer as well as an improved calculation of the radiative pressure in Kurucz model atmospheres increase the theoretical acoustic cut-off frequency by about 200 microHz, which is closer to the observations. For alpha Cir we find models with Kurucz atmospheres which have indeed a cut-off frequency beyond the largest observed frequency and which are well within the Teff - L error box. For HD 24712 only models which are hotter by about 100 K and less luminous by nearly 10% than what is actually the most probable value would have an acoustic cut-off frequency large enough. One may thus speculate that the...

  1. Effects of artificial sea film slick upon the atmospheric boundary layer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repina, Irina; Artamonov, Arseniy; Malinovsky, Vladimir; Chechin, Dmitriy

    2010-05-01

    Organic surface-active compounds accumulate at the ocean-atmosphere boundary, influencing several air-sea interaction processes. In coastal areas with high biological activity this accumulation frequently becomes visible as mirrorlike patches ("slicks") on the sea surface. The artificial surface films of oleyl alcohol and vegetable oil were produced in the Black Sea coastal zone (one site was located near Gelendjik and another was near Crimea coast) to investigate its influence on energy and gas exchange between atmosphere and sea surface under different meteorological conditions. The atmospheric turbulence measurements during the passage of an artificial sea slick are compared with similar measurements without a sea slick. The effects of the slick are modifications of roughness length z0, and a possible increase in mean wind speed. In the mean, during the passage of the slick, the roughness length decreased while the mean wind speed appeared to increase. For the spectral comparison we compared the wind field over the sea during the time the film slick was in the vicinity of the measurement site with the wind field observed after the slick had passed. The cross-spectral density was computed between horizontal velocity and vertical velocity (Reynolds stress) and between atmospheric temperature and vertical velocity (heat flux). The introduction of the sea film slick, with its damping and suppression of capillary waves, appears to completely destroy the atmospheric turbulence generation. When a slick is present, the U-W phase angle and Reynolds stress spectrum for the atmosphere appear to be completely unaffected by undulating sea surface directly below the sensors. Spectral and wavelet analysis of the atmospheric surface layer characteristics showed a significant correlation between the processes on the sea surface and the atmospheric boundary layer. An intensification of change processes in the vicinity of the windward slick boundary are detected. It may be

  2. Spatial and Temporal Variability in Atmospheric-Methane-Oxidizing Bacterial Community Structure and Activity in an Alpine Glacier Forefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiri, E.; Nauer, P. A.; Rainer, E. M.; Zeyer, J. A.; Schroth, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    High-affinity methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) play a crucial role in regulating the sink strength for atmospheric methane (CH4) in upland soils. Community structure and activity of MOB have been extensively studied in developed soils. However, little is known about their ecosystem service in young, developing soils. Examples of developing soils are found in Alpine glacier forefields, which progressively expand due to glacial retreat. Glacier forefields exhibit diverse geomorphological landforms, which may differ in biogeochemical properties. Also, glacier forefields are subject to seasonal variability in environmental parameters such as soil temperature and water content, which may affect MOB community structure and activity. We recently showed that glacier-forefield soils are a sink for atmospheric CH4, but a comprehensive understanding of crucial factors affecting MOB community structure and activity is still missing. In this study we assessed soil-atmosphere CH4 flux and MOB community structure in three different glacier-forefield landforms (sandhills, floodplains, terraces) throughout a snow-free sampling season. Specifically, we quantified CH4 flux using the soil-gas-profile method and static flux chambers. The MOB community structure was assessed using next-generation sequencing technology (Illumina-MiSeqTM) targeting the functional gene pmoA. We observed substantial differences in CH4 flux between soils of different landforms, with largest fluxes observed in well-drained sandhills (up to -2.2 mg CH4 m-2 d-1) and considerably smaller fluxes in other landforms. Methane flux showed a prominent seasonal variability, which was attenuated in older forefield soils. High-diversity MOB communities and a remarkable number of landform-specific operational taxonomic units were found in sandhills, whereas a lower diversity was observed in other landforms. Our phylogenetic analysis suggests the presence of a potentially new group of MOB inhabiting glacier-forefield soils.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of scattering in optical coherence tomography skin images using the extended Huygens-Fresnel theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanaki, Mohammad R N; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh; Schofield, John B; Jones, Carole; Sira, Manu; Liu, Yan; Hojjat, Ali

    2013-03-10

    An optical properties extraction algorithm is developed based on enhanced Huygens-Fresnel light propagation theorem, to extract the scattering coefficient of a specific region in an optical coherence tomography (OCT) image. The aim is to quantitatively analyze the OCT images. The algorithm is evaluated using a set of phantoms with different concentrations of scatterers, designed based on Mie theory. The algorithm is then used to analyze basal cell carcinoma and healthy eyelid tissues, demonstrating distinguishable differences in the scattering coefficient between these tissues. In this study, we have taken advantage of the simplification introduced by the utilization of a dynamic focus OCT system. This eliminates the need to deconvolve the reflectivity profile with the confocal gate profile, as the sensitivity of the OCT system is constant throughout the axial range.

  4. Assessment of Density Functional Theory in Predicting Structures and Free Energies of Reaction of Atmospheric Prenucleation Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elm, Jonas; Bilde, Merete; Mikkelsen, Kurt V

    2012-06-12

    This work assesses different computational strategies for predicting structures and Gibb's free energies of reaction of atmospheric prenucleation clusters. The performance of 22 Density Functional Theory functionals in predicting equilibrium structures of molecules and water prenucleation clusters of atmospheric relevance is evaluated against experimental data using a test set of eight molecules and prenucleation clusters: SO2, H2SO4, CO2·H2O, CS2·H2O, OCS·H2O, SO2·H2O, SO3·H2O, and H2SO4·H2O. Furthermore, the functionals are tested and compared for their ability to predict the free energy of reaction for the formation of five benchmark atmospheric prenucleation clusters: H2SO4·H2O, H2SO4·(H2O)2, H2SO4·NH3, HSO4(-)·H2O, and HSO4(-)·(H2O)2. The performance is evaluated against experimental data, coupled cluster, and complete basis set extrapolation procedure methods. Our investigation shows that the utilization of the M06-2X functional with the 6-311++G(3df,3pd) basis set represents an improved approach compared to the conventionally used PW91 functional, yielding mean absolute errors of 0.48 kcal/mol and maximum errors of 0.67 kcal/mol compared to experimental results.

  5. Implications of Stably Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulence on the Near-Wake Structure of Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Bhaganagar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence structure in the wake behind a full-scale horizontal-axis wind turbine under the influence of real-time atmospheric inflow conditions has been investigated using actuator-line-model based large-eddy-simulations. Precursor atmospheric boundary layer (ABL simulations have been performed to obtain mean and turbulence states of the atmosphere under stable stratification subjected to two different cooling rates. Wind turbine simulations have revealed that, in addition to wind shear and ABL turbulence, height-varying wind angle and low-level jets are ABL metrics that influence the structure of the turbine wake. Increasing stability results in shallower boundary layers with stronger wind shear, steeper vertical wind angle gradients, lower turbulence, and suppressed vertical motions. A turbulent mixing layer forms downstream of the wind turbines, the strength and size of which decreases with increasing stability. Height dependent wind angle and turbulence are the ABL metrics influencing the lateral wake expansion. Further, ABL metrics strongly impact the evolution of tip and root vortices formed behind the rotor. Two factors play an important role in wake meandering: tip vortex merging due to the mutual inductance form of instability and the corresponding instability of the turbulent mixing layer.

  6. Nonzonal structure of the response of the global field of the Earth's atmospheric temperature to solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivolutsky, A. A.; Dement'eva, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The work describes the results of calculations obtained with the Atmospheric Research Model (ARM) general circulation model. The temperature response of the troposphere and middle atmosphere to variations in UV solar radiation were found to have a large-scale wave structure when planetary waves at the lower model boundary were taken into account. In the present paper, the results from the processing of global temperature fields with three databases (ERA-20C, NOAA-CIRES 20th Century Reanalysis, v2, and NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis I) are provided. Analysis of the differences of the mean monthly temperature global fields (January and July) between the maxima and minima of three solar activity cycles (21, 22, and 23 cycles) also demonstrated their nonzonal structure. It was shown that the amplitude of this difference in January in the stratosphere (10 hPa) can be 7-29 K in the Northern Hemisphere. In July, this effect is prominent in Southern Hemisphere. In the troposphere (500 hPa), a nonzonal temperature effect is present in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres; the amplitude of the effects amounts to approximately 5-12 K. In conclusion, we discuss that the mechanism of solar energy impact on atmospheric temperature discovered by numerical modeling is supported after reanalysis data processing.

  7. A Study of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Structure During a Clear Day in the Arid Region of Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiang; WANG Sheng

    2009-01-01

    The local climate and atmospheric circulation pattern exert a clear influence on the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) formation and development in Northwest China. In this paper, we use field observational data to analyze the distribution and characteristics of the ABL in the extremely arid desert in Dunhuang, Northwest China. These data show that the daytime convective boundary layer and night time stable boundary layer in this area extend to higher altitudes than in other areas. In the night time, the stable boundary layer exceeds 900 m in altitude and can sometimes peak at 1750 m, above which the residual layer may reach up to about 4000 m. The daytime convective boundary layer develops rapidly after entering the residual layer, and exceeds 4000 m in thickness. The results show that the deep convective boundary layer in the daytime is a pre-requisite for maintaining the deep residual mixed layer in the night time. Meanwhile, the deep residual mixed layer in the night time provides favorable thermal conditions for the development of the convective boundary layer in the daytime. The prolonged periods of clear weather that often occurs in this area allow the cumulative effect of the atmospheric residual layer to develop fully, which creates thermal conditions beneficial for the growth of the daytime convective boundary layer. At the same time, the land surface process and atmospheric motion within the surface layer in this area also provide helpful support for forming the particular structure of the thermal ABL. High surface temperature is clearly the powerful external thermal forcing for the deep convective boundary layer. Strong sensible heat flux in the surface layer provides the required energy. Highly convective atmosphere and strong turbulence provide the necessary dynamic conditions, and the accumulative effect of the residual layer provides a favorable thermal environment.

  8. Evidence of large-scale structures in the atmosphere of the active K-dwarf component of V471 Tauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, E. F.; Raymond, J. C.; Raymond, J. C.; Raymond, J. C.; Raymond, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Contemporaneous IUE ultraviolet spectra and visible photoelectric data of the eclipsing binary V471 Tauri (K2V + DA) between 1979 and 1985 was analyzed. The combined data detail the three-dimensional structure of atmospheric loops and their associated starspots on the K dwarf. The distribution of starspot regions on the surface of the K star was inferred from the visible photometry. When spots are located near the limb of the K dwarf prior to and shortly after the total eclipse of the white dwarf, absorption lines such as C II, C III, c IV, and Si IV appear superimposed on the continuum of the white dwarf. These absorption lines are likely caused by cool coronal loops overlying the spots in the atmosphere of the K dwarf. The loops can extend nearly one stellar radius above the surface of the K2V star.

  9. Diurnal Variations of Air Pollution and Atmospheric Boundary Layer Structure in Beijing During Winter 2000/2001

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li; XU Xiangde; DING Guoan; ZHOU Mingyu; CHENG Xinghong

    2005-01-01

    The diurnal variations of gaseous pollutants and the dynamical and thermodynamic structures of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in the Beijing area from January to March 2001 are analyzed in this study using data from the Beijing City Air Pollution Observation Field Experiment (BECAPEX). A heavy pollution day (22 February) and a good air quality day (24 February) are selected and individually analyzed and compared to reveal the relationships between gaseous pollutants and the diurnal variations of the ABL. The results show that gaseous pollutant concentrations exhibit a double-peak-double-valley-type diurnal variation and have similar trends but with different magnitudes at different sites in Beijing. The diurnal variation of the gaseous pollutant concentrations is closely related to (with a 1-2 hour delay of)changes in the atmospheric stability and the mean kinetic energy in the ABL.

  10. Identifying the upper atmosphere structure of the inflated hot sub-Neptune CoRoT-24b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvan, Ines; Lammer, Helmut; Erkaev, Nikolai V.; Fossati, Luca; Cubillos, Patricio E.; Guenther, Eike; Odert, Petra; Kislyakova, Kristina G.; Lendl, Monika

    2016-04-01

    The CoRoT satellite mission discovered two Neptune-type planets, CoRoT-24b and CoRoT-24c, with observed transit radii of ≈3.7REarth and ≈4.9REarth and masses of ≤5.7MEarth and ≈28MEarth, respectively. From the deduced low mean densities it can be expected that their planetary cores are most likely surrounded by H2 dominated envelopes. While having very similar radii, the outer planet CoRoT-24c is at least 4.9 times more massive than its neighbour, indicating that their atmospheres can be fundamentally different. Therefore, we have investigated the upper atmosphere structure and escape rates of these two planets. We applied a hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model including heating by absorption of stellar extreme ultraviolet and X-ray (XUV) radiation, under the assumption that the observed transit radius RT is produced by Rayleigh scattering and H2-H2 collision absorption in a pure hydrogen atmosphere. This corresponds to a pressure level near 1 bar. We find an unsustainably high hydrodynamic escape rate of 1.6 × 1011 g/s for the atmosphere of CoRoT-24b. If real, such high atmospheric escape would lead to substantial mass loss from the planetary atmosphere, shrinking it to ≈2.2REarth within ≈4 Myr, which is inconsistent with the old age of the system. The solution to this discrepancy is that the observed transit radius RT must be 30-60% larger than the actual planetary radius at the 1 bar pressure level. We suggest that the observed transit radius RT is produced by absorption through scattering processes due to high altitude clouds or hazes. The Kepler satellite has discovered similar close-in low-density Neptune-type planets. We propose that it is very likely that the observed transit radii for the vast majority of these planets also differ from their actual planetary radii at the 1 bar pressure level. This would introduce a systematic bias in the measured radii and has dramatic implications in the determination of the mass-radius relation and for planet

  11. The GISS global climate-middle atmosphere model. I - Model structure and climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, D.; Suozzo, R.; Balachandran, N. K.; Lacis, A.; Russell, G.

    1988-01-01

    A coupled global climate/middle atmosphere model (GCMAM) is developed by extending the Hansen et al. (1983) GISS global climate model to include the middle atmosphere up to 85 km. The model includes numerical solutions of the primitive equations, calculations of the radiative and surface fluxes, and a complete hydrologic cycle with convective and cloud-cover parameterizations. In addition, a parameterized gravity wave drag cycle is incorporated, in which gravity-wave momentum fluxes due to flow over topography, wind shear, and convection are calculated at each grid box, using theoretical relationships between the grid-scale variables and expected source strengths. The results of the GCMAM demonstrate that the model produces a reasonable simulation of the stratosphere. It is shown that the improvements over the previous version were achieved largely through the incorporation of the parameterized gravity wave drag.

  12. The occultation of beta Scorpii by Jupiter. I - The structure of the Jovian upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veverka, J.; Wasserman, L. H.; Elliot, J.; Sagan, C.; Liller, W.

    1974-01-01

    The light curves of beta Scorpii AB and C were recorded during occultation by Jupiter with a time resolution of 0.01 sec. The spikes on the curves, correlated with flashes observed through the eyepiece, are shown to be due to density fluctuations in Jupiter's atmosphere. Using the delays in spike arrival times, the ratio of the refractivities at 3934 and 6201 A is found to be 0.9713 + or - 0.0015. Temperature profiles for three different assumed atmospheric compositions are generated from the light curves. Assuming the terrestrial value for the eddy diffusion coefficient, the turbopause is calculated to occur at the 10 to the 13th power per cu cm level, below which a positive temperature gradient of about 1 K/km is indicated.

  13. Kinematic structure of the atmosphere and envelope of the post-AGB star HD56126

    CERN Document Server

    Klochkova, Valentina

    2007-01-01

    We present results of an analysis of the optical spectrum of the post-AGB star HD56126 (IRAS 07134+1005) based on observations made with the echelle spectrographs of the 6-m telescope with spectral resolutions of R=25000 and 60000 at 4012-8790 AA. The profiles of strongest lines (HI; FeII, YII, BaII absorptions, etc.) formed in the expanding atmosphere at the base of the stellar wind have complex and variable shapes. To study the kinematics of the atmosphere, the velocities of individual features in these profiles must be measured. Differential line shifts of up to Vr=15-30 km/s have been detected from the lines of metals and molecular features. The star's atmosphere simultaneously contains both expanding layers and layers falling onto the star. A comparison of the data for different times demonstrates that both the radial velocity and the velocity pattern in whole are variable. The position of the molecular spectrum is stable, implying stability of the expansion velocity of the circumstellar envelope around ...

  14. Real-time prediction of atmospheric Lagrangian coherent structures based on forecast data: An application and error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    BozorgMagham, Amir E.; Ross, Shane D.; Schmale, David G.

    2013-09-01

    The language of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) provides a new means for studying transport and mixing of passive particles advected by an atmospheric flow field. Recent observations suggest that LCSs govern the large-scale atmospheric motion of airborne microorganisms, paving the way for more efficient models and management strategies for the spread of infectious diseases affecting plants, domestic animals, and humans. In addition, having reliable predictions of the timing of hyperbolic LCSs may contribute to improved aerobiological sampling of microorganisms with unmanned aerial vehicles and LCS-based early warning systems. Chaotic atmospheric dynamics lead to unavoidable forecasting errors in the wind velocity field, which compounds errors in LCS forecasting. In this study, we reveal the cumulative effects of errors of (short-term) wind field forecasts on the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields and the associated LCSs when realistic forecast plans impose certain limits on the forecasting parameters. Objectives of this paper are to (a) quantify the accuracy of prediction of FTLE-LCS features and (b) determine the sensitivity of such predictions to forecasting parameters. Results indicate that forecasts of attracting LCSs exhibit less divergence from the archive-based LCSs than the repelling features. This result is important since attracting LCSs are the backbone of long-lived features in moving fluids. We also show under what circumstances one can trust the forecast results if one merely wants to know if an LCS passed over a region and does not need to precisely know the passage time.

  15. The laser-backscattering equations and their application to the study of the atmospheric structure

    CERN Document Server

    Castrejon, R; Castrejon, J; Morales, A

    2002-01-01

    In this work a method for interpreting backscattering signals acquired by a lidar is described. The method is based on the elastic scattering of laser radiation due to gases and particles suspended in the atmosphere (bulk effects). We propose a space-time diagram which helps to evaluate the arguments of the equation that serves to calculate the lidar signal in terms of the backscattering coefficient. We describe how the system detects gradients on this coefficient, along the laser optical path. To illustrate the method, we present some typical lidar results obtained in the neighborhood of Mexico City. (Author)

  16. Fabrication of transparent antifouling thin films with fractal structure by atmospheric pressure cold plasma deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Hayato; Yamauchi, Koji; Kim, Yoon-Kee; Ogawa, Kazufumi; Yamaguchi, Kenzo; Suzaki, Yoshifumi

    2012-12-21

    Antifouling surface with both superhydrophobicity and oil-repellency has been fabricated on glass substrate by forming fractal microstructure(s). The fractal microstructure was constituted by transparent silica particles of 100 nm diameter and transparent zinc-oxide columns grown on silica particles by atmospheric pressure cold plasma deposition. The sample surface was coated with a chemically adsorbed monomolecular layer. We found that one sample has the superhydrophobic ability with a water droplet contact angle of more than 150°, while another sample has a high transmittance of more than 85% in a wavelength range from 400 to 800 nm.

  17. Untangling the Chemical Evolution of Titan's Atmosphere and Surface -- From Homogeneous to Heterogeneous Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Ralf I.; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Ennis, Courtney; Zhang, Fangtong; Gu, Xibin; Krishtal, Sergey P.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-16

    The arrival of the Cassini-Huygens probe at Saturn's moon Titan - the only Solar System body besides Earth and Venus with a solid surface and a thick atmosphere with a pressure of 1.4 atm at surface level - in 2004 opened up a new chapter in the history of Solar System exploration. The mission revealed Titan as a world with striking Earth-like landscapes involving hydrocarbon lakes and seas as well as sand dunes and lava-like features interspersed with craters and icy mountains of hitherto unknown chemical composition. The discovery of a dynamic atmosphere and active weather system illustrates further the similarities between Titan and Earth. The aerosol-based haze layers, which give Titan its orange-brownish color, are not only Titan's most prominent optically visible features, but also play a crucial role in determining Titan's thermal structure and chemistry. These smog-like haze layers are thought to be very similar to those that were present in Earth's atmosphere before life developed more than 3.8 billion years ago, absorbing the destructive ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, thus acting as 'prebiotic ozone' to preserve astrobiologically important molecules on Titan. Compared to Earth, Titan's low surface temperature of 94 K and the absence of liquid water preclude the evolution of biological chemistry as we know it. Exactly because of these low temperatures, Titan provides us with a unique prebiotic 'atmospheric laboratory' yielding vital clues - at the frozen stage - on the likely chemical composition of the atmosphere of the primitive Earth. However, the underlying chemical processes, which initiate the haze formation from simple molecules, have been not understood well to date.

  18. Effect of Additional Structure on Effective Stack Height of Gas Dispersion in Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenobu Michioka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wind-tunnel experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of additional structure (building, sea wall and banking on the effective stack height, which is usually used in safety analyses of nuclear power facilities in Japan. The effective stack heights were estimated with and without the additional structure in addition to the reactor building while varying several conditions such as the source height, the height of additional structure and the distance between the source position and the additional structure. When the source height is equivalent to the reactor building height, the additional structure enhances both the vertical and horizontal gas dispersion widths and decreases the ground gas concentration, and it means that the additional structure does not decrease the effective stack height. When the source height is larger than the reactor height, the additional structures might affect the effective stack height. As the distance between the source and the additional structure decreases, or as the height of the additional structure increases, the structure has a larger effect on the effective stack height.

  19. Structure and evolution of Pluto's Atmosphere from ground-based stellar occultations between 2002 and 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Erick; Sicardy, Bruno; Rio de Janeiro occultation team, Granada occultation team, International Occultation and Timing Association

    2016-10-01

    Ground-Based stellar occultations probe Pluto's atmosphere from about 3 km altitude (~ 10 μbar pressure level) up to 260 km altitude (~0.1 μbar). Our main goal is to derive Pluto's atmosphere evolution using thirteen ground-based occultations observed between 2002 and 2015 (plus 2016, if available). We consistently analyze the light curves using the Dias et al. (ApJ 811, 53, 2015) model, and confirm the general pressure increase by a factor of about 1.5 between 2002 and 2015 and a factor of almost three between 1988 and 2015. Implications for Pluto's seasonal evolution will be briefly discussed in the context of the New Horizons (NH) findings.Ground-based-derived temperature profiles will be compared with NH's results, where we use new temperature boundary conditions in our inversion procedures, as given by NH near 260 km altitude. Although the profiles reasonably agree, significant discrepancies are observed both in the deeper stratospheric zone (altitude topographic features revealed by NH.Finally, possible correlations between spike activity in the occultation light-curves and local underlying presence of free nitrogen ice terrains will be investigated.Part of the research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Community's H2020 (2014-2020/ ERC Grant Agreement n 669416 "LUCKY STAR").

  20. O-Toluic Acid Monomer and Monohydrate: Rotational Spectra, Structures, and Atmospheric Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Elijah G.; Zenchyzen, Brandi L. M.; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Clusters of carboxylic acids with water, sulfuric acid, and other atmospheric species potentially increase the rate of new particle formation in the troposphere. Here, we present high-resolution pure rotational spectra of o-toluic acid and its complex with water in the range of 5-14 GHz, measured with a cavity-based molecular beam Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer. In both the monomer and the complex, the carboxylic acid functional group adopts a syn- conformation, with the acidic proton oriented away from the aromatic ring. In the complex, water participates in two hydrogen bonds, forming a six-membered intermolecular ring. Despite its large calculated c-dipole moment, no c-type transitions were observed for the complex, because of a large amplitude "wagging" motion of the unbound hydrogen of water, similar to the case of the benzoic acid-water complex. No methyl internal rotation splittings were observed, consistent with a high barrier (7 kJ mol-1) calculated for the monomer at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Using statistical thermodynamics, experimental rotational constants were combined with a theoretical frequency analysis and binding energy to give an estimate of the percentage of hydrated acid in the atmosphere under various conditions. F. Riccobono, et al., Science, 344, 717 (2014). R. Zhang, et al., Science, 304, 1487 (2004). E. G. Schnitzler and W. Jäger, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 16, 2305 (2014).

  1. Proceedings of the 11. International Workshop on Atmospheric Icing of Structures (IWAIS 2005)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farzaneh, M. (ed.) [Quebec Univ., Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada). Icing Research Building; Goel, A.P. (ed.) [Hydro One, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    The widespread impacts and related costs of atmospheric icing were demonstrated in the ice storm that struck Quebec and eastern Ontario in January 1998. The storm incurred losses in the billions of dollars, caused extended power failures, and affected approximately 5.5 million people. The aim of this conference was to regroup as many icing experts and specialists as possible to facilitate interaction conducive to finding practical, safe and economical solutions to atmospheric icing. Recent developments in icing models were reviewed, as well as new approaches to data collection. New technologies in de-icing were presented, and issues concerning the behaviour of electrical equipment during icing events were discussed. The importance of finding adequate practical solutions to help to protect strategic infrastructures exposed to icing was emphasized. The conference was divided into the following 7 sections: (1) ice and snow climate; (2) modelling and simulation of icing; (3) field observations, data gathering and information; (4) impact of ice and snow on insulator performance; (5) design for icing; (6) behaviour of ice or snow-covered power equipment; (7) de-icing and anti-icing techniques. Sixty-eight papers were presented at this conference, all of which were catalogued for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  2. Potential of Glassy Carbon and Silicon Carbide Photonic Structures as Electromagnetic Radiation Shields for Atmospheric Re-entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarevskiy,Nikolay; Shklover, Valery; Braginsky, Leonid; Hafner, Christian; Lawson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    During high-velocity atmospheric entries, space vehicles can be exposed to strong electromagnetic radiation from ionized gas in the shock layer. Glassy carbon (GC) and silicon carbide (SiC) are candidate thermal protection materials due to their high melting point and also their good thermal and mechanical properties. Based on data from shock tube experiments, a significant fraction of radiation at hypersonic entry conditions is in the frequency range from 215 to 415 THz. We propose and analyze SiC and GC photonic structures to increase the reflection of radiation in that range. For this purpose, we performed numerical optimizations of various structures using an evolutionary strategy. Among the considered structures are layered, porous, woodpile, inverse opal and guided-mode resonance structures. In order to estimate the impact of fabrication inaccuracies, the sensitivity of the reflectivity to structural imperfections is analyzed. We estimate that the reflectivity of GC photonic structures is limited to 38% in the aforementioned range, due to material absorption. However, GC material can be effective for photonic reflection of individual, strong spectral line. SiC on the other hand can be used to design a good reflector for the entire frequency range.

  3. Nonlinear Aerodynamic ROM-Structural ROM Methodology for Inflatable Aeroelasticity in Hypersonic Atmospheric Entry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology proposes to develop an innovative nonlinear structural reduced order model (ROM) - nonlinear aerodynamic ROM methodology for the inflatable...

  4. Titan's Atmospheric Dynamics and Meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. M.; Baines, K. H.; Bird, M. K.; Tokano, T.; West, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Titan, after Venus, is the second example of an atmosphere with a global cyclostrophic circulation in the solar system, but a circulation that has a strong seasonal modulation in the middle atmosphere. Direct measurement of Titan's winds, particularly observations tracking the Huygens probe at 10degS, indicate that the zonal winds are generally in the sense of the satellites rotation. They become cyclostrophic approx. 35 km above the surface and generally increase with altitude, with the exception of a sharp minimum centered near 75 km, where the wind velocity decreases to nearly zero. Zonal winds derived from the temperature field retrieved from Cassini measurements, using the thermal wind equation, indicate a strong winter circumpolar vortex, with maximum winds at mid northern latitudes of 190 ms-' near 300 km. Above this level, the vortex decays. Curiously, the zonal winds and temperatures are symmetric about a pole that is offset from the surface pole by approx.4 degrees. The cause of this is not well understood, but it may reflect the response of a cyclostrophic circulation to the offset between the equator, where the distance to the rotation axis is greatest, and the solar equator. The mean meridional circulation can be inferred from the temperature field and the meridional distribution of organic molecules and condensates and hazes. Both the warm temperatures in the north polar region near 400 km and the enhanced concentration of several organic molecules suggests subsidence there during winter and early spring. Stratospheric condensates are localized at high northern latitudes, with a sharp cut-off near 50degN. Titan's winter polar vortex appears to share many of the same characteristics of winter vortices on Earth-the ozone holes. Global mapping of temperatures, winds, and composition in he troposphere, by contrast, is incomplete. The few suitable discrete clouds that have bee found for tracking indicate smaller velocities than aloft, consistent with the

  5. Investigations of the middle atmospheric thermal structure and oscillations over sub-tropical regions in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Som; Kumar, Prashant; Jethva, Chintan; Vaishnav, Rajesh; Bencherif, Hassan

    2017-06-01

    The temperature retrieved from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) onboard Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite during January 2002 to September 2015 are used in this study to delineate the differences of middle atmospheric thermal structure in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and Southern Hemisphere (SH). Two stations namely Mt. Abu (24.59°N, 72.70°E) in NH and Reunion Island (21.11°S, 55.53°E) in SH are chosen over sub-tropical regions. Temperature climatology from SABER observations suggests that stratopause is warmer, and upper mesosphere is cooler in NH as compared to SH. Three atmospheric models are used to understand the monthly thermal structure differences for different altitudes. Moreover, semi-annual, annual and quasi-biennial oscillations are studied using Lomb Scargle Periodogram and Wavelet transform techniques. Over NH, summer and winter season are warmer ( 4 K) and cooler ( 3 K) respectively in stratosphere as compared to SH. It is important to note here that Mt. Abu temperature is warmer ( 9 K) than Reunion Island in winter but in summer season Mt. Abu temperature is cooler in upper mesosphere and above mesosphere NH shows warming. Results show that annual oscillations are dominated in both hemisphere as compared to semi-annual and quasi-biennial oscillations. In upper mesosphere, strength of annual oscillations is substantial in NH, while semi-annual oscillations are stronger in SH. Wavelet analyses found that annual oscillations are significant in NH near mesopause, while semi-annual oscillations are strengthening in SH.

  6. Thermodynamic and dynamic structure of atmosphere over the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia during the passage of a cold surge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samah, Azizan Abu; Babu, C. A.; Varikoden, Hamza; Jayakrishnan, P. R.; Hai, Ooi See

    2016-08-01

    An intense field observation was carried out for a better understanding of cold surge features over Peninsular Malaysia during the winter monsoon season. The study utilizes vertical profiles of temperature, humidity and wind at high vertical and temporal resolution over Kota Bharu, situated in the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia. LCL were elevated during the passage of the cold surge as the relative humidity values decreased during the passage of cold surge. Level of Free Convection were below 800 hPa and equilibrium levels were close to the LFC in most of the cases. Convective available potential energy and convection inhibition energy values were small during most of the observations. Absence of local heating and instability mechanism are responsible for the peculiar thermodynamic structure during the passage of the cold surge. The wind in the lower atmosphere became northeasterly and was strong during the entire cold surge period. A slight increase in temperature near the surface and a drop in temperature just above the surface were marked by the passage of the cold surge. A remarkable increase in specific humidity was observed between 970 and 900 hPa during the cold surge period. Further, synoptic scale features were analyzed to identify the mechanism responsible for heavy rainfall. Low level convergence, upper level divergence and cyclonic vorticity prevailed over the region during the heavy rainfall event. Dynamic structure of the atmosphere as part of the organized convection associated with the winter monsoon was responsible for the vertical lifting and subsequent rainfall.

  7. Spatial Structure of Turbulent Heat Exchange at the Snow-Atmosphere Interface Inferred from Time-sequential Infrared Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, A.; Oldroyd, H. J.; Diebold, M.; Huwald, H.; Parlange, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    Land surfaces with a low thermal admittance, such as snow, experience fluctuations in their surface temperature (Ts) not only due to the diurnal course of the energy balance, but also on much shorter time-scales as the consequence of turbulent heat exchange between the surface and the atmospheric surface layer. High-frequency fluctuations in Ts, as reported for selected land-surfaces in the literature, are the imprint of coherent turbulent structures transporting heat away or towards the surface in the atmospheric surface layer. Our hypothesis is that spatially coherent perturbations in Ts on a snowpack can be mapped using time-sequential thermography (TST) - time series of thermal images sampled using state-of-the-art thermal cameras. The low thermal admittance of fresh snow implies that snow should respond with higher amplitudes in Ts to atmospheric forcing than many other land-surfaces, where fluctuations in Ts can be below the radiometric resolution of common thermal camera systems. On February 13 and 14, 2013 we operated an uncooled thermal camera (A320, FLIR, Wilsonville, OR, USA) over a snow covered glacier (';Glacier de la Plaine Morte', 46°22'37"N, 7°29'16" E, 2720 m a.s.l.). The thermal camera was mounted on a short 3 m mast to provide an oblique view of a uniform and flat part of the glacier upstream of the tower, with a filed of view (FOV) of 25 x 19° at 320 x 240 pixel resolution. Thermal images of the apparent surface temperature were acquired with ~5Hz and complemented by 20 Hz measurements of the atmospheric flow with three ultrasonic anemometer-thermometers (CSAT-3, CSI, Logan, UT, USA), of which one was installed in the FOV of the thermal camera. During the measurement campaign, the atmospheric surface layer was stably stratified (clear skies, air temperatures -15 to -10°C), and Ts ranged between -21 and -10°C. The snow-surface exhibited quite large fluctuations in Ts up to ×3 K over short time (within ~10-30 seconds). The extracted spatio

  8. Combined stellar structure and atmosphere models for massive stars; 4, The impact on the ionization structure of single star HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Stasinska, G; Stasinska, Grazyna; Schaerer, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    We study the impact of modern stellar atmospheres that take into account the effects of stellar winds, departures from LTE and line blanketing ("CoStar" models) on the ionization structure of HII regions. Results from a large grid of photoionization models are presented. Due to a flatter energy distribution in the HeI continuum, compared to the widely used Kurucz models, generally higher ionic ratios are obtained. We find that N+/O+ and Ne++/O++ can be safely used as direct indicators of N/O and Ne/O abundance ratios in HII regions, over a wide range of astrophysical situations. The roughly constant observed value of Ne++/O++ ionic ratios in Galactic HII regions is naturally reproduced by photoionization models using CoStar fluxes, while Kurucz models at solar metallicity fail to reproduce this behaviour. This gives support to ionizing fluxes from non-LTE atmospheres including stellar winds and line blanketing. However, we also point out that tests of stellar atmosphere models from observations of HII regions...

  9. 3D Simulations of methane convective storms on Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2005-08-01

    The arrival of the Cassini/Huygens mission to Titan has opened an unprecedented opportunity to study the atmosphere of this satellite. Under the pressure-temperature conditions on Titan, methane, a large atmospheric component amounting perhaps to a 3-5% of the atmosphere, is close to its triple point, potentially playing a similar role as water on Earth. The Huygens probe has shown a terrain shaped by erosion of probably liquid origin, suggestive of past rain. On the other hand, Voyager IRIS spectroscopic observations of Titan imply a saturated atmosphere of methane (amounting perhaps to 150 covered by methane clouds, if we think on Earth meteorology. However, observations from Earth and Cassini have shown that clouds are localized, transient and fast evolving, in particular in the South Pole (currently in its summer season). This might imply a lack of widespread presence on Titan of nuclei where methane could initiate condensation and particle growth with subsequent precipitation. We investigate different scenarios of moist convective storms on Titan using a complete 3D atmospheric model that incorporates a full microphysics treatment required to study cloud formation processes under a saturated atmosphere with low concentration of condensation nuclei. We study local convective development under a variety of atmospheric conditions: sub-saturation, super-saturation, abundances of condensation nuclei fall, condensation nuclei lifted from the ground or gently falling from the stratosphere. We show that under the appropriate circumstances, precipitation rates comparable to typical tropical storms on Earth can be found. Acknowledgements: This work has been funded by Spanish MCYT PNAYA2003-03216, fondos FEDER and Grupos UPV 15946/2004. R. Hueso acknowledges a post-doc fellowship from Gobierno Vasco.

  10. Effect of turbulent atmosphere on the on-axis average intensity of Pearcey-Gaussian beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    F, Boufalah; L, Dalil-Essakali; H, Nebdi; A, Belafhal

    2016-06-01

    The propagation characteristics of the Pearcey-Gaussian (PG) beam in turbulent atmosphere are investigated in this paper. The Pearcey beam is a new kind of paraxial beam, based on the Pearcey function of catastrophe theory, which describes diffraction about a cusp caustic. By using the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral formula in the paraxial approximation and the Rytov theory, an analytical expression of axial intensity for the considered beam family is derived. Some numerical results for PG beam propagating in atmospheric turbulence are given by studying the influences of some factors, including incident beam parameters and turbulence strengths.

  11. The Middle Atmosphere Program: A special project for the Antarctic Middle Atmosphere (AMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasawa, T.

    1982-01-01

    Areas of concern are: dynamics, structure, and atmospheric composition of the middle atmosphere in Antarctica; particle precipitation and interaction of the middle atmosphere with the lower ionosphere; atmospheric pollution; and the difference between the northern and southern polar middle atmosphere.

  12. In situ structural characterisation of non stable phases involved in atmospheric corrosion of ferrous heritage artefacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, E.; Perrin, S. [CEA Saclay, DEN, DPC, SCCME, LECA, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Burger, E.; Neff, D.; Faiz, H.; Dillmann, P. [CEA Saclay, UMR CEA CNRS, UMR 3299, IRAMIS, SIS2M, LAPA, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Legrand, L. [Univ Evry, CNRS, LAMBE UMR8587, F-91025 Evry (France); Faiz, H. [Nancy Univ, Inst Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS 7198, Nancy (France); L' Hostis, V. [CEA Saclay, DEN, DPC, SCCME, LECBA, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Dillmann, P. [CNRS, IRAMAT, LMC, UMR 5060, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2010-07-01

    The prediction of very long term corrosion of iron and low alloy steel in atmospheric conditions or in hydraulic binder media is a crucial issue for the conservation and restoration of heritage artefacts. For both media, the typical iron corrosion product layers (CPL) can be described as a matrix of goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) crossed by marbling of reactive phases: maghemite (gamma-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), ferri-hydrite (Fe{sub 5}HO{sub 8}.4H{sub 2}O), feroxyhyte ({delta}-FeOOH), etc. The aim of the experiments presented here is to bring new insights on the role that the maghemite could potentially play in the mechanisms of corrosion. For that purpose, electrochemical reductions have been coupled with in situ Raman microspectroscopy. These experiments enable the authors to propose a hypothesis of local mechanisms in the specific case of marbling of maghemite connected to the metallic substrate. These local mechanisms could drastically influence the global corrosion rate. (authors)

  13. Influence of atmospheric oxygen on leaf structure and starch deposition in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramonell, K. M.; Kuang, A.; Porterfield, D. M.; Crispi, M. L.; Xiao, Y.; McClure, G.; Musgrave, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    Plant culture in oxygen concentrations below ambient is known to stimulate vegetative growth, but apart from reports on increased leaf number and weight, little is known about development at subambient oxygen concentrations. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (cv. Columbia) plants were grown full term in pre-mixed atmospheres with oxygen partial pressures of 2.5, 5.1, 10.1, 16.2, and 21.3 kPa O2, 0.035 kPa CO2 and the balance nitrogen under continuous light. Fully expanded leaves were harvested and processed for light and transmission electron microscopy or for starch quantification. Growth in subambient oxygen concentrations caused changes in leaf anatomy (increased thickness, stomatal density and starch content) that have also been described for plants grown under carbon dioxide enrichment. However, at the lowest oxygen treatment (2.5 kPa), developmental changes occurred that could not be explained by changes in carbon budget caused by suppressed photorespiration, resulting in very thick leaves and a dwarf morphology. This study establishes the leaf parameters that change during growth under low O2, and identifies the lower concentration at which O2 limitation on transport and biosynthetic pathways detrimentally affects leaf development. Grant numbers: NAG5-3756, NAG2-1020, NAG2-1375.

  14. Discovery of a Three-Layered Atmospheric Structure in Accretion Disks around Stellar-Mass Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. N.; Zhang, Xiaoling; Sun, Xuejun; Yao, Yangsen; Cui, Wei; Chen, Wan; Wu, Xuebing; Xu, Haiguang

    1999-01-01

    We have carried out systematic modeling of the X-ray spectra of the Galactic superluminal jet sources GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40, using our newly developed spectral fitting methods. Our results reveal, for the first time, a three-layered structure of the atmosphere in the inner region of the accretion disks. Above the conanonly known, cold and optically thick disk of a blackbody temperature 0.2-0.5 keV, there is a layer of warm gas with a temperature of 1.0-1.5 keV and an optical depth of around 10. Compton scattering of the underlying disk blackbody photons produces the soft X-ray component we comonly observe. Under certain conditions, there is also a much hotter, optically thin corona above the warm layer, characterized by a temperature of 100 keV or higher and an optical depth of unity or less. The corona produces the hard X-ray component typically seen in these sources. We emphasize that the existence of the warm layer seem to be independent of the presence of the hot corona and, therefore, it is not due to irradiation of the disk by hard X-rays from the corona. Our results suggest a striking structural similarity between the accretion disks and the solar atmosphere, which may provide a new stimulus to study the common underlying physical processes operating in these vastly different systems. We also report the first unambiguous detection of an emission line around 6.4 keV in GRO J1655-40, which may allow further constraining of the accretion disk structure. We acknowledge NASA GSFC and MFC for partial financial support. (copyright) 1999: American Astronomical Society. All rights reverved.

  15. Formation, Structure and Properties of Amorphous Carbon Char from Polymer Materials in Extreme Atmospheric Reentry Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous carbonaceous char produced from the pyrolysis of polymer solids has many desirable properties for ablative heat shields for space vehicles. Molecular dynamics simulations are presented to study the transformation of the local atomic structure from virgin polymer to a dense, disordered char [1]. Release of polymer hydrogen is found to be critical to allow the system to collapse into a highly coordinated char structure. Mechanisms of the char formation process and the morphology of the resulting structures are elucidated. Thermal conductivity and mechanical response of the resulting char are evaluated [2]. During reenty, the optical response and oxidative reactivity of char are also important properties. Results of ab initio computations of char optical functions [3] and char reactivity [4] are also presented.

  16. DETERMINATION OF TRANSVERSE DENSITY STRUCTURING FROM PROPAGATING MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arregui, I.; Asensio Ramos, A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Pascoe, D. J., E-mail: iarregui@iac.es [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-01

    We present a Bayesian seismology inversion technique for propagating magnetohydrodynamic transverse waves observed in coronal waveguides. The technique uses theoretical predictions for the spatial damping of propagating kink waves in transversely inhomogeneous coronal waveguides. It combines wave amplitude damping length scales along the waveguide with theoretical results for resonantly damped propagating kink waves to infer the plasma density variation across the oscillating structures. Provided that the spatial dependence of the velocity amplitude along the propagation direction is measured and the existence of two different damping regimes is identified, the technique would enable us to fully constrain the transverse density structuring, providing estimates for the density contrast and its transverse inhomogeneity length scale.

  17. Determination of Transverse Density Structuring from Propagating MHD Waves in the Solar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Arregui, I; Pascoe, D J

    2013-01-01

    We present a Bayesian seismology inversion technique for propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) transverse waves observed in coronal waveguides. The technique uses theoretical predictions for the spatial damping of propagating kink waves in transversely inhomogeneous coronal waveguides. It combines wave amplitude damping length scales along the waveguide with theoretical results for resonantly damped propagating kink waves to infer the plasma density variation across the oscillating structures. Provided the spatial dependence of the velocity amplitude along the propagation direction is measured and the existence of two different damping regimes is identified, the technique would enable us to fully constrain the transverse density structuring, providing estimates for the density contrast and its transverse inhomogeneity length scale.

  18. Effects of vacuum and modified atmosphere on textural parameters and structural proteins of cultured meagre (Argyrosomus regius) fillets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, María I; Martínez, Tomás F; Cárdenas, Salvador; Suárez, María D

    2015-09-01

    The influence of two preservation strategies (vacuum package and modified atmosphere package) on the post-mortem changes of textural parameters, pH, water holding capacity, sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins, and collagen content of meagre (Argyrosomus regius) fillets was studied. Fillets were stored in a cold room in aerobic (control, C), vacuum (V) and modified atmosphere (MA) package. Samples were withdrawn at six sampling points throughout 15-day storage, and post-mortem changes were assessed. The textural parameters were significantly enhanced in V and MA compared to C. Both V and MA treatments reduced the intensity of a group of myofibrillar protein fractions (140-195 kDa) and increased insoluble collagen compared to C. Consequently, the post-mortem flesh softening in C was attributed to increased proteolysis in both intracellular and extracellular structural proteins. The preservation of the textural and biochemical characteristics of meagre fillets subjected to V and MA treatments makes these two treatments highly recommendable for the commercialization of meagre fillets. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Complete synthetic seismograms based on a spherical self-gravitating Earth model with an atmosphere-ocean-mantle-core structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongjiang; Heimann, Sebastian; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Hansheng; Dahm, Torsten

    2017-09-01

    A hybrid method is proposed to calculate complete synthetic seismograms based on a spherically symmetric and self-gravitating Earth with a multilayered structure of atmosphere, ocean, mantle, liquid core and solid core. For large wavelengths, a numerical scheme is used to solve the geodynamic boundary-value problem without any approximation on the deformation and gravity coupling. With decreasing wavelength, the gravity effect on the deformation becomes negligible and the analytical propagator scheme can be used. Many useful approaches are used to overcome the numerical problems that may arise in both analytical and numerical schemes. Some of these approaches have been established in the seismological community and the others are developed for the first time. Based on the stable and efficient hybrid algorithm, an all-in-one code QSSP is implemented to cover the complete spectrum of seismological interests. The performance of the code is demonstrated by various tests including the curvature effect on teleseismic body and surface waves, the appearance of multiple reflected, teleseismic core phases, the gravity effect on long period surface waves and free oscillations, the simulation of near-field displacement seismograms with the static offset, the coupling of tsunami and infrasound waves, and free oscillations of the solid Earth, the atmosphere and the ocean. QSSP is open source software that can be used as a stand-alone FORTRAN code or may be applied in combination with a Python toolbox to calculate and handle Green's function databases for efficient coding of source inversion problems.

  20. A study on the structure of the convective atmosphere over the Bay of Bengal during BOBMEX-99

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U C Mohanty; N V Sam; S Das; A N V Satyanarayana

    2003-06-01

    Convective activity is one of the major processes in the atmosphere influencing the local and large scale weather in the tropics. The latent heat released by the cumulus cloud is known to drive monsoon circulation, which on the other hand supplies the moisture that maintains the cumulus clouds. An investigation is carried out on the convective structure of the atmosphere during active and suppressed periods of convection using data sets obtained from the Bay of Bengal and Monsoon Experiment (BOBMEX). The cumulus convection though being a small-scale phenomenon, still influences its embedding environment by interaction through various scales. This study shows the variation in the kinematic and convective parameters during the transition from suppressed to active periods of convection. Convergence in the lower levels and strong upward vertical velocity, significant during active convection are associated with the formation of monsoon depressions. The apparent heat source due to latent heat release and the vertical transport of the eddy heat by cumulus convection, and the apparent moisture sink due to net condensation and vertical divergence of the eddy transport of moisture, are estimated through residuals of the thermodynamic equation and examined in relation to monsoon activity during BOBMEX.

  1. 3D Structures of equatorial waves and the resulting superrotation in the atmosphere of a tidally locked hot Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Shang-Min; Gu, Pin-Gao

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional equatorial trapped waves excited by stellar isolation and the resulting equatorial superrotating jet in a vertical stratified atmosphere of a tidally-locked hot Jupiter are investigated. Taking the hot Jupiter HD 189733b as a fiducial example, we analytically solve a set of linear equations subject to stationary stellar heating with a uniform zonal-mean flow included. We also extract wave information in the final equilibrium state of the atmosphere from the radiative hydrodynamical simulation for HD 189733b by Dobbs-Dixon & Agol (2013). We find that the analytic wave solutions are able to qualitatively explain the three-dimensional simulation results. Studying the vertical structure of waves allows us to explore new wave features such as the westward tilt of wavefronts related to the Rossby-wave resonance as well as double gyres of dispersive Rossby waves. We also make an attempt to apply our linear wave analysis to explain some numerical features associated with the equatorial jet devel...

  2. Cavity-excited Huygens' metasurface antennas for near-unity aperture illumination efficiency from arbitrarily large apertures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Ariel; Wong, Joseph P S; Eleftheriades, George V

    2016-01-21

    One of the long-standing problems in antenna engineering is the realization of highly directive beams using low-profile devices. In this paper, we provide a solution to this problem by means of Huygens' metasurfaces (HMSs), based on the equivalence principle. This principle states that a given excitation can be transformed to a desirable aperture field by inducing suitable electric and (equivalent) magnetic surface currents. Building on this concept, we propose and demonstrate cavity-excited HMS antennas, where the single-source-fed cavity is designed to optimize aperture illumination, while the HMS facilitates the current distribution that ensures phase purity of aperture fields. The HMS breaks the coupling between the excitation and radiation spectra typical to standard partially reflecting surfaces, allowing tailoring of the aperture properties to produce a desirable radiation pattern, without incurring edge-taper losses. The proposed low-profile design yields near-unity aperture illumination efficiencies from arbitrarily large apertures, offering new capabilities for microwave, terahertz and optical radiators.

  3. Prevalent structural disorder carries signature of prokaryotic adaptation to oxic atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Arup; Ghosh, Tapash Chandra

    2014-09-10

    Microbes have adopted efficient mechanisms to contend with environmental changes. The emergence of oxygen was a major event that led to an abrupt change in Earth's atmosphere. To adjust with this shift in environmental condition ancient microbes must have undergone several modifications. Although some proteomic and genomic attributes were proposed to facilitate survival of microorganisms in the presence of oxygen, the process of adaptation still remains elusive. Recent studies have focused that intrinsically disordered proteins play crucial roles in adaptation to a wide range of ecological conditions. Therefore, it is likely that disordered proteins could also play indispensable roles in microbial adaptation to the aerobic environment. To test this hypothesis we measured the disorder content of 679 prokaryotes from four oxygen requirement groups. Our result revealed that aerobic proteomes are endowed with the highest protein disorder followed by facultative microbes. Minimal disorder was observed in anaerobic and microaerophilic microbes with no significant difference in their disorder content. Considering all the potential confounding factors that can modulate protein disorder, here we established that the high protein disorder in aerobic microbe is not a by-product of adaptation to any other selective pressure. On the functional level, we found that the high disorder in aerobic proteomes has been utilized for processes that are important for their aerobic lifestyle. Moreover, aerobic proteomes were found to be enriched with disordered binding sites and to contain transcription factors with high disorder propensity. Based on our results, here we proposed that the high protein disorder is an adaptive opportunity for aerobic microbes to fit with the genomic and functional complexities of the aerobic lifestyle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Planetary-Scale Wave Structures of the Earth’s Atmosphere Revealed from the COSMIC Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P. S. BRAHMANANDAM; G. UMA; A. Narendra BABU; HUANG Ching-Yuang; G. Anil KUMAR; S. Tulasi RAM; WANG Hsiao-Lan; CHU Yen-Hsyang

    2014-01-01

    GPS radio occultation (GPS RO) method, an active satellite-to-satellite remote sensing technique, is capable of producing accurate, all-weather, round the clock, global refractive index, density, pressure, and temperature profiles of the troposphere and stratosphere. This study presents planetary-scale equatorially trapped Kelvin waves in temperature profiles retrieved using COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate) satellites during 2006-2009 and their interactions with background atmospheric conditions. It is found that the Kelvin waves are not only associated with wave periods of higher than 10 days (slow Kelvin waves) with higher zonal wave numbers (either 1 or 2), but also possessing downward phase progression, giving evidence that the source regions of them are located at lower altitudes. A thorough verification of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) reveals that deep convection activity has developed regularly over the Indonesian region, suggesting that the Kelvin waves are driven by the convective activity. The derived Kelvin waves show enhanced (diminished) tendencies during westward (eastward) phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in zonal winds, implying a mutual relation between both of them. The El Ni˜no and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) below 18 km and the QBO features between 18 and 27 km in temperature profiles are observed during May 2006-May 2010 with the help of an adaptive data analysis technique known as Hilbert Huang Transform (HHT). Further, temperature anomalies computed using COSMIC retrieved temperatures are critically evaluated during different phases of ENSO, which has revealed interesting results and are discussed in light of available literature.

  5. The atmospheres of Saturn and Titan in the near-infrared: First results of Cassini/Vims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, K.H.; Momary, T.W.; Buratti, B.J.; Matson, D.L.; Nelson, R.M.; Drossart, P.; Sicardy, B.; Formisano, V.; Bellucci, G.; Coradini, A.; Griffith, C.; Brown, R.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Langevin, Y.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Jaumann, R.; McCordt, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sotin, C.

    2006-01-01

    The wide spectral coverage and extensive spatial, temporal, and phase-angle mapping capabilities of the Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini-Huygens Orbiter are producing fundamental new insights into the nature of the atmospheres of Saturn and Titan. For both bodies, VIMS maps over time and solar phase angles provide information for a multitude of atmospheric constituents and aerosol layers, providing new insights into atmospheric structure and dynamical and chemical processes. For Saturn, salient early results include evidence for phosphine depletion in relatively dark and less cloudy belts at temperate and mid-latitudes compared to the relatively bright and cloudier Equatorial Region, consistent with traditional theories of belts being regions of relative downwelling. Additional Saturn results include (1) the mapping of enhanced trace gas absorptions at the south pole, and (2) the first high phase-angle, high-spatial-resolution imagery of CH4 fluorescence. An additional fundamental new result is the first nighttime near-infrared mapping of Saturn, clearly showing discrete meteorological features relatively deep in the atmosphere beneath the planet's sunlit haze and cloud layers, thus revealing a new dynamical regime at depth where vertical dynamics is relatively more important than zonal dynamics in determining cloud morphology. Zonal wind measurements at deeper levels than previously available are achieved by tracking these features over multiple days, thereby providing measurements of zonal wind shears within Saturn's troposphere when compared to cloudtop movements measured in reflected sunlight. For Titan, initial results include (1) the first detection and mapping of thermal emission spectra of CO, CO2, and CH3D on Titan's nightside limb, (2) the mapping of CH4 fluorescence over the dayside bright limb, extending to ??? 750 km altitude, (3) wind measurements of ???0.5 ms-1, favoring prograde, from the movement of a persistent

  6. Possible Niches for Extant Life on Titan in Light of Cassini/Huygens Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinspoon, D. H.; Bullock, M. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Schulze-Makuch, D.

    2005-08-01

    Results from the first year of the Cassini mission show that Titan has an active surface with few impact craters and abundant hints of cryovolcanism, tectonism, aeolian and fluvial activity (Porco et al., 2005; Elachi et al., 2005). Methane clouds and surface characteristics strongly imply the presence of an active global methane cycle analogous to Earth's hydrological cycle. Astrobiological interest in Titan has previously focused on possible prebiological chemical evolution on a moon with a thick nitrogen atmosphere and rich organic chemistry (Raulin and Owen, 2002). Yet the emerging new picture of Titan has raised prospects for the possibility of extant life. Several key requirements for life appear to be present, including liquid reservoirs, organic molecules and ample energy sources. One promising location may be hot springs in contact with hydrocarbon reservoirs. Hydrogenation of photochemically produced acetylene could provide metabolic energy for near-surface organisms and also replenish atmospheric methane (Schulze-Makuch and Grinspoon, 2005). The energy released could be used by organisms to drive endothermic reactions, or go into heating their surroundings, helping to create their own liquid microenvironments. In environments which are energy-rich but liquid-poor, like the near-surface of Titan, natural selection may favor organisms that use their ``waste heat" to melt their own watering holes. Downward transport of high energy photochemical compounds could provide an energy supply for near-surface organisms which could be used, in part, to maintain the liquid environments conducive to life. We will present the results of thermal modeling designed to test the feasibility of biothermal melting on Titan. C. Porco and the Cassini Imaging Team (2005) Nature 434, 159-168; C. Elachi et al, Science, 308, 970-974; F. Raulin and T. Owen (2002) Space Sci. Rev. 104, 377 - 394.; D. Schulze-Makuch and D. H. Grinspoon (2005) Astrobiology, in press.

  7. Simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer in the wind tunnel for modeling of wind loads on low-rise structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieleman, H. W.; Reinhold, T. A.; Marshall, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    The lower part of the atmospheric boundary layer (strong wind conditions) was simulated in low speed wind tunnel for the modeling of wind loads on low-rise structures. The turbulence characteristics of the turbulent boundary layer in the wind tunnel are compared with full scale measurements and with measurements made at NASA Wallops Flight Center. Wind pressures measured on roofs of a 1:70 scale model of a small single family dwelling were compared with results obtained from full scale measurements. The results indicate a favorable comparison between full scale and model pressure data as far as mean, r.m.s. and peak pressures are concerned. In addition, results also indicate that proper modeling of the turbulence is essential for proper simulation of the wind pressures.

  8. Effect of oxygen content on the structural and optical properties of ZnO films grown by atmospheric pressure MOCVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sajjad Hussain; Yaqoob Khan; Volodymyr Khranovskyy; Riaz Muhammad; Rositza Yakimova

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure MOCVD was used to deposit ZnO layers on sapphire and homoepitaxial template under different oxygen flow rates. Oxygen content affects the lattice constant value and texture coefficient of the films as evidenced by the y-2y peaks position and their intensity. Films deposited at lower oxygen flow rate possess higher value of strain and stresses. ZnO films deposited at high oxygen flow rates show intense UV emissions while samples prepared under oxygen deficient conditions exhibited defect related emission along with UV luminescence. The results are compared to the ZnO films deposited homoepitaxially on annealed ZnO samples. The data obtained suggest that ZnO stoichiometry is responsible for the structural and optical quality of ZnO films.

  9. Density, porosity, mineralogy, and internal structure of cosmic dust and alteration of its properties during high velocity atmospheric entry

    CERN Document Server

    Kohout, T; Suuronen, J -P; Rochette, P; Hutzler, A; Gattacceca, J; Skála, D D Badjukov R; Böhmová, V; Čuda, J

    2014-01-01

    X-ray microtomography (XMT), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetic hysteresis measurements were used to determine micrometeorite internal structure, mineralogy, crystallography, and physical properties at ~{\\mu}m resolution. The study samples include unmelted, partially melted (scoriaceous) and completely melted (cosmic spherules) micrometeorites. This variety not only allows comparison of the mineralogy and porosity of these three micrometeorite types, but also reveals changes in meteoroid properties during atmospheric entry at various velocities. At low entry velocities, meteoroids do not melt, and their physical properties do not change. The porosity of unmelted micrometeorites varies considerably (0-12%) with one friable example having porosity around 50%. At higher velocities, the range of meteoroid porosity narrows, but average porosity increases (to 16-27%) due to volatile evaporation and partial melting (scoriaceous phase). Metal distribution seems to be mostly unaffected at this stage. At even higher ...

  10. Structural and mechanical characterization of detonation coatings formed by reaction products of titanium with components of the spraying atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulianitsky, Vladimir Yu.; Dudina, Dina V.; Panin, Sergey V.; Vlasov, Ilya V.; Batraev, Igor S.; Bokhonov, Boris B.

    2016-11-01

    Structural characterization of detonation deposits formed by reaction products of titanium with the components of the spraying atmosphere showed that ceramic-based coatings of unique microstructures—consisting of alternating layers of different compositions—can be formed. For the first time, mechanical characteristics of the coatings formed by reaction-accompanied detonation spraying of titanium were evaluated. It was found that high-yield transformation of titanium into oxides and nitrides during spraying can result in the formation of coatings with high fracture resistance and interface fracture toughness. The hardness of the coatings measured along the cross-section of the specimens was higher than that on the surface of the coatings, which indicated mechanical anisotropy of the deposited material. In terms of mechanical properties, coatings formed by the reaction products appear to be more attractive than those specially treated to preserve metallic titanium.

  11. Polarized scattering with Paschen-Back effect, hyperfine structure, and partial frequency redistribution in magnetized stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Sowmya, K; Stenflo, J O; Sampoorna, M

    2015-01-01

    $F$-state interference significantly modifies the polarization produced by scattering processes in the solar atmosphere. Its signature in the emergent Stokes spectrum in the absence of magnetic fields is depolarization in the line core. In the present paper, we derive the partial frequency redistribution (PRD) matrix that includes interference between the upper hyperfine structure states of a two-level atom in the presence of magnetic fields of arbitrary strengths. The theory is applied to the Na I D$_2$ line that is produced by the transition between the lower $J=1/2$ and upper $J=3/2$ states which split into $F$ states because of the coupling with the nuclear spin $I_s=3/2$. The properties of the PRD matrix for the single-scattering case is explored, in particular, the effects of the magnetic field in the Paschen--Back regime and their usefulness as a tool for the diagnostics of solar magnetic fields.

  12. Polarized Scattering with Paschen-Back Effect, Hyperfine Structure, and Partial Frequency Redistribution in Magnetized Stellar Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowmya, K.; Nagendra, K. N.; Stenflo, J. O.; Sampoorna, M.

    2014-05-01

    F-state interference significantly modifies the polarization produced by scattering processes in the solar atmosphere. Its signature in the emergent Stokes spectrum in the absence of magnetic fields is depolarization in the line core. In the present paper, we derive the partial frequency redistribution (PRD) matrix that includes interference between the upper hyperfine structure states of a two-level atom in the presence of magnetic fields of arbitrary strengths. The theory is applied to the Na I D2 line that is produced by the transition between the lower J = 1/2 and upper J = 3/2 states which split into F states because of the coupling with the nuclear spin Is = 3/2. The properties of the PRD matrix for the single-scattering case is explored, in particular, the effects of the magnetic field in the Paschen-Back regime and their usefulness as a tool for the diagnostics of solar magnetic fields.

  13. Modeling the reactivities of hydroxyl radical and ozone towards atmospheric organic chemicals using quantitative structure-reactivity relationship approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita; Mohan, Dinesh; Singh, Kunwar P

    2016-07-01

    The persistence and the removal of organic chemicals from the atmosphere are largely determined by their reactions with the OH radical and O3. Experimental determinations of the kinetic rate constants of OH and O3 with a large number of chemicals are tedious and resource intensive and development of computational approaches has widely been advocated. Recently, ensemble machine learning (EML) methods have emerged as unbiased tools to establish relationship between independent and dependent variables having a nonlinear dependence. In this study, EML-based, temperature-dependent quantitative structure-reactivity relationship (QSRR) models have been developed for predicting the kinetic rate constants for OH (kOH) and O3 (kO3) reactions with diverse chemicals. Structural diversity of chemicals was evaluated using a Tanimoto similarity index. The generalization and prediction abilities of the constructed models were established through rigorous internal and external validation performed employing statistical checks. In test data, the EML QSRR models yielded correlation (R (2)) of ≥0.91 between the measured and the predicted reactivities. The applicability domains of the constructed models were determined using methods based on descriptors range, Euclidean distance, leverage, and standardization approaches. The prediction accuracies for the higher reactivity compounds were relatively better than those of the low reactivity compounds. Proposed EML QSRR models performed well and outperformed the previous reports. The proposed QSRR models can make predictions of rate constants at different temperatures. The proposed models can be useful tools in predicting the reactivities of chemicals towards OH radical and O3 in the atmosphere.

  14. Three-dimensional mapping of fine structure in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Vasco M. J.

    2013-04-01

    The effects on image formation through a tilted interference filter in a converging beam are investigated and an adequate compensation procedure is established. A method that compensates for small-scale seeing distortions is also developed with the aim of co-aligning non-simultaneous solar images from different passbands. These techniques are applied to data acquired with a narrow tiltable filter at the Swedish 1-meter Solar Telescope. Tilting provides a way to scan the wing of the Ca II H line. The resulting images are used to map the temperature stratification and vertical temperature gradients in a solar active region containing a sunspot at a resolution approaching 0''10. The data are compared with hydro-dynamical quiet sun models and magneto-hydrodynamic models of plage. The comparison gives credence to the observational techniques, the analysis methods, and the simulations. Vertical temperature gradients are lower in magnetic structures than in non-magnetic. Line-of-sight velocities and magnetic field properties in the penumbra of the same sunspot are estimated using the CRISP imaging spectropolarimeter and straylight compensation adequate for the data. These reveal a pattern of upflows and downflows throughout the entire penumbra including the interior penumbra. A correlation with intensity positively identifies these flows as convective in origin. The vertical convective signatures are observed everywhere, but the horizontal Evershed flow is observed to be confined to areas of nearly horizontal magnetic field. The relation between temperature gradient and total circular polarization in magnetically sensitive lines is investigated in different structures of the penumbra. Penumbral dark cores are prominent in total circular polarization and temperature gradient maps. These become longer and more contiguous with increasing height. Dark fibril structures over bright regions are observed in the Ca II H line core, above both the umbra and penumbra.

  15. Design and optimization of coating structure for the thermal barrier coatings fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying via finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The first prerequisite for fabricating the thermal barrier coatings (TBCs with excellent performance is to find an optimized coating structure with high thermal insulation effect and low residual stress. This paper discusses the design and optimization of a suitable coating structure for the TBCs prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS using the finite element method. The design and optimization processes comply with the rules step by step, as the structure develops from a simple to a complex one. The research results indicate that the suitable thicknesses of the bond-coating and top-coating are 60–120 μm and 300–420 μm, respectively, for the single ceramic layer YSZ/NiCoCrAlY APS-TBC. The embedded interlayer (50 wt.%YSZ + 50 wt.%NiCoCrAlY will further reduce the residual stress without sacrificing the thermal insulation effect. The double ceramic layer was further considered which was based on the single ceramic layer TBC. The embedded interlayer and the upper additional ceramic layer will have a best match between the low residual stress and high thermal insulation effect. Finally, the optimized coating structure was obtained, i.e., the La2Ce2O7(LC/YSZ/Interlayer/NiCoCrAlY coating structure with appropriate layer thickness is the best choice. The effective thermal conductivity of this optimized LC/YSZ/IL/BL TBC is 13.2% lower than that of the typical single ceramic layer YSZ/BL TBC.

  16. Fe-doped cryptomelane synthesized by refluxing at atmosphere: Structure, properties and photocatalytic degradation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hui; Dai, Xiaoxue; Zhu, Mengqiang; Li, Feihu; Feng, Xionghan; Liu, Fan

    2015-10-15

    Fe-doped cryptomelanes were synthesized by refluxing at ambient pressure, followed by characterization with multiple techniques and test in photocatalytic degradation of phenol. The introduction of Fe(III) into the structure of cryptomelane results in a decrease in particle size and the contents of Mn and K(+), and an increase in the Mn average oxidation state (AOS), specific surface area and UV-vis light absorption ability. Mn and Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy analysis indicates that some Fe(III) is incorporated into the framework of cryptomelane by replacing Mn(III) while the remaining Fe(3+) is adsorbed in the tunnel cavity. These Fe-doped cryptomelanes have significantly improved the photocatalytic degradation rate of phenol, with the sample of ∼3.04 wt.% Fe doping being the most reactive and achieving a degradation rate of 36% higher than that of the un-doped one. The enhanced reactivity can be ascribed to the increase in the coherent scattering domain size of the crystals, Mn AOS and light absorption, as well as the presence of sufficient K(+) in the tunnel. The results imply that metal doping is an effective way to improve the performance of cryptomelane in pollutants removal and has the potential for modification of Mn oxide materials.

  17. Convectively Forced Gravity Waves and their Sensitivity to Heating Profile and Atmospheric Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Oliver; Parker, Douglas; Griffiths, Stephen; Vosper, Simon; Stirling, Alison

    2016-04-01

    It has been known for some time that convective heating is communicated to its environment by gravity waves. Despite this, the radiation of gravity waves in macro-scale models, which are typically forced at the grid-scale by meso-scale parameterization schemes, is not well understood. We present here theoretical work directed toward improving our fundamental understanding of convectively forced gravity wave effects at the meso-scale, in order to begin to address this problem. Starting with the hydrostatic, non-rotating, 2D, Boussinesq equations in a slab geometry, we find a radiating, analytical solution to prescribed sensible heat forcing for both the vertical velocity and potential temperature response. Both Steady and pulsed heating with adjustable horizontal structure is considered. From these solutions we construct a simple model capable of interrogating the spatial and temporal sensitivity to chosen heating functions of the remote forced response in particular. By varying the assumed buoyancy frequency, the influence of the model stratosphere on the upward radiation of gravity waves, and in turn, on the tropospheric response can be understood. Further, we find that the macro-scale response to convection is highly dependent on the radiation characteristics of gravity waves, which are in turn dependent upon the temporal and spatial structure of the source, and upper boundary condition of the domain.

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Major Factors Affecting Black Carbon Transport and Concentrations in the Unique Atmospheric Structures of Urban Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Marissa Shuang

    Black carbon (BC) from vehicular emission in transportation is a principal component of particulate matters ≤ 2.5 mum (PM2.5). PM2.5 and other diesel emission pollutants (e.g., NOx) are regulated by the Clean Air Act (CAA) according to the National Ambient Air Quality standards (NAAQS). This doctoral dissertation details a study on transport behaviors of black carbon and PM2.5 from transportation routes, their relations with the atmospheric structure of an urban formation, and their relations with the use of biodiesel fuels. The results have implications to near-road risk assessment and to the development of sustainable transportation solutions in urban centers. The first part of study quantified near-roadside black carbon transport as a function of particulate matter (PM) size and composition, as well as microclimatic variables (temperature and wind fields) at the interstate highway I-75 in northern Cincinnati, Ohio. Among variables examined, wind speed and direction significantly affect the roadside transport of black carbon and hence its effective emission factor. Observed non-Gaussian dispersion occurred during low wind and for wind directions at acute angles or upwind to the receptors, mostly occurring in the morning hours. Meandering of air pollutant mass under thermal inversion is likely the driving force. In contrary, Gaussian distribution predominated in daytime of strong downwinds. The roles of urban atmospheric structure, wind fields, and the urban heat island (UHI) effects were further examined on pollutant dispersion and transport. Spatiotemporal variations of traffic flow, atmospheric structure, ambient temperature and PM2.5 concentration data from 14 EPA-certified NAAQS monitoring stations, were analyzed in relation to land-use in the Cincinnati metropolitan area. The results show a decade-long UHI effects with higher interior temperature than that in exurban, and a prominent nocturnal thermal inversion frequent in urban boundary layer. The

  19. Comparison of Structures and Properties between Wool and Ramie Fibers Treated by Atmospheric Pressure Ar and Ar/O2 Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yue-ping; XU Xiang-yu; WANG Shou-guo; ZHANG Xiao-dan; ZHAO Ling-li; SHI Li-min; GAO Xu-shan

    2009-01-01

    The technique of atmospheric pressure plasma is of value in textile industry. In this paper, argon (Ar) and argon/oxygen (Ar/O2) atmospheric pressure plasma were used to treat wool and ramie fibers. The structures and properties of treated fibers were investigated by means of SEM, XPS, single fiber tensile tester and so on.The results proved that the effects of plasma treatments depended on structural characteristics of fibers to a great extent, besides conditions of plasma treatment. By atmospheric pressure plasma treatment, wool fiber had significant changes in morphology structure, surface chemical component, mechanic properties and dyeability, while ramie fiber just showed a little change. In additional, Ar/Q2 plasma showed more effective action than argon. And at the beginning of treatment, plasma brought about remarkable effects, which did not increase with prolonging of treat time.

  20. Using particle filter to track horizontal variations of atmospheric duct structure from radar sea clutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. F. Zhao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of estimating range-varying parameters of the height-dependent refractivity over the sea surface from radar sea clutter. In the forward simulation, the split-step Fourier parabolic equation (PE is used to compute the radar clutter power in the complex refractive environments. Making use of the inherent Markovian structure of the split-step Fourier PE solution, the refractivity from clutter (RFC problem is formulated within a nonlinear recursive Bayesian state estimation framework. Particle filter (PF that is a technique for implementing a recursive Bayesian filter by Monte Carlo simulations is used to track range-varying characteristics of the refractivity profiles. Basic ideas of employing PF to solve RFC problem are introduced. Both simulation and real data results are presented to check up the feasibility of PF-RFC performances.

  1. Small-scale structure and dynamics of the lower solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Wedemeyer-Böhm, Sven

    2007-01-01

    The chromosphere of the quiet Sun is a highly intermittent and dynamic phenomenon. Three-dimensional radiation (magneto-)hydrodynamic simulations exhibit a mesh-like pattern of hot shock fronts and cool expanding post-shock regions in the sub-canopy part of the inter-network. This domain might be called "fluctosphere". The pattern is produced by propagating shock waves, which are excited at the top of the convection zone and in the photospheric overshoot layer. New high-resolution observations reveal a ubiquitous small-scale pattern of bright structures and dark regions in-between. Although it qualitatively resembles the picture seen in models, more observations - e.g. with the future ALMA - are needed for thorough comparisons with present and future models. Quantitative comparisons demand for synthetic intensity maps and spectra for the three-dimensional (magneto-)hydrodynamic simulations. The necessary radiative transfer calculations, which have to take into account deviations from local thermodynamic equil...

  2. Sintering temperature and atmosphere modulated evolution of structure and luminescence of 2CaO-P2O5-B2O3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, C. F.; Wang, J.; Ren, X. R.

    2014-01-01

    Europium doped 2CaO-P2O5-B2O3 phosphors prepared via high temperature solid state reactions are reported. The evolution of luminescence and structure of the phosphors induced by variation of sintering temperature and atmosphere is investigated using photoluminescence spectra and X-ray diffraction...... techniques. We found that the optical performance and structure of the phosphors are sensitive to the sintering temperature and atmosphere. The luminescence intensity due to 5D0 → 7F2 transition of Eu3+ is decreased with increasing sintering temperature. CaBPO5 and BPO4 crystals co-exist in the as...

  3. Reactions of ethynyl radicals as a source of C 4 and C 5 hydrocarbons in Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, F.; Schleyer, P. v. R.; Schaefer, H. F., III; Kaiser, R. I.

    2002-06-01

    Crossed molecular beam experiments augmented by electronic structure computations of neutral-neutral reactions of the ethynyl radical (C 2H, X 2Σ+) with the unsaturated hydrocarbons acetylene (C 2H 2), methylacetylene (CH 3CCH), and allene (H 2CCCH 2) are reviewed briefly. All reactions are characterized by a C 2H versus H atom exchange and in the case of the C 2H/C 2H 2 system by an additional molecular hydrogen (H 2) elimination pathway. The attack of the ethynyl radical onto the π-electron density of the unsaturated hydrocarbons has no entrance barrier and initializes each reaction. Consecutive hydrogen atom migrations may precede the exit channels. Diacetylene (HCCCCH), the butadiynyl radical (HCCCC), methyldiacetylene (CH 3CCCCH), ethynylallene (H 2CCH(C 2H)), and penta-4-diyne (HCC(CH 2)C 2H) were identified as products of which only diacetylene has yet been observed in Titan's atmosphere. Our results, however, strongly suggest the presence of all these species on Titan, and the Cassini-Huygens mission is likely to detect these upon arrival in the Saturnian system in 2004.

  4. Sulfur X-ray absorption fine structure in porous Li–S cathode films measured under argon atmospheric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.mueller@ptb.de [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Choudhury, Soumyadip [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung, Hohe Strasse 6, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Physical Chemistry of Polymeric Materials ,01062 Dresden (Germany); Gruber, Katharina [VARTA Micro Innovation GmbH, Stremayrgasse 9, 8010 Graz (Austria); Cruz, Valene B. [Universität Ulm, Institut für Elektrochemie, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Ulm (HIU), 89069 Ulm (Germany); Fuchsbichler, Bernd [VARTA Micro Innovation GmbH, Stremayrgasse 9, 8010 Graz (Austria); Jacob, Timo [Universität Ulm, Institut für Elektrochemie, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Ulm (HIU), 89069 Ulm (Germany); Koller, Stefan [VARTA Micro Innovation GmbH, Stremayrgasse 9, 8010 Graz (Austria); Stamm, Manfred [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung, Hohe Strasse 6, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Physical Chemistry of Polymeric Materials ,01062 Dresden (Germany); Ionov, Leonid [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung, Hohe Strasse 6, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Beckhoff, Burkhard [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we present the first results for the characterization of highly porous cathode materials with pore sizes below 1 μm for Lithium Sulfur (Li–S) batteries by Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. A novel cathode material of porous carbon films fabricated with colloidal array templates has been investigated. In addition, an electrochemical characterization has been performed aiming on an improved correlation of physical and chemical parameters with the electrochemical performance. The performed NEXAFS measurements of cathode materials allowed for a chemical speciation of the sulfur content inside the cathode material. The aim of the presented investigation was to evaluate the potential of the NEXAFS technique to characterize sulfur in novel battery material. The long term goal for the characterization of the battery materials is the sensitive identification of undesired side reactions, such as the polysulfide shuttle, which takes place during charging and discharging of the battery. The main drawback associated with the investigation of these materials is the fact that NEXAFS measurements can usually only be performed ex situ due to the limited in situ instrumentation being available. For Li–S batteries this problem is more pronounced because of the low photon energies needed to study the sulfur K absorption edge at 2472 eV. We employed 1 μm thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} windows to construct sealed argon cells for NEXAFS measurements under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions as a first step towards in situ measurements. The cells keep the sample under argon atmosphere at any time and the X-ray beam passes mainly through vacuum which enables the detection of the low energy X-ray emission of sulfur. Using these argon cells we found indications for the presence of lithium polysulfides in the cathode films whereas the correlations to the offline electrochemical results remain somewhat ambiguous. As a consequence of these findings one

  5. 高斯-谢尔模型阵列光束在湍流大气中的空间相干性%Spatial coherence properties of GSM array beams in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢芳; 韩香娥

    2015-01-01

    基于广义Huygens- Fresnel原理和Rytov相位结构函数二次近似的方法,推导出了径向分布高斯-谢尔模(GSM)阵列光束在湍流大气中传输时的交叉谱密度函数解析表达式,并利用表征光束相干性的空间复相干度系数,详细分析了GSM阵列光束在大气湍流中传输时的空间相干性变化规律。研究结果表明:径向分布GSM阵列光束的空间相干性由子光束空间相干长度、传输距离、大气折射率结构常数及相对径向填充因子等因素共同确定;径向分布GSM阵列光束通过湍流大气时,其空间相干度在传输过程中会出现多峰值现象,但是随着传输距离增大,多峰值现象逐渐消失并趋向于高斯分布,并且随着距离增大空间相干度宽度逐渐减小,光束空间相干性变差。%Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the quadratic approximation of Rytov's phase structure function, the analytical expression for the cross-spectral density function of the Gaussian Schell-Model (GSM) array beams propagating in atmospheric turbulence was derived. The degree of spatial coherence of GSM array beams in atmospheric turbulence was investigated numerically. The result shows that the spatial coherence properties of the GSM array beams are determined by the coherent length of beamlets, the transmission distance, the refractive index structure constant of atmospheric turbulence and the relative radial fill factor of the source in common. It also shows that the spatial coherence of the GSM array beams ends as Gaussian distribution, but multiple peaks are existed during the transmission, the width of the degree of coherence becomes smaller with the transmission distance continues increase which means that the degree of spatial coherence turns worse.

  6. Chapter 13. Atmospheric Dynamics and Meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. M.; Baines, K. H.; Bird, M. K.; Tokano, T.

    2009-01-01

    Titan, after Venus, is the second example in the solar system of an atmosphere with a global cyclostrophic circulation, but in this case a circulation that has a strong seasonal modulation in the middle atmosphere. Direct measurement of Titan's winds, particularly observations tracking the Huygens probe at 10 deg S, indicate that the zonal winds are mostly in the sense of the satellite's rotation. They generally increase with altitude and become cyclostrophic near 35 km above the surface. An exception to this is a sharp minimum centered near 75 km, where the wind velocity decreases to nearly zero. Zonal winds derived from temperatures retrieved from Cassini orbiter measurements, using the thermal wind equation, indicate a strong winter circumpolar vortex, with maximum winds of 190 m/s at mid northern latitudes near 300 km. Above this level, the vortex decays. Curiously, the stratospheric zonal winds and temperatures in both hemispheres are symmetric about a pole that is offset from the surface pole by about 4 deg. The cause of this is not well understood, but it may reflect the response of a cyclostrophic circulation to the onset between the equator, where the distance to the rotation axis is greatest, and the seasonally varying subsolar latitude. The mean meridional circulation can be inferred from the temperature field and the meridional distribution of organic molecules and condensates and hazes. Both the warm temperatures near 400 km and the enhanced concentration of several organic molecules suggest subsidence in the north polar region during winter and early spring. Stratospheric condensates are localized at high northern latitudes, with a sharp cut-off near 50 deg N. Titan's winter polar vortex appears to share many of the same characteristics of isolating high and low-latitude air masses as do the winter polar vortices on Earth that envelop the ozone holes. Global mapping of temperatures, winds, and composition in the troposphere, by contrast, is incomplete

  7. Validity of quadratic two-source spherical wave structure functions in analysis of beam propagation through generalized atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunyi; Yang, Huamin; Kavehrad, Mohsen; Tong, Shoufeng; Li, Yanfang

    2014-12-01

    Two distinct methods based on which two different quadratic-form expressions for the two-source spherical wave structure function (WSF) can be derived are reviewed. The validity of closed-form expressions for the beam-wave cross-spectral density function (CSDF) due to generalized atmospheric turbulence featuring an arbitrary spectral index ranging from 3 to 4, developed based on the quadratic two-source spherical WSFs, is examined in detail. New formulations for the conditions under which the said closed-form expressions for the beam-wave CSDF are strictly valid are developed and several novel interesting findings are elucidated. In particular, the closed-form beam-wave CSDF derived based on the small-separation asymptotic two-source spherical WSF can be considered a rigorous asymptotic solution under the strong-turbulence condition only when the separation distance between the two observation points is much smaller than the inner scale of turbulence; moreover it is also a rigorous asymptotic solution when a certain relation among the initial beam radius, initial transverse coherence width and inner scale holds, regardless of the turbulence strength and spectral index. On the other hand, the accuracy of the closed-form beam-wave CSDF derived based on the large-separation-approximation two-source spherical WSF depends on the spectral index, and a spectral index closer to 4 results in better accuracy.

  8. Polarized scattering with Paschen-Back effect, hyperfine structure, and partial frequency redistribution in magnetized stellar atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowmya, K.; Nagendra, K. N.; Sampoorna, M. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bengaluru (India); Stenflo, J. O., E-mail: ksowmya@iiap.res.in, E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in, E-mail: sampoorna@iiap.res.in, E-mail: stenflo@astro.phys.ethz.ch [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-05-10

    F-state interference significantly modifies the polarization produced by scattering processes in the solar atmosphere. Its signature in the emergent Stokes spectrum in the absence of magnetic fields is depolarization in the line core. In the present paper, we derive the partial frequency redistribution (PRD) matrix that includes interference between the upper hyperfine structure states of a two-level atom in the presence of magnetic fields of arbitrary strengths. The theory is applied to the Na I D{sub 2} line that is produced by the transition between the lower J = 1/2 and upper J = 3/2 states which split into F states because of the coupling with the nuclear spin I{sub s} = 3/2. The properties of the PRD matrix for the single-scattering case is explored, in particular, the effects of the magnetic field in the Paschen-Back regime and their usefulness as a tool for the diagnostics of solar magnetic fields.

  9. Effects of oxygen defects on structure and properties of Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-δannealed in different atmospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆依; 陈乐; 陆春华; 倪亚茹; 许仲梓

    2013-01-01

    Samples of Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-δwere annealed in different atmospheres (Ar, N2, and O2) and temperatures (400-1200 ºC), and changes in their masses, structures, surface transport properties, optical properties, and oxygen nonstoichiometries were investi-gated using thermogravimetric (TG) analyses, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, electrical conductivity measurements, reflection spectra measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The TG analyses, performed in air and an N2 atmosphere, allowed us to determine the changes in the masses of the samples. The results of the XRD analyses elucidated the changes in the structure of the samples under different conditions. The XPS spectra and simulation data indicated that the number of oxygen defects generated in the samples depended on the temperature and atmosphere. At high temperatures, the surface conductivities and full-spectrum reflectivities of the samples decreased with an increase in the number of oxygen vacancies. In an oxidative atmosphere, the samples exhibited outstanding visible and near-infrared light absorption. Furthermore, the samples were highly sensitive to a re-ducing atmosphere at various temperatures. On the basis of the fact that the properties of Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-δvary with the environment, it has potential use in high-temperature applications such as weather sensors.

  10. Using a balloon-borne accelerometer to improve understanding of the turbulent structure of the atmosphere for aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlton, Graeme; Harrison, Giles; Nicoll, Keri; Williams, Paul

    2017-04-01

    the increased intensity of in-cloud processes. The accelerometer data were used to verify the skill of turbulence diagnostics, in order to assess which diagnostics are best at forecasting turbulence. It was found using a Receiver Operating Characteristics curve analysis that turbulence diagnostics calculated using ECMWF high resolution data that featured wind speed, deformation and relative vorticity advection predicted turbulence best with area under curve values of 0.7,0.66 and 0.62 respectively. This work provides a new, safe and inexpensive method to retrieve in-situ information about the turbulent structure of the atmosphere. It can inform the aviation industry through identifying turbulence generation regions and assess which predictive diagnostics are the most skilful.

  11. Methodology and Politics in Science: The Fate of Huygens' 1673 Proposal of the Seconds Pendulum as an International Standard of Length and Some Educational Suggestions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Michael R.

    This paper is part of a larger work on the history, philosophy and utilisation of pendulum motion studies (Matthews 2000). The paper deals with the fate of Christiaan Huygens 1673 proposal to use the length of a seconds pendulum (effectively one metre) as a universal, natural and objective standard of length. This is something which, if it had been adopted, would have been of inestimable scientific, commercial and cultural benefit. Why it was not originally adopted in the late seventeenth century, and why it was again rejected in the late eighteenth century (1795) when the Revolutionary Assembly in France adopted the metric system with the metre being defined as one ten-millionth of the quarter meridan distance - raise interesting questions about the methodology and politics of science. Given that pendulum motion is a standard component of all science courses throughout the world, and given that most science education reforms, including the US National Science Education Standards and recent Australian state reforms, require that something of the big picture of science be conveyed to students (the relationship of science to culture, commerce, history and philosophy) - it is suggested that these educational goals can be advanced by teaching about the fate of Huygens' proposal.

  12. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at atmospheric pressure with a table-top laser-induced soft x-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kühl, Frank-Christian, E-mail: Frank-christian.kuehl@mail.de; Müller, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.mueller@llg-ev.de; Schellhorn, Meike; Mann, Klaus [Laser-Laboratorium Göttingen e.V., Hans-Adolf-Krebs-Weg 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Wieneke, Stefan [Hochschule für angewandte Wissenschaft und Kunst, Von-Ossietzky-Str 99, D-37085 Göttingen (Germany); Eusterhues, Karin [Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Fürstengraben 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    The authors present a table-top soft x-ray absorption spectrometer, accomplishing investigations of the near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) in a laboratory environment. The system is based on a low debris plasma ignited by a picosecond laser in a pulsed krypton gas jet, emitting soft x-ray radiation in the range from 1 to 5 nm. For absorption spectroscopy in and around the “water window” (2.3–4.4 nm), a compact helium purged sample compartment for experiments at atmospheric pressure has been constructed and tested. NEXAFS measurements on CaCl{sub 2} and KMnO{sub 4} samples were conducted at the calcium and manganese L-edges, as well as at the oxygen K-edge in air, atmospheric helium, and under vacuum, respectively. The results indicate the importance of atmospheric conditions for an investigation of sample hydration processes.

  13. A TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF TITAN'S NORTH POLAR ATMOSPHERE FROM A SPECULAR REFLECTION OF THE SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Jason W. [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-0903 (United States); Clark, Roger N. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Sotin, Christophe; Buratti, Bonnie J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ádámkovics, Máté [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Appéré, Thomas; Rodriguez, Sebastien [Laboratoire AIM, Université Paris Diderot, Paris 7/CNRS/CEA-Saclay, DSM-IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Soderblom, Jason M. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Brown, Robert H. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Baines, Kevin H. [Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, 53706 (United States); Le Mouélic, Stéphane [Laboratoire de Planétologie et Géodynamique, Université de Nantes, F-44322 Nantes (France); Nicholson, Philip D., E-mail: jwbarnes@uidaho.edu [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    Cassini/VIMS T85 observations of a solar specular reflection off of Kivu Lacus (87.°4N 241.°1E) provide an empirical transmission spectrum of Titan's atmosphere. Because this observation was acquired from short range (33,000 km), its intensity makes it visible within the 2.0, 2.7, and 2.8 μm atmospheric windows in addition to the 5 μm window where all previous specular reflections have been seen. The resulting measurement of the total one-way normal atmospheric optical depth (corresponding to haze scattering plus haze and gas absorption) provides strong empirical constraints on radiative transfer models. Using those models, we find that the total haze column abundance in our observation is 20% higher than the Huygens equatorial value. Ours is the first measurement in the 2-5 μm wavelength range that probes all the way to the surface in Titan's arctic, where the vast majority of surface liquids are located. The specular technique complements other probes of atmospheric properties such as solar occultations and the direct measurements from Huygens. In breaking the degeneracy between surface and atmospheric absorptions, our measured optical depths will help to drive future calculations of deconvolved surface albedo spectra.

  14. Evolution on the structural and optical properties of SiO{sub x} films annealed in nitrogen atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyopol, A., E-mail: acoyopol@gmail.com; Díaz-Becerril, T.; García-Salgado, G.; Juárez-Santisteban, H.; López, R.; Rosendo-Andrés, E.

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, thermal annealing in nitrogen atmosphere at temperatures from 900 to 1100 °C was done on the SiO{sub x} films to follow the changes in their optical and structural properties. Micro-Raman measurements revealed the existence of a nanocrystalline phase and it become dominant as the annealing temperature increased from 900 to 1100 °C. The last might be an indicative of presence of silicon clusters with high crystallization grade embedded in the SiO{sub x} matrix. X-ray diffractograms from samples annealed at 1100 °C showed reflections at 2θ=28.4, 47.3, and 56.1° ascribed to (1 1 1), (2 2 0), and (3 1 1) planes of the silicon respectively. HRTEM measurements confirmed the existence of silicon nanocrystals (Si-ncs) in the SiO{sub x} films and both the average size and number of the Si-ncs were modified by the annealing process. Photoluminescence (PL) measurement displayed a broad emission from 400 to 1100 nm. This emission was related to the number of nanocrystals and to the creation of interface defects in SiO{sub x} films. -- Highlights: • Si-ncs are synthesized from interaction between a silicon solid-source and hydrogen atoms. • The size modulation of Si-ncs by effect of the annealing temperature is studied. • Silicon clusters consist of a crystalline core surrounded by an amorphous silicon shell. • The average size and number of the Si-ncs are modified by the annealing effect. • The increase in the number of Si-ncs with annealing process causes radiative centers.

  15. The marine atmospheric boundary layer under strong wind conditions: Organized turbulence structure and flux estimates by airborne measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilouet, Pierre-Etienne; Durand, Pierre; Canut, Guylaine

    2017-02-01

    During winter, cold air outbreaks take place in the northwestern Mediterranean sea. They are characterized by local strong winds (Mistral and Tramontane) which transport cold and dry continental air across a warmer sea. In such conditions, high values of surface sensible and latent heat flux are observed, which favor deep oceanic convection. The HyMeX/ASICS-MED field campaign was devoted to the study of these processes. Airborne measurements, gathered in the Gulf of Lion during the winter of 2013, allowed for the exploration of the mean and turbulent structure of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). A spectral analysis based on an analytical model was conducted on 181 straight and level runs. Profiles of characteristic length scales and sharpness parameter of the vertical wind spectrum revealed larger eddies along the mean wind direction associated with an organization of the turbulence field into longitudinal rolls. These were highlighted by boundary layer cloud bands on high-resolution satellite images. A one-dimensional description of the vertical exchanges is then a tricky issue. Since the knowledge of the flux profile throughout the entire MABL is essential for the estimation of air-sea exchanges, a correction of eddy covariance turbulent fluxes was developed taking into account the systematic and random errors due to sampling and data processing. This allowed the improvement of surface fluxes estimates, computed from the extrapolation of the stacked levels. A comparison between those surface fluxes and bulk fluxes computed at a moored buoy revealed considerable differences, mainly regarding the latent heat flux under strong wind conditions.

  16. A Microwave Radiometric Method to Obtain the Average Path Profile of Atmospheric Temperature and Humidity Structure Parameters and Its Application to Optical Propagation System Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.; Vyhnalek, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    The values of the key atmospheric propagation parameters Ct2, Cq2, and Ctq are highly dependent upon the vertical height within the atmosphere thus making it necessary to specify profiles of these values along the atmospheric propagation path. The remote sensing method suggested and described in this work makes use of a rapidly integrating microwave profiling radiometer to capture profiles of temperature and humidity through the atmosphere. The integration times of currently available profiling radiometers are such that they are approaching the temporal intervals over which one can possibly make meaningful assessments of these key atmospheric parameters. Since these parameters are fundamental to all propagation conditions, they can be used to obtain Cn2 profiles for any frequency, including those for an optical propagation path. In this case the important performance parameters of the prevailing isoplanatic angle and Greenwood frequency can be obtained. The integration times are such that Kolmogorov turbulence theory and the Taylor frozen-flow hypothesis must be transcended. Appropriate modifications to these classical approaches are derived from first principles and an expression for the structure functions are obtained. The theory is then applied to an experimental scenario and shows very good results.

  17. Early Juno Era Optical Imaging and Analysis of Jupiter's Atmospheric Structure and Color with the NMSU Acousto-optic Imaging Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, E.; Chanover, N.; Voelz, D.; Kuehn, D.; Strycker, P.

    2016-12-01

    Jupiter's upper atmosphere is a highly dynamic system in which clouds and storms change color, shape, and size on variable timescales. The exact mechanism by which the deep atmosphere affects these changes in the uppermost cloud deck is still unknown. However, with Juno's arrival in July 2016, it is now possible to take detailed observations of the deep atmosphere with the spacecraft's Microwave Radiometer. By taking detailed optical measurements of Jupiter's uppermost cloud deck in conjunction with these microwave observations, we can provide a context in which to better understand these observations. Ultimately, we can utilize these two complementary datasets in order to thoroughly characterize Jupiter's atmosphere in terms of its vertical cloud structure, color distribution, and dynamical state throughout the Juno era. These optical data will also provide a complement to the near-IR sensitivity of the Jovian InfraRed Auroral Mapper and will expand on the limited spectral coverage of JunoCam. In order to obtain high spectral resolution images of Jupiter's atmosphere in the optical regime we use the New Mexico State University Acousto-optic Imaging Camera (NAIC). NAIC's acousto-optic tunable filter allows us to take hyperspectral image cubes of Jupiter from 450-950 nm at an average spectral resolution (λ/dλ) of 242. We present a preliminary analysis of two datasets obtained with NAIC at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope: one pre-Juno dataset from March 2016 and the other from November 2016. From these data we derive low-resolution optical spectra of the Great Red Spot and a representative belt and zone to compare with previous work and laboratory measurements of candidate chromophore materials. Additionally, we compare these two datasets to inspect how the atmosphere has changed since before Juno arrived at Jupiter. NASA supported this work through award number NNX15AP34A.

  18. Effects of residual hydrogen in sputtering atmosphere on structures and properties of amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Haochun; Ishikawa, Kyohei; Ide, Keisuke [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio, E-mail: kamiya.t.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Ueda, Shigenori [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba-city, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Ohashi, Naoki [Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba-city, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Kumomi, Hideya [Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2015-11-28

    We investigated the effects of residual hydrogen in sputtering atmosphere on subgap states and carrier transport in amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) using two sputtering systems with different base pressures of ∼10{sup −4} and 10{sup −7 }Pa (standard (STD) and ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) sputtering, respectively), which produce a-IGZO films with impurity hydrogen contents at the orders of 10{sup 20} and 10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3}, respectively. Several subgap states were observed by hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, i.e., peak-shape near-valence band maximum (near-VBM) states, shoulder-shape near-VBM states, peak-shape near-conduction band minimum (near-CBM) states, and step-wise near-CBM states. It was confirmed that the formation of these subgap states were affected strongly by the residual hydrogen (possibly H{sub 2}O). The step-wise near-CBM states were observed only in the STD films deposited without O{sub 2} gas flow and attributed to metallic In. Such step-wise near-CBM state was not detected in the other films including the UHV films even deposited without O{sub 2} flow, substantiating that the metallic In is segregated by the strong reduction effect of the hydrogen/H{sub 2}O. Similarly, the density of the near-VBM states was very high for the STD films deposited without O{sub 2}. These films had low film density and are consistent with a model that voids in the amorphous structure form a part of the near-VBM states. On the other hand, the UHV films had high film densities and much less near-VBM states, keeping the possibility that some of the near-VBM states, in particular, of the peak-shape ones, originate from –OH and weakly bonded oxygen. These results indicate that 2% of excess O{sub 2} flow is required for the STD sputtering to compensate the effects of the residual hydrogen/H{sub 2}O. The high-density near-VBM states and the metallic In segregation deteriorated the electron mobility to 0.4 cm{sup 2}/(V s)

  19. The thermal structure of the Venus atmosphere: Intercomparison of Venus Express and ground based observations of vertical temperature and density profiles✰

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Sanjay S.; Lebonnois, Sebastien; Mahieux, Arnaud; Pätzold, Martin; Bougher, Steven; Bruinsma, Sean; Chamberlain, Sarah; Clancy, R. Todd; Gérard, Jean-Claude; Gilli, Gabriella; Grassi, Davide; Haus, Rainer; Herrmann, Maren; Imamura, Takeshi; Kohler, Erika; Krause, Pia; Migliorini, Alessandra; Montmessin, Franck; Pere, Christophe; Persson, Moa; Piccialli, Arianna; Rengel, Miriam; Rodin, Alexander; Sandor, Brad; Sornig, Manuela; Svedhem, Håkan; Tellmann, Silvia; Tanga, Paolo; Vandaele, Ann C.; Widemann, Thomas; Wilson, Colin F.; Müller-Wodarg, Ingo; Zasova, Ludmila

    2017-09-01

    The Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) model contains tabulated values of temperature and number densities obtained by the experiments on the Venera entry probes, Pioneer Venus Orbiter and multi-probe missions in the 1980s. The instruments on the recent Venus Express orbiter mission generated a significant amount of new observational data on the vertical and horizontal structure of the Venus atmosphere from 40 km to about 180 km altitude from April 2006 to November 2014. Many ground based experiments have provided data on the upper atmosphere (90-130 km) temperature structure since the publication of VIRA in 1985. The "Thermal Structure of the Venus Atmosphere" Team was supported by the International Space Studies Institute (ISSI), Bern, Switzerland, from 2013 to 2015 in order to combine and compare the ground-based observations and the VEx observations of the thermal structure as a first step towards generating an updated VIRA model. Results of this comparison are presented in five latitude bins and three local time bins by assuming hemispheric symmetry. The intercomparison of the ground-based and VEx results provides for the first time a consistent picture of the temperature and density structure in the 40 km-180 km altitude range. The Venus Express observations have considerably increased our knowledge of the Venus atmospheric thermal structure above ∼40 km and provided new information above 100 km. There are, however, still observational gaps in latitude and local time above certain regions. Considerable variability in the temperatures and densities is seen above 100 km but certain features appear to be systematically present, such as a succession of warm and cool layers. Preliminary modeling studies support the existence of such layers in agreement with a global scale circulation. The intercomparison focuses on average profiles but some VEx experiments provide sufficient global coverage to identify solar thermal tidal components. The differences

  20. Operational Data Reduction Procedure for Determining Density and Vertical Structure of the Martian Upper Atmosphere from Mars Global Surveyor Accelerometer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancro, George J.; Tolson, Robert H.; Keating, Gerald M.

    1998-01-01

    The success of aerobraking by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft was partly due to the analysis of MGS accelerometer data. Accelerometer data was used to determine the effect of the atmosphere on each orbit, to characterize the nature of the atmosphere, and to predict the atmosphere for future orbits. To interpret the accelerometer data, a data reduction procedure was developed to produce density estimations utilizing inputs from the spacecraft, the Navigation Team, and pre-mission aerothermodynamic studies. This data reduction procedure was based on the calculation of aerodynamic forces from the accelerometer data by considering acceleration due to gravity gradient, solar pressure, angular motion of the MGS, instrument bias, thruster activity, and a vibration component due to the motion of the damaged solar array. Methods were developed to calculate all of the acceleration components including a 4 degree of freedom dynamics model used to gain a greater understanding of the damaged solar array. The total error inherent to the data reduction procedure was calculated as a function of altitude and density considering contributions from ephemeris errors, errors in force coefficient, and instrument errors due to bias and digitization. Comparing the results from this procedure to the data of other MGS Teams has demonstrated that this procedure can quickly and accurately describe the density and vertical structure of the Martian upper atmosphere.

  1. The Influence of CO2 Admixtures on the Product Composition in a Nitrogen-Methane Atmospheric Glow Discharge Used as a Prebiotic Atmosphere Mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazankova, V.; Torokova, L.; Krcma, F.; Mason, N. J.; Matejcik, S.

    2016-11-01

    This work extends our previous experimental studies of the chemistry of Titan's atmosphere by atmospheric glow discharge. The Titan's atmosphere seems to be similarly to early Earth atmospheric composition. The exploration of Titan atmosphere was initiated by the exciting results of the Cassini-Huygens mission and obtained results increased the interest about prebiotic atmospheres. Present work is devoted to the role of CO2 in the prebiotic atmosphere chemistry. Most of the laboratory studies of such atmosphere were focused on the chemistry of N2 + CH4 mixtures. The present work is devoted to the study of the oxygenated volatile species in prebiotic atmosphere, specifically CO2 reactivity. CO2 was introduced to the standard N2 + CH4 mixture at different mixing ratio up to 5 % CH4 and 3 % CO2. The reaction products were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. This work shows that CO2 modifies the composition of the gas phase with the detection of oxygenated compounds: CO and others oxides. There is a strong influence of CO2 on increasing concentration other products as cyanide (HCN) and ammonia (NH3).

  2. [Spectral analyzing effects of atmosphere states on the structure and characteristics of CdTe polycrystalline thin films made by close-spaced sublimation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hua-jing; Zheng, Jia-gui; Feng, Liang-huan; Zhang, Jing-quan; Xie, Er-qing

    2005-07-01

    The structure and characteristics of CdTe thin films are dependent on the working atmosphere states in close-spaced sublimation. In the present paper, CdTe polycrystalline thin films were deposited by CSS in mixture atmosphere of argon and oxygen. The physical mechanism of CSS was analyzed, and the temperature distribution in CSS system was measured. The dependence of preliminary nucleus creation on the atmosphere states (involving component and pressure) was studied. Transparencies were measured and optic energy gaps were calculated. The results show that: (1) The CdTe films deposited in different atmospheres are cubic structure. With increasing oxygen concentration, a increases and reaches the maximum at 6% oxygen concentration, then reduces, and increases again after passing the point at 12% oxygen concentration. Among them, the sample depositing at 9% oxygen concentration is the best. The optic energy gaps are 1.50-1.51 eV for all CdTe films. (2) The samples depositing at different pressures at 9% oxygen concentration are all cubical structure of CdTe, and the diffraction peaks of CdS and SnO2:F still appear. With the gas pressure increasing, the crystal size of CdTe minishes, the transparency of the thin film goes down, and the absorption side shifts to the short-wave direction. (3) The polycrystalline thin films with high quality deposit in 4 minutes under the depositing condition that the substrate temperature is 550 degrees C, and source temperature is 620 degrees C at 9% oxygen concentration.

  3. Atmospheric Circulation of Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Showman, Adam P; Menou, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    We survey the basic principles of atmospheric dynamics relevant to explaining existing and future observations of exoplanets, both gas giant and terrestrial. Given the paucity of data on exoplanet atmospheres, our approach is to emphasize fundamental principles and insights gained from Solar-System studies that are likely to be generalizable to exoplanets. We begin by presenting the hierarchy of basic equations used in atmospheric dynamics, including the Navier-Stokes, primitive, shallow-water, and two-dimensional nondivergent models. We then survey key concepts in atmospheric dynamics, including the importance of planetary rotation, the concept of balance, and scaling arguments to show how turbulent interactions generally produce large-scale east-west banding on rotating planets. We next turn to issues specific to giant planets, including their expected interior and atmospheric thermal structures, the implications for their wind patterns, and mechanisms to pump their east-west jets. Hot Jupiter atmospheric d...

  4. Influence of turbulent atmosphere on the far-field coherent combined beam quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Zhou; Zejin Liu; Xiaojun Xu; Xiaolin Wang; Xiao Li; Zilun Chen

    2008-01-01

    Propagation of coherent combined laser beams in turbulent atmosphere is numerically studied based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. By choosing beam propagation factor (BPF) and beam quality factor (BQ) to characterize the far-field irradiance distribution properties, the influence of turbulence on far-field coherent combined beam quality is studied in detail. The investigation reveals that with the coherence length decreasing, the irradiance distribution pattern evolves from typical non-Gaussian shape with multiple side-lobes into Gaussian shape which is seen in the incoherent combining case. In weak turbulent atmosphere, the far-field beam quality suffers less when the 1aser array gets more compact and operates at a longer wavelength. In strong turbulent atmosphere, the far-field beam quality degrades into the incoherent combining case without any relationship with the fill factor and laser wavelength.

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF THE EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION ON THE STRUCTURE AND COMPOSITION OF THE UPPER ATMOSPHERE OF EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, J. H. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming 650011 (China); Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi, E-mail: guojh@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: bjaffel@iap.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 6 et CNRS, UMR 7095, Institut Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2016-02-20

    By varying the profiles of stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we tested the influences of stellar EUV SEDs on the physical and chemical properties of an escaping atmosphere. We apply our model to study four exoplanets: HD 189733b, HD 209458b, GJ 436b, and Kepler-11b. We find that the total mass loss rates of an exoplanet, which are determined mainly by the integrated fluxes, are moderately affected by the profiles of the EUV SED, but the composition and species distributions in the atmosphere can be dramatically modified by the different profiles of the EUV SED. For exoplanets with a high hydrodynamic escape parameter (λ), the amount of atomic hydrogen produced by photoionization at different altitudes can vary by one to two orders of magnitude with the variation of stellar EUV SEDs. The effect of photoionization of H is prominent when the EUV SED is dominated by the low-energy spectral region (400–900 Å), which pushes the transition of H/H{sup +} to low altitudes. In contrast, the transition of H/H{sup +} moves to higher altitudes when most photons are concentrated in the high-energy spectral region (50–400 Å). For exoplanets with a low λ, the lower temperatures of the atmosphere make many chemical reactions so important that photoionization alone can no longer determine the composition of the escaping atmosphere. For HD 189733b, it is possible to explain the time variability of Lyα between 2010 and 2011 by a change in the EUV SED of the host K-type star, yet invoking only thermal H i in the atmosphere.

  6. On structural similarity in wall turbulence organization under weak thermal effects: from the wind tunnel to the atmospheric surface layer (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guala, M.

    2013-12-01

    Reproducing the different thermal stability regimes of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in wind tunnel experiments requires accurate control of the free stream air and wall temperatures and a test section long enough to ensure the establishment of fully developed conditions. Such requirements are met in the SAFL atmospheric wind tunnel, with some limitations on the achievable range of z/L, confined between the weakly stratified and weakly convective boundary layers. A number of statistical checks based on Reynolds, Monin-Obukhov similarities, Kolmogorov small scale universality, temperature and velocity variance balance equations, are available to assess the quality of the measurements, flow and estimate of the scaling parameters. However, limited work has been devoted to the comparison of the spatio-temporal structure of turbulent flows from the laboratory to the field scale. Specifically, the vertical extent, scaling and statistical relevance of different structural types pose some scalability issues and deserve further investigation. PIV and triple wire measurements from the SAFL Wind Tunnel will be presented and compared with measurements in the atmospheric surface layer. Particular care is devoted to the contributions of large and very-large scale motions to the momentum and heat fluxes, and to their role in near-surface processes and wind energy.

  7. Molecular view modeling of atmospheric organic particulate matter: Incorporating molecular structure and co-condensation of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, James F.; Marks, Marguerite C.; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Mahmud, Abdullah; Asher, William E.; Li, Jingyi; Ying, Qi; Jathar, Shantanu H.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    Most urban and regional models used to predict levels of organic particulate matter (OPM) are based on fundamental equations for gas/particle partitioning, but make the highly simplifying, anonymized-view (AV) assumptions that OPM levels are not affected by either: a) the molecular characteristics of the condensing organic compounds (other than simple volatility); or b) co-condensation of water as driven by non-zero relative humidity (RH) values. The simplifying assumptions have allowed parameterized chamber results for formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) (e.g., ;two-product; (2p) coefficients) to be incorporated in chemical transport models. However, a return towards a less simplistic (and more computationally demanding) molecular view (MV) is needed that acknowledges that atmospheric OPM is a mixture of organic compounds with differing polarities, water, and in some cases dissolved salts. The higher computational cost of MV modeling results from a need for iterative calculations of the composition-dependent gas/particle partition coefficient values. MV modeling of OPM that considered water uptake (but not dissolved salts) was carried out for the southeast United States for the period August 29 through September 7, 2006. Three model variants were used at three universities: CMAQ-RH-2p (at PSU), UCD/CIT-RH-2p (at UCD), and CMAQ-RH-MCM (at TAMU). With the first two, MV structural characteristics (carbon number and numbers of functional groups) were assigned to each of the 2p products used in CMAQv.4.7.1 such that resulting predicted Kp,i values matched those in CMAQv.4.7.1. When water uptake was allowed, most runs assumed that uptake occurred only into the SOA portion, and imposed immiscibility of SOA with primary organic aerosol (POA). (POA is often viewed as rather non-polar, while SOA is commonly viewed as moderately-to-rather polar. Some runs with UCD/CIT-RH-2p were used to investigate the effects of POA/SOA miscibility.) CMAQ-RH-MCM used MCM to

  8. On the Structure and Adjustment of Inversion-Capped Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flows: Large-Eddy Simulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Kelly, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    A range of large-eddy simulations, with differing free atmosphere stratification and zero or slightly positive surface heat flux, is investigated to improve understanding of the neutral and near-neutral, inversion-capped, horizontally homogeneous, barotropic atmospheric boundary layer with emphasis...... on the upper region. We find that an adjustment time of at least 16 h is needed for the simulated flow to reach a quasi-steady state. The boundary layer continues to grow, but at a slow rate that changes little after 8 h of simulation time. A common feature of the neutral simulations is the development...... of a super-geostrophic jet near the top of the boundary layer. The analytical wind-shear models included do not account for such a jet, and the best agreement with simulated wind shear is seen in cases with weak stratification above the boundary layer. Increasing the surface heat flux decreases the magnitude...

  9. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...... localities of tensions between matter and the immaterial, the practical and the ideal, and subject and object. In the colloquial language there can, moreover, often seem to be something authentic or genuine about atmosphere, juxtaposing it to staging, which is implied to be something simulated or artificial....... This introduction seeks to outline how a number of scholars have addressed the relationship between staged atmospheres and experience, and thus highlight both the philosophical, social and political aspects of atmospheres...

  10. Average intensity and spreading of a partially coherent Gaussian Schell- model beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence%部分相干高斯-谢尔光束在大气湍流中的平均强度与展宽

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向宁静; 王明军; 王太荣

    2012-01-01

    基于广义惠更斯-菲涅耳原理,交叉密度函数以及Rytov’s相位结构函数二次近似,利用傅里叶高斯变换推导出部分相干高斯-谢尔光束在大气湍流中的强度分布表达式,并在此基础上分析了大气湍流对角展宽、桶中功率以及光束漂移的影响。数值结果表明:角展宽和光束漂移与光束的初始半径、光源的相干长度有关;远场能量集中度随湍流强度增加、光源相干宽度减小而减小。%Based on the extended Huygens - Fresnel integral, the cross - spectral density and Rytov ' s phase structure function, average intensity is derived by a formula for the Fourier transform of Ganssian function. Angular spread , PIB, beam wander of a partially coherent Gaussian - Schell - model ( GSM ) beam in turbulent atmosphere are found out. It shows that angular spread and beam wander have relation with initial beam radius, initial coherence width in the atmospheric turbulence, The energy centrality will decrease as the turbulence intensity increases, spatial correlation length decreases.

  11. Thermodynamic structure of the marine atmosphere over the region 80-87°E along 13°N during August (phase II) BOBMEX-99

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Savita B Morwal; P Seetaramayya

    2003-06-01

    Thermodynamic structure of the marine atmosphere in the region between 80 and 87°E along 13°N over the Bay of Bengal was studied using 13 high resolution radiosonde profiles from surface −400 hPa collected onboard ORV Sagar Kanya during the period 27th-30th August, during BOBMEX-99. Saturation point concept, mixing line analysis and conserved variable diagrams have been used to identify boundary layer characteristics such as air mass movement and stability of the atmosphere. The results showed relatively dry air near the ocean surface between 1000 and 950 hPa. This feature is confirmed by the conserved v structure in this layer. Further, v seldom showed any inversions in this region. The e and es profiles showed persistent low cloud layers between 900 and 700 hPa. The conserved variable diagrams (e-q) showed the existence of double mixing line structures approximately at 950 and 700 hPa levels.

  12. VERTICAL ATMOSPHERIC STRUCTURE IN A VARIABLE BROWN DWARF: PRESSURE-DEPENDENT PHASE SHIFTS IN SIMULTANEOUS HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE-SPITZER LIGHT CURVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buenzli, Esther; Apai, Daniel; Flateau, Davin [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Morley, Caroline V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 (United States); Showman, Adam P.; Lewis, Nikole K. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Marley, Mark S. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Reid, I. Neill, E-mail: ebuenzli@email.arizona.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Heterogeneous clouds or temperature perturbations in rotating brown dwarfs produce variability in the observed flux. We report time-resolved simultaneous observations of the variable T6.5 brown dwarf 2MASS J22282889-431026 over the wavelength ranges 1.1-1.7 {mu}m and broadband 4.5 {mu}m. Spectroscopic observations were taken with Wide Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope and photometry with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The object shows sinusoidal infrared variability with a period of 1.4 hr at most wavelengths with peak-to-peak amplitudes between 1.45% and 5.3% of the mean flux. While the light curve shapes are similar at all wavelengths, their phases differ from wavelength to wavelength with a maximum difference of more than half of a rotational period. We compare the spectra with atmospheric models of different cloud prescriptions, from which we determine the pressure levels probed at different wavelengths. We find that the phase lag increases with decreasing pressure level, or higher altitude. We discuss a number of plausible scenarios that could cause this trend of light curve phase with probed pressure level. These observations are the first to probe heterogeneity in an ultracool atmosphere in both horizontal and vertical directions, and thus are an ideal test case for realistic three-dimensional simulations of the atmospheric structure with clouds in brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets.

  13. Polymorphism and electronic structure of polyimine and its potential significance for prebiotic chemistry on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahm, Martin; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Usher, David A.; Shalloway, David

    2016-07-01

    The chemistry of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is believed to be central to the origin of life question. Contradictions between Cassini-Huygens mission measurements of the atmosphere and the surface of Saturn’s moon Titan suggest that HCN-based polymers may have formed on the surface from products of atmospheric chemistry. This makes Titan a valuable “natural laboratory” for exploring potential nonterrestrial forms of prebiotic chemistry. We have used theoretical calculations to investigate the chain conformations of polyimine (pI), a polymer identified as one major component of polymerized HCN in laboratory experiments. Thanks to its flexible backbone, the polymer can exist in several different polymorphs, which are relatively close in energy. The electronic and structural variability among them is extraordinary. The band gap changes over a 3-eV range when moving from a planar sheet-like structure to increasingly coiled conformations. The primary photon absorption is predicted to occur in a window of relative transparency in Titan’s atmosphere, indicating that pI could be photochemically active and drive chemistry on the surface. The thermodynamics for adding and removing HCN from pI under Titan conditions suggests that such dynamics is plausible, provided that catalysis or photochemistry is available to sufficiently lower reaction barriers. We speculate that the directionality of pI’s intermolecular and intramolecular =N-H…N hydrogen bonds may drive the formation of partially ordered structures, some of which may synergize with photon absorption and act catalytically. Future detailed studies on proposed mechanisms and the solubility and density of the polymers will aid in the design of future missions to Titan.

  14. Polymorphism and electronic structure of polyimine and its potential significance for prebiotic chemistry on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahm, Martin; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Usher, David A.; Shalloway, David

    2016-01-01

    The chemistry of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is believed to be central to the origin of life question. Contradictions between Cassini–Huygens mission measurements of the atmosphere and the surface of Saturn’s moon Titan suggest that HCN-based polymers may have formed on the surface from products of atmospheric chemistry. This makes Titan a valuable “natural laboratory” for exploring potential nonterrestrial forms of prebiotic chemistry. We have used theoretical calculations to investigate the chain conformations of polyimine (pI), a polymer identified as one major component of polymerized HCN in laboratory experiments. Thanks to its flexible backbone, the polymer can exist in several different polymorphs, which are relatively close in energy. The electronic and structural variability among them is extraordinary. The band gap changes over a 3-eV range when moving from a planar sheet-like structure to increasingly coiled conformations. The primary photon absorption is predicted to occur in a window of relative transparency in Titan’s atmosphere, indicating that pI could be photochemically active and drive chemistry on the surface. The thermodynamics for adding and removing HCN from pI under Titan conditions suggests that such dynamics is plausible, provided that catalysis or photochemistry is available to sufficiently lower reaction barriers. We speculate that the directionality of pI’s intermolecular and intramolecular =N–H…N hydrogen bonds may drive the formation of partially ordered structures, some of which may synergize with photon absorption and act catalytically. Future detailed studies on proposed mechanisms and the solubility and density of the polymers will aid in the design of future missions to Titan. PMID:27382167

  15. Articulating Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an architectural approach to designing computational interfaces by articulating the notion of atmosphere in the field of interaction design. It draws upon the concept of kinesthetic interaction and a philosophical notion on atmosphere emphasizing the importance of bodily...... experience in space, presented as middle ground experience. In the field of HCI, middle ground experiences complete the unarticulated spectrum between designing for foreground of attention or background awareness. When “Articulating Atmospheres through Middle Ground Experiences in Interaction Design...

  16. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Takaaki Kajita

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses...

  17. Vertical Resolution Effects on CIRS Spectroscopy of Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C. A.; Calcutt, S. B.; Taylor, F. W.

    1996-09-01

    The Cassini/Huygens mission to the Saturnian system, which is scheduled for launch late next year, will study the moon Titan in unprecedented detail. Onboard the orbiter will be CIRS - the Composite Infrared Spectrometer - which will, amongst many tasks, provide a wealth of information on Titan's atmosphere. This enigmatic world is known to have a massive, mainly nitrogen atmosphere, but important questions remain; in particular the abundance of argon, and the state of methane in the troposphere, where patchy clouds may form and some sort of rainfall is likely. The infrared data from CIRS will help to resolve these and other issues. When CIRS makes measurements of the limb, the field of view must be taken into account. Not only is the width important, but there is also an unusual weighting function due to the slight asymmetry in response of some of the detector elements, which must be taken into account when the spectral data is analysed. We have developed a radiative transfer code to model the infrared signature of the atmosphere from 10 to 1400 cm(-1) , for nadir and limb sightlines, at the CIRS resolution of 0.5 cm(-1) . We also present measurements made at Oxford of the responses of individual detectors. Finally, we show limb spectra calculated for different heights in the atmosphere convolved with the detector responses, to demonstrate the importance of the field-of-view effect on the scientific objectives.

  18. The influence of the Extreme Ultraviolet spectral energy distribution on the structure and composition of the upper atmosphere of exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, J H

    2015-01-01

    By varying the profiles of stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral energy distribution (SED), we tested the influences of stellar EUV SEDs on the physical and chemical properties of the escaping atmosphere. We apply our model to study four exoplanets, HD\\,189733b, HD\\,209458b, GJ \\,436b, and Kepler-11b. We found that the total mass loss rates of an exoplanet, which are determined mainly by the integrated fluxes, are moderately affected by the profiles of the EUV SED, but the composition and species distributions in the atmosphere can be dramatically modified by the different profiles of the EUV SED. For exoplanets with a high hydrodynamic escape parameter ($\\lambda$), the amount of atomic hydrogen produced by photoionization at different altitudes can vary by one to two orders of magnitude with the variation of stellar EUV SEDs. The effect of photoionization of H is prominent when the EUV SED is dominated by the low-energy spectral region (400-900${\\AA}$), which pushes the transition of H/H$^{+}$ to low al...

  19. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Kajita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses atmospheric neutrino experiments and the neutrino oscillation studies with these neutrinos.

  20. Atmospheric electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, J Alan

    1957-01-01

    Atmospheric Electricity brings together numerous studies on various aspects of atmospheric electricity. This book is composed of 13 chapters that cover the main problems in the field, including the maintenance of the negative charge on the earth and the origin of the charges in thunderstorms. After a brief overview of the historical developments of atmospheric electricity, this book goes on dealing with the general principles, results, methods, and the MKS system of the field. The succeeding chapters are devoted to some aspects of electricity in the atmosphere, such as the occurrence and d

  1. Nonlinear Aerodynamic and Nonlinear Structures Interations (NANSI) Methodology for Ballute/Inflatable Aeroelasticity in Hypersonic Atmospheric Entry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA proposes a phase II effort to fully develop a comprehensive methodology for aeroelastic predictions of the nonlinear aerodynamic/aerothermodynamic - structure...

  2. Advancing the Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) to Accommodate Atmospheric River Influences Using a Hierarchical Estimation Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C.; Cifelli, R.; Zamora, R. J.; Schneider, T.

    2014-12-01

    The PRISM monthly climatology has been widely used by various agencies for diverse purposes. In the River Forecast Centers (RFCs), the PRISM monthly climatology is used to support tasks such as QPE, or quality control of point precipitation observation, and fine tune QPFs. Validation studies by forecasters and researchers have shown that interpolation involving PRISM climatology can effectually reduce the estimation bias for the locations where moderate or little orographic phenomena occur. However, many studies have pointed out limitations in PRISM monthly climatology. These limitations are especially apparent in storm events with fast-moving wet air masses or with storm tracks that are different from climatology. In order to upgrade PRISM climatology so it possesses the capability to characterize the climatology of storm events, it is critical to integrate large-scale atmospheric conditions with the original PRISM predictor variables and to simulate them at a temporal resolution higher than monthly. To this end, a simple, flexible, and powerful framework for precipitation estimation modeling that can be applied to very large data sets is thus developed. In this project, a decision tree based estimation structure was developed to perform the aforementioned variable integration work. Three Atmospheric River events (ARs) were selected to explore the hierarchical relationships among these variables and how these relationships shape the event-based precipitation distribution pattern across California. Several atmospheric variables, including vertically Integrated Vapor Transport (IVT), temperature, zonal wind (u), meridional wind (v), and omega (ω), were added to enhance the sophistication of the tree-based structure in estimating precipitation. To develop a direction-based climatology, the directions the ARs moving over the Pacific Ocean were also calculated and parameterized within the tree estimation structure. The results show that the involvement of the

  3. Vertical Structure and Optical Properties of Titans Aerosols from Radiance Measurements Made Inside and Outside the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doose, Lyn R.; Karkoschka, Erich; Tomasko, Martin G.; Anderson, Carrie M.

    2017-01-01

    Prompted by the detection of stratospheric cloud layers by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS; see Anderson, C.M., Samuelson, R.E. [2011]. Icarus 212, 762-778), we have re-examined the observations made by the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) in the atmosphere of Titan together with two constraints from measurements made outside the atmosphere. No evidence of thin layers (coefficient near this altitude. To fit the geometric albedo measured from outside the atmosphere the decrease in the single scattering albedo of Titan's aerosols at high altitudes, noted in earlier studies of DISR data, must continue to much higher altitudes. The altitude of Titan's limb as a function of wavelength requires that the scale height of the aerosols decrease with altitude from the 65 km value seen in the DISR observations below 140 km to the 45 km value at higher altitudes. We compared the variation of radiance with nadir angle observed in the DISR images to improve our aerosol model. Our new aerosol model fits the altitude and wavelength variations of the observations at small and intermediate nadir angles but not for large nadir angles, indicating an effect that is not reproduced by our radiative transfer model. The volume extinction profiles are modeled by continuous functions except near the enhancement level near 55 km altitude. The wavelength dependence of the extinction optical depth is similar to earlier results at wavelengths from 500 to 700 nm, but is smaller at shorter wavelengths and larger toward longer wavelengths. A Hapke-like model is used for the ground reflectivity, and the variation of the Hapke single scattering albedo with wavelength is given. Fits to the visible spectrometers looking upward and downward are achieved except in the methane bands longward of 720 nm. This is possibly due to uncertainties in extrapolation of laboratory measurements from 1 km-am paths to much longer paths at lower pressures. It could also be due to changes in the

  4. Explosion of red-supergiant stars: Influence of the atmospheric structure on shock breakout and early-time supernova radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessart, Luc; John Hillier, D.; Audit, Edouard

    2017-09-01

    Early-time observations of Type II supernovae (SNe) 2013cu and 2013fs have revealed an interaction of ejecta with material near the star surface. Unlike Type IIn SN 2010jl, which interacts with a dense wind for 1 yr, the interaction ebbs after 2-3 d, suggesting a dense and compact circumstellar envelope. Here, we use multi-group radiation hydrodynamics and non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium radiative transfer to explore the properties of red-supergiant (RSG) star explosions embedded in a variety of dense envelopes. We consider the cases of an extended static atmosphere or a steady-state wind, adopting a range of mass loss rates. The shock breakout signal, luminosity and color evolution up to 10 d, and ejecta dynamics are strongly influenced by the properties of this nearby environment. This compromises the use of early-time observations to constrain R⋆. For dense circumstellar envelopes, the time-integrated luminosity over the first 10-15 d can be boosted by a factor of a few. The presence of narrow lines for 2-3 d in 2013fs and 2013cu require a cocoon of material of 0.01 M⊙ out to 5-10 R⋆. Spectral lines evolve from electron scattering to Doppler broadened with a growing blueshift of their emission peaks. Recent studies propose a super-wind phase with a mass loss rate from 0.001 up to 1 M⊙ yr-1 in the last months or years of the life of a RSG, although there is no observational constraint that this external material is a steady-state outflow. Alternatively, observations may be explained by the explosion of a RSG star inside its complex atmosphere. Indeed, spatially resolved observations reveal that RSG stars have extended atmospheres, with the presence of downflows and upflows out to several R⋆, even in a standard RSG such as Betelgeuse. Mass loading in the region intermediate between star and wind can accommodate the 0.01 M⊙ needed to explain the observations of 2013fs. Signatures of interaction in early-time spectra of RSG star explosions may

  5. Vertical Structure and Optical Properties of Titans Aerosols from Radiance Measurements Made Inside and Outside the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doose, Lyn R.; Karkoschka, Erich; Tomasko, Martin G.; Anderson, Carrie M.

    2017-01-01

    Prompted by the detection of stratospheric cloud layers by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS; see Anderson, C.M., Samuelson, R.E. [2011]. Icarus 212, 762-778), we have re-examined the observations made by the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) in the atmosphere of Titan together with two constraints from measurements made outside the atmosphere. No evidence of thin layers (<1 km) in the DISR image data sets is seen beyond the three previously reported layers at 21 km, 11 km, and 7 km by Karkoschka and Tomasko (Karkoschka, E., Tomasko, M.G. [2009]. Icarus 199, 442-448). On the other hand, there is evidence of a thicker layer centered at about 55 km. A rise in radiance gradients in the Downward-Looking Visible Spectrometer (DLVS) data below 55 km indicates an increase in the volume extinction coefficient near this altitude. To fit the geometric albedo measured from outside the atmosphere the decrease in the single scattering albedo of Titan's aerosols at high altitudes, noted in earlier studies of DISR data, must continue to much higher altitudes. The altitude of Titan's limb as a function of wavelength requires that the scale height of the aerosols decrease with altitude from the 65 km value seen in the DISR observations below 140 km to the 45 km value at higher altitudes. We compared the variation of radiance with nadir angle observed in the DISR images to improve our aerosol model. Our new aerosol model fits the altitude and wavelength variations of the observations at small and intermediate nadir angles but not for large nadir angles, indicating an effect that is not reproduced by our radiative transfer model. The volume extinction profiles are modeled by continuous functions except near the enhancement level near 55 km altitude. The wavelength dependence of the extinction optical depth is similar to earlier results at wavelengths from 500 to 700 nm, but is smaller at shorter wavelengths and larger toward longer wavelengths. A Hapke

  6. Vertical Structure and Optical Properties of Titans Aerosols from Radiance Measurements Made Inside and Outside the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doose, Lyn R.; Karkoschka, Erich; Tomasko, Martin G.; Anderson, Carrie M.

    2017-01-01

    Prompted by the detection of stratospheric cloud layers by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS; see Anderson, C.M., Samuelson, R.E. [2011]. Icarus 212, 762-778), we have re-examined the observations made by the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) in the atmosphere of Titan together with two constraints from measurements made outside the atmosphere. No evidence of thin layers (<1 km) in the DISR image data sets is seen beyond the three previously reported layers at 21 km, 11 km, and 7 km by Karkoschka and Tomasko (Karkoschka, E., Tomasko, M.G. [2009]. Icarus 199, 442-448). On the other hand, there is evidence of a thicker layer centered at about 55 km. A rise in radiance gradients in the Downward-Looking Visible Spectrometer (DLVS) data below 55 km indicates an increase in the volume extinction coefficient near this altitude. To fit the geometric albedo measured from outside the atmosphere the decrease in the single scattering albedo of Titan's aerosols at high altitudes, noted in earlier studies of DISR data, must continue to much higher altitudes. The altitude of Titan's limb as a function of wavelength requires that the scale height of the aerosols decrease with altitude from the 65 km value seen in the DISR observations below 140 km to the 45 km value at higher altitudes. We compared the variation of radiance with nadir angle observed in the DISR images to improve our aerosol model. Our new aerosol model fits the altitude and wavelength variations of the observations at small and intermediate nadir angles but not for large nadir angles, indicating an effect that is not reproduced by our radiative transfer model. The volume extinction profiles are modeled by continuous functions except near the enhancement level near 55 km altitude. The wavelength dependence of the extinction optical depth is similar to earlier results at wavelengths from 500 to 700 nm, but is smaller at shorter wavelengths and larger toward longer wavelengths. A Hapke

  7. Comparison of CO{2} laser and atmospheric plasma treatments on thermal stability and structural modifications of microporous poly(vinyl chloride)/Silica composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, C.; Etienne, S.; Bour, J.; Ruch, D.; Aubriet, F.

    2008-09-01

    Several ways using surface modification are commonly used to enhance thermal stability of polymer matrices. In this study, Continuous-Wave carbon dioxide (CW CO{2}) laser irradiation and atmospheric pressure non-thermal He plasma treatment on microporous poly(vinyl chlo-ride)/Silica composite have been investigated and compared. On one hand the alternative was based on the efficiency of the thermal energy afforded by CW CO{2} laser irradiation and induced photodegradation processes to release HCl and form polyene sequences under well-controlled condition. On the other hand atmospheric plasma treatment involved surface modification by formation of unstable radicals, inducing crosslinking and dehydrochlorination. In both cases a global thermal stabilization of the composite was noticed by partial dehydrochlorination of PVC, even for short exposure time. The main effects observed after laser irradiation were related to the formation of a very dense structure on surface with very low chlorine content and an important chlorine atoms in-depth gradient on the cross section up to 150 μm in thickness; whereas atmospheric He plasma treatment led to a homogeneous decrease of the chlorine in-depth content due to the plasma interpenetration in the porous microstructure. Structural and chemical modifications both on extreme surface and in the thickness have been investigated respectively by Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) coupled with an Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Composites thermal stability and investigation on chlorine release have been evaluated by Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) coupled with Mass Spectrometry (MS).

  8. The structure of an Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope with novel photon detectors for ground-based gamma-ray astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehne, Jan-Hendrik [TU, Dortmund (Germany); Collaboration: FACT-Collaboration

    2011-07-01

    Very high energy gamma-ray astronomy is a rapidly expanding field of research. Observations are nearly all carried out with so-called Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes all using Photomultipliers as light sensors up to now. A test telescope using Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (G-APD) for the first time is under construction. The former HEGRA CT3 telescope mount on the Canary island La Palma is being refurbished for the First G-APD Cherenkov Telescope (FACT). Here, we describe the mirror system, its detailed construction, focal length distribution, spectral reflectivity and point spread function for all hexagonal aluminum facets. In October 2010, the mirrors were pre-aligned on site using a laser alignment setup, and first tracking tests of the new drive system were conducted.

  9. Structural evolution of derived species on FeAl surface exposed to a N{sub 2} + SO{sub 2} atmosphere: Experimental and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Medina, M.A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Lazaro Cardenas 152, San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. C.P. 07730 (Mexico); Liu, H.B. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Lazaro Cardenas 152, San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. C.P. 07730 (Mexico); Canizal, G. [Centro de Educacion Continua y a Distancia (Unidad Allende), Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Allende No. 38, Centro, Mexico D.F. 06010 (Mexico); Ascencio, J.A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Lazaro Cardenas 152, San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. C.P. 07730 (Mexico)]. E-mail: ascencio@imp.mx

    2007-01-15

    Characterizations were performed by scanning electron microscopy analysis with energy dispersive spectrometry and scanning probe microscope for structural evolution of derived species on FeAl surface exposed to a N{sub 2} + SO{sub 2} atmosphere at high temperature. First principle calculations were also employed in order to clarify the formation of new product on the surface and its mechanism. The results demonstrate that the tendency of the structure with oxygen atoms involve a stronger interaction and lower energy to be formed with the surface and consequently the possible production of oxide-species is more probable and multiple aggregates with different shapes can be generated for the temperatures of 625 and 700 deg. C, with no preferential crystal habit. Sample treated at 775 deg. C denotes the production of hexagonal crystals, which is externally characterized by polyhedrons growing in axial direction as fibbers with flat faces that match with the alumina.

  10. Structure and deuterium retention properties of tungsten layers deposited by plasma sputtering in a mixed atmosphere of D2 and He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X. H.; Shi, L. Q.; O'Connor, D. J.; King, B.

    2014-03-01

    The influence of the deposition conditions on the surface morphology, crystal structure and deuterium retention of the tungsten layers formed by rf magnetron plasma sputtering in mixed atmosphere of D2, He and Ar, has been carried out. Helium containing deuterated tungsten layers (named He-WDx) on Cu/Si substrate demonstrate serious film damages with zones of cracks, fractures, flaking-off and large surface blisters. However, these kinds of damages do not happen on the He-WDx layers performed on mechanically polished polycrystalline Cu substrates because of larger surface roughness of the substrates. The crystal structure of the W layer greatly changes with the additional He in the layer, and large amounts of defects resulting in lattice expansion and X-diffraction peak broadening were produced in the W crystal. He in the W layer has direct impacts on D retention. Both D and He concentrations vary simultaneously with He fraction, attached negative bias and substrate temperature.

  11. Understanding the Spatiotemporal Structures in Atmosphere-Land Surface Exchange at the Jülich Observatory for Cloud Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marke, T.; Crewell, S.; Loehnert, U.; Rascher, U.; Schween, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    This study aims at identifying spatial and temporal patterns of surface-atmosphere exchange parameters from highly-resolved and long-term observations. For this purpose, a combination of continuous ground-based measurements and dedicated aircraft campaigns using state-of-the-art remote sensing instrumentation at the Jülich Observatory for Cloud Evolution (JOYCE) is available. JOYCE provides a constantly growing multi-year data set for detailed insight into boundary layer processes and patterns related to surface conditions since 2011. The JOYCE site is embedded in a rural environment with different crop types. The availability of a scanning microwave radiometer and cloud radar is a unique component of JOYCE. The hemispheric scans of the ground-based radiometer allow the identification and quantification of horizontal gradients in water vapor and liquid water path measurements. How these gradients are connected to near-surface fluxes and the topography depending on the mean wind flow and surface fluxes is investigated by exploring the long-term data set. Additionally, situations with strong coupling to the surface can be identified by observing the atmospheric turbulence and stability within the boundary layer, using different lidar systems. Furthermore, the influence of thin liquid water clouds, which are typical for the boundary layer development, on the radiation field and the interaction with the vegetation is examined. Applying a synergistic statistical retrieval approach, using passive microwave and infrared observations, shows an improvement in retrieving thin liquid cloud microphysical properties. The role of vegetation is assessed by exploiting the time series of the sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) signal measured at the ground level using automated measurements. For selected case studies, a comparison to maps of hyperspectral reflectance and SIF obtained from an airborne high-resolution imaging spectrometer is realized.

  12. Spreading and wander of Gaussian-Schell model beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence%部分相干高斯-谢尔光束在大气湍流中的展宽与漂移

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向宁静; 吴振森; 王明军

    2013-01-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral, the cross-spectral density and Rytov's phase structure function, average intensity was derived by a formula for the Fourier transform of Gaussian function. Then mean squared root beam width, beam wander of a partially coherent Gaussian-Schell-model (GSM) beam in turbulent atmosphere were found out. It shows that beam spread and beam wander have relation with initial beam radius, initial coherence width, wavelength and transmitter hight in the atmospheric turbulence. At last, some measures were brought to decrease the effect of atmospheric turbulence.%  基广义惠更斯-菲涅耳理,交叉密度函数以及Rytov's相位结构函数二次近似,利用傅里高斯变换推导出部分相干高斯-谢尔(GSM)光束在大气湍流中的强度分布表达式,并在此基础上分析了大气湍流对光束展宽、以及光束漂移的影响。数值模拟表明:光束展宽和光束漂移与光束的初始半径、波长、光的相干宽度以及发射机的位置高度有关,并提出了减小湍流影响的措施。

  13. Structure of large nitrate-water clusters at ambient temperatures: simulations with effective fragment potentials and force fields with implications for atmospheric chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Yifat; Thomas, Jennie L; Kemp, Daniel D; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J; Gordon, Mark S; Tobias, Douglas J; Gerber, R Benny

    2009-11-19

    Structural properties of large NO(3)(-).(H(2)O)(n) (n = 15-500) clusters are studied by Monte Carlo simulations using effective fragment potentials (EFPs) and by classical molecular dynamics simulations using a polarizable empirical force field. The simulation results are analyzed with a focus on the description of hydrogen bonding and solvation in the clusters. In addition, a comparison between the electronic structure based EFP and the classical force field description of the 32 water cluster system is presented. The EFP simulations, which focused on the cases of n = 15 and 32, show an internal, fully solvated structure and a "surface adsorbed" structure for the 32 water cluster at 300 K, with the latter configuration being more probable. The internal solvated structure and the "surface adsorbed" structure differ considerably in their hydrogen bonding coordination numbers. The force field based simulations agree qualitatively with these results, and the local geometry of NO(3)(-) and solvation at the surface-adsorbed site in the force field simulations are similar to those predicted using EFPs. Differences and similarities between the description of hydrogen bonding of the anion in the two approaches are discussed. Extensive classical force field based simulations at 250 K predict that long time scale stability of "internal" NO(3)(-), which is characteristic of extended bulk aqueous interfaces, emerges only for n > 300. Ab initio Møller-Plesset perturbation theory is used to test the geometries of selected surface and interior anions for n = 32, and the results are compared to the EFP and MD simulations. Qualitatively, all approaches agree that surface structures are preferred over the interior structures for clusters of this size. The relatively large aqueous clusters of NO(3)(-) studied here are of comparable size to clusters that lead to new particle formation in air. Nitrate ions on the surface of such clusters may have significantly different photochemistry

  14. A new model for the structure of the DACs and SACs regions in the Oe and Be stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Danezis, E; Lyratzi, E; Popović, L Č; Dimitrijević, M S; Antoniou, A; Theodosiou, E

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a new mathematical model for the density regions where a specific spectral line and its SACs/DACs are created in the Oe and Be stellar atmospheres. In the calculations of final spectral line function we consider that the main reasons of the line broadening are the rotation of the density regions creating the spectral line and its DACs/SACs, as well as the random motions of the ions. This line function is able to reproduce the spectral feature and it enables us to calculate some important physical parameters, such as the rotational, the radial and the random velocities, the Full Width at Half Maximum, the Gaussian deviation, the optical depth, the column density and the absorbed or emitted energy. Additionally, we can calculate the percentage of the contribution of the rotational velocity and the ions' random motions of the DACs/SACs regions to the line broadening. Finally, we present two tests and three short applications of the proposed model.

  15. Lidar and Ceilometer Observations and Comparisons of Atmospheric Cloud Structure at Nagqu of Tibetan Plateau in 2014 Summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoquan Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the project of the Third Tibetan Plateau Experiment of Atmospheric Science (TIPEX III, the intensive observation of cloud and precipitation in Nagqu was conducted from 1 July to 31 August 2014. The CL31 ceilometer and a WAter vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Lidar (WACAL were deployed and focused on studying the cloud macroscopic characteristics and vertical distribution. The statistical result of CL31 ceilometer in continuous operation mode shows that the cloud occurrence is about 81% with a majority of simple one-layer cloud. The cloud base and top height are retrieved by improved differential zero-crossing method using lidar data. The results of cloud base height (CBH are compared with CL31 ceilometer, showing a good consistency with each other, however, in some cases, the CL31 ceilometer overestimates the CBH and is also validated by synchronous radiosonde data. The time snippet comparisons of cloud property between CL31 ceilometer and lidar imply that the cloud properties have obvious diurnal variations with “U” shape distribution. The cloud development including the time-spatial distribution features also has distinct diurnal variations based on the lidar measurement. The detection range of lidar goes beyond the maximum height of CL31 ceilometer, offering substantial observations to the analysis of cirrus cloud radiation characteristics and formation mechanism.

  16. Optical and Structural Properties of ZnO Nanoparticles Synthesized by CO2 Microwave Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Min Chun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of carbon-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles synthesized by CO2 microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure are presented. The 2.45-GHz microwave plasma torch and feeder for injecting Zn granules are used in the synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles. The Zn granules (13.5 g/min were introduced into the microwave plasma by CO2 (5 l/min swirl gas. The microwave power delivered to the CO2 microwave plasma was 1 kW. The synthesis of carbon-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles was carried out in accordance with CO2 + Zn → carbon-doped ZnO + CO. The synthesized carbon-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles have a high purity hexagonal phase. The absorption edge of carbon-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles exhibited a red shift from a high-energy wavelength to lower in the UV-visible spectrum, due to band gap narrowing. A UV-NIR spectrometer, X-ray diffraction, emission scanning electron-microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and a UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer were used for the characterization of the as-produced products.

  17. Performance Evaluation of Engineered Structured Sorbents for Atmosphere Revitalization Systems On Board Crewed Space Vehicles and Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David F.; Perry, Jay L.; Knox, James C.; Junaedi, Christian; Roychoudhury, Subir

    2011-01-01

    Engineered structured (ES) sorbents are being developed to meet the technical challenges of future crewed space exploration missions. ES sorbents offer the inherent performance and safety attributes of zeolite and other physical adsorbents but with greater structural integrity and process control to improve durability and efficiency over packed beds. ES sorbent techniques that are explored include thermally linked and pressure-swing adsorption beds for water-save dehumidification and sorbent-coated metal meshes for residual drying, trace contaminant control, and carbon dioxide control. Results from sub-scale performance evaluations of a thermally linked pressure-swing adsorbent bed and an integrated sub-scale ES sorbent system are discussed.

  18. 用惠更斯面等效原理证明零场定理%Using Huygens' surface equivalence principle to prove the extinction theorem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯维娜; 杜惠平

    2006-01-01

    The field equivalence principle, one of the fundamental concepts in electromagnetics, has numerous applications. However, it is not easy for people to understand it thoroughly. Especially,it is even harder to understand the extinction theorem and its realization in practice. In this article the authors use Huygens' surface equivalence principle to prove the extinction theorem, which is the fundamental concepts in electromagnetics. And this method proved to be a simple and good one in practice.%场等效原理是电磁学的基本定理之一,但场等效原理特别是零场定理很难被人理解,人们很难想象在一个区域中的场等效为原问题的场,而在另一个区域中却为零场.用惠更斯面等效原理证明了零场定理,该方法简单明了,易于理解,是一个很好的证明方法.

  19. Incorporation of a spatial source distribution and a spatial sensor sensitivity in a laser ultrasound propagation model using a streamlined Huygens' principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laloš, Jernej; Babnik, Aleš; Možina, Janez; Požar, Tomaž

    2016-03-01

    The near-field, surface-displacement waveforms in plates are modeled using interwoven concepts of Green's function formalism and streamlined Huygens' principle. Green's functions resemble the building blocks of the sought displacement waveform, superimposed and weighted according to the simplified distribution. The approach incorporates an arbitrary circular spatial source distribution and an arbitrary circular spatial sensitivity in the area probed by the sensor. The displacement histories for uniform, Gaussian and annular normal-force source distributions and the uniform spatial sensor sensitivity are calculated, and the corresponding weight distributions are compared. To demonstrate the applicability of the developed scheme, measurements of laser ultrasound induced solely by the radiation pressure are compared with the calculated waveforms. The ultrasound is induced by laser pulse reflection from the mirror-surface of a glass plate. The measurements show excellent agreement not only with respect to various wave-arrivals but also in the shape of each arrival. Their shape depends on the beam profile of the excitation laser pulse and its corresponding spatial normal-force distribution.

  20. Atmospheric composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    The earth's atmosphere is made up of a number of gases in different relative amounts. Near sea level and up to about 90 km, the amount of these atmospheric gases in clean, relatively dry air is practically constant. Four of these gases, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon dioxide, make up 99.99 percent by volume of the atmosphere. Two gases, ozone and water vapor, change in relative amounts, but the total amount of these two is very small compared to the amount of the other gases. The atmospheric composition shown in a table can be considered valid up to 90 km geometric altitude. Above 90 km, mainly because of molecular dissociation and diffusive separation, the composition changes.

  1. Atmospheric Dispositifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    , the conceptual foundations and protocols for the production of atmosphere in architecture might be found beneath the surface of contemporary debates. In this context, the notion of atmospheric dispositif – illustrated through an oeuvre of the German architect Werner Ruhnau and its theoretical and historical...... as a spatial phenomenon, exploring a multiplicity of conditions that constitute their resonant origins – i.e. the production sites from and within they have emerged. The intention is also to argue that despite the fact that atmosphere as an aesthetic category has crystallised over the last few decades...... contextualisation – provides a platform for revealing productive entanglements between heterogeneous elements, disciplines and processes. It also allows rendering atmosphere as a site of co-production open to contingencies and affective interplay on multiples levels: at the moment of its conceptualisation...

  2. Hotsotpots and hot moments; the control of structural heterogeneity on the thermal regime of the peatland soil-atmosphere interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Rhoswen; Moore, Paul; Kettridge, Nicholas; Krause, Stefan; Devito, Kevin; Waddington, James Michael

    2017-04-01

    Peat surface temperature acts as a master variable driving non-linear terrestrial biogeochemical, ecohydrological, and micrometeorological processes, inducing short-lived extremes or spatially isolated events across heterogeneous peatland surfaces. Changes to ecosystem structure such as canopy removal may change the temperature extremes and spatio-temporal location of these non-linear processes. In order to understand the impact of structural disturbances on peat surface thermal regimes, we simulate how different ecosystem structural layers (i.e. tree layer, lower vascular layer, bryophyte layer, micro topography) influence the spatial and temporal variability of peatland surface temperatures on a carbon rich forested peatland system. Simulations of peat temperatures are validated using more than 1.9 million peat surface temperature measurements across a 10 m2 area of peatland under un-disturbed, trees removed, and lower vascular vegetation removed conditions (through the use of Fibre Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing Technology). The simulations of peat temperature using different structural complexity allows us to determine how ecosystem layers may simplify or complicate surface thermal patterns and promote or dampen temperature extremes. Our study provides important insight into spatial and temporal variability in peatland biogeochemical functioning and the production of hot spots or hot moments in peatland carbon storage or export.

  3. Identification of sources of lead in the atmosphere by chemical speciation using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Kohei; Sakaguchi, Aya; Tanimizu, Masaharu; Takaku, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Yuka; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2014-02-01

    Sources of Pb pollution in the local atmosphere together with Pb species, major ions, and heavy metal concentrations in a size-fractionated aerosol sample from Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan) have been determined by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, ion chromatography, and ICP-MS/AES, respectively. About 80% of total Pb was concentrated in fine aerosol particles. Lead species in the coarse aerosol particles were PbC2O4, 2PbCO3 Pb(OH)2, and Pb(NO3)2, whereas Pb species in the fine aerosol particles were PbC2O4, PbSO4, and Pb(NO3)2. Chemical speciation and abundance data suggested that the source of Pb in the fine aerosol particles was different from that of the coarse ones. The dominant sources of Pb in the fine aerosol particles were judged to be fly ash from a municipal solid waste incinerator and heavy oil combustion. For the coarse aerosol particles, road dust was considered to be the main Pb source. In addition to Pb species, elemental concentrations in the aerosols were also determined. The results suggested that Pb species in size-fractionated aerosols can be used to identify the origin of aerosol particles in the atmosphere as an alternative to Pb isotope ratio measurement.

  4. Structure and properties of chromium-containing coatings produced by electron-beam facing in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletika, I. M.; Golkovskii, M. G.; Krylova, T. A.; Perovskaya, M. V.

    2009-03-01

    The chemical and phase compositions and the structure of layers formed by electron-beam facing of low-carbon steel with mixtures of powdered chromium and chromium carbide in air are studied. The microhardness of the layers is determined over their thickness. The faced steels are tested for bending strength, corrosion resistance, and resistance to abrasive wear. A possible mechanism of formation of the properties of the coating, i.e., the hardness, the wear resistance, and the crack resistance, is considered.

  5. Effects of atmospheric relative humidity on Stratum Corneum structure at the molecular level: ex vivo Raman spectroscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyumvuhore, Raoul; Tfayli, Ali; Duplan, Hélène; Delalleau, Alexandre; Manfait, Michel; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette

    2013-07-21

    Skin hydration plays an important role in the optimal physical properties and physiological functions of the skin. Despite the advancements in the last decade, dry skin remains the most common characteristic of human skin disorders. Thus, it is important to understand the effect of hydration on Stratum Corneum (SC) components. In this respect, our interest consists in correlating the variations of unbound and bound water content in the SC with structural and organizational changes in lipids and proteins using a non-invasive technique: Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra were acquired on human SC at different relative humidity (RH) levels (4-75%). The content of different types of water, bound and free, was measured using the second derivative and curve fitting of the Raman bands in the range of 3100-3700 cm(-1). Changes in lipidic order were evaluated using νC-C and νC-H. To analyze the effect of RH on the protein structure, we examined in the Amide I region, the Fermi doublet of tyrosine, and the νasymCH3 vibration. The contributions of totally bound water were found not to vary with humidity, while partially bound water varied with three different rates. Unbound water increased greatly when all sites for bound water were saturated. Lipid organization as well as protein deployment was found to be optimal at intermediate RH values (around 60%), which correspond to the maximum of SC water binding capacity. This analysis highlights the relationship between bound water, the SC barrier state and the protein structure and elucidates the optimal conditions. Moreover, our results showed that increased content of unbound water in the SC induces disorder in the structures of lipids and proteins.

  6. Identification of Coherent Structures of Turbulence at the Atmospheric Surface Layer%大气边界层湍流相干结构的识别

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昕; M.H.Al-Jiboori; 等

    2002-01-01

    A parameter-free method based on orthonormal wavelet transforms is recommended for calculating the principal time scale of coherent structures in atmospheric boundary-layer measurements. First, the atmospheric turbulent signal is decomposed into the small scate vortex that has approximate isotropy and the large scale vortex with the digital filter. Then, the large scale vortex is used to detect colterent structures with this method. The principal time scale and profile of coherent structures for velocity components (u, v, w)above rice fields are obtained. In order to testify the validity of this method, the correlation of coherent structures and non-coherent structures are also calculated.%首先利用数字滤波方法对淮河流域试验的大气边界层湍流观测资料进行三项分解,将大气边界层湍流的风速信号分解为近似各项同性的小尺度涡和各向异性的大尺度涡.然后再将大尺度涡信号进行离散正交小波分解,寻找相干结构的主要特征尺度.对于大气边界层湍流垂直脉动风速来说,其相干结构的主要特征尺度为16 s;对径向与纬向脉动风速来说,其相干结构的主要特征尺度为32~64 s.在此基础上,利用小波的反变换提取出相干结构的信号与非相干结构的信号,并计算两者间的相关系数,最大仅有0.02.此外,对原始大气湍流观测信号不进行数字滤波,直接利用本文中子波分析法提取湍流相干结构所得结果作比较研究;并探讨了采用对称或似对称离散正交小波对此研究的影响.

  7. Atmospheric Photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Harrie; Potter, A. E.

    1961-01-01

    The upper atmosphere offers a vast photochemical laboratory free from solid surfaces, so all reactions take place in the gaseous phase. At 30 km altitude the pressure has fallen to about one-hundredth of that at ground level, and we shall, rather arbitrarily, regard the upper atmosphere as beginning at that height. By a little less than 100 km the pressure has fallen to 10(exp -3) mm Hg and is decreasing by a power of ten for every 15 km increase in altitude. Essentially we are concerned then with the photochemistry of a nitrogen-oxygen mixture under low-pressure conditions in which photo-ionization, as well as photodissociation, plays an important part. Account must also be taken of the presence of rare constituents, such as water vapour and its decomposition products, including particularly hydroxyl, oxides of carbon, methane and, strangely enough, sodium, lithium and calcium. Many curious and unfamiliar reactions occur in the upper atmosphere. Some of them are luminescent, causing the atmosphere to emit a dim light called the airglow. Others, between gaseous ions and neutral molecules, are almost a complete mystery at this time. Similar interesting phenomena must occur in other planetary atmospheres, and they might be predicted if sufficient chemical information were available.

  8. Change in atmospheric deposition during last half century and its impact on lichen community structure in Eastern Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Rajesh; Mishra, Seema; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Upreti, Dalip Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Climatic fluctuations largely affects species turnover and cause major shifts of terrestrial ecosystem. In the present study the five decade old herbarium specimens of lichens were compared with recent collection from Darjeeling district with respect to elements, PAHs accumulation and carbon isotope composition (δ13C) to explore the changes in climatic conditions and its impact on lichen flora. The δ13C has increased in recent specimens which is in contrast to the assumption that anthropogenic emission leads to δ13C depletion in air and increased carbon discrimination in flora. Study clearly demonstrated an increase in anthropogenic pollution and drastic decrease in precipitation while temperature showed abrupt changes during the past five decades resulting in significant change in lichen community structure. The Usneoid and Pertusorioid communities increased, while Physcioid and Cyanophycean decreased, drastically. Lobarian abolished from the study area, however, Calcicoid has been introduced in the recent past. Probably, post-industrial revolution, the abrupt changes in the environment has influenced CO2 diffusion and/C fixation of (lower) plants either as an adaptation strategy or due to toxicity of pollutants. Thus, the short term studies (≤5 decades) might reflect recent micro-environmental condition and lichen community structure can be used as model to study the global climate change.

  9. Atmospheric thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Iribarne, J V

    1973-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the atmosphere is the subject of several chapters in most textbooks on dynamic meteorology, but there is no work in English to give the subject a specific and more extensive treatment. In writing the present textbook, we have tried to fill this rather remarkable gap in the literature related to atmospheric sciences. Our aim has been to provide students of meteorology with a book that can playa role similar to the textbooks on chemical thermodynamics for the chemists. This implies a previous knowledge of general thermodynamics, such as students acquire in general physics courses; therefore, although the basic principles are reviewed (in the first four chapters), they are only briefly discussed, and emphasis is laid on those topics that will be useful in later chapters, through their application to atmospheric problems. No attempt has been made to introduce the thermodynamics of irreversible processes; on the other hand, consideration of heterogeneous and open homogeneous systems permits a...

  10. Structural and Chemical Analysis of Hydroxyapatite (HA)-Boron Nitride (BN) Nanocomposites Sintered Under Different Atmospheric Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Feray; Sezen, Meltem; Gecgin, Merve; Goncu, Yapincak; Ay, Nuran

    2017-08-24

    Calcium phosphate derivatives have been widely employed in medical and dental applications for hard tissue repair, as they are the main inorganic constitution of hard tissue; such as bones and teeth. Owing to their excellent osteoconductive and bioactive properties, hydroxyapatite- (HA) based ceramics are the best candidates of this group for medical, bioscience, and dental applications. However, when replacing a bone or tooth, HA is not able to sustain similar mechanical properties. In this study, to improve the mechanical properties, nanoscale hexagonal boron nitride with different compositional percentages was added to the nano HA to form composites. The effect of compositional changes and sintering parameters on microstructural and morphological properties of the ceramic composites was comparatively investigated. Detailed chemical characterization of the composite materials was carried out using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, whereas scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy investigations were employed to monitor morphological and surface features. Additional transmission electron microscopy investigations were carried out to reveal the nanostructure and crystal structure of the composites.

  11. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, M. S.; Fortney, J.; Seager, S.; Barman, T.

    The key to understanding an extrasolar giant planet's spectrum - and hence its detectability and evolution - lies with its atmosphere. Now that direct observations of thermal emission from extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are in hand, atmosphere models can be used to constrain atmospheric composition, thermal structure, and ultimately the formation and evolution of detected planets. We review the important physical processes that influence the atmospheric structure and evolution of EGPs and consider what has already been learned from the first generation of observations and modeling. We pay particular attention to the roles of cloud structure, metallicity, and atmospheric chemistry in affecting detectable properties through Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the transiting giant planets. Our review stresses the uncertainties that ultimately limit our ability to interpret EGP observations. Finally we will conclude with a look to the future as characterization of multiple individual planets in a single stellar system leads to the study of comparative planetary architectures.

  12. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Marley, M S; Seager, S; Barman, T; Marley, Mark S.; Fortney, Jonathan; Seager, Sara; Barman, Travis

    2006-01-01

    The key to understanding an extrasolar giant planet's spectrum--and hence its detectability and evolution--lies with its atmosphere. Now that direct observations of thermal emission from extrasolar giant planets are in hand, atmosphere models can be used to constrain atmospheric composition, thermal structure, and ultimately the formation and evolution of detected planets. We review the important physical processes that influence the atmospheric structure and evolution of extrasolar giant planets and consider what has already been learned from the first generation of observations and modeling. We pay particular attention to the roles of cloud structure, metallicity, and atmospheric chemistry in affecting detectable properties through Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the transiting giant planets. Our review stresses the uncertainties that ultimately limit our ability to interpret EGP observations. Finally we will conclude with a look to the future as characterization of multiple individual planets in a ...

  13. The influence of annealing in nitrogen atmosphere on the electrical, optical and structural properties of spray- deposited ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikhmayies, S.J. [Applied Science Private Univ., Amman (Jordan). Dept. of Physics; Abu El-Haija, N.M.; Ahmad-Bitar, R.N. [Jordan Univ., Amman (Jordan). Dept. of Physics

    2009-07-01

    Thin-film zinc oxide (ZnO) has many applications in solar cell technology and is considered to be a candidate for the substitution of indium tin oxide and tin oxide. ZnO thin films can be prepared by thermal evaporation, rf-sputtering, atomic layer deposition, chemical vapor deposition, sol-gel, laser ablation and spray pyrolysis technique. Spray pyrolysis has received much attention because of its simplicity and low cost. In this study, large area and highly uniform polycrystalline ZnO thin films were produced by spray pyrolysis using a home-made spraying system on glass substrates at 450 degrees C. The electrical, optical and structural properties of the ZnO films were enhanced by annealing the thin films in nitrogen atmosphere. X-ray diffraction revealed that the films are polycrystalline with a hexagonal wurtzite structure. The preferential orientation did not change with annealing, but XRD patterns revealed that some very weak lines had grown. There was no noticeable increase in the grain size. The transmittance of the films increased as a result of annealing. It was concluded that post-deposition annealing is essential to improve the quality of the ZnO thin films. The electrical properties improved due to a decrease in resistivity. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Atmospheric Refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Calculations of atmospheric refraction are generally based on a simplified model of atmospheric density in the troposphere which assumes that the temperature decreases at a constant lapse rate from sea level up to a height equal to eleven km, and that afterwards it remains constant. In this model, the temperature divided by the lapse rate determines the length scale in the calculations for altitudes less than this height. But daily balloon measurements across the U.S.A. reveal that in some cases the air temperature actually increases from sea level up to a height of about one km, and only after reaching a plateau, it decreases at an approximately constant lapse rate. Moreover, in three examples considered here, the temperature does not remain constant at eleven km , but continues to decreases to a minimum at about sixteen kilometers , and then increases at higher altitudes at a lower rate. Calculations of atmospheric refraction based on this atmospheric data is compared with the results of simplified models.

  15. Study of the origin and structure of a nocturnal atmospheric density current from observations and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ander Arrillaga, Jon; Yagüe, Carlos; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Sastre, Mariano

    2016-04-01

    Density currents are flows generated when a dense fluid passes through a less dense surrounding, under the influence of gravity. They usually appear as a consequence of sea-breeze circulations, thunderstorm outflows or katabatic flows. Density currents acquire a particular relevance during nocturnal stable situations, as their onset causes a significant turbulence increase (both from buoyancy and shear) and they occasionally produce turbulence intermittency through the formation of gravity waves. In this work, the arrival of a density current on 23 September 2015 is analysed in the CIBA site (Spain), which is located in the Spanish Northern Plateau, approximately 200 km away from the sea and 100 km away from the closest mountain ranges. Previous studies at this location associated similar nocturnal events with daytime sea breeze in the eastern Cantabrian coast [1]. Micrometeorological measurements from sonic anemometers and different sensors at multiple levels up to 100 m agl provide a solid database. In this specific case, the outbreak of the density current occurs 2 hours after sunset, causing an abrupt increase of the wind speed and a significant weakening of the surface-based thermal inversion. Besides, turbulent parameters and fluxes such as the friction velocity, the sensible heat flux and the Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) are sharply altered with its arrival. The latter, indeed, increases by two orders of magnitude and the Multi Resolution Flux Decomposition (MRFD) of this and other turbulent variables gives the approximate size of the contributing eddies. Furthermore, simulations with the WRF model, which is tested for different Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) schemes and the topo_wind option for complex topography [2], give meaningful information about the vertical structure and origin of this density current. [1] Udina, M., Soler, M.R., Viana, S. & Yagüe, C. (2013). Model simulation of gravity waves triggered by a density current. Q J R Meteorol Soc, 139

  16. Pluto's atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot, J.L.; Dunham, E.W.; Bosh, A.S.; Slivan, S.M.; Young, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    Airborne CCD photometer observations of Pluto's June 9, 1988 stellar occultation have yielded an occultation lightcurve, probing two regions on the sunrise limb 2000 km apart, which reveals an upper atmosphere overlying an extinction layer with an abrupt upper boundary. The extinction layer may surround the entire planet. Attention is given to a model atmosphere whose occultation lightcurve closely duplicates observations; fits of the model to the immersion and emersion lightcurves exhibit no significant derived atmosphere-structure differences. Assuming a pure methane atmosphere, surface pressures of the order of 3 microbars are consistent with the occultation data. 43 references.

  17. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Crossfield, Ian J M

    2015-01-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics & circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly-imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  18. Atmospheric materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    A disjunction between the material and the immaterial has been at the heart of the architectural debate for decades. In this dialectic tension, the notion of atmosphere which increasingly claims attention in architectural discourse seems to be parallactic, leading to the re-evaluation of perceptual...... experience and, consequently, to the conceptual and methodological shifts in the production of space, and hence in the way we think about materiality. In this context, architectural space is understood as a contingent construction – a space of engagement that appears to us as a result of continuous...... and complex interferences revealed through our perception; ‘the atmospheric’ is explored as a spatial and affective quality as well as a sensory background, and materiality as a powerful and almost magical agency in shaping of atmosphere. Challenging existing dichotomies and unraveling intrinsic...

  19. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K

    2016-01-01

    In view of the observation by IceCube of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos, it is important to quantify the uncertainty in the background of atmospheric neutrinos. There are two sources of uncertainty, the imperfect knowledge of the spectrum and composition of the primary cosmic rays that produce the neutrinos and the limited understanding of hadron production, including charm, at high energy. This paper is an overview of both aspects.

  20. Extension of the AURIC Radiative Transfer Model for Mars Atmospheric Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. S.; Lumpe, J. D.; Correira, J.; Stewart, A. I.; Schneider, N. M.; Deighan, J.

    2013-12-01

    We present recent updates to the Atmospheric Ultraviolet Radiance Integrated Code (AURIC) model that allow it to be used as a forward model for Mars atmospheric research. AURIC is a state of the art far ultraviolet (FUV) to near-infrared (NIR) atmospheric radiance model that has been used extensively for analysis and modeling of terrestrial upper atmospheric remote sensing data. We present recent updates to the Atmospheric Ultraviolet Radiance Integrated Code (AURIC) model that allow it to be used as a forward model for Mars atmospheric research. AURIC is a state of the art far ultraviolet (FUV) to near-infrared (NIR) atmospheric radiance model that has been used extensively for analysis and modeling of terrestrial upper atmospheric remote sensing data. The airglow modeling capabilities of AURIC make it a powerful tool that can be used to characterize optical backgrounds, simulate data from both rocket and satellite-borne optical instrumentation, and serve as a forward model driver for geophysical retrieval algorithms. Upgrades made to allow modeling of the Martian atmosphere include 1-D Mars photochemistry and molecular transport and the addition of the following molecular band systems: CO Cameron; CO Fourth Positive Group; CO2+ Fox-Duffendack-Barker; CO2+ UV Doublet; CO Hopfield-Birge (B-X); and CO+ First Negative Group. Furthermore, a prototype AURIC-Titan model has also been developed, allowing comparison of AURIC spectral radiances with Cassini-Huygens/UVIS data [Stevens et al., 2011; Stevens et al., in preparation]. Extension of AURIC to the atmospheres of Pluto and it's largest moon, Charon, is also ongoing in support of NASA's New Horizons mission [Stevens, Evans, and Gladstone, 2012; 2013].

  1. Gas chromatography for space exploration : application to the in situ analysis of Titan's atmosphere, comets nucleus and martian soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, R.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; Mettetal, F.; Coscia, D.; Coll, P.; Cabane, M.; Rodier, C.; Vidal-Madjar, C.; Raulin, F.

    Gas chromatography is one of the most powerful technique for the in situ chemical investigation of extraterrestrial environments Its successful use in past planetary missions to Mars 1976-78 and Venus 1978-85 made it the main method selected for the in situ molecular characterization of the Titan s atmosphere comets and the Martian soil Indeed gas chromatography fully meet the severe constraints required in space instrumentation such as small weight and size low power consumption high mechanical strength and resistance to deep space conditions vacuum cosmic rays This paper presents the gas chromatographic subsystems which have been developed at LISA and SA respectively for the Huygens probe of the Cassini-Huygens mission to Titan 1 the Philae probe of the Rosetta mission to a comet 2 and the future landing probe of the MSL 2009 mission to Mars 3 The coupling of these GC subsystems with pyrolysis and chemical derivatization techniques allows the chemical analysis of a wide range of molecules including non-volatiles complex organics such as aminoacides and nucleobases the search of wich is of particular interest for exobiology The analytical capabilities of these subsystems with a particular emphasis of their exobiological aspects and implications are described 1 G Israel C Szopa F Raulin M Cabane P Coll R Sternberg et al Nature vol438 796-799 2005 2 C Szopa R Sternberg F Raulin and H Rosenbauer PSS 863-877 2003 3 Cabane M P Coll C Szopa G Isra e l F Raulin

  2. A study of the atmospherically important reactions of dimethylsulfide (DMS) with I2 and ICl using infrared matrix isolation spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccaceci, Sonya; Armata, Nerina; Ogden, J Steven; Dyke, John M; Rhyman, Lydia; Ramasami, Ponnadurai

    2012-02-21

    The reactions of dimethylsulfide (DMS) with molecular iodine (I(2)) and iodine monochloride (ICl) have been studied by infrared matrix isolation spectroscopy by co-condensation of the reagents in an inert gas matrix. Molecular adducts of DMS + I(2) and DMS + ICl have also been prepared using standard synthetic methods. The vapour above each of these adducts trapped in an inert gas matrix gave the same infrared spectrum as that recorded for the corresponding co-condensation reaction. In each case, the infrared spectrum has been interpreted in terms of a van der Waals adduct, DMS : I(2) and DMS : ICl, with the aid of infrared spectra computed for their minimum energy structures at the MP2 level. Computed relative energies of minima and transition states on the potential energy surfaces of these reactions were used to understand why they do not proceed further than the reactant complexes DMS : I(2) and DMS : ICl. The main findings of this research are compared with results obtained earlier for the DMS + Cl(2) and DMS + Br(2) reactions, and the atmospheric implications of the conclusions are also considered.

  3. Structure-dependent degradation of polar compounds in weathered oils observed by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Ananna; Kim, Donghwi; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-10-15

    The resin fractions of fresh mixtures of three oils spilled during the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill, as well as weathered oils collected at weathering stages II and IV from the oil spill site were analyzed and compared by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The significantly decreased abundance of N(+) and [N-H+D](+) ions suggested that secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds were preferentially degraded during the early stage of weathering. [N+H](+) and [N+D](+) ions previously attributed to pyridine-type compounds degraded more slowly than secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds. The preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed by photo-degradation experiments using 15 standard compounds. In addition, significant increases of [S1O1+H](+) and [S1O1+D](+) ions with higher DBE values were observed from fresh oil mixtures as compared to stages II and IV samples, and that could be linked with the decrease of higher DBE compounds of the S1 class. This study presented convincing arguments and evidence demonstrating that secondary and tertiary amines were more vulnerable to photo-degradation than compounds containing pyridine, and hence, preferential degradation depending on chemical structures must be considered in the production of hazardous or toxic components.

  4. Influence of RF excitation during pulsed laser deposition in oxygen atmosphere on the structural properties and luminescence of nanocrystalline ZnO:Al thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meljanac, Daniel, E-mail: dmeljan@irb.hr; Plodinec, Milivoj; Siketić, Zdravko; Gracin, Davor [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Juraić, Krunoslav [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička 54, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia and Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Graz University of Technology, Stremayrgasse 9/IV, 8010 Graz (Austria); Krstulović, Nikša; Salamon, Krešimir; Skenderović, Hrvoje; Kregar, Zlatko; Rakić, Iva Šrut [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Bernstorff, Sigrid [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, SS 14, Km 163.5, I-34049 Basovizza (TS) (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Thin ZnO:Al layers were deposited by pulsed laser deposition in vacuum and in oxygen atmosphere at gas pressures between 10 and 70 Pa and by applying radio-frequency (RF) plasma. Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) data showed that an increase in the oxygen pressure leads to an increase in the roughness, a decrease in the sample density, and changes in the size distribution of nanovoids. The nanocrystal sizes estimated from GIXRD were around 20 nm, while the sizes of the nanovoids increased from 1 to 2 nm with the oxygen pressure. The RF plasma mainly influenced the nanostructural properties and point defects dynamics. The photoluminescence consisted of three contributions, ultraviolet (UV), blue emission due to Zn vacancies, and red emission, which are related to an excess of oxygen. The RF excitation lowered the defect level related to blue emission and narrowed the UV luminescence peak, which indicates an improvement of the structural ordering. The observed influence of the deposition conditions on the film properties is discussed as a consequence of two main effects: the variation of the energy transfer from the laser plume to the growing film and changes in the growth chemistry.

  5. Establishment of a structural scale for evaluating sports team’s ethical atmospheres%运动队伦理气氛测评结构量表的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马德森; 孙庆祝

    2012-01-01

      在梳理国外相关研究文献、开放式调查和结构访谈的基础上,编制了运动队伦理气氛测评结构初始量表,通过对初始量表的试测和修改,形成了正式的“运动队伦理气氛测评结构量表”。运用此量表对600名被试者进行了调查,通过探索性因素和验证性因素分析,得出我国运动队伦理气氛测评结构,包括道德准则型伦理气氛、关怀型伦理气氛、法律制度型伦理气氛、团队精神型伦理气氛和利己主义型伦理气氛。我国运动队伦理气氛测评结构量表与西方的有所差异。%  On the basis of sorting out related domestic and foreign research literature, open surveys and structural interviews, the authors established an initial structural scale for evaluating sports team’s ethic atmospheres, formed a“Structural Scale for Evaluating Sports Team’s Ethical Atmospheres” by testing and revising the initial scale, used this scale to survey 600 testees, and by means of exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis, worked out a structure for evaluating Chinese sports team’s ethical atmospheres, which include moral standard type ethical atmosphere, caring type ethical atmosphere, legal system type ethical atmosphere, team spirit type ethical atmosphere and egoism type ethical atmosphere. The structural scale for evaluating Chinese sports team’s ethical atmospheres is somewhat different from the ones used by western countries.

  6. Diagnosis of an intense atmospheric river impacting the pacific northwest: Storm summary and offshore vertical structure observed with COSMIC satellite retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, P.J.; Ralph, F.M.; Wick, G.A.; Kuo, Y.-H.; Wee, T.-K.; Ma, Z.; Taylor, G.H.; Dettinger, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses the new satellite-based Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) mission to retrieve tropospheric profiles of temperature and moisture over the data-sparse eastern Pacific Ocean. The COSMIC retrievals, which employ a global positioning system radio occultation technique combined with "first-guess" information from numerical weather prediction model analyses, are evaluated through the diagnosis of an intense atmospheric river (AR; i.e., a narrow plume of strong water vapor flux) that devastated the Pacific Northwest with flooding rains in early November 2006. A detailed analysis of this AR is presented first using conventional datasets and highlights the fact that ARs are critical contributors to West Coast extreme precipitation and flooding events. Then, the COSMIC evaluation is provided. Offshore composite COSMIC soundings north of, within, and south of this AR exhibited vertical structures that are meteorologically consistent with satellite imagery and global reanalysis fields of this case and with earlier composite dropsonde results from other landfalling ARs. Also, a curtain of 12 offshore COSMIC soundings through the AR yielded cross-sectional thermodynamic and moisture structures that were similarly consistent, including details comparable to earlier aircraft-based dropsonde analyses. The results show that the new COSMIC retrievals, which are global (currently yielding ???2000 soundings per day), provide high-resolution vertical-profile information beyond that found in the numerical model first-guess fields and can help monitor key lower-tropospheric mesoscale phenomena in data-sparse regions. Hence, COSMIC will likely support a wide array of applications, from physical process studies to data assimilation, numerical weather prediction, and climate research. ?? 2008 American Meteorological Society.

  7. Impact of the Loess Plateau on the atmospheric boundary layer structure and air quality in the North China Plain: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Ming; Ma, ZhiQiang; Lin, Weili; Zhang, Hongliang; Hu, Jianlin; Wang, Ying; Xu, Xiaobin; Fuentes, Jose D; Xue, Ming

    2014-11-15

    The North China Plain (NCP), to the east of the Loess Plateau, experiences severe regional air pollution. During the daytime in the summer, the Loess Plateau acts as an elevated heat source. The impacts of such a thermal effect on meteorological phenomena (e.g., waves, precipitation) in this region have been discussed. However, its impacts on the atmospheric boundary layer structure and air quality have not been reported. It is hypothesized that the thermal effect of the Plateau likely modulates the boundary layer structure and ambient concentrations of pollutants over the NCP under certain meteorological conditions. Thus, this study investigates such effect and its impacts using measurements and three-dimensional model simulations. It is found that in the presence of daytime westerly wind in the lower troposphere (~1 km above the NCP), warmer air above the Loess Plateau was transported over the NCP and imposed a thermal inversion above the mixed boundary layer, which acted as a lid and suppressed the mixed layer growth. As a result, pollutants accumulated in the shallow mixed layer and ozone was efficiently produced. The downward branch of the thermally-induced Mountain-Plains Solenoid circulation over the NCP contributed to enhancing the capping inversion and exacerbating air pollution. Previous studies have reported that low mixed layer, a factor for elevated pollution in the NCP, may be caused by aerosol scattering and absorption of solar radiation, frontal inversion, and large scale subsidence. The present study revealed a different mechanism (i.e., westerly warm advection) for the suppression of the mixed layer in summer NCP, which caused severe O3 pollution. This study has important implications for understanding the essential meteorological factors for pollution episodes in this region and forecasting these severe events.

  8. Alkyl Chain Length Dependent Structural and Orientational Transformations of Water at Alcohol-Water Interfaces and Its Relevance to Atmospheric Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Jahur A; Namboodiri, V; Mathi, P; Singh, Ajay K

    2017-04-06

    Although the hydrophobic size of an amphiphile plays a key role in various chemical, biological, and atmospheric processes, its effect at macroscopic aqueous interfaces (e.g., air-water, oil-water, cell membrane-water, etc.), which are ubiquitous in nature, is not well understood. Here we report the hydrophobic alkyl chain length dependent structural and orientational transformations of water at alcohol (CnH2n+1OH, n = 1-12)-water interfaces using interface-selective heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (HD-VSFG) and Raman multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) spectroscopic techniques. The HD-VSFG results reveal that short-chain alcohols (CnH2n+1OH, n alcohols (CnH2n+1OH, n > 4, i.e., beyond 1-butanol) make the interfacial water more strongly H-bonded and reversely orientated; the OH stretch band maximum appears at ∼3200 cm(-1), and the H atoms are pointed away from the bulk water, that is, "H-up" oriented. Interestingly, for the alcohol of intermediate chain length (CnH2n+1OH, n = 4, i.e, 1-butanol), the interface is quite unstable even after hours of its formation and the time-averaged result is qualitatively similar to that of the long-chain alcohols, indicating a structural/orientational crossover of interfacial water at the 1-butanol-water interface. pH-dependent HD-VSFG measurements (with H2O as well as isotopically diluted water, HOD) suggest that the structural/orientational transformation of water at the long-chain alcohol-water interface is associated with the adsorption of OH(-) anion at the interface. Vibrational mapping of the water structure in the hydration shell of OH(-) anion (obtained by Raman-MCR spectroscopy of NaOH in HOD) clearly shows that the water becomes strongly H-bonded (OH stretch max. ≈ 3200 cm(-1)) while hydrating the OH(-) anion. Altogether, it is conceivable that alcohols of different hydrophobic chain lengths that are present in the troposphere will differently affect the interfacial electrostatics and

  9. Atmospheric Smell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenslund, Anette

    their attention away from smell – as skilled inattentive noses – in order to focus on their more important work. Intruding body odours breaching the uniform ‘scentless silence’ of the environment, however, provoked explicit handlings to avoid discomfort observed in the interaction between nurses and patients...... revealed how a museum-staged hospital atmosphere of an art installation was directly addressed owing to its smell. Curiously, this observation speaks against prevailing literature portraying smell as the ‘mute sense’, and what is more, the museum display did not alter smell curatorially. Rather, smell...

  10. Alarming atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie; Kinch, Sofie

    2014-01-01

    . As a response to this situation, our design artefact, the interactive furniture Kidkit, invites children to become accustomed to the alarming sounds sampled from the ward while they are waiting in the waiting room. Our design acknowledges how atmospheres emerge as temporal negotiations between the rhythms......, a familiar relationship with the alarming sounds in the ward, enabling her to focus later more on the visit with the relative. The article discusses the proposed design strategy behind this solution and the potentiality for its use in hospital environments in general....

  11. Alarming atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie; Kinch, Sofie

    2014-01-01

    Nurses working in the Neuro-Intensive Care Unit at Aarhus University Hospital lack the tools to prepare children for the alarming atmosphere they will enter when visiting a hospitalised relative. The complex soundscape dominated by alarms and sounds from equipment is mentioned as the main stressor...... of the body and the environment in conjunction with our internalised perception of the habituated background. By actively controlling the sounds built into Kidkit, the child can habituate them through a process of synchronising them with her own bodily rhythms. Hereby the child can establish, in advance...

  12. The structure of turbulence in the middle and lower atmosphere seen by and deduced from MF, HF and VHF radar, with special emphasis on small-scale features and anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. K. Hocking

    Full Text Available An overview of the turbulent structures seen by MF, HF and VHF radars in the troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere is presented, drawing on evidence from previous radar measurements, in situ studies, laboratory observations, observations at frequencies other than those under focus, and modelling studies. We are particularly interested in structures at scales less than one radar pulse length, and smaller than the beam width, and especially the degree of anisotropy of turbulence at these scales. Previous radar observations are especially important in regard to the degree of anisotropy, and we highlight the role that these studies have had in furthering our understanding in this area. The contrasts and similarities between the models of anisotropic turbulence and specular reflection are considered. The need for more intense studies of anisotropy at MF, HF and VHF is especially highlighted, since this is an area in which these radars can make important contributions to the understanding of atmospheric turbulence.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence – Atmospheric composition and structure (instruments and techniques – History of geophysics (atmospheric sciences

  13. Atmospheric Ice Accretion Measurement Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Virk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric icing on structures has proven to be an area of concern in many cold climate geographical regions like arctic and alpine. Difficulties encountered by the communication, construction and power industries in these areas are the subject of intense investigations for researchers from decades. Three main methods of investigation are generally employed by researchers to study atmospheric ice accretion on structures: a continuous field measurements, b lab based simulations using icing wind tunnel & c numerical modelling. This paper presents a brief review study of various techniques to understand and measure the atmospheric ice accretion on structures, anti/de icing techniques and important parameters for numerical modelling of atmospheric ice accretion.

  14. Impact of the Loess Plateau on the atmospheric boundary layer structure and air quality in the North China Plain: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiao-Ming, E-mail: xhu@ou.edu [Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms, and School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73072 (United States); Ma, ZhiQiang, E-mail: zqma@ium.cn [Institute of Urban Meteorology, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing 100089 (China); Lin, Weili [Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Chemistry, Center for Atmospheric Watch and Services, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing, 100081 (China); Zhang, Hongliang; Hu, Jianlin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wang, Ying; Xu, Xiaobin [Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Chemistry, Center for Atmospheric Watch and Services, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing, 100081 (China); Fuentes, Jose D. [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Xue, Ming [Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms, and School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73072 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The North China Plain (NCP), to the east of the Loess Plateau, experiences severe regional air pollution. During the daytime in the summer, the Loess Plateau acts as an elevated heat source. The impacts of such a thermal effect on meteorological phenomena (e.g., waves, precipitation) in this region have been discussed. However, its impacts on the atmospheric boundary layer structure and air quality have not been reported. It is hypothesized that the thermal effect of the Plateau likely modulates the boundary layer structure and ambient concentrations of pollutants over the NCP under certain meteorological conditions. Thus, this study investigates such effect and its impacts using measurements and three-dimensional model simulations. It is found that in the presence of daytime westerly wind in the lower troposphere (∼ 1 km above the NCP), warmer air above the Loess Plateau was transported over the NCP and imposed a thermal inversion above the mixed boundary layer, which acted as a lid and suppressed the mixed layer growth. As a result, pollutants accumulated in the shallow mixed layer and ozone was efficiently produced. The downward branch of the thermally-induced Mountain-Plains Solenoid circulation over the NCP contributed to enhancing the capping inversion and exacerbating air pollution. Previous studies have reported that low mixed layer, a factor for elevated pollution in the NCP, may be caused by aerosol scattering and absorption of solar radiation, frontal inversion, and large scale subsidence. The present study revealed a different mechanism (i.e., westerly warm advection) for the suppression of the mixed layer in summer NCP, which caused severe O{sub 3} pollution. This study has important implications for understanding the essential meteorological factors for pollution episodes in this region and forecasting these severe events. - Highlights: • Low mixed layer exacerbates air pollution over the North China Plain (NCP) • Warm advection from the Loess

  15. Influence of orographically induced transport process on the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer and on the distribution of trace gases; Einfluss orographisch induzierter Transportprozesse auf die Struktur der atmosphaerischen Grenzschicht und die Verteilung von Spurengasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossmann, M.

    1998-04-01

    The influence of terrain on the structure of the atmospheric boundary-layer and the distribution of trace gases during periods of high atmospheric pressure was studied by means of meteorological and air-chemical data collected in September 1992 during the TRACT experiment in the transition area between the upper Rhine valley and the northern Black Forest. The emphasis was on the investigation of the development of the convective boundary layer, the formation of thermally induced circulation systems, and the orographic exchange between the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere. Thanks to the extensive measurements, phenomena not yet described in literature could be verified by case studies, and processes that had only been established qualitatively could be quantified. (orig.)

  16. Ambient atmosphere-processable, printable Cu electrodes for flexible device applications: structural welding on a millisecond timescale of surface oxide-free Cu nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sang-Jin; Jo, Yejin; Lee, Eun Jung; Lee, Sun Sook; Kang, Young Hun; Jeon, Hye-Ji; Cho, Song Yun; Park, Jin-Seong; Seo, Yeong-Hui; Ryu, Beyong-Hwan; Choi, Youngmin; Jeong, Sunho

    2015-02-01

    Recently, various functional devices based on printing technologies have been of paramount interest, owing to their characteristic processing advantages along with excellent device performance. In particular, printable metallic electrodes have drawn attention in a variety of optoelectronic applications; however, research into printable metallic nanoparticles has been limited mainly to the case of an environmentally stable Ag phase. Despite its earth-abundance and highly conductive nature, the Cu phase, to date, has not been exploited as an ambient atmosphere-processable, printable material due to its critical oxidation problem in air. In this study, we demonstrate a facile route for generating highly conductive, flexible Cu electrodes in air by introducing the well-optimized photonic sintering at a time frame of 10-3 s, at which the photon energy, rather than conventional thermal energy, is instantly provided. It is elucidated here how the surface oxide-free, printed Cu particulate films undergo chemical structural/microstructural evolution depending on the instantly irradiated photon energy, and a successful demonstration is provided of large-area, flexible, printed Cu conductors on various substrates, including polyimide (PI), polyethersulfone (PES), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and paper. The applicability of the resulting printed Cu electrodes is evaluated via implementation into both flexible capacitor devices and indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) flexible thin-film transistors.Recently, various functional devices based on printing technologies have been of paramount interest, owing to their characteristic processing advantages along with excellent device performance. In particular, printable metallic electrodes have drawn attention in a variety of optoelectronic applications; however, research into printable metallic nanoparticles has been limited mainly to the case of an environmentally stable Ag phase. Despite its earth-abundance and highly conductive

  17. Structure-dependent degradation of polar compounds in weathered oils observed by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Ananna; Kim, Donghwi [Kyungpook National University, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon [Oil and POPs Research Group, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, KIOST, Geoje 656-834 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunghwan, E-mail: sunghwank@knu.ac.kr [Kyungpook National University, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Green Nano Center, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We examined source crude oil and weathered oils from M/V Hebei accident. • APPI hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh mass spectrometry was applied. • N{sub 1} class compounds with 2° and/or 3° amine decrease in larger scale than pyridines. • Preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed. • Significant increase in S{sub 1}O{sub 1} compounds was observed as the weathering proceeds. - Abstract: The resin fractions of fresh mixtures of three oils spilled during the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill, as well as weathered oils collected at weathering stages II and IV from the oil spill site were analyzed and compared by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The significantly decreased abundance of N{sup +}· and [N − H + D]{sup +} ions suggested that secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds were preferentially degraded during the early stage of weathering. [N + H]{sup +} and [N + D]{sup +} ions previously attributed to pyridine-type compounds degraded more slowly than secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds. The preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed by photo-degradation experiments using 15 standard compounds. In addition, significant increases of [S{sub 1}O{sub 1} + H]{sup +} and [S{sub 1}O{sub 1} + D]{sup +} ions with higher DBE values were observed from fresh oil mixtures as compared to stages II and IV samples, and that could be linked with the decrease of higher DBE compounds of the S{sub 1} class. This study presented convincing arguments and evidence demonstrating that secondary and tertiary amines were more vulnerable to photo-degradation than compounds containing pyridine, and hence, preferential degradation depending on chemical structures must be considered in the production of hazardous or toxic components.

  18. Surface effects of heat treatments in active atmosphere on structural, morphological and electrical characteristics of CuInS{_2} thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzari, M.; Abaab, M.; Rezig, B.; Brunel, M.

    1999-05-01

    Thin amorphous CuInS2 films were deposited on the glass substrates by single source thermal evaporation technique. The effect of heat treatments in sulfur atmosphere, in air and under vacuum on the surface layers is discussed in terms of the surface structure of the films. The films were examined by grazing X-ray diffraction and reflectometry (GXRD and GXRR). From a comparison with the GXRD results, the densities of the surface layers are explained by the presence of secondary phases. We established a correlation between stoichiometry and conductivity depending on the annealing conditions. Des couches minces de CuInS2 amorphe sont déposées sur des substrats de verre par la technique d'évaporation thermique monosource. L'effet des traitements thermiques sous atmosphère de soufre, air et sous vide sur les surfaces des couches a été discuté en relation avec les propriétés structurales des surfaces des couches. Les couches sont analysées par la réflectométrie et la diffraction de rayons X rasants. Par comparaison avec les résultats de la diffraction de rayons X rasants, les densités des surfaces des couches sont expliquées par la présence des phases secondaires. Nous avons établi une corrélation entre la stœchiométrie des couches et leurs conductivités en fonction des conditions de recuit.

  19. Structural Variation of an Atmospheric Heat Source over the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau and Its Influence on Precipitation in Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Na; GONG Yuanfa; HE Jinhai

    2009-01-01

    NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data and a 47-year precipitation dataset are utilized to analyze the relationship between an atmospheric heat source (hereafter called ) over the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau (QXP) and its surrounding area and precipitation in northwest China.Our main conclusions are as follows:(1) The horizontal distribution of and its changing trend are dramatic over QXP in the summer.There are three strong centers of over the south side of QXP with obvious differences in the amount of yearly precipitation and the number of heat sinks predominate in the arid and semi-arid regions of northwest China (NWC),beside the northern QXP with an obvious higher intensity in years with less precipitation.(2) In the summer,the variation of the heat source's vertical structure is obviously different between greater and lesser precipitation years in eastern northwest China (ENWC).The narrow heat sink belt forms between the northeast QXP and the southwestern part of Lake Baikal.In July and August of greater precipitation years,the heating center of the eastern QXP stays nearly over 35°N,and at 400 hPa of the eastern QXP,the strong upward motion of the heating center constructs a closed secondary vertical circulation cell over the northeast QXP (40°-46°N),which is propitious to add precipitation over the ENWC.Otherwise,the heating center shifts to the south of 30°N and disappears in July and August of lesser precipitation years,an opposite secondary circulation cell forms over the northeast QXP,which is a disadvantage for precipitation.Meanwhile,the secondary circulation cell in years with more or less precipitation over the ENWC is also related to the heat source over the Lake Baikal. (3) The vertical structure of the heat source over the western QXP has obvious differences between greater and lesser precipitation years in western northwest China in June and July.The strong/weak heat source over the western QXP produces relatively strong/weak ascending motion and

  20. ESA Atmospheric Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeijer, Sander

    2017-04-01

    The ESA Atmospheric Toolbox (BEAT) is one of the ESA Sentinel Toolboxes. It consists of a set of software components to read, analyze, and visualize a wide range of atmospheric data products. In addition to the upcoming Sentinel-5P mission it supports a wide range of other atmospheric data products, including those of previous ESA missions, ESA Third Party missions, Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS), ground based data, etc. The toolbox consists of three main components that are called CODA, HARP and VISAN. CODA provides interfaces for direct reading of data from earth observation data files. These interfaces consist of command line applications, libraries, direct interfaces to scientific applications (IDL and MATLAB), and direct interfaces to programming languages (C, Fortran, Python, and Java). CODA provides a single interface to access data in a wide variety of data formats, including ASCII, binary, XML, netCDF, HDF4, HDF5, CDF, GRIB, RINEX, and SP3. HARP is a toolkit for reading, processing and inter-comparing satellite remote sensing data, model data, in-situ data, and ground based remote sensing data. The main goal of HARP is to assist in the inter-comparison of datasets. By appropriately chaining calls to HARP command line tools one can pre-process datasets such that two datasets that need to be compared end up having the same temporal/spatial grid, same data format/structure, and same physical unit. The toolkit comes with its own data format conventions, the HARP format, which is based on netcdf/HDF. Ingestion routines (based on CODA) allow conversion from a wide variety of atmospheric data products to this common format. In addition, the toolbox provides a wide range of operations to perform conversions on the data such as unit conversions, quantity conversions (e.g. number density to volume mixing ratios), regridding, vertical smoothing using averaging kernels, collocation of two datasets, etc. VISAN is a cross-platform visualization and

  1. MLAM Simulation of Martian Atmosphere around Curiosity Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlaskin, Evgeny; Harri, Ari-Matti; Kauhanen, Janne; Määttänen, Anni; Paton, Mark; Savijärvi, Hannu; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero

    2013-04-01

    The NASA Mars Science Laboratory 'Curiosity' landed successfully in the Martian Gale crater close to the equator on 6 Aug 2012. As part of the environment monitoring instrument package REMS [1] the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) provided the pressure and humidity sensors. A similar pressure sensor was successfully flown earlier on the Phoenix lander mission in 2008 and on the Cassini / Huygens probe to Titan in 2005. The behaviour of the Martian atmosphere inside the Gale crater is dominated by its location close to the equator, the steep outer rims and the slopes of the central mountain. These complex topographical features make it ideally suited for a mesoscale atmospheric model like the Mars Limited Area Model (MLAM), developed jointly by the University of Helsinki (UH) and FMI to study mesoscale phenomena in the Martian Atmosphere [2]. MLAM is based on the hydro-static dynamical core of the HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM), an operational weather prediction model-analysis system used by several European countries. Using the simulation tools already published observational data from the first three months of Curiosity's operations and detailed topographical feature information we will show the observations in the context of the atmospheric conditions in the wider Gale crater region. In preparation of the simulation also the UH 1-dimensional model [3] is being used to study the boundary layer behaviour in that area. The expected long operation time of the rover will additionally provide insight in the seasonal change of atmospheric conditions at the equator. Some aspects might already become visible by the time of the conference. Newest Curiosity/REMS data will be shown in session PS2.5 "Curiosity on Mars: First results". Reference: [1] Gómez-Elvira J. et al. (2012), Space Sci. Rev. 170, 583-640. [2] Kauhanen, J., Siili T., Järvenoja, S. and Savijärvi, H. (2008) , The Mars Limited Area Model (MLAM) and simulations of atmospheric circulations

  2. Scattering of a partially coherent Gaussian-Schell beam from a diffuse target in slant atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen-Sen; Li, Ya-Qing

    2011-07-01

    On the basis of the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, the scattering of partially coherent Gaussian-Schell-model (GSM) beams from a diffuse target in slant double-passage atmospheric turbulence is studied and compared with that of fully coherent Gaussian beams. Using the cross-spectral density function of the GSM beams, we derive the expressions of the mutual coherence function, angle-of-arrival fluctuation, and covariance and variance of the intensity of the scattered field, taking into account the fluctuations of both the log-amplitude and phase. The numerical results are presented, and the influences of the wavelength, propagation distance, and waist radius on scattering properties are discussed. The perturbation region of the normalized intensity variance of the partially coherent GSM beam is smaller than that of the fully coherent Gaussian beam at the middle turbulence level. The normalized intensity variance of long-distance beam propagation is smaller than that of beam propagation along a short distance.

  3. Propagation based on second-order moments for partially coherent Laguerre-Gaussian beams through atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonggen; Li, Yude; Dan, Youquan; Du, Quan; Wang, Shijian

    2016-07-01

    The Wigner distribution function (WDF) has been used to study the propagation properties of partially coherent Laguerre Gaussian (PCLG) beams through atmospheric turbulence. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, an analytical formula of the propagation matrixes in terms of the second-order moments of the WDF for PCLG Beams in the receiving plane is derived. And then the analytical formulae for the curvature radii of PCLG Beams propagating in turbulence are given by the second-order moments of the WDF. The numerical results indicate that the curvature radius of PCLG Beams changes more rapidly in turbulence than that in the free space. The influence of the transverse coherence width and the beam waist width on the curvature radius of PCLG Beams is obvious, while the laser wavelength and the inner scale of turbulence have a slight effect. The study results may be useful for remote sensing and free space optical communications.

  4. Vertical structures of PM10 and PM 2.5 and their dynamical character in low atmosphere in Beijing urban areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING; Guoan; CHAN; Chuenyu; GAO; Zhiqiu; YAO; Wenqing; LI

    2005-01-01

    The vertical structures and their dynamical character of PM2.5 and PM10 over Beijing urban areas are revealed using the 1 min mean continuous mass concentration data of PM2.5 and PM10 at 8, 100, and 320 m heights of the meteorological observation tower of 325 m at Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IAP CAS tower hereafter) on 10―26 August, 2003, as well as the daily mean mass concentration data of PM2.5 and PM10 and the continuous data of CO and NO2 at 8, 100 (low layer), 200 (middle layer), and 320 m (high layer) heights, in combination with the same period meteorological field observation data of the meteorological tower. The vertical distributions of aerosols observed on IAP CAS tower in Beijing can be roughly divided into two patterns: gradually and rapidly decreasing patterns, I.e. The vertical distribution of aerosols in calm weather or on pollution day belongs to the gradually decreasing pattern, while one on clean day or weak cold air day belongs to the rapidly decreasing pattern. The vertical distributive characters of aerosols were closely related with the dynamical/thermal structure and turbulence character of the atmosphere boundary layer. On the clean day, the low layer PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations were close to those at 8 m height, while the concentrations rapidly decreased at the high layer, and their values were only one half of those at 8 m, especially, the concentration of PM2.5 dropped even more. On the clean day, there existed stronger turbulence below 150 m, aerosols were well mixed, but blocked by the more stronger inversion layer aloft, and meanwhile, at various heights, especially in the high layer, the horizontal wind speed was larger, resulting in the rapid decrease of aerosol concentration, I.e. Resulting in the obvious vertical difference of aerosol concentrations between the low and high layers. On the pollution day, the concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 at the low, middle, and high layers dropped

  5. Fine-Structure Measurements of Oxygen A Band Absorbance for Estimating the Thermodynamic Average Temperature of the Earth's Atmosphere: An Experiment in Physical and Environmental Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrick, M. L.; Greer, A. E.; Nieuwland, A.; Priore, R. J.; Scaffidi, J.; Andreatta, Daniele; Colavita, Paula

    2006-01-01

    The experiment describe the measures of the A band transitions of atmospheric oxygen, a rich series of rotation-electronic absorption lines falling in the deep red portion of the optical spectrum and clearly visible owing to attenuation of solar radiation. It combines pure physical chemistry with analytical and environmental science and provides a…

  6. Fine-Structure Measurements of Oxygen A Band Absorbance for Estimating the Thermodynamic Average Temperature of the Earth's Atmosphere: An Experiment in Physical and Environmental Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrick, M. L.; Greer, A. E.; Nieuwland, A.; Priore, R. J.; Scaffidi, J.; Andreatta, Daniele; Colavita, Paula

    2006-01-01

    The experiment describe the measures of the A band transitions of atmospheric oxygen, a rich series of rotation-electronic absorption lines falling in the deep red portion of the optical spectrum and clearly visible owing to attenuation of solar radiation. It combines pure physical chemistry with analytical and environmental science and provides a…

  7. Structure and density of Callisto's atmosphere from a fluid-kinetic model of its ionosphere: Comparison with Hubble Space Telescope and Galileo observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartkorn, Oliver; Saur, Joachim; Strobel, Darrell F.

    2017-01-01

    We develop a model of the ionospheric electron population of Jupiter's moon Callisto using a prescribed neutral atmosphere composed of O2, CO2 and H2O. A kinetic description of ionospheric suprathermal electrons coupled with a fluid description of ionospheric thermal electrons is well suited to jointly analyze and interpret observations of electron density and atmospheric UV emission. Accordingly, we calculate the electron energy distribution function at each point in the ionosphere by solving a coupled set of equations consisting of the Boltzmann equation for suprathermal electrons and the continuity and energy equation for thermal electrons. We assume a stationary balance between local sources and sinks of electrons and electron energy. Electron transport within the ionosphere is neglected, since collision time scales are shorter than transport time scales in the region of Callisto's ionosphere where the major concentrations of electrons is located and the major part of the atmospheric UV emission is generated. We consider photoionization, which is the dominant ionospheric electron source, and secondary ionization from collisions of photoelectrons with neutrals. Our calculations yield electron densities and electron impact generated UV emissions from Callisto's atmosphere. Comparing our modeled UV emission intensities with the Hubble Space Telescope observation of Cunningham et al. (2015) , we find that Callisto's atmosphere has a mean O2 column density of 2.1-1.1+1.1 ×1019 m-2. A joint comparison with this HST observation and radio occultation observations of Kliore et al. (2002) shows that Callisto's atmosphere possesses a day night asymmetry. We derive terminator O2 column densities of ∼ 0.4 × 1019 m-2 , for which we find subsolar O2 column densities in the range of 2.4 - 9.8 ×1019 m-2. Our calculations also show that the electron density is very sensitive to the relative abundance of H2O due to the thermal electron cooling by rotational state excitation

  8. Titan's atmosphere and surface liquid: New calculation using Statistical Associating Fluid Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sugata P.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Marion, Giles M.

    2013-01-01

    The application of PC-SAFT equation of state (EOS) in analyzing the in situ measurement of atmospheric data by Huygens probe reveals new insights into Titan's atmosphere and surface liquids. The EOS offers the most reliable and accurate calculations in fluid phase equilibria at the cryogenic conditions encountered in Titan and other extra-terrestrial bodies. This paper and a succeeding one pertaining to solid phases are foundational introductions to a new thermodynamics tool (new to planetary science) and will open the way for many diverse planetological applications, but here we limit applications to Titan. Titan's lower stratosphere and lower troposphere are modeled as a well-mixed chemical solution with fixed overall composition of nine components. Using this model in the lower stratosphere, the dew point, below which condensation occurs, is calculated to be at an altitude of 65.3 km (T = 91.3 K, P = 0.031 bar). The first drop of liquid at this point is almost pure propane, which would form a haze (not a dense cloud) due to the minor abundance of this species. Using this model in the lower troposphere, the atmospheric methane mole fractions measured by Huygens probe is well predicted up to an altitude of 29 km, thus validates the model and the EOS. The surface liquid, which is assumed to be in thermodynamic equilibrium with the ground-level atmosphere, is dominated by C2H6, CH4, C3H8, and N2 with mole percents of 53%, 32%, 7%, and 7%, respectively, at a density of 614 kg/m3 in the equator. The effects of the temperature on the surface liquid composition are also discussed. Despite the small surface temperature difference between equatorial and polar regions (3.7 K), the composition of liquid in polar regions is very different from that in the equator: 68% CH4, 22% N2, and 8% C2H6 with the amount of liquid nine times larger than that in the equator at a 10%-smaller density of 551 kg/m3. The system is accurately estimated using the binary of CH4 and N2 only at an

  9. New planetary atmosphere simulations: application to the organic aerosols of Titan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, P; Cosia, D; Gazeau, M C; Raulin, F

    1997-01-01

    The atmosphere of Titan partly consists of hazes and aerosol particles. Experimental simulation is one of the powerful approaches to study the processes which yield these particles, and their chemical composition. It provides laboratory analogues, sometimes called tholins. Development and optimization of experimental tools were undertaken in order to perform chemical and physical analyses of analogues under conditions free from contamination. A "Titan aerosol generator" was developed in the frame of the Cassini-Huygens mission, in order to produce Titan's aerosol analogues within conditions closer to those of the titanian atmosphere: cold plasma simulation system, low pressure and low temperature. The direct current (DC) glow discharge is produced by applying a DC voltage between two conductive electrodes inserted into the gas mixture-model of the studied atmosphere- at low pressure. A high-impedance power supply is used to provide the electrical field. All the system is installed in a glove box, which protect samples from any contamination. Finally the research program expected with this new material is presented.

  10. Haze in Pluto's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, A. F.; Summers, M. E.; Gladstone, G. R.; Strobel, D. F.; Young, L. A.; Lavvas, P.; Kammer, J. A.; Lisse, C. M.; Parker, A. H.; Young, E. F.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Ennico, K.

    2017-07-01

    Haze in Pluto's atmosphere was detected in images by both the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) and the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) on New Horizons. LORRI observed haze up to altitudes of at least 200 km above Pluto's surface at solar phase angles from ∼20° to ∼169°. The haze is structured with about ∼20 layers, and the extinction due to haze is greater in the northern hemisphere than at equatorial or southern latitudes. However, more haze layers are discerned at equatorial latitudes. A search for temporal variations found no evidence for motions of haze layers (temporal changes in layer altitudes) on time scales of 2 to 5 hours, but did find evidence of changes in haze scale height above 100 km altitude. An ultraviolet extinction attributable to the atmospheric haze was also detected by the ALICE ultraviolet spectrograph on New Horizons. The haze particles are strongly forward-scattering in the visible, and a microphysical model of haze is presented which reproduces the visible phase function just above the surface with 0.5 μm spherical particles, but also invokes fractal aggregate particles to fit the visible phase function at 45 km altitude and account for UV extinction. A model of haze layer generation by orographic excitation of gravity waves is presented. This model accounts for the observed layer thickness and distribution with altitude. Haze particles settle out of the atmosphere and onto Pluto's surface, at a rate sufficient to alter surface optical properties on seasonal time scales. Pluto's regional scale albedo contrasts may be preserved in the face of the haze deposition by atmospheric collapse.

  11. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The next decade will almost certainly see the direct imaging of extrasolar giant planets around nearby stars. Unlike purely radial velocity detections, direct imaging will open the door to characterizing the atmosphere and interiors of extrasola planets and ultimately provide clues on their formation and evolution through time. This process has already begun for the transiting planets, placing new constraints on their atmospheric structure, composition, and evolution. Indeed the key to understanding giant planet detectability, interpreting spectra, and constraining effective temperature and hence evolution-is the atmosphere. I will review the universe of extrasolar giant planet models, focusing on what we have already learned from modeling and what we will likely be able to learn from the first generation of direct detection data. In addition to these theoretical considerations, I will review the observations and interpretation of the - transiting hot Jupiters. These objects provide a test of our ability to model exotic atmospheres and challenge our current understanding of giant planet evolution.

  12. Atmosphere: Power, Critique, Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    This paper hans three interrelated parts. First, atmosphere is approached through the concept of power. Atmospheres 'grip' us directly or mediate power indirectly by manipulating moods and evoking emotions. How does atmosphere relate to different conceptions of power? Second, atmospheric powers m...... be critiqued. Which conception of critique can be involved? Third, critiquing atmospheric powers can generate political conflict. How does atmospheric disputes relate to conceptions of politics and the political?...

  13. Radiation-Hydrodynamics of Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Menou, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    Radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres is usually treated in the static limit, i.e., neglecting atmospheric motions. We argue that hot Jupiter atmospheres, with possibly fast (sonic) wind speeds, may require a more strongly coupled treatment, formally in the regime of radiation-hydrodynamics. To lowest order in v/c, relativistic Doppler shifts distort line profiles along optical paths with finite wind velocity gradients. This leads to flow-dependent deviations in the effective emission and absorption properties of the atmospheric medium. Evaluating the overall impact of these distortions on the radiative structure of a dynamic atmosphere is non-trivial. We present transmissivity and systematic equivalent width excess calculations which suggest possibly important consequences for radiation transport in hot Jupiter atmospheres. If winds are fast and bulk Doppler shifts are indeed important for the global radiative balance, accurate modeling and reliable data interpretation for hot Jupiter atmospheres may p...

  14. 大气湍流中部分相干聚焦涡旋光束的传输特性%Propagation Properties of Focused Partially Coherent Vortex Beams in Turbulent Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仓吉; 张逸新

    2009-01-01

    The propagation properties of focused partially coherent Gauss-Schell model vortex beams in the turbulent atmosphere were investigated based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the quadratic approximation of phase structure function. Optical intensity expression on the focal plane was obtained. By use of the expression, the intensity distribution of such kind of beam on the focal plane in the turbulent atmosphere was studied. The results show that in the turbulent atmosphere, the singularity of the vortex beam lows down with the propagation distance increasing. The maintenance of singularity is better for the vortex beams with larger topological charge and longer spatially coherent length. When the focal length and turbulent strength are fixed, the topological charge and coherent length of the source can be adjusted to control the behavior of intensity distribution on the focal plane and size of the focal spot. Vortex beams with larger topological charge can be resistant to the turbulent effects on the intensity distribution on the focal plane to some extent.%基于广义惠更斯-菲涅耳原理和相位结构函数的平方近似,研究了部分相干高斯-谢尔模型涡旋光束被聚焦后在大气湍流中的传输特性,得到了焦平面上光强解析表达式.利用该表达式,详细研究了该类光束在大气湍流中传输焦平面上的光强分布特性.结果表明:在大气湍流中,随着传输距离的增加,涡旋光束的奇异性逐渐降低.对于拓扑荷大的以及空间相干长度较长的涡旋光束,光束奇异性的保持相对要好.在一定的焦距长度和湍流大气条件下,我们可以通过调整光源的拓扑荷和相干长度控制焦面光强分布和焦斑大小.另外,有一定拓扑荷的涡旋光束可以在一定程度上降低大气湍流对传输光束焦面光强分布的影响.

  15. Effect of Pulse Nanosecond Volume Discharge in Air at Atmospheric Pressure on Electrical Properties of Mis Structures Based on p-HgCdTe Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Nesmelov, S. N.; Dzyadukh, S. M.; Grigor'ev, D. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of the pulse nanosecond volume discharge in air at atmospheric pressure on the admittance of MIS structures based on MBE graded-gap p-Hg0.78Cd0.22Te is studied in a wide range of frequencies and temperatures. It is shown that the impact of the discharge leads to significant changes in electrical characteristics of MIS structures (the density of positive fixed charge increases), to the changes in the nature of the hysteresis of capacitance-voltage characteristics, and to an increase in the density of surface states. A possible reason for the changes in the characteristics of MIS structures after exposure to the discharge is substantial restructuring of the defect-impurity system of the semiconductor near the interface.

  16. The impact of latent heating on the location, strength and structure of the Tropical Easterly Jet in the Community Atmosphere Model, version 3.1: Aqua-planet simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, Samrat

    2015-01-01

    The Tropical Easterly Jet (TEJ) is a prominent atmospheric circulation feature observed during the Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM). The simulation of TEJ by the Community Atmosphere Model, version 3.1 (CAM-3.1) has been discussed in detail. Although the simulated TEJ replicates many observed features of the jet, the jet maximum is located too far to the west when compared to observation. Orography has minimal impact on the simulated TEJ hence indicating that latent heating is the crucial parameter. A series of aqua-planet experiments with increasing complexity was undertaken to understand the reasons for the extreme westward shift of the TEJ. The aqua-planet simulations show that a single heat source in the deep tropics is inadequate to explain the structure of the observed TEJ. Equatorial heating is necessary to impart a baroclinic structure and a realistic meridional structure. Jet zonal wind speeds are directly related to the magnitude of deep tropical heating. The location of peak zonal wind is influenced by o...

  17. The VLA Atmospheric Phase Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Keith

    2014-05-01

    The Atmospheric Phase Interferometer (API) is a two-element atmospheric seeing monitor located at the Very Large Array (VLA) site. The instrument measures turbulent refractive index variation through the atmosphere by examining phase differences in a satellite beacon signal detected at two (or more) antennas. With this measurement, the VLA scheduling software is able to consider atmospheric stability when determining which frequency observation to schedule next. We are in the process of extending this two-element interferometer to four elements, which will allow us to measure the turbulence in two dimensions and at multiple length scales. This thesis will look at some statistical properties of turbulence, the effects of atmospheric stability on radio interferometric observations, and discuss details of the instrument and the data that it collects. The thesis will also cover some techniques and principles of signal processing, and an analysis of some data from the instrument. The results demonstrate that other surface atmospheric variables (e.g. windspeed, water vapor pressure) show the same structure function exponent as the atmospheric phase fluctuations. In particular, the structure functions of water vapor partial pressure and wind speed show the same exponent as the phase. Though the agreement between meteorological variables and atmospheric phase is scientifically satisfying, these surface measurements are not nearly as sensitive as the API saturation phase measurement, and therefore cannot be used to schedule telescope time in its stead. What is informative about these results is that the similar structure functions for API and meteorological data are detecting reinforce the claim that both measurements represent turbulent transport, and not instrumental noise. Data from the instrument reveals that measurements are consistent with both Kolmogorov turbulence theory, and with prior observations. The API predominately measures three-dimensional isotropic

  18. IMPACTS OF INTERACTING ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND O3 ON THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONING OF A NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEM: OPERATING AND DECOMMISSIONING THE ASPEN FACE PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, Andrew J. [Michigan Technological University; Zak, Donald R. [University of Michigan; Kubiske, Mark E. [USDA Forest Service; Pregitzer, Kurt S. [University of Idaho

    2014-06-30

    Two of the most important and pervasive greenhouse gases driving global change and impacting forests in the U.S. and around the world are atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3. As the only free air, large-scale manipulative experiment studying the interaction of elevated CO2 and O3 on forests, the Aspen FACE experiment was uniquely designed to address the long-term ecosystem level impacts of these two greenhouse gases on aspen-birch-maple forests, which dominate the richly forested Lake States region. The project was established in 1997 to address the overarching scientific question: “What are the effects of elevated [CO2] and [O3], alone and in combination, on the structure and functioning of northern hardwood forest ecosystems?” From 1998 through the middle of the 2009 growing season, we examined the interacting effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on ecosystem processes in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem to compare the responses of early-successional, rapid-growing shade intolerant trembling aspen and paper birch to those of a late successional, slower growing shade tolerant sugar maple. Fumigations with elevated CO2 (560 ppm during daylight hours) and O3 (approximately 1.5 x ambient) were conducted during the growing season from 1998 to 2008, and in 2009 through harvest date. Response variables quantified during the experiment included growth, competitive interactions and stand dynamics, physiological processes, plant nutrient status and uptake, tissue biochemistry, litter quality and decomposition rates, hydrology, soil respiration, microbial community composition and respiration, VOC production, treatment-pest interactions, and treatment-phenology interactions. In 2009, we conducted a detailed harvest of the site. The harvest included detailed sampling of a subset of trees by component (leaves and buds, fine branches, coarse branches and stem, coarse roots, fine roots) and excavation of soil to a depth of 1 m. Throughout the experiment, aspen and birch

  19. IMPACTS OF INTERACTING ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND O3 ON THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONING OF A NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEM: OPERATING AND DECOMMISSIONING THE ASPEN FACE PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, Andrew J. [Michigan Technological University; Zak, Donald R. [University of Michigan; Kubiske, Mark E. [USDA Forest Service; Pregitzer, Kurt S. [University of Idaho

    2014-06-30

    Two of the most important and pervasive greenhouse gases driving global change and impacting forests in the U.S. and around the world are atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3. As the only free air, large-scale manipulative experiment studying the interaction of elevated CO2 and O3 on forests, the Aspen FACE experiment was uniquely designed to address the long-term ecosystem level impacts of these two greenhouse gases on aspen-birch-maple forests, which dominate the richly forested Lake States region. The project was established in 1997 to address the overarching scientific question: “What are the effects of elevated [CO2] and [O3], alone and in combination, on the structure and functioning of northern hardwood forest ecosystems?” From 1998 through the middle of the 2009 growing season, we examined the interacting effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on ecosystem processes in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem to compare the responses of early-successional, rapid-growing shade intolerant trembling aspen and paper birch to those of a late successional, slower growing shade tolerant sugar maple. Fumigations with elevated CO2 (560 ppm during daylight hours) and O3 (approximately 1.5 x ambient) were conducted during the growing season from 1998 to 2008, and in 2009 through harvest date. Response variables quantified during the experiment included growth, competitive interactions and stand dynamics, physiological processes, plant nutrient status and uptake, tissue biochemistry, litter quality and decomposition rates, hydrology, soil respiration, microbial community composition and respiration, VOC production, treatment-pest interactions, and treatment-phenology interactions. In 2009, we conducted a detailed harvest of the site. The harvest included detailed sampling of a subset of trees by component (leaves and buds, fine branches, coarse branches and stem, coarse roots, fine roots) and excavation of soil to a depth of 1 m. Throughout the experiment, aspen and birch

  20. Balanced Atmospheric Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastermann, Gottfried; Reinhardt, Maria; Klein, Rupert; Reich, Sebastian

    2017-04-01

    The atmosphere's multi-scale structure poses several major challenges in numerical weather prediction. One of these arises in the context of data assimilation. The large-scale dynamics of the atmosphere are balanced in the sense that acoustic or rapid internal wave oscillations generally come with negligibly small amplitudes. If triggered artificially, however, through inappropriate initialization or by data assimilation, such oscillations can have a detrimental effect on forecast quality as they interact with the moist aerothermodynamics of the atmosphere. In the setting of sequential Bayesian data assimilation, we therefore investigate two different strategies to reduce these artificial oscillations induced by the analysis step. On the one hand, we develop a new modification for a local ensemble transform Kalman filter, which penalizes imbalances via a minimization problem. On the other hand, we modify the first steps of the subsequent forecast to push the ensemble members back to the slow evolution. We therefore propose the use of certain asymptotically consistent integrators that can blend between the balanced and the unbalanced evolution model seamlessly. In our work, we furthermore present numerical results and performance of the proposed methods for two nonlinear ordinary differential equation models, where we can identify the different scales clearly. The first one is a Lorenz 96 model coupled with a wave equation. In this case the balance relation is linear and the imbalances are caused only by the localization of the filter. The second one is the elastic double pendulum where the balance relation itself is already highly nonlinear. In both cases the methods perform very well and could significantly reduce the imbalances and therefore increase the forecast quality of the slow variables.

  1. Ultra-High Resolution Spectroscopic Remote Sensing: A Microscope on Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiuk, Theodor

    2010-01-01

    Remote sensing of planetary atmospheres is not complete without studies of all levels of the atmosphere, including the dense cloudy- and haze filled troposphere, relatively clear and important stratosphere and the upper atmosphere, which are the first levels to experience the effects of solar radiation. High-resolution spectroscopy can provide valuable information on these regions of the atmosphere. Ultra-high spectral resolution studies can directly measure atmospheric winds, composition, temperature and non-thermal phenomena, which describe the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere. Spectroscopy in the middle to long infrared wavelengths can also probe levels where dust of haze limit measurements at shorter wavelength or can provide ambiguous results on atmospheric species abundances or winds. A spectroscopic technique in the middle infrared wavelengths analogous to a radio receiver. infrared heterodyne spectroscopy [1], will be describe and used to illustrate the detailed study of atmospheric phenomena not readily possible with other methods. The heterodyne spectral resolution with resolving power greater than 1,000.000 measures the true line shapes of emission and absorption lines in planetary atmospheres. The information on the region of line formation is contained in the line shapes. The absolute frequency of the lines can be measured to I part in 100 ,000,000 and can be used to accurately measure the Doppler frequency shift of the lines, directly measuring the line-of-sight velocity of the gas to --Im/s precision (winds). The technical and analytical methods developed and used to measure and analyze infrared heterodyne measurements will be described. Examples of studies on Titan, Venus, Mars, Earth, and Jupiter will be presented. 'These include atmospheric dynamics on slowly rotating bodies (Titan [2] and Venus [3] and temperature, composition and chemistry on Mars 141, Venus and Earth. The discovery and studies of unique atmospheric phenomena will also be

  2. Variations for Pure Cu Melt Viscosity with Different Atmospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿红霞; 耿浩然; 薛宪营; 郁可; 刘建同

    2003-01-01

    The viscosity of Cu melt is obtained to be in the ranges from 2.418 to 3.039mPa.s under vacuum atmosphere (2Pa), from 2.907 to 3.425mPa.s under nitrogen gas atmosphere and from 3.352 to 4.015mPa.s under argon gas atmosphere. The activation energy is estimated to be 0.224, 0.162 and 0.150eV for the vacuum atmosphere (2 Pa), nitrogen gas atmosphere and argon gas atmosphere, respectively. The results reflect the essential structural change in the Cu melt by using different atmospheres.

  3. Atmospheric composition change: Ecosystems-Atmosphere interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fowler, D.; Pilegaard, K.; Sutton, M.A.; Ambus, P.; Raivonen, M.; Duyzer, J.; Simpson, D.; Fagerli, H.; Fuzzi, S.; Schjoerring, J.K.; Granier, C.; Neftel, A.; Isaksen, I.S.A.; Laj, P.; Maione, M.; Monks, P.S.; Burkhardt, J.; Daemmgen, U.; Neirynck, J.; Personne, E.; Wichink Kruit, R.J.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Flechard, C.; Tuovinen, J.P.; Coyle, M.; Gerosa, G.; Loubet, B.; Altimir, N.; Gruenhage, L.; Ammann, C.; Cieslik, S.; Paoletti, E.; Mikkelsen, T.N.; Ro-Poulsen, H.; Cellier, P.; Cape, J.N.; Horvath, L.; Loreto, F.; Niinemets, U.; Palmer, P.I.; Rinne, J.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Nilsson, D.; Pryor, S.; Gallagher, M.W.; Vesala, T.; Skiba, U.; Brueggemann, N.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.; Williams, J.; O'Dowd, C.; Facchini, M.C.; Leeuw, de G.; Flossman, A.; Chaumerliac, N.; Erisman, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Ecosystems and the atmosphere: This review describes the state of understanding the processes involved in the exchange of trace gases and aerosols between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. The gases covered include NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, NH3, SO2, DMS, Biogenic VOC, O-3, CH4, N2O and particles i

  4. Canopy structure and atmospheric flows in relation to the δ13C of respired CO2 in a subalpine coniferous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Sean M.; Anderson, Dean E.; Burns, Sean P.; Monson, Russell K.; Sun, Jielun; Bowling, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Stable isotopes provide insight into ecosystem carbon cycling, plant physiological processes, atmospheric boundary-layer dynamics, and are useful for the integration of processes over multiple scales. Of particular interest is the carbon isotope content (δ13C) of nocturnal ecosystem-respired CO2 (δR). Recent advances in technology have made it possible to continuously examine the variation in δR within a forest canopy over relatively long time-scales (months–years). We used tunable diode laser spectroscopy to examine δR at within- and below-canopy spatial locations in a Colorado subalpine forest (the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site). We found a systematic pattern of increased δR within the forest canopy (δR-c) compared to that near the ground (δR-g). Values of δR-c were weakly correlated with the previous day's mean maximum daytime vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Conversely, there was a negative but still weak correlation between δR-g and time-lagged (0–5 days) daily mean soil moisture. The topography and presence of sustained nightly drainage flows at the Niwot Ridge forest site suggests that, on nights with stable atmospheric conditions, there is little mixing of air near the ground with that in the canopy. Atmospheric stability was assessed using thresholds of friction velocity, stability above the canopy, and bulk Richardson number within the canopy. When we selectively calculated δR-g and δR-c by removing time periods when ground and canopy air were well mixed, we found stronger correlations between δR-c and VPD, and δR-g and soil moisture. This suggests that there may be fundamental differences in the environmental controls on δR at sub-canopy spatial scales. These results may help explain the wide variance observed in the correlation of δR with different environmental parameters in other studies.

  5. Infrared characterisation of acetonitrile and propionitrile aerosols under Titan's atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, C; Auchettl, R; Ruzi, M; Robertson, E G

    2017-01-25

    Pure, crystalline acetonitrile (CH3CN) and propionitrile (CH3CH2CN) particles were formed in a collisional cooling cell allowing for infrared (IR) signatures to be compiled from 50 to 5000 cm(-1). The cell temperature and pressure conditions were controlled to simulate Titan's lower atmosphere (80-130 K and 1-100 mbar), allowing for the comparison of laboratory data to the spectra obtained from the Cassini-Huygens mission. The far-IR features confirmed the morphology of CH3CN aerosols as the metastable β-phase (monoclinic) ice, however, a specific crystalline phase for CH3CH2CN could not be verified. Mie theory and the literature complex refractive indices enabled of the experimental spectra to be modelled. The procedure yielded size distributions for CH3CN (55-140 nm) and CH3CH2CN (140-160 nm) particles. Effective kinetic profiles, tracing the evolution of aerosol band intensities, showed that condensation of CH3CH2CN proceeded at twice the rate of CH3CN aerosols. In addition, the rate of CH3CH2CN aerosol depletion via lateral diffusion of the particles from the interrogation volume was approximately 50% faster than that of CH3CN. The far-IR spectra recorded for both nitrile aerosols did not display absorption profiles that could be attributed to the unassigned 220 cm(-1) feature, which has been observed to fluctuate seasonally in the spectra obtained from Titan's atmosphere.

  6. Optical models of the molecular atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuev, V. E.; Makushkin, Y. S.; Mitsel, A. A.; Ponomarev, Y. N.; Rudenko, V. P.; Firsov, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    The use of optical and laser methods for performing atmospheric investigations has stimulated the development of the optical models of the atmosphere. The principles of constructing the optical models of molecular atmosphere for radiation with different spectral composition (wideband, narrowband, and monochromatic) are considered in the case of linear and nonlinear absorptions. The example of the development of a system which provides for the modeling of the processes of optical-wave energy transfer in the atmosphere is presented. Its physical foundations, structure, programming software, and functioning were considered.

  7. Crystal structure transformation of TiO2 in presence of Fe2O3 and NiO in air atmosphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Riyas; V Ahmed Yasir; P N Mohan Das

    2002-08-01

    TiO2 is produced and marketed in two main grades viz. anatase and rutile. Both anatase and rutile have their own pigmentry properties and hence cannot be substituted by each other. Pure anatase on heating at higher temperatures undergoes crystallographic rearrangement to form rutile. This transformation in presence of NiO and Fe2O3 under air atmosphere was studied using XRD and SEM. The transformation temperature was found to be reduced much in presence of NiO and Fe2O3 and the extent of lowering was higher for NiO than Fe2O3. The activation energy for this transformation was also calculated. The method of preparation had major influence on the transformation.

  8. Thermodynamic structure of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer over the Arabian Sea and the Indian Ocean during pre-INDOEX and INDOEX-FFP campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Ramana

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variability of the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL height for the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX study period are examined using the data collected through Cross-chained LORAN (Long-Range Aid to Navigation Atmospheric Sounding System (CLASS launchings during the Northern Hemispheric winter monsoon period. This paper reports the results of the analyses of the data collected during the pre-INDOEX (1997 and the INDOEX-First Field Phase (FFP; 1998 in the latitude range 14°N to 20°S over the Arabian Sea and the Indian Ocean. Mixed layer heights are derived from thermodynamic profiles and they indicated the variability of heights ranging from 400m to 1100m during daytime depending upon the location. Mixed layer heights over the Indian Ocean are slightly higher during the INDOEX-FFP than the pre-INDOEX due to anomalous conditions prevailing during the INDOEX-FFP. The trade wind inversion height varied from 2.3km to 4.5km during the pre-INDOEX and from 0.4km to 2.5km during the INDOEX-FFP. Elevated plumes of polluted air (lofted aerosol plumes above the marine boundary layer are observed from thermodynamic profiles of the lower troposphere during the INDOEX-FFP. These elevated plumes are examined using 5-day back trajectory analysis and show that one group of air mass travelled a long way from Saudi Arabia and Iran/Iraq through India before reaching the location of measurement, while the other air mass originates from India and the Bay of Bengal.

  9. Chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Venot, Olivia

    2014-01-01

    The past twenty years have revealed the diversity of planets that exist in the Universe. It turned out that most of exoplanets are different from the planets of our Solar System and thus, everything about them needs to be explored. Thanks to current observational technologies, we are able to determine some information about the atmospheric composition, the thermal structure and the dynamics of these exoplanets, but many questions remain still unanswered. To improve our knowledge about exoplanetary systems, more accurate observations are needed and that is why the Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) is an essential space mission. Thanks to its large spectral coverage and high spectral resolution, EChO will provide exoplanetary spectra with an unprecedented accuracy, allowing to improve our understanding of exoplanets. In this work, we review what has been done to date concerning the chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres and what are the main characteristics of warm exoplanet atmospheres, which a...

  10. Sintering temperature and atmosphere modulated evolution of structure and luminescence of 2CaO–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Eu phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chaofeng, E-mail: chaofengzhu@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Processing and Testing Technology of Glass and Functional Ceramics of Shandong Province, Shandong Polytechnic University, Jinan 250353 (China); Key Laboratory of Amorphous and Polycrystalline Materials in Universities of Shandong, Shandong Polytechnic University, Jinan 250353 (China); Wang, Jia [Key Laboratory of Processing and Testing Technology of Glass and Functional Ceramics of Shandong Province, Shandong Polytechnic University, Jinan 250353 (China); Ren, Xiaorong [Instrumental Analysis Center, Shandong Polytechnic University, Jinan 250353 (China); Zhang, Yanfei; Liu, Shujiang; Shen, Jianxing [Key Laboratory of Processing and Testing Technology of Glass and Functional Ceramics of Shandong Province, Shandong Polytechnic University, Jinan 250353 (China); Yue, Yuanzheng, E-mail: yy@bio.aau.dk [Key Laboratory of Processing and Testing Technology of Glass and Functional Ceramics of Shandong Province, Shandong Polytechnic University, Jinan 250353 (China); Section of Chemistry, Aalborg University, Aalborg DK-9000 (Denmark)

    2014-01-15

    Europium doped 2CaO–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} phosphors prepared via high temperature solid state reactions are reported. The evolution of luminescence and structure of the phosphors induced by variation of sintering temperature and atmosphere is investigated using photoluminescence spectra and X-ray diffraction techniques. We found that the optical performance and structure of the phosphors are sensitive to the sintering temperature and atmosphere. The luminescence intensity due to {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 2} transition of Eu{sup 3+} is decreased with increasing sintering temperature. CaBPO{sub 5} and BPO{sub 4} crystals co-exist in the as-prepared phosphors and the relative content of these two phases is dependent on sintering temperature. CaBPO{sub 5} crystal favors the transition of {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 1} of Eu{sup 3+} ions, while BPO{sub 4} enhances the emission of 612 nm. This study gives insight into the correlation between optical properties and structure of the as-prepared phosphors. The phosphors reported here are good candidates for light emitting diode applications. -- Highlights: • Eu doped 2CaO–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} phosphors for LED applications are studied. • Effect of sintering conditions on optical property and structure is examined. • CaBPO{sub 5} favors the transition of {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 1} of Eu{sup 3+} in the investigated phosphors. • BPO{sub 4} enhances the emission of 612 nm of the phosphor.

  11. Venus Atmospheric Maneuverable Platform (VAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidan, R.; Lee, G.; Sokol, D.; Griffin, K.; Bolisay, L.; Barnes, N.

    2014-04-01

    Over the past years we have explored a possible new approach to Venus upper atmosphere exploration by applying recent Northrop Grumman (non-NASA) development programs to the challenges associated with Venus upper atmosphere science missions. Our concept is a low ballistic coefficient (aircraft that deploys prior to entering the Venus atmosphere, enters the Venus atmosphere without an aeroshell, and provides a long-lived (months to years), maneuverable vehicle capable of carrying science payloads to explore the Venus upper atmosphere. VAMP targets the global Venus atmosphere between 55 and 70 km altitude and would be a platform to address VEXAG goals I.A, I.B, and I.C. We will discuss the overall mission architecture and concept of operations from launch through Venus arrival, orbit, entry, and atmospheric science operations. We will present a strawman concept of VAMP, including ballistic coefficient, planform area, percent buoyancy, inflation gas, wing span, vehicle mass, power supply, propulsion, materials considerations, structural elements, subsystems, and packaging. The interaction between the VAMP vehicle and the supporting orbiter will also be discussed. In this context, we will specifically focus upon four key factors impacting the design and performance of VAMP: 1. Science payload accommodation, constraints, and opportunities 2. Characteristics of flight operations and performance in the Venus atmosphere: altitude range, latitude and longitude access, day/night performance, aircraft performance, performance sensitivity to payload weight 3. Feasibility of and options for the deployment of the vehicle in space 4. Entry into the Venus atmosphere, including descent profile, heat rate, total heat load, stagnation temperature, control, and entry into level flight We will discuss interdependencies of the above factors and the manner in which the VAMP strawman's characteristics affect the CONOPs and the science objectives. We will show how the these factors provide

  12. Engineered Structured Sorbents for the Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor from Manned Spacecraft Atmospheres: Applications and Testing 2008/2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David F.; Perry, Jay L.; Knox, James C.; Junaedi, Christian

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes efforts to improve on typical packed beds of sorbent pellets by making use of structured sorbents and alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. The benefits of the alternate configurations include increased structural stability gained by eliminating clay bound zeolite pellets that tend to fluidize and erode, and better thermal control during sorption to increase process efficiency. Test results that demonstrate such improvements are described and presented.

  13. Engineered Structured Sorbents for the Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor from Manned Spacecraft Atmospheres: Applications and Testing 2008/2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David F.; Perry, Jay L.; Knox, James C.; Junaedi, Christian

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes efforts to improve on typical packed beds of sorbent pellets by making use of structured sorbents and alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. The benefits of the alternate configurations include increased structural stability gained by eliminating clay bound zeolite pellets that tend to fluidize and erode, and better thermal control during sorption to increase process efficiency. Test results that demonstrate such improvements are described and presented.

  14. Planetary Atmospheric Electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Leblanc, F; Yair, Y; Harrison, R. G; Lebreton, J. P; Blanc, M

    2008-01-01

    This volume presents our contemporary understanding of atmospheric electricity at Earth and in other solar system atmospheres. It is written by experts in terrestrial atmospheric electricity and planetary scientists. Many of the key issues related to planetary atmospheric electricity are discussed. The physics presented in this book includes ionisation processes in planetary atmospheres, charge generation and separation, and a discussion of electromagnetic signatures of atmospheric discharges. The measurement of thunderstorms and lightning, including its effects and hazards, is highlighted by articles on ground and space based instrumentation, and new missions.Theory and modelling of planetary atmospheric electricity complete this review of the research that is undertaken in this exciting field of space science. This book is an essential research tool for space scientists and geoscientists interested in electrical effects in atmospheres and planetary systems. Graduate students and researchers who are new to t...

  15. Mirador - Atmospheric Composition

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Earth Science data access made simple. Atmospheric Composition is focused on the composition of Earth's atmosphere in relation to climate prediction, solar effects,...

  16. Atmospheric neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, G; Antolini, R; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bloise, C; Bower, C; Brigida, M; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Chiarusi, T; Choudhary, B C; Coutu, S; Cozzi, M; De Cataldo, G; Dekhissi, H; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; Derkauoi, J; De Vincenzi, M; Di Credico, A; Esposito, L; Forti, C; Fusco, P; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Grassi, M; Grillo, A; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Heinz, R; Iarocci, E; Katsavounidis, E; Katsavounidis, I; Kearns, E; Kim, H; Kumar, A; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longo, M J; Loparco, F; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Mazziotta, M N; Mengucci, A; Michael, D G; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Satriano, C; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Vakili, M; Walter, C W; Webb, R

    2005-01-01

    The latest results from the Soudan 2, MACRO and SuperKamiokande experiments on atmospheric neutrino oscillations are summarised and discussed. In particular a discussion is made on the Monte Carlo simulations used for the atmospheric neutrino flux.

  17. Planetary atmosphere processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorenkov, N.S.

    1991-01-01

    The papers presented in this volume focus on various atmospheric processes, including zonal circulation of the atmosphere, the quasi-biennial cycle, blocking processes, monsoon circulation, and the response of the atmosphere to solar corpuscular fluxes. Other topics discussed include climatic characteristics of atmospheric circulation in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, seasonal changes of the geopotential in the tropical stratosphere, and characteristics of the Southern Oscillation-El Nino phenomenon.

  18. Laboratory and theoretical work in the service of planetary atmospheric research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coustenis, Athena

    2015-08-01

    A large quantity of observations is obtained by instruments onboard space missions exploring our solar system and by large ground-based telescopes observing the planets and also the exoplanets. Spectroscopy plays a major role in this type of investigation. To analyze and exploit these observations, planetary scientists need spectroscopic data covering wide ranges in wavelength but also in temperature, pressure, distance, etc.The outer regions of our solar system in particular, including the giant gaseous planets Jupiter and Saturn and their satellites, have recently been the target of space missions such as Cassini-Huygens and several investigations from the ground. Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, in particular, offers many similarities with our own planet, among which a dense atmosphere whose major component is dinitrogen at about 95%. Combining with methane (at a few percent) and hydrogen, gives rise to a complex organic chemistry with hydrocarbons and nitriles. Oxygen compounds also exist in Titan’s atmosphere. By studying Titan, we learn about our own planet and our Solar system Solar as a whole [1,2,3]. To properly interpret the Cassini-Huygens data and in anticipation of future missions like ESA’s JUICE to the Jupiter system, spectroscopic data are crucially needed. In the field of exoplanets (over 1000 discovered to date), it also becomes urgent to have adequate data of several molecules in order to analyze the observations returned to us every day by major observatories on Earth and in the space [4,5]. I will discuss recent applications from theoretical and experimental studies on the investigation of Titan and exoplanets, with emphasis on methane. I will also present some needs for future analyses.References: [1] Campargue, A., et al. 2012. Icarus 219, 110-128. [2] Coustenis, A., et al. 2013. Astrophys. J. 799, 177, 9p. [3] Hirtzig, et al., 2013. Icarus 226, 470-486 and corrigendum 1182-1182. [4] Tinetti, G., Encrenaz, Th., Coustenis, A., 2013

  19. Atmospheric refraction : a history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehn, WH; van der Werf, S

    2005-01-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of un

  20. Atmospheric and accelerator neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoichiro [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida-City, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    Results from the atmospheric neutrino measurements are presented. Evidence for the {nu}{sub {tau}} appearance in the atmospheric neutrino events was shown by statistical methods. The long baseline oscillation experiment using man-made neutrinos has confirmed the atmospheric neutrino oscillation. The future accelerator experiments are briefly discussed.

  1. Atmospheric refraction : a history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehn, WH; van der Werf, S

    2005-01-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of

  2. Modeling the temporal and spatial variations of the vertical structure of Jupiter's atmosphere using observations of the 3-0 hydrogen quadrupole lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, C. C.; Hunten, D. M.; Tomasko, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    An observational program was established in 1983 to monitor the spatial and temporal variations in the Jovian atmosphere over short and long time scales. The program involves tracking several different longitudes as they rotate around the planet from one limb to another. This tracking experiment was done at many different wavelengths including the 3-0 S(1) and S(0) hydrogen quadrupole lines as well as several broad band methane absorptions. The June 1983 hydrogen quadrupole data was reduced and equivalent widths were measured for approximately 25 east-west positions across the planet at 7 different latitudes for both wavelengths. The data for the South Tropical Zone (20 deg. S) was modeled extensively and the effects of the various model parameters on the value of the calculated equivalent widths of both lines was measured as a longitude rotated from the east (or morning) limb to the west (or evening) limb. The value of the equivalent width is also quite sensitive to the height of the NH3 cloud top and to the value used for the single scattering albedo. A combination of these parameters changing on a diurnal time scale could also explain these observations. This gradual increase from one limb to the other appears in the data for both the North and South Equatorial Belts as well as the equatorial region and the North Tropical Zone. Models that used only normal hydrogen and models that used only equilibrium hydrogen were studied.

  3. Effects of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 on Microbial Community Structure at the Plant-Soil Interface of Young Beech Trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) Grown at Two Sites with Contrasting Climatic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Leberecht, Martin; Engel, Marion; Kublik, Susanne; Dannenmann, Michael; Polle, Andrea; Schloter, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Soil microbial community responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) occur mainly indirectly via CO2-induced plant growth stimulation leading to quantitative as well as qualitative changes in rhizodeposition and plant litter. In order to gain insight into short-term, site-specific effects of eCO2 on the microbial community structure at the plant-soil interface, young beech trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) from two opposing mountainous slopes with contrasting climatic conditions were incubated under ambient (360 ppm) CO2 concentrations in a greenhouse. One week before harvest, half of the trees were incubated for 2 days under eCO2 (1,100 ppm) conditions. Shifts in the microbial community structure in the adhering soil as well as in the root rhizosphere complex (RRC) were investigated via TRFLP and 454 pyrosequencing based on 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Multivariate analysis of the community profiles showed clear changes of microbial community structure between plants grown under ambient and elevated CO2 mainly in RRC. Both TRFLP and 454 pyrosequencing showed a significant decrease in the microbial diversity and evenness as a response of CO2 enrichment. While Alphaproteobacteria dominated by Rhizobiales decreased at eCO2, Betaproteobacteria, mainly Burkholderiales, remained unaffected. In contrast, Gammaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria, predominated by Pseudomonadales and Myxococcales, respectively, increased at eCO2. Members of the order Actinomycetales increased, whereas within the phylum Acidobacteria subgroup Gp1 decreased, and the subgroups Gp4 and Gp6 increased under atmospheric CO2 enrichment. Moreover, Planctomycetes and Firmicutes, mainly members of Bacilli, increased under eCO2. Overall, the effect intensity of eCO2 on soil microbial communities was dependent on the distance to the roots. This effect was consistent for all trees under investigation; a site-specific effect of eCO2 in response to the origin of the trees was not observed.

  4. Influence of the electrical power applied to the target on the optical and structural properties of ZrON films produced via RF magnetron sputtering in a reactive atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinzón, M.J. [Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales y Superficies, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, AA 14490 Bogotá (Colombia); Alfonso, J.E., E-mail: jealfonsoo@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales y Superficies, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, AA 14490 Bogotá (Colombia); Olaya, J.J. [Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales y Superficies, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, AA 14490 Bogotá (Colombia); Cubillos, G.I.; Romero, E. [Grupo de Materiales y Procesos Químicos, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, AA 14490 Bogotá (Colombia)

    2014-12-01

    The influence of the variation of electrical power applied to the target on the morphology and optical properties of zirconium oxynitride - zirconium oxide (ZrON) films deposited via RF magnetron sputtering on common glass substrates in a reactive atmosphere of N{sub 2}/O{sub 2}, with a flow ratio ΦN{sub 2}/ΦO{sub 2} of 1.25 was investigated. The crystallographic structure of the films was established through X-ray diffraction (XRD), the morphology was evaluated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the optical behavior was evaluated through transmittance measurements. The XRD analysis showed that the films grew with mixed crystalline structures: monoclinic (ZrO{sub 2}) and body-centered cubic (Zr{sub 2}ON{sub 2}). SEM analysis showed that the films grew with a homogeneous morphology, and AFM results established that as the electrical power applied to the target increased, there were changes in the grain size and the roughness of the films. The thickness, refractive index, and absorption coefficient of the films were calculated using the values of the transmittance through the Swanepoel method. Additionally, the energy band gap was determined via analysis of the free interference region. - Highlights: • We growth zirconium oxynitride films by RF magnetron sputtering in reactive atmosphere. • We determine the influence of the electrical power applied at the target in optical and structural properties. • We determine the crystallite size, grain size and roughness of the zirconium oxynitride films. • We determine the optical parameters such refractive index of the zirconium oxynitride films through Swanepoel method. • We calculated the absorption coefficient and optical band gap of the zirconium oxynitride films.

  5. In Vitro Assessment of Optical Properties of Blood by Applying the Extended Huygens-Fresnel Principle to Time-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Signal at 1300 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan P. Popescu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A direct method for the measurement of the optical attenuation coefficient and the scattering anisotropy parameter based on applying the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle to optical coherence tomography images of blood is demonstrated. The images are acquired with a low-power probing beam at the wavelength of 1300 nm. Values of 12.15 mm−1 and 0.95 are found for the total attenuation coefficient and the scattering anisotropy factor, respectively. Also, as a preliminary step, the optical refraction index is determined with a precision of two decimal numbers directly from optical coherence images. The total attenuation coefficient and the scattering anisotropy factor are determined with precisions within experimental error margins of 5% and 2%, respectively. Readable OCT signal is obtained for a maximum propagation of light into blood of 0.25 mm. At the maximum probed depth, the measured signal is almost 103 smaller than its initial intensity when entering the sample.

  6. Nonisothermal Pluto atmosphere models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, W.B.; Yelle, R.V.; Lunine, J.I. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA))

    1990-03-01

    The present thermal profile calculation for a Pluto atmosphere model characterized by a high number fraction of CH4 molecules encompasses atmospheric heating by solar UV flux absorption and conductive transport cooling to the surface of Pluto. The stellar occultation curve predicted for an atmosphere of several-microbar surface pressures (which entail the existence of a substantial temperature gradient close to the surface) agrees with observations and implies that the normal and tangential optical depth of the atmosphere is almost negligible. The minimum period for atmospheric methane depletion is calculated to be 30 years. 29 refs.

  7. Atmospheric Habitable Zones in Y Dwarf Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Jack S.; Palmer, Paul I.; Biller, Beth; Cockell, Charles S.

    2017-02-01

    We use a simple organism lifecycle model to explore the viability of an atmospheric habitable zone (AHZ), with temperatures that could support Earth-centric life, which sits above an environment that does not support life. To illustrate our model, we use a cool Y dwarf atmosphere, such as WISE J085510.83-0714442.5, whose 4.5-5.2 μm spectrum shows absorption features consistent with water vapor and clouds. We allow organisms to adapt to their atmospheric environment (described by temperature, convection, and gravity) by adopting different growth strategies that maximize their chance of survival and proliferation. We assume a constant upward vertical velocity through the AHZ. We found that the organism growth strategy is most sensitive to the magnitude of the atmospheric convection. Stronger convection supports the evolution of more massive organisms. For a purely radiative environment, we find that evolved organisms have a mass that is an order of magnitude smaller than terrestrial microbes, thereby defining a dynamical constraint on the dimensions of life that an AHZ can support. Based on a previously defined statistical approach, we infer that there are of the order of 109 cool Y brown dwarfs in the Milky Way, and likely a few tens of these objects are within 10 pc from Earth. Our work also has implications for exploring life in the atmospheres of temperate gas giants. Consideration of the habitable volumes in planetary atmospheres significantly increases the volume of habitable space in the galaxy.

  8. VERTICAL STRUCTURE OF THE LOW LEVEL ATMOSPHERE AROUND THE SOUTHEAST INDIAN OCEAN FRONTS%东南印度洋海洋锋面处低空大气的垂向分布结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘琳; 高立宝

    2012-01-01

    本文利用中国第25次南极科学考察期间获取的现场观测数据研究了东南印度洋(弗里曼特尔至中山站间)海洋锋面附近的低空大气风场以及温度场垂向分布特征.结果表明:弗里曼特尔港至中山站之间的亚南极锋锋面暖水侧与冷水侧风速垂向分布结构不同,锋面暖水侧风速垂向梯度小,风速梯度最大值出现在500m高度附近,而锋面冷水侧低空风速梯度最人值出现在150m高度附近,揭示了中纬度海气相互作用机制在东南印度洋海洋锋面附近起重要作用.同时,本文还发现了亚南极锋锋面上空存在一支强的低空纬向急流,急流中心位于300m高度处;极锋上空低空风速强而高空风速弱.%During the 25th Chinese Antarctic expedition, a new GPS radiosonde system was launched to detect the vertical structure of the atmosphere around the southeast Indian Ocean fronts region. Detailed information on the vertical profiles of wind speed and air temperature above the fronts between the Chinese Antarctic station, Zhongshan and the port of Fremantle, Australia, was obtained. The research showed that a distinct vertical structure appeared at the warm/cold side of the sub-Antarctic front between Zhongshan Station and Fremantle. The low level wind speed at the warm side was stronger than at the cold side, a finding that confirmed the special atmosphere-ocean interaction at the front area in the southeast Indian Ocean region. A low-level jet was observed above the sub-Antarctic front between Zhongshan Station and Fremantle. The vertical structure of the atmosphere around the Antarctic front was quite different compared with the sub-Antarctic front.

  9. Seasonal variation of local atmospheric circulations and boundary layer structure in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region and implications for air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yucong; Hu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Shuhua; Qian, Tingting; Xue, Ming; Zheng, Yijia; Wang, Shu

    2015-12-01

    The Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region experiences frequent heavy haze pollution in fall and winter. Pollution was often exacerbated by unfavorable atmospheric boundary layer (BL) conditions. The topography in this region impacts the BL processes in complex ways. Such impacts and implications on air quality are not yet clearly understood. The BL processes in all four seasons in BTH are thus investigated in this study using idealized simulations with the WRF-Chem model. Results suggest that seasonal variation of thermal conditions and synoptic patterns significantly modulates BL processes. In fall, with a relatively weak northwesterly synoptic forcing, thermal contrast between the mountains and the plain leads to a prominent mountain-plain breeze circulation (MPC). In the afternoon, the downward branch of the MPC, in addition to northwesterly warm advection, suppresses BL development over the western side of BTH. In the eastern coastal area, a sea-breeze circulation develops late in the morning and intensifies during the afternoon. In summer, southeasterly BL winds allow the see-breeze front to penetrate farther inland (˜150 km from the coast), and the MPC is less prominent. In spring and winter, with strong northwesterly synoptic winds, the sea-breeze circulation is confined in the coastal area, and the MPC is suppressed. The BL height is low in winter due to strong near-surface stability, while BL heights are large in spring due to strong mechanical forcing. The relatively low BL height in fall and winter may have exacerbated the air pollution, thus contributing to the frequent severe haze events in the BTH region.

  10. The Lowest Atmosphere: Atmospheric Boundary Layer Including Atmospheric Surface Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    of motion of the atmosphere— "second order closure"—to such applications as the SCIPUFF -PC code for tracer dispersion (see Sykes, 1994). Now, for...Turbulence, Methuen, London, 2nd Ed., 1955. Sykes, R.I., "The SCIPUFF -PC Code," ARAP Draft Report, 1994. Tennekes, H., "The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

  11. Influence of atmospheric plasma spray parameters on YSZ coatings obtained from micro and nano structured feedstocks; Influencia de los parametros de proyeccion por plasma atmosferico en recubrimientos de YSZ obtenidos a partir de polvos micro y nanoestructurados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpio, P.; Bannier, E.; Borrell, A.; Salvador, M. d.; Sanchez, E.

    2014-07-01

    In the present work, the influence of atmospheric plasma spray (APS) parameters on the deposition of two commercial YSZ feedstocks, one conventional and one non-conductor's, has been studied. First the study focused on how the variability of the different parameters affects the particle behaviour during spraying. For this purpose, a sensor which enables to measure the particle temperature and velocity inside the plasma was used. Once the spraying parameters influence was known, both powders were deposited by APS onto stainless steel substrates modifying the higher influencing parameters. These coatings have been characterised and the influence of the particle behaviour on the coating microstructure and properties has been analysed. This work concludes the spraying parameters variation affects on the particle velocity and temperature inside the plasma plume and this behaviour influences, in turn but in a different way, on the final coating characteristics when using different powders (micro- and nano structured). (Author)

  12. Meteoric Material: An Important Component of Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Moses, Julianne I.; Pesnell, W. Dean; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) interact with all planetary atmospheres and leave their imprint as perturbations of the background atmospheric chemistry and structure. They lead to layers of metal ions that can become the dominant positively charged species in lower ionospheric regions. Theoretical models and radio occultation measurements provide compelling evidence that such layers exist in all planetary atmospheres. In addition IDP ablation products can affect neutral atmospheric chemistry, particularly at the outer planets where the IDPs supply oxygen compounds like water and carbon dioxide to the upper atmospheres. Aerosol or smoke particles from incomplete ablation or recondensation of ablated IDP vapors may also have a significant impact on atmospheric properties.

  13. Measurement of the Atmospheric $\

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose1, D; Boser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegard, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glusenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Goodman, J A; Gora, D; Grant, D; Gross, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klas, J; Klein, S R; Kohne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Kopke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lunemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Meszaros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Perez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Radel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schoneberg, S; Schonherr, L; Schonwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoss, A; Strahler, E A; Strom, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge1, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    We report the first observation in a high energy neutrino telescope of cascades induced by atmospheric electron neutrinos and by neutral current interactions of atmospheric neutrinos of all flavors. Using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube's DeepCore low energy extension, a sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data. The number of observed cascades is $N_{\\rm cascade} = 496 \\pm 66 (stat.) \\pm 88(syst.)$ and the rest of the sample consists of residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is determined in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV and is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos.

  14. Atmospheric Habitable Zones in Y Dwarf Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, Jack S; Biller, Beth; Cockell, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    We use a simple organism lifecycle model to explore the viability of an atmospheric habitable zone (AHZ), with temperatures that could support Earth-centric life, which sits above an environment that does not support life. We illustrate this idea using the object WISE J085510.83-0714442.5, which is a cool, free-floating brown dwarf. We allow organisms to adapt to their atmospheric environment (described by temperature, convection, and gravity) by adopting different growth strategies that maximize their chance of survival and proliferation. We assume a constant upward vertical velocity through the AHZ. We found that the organism growth strategy is most sensitive to the magnitude of the atmospheric convection. Stronger convection supports the evolution of more massive organisms. For a purely radiative environment we find that evolved organisms have a mass that is an order of magnitude smaller than terrestrial microbes, thereby defining a dynamical constraint on the dimensions of life that an AHZ can support. Ba...

  15. Titan Ice and Dust Experiment (TIDE): Detection and Analysis of Compounds of Interest to Astrobiology in the Lower Atmosphere and Surface of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Holland Paul M.; Stimac, Robert M.; Kaye, William J.; Takeruchi, Noreshige

    2004-01-01

    The Titan Orbiter Aerorover Mission (TOAM) is a proposed concept for the Solar System Exploration Visions Mission, Titan Explorer, a follow-on to the Cassini-Huygens mission. TOAM would use a Titan polar orbiter and a lighter-than-air aerorover to investigate the surface and atmosphere of Titan. Astrobiology issues will be addressed though TOAM investigations including, for example: Distribution and composition of organics (atmospheric, aerosol, surface); Organic chemical processes, their chemical context and energy sources; and Seasonal variations and interactions of the atmosphere and surface. The TIDE instrument will perform in-situ analyses to obtain comprehensive and sensitive molecular and elemental assays of volatile organics in the atmosphere, oceans and surface. TIDE chemical analyses are conducted by a Gas Chromatograph-Ion Mobility Spectrometer (GC-IMS). This TIDE GC-IMS was a component of the mini-Cometary Ice and Dust Experiment (mini-CIDEX) developed for the chemical analysis of a cometary environment. Both the GC and helium IMS of mini-CIDEX have been further developed to better meet the analytical and operational requirements of the TOAM. application. A Micro-ElectroMechanical System (MEMS) GC and Mini-Cell helium IMS are under development to replace their respective mini-CIDEX components, providing similar or advanced analytical capabilities.

  16. Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML) is one of the nation's leading research facilities for understanding aerosols, clouds, and their interactions. The AML...

  17. Quantitative evaluation of evaporation rate during spin-coating of polymer blend films: Control of film structure through defined-atmosphere solvent-casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokarian-Tabari, P; Geoghegan, M; Howse, J R; Heriot, S Y; Thompson, R L; Jones, R A L

    2010-12-01

    Thin films of polymer mixtures made by spin-coating can phase separate in two ways: by forming lateral domains, or by separating into distinct layers. The latter situation (self-stratification or vertical phase separation) could be advantageous in a number of practical applications, such as polymer optoelectronics. We demonstrate that, by controlling the evaporation rate during the spin-coating process, we can obtain either self-stratification or lateral phase separation in the same system, and we relate this to a previously hypothesised mechanism for phase separation during spin-coating in thin films, according to which a transient wetting layer breaks up due to a Marangoni-type instability driven by a concentration gradient of solvent within the drying film. Our results show that rapid evaporation leads to a laterally phase-separated structure, while reducing the evaporation rate suppresses the interfacial instability and leads to a self-stratified final film.

  18. Chemical composition, structural properties, and source apportionment of organic macromolecules in atmospheric PM10 in a coastal city of Southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanting; Du, Wenjiao; Chen, Jinsheng; Hong, Youwei; Zhao, Jinping; Xu, Lingling; Xiao, Hang

    2017-02-01

    Particulate matter (PM10) associated with the fractions of organic macromolecules, including humic acid (HA), kerogen + black carbon (KB), and black carbon (BC), was determined during summer and winter at urban and suburban sites in a coastal city of southeast China. The organic macromolecules were characterized by elemental analysis (EA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and their sources were identified by using stable carbon/nitrogen isotope (δ(13)C/δ(15)N) and the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) Model. The results showed that HA, kerogen (K), and BC accounted for the range of 3.89 to 4.55 % in PM10, while they were the dominant fractions of total organic carbon (TOC), ranging from 64.70 to 84.99 %. SEM analysis indicated that BC particles were porous/nonporous and consisted of spherical and non-spherical (i.e., cylindrical and elongate) structures. The FTIR spectra of HA, KB, and BC exhibited similar functional groups, but the difference of various sites and seasons was observed. HA in PM10 contained a higher fraction of aliphatic structures, such as long-chain fatty and carbohydrates with a carboxylic extremity. The C/N ratio, SEM, and δ(13)C/δ(15)N values provided reliable indicators of the sources of HA, K, and BC in PM10. The results suggested that HA and K majorly originated from terrestrial plants, and BC came from the mixture of combustion of terrestrial plants, fossil fuel, and charcoal. The air masses in winter originated from Mongolia (4 %), the northern area of China (48 %), and northern adjacent cities (48 %), suggesting the influence of anthropogenic sources through long-range transport, while the air masses for the summer period came from South China Sea (34 %) and Western Pacific Sea (66 %), representing clean marine air masses with low concentrations of organic macromolecules.

  19. Electronic Structures and OH-Induced Atmospheric Degradation of CF3NSF2: A Potential Green Dielectric Replacement for SF6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lin; Yu, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Kun; Hou, Hua; Wang, Baoshan

    2017-04-06

    Electronic structures of [(trifluoromethyl)imino]sulfur difluoride (CF3NSF2) and degradation mechanisms by hydroxyl radical have been investigated using density functional theory (M06-2X), the complete basis set quadratic CBS-Q, and the explicitly correlated coupled-cluster methods [CCSD(T)-F12]. The d-function augmented correlation-consistent basis sets including triple- and quadruple-ξ were employed for the sulfur-containing species. It was found that CF3NSF2 exists as two conformations connected by the internal rotation of CF3 around the central NS bond. The distorted syn conformer is more stable than the symmetrical anti conformer. The nitrogen-sulfur link in CF3NSF2 was revealed to be predominantly ionic CF3N(-)-(+)SF2 in structure rather than the conventional N═S double bond on the basis of natural bond orbital analysis. OH radical prefers to attach on the S atom of CF3NSF2 along the opposite direction of the S-F bond via a nucleophilic addition mechanism with a barrier of 2.9 kcal/mol whereas the ON association pathway is negligible. Although many product channels are thermodynamically favorable, none of them is kinetically accessible because of the significant barriers along the reaction routes. However, the degradation of CF3NSF2 by OH can be accelerated considerably in the presence of a single water molecule, which acts as a bridge for the consecutive proton migration within the floppy cyclic geometries. The half-life of CF3NSF2 was estimated to be 2.5 year, and the final products are exclusively CF3NH and SF2O. Theoretical calculation supports that CF3NSF2 is an environment-friendly green gas. It is worthy of testing its dielectric properties to replace SF6 for practical use.

  20. Effect of hot-filament annealing in a hydrogen atmosphere on the electrical and structural properties of Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} sputtered thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, C.J., E-mail: ctavares@fisica.uminho.pt [Centre of Physics, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Castro, M.V.; Marins, E.S.; Samantilleke, A.P.; Ferdov, S.; Rebouta, L.; Benelmekki, M.; Cerqueira, M.F.; Alpuim, P. [Centre of Physics, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Xuriguera, E. [Dept. Ciencia dels Materials, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Riviere, J.-P.; Eyidi, D.; Beaufort, M.-F. [Institut P' , University of Poitiers, Bat. SP2MI, Bd. Pierre et Marie Curie, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope (France); Mendes, A. [Laboratory of Process, Environment and Energy Engineering (LEPAE), Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2012-01-31

    In this work Nb-doped TiO2 thin films were deposited by d.c.-pulsed reactive magnetron sputtering at 500 Degree-Sign C from a composite target with weight fractions of 96% Ti and 4% Nb, using oxygen as reactive gas. In order to enhance the conductive properties, the as-deposited samples were treated in vacuum with atomic hydrogen at a substrate temperature of 500 Degree-Sign C. The atomic hydrogen flow was generated by a hot filament, inside a high-vacuum chemical vapour deposition reactor, at a temperature of 1750 Degree-Sign C. In order to optimise the hydrogen hot-wire treatments, the H{sub 2} pressure was varied between 1.3 and 67 Pa, the treatment time was monitored between 1 and 5 min and the hot-filament current was changed between 12 and 17 A. Dark conductivity was measured as a function of temperature and its value at room temperature was extrapolated and used to assess the effect of the hydrogen annealing on the charge transport properties. A two-order of magnitude increase in dark conductivity was typically observed for optimised hydrogen treatments (10 Pa), when varying the hydrogen pressure, resulting in a minimum resistivity of {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} {Omega} cm at room temperature. The maximum amount of atomic H incorporation in oxygen vacancies was determined to be {approx} 5.7 at.%. Carrier mobility and resistivity were also investigated using Hall effect measurements. Correlations between structural and electrical properties and the hydrogen treatment conditions are discussed. The purpose of these films is to provide a transparent and conductive front contact layer for a-Si based photovoltaics, with a refractive index that better matches that of single and tandem solar cell structures. This can be achieved by an appropriate incorporation of a very small amount of cationic doping (Nb{sup 5+}) into the titanium dioxide lattice.

  1. Propagation of partially coherent flat-topped beams through a turbulent atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Youquan; Zhang, Bin; Pan, Pingping

    2008-09-01

    Based on the modified beam model for flat-topped beams and the Schell model for partially coherent light, an expression for partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) beams has been proposed. The propagation characteristics of PCFT beams with circular symmetry through a turbulent atmosphere have been studied. By using the generalized Huygens-Fresnel integral and Fourier transform method, the expressions for the cross-spectral density function and the average intensity have been given and the analytical expression for the root-mean-square width has been derived. The effects of the beam order, the spatial coherence, and the turbulent parameter on the intensity distributions and beam spreading have been discussed in detail. Our results show that the on-axis intensity of the beams decreases with increasing turbulence and decreasing coherence of the source, whereas the on-axis intensity of the beams in the far field decreases slightly with increasing beam order. The relative spreading of PCFT beams is smaller for beams with a higher order, a lower degree of global coherence of the source, a larger inner scale, and a smaller outer scale of the turbulence.

  2. Forest-atmosphere BVOC exchange in diverse and structurally complex canopies: 1-D modeling of a mid-successional forest in northern Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Alexander M.; Cheng, Susan J.; Ashworth, Kirsti; Guenther, Alex B.; Hardiman, Brady; Bohrer, Gil; Steiner, A. L.

    2015-11-01

    Foliar emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC)dimportant precursors of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosolsdvary widely by vegetation type. Modeling studies to date typi-cally represent the canopy as a single dominant tree type or a blend of tree types, yet many forests are diverse with trees of varying height. To assess the sensitivity of biogenic emissions to tree height vari-ation, we compare two 1-D canopy model simulations in which BVOC emission potentials are homo-geneous or heterogeneous with canopy depth. The heterogeneous canopy emulates the mid-successional forest at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). In this case, high-isoprene-emitting fo-liage (e.g., aspen and oak) is constrained to the upper canopy, where higher sunlight availability increases the light-dependent isoprene emission, leading to 34% more isoprene and its oxidation products as compared to the homogeneous simulation. Isoprene declines from aspen mortality are 10% larger when heterogeneity is considered. Overall, our results highlight the importance of adequately representing complexities of forest canopy structure when simulating light-dependent BVOC emissions and chemistry.

  3. Critical Time Span and Nonlinear Action Structure of Climatic Atmosphere and Ocean%气候大气和海洋的临界时间跨度与非线性作用结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志仁; 吴德星; 陈大可; 吴辉碇; 宋学家; 张占海

    2002-01-01

    研究了气候海洋与大气的临界时间跨度及其非线性作用的大致结构.与预报的空间分辩率及系统的非线性强度相联系,气候大气和海洋的临界时间跨度可反映系统可预报的相对时间尺度.对于具有同样空间特征尺度的大气和海洋,海洋的最小临界时间跨度约是大气的9倍(可达数日至数十日).一般(外源变化缓慢的)气候海洋与大气的一阶非线性越强,其临界时间跨度越小.气候海洋与大气非线性作用的大致结构是:通常与科里奥利力对流体运动的规范作用(如地转运动)有关,非线性作用随纬度增加而减弱.距平流场的切变结构及其沿经向与纬向上强度的比较直接改变气候大气和海洋的非线性作用(比如,向东的距平环流强度与经向环流强度相当时,非线性作用最强),较强的外部驱动(风应力和压强梯度力)使非线性作用加大等等.%This paper studies the critical time span and the approximate nonlinear action structure of climatic atmosphere and ocean. The critical time span of the climatic atmosphere and ocean, which is related to the spatial resolution required, the strength of nonlinear action, and the calculation exactness, may represent the relative temporal scale of predictability. As far as the same characteristic spatial scale is concerned, the minimum critical time span of the ocean is about 9 times of that of atmosphere, several days or more. Usually,the stronger the nonlinear action, the shorter the critical time span with smooth changes of external forces.The approximate structure of nonlinear action of climatic atmosphere and ocean is: the nonlinear action decreases usually with increasing latitude, which is related to the role of the Coriolis force in fluid motion (forming geostrophic current); the nonlinear action changes with the anomalous cyclonic or anticyclonic circulation shear, for instance, when the strength of anomalous eastward zonal circulation

  4. The Influence of Industrial Structure Evolution on Atmospheric Environment -Based on the Panel Data of Industries in Chongqing%重庆市产业结构演变对大气环境的影响分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅强; 陈雪娇

    2011-01-01

    产业结构转型在促进经济增长的同时,也对大气环境产生了影响.本文根据结构效应、规模效应及技术效应建立模型,利用重庆市1999-2008年22个工业行业的相关面板数据进行了实证分析.结果表明,工业结构效应对于工业二氧化硫、工业烟尘、工业粉尘所起到的影响有限,大气污染物排放量的降低主要归功于政府环境政策强度,技术进步所带来的大气环境的改善逐渐显现.重庆市应重点加强非金属矿物制品业、化学原料及化学制品制造业、黑色金属冶炼及压延加工业与电力、燃气及水的生产和供应业等高污染排放行业的治理及技术创新.%While industrial structure transformation promotes economic growth, it might also have a negative impact on the atmospheric environment. This paper uses the panel data of 22 industries from 1999 to 2008 in Chongqing. This paper does an empirical analysis through establishing a model based on structural effect, scale effect and technical effect. The conclusion shows that the impact of industrial structure effect on industrial sulfur dioxide, industrial smoke and industrial dust is limited and environment-protection policies of the government and technological progress play a major role in reduction of atmospheric pollutants emission. The paper proposes that Chongqing should focus on management and technological innovation of high pollution industries such as the non-metallic mineral products industry, chemical materials and chemical products manufacturing industry, ferrous metal smelting and rolling processing industry and in production and supply of electricity, gas and water.

  5. Wind-Induced Atmospheric Escape: Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, Richard; Johnson, Robert; Sittler, Edward, Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Simpson, David

    2012-01-01

    Rapid thermospheric flows can significantly enhance the estimates of the atmospheric loss rate and the structure of the atmospheric corona of a planetary body. In particular, rapid horizontal flow at the exobase can increase the corresponding constituent escape rate. Here we show that such corrections, for both thermal and non-thermal escape, cannot be ignored when calculating the escape of methane from Titan, for which drastically different rates have been proposed. Such enhancements are also relevant to Pluto and exoplanets.

  6. Clouds in Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    What are clouds? The answer to that question is both obvious and subtle. In the terrestrial atmosphere clouds are familiar as vast collections of small water drops or ice crystals suspended in the air. In the atmospheres of Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Saturn's moon Titan, Uranus, Neptune, and possibly Pluto, they are composed of several other substances including sulfuric acid, ammonia, hydroge...

  7. Intensifying the Atmospheric

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebst, Lasse Suonperä

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenological concept of urban atmospheres is more often applied as an aesthetic description of the metropolitan space as such. This conceptualization is supported in this paper; however, I strive to give the concept a post-phenomenological axial turn. While phenomenology, due to its...... are ‘compressed’ by the spatial morphologies of urban space. In this perspective atmospheres are to be understood as an emergent property that develops when the spatial morphological compression of urban life passes a certain threshold, that is, when the affective rhythm of the urban assemblages becomes...... understanding of atmospheres as aesthetically ‘radiating’ from the surfaces of space, thinks physiognomically, the article argues for a spatial morphological perspective on atmospheres. Thus, post-phenomeno¬logically, it is argued that the atmospheric given is given by the density of pedestrians, which...

  8. First simulation results of Titan's atmosphere dynamics with a global 3-D non-hydrostatic circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Mingalev

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the first results of a 3-D General Circulation Model of Titan's atmosphere which differs from traditional models in that the hydrostatic equation is not used and all three components of the neutral gas velocity are obtained from the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation. The current version of our GCM is, however, a simplified version, as it uses a predescribed temperature field in the model region thereby avoiding the complex simulation of radiative transfer based on the energy equation. We present the first simulation results and compare them to the results of existing GCMs and direct wind observations. The wind speeds obtained from our GCM correspond well with data obtained during the Huygens probe descent through Titan's atmosphere. We interpret the most unexpected feature of these data which consist of the presence of a non-monotonicity of the altitude profile of the zonal wind speed between 60 and 75 km.

  9. The 26th AFOSR chemical and atmospheric sciences program review FY81

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, W. G.; Myers, L. E.; Stallings, S. A.

    1982-03-01

    A review is presented of research efforts sponsored by the Directorate of Chemical and Atmospheric Sciences which have completed their period of support. Illustrated accounts resulting from the basic research programs in the Atmospheric and Chemical Sciences are highlighted. The Atmospheric Sciences is concerned with meteorology and upper atmospheric structure and dynamics. The meteorology focuses on mesoscale meteorology, cloud physics, and atmospheric dynamics. The Chemical Sciences deal with Chemical Techniques, Chemical Structures, Surface Chemistry, Chemical Dynamics, and Synthesis and properties of Materials.

  10. Atmospheric composition change: Ecosystems–Atmosphere interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fowler, D.; Pilegaard, Kim; Sutton, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    and techniques in micrometeorology. For some of the compounds there have been paradigm shifts in approach and application of both techniques and assessment. These include flux measurements over marine surfaces and urban areas using micrometeorological methods and the up-scaling of flux measurements using...... in the size range 1 nm–10 μm including organic and inorganic chemical species. The main focus of the review is on the exchange between terrestrial ecosystems, both managed and natural and the atmosphere, although some new developments in ocean–atmosphere exchange are included. The material presented is biased...... towards the last decade, but includes earlier work, where more recent developments are limited or absent. New methodologies and instrumentation have enabled, if not driven technical advances in measurement. These developments have advanced the process understanding and upscaling of fluxes, especially...

  11. Dynamics of Massive Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemke, Rei; Kaspi, Yohai

    2017-08-01

    The many recently discovered terrestrial exoplanets are expected to hold a wide range of atmospheric masses. Here the dynamic-thermodynamic effects of atmospheric mass on atmospheric circulation are studied using an idealized global circulation model by systematically varying the atmospheric surface pressure. On an Earth analog planet, an increase in atmospheric mass weakens the Hadley circulation and decreases its latitudinal extent. These changes are found to be related to the reduction of the convective fluxes and net radiative cooling (due to the higher atmospheric heat capacity), which, respectively, cool the upper troposphere at mid-low latitudes and warm the troposphere at high latitudes. These together decrease the meridional temperature gradient, tropopause height and static stability. The reduction of these parameters, which play a key role in affecting the flow properties of the tropical circulation, weakens and contracts the Hadley circulation. The reduction of the meridional temperature gradient also decreases the extraction of mean potential energy to the eddy fields and the mean kinetic energy, which weakens the extratropical circulation. The decrease of the eddy kinetic energy decreases the Rhines wavelength, which is found to follow the meridional jet scale. The contraction of the jet scale in the extratropics results in multiple jets and meridional circulation cells as the atmospheric mass increases.

  12. Glacial atmospheric phosphorus deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid; Dallmayr, Remi; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Svensson, Anders; Vallelonga, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus in the atmosphere is poorly studied and thus not much is known about atmospheric phosphorus and phosphate transport and deposition changes over time, though it is well known that phosphorus can be a source of long-range nutrient transport, e.g. Saharan dust transported to the tropical forests of Brazil. In glacial times it has been speculated that transport of phosphorus from exposed shelves would increase the ocean productivity by wash out. However whether the exposed shelf would also increase the atmospheric load to more remote places has not been investigated. Polar ice cores offer a unique opportunity to study the atmospheric transport of aerosols on various timescales, from glacial-interglacial periods to recent anthropogenic influences. We have for the first time determined the atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic by means of ice core analysis. Both total and dissolved reactive phosphorus were measured to investigate current and past atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic. Results show that glacial cold stadials had increased atmospheric total phosphorus mass loads of 70 times higher than in the past century, while DRP was only increased by a factor of 14. In the recent period we find evidence of a phosphorus increase over the past 50 yrs in ice cores close to human occupation likely correlated to forest fires. References: Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Continuous flow analysis method for determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus in ice cores." Environmental science & technology 47.21 (2013): 12325-12332. Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Greenland ice cores constrain glacial atmospheric fluxes of phosphorus." Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres120.20 (2015).

  13. Riblet Sensor -- Light Scattering on Micro Structured Surface Coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Imlau, Mirco; Voit, Kay-Michael; Tschentscher, Juliane; Dieckmann, Volker

    2016-01-01

    With the application of appropriate surface structuring on aircrafts, up to 8\\% fuel may be saved in regular air traffic. Before these techniques can be introduced into productive environments, a controlling method for the quality of surface structuring is needed to be used during fabrication and service, ensuring persistent quality of the structured coatings and a justified decision for surface renewal. In this project, these important requirements for achieving the improvements defined above are fulfilled. We have shown that fast sampling is possible using noncontacting laser probing, and we have presented a working preliminary configuration for the sensor. In the theoretical part, a model for the interaction between a probing laser beam and the surface is developed and the resulting wavefront is derived. This is done using a combination of Huygens-Fresnel diffraction theory and geometrical optics. The model is then used to counsel the design of the experimental setup, to interpret the emerging data and to ...

  14. Atmosphere beyond Poetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2014-01-01

    . In doing so, analysing the Crystal Palace – recognised as the epitome of controlled immersive experience as well as of atmospheric engineering (Sloterdijk 2008 (2005) – in parallel with other examples and theoretical explorations, will provide a canvas for discerning the means of creation of atmosphere...... Physical Presence in Space.” Oase #91, Building Atmosphere, 21-33 Sloterdijk, Peter. (2005) 2008. “The Crystal Palace.” Translated by Michael Darroch. Public 37: Public?, 12-15. Originally published in Peter Sloterdijk. Im Weltinnenraum des Kapitals: Für eine philoso-phische Theorie der Globalisierung, 265...

  15. New atmospheric program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Science Foundation's Division of Atmospheric Sciences has established an Upper Atmospheric Facilities program within its Centers and Facilities section. The program will support the operation of and the scientific research that uses the longitudinal chain of incoherent scatter radars. The program also will ensure that the chain is maintained as a state-of-the-art research tool available to all interested and qualified scientists.For additional information, contact Richard A. Behnke, Division of Atmospheric Sciences, National Science Foundation, 1800 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20550 (telephone: 202-357-7390).

  16. Atmospheric refraction: a history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Waldemar H.; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  17. "Explosively growing" vortices of unstably stratified atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, O. G.; Horton, W.; Pokhotelov, O. A.; Fedun, V.

    2016-10-01

    A new type of "explosively growing" vortex structure is investigated theoretically in the framework of ideal fluid hydrodynamics. It is shown that vortex structures may arise in convectively unstable atmospheric layers containing background vorticity. From an exact analytical vortex solution the vertical vorticity structure and toroidal speed are derived and analyzed. The assumption that vorticity is constant with height leads to a solution that grows explosively when the flow is inviscid. The results shown are in agreement with observations and laboratory experiments

  18. A whiff of nebular gas in Titan's atmosphere - Potential implications for the conditions and timing of Titan's formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glein, Christopher R.

    2017-09-01

    In situ data from the GCMS instrument on the Huygens probe indicate that Titan's atmosphere contains small amounts of the primordial noble gases 36Ar and 22Ne (tentative detection), but it is unknown how they were obtained by the satellite. Based on the apparent similarity in the 22Ne/36Ar (atom) ratio between Titan's atmosphere and the solar composition, a previously neglected hypothesis for the origin of primordial noble gases in Titan's atmosphere is suggested - these species may have been acquired near the end of Titan's formation, when the moon could have gravitationally captured some nebular gas that would have been present in its formation environment (the Saturnian subnebula). These noble gases may be remnants of a primary atmosphere. This could be considered the simplest hypothesis to explain the 22Ne/36Ar ratio observed at Titan. However, the 22Ne/36Ar ratio may not be exactly solar if these species can be fractionated by external photoevaporation in the solar nebula, atmospheric escape from Titan, or sequestration on the surface of Titan. While the GCMS data are consistent with a 22Ne/36Ar ratio of 0.05 to 2.5 times solar (1σ range), simple estimates that attempt to account for some of the effects of these evolutionary processes suggest a sub-solar ratio, which may be depleted by approximately one order of magnitude. Models based on capture of nebular gas can explain why the GCMS did not detect any other primordial noble gas isotopes, as their predicted abundances are below the detection limits (especially for 84Kr and 132Xe). It is also predicted that atmospheric Xe on Titan should be dominated by radiogenic 129Xe if the source of primordial Xe is nebular gas. Of order 10-2-10-1 bar of primordial H2 may have been captured along with the noble gases from a gas-starved disk, but this H2 would have quickly escaped from the initial atmosphere. To have the opportunity to capture nebular gas, Titan should have formed within ∼10 Myr of the formation of the

  19. Carbon neutron star atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, V F; Pavlov, G G; Werner, K

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars is limited in particular by uncertainties in chemical composition of their atmospheres. For example, atmospheres of thermally - emitting neutron stars in supernova remnants might have exotic chemical compositions, and for one of them, the neutron star in CasA, a pure carbon atmosphere has recently been suggested by Ho & Heinke (2009). To test such a composition for other similar sources, a publicly available detailed grid of carbon model atmosphere spectra is needed. We have computed such a grid using the standard LTE approximation and assuming that the magnetic field does not exceed 10^8 G. The opacities and pressure ionization effects are calculated using the Opacity Project approach. We describe the properties of our models and investigate the impact of the adopted assumptions and approximations on the emergent spectra.

  20. The invention of atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Craig

    2015-08-01

    The word "atmosphere" was a neologism Willebrord Snellius created for his Latin translation of Simon Stevin's cosmographical writings. Astronomers and mathematical practitioners, such as Snellius and Christoph Scheiner, applying the techniques of Ibn Mu'ādh and Witelo, were the first to use the term in their calculations of the height of vapors that cause twilight. Their understandings of the atmosphere diverged from Aristotelian divisions of the aerial region. From the early years of the seventeenth century, the term was often associated with atomism or corpuscular matter theory. The concept of the atmosphere changed dramatically with the advent of pneumatic experiments in the middle of the seventeenth century. Pierre Gassendi, Walter Charleton, and Robert Boyle transformed the atmosphere of the mathematicians giving it the characteristics of weight, specific gravity, and fluidity, while disputes about its extent and border remained unresolved.

  1. Atmospheric muons: experimental aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Cecchini, S.; Spurio, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a review of atmospheric muon flux and energy spectrum measurements over almost six decades of muon momentum. Sea-level and underground/water/ice experiments are considered. Possible sources of systematic errors in the measurements are examinated. The characteristics of underground/water muons (muons in bundle, lateral distribution, energy spectrum) are discussed. The connection between the atmospheric muon and neutrino measurements are also reported.

  2. Atmospheric muons: experimental aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cecchini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of atmospheric muon flux and energy spectrum measurements over almost six decades of muon momentum. Sea level and underground/water/ice experiments are considered. Possible sources of systematic errors in the measurements are examined. The characteristics of underground/water muons (muons in bundle, lateral distribution, energy spectrum are discussed. The connection between the atmospheric muon and neutrino measurements are also reported.

  3. Global atmospheric changes.

    OpenAIRE

    Piver, W T

    1991-01-01

    Increasing concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere can be directly related to global warming. In terms of human health, because a major cause of increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 is the increased combustion of fossil fuels, global warming also may result in increases in air pollutants, acid deposition, and exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. To understand better the impacts of global warming phenomena on human health, this review emphasizes the proces...

  4. Proterozoic atmospheric oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2014-01-01

    This article is concerned with the evolution of atmospheric oxygen concentrations through the Proterozoic Eon. In particular, this article will seek to place the history of atmospheric oxygenation through the Proterozoic Eon in the context of the evolving physical environment including the history...... of continental growth and volcanic outgassing, as well as biogeochemical processing of elements within the oceans. The author will seek to explore constraints on the history of oxygenation and understand which processes have regulated oxygen through this eon....

  5. Picosecond delays of light emitted by streamer in atmospheric pressure air: analysis of N2(C3{\\Pi}u) and N+2 (B2{\\Sigma}+u) emissions and fundamental streamer structure

    CERN Document Server

    Hoder, Tomas; Bourdon, Anne; Simek, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Both experimental and theoretical analysis of ultra-short phenomena occurring dur- ing the positive streamer propagation in atmospheric pressure air is presented. It is shown that as the streamer passes a spatial coordinate, emission maxima from radiative states with different excitation energies follow with different delays. Associating the po- sition of the streamer head with the maximum value of the self-enhanced electric field, a maximum delay of 220 ps was experimentally found for the peak emission of the second positive system of molecular nitrogen. On a later stage of streamer development this delay can reach as much as 400 ps. Different delays for first negative and second positive systems emission maxima are caused by differences in the dynamics of populating the radiative states, due to different excitation rates. It is shown that emission maxima delays linearly depend on the ratio of streamer radius and its velocity. This is found to be one of the fundamental features of the streamer structure and ...

  6. Millimeter-Wave Atmospheric Sounder (MAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, G. K.

    1988-01-01

    MAS is a remote sensing instrument for passive sounding (limb sounding) of the earth's atmosphere from the Space Shuttle. The main objective of the MAS is to study the composition and dynamic structure of the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere in the height range 20 to 100 km, the region known as the middle atmosphere. The MAS will be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission scheduled for late 1990. The Millimeter-Wave Atmospheric Sounder will provide, for the first time, information obtained simultaneously on the temperature and on ozone concentrations in the 20 to 90 km altitude region. The information will cover a large area of the globe, will have high accuracy and high vertical resolution, and will cover both day and night times. Additionally, data on the two important molecules, H2O and ClO, will also be provided.

  7. Dynamics in Atmospheric Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindzen, Richard A.

    2005-08-01

    Motion is manifest in the atmosphere in an almost infinite variety of ways. In Dynamics in Atmospheric Physics, Dr. Richard Lindzen describes the nature of motion in the atmosphere, develops fluid dynamics relevant to the atmosphere, and explores the role of motion in determining the climate and atmospheric composition. The author presents the material in a lecture note style, and the emphasis throughout is on describing phenomena that are at the frontiers of current research, but due attention is given to the methodology of research and to the historical background of these topics. The author's treatment and choice of topics is didactic. Problems at the end of each chapter will help students assimilate the material. In general the discussions emphasize physical concepts, and throughout Dr. Lindzen makes a concerted effort to avoid the notion that dynamic meteorology is simply the derivation of equations and their subsequent solution. His desire is that interested students will delve further into solution details. The book is intended as a text for first year graduate students in the atmospheric sciences. Although the material in the book is self contained, a familiarity with differential equations is assumed; some background in fluid mechanics is helpful.

  8. Encouragement from Jupiter for Europe's Titan Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Huygens will transmit scientific information for 150 minutes, from the outer reaches of Titan's cold atmosphere and all the way down to its enigmatic surface. For comparison, the Jupiter Probe radioed scientific data for 58 minutes as it descended about 200 kilometres into the outer part of the atmosphere of the giant planet. The parachutes controlling various stages of Huygens' descent will rely upon a system for deployment designed and developed in Europe that is nevertheless similar to that used by the Jupiter Probe. The elaborate sequence of operations in Huygens worked perfectly during a dramatic drop test from a stratospheric balloon over Sweden in May 1995, which approximated as closely as possible to events on Titan. The performance of the American Probe at Jupiter renews the European engineers' confidence in their own descent control system, and also in the lithium sulphur-dioxide batteries which were chosen to power both Probes. "The systems work after long storage in space," comments Hamid Hassan, ESA's Project Manager for Huygens. "Huygens will spend seven years travelling to Saturn's vicinity aboard the Cassini Orbiter. The Jupiter Probe was a passenger in Galileo for six years before its release, so there is no reason to doubt that Huygens will work just as well." Huygens will enter the outer atmosphere of Titan at 20,000 kilometres per hour. A heat shield 2.7 metres in diameter will withstand the friction and slow the Probe to a speed at which parachutes can be deployed. The size of the parachute for the main phase of the descent is chosen to allow Huygens to reach the surface in about 2 hours. The batteries powering Huygens will last for about 21/2 hours. Prepared for surprises A different perspective on the Jupiter Probe comes from Jean-Pierre Lebreton, ESA's Project Scientist for Huygens. The results contradicted many preconceptions of the Galileo scientists, particularly about the abundance of water and the structure of cloud layers. Arguments

  9. Atmospheric Modeling Using Accelerometer Data During Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) Flight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Robert H.; Lugo, Rafael A.; Baird, Darren T.; Cianciolo, Alicia D.; Bougher, Stephen W.; Zurek, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft is a NASA orbiter designed to explore the Mars upper atmosphere, typically from 140 to 160 km altitude. In addition to the nominal science mission, MAVEN has performed several Deep Dip campaigns in which the orbit's closest point of approach, also called periapsis, was lowered to an altitude range of 115 to 135 km. MAVEN accelerometer data were used during mission operations to estimate atmospheric parameters such as density, scale height, along-track gradients, and wave structures. Density and scale height estimates were compared against those obtained from the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model and used to aid the MAVEN navigation team in planning maneuvers to raise and lower periapsis during Deep Dip operations. This paper describes the processes used to reconstruct atmosphere parameters from accelerometers data and presents the results of their comparison to model and navigation-derived values.

  10. Free from the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    /07 ESO PR Photo 27e/07 Active Galaxy NGC 4945 (NACO-LGS/VLT) Still closer to home, the LGS system can also be applied to solar system objects, such as asteroids or satellites, but also to the study of particular regions of spatially extended bodies like the polar regions of giant planets, where aurora activity is concentrated. During their science verification, the scientists turned the SINFONI instrument with the LGS to a Trans-Neptunian Object, 2003 EL 61. The high image contrast and sensitivity obtained with the use of the LGS mode permit the detection of the two faint satellites known to orbit the TNO. "From such observations one can study the chemical composition of the surface material of the TNO and its satellites (mainly crystalline water ice), estimate their surface properties and constrain their internal structure," explains Christophe Dumas, from ESO. The VLT Laser Guide System is the result of a collaborative work by a team of scientists and engineers from ESO and the Max Planck Institutes for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching and for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany. NACO was built by a Consortium of French and German institutes and ESO. SINFONI was built by a Consortium of German and Dutch Institutes and ESO. More Information Normally, the achievable image sharpness of a ground-based telescope is limited by the effect of atmospheric turbulence. This drawback can be surmounted with adaptive optics, allowing the telescope to produce images that are as sharp as if taken from space. This means that finer details in astronomical objects can be studied, and also that fainter objects can be observed. In order to work, adaptive optics needs a nearby reference star that has to be relatively bright, thereby limiting the area of the sky that can be surveyed to a few percent only. To overcome this limitation, astronomers use a powerful laser that creates an artificial star, where and when they need it. The laser beam takes advantage of the layer of sodium atoms

  11. Laboratory investigation on the formation of unsaturated nitriles in Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balucani, N.; Asvany, O.; Osamura, Y.; Huang, L. C. L.; Lee, Y. T.; Kaiser, R. I.

    2000-04-01

    Crossed molecular beam experiments of ground state cyano radicals, CN(X 2Σ +), with hydrocarbons acetylene (C 2H 2), ethylene (C 2H 4), methylacetylene (CH 3CCH), allene (H 2CCCH 2), dimethylacetylene (CH 3CCCH 3), and benzene (C 6H 6,) were performed to investigate the formation of unsaturated nitriles in Titan's atmosphere. These radical-neutral reactions have no entrance barrier, depict an exit barrier well below the energy of the reactant molecules, and are all exothermic. The CN radical attacks the π electron density at the olefine, alkyne, and aromatic molecules; the formation of an initial addition complex is a common pathway on the involved potential energy surfaces for all reactions. A subsequent carbon-hydrogen bond rupture yields the unsaturated nitriles HCCCN, C 2H 3CN, CH 3CCCN, H 2CCCH(CN), H 2CCCH 2CN, and C 6H 5CN as detected in our experiments. The explicit identification of this CN vs H atom exchange pathway under single collision, makes this reaction-class a compelling candidate to synthesize unsaturated nitriles in Titan's atmosphere. This versatile concept makes it even possible to predict the formation of nitriles once the corresponding unsaturated hydrocarbons are identified in Titan. Here, the C 2H 2 as well as cyanoacetylene, HCCCN, have been already identified unambiguously in Titan's troposphere. Those nitriles as sampled in our crossed beam experiments resemble an ideal challenge to be detected in the framework of the NASA-ESA Cassini-Huygens mission to Titan.

  12. Fundamental spectroscopic studies of some atmospheric pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findley, G.L.; McGlynn, S.P.

    1980-01-01

    Molecular electronic transitions that lie in the vuv (vacuum ultraviolet) spectral region initiate many harmful photochemical modifications in the upper atmosphere. Consequently, investigations have focused on molecules that are primary atmospheric pollutants, but which are simple enough structurally to yield detailed photophysical information. Terminal electronic states for vuv transitions can be either valence or Rydberg and, at low enough energies, the distinction between the two becomes fuzzy. A major thrust of this program has been the classification and characterization of Rydberg transitions in an attempt to gain insight into Rydberg/valence state mixing Rydberg studies. It is concluded that in order to understand the nature of photochemical reactions of molecules in the upper atmosphere, it is necessary to understand the structure and function of high-energy molecular electronic states. It is also necessary to understand the ways in which these states interact and, thereby, facilitate energy transfer. The study of molecular Rydberg states provides information crucial to such an understanding.

  13. Stellar model atmospheres with magnetic line blanketing

    CERN Document Server

    Kochukhov, O; Shulyak, D

    2004-01-01

    Model atmospheres of A and B stars are computed taking into account magnetic line blanketing. These calculations are based on the new stellar model atmosphere code LLModels which implements direct treatment of the opacities due to the bound-bound transitions and ensures an accurate and detailed description of the line absorption. The anomalous Zeeman effect was calculated for the field strengths between 1 and 40 kG and a field vector perpendicular to the line of sight. The model structure, high-resolution energy distribution, photometric colors, metallic line spectra and the hydrogen Balmer line profiles are computed for magnetic stars with different metallicities and are discussed with respect to those of non-magnetic reference models. The magnetically enhanced line blanketing changes the atmospheric structure and leads to a redistribution of energy in the stellar spectrum. The most noticeable feature in the optical region is the appearance of the 5200 A depression. However, this effect is prominent only in ...

  14. Atmospheric Laser Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer(, Kenneth W.; Witiw, Michael R.; Baars+, Jeffrey A.; Oke, T. R.

    2004-05-01

    Atmospheric laser communication, often referred to as free-space optics (FSO) or free-space laser (FSL) communication, is similar to fiber optic cable in terms of carrier wavelength and bandwidth capability, but data are transmitted directly through the atmosphere via laser beams over paths from a few meters to 4 km or longer. FSL uses lasers in the near-infrared spectrum, typically at wavelengths of 850 or 1550 nm. Given these wavelengths, atmospheric attenuation must be considered, and an adequate margin of optical power (dB) must exist to support high system availability (the percentage of time that an FSL link is in operation, typically 99.9%). A visual range of 100 m can attenuate a laser beam at a rate of nearly 130 dB km-1. For short links (rain, and snow frequently become issues. To address these issues, long-term climate data are analyzed to determine the frequency of occurrence of low visibilities and low-cloud ceilings. To estimate availability at a site of interest, adjustments to airport climate data are made to accommodate differences in altitude, geography, and the effects of the urban heat island. In sum, communication via FSL is a feasible alternative to fiber optic cable when atmospheric conditions are considered and properly analyzed.(Current affiliation: The Boeing Company, Seattle, Washington+Current affiliation: Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

  15. Atmosphere and Ambient Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    Atmosphere and Ambient Space This paper explores the relation between atmosphere and ambient space. Atmosphere and ambient space share many salient properties. They are both ontologically indeterminate, constantly varying and formally diffuse and they are both experienced as a subtle, non......-signifying property of a given space. But from a certain point of view, the two concepts also designate quite dissimilar experiences of space. To be ’ambient’ means to surround. Accordingly, ambient space is that space, which surrounds something or somebody. (Gibson 1987: 65) Since space is essentially...... of a surrounding character, all space can thus be described as having a fundamentally ambient character. So what precisely is an ambient space, then? As I will argue in my presentation, ambient space is a sensory effect of spatiality when a space is experienced as being particularly surrounding: a ‘space effect...

  16. Atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Helling, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Brown Dwarfs are the coolest class of stellar objects known to date. Our present perception is that Brown Dwarfs follow the principles of star formation, and that Brown Dwarfs share many characteristics with planets. Being the darkest and lowest mass stars known makes Brown Dwarfs also the coolest stars known. This has profound implication for their spectral fingerprints. Brown Dwarfs cover a range of effective temperatures which cause brown dwarfs atmospheres to be a sequence that gradually changes from a M-dwarf-like spectrum into a planet-like spectrum. This further implies that below an effective temperature of < 2800K, clouds form already in atmospheres of objects marking the boundary between M-Dwarfs and brown dwarfs. Recent developments have sparked the interest in plasma processes in such very cool atmospheres: sporadic and quiescent radio emission has been observed in combination with decaying Xray-activity indicators across the fully convective boundary.

  17. Phenomenology of atmospheric neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedynitch Anatoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of astrophysical neutrinos, certainly a break-through result, introduced new experimental challenges and fundamental questions about acceleration mechanisms of cosmic rays. On one hand IceCube succeeded in finding an unambiguous proof for the existence of a diffuse astrophysical neutrino flux, on the other hand the precise determination of its spectral index and normalization requires a better knowledge about the atmospheric background at hundreds of TeV and PeV energies. Atmospheric neutrinos in this energy range originate mostly from decays of heavy-flavor mesons, which production in the phase space relevant for prompt leptons is uncertain. Current accelerator-based experiments are limited by detector acceptance and not so much by the collision energy. This paper recaps phenomenological aspects of atmospheric leptons and calculation methods, linking recent progress in flux predictions with particle physics at colliders, in particular the Large Hadron Collider.

  18. Atmosphere and Ambient Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    Atmosphere and Ambient Space This paper explores the relation between atmosphere and ambient space. Atmosphere and ambient space share many salient properties. They are both ontologically indeterminate, constantly varying and formally diffuse and they are both experienced as a subtle, non......-signifying property of a given space. But from a certain point of view, the two concepts also designate quite dissimilar experiences of space. To be ’ambient’ means to surround. Accordingly, ambient space is that space, which surrounds something or somebody. (Gibson 1987: 65) Since space is essentially...... of a surrounding character, all space can thus be described as having a fundamentally ambient character. So what precisely is an ambient space, then? As I will argue in my presentation, ambient space is a sensory effect of spatiality when a space is experienced as being particularly surrounding: a ‘space effect...

  19. Dreaming of Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2016-10-01

    Radiative transfer retrievals have become the standard in modelling of exoplanetary transmission and emission spectra. Analysing currently available observations of exoplanetary atmospheres often invoke large and correlated parameter spaces that can be difficult to map or constrain.To address these issues, we have developed the Tau-REx (tau-retrieval of exoplanets) retrieval and the RobERt spectral recognition algorithms. Tau-REx is a bayesian atmospheric retrieval framework using Nested Sampling and cluster computing to fully map these large correlated parameter spaces. Nonetheless, data volumes can become prohibitively large and we must often select a subset of potential molecular/atomic absorbers in an atmosphere.In the era of open-source, automated and self-sufficient retrieval algorithms, such manual input should be avoided. User dependent input could, in worst case scenarios, lead to incomplete models and biases in the retrieval. The RobERt algorithm is build to address these issues. RobERt is a deep belief neural (DBN) networks trained to accurately recognise molecular signatures for a wide range of planets, atmospheric thermal profiles and compositions. Using these deep neural networks, we work towards retrieval algorithms that themselves understand the nature of the observed spectra, are able to learn from current and past data and make sensible qualitative preselections of atmospheric opacities to be used for the quantitative stage of the retrieval process.In this talk I will discuss how neural networks and Bayesian Nested Sampling can be used to solve highly degenerate spectral retrieval problems and what 'dreaming' neural networks can tell us about atmospheric characteristics.

  20. Lidar measured vertical atmospheric scattering profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The vertical structure of the atmosphere, which is of invaluable interest to meteorologists, geo-physicists and environmental researchers, can be measured with LIDAR. A method has been proposed and applied to invert lidar signals from vertical soundings to height resolved scattering coefficients. In

  1. Lidar measured vertical atmospheric scattering profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The vertical structure of the atmosphere, which is of invaluable interest to meteorologists, geo-physicists and environmental researchers, can be measured with LIDAR. A method has been proposed and applied to invert lidar signals from vertical soundings to height resolved scattering coefficients. In

  2. Exoplanet atmospheres physical processes

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, astronomers have identified hundreds of extrasolar planets--planets orbiting stars other than the sun. Recent research in this burgeoning field has made it possible to observe and measure the atmospheres of these exoplanets. This is the first textbook to describe the basic physical processes--including radiative transfer, molecular absorption, and chemical processes--common to all planetary atmospheres, as well as the transit, eclipse, and thermal phase variation observations that are unique to exoplanets. In each chapter, Sara Seager offers a conceptual introdu

  3. Symmetries in atmospheric sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Bihlo, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Selected applications of symmetry methods in the atmospheric sciences are reviewed briefly. In particular, focus is put on the utilisation of the classical Lie symmetry approach to derive classes of exact solutions from atmospheric models. This is illustrated with the barotropic vorticity equation. Moreover, the possibility for construction of partially-invariant solutions is discussed for this model. A further point is a discussion of using symmetries for relating different classes of differential equations. This is illustrated with the spherical and the potential vorticity equation. Finally, discrete symmetries are used to derive the minimal finite-mode version of the vorticity equation first discussed by E. Lorenz (1960) in a sound mathematical fashion.

  4. The Atmosphere of Pluto as Observed by New Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, Randy

    2016-07-01

    A major goal of the New Horizons (NH) mission was to explore and characterize the structure and composition of Pluto's atmosphere. Several instruments onboard NH contributed to these goals, primarily: 1) the REX instrument, through uplink X-band radio occultations, 2) the Alice instrument, through extreme- and far-ultraviolet solar occultations, and 3) the LORRI panchromatic and MVIC color imagers, through high-resolution imaging. The associated datasets were obtained near closest approach of NH to Pluto at 11:48 UT on 14 July 2015. Pressure and temperature profiles of the lower atmosphere are derived from the REX radio occultation data, the composition and structure of the extended atmosphere are derived from the Alice solar occultation data, and the distribution and properties of Pluto's hazes are derived from the LORRI and MVIC imaging data. The observations made during the NH flyby provide a detailed snapshot of the current state of Pluto's atmosphere. While the lower atmosphere (at altitudes less than 200 km) is largely consistent with ground-based stellar occultations, the upper atmosphere is much colder and more compact than indicated by pre-encounter models. Molecular nitrogen dominates the atmosphere (at altitudes less than 1800 km or so), while methane, acetylene, ethylene, and ethane are important minor species, and likely help produce the haze which surrounds Pluto. The cold upper atmosphere considerably reduces the magnitude of the hydrodynamic escape of Pluto's atmosphere to space. In this talk an overview of the atmosphere science results will be presented.

  5. Characterization of atmospheric aerosols using Synchroton radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence and Fe K-edge total reflection X-ray fluorescence-X-ray absorption near-edge structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fittschen, U.E.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: ursula.fittschen@chemie.uni-hamburg.de; Meirer, F. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien (Austria)], E-mail: fmeirer@ati.ac.at; Streli, C. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien (Austria)], E-mail: streli@ati.ac.at; Wobrauschek, P. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien (Austria)], E-mail: wobi@ati.ac.at; Thiele, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: Julian.Thiele@gmx.de; Falkenberg, G. [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: falkenbe@mail.desy.de; Pepponi, G. [ITC-irst, Via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy)], E-mail: pepponi@itc.it

    2008-12-15

    In this study a new procedure using Synchrotron total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF) to characterize elemental amounts in atmospheric aerosols down to particle sizes of 0.015 um is presented. The procedure was thoroughly evaluated regarding bounce off effects and blank values. Additionally the potential of total reflection X-ray fluorescence-X-ray absorption near edge structure (SR-TXRF-XANES) for speciation of FeII/III down to amounts of 34 pg in aerosols which were collected for 1 h is shown. The aerosols were collected in the city of Hamburg with a low pressure Berner impactor on Si carriers covered with silicone over time periods of 60 and 20 min each. The particles were collected in four and ten size fractions of 10.0-8.0 {mu}m, 8.0-2.0 {mu}m, 2.0-0.13 {mu}m 0.13-0.015 {mu}m (aerodynamic particle size) and 15-30 nm, 30-60 nm, 60-130 nm, 130-250 nm, 250-500 nm, 0.5-1 {mu}m, 1-2 {mu}m, 2-4 {mu}m, 4-8 {mu}m, 8-16 {mu}m. Prior to the sampling 'bounce off' effects on Silicone and Vaseline coated Si carriers were studied with total reflection X-ray fluorescence. According to the results silicone coated carriers were chosen for the analysis. Additionally, blank levels originating from the sampling device and the calibration procedure were studied. Blank levels of Fe corresponded to 1-10% of Fe in the aerosol samples. Blank levels stemming from the internal standard were found to be negligible. The results from the Synchroton radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of the aerosols showed that 20 min of sampling time gave still enough sample material for elemental determination of most elements. For the determination of the oxidation state of Fe in the aerosols different Fe salts were prepared as a reference from suspensions in isopropanol. The results from the Fe K-edge Synchroton radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence-X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis of the aerosol samples showed that mainly Fe(III) was present in

  6. Results from atmospheric neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J G Learned

    2000-07-01

    With the announcement of new evidence for muon neutrino disappearance observed by the super-Kamiokande experiment, the more than a decade old atmospheric neutrino anomaly moved from a possible indication for neutrino oscillations to an apparently inescapable fact. The evidence is reviewed, and new indications are presented that the oscillations are probably between muon and tau neutrinos. Implications and future directions are discussed.

  7. Exoplanet atmosphere highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Muñoz, A.

    2017-03-01

    In only two decades since the first identification of a planet outside the Solar System,and about one since the pioneering detection of an atmosphere, exoplanet science has established itself as a mature field of astrophysics. As the search of as-of-yet undiscovered planets goes on, the field is steadily expanding its focus from detection only to detection and characterization. The information to be grasped from exoplanet atmospheres provides valuable insight into the formation and evolution of the planets and, in turn, into how unique our Solar System is. Ultimately, a dedicated search for life in these distant worlds will have to deal with the information encoded in their atmospheres. In recent years there has been rapid progress on both the theoretical and observational fronts in the investigation of exoplanet atmospheres. Theorists are predicting the prevailing conditions (temperature, chemical composition, cloud occurrence, energy transport) in these objects' envelopes, and are building the frameworks with which to approach the interpretation of observables. In parallel, observers have consolidated the remote sensing techniques that were utilized during the early years, and are now venturing into techniques that hold great promise for the future. With a number of space missions soon to fly and ground-based telescopes and instruments to be commissioned, all of them conceived during the exoplanet era, the field is set to experience unprecedented progress.

  8. Modeling of Cometary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombosi, Tamas

    2004-01-01

    The NASA supported project 'Modeling of Cometary Atmospheres' has been quite successful in broadening our understanding of the cometary environment. We list peer reviewed publications and conference presentation that have been made as a result of studies performed under this project. Following the list we present details of a selection of the results.

  9. Astronomy and Atmospheric Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Les; Gaina, Alex

    2011-12-01

    The authors discusse the insuccess of the observation of the Total Eclipse of the Moon from 10 december 2011 in Romania and relate them with meteoconditions. Only a very short part of the last penumbral phase was observed, while the inital part and the totality was not observed due to very dense clouds. The change in color and brightness during this phase was signaled. Meanwhile, there is an area of science where clouds are of great use and interest. This area is Atmospheric optics, while the science which study clouds is meteorology. Clouds in combination with Solar and Moon light could give rise to a variety of strange, rare and unobvious phenomena in the atmosphere (sky), sometimes confused with Unidentified Flying Objects (UFO). The importance of meteorology for astronomy and atmospheric optics is underlined and an invitation to astronomers to use unfavourable days for athmospheric observations was sent. The web address of the site by Les Cowley, designed for atmospheric optics phenomena is contained in the text of the entry.

  10. Atmospheric and aerosol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeill, V. Faye [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Ariya, Parisa A. (ed.) [McGill Univ. Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; McGill Univ. Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

    2014-09-01

    This series presents critical reviews of the present position and future trends in modern chemical research. Short and concise reports on chemistry, each written by the world renowned experts. Still valid and useful after 5 or 10 years. More information as well as the electronic version of the whole content available at: springerlink.com. Christian George, Barbara D'Anna, Hartmut Herrmann, Christian Weller, Veronica Vaida, D. J. Donaldson, Thorsten Bartels-Rausch, Markus Ammann Emerging Areas in Atmospheric Photochemistry. Lisa Whalley, Daniel Stone, Dwayne Heard New Insights into the Tropospheric Oxidation of Isoprene: Combining Field Measurements, Laboratory Studies, Chemical Modelling and Quantum Theory. Neil M. Donahue, Allen L. Robinson, Erica R. Trump, Ilona Riipinen, Jesse H. Kroll Volatility and Aging of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol. P. A. Ariya, G. Kos, R. Mortazavi, E. D. Hudson, V. Kanthasamy, N. Eltouny, J. Sun, C. Wilde Bio-Organic