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Sample records for hutchinson cancer ctr

  1. EGCG Enhances Cisplatin Sensitivity by Regulating Expression of the Copper and Cisplatin Influx Transporter CTR1 in Ovary Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemin Wang

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is one of the first-line platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents for treatment of many types of cancer, including ovary cancer. CTR1 (copper transporter 1, a transmembrane solute carrier transporter, has previously been shown to increase the cellular uptake and sensitivity of cisplatin. It is hypothesized that increased CTR1 expression would enhance the sensitivity of cancer cells to cisplatin (cDDP. The present study demonstrates for the first time that (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, a major polyphenol from green tea, can enhance CTR1 mRNA and protein expression in ovarian cancer cells and xenograft mice. EGCG inhibits the rapid degradation of CTR1 induced by cDDP. The combination of EGCG and cDDP increases the accumulation of cDDP and DNA-Pt adducts, and subsequently enhances the sensitivity of ovarian cancer SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent. In the OVCAR3 ovarian cancer xenograft nude mice model, the combination of the lower concentration of cDDP and EGCG strongly repressed the tumor growth and exhibited protective effect on the nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin. Overall, these findings uncover a novel chemotherapy mechanism of EGCG as an adjuvant for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  2. The Copper Transporter 1 (CTR1) is Required to Maintain the Stability of Copper Transporter 2 (CTR2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Liebig, Janika K.; Tsigelny, Igor F.; Howell, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells have two influx Cu transporters that form trimers in membranes. CTR1 is the high affinity transporter that resides largely in the plasma membrane, and CTR2 is the low affinity transporter that is primarily associated with vesicular structures inside the cell. The major differences between CTR1 and CTR2 are that CTR1 contains a HIS/MET-rich domain N-terminal of the METS that participate in the first two stacked rings that form the pore, and a longer C-terminal tail that includes a Cu binding HIS-CYS-HIS (HCH) motif right at the end. It has been reported that CTR1 and CTR2 are physically associated with each other in the cell. We used the CRISPR-Cas9 technology to knock out either CTR1 or CTR2 in fully malignant HEK293T and OVCAR8 human ovarian cancer cells to investigate the interaction of CTR1 and CTR2. We report here that the level of CTR2 protein is markedly decreased in CTR1 knockout clones while the CTR2 transcript level remains unchanged. CTR2 was found to be highly ubiquitinated in the CTR1 knock out cells, and inhibition of the proteosome prevented the degradation of CTR2 when CTR1 was not present while inhibition of autophagy had no effect. Re-expression of CTR1 rescued CTR2 from degradation in the CTR1 knockout cells. We conclude that CTR1 is essential to maintain the stability of CTR2 and that in the absence of CTR1 CTR2 is degraded by the proteosome. This reinforces the concept that the functions of CTR1 and CTR2 are inter-dependent within the Cu homeostasis system. PMID:26205368

  3. The copper transporter 1 (CTR1) is required to maintain the stability of copper transporter 2 (CTR2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Liebig, Janika K; Tsigelny, Igor F; Howell, Stephen B

    2015-11-01

    Mammalian cells have two influx Cu transporters that form trimers in membranes. CTR1 is the high affinity transporter that resides largely in the plasma membrane, and CTR2 is the low affinity transporter that is primarily associated with vesicular structures inside the cell. The major differences between CTR1 and CTR2 are that CTR1 contains a HIS/MET-rich domain N-terminal of the METS that participate in the first two stacked rings that form the pore, and a longer C-terminal tail that includes a Cu binding HIS-CYS-HIS (HCH) motif right at the end. It has been reported that CTR1 and CTR2 are physically associated with each other in the cell. We used the CRISPR-Cas9 technology to knock out either CTR1 or CTR2 in fully malignant HEK293T and OVCAR8 human ovarian cancer cells to investigate the interaction of CTR1 and CTR2. We report here that the level of CTR2 protein is markedly decreased in CTR1 knockout clones while the CTR2 transcript level remains unchanged. CTR2 was found to be highly ubiquitinated in the CTR1 knock out cells, and inhibition of the proteasome prevented the degradation of CTR2 when CTR1 was not present while inhibition of autophagy had no effect. Re-expression of CTR1 rescued CTR2 from degradation in the CTR1 knockout cells. We conclude that CTR1 is essential to maintain the stability of CTR2 and that in the absence of CTR1 CTR2 is degraded by the proteasome. This reinforces the concept that the functions of CTR1 and CTR2 are inter-dependent within the Cu homeostasis system.

  4. ADIDAS SUPERNOVA CTR10

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘楠

    2008-01-01

    ADIDAS SUPERNOVA CTR10作为ADIDAS控制型跑鞋中的佼佼者,鞋款结合了如立体FORMOTION,大面积的PRO-MODERATOR特殊材质,以及强化型的07款鞋模(EL-07),前脚掌大块ADIPRENE+等诸多ADIDAS的当家技术,但在实际的跑步过程中,这些技术点能否真正为跑步者带来明显的感受?请随我们进入到ADIDAS SUPERNOVA CONTROL10评测环节。

  5. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gopal G; Belavadi GB

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare pediatric genetic syndrome associated with a characteristic aged appearance very early in life, generally leading to death in the second decade of life...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a genetic condition characterized by the ...

  7. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Amar Singh Bhukya; Bellum Siva Nagi Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare pediatric genetic syndrome associated with a characteristic aged appearance very early in life, generally leading to death in the second decade of life. Apart from premature aging, the other notable characteristics of children with HGPS include extreme short stature, prominent superficial veins, poor weight gain, alopecia, as well as various skeletal and cardiovascular pathologies associated with advanced age. The pattern of inheritance of...

  8. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahoor Hussain Daraz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare genetic disease in which symptoms of aging are manifested at an early age. In the present report, we describe a 9 months old female child presented with a history of progressive coarsening of skin, failure to thrive and irregular bumps over thighs, buttocks and lower limbs for the last 7½ months. In the course of time, she developed alopecia, hyperpigmented spots over the abdomen with thickening and a typical facial profile of HGPS including micrognathia, absent ear lobules, prominent eyes, loss of eyelashes, eyebrows and a bluish hue over the nose.

  9. Regulation of the high-affinity copper transporter (hCtr1) expression by cisplatin and heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zheng Dong; Long, Yan; Chen, Helen H W; Savaraj, Niramol; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2014-01-01

    Platinum-based antitumor agents have been the mainstay in cancer chemotherapy for many human malignancies. Drug resistance is an important obstacle to achieving the maximal therapeutic efficacy of these drugs. Understanding how platinum drugs enter cells is of great importance in improving therapeutic efficacy. It has been demonstrated that human high-affinity copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) is involved in transporting cisplatin into cells to elicit cytotoxic effects, although other mechanisms may exist. In this communication, we demonstrate that cisplatin transcriptionally induces the expression of hCtr1 in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Cisplatin functions as a competitor for hCtr1-mediated copper transport, resulting in reduced cellular copper levels and leading to upregulated expression of Sp1, which is a positive regulator for hCtr1 expression. Thus, regulation of hCtr1 expression by cisplatin is an integral part of the copper homeostasis regulation system. We also demonstrate that Ag(I) and Zn(II), which are known to suppress hCtr1-mediated copper transport, can also induce hCtr1/Sp1 expression. In contrast, Cd(II), another inhibitor of copper transport, downregulates hCtr1 expression by suppressing Sp1 expression. Collectively, our results demonstrate diverse mechanisms of regulating copper metabolism by these heavy metals.

  10. Ectopic Expression of CsCTR1, a Cucumber CTR-Like Gene, Attenuates Constitutive Ethylene Signaling in an Arabidopsis ctr1-1 Mutant and Expression Pattern Analysis of CsCTR1 in Cucumber (Cucumis sativus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beibei Bie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The gaseous plant hormone ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth, development and responses to the environment. Constitutive triple response 1 (CTR1 is a central regulator involved in the ethylene signal transduction pathway. To obtain a better understanding of this particular pathway in cucumber, the cDNA-encoding CTR1 (designated CsCTR1 was isolated from cucumber. A sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses revealed that CsCTR1 has a high degree of homology with other plant CTR1 proteins. The ectopic expression of CsCTR1 in the Arabidopsis ctr1-1 mutant attenuates constitutive ethylene signaling of this mutant, suggesting that CsCTR1 indeed performs its function as negative regulator of the ethylene signaling pathway. CsCTR1 is constitutively expressed in all of the examined cucumber organs, including roots, stems, leaves, shoot apices, mature male and female flowers, as well as young fruits. CsCTR1 expression gradually declined during male flower development and increased during female flower development. Additionally, our results indicate that CsCTR1 can be induced in the roots, leaves and shoot apices by external ethylene. In conclusion, this study provides a basis for further studies on the role of CTR1 in the biological processes of cucumber and on the molecular mechanism of the cucumber ethylene signaling pathway.

  11. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal G

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare pediatric genetic syndrome associated with a characteristic aged appearance very early in life, generally leading to death in the second decade of life. Apart from premature aging, the other notable characteristics of children with HGPS include extreme short stature, prominent superficial veins, poor weight gain, alopecia, as well as various skeletal and cardiovascular pathologies associated with advanced age. The pattern of inheritance of HGPS is uncertain, though both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive modes have been described. Recent genetic studies have demonstrated mutations in the LMNA gene in children with HGPS. In this article, we report a 16 years old girl who had the phenotypic features of HGPS and was later confirmed to have LMNA mutation by genetic analysis.

  12. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Nicole J; Gordon, Leslie B

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an extremely rare, uniformly fatal, segmental "premature aging" disease in which children exhibit phenotypes that may give us insights into the aging process at both the cellular and organismal levels. Initial presentation in early childhood is primarily based on growth and dermatologic findings. Primary morbidity and mortality for children with HGPS is from atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and strokes with death occurring at an average age of 14.6 years. There is increasing data to support a unique phenotype of the craniofacial and cerebrovascular anatomy that accompanies the premature aging process. Strokes in HGPS can occur downstream of carotid artery and/or vertebral artery occlusion, stenosis, and calcification, with prominent collateral vessel formation. Both large and small vessel disease are present, and strokes are often clinically silent. Despite the presence of multisystem premature aging, children with HGPS do not appear to have cognitive deterioration, suggesting that some aspects of brain function may be protected from the deleterious effects of progerin, the disease-causing protein. Based on limited autopsy material, there is no pathologic evidence of dementia or Alzheimer-type changes. In a transgenic mouse model of progeria with expression of the most common HGPS mutation in brain, skin, bone, and heart, there are distortions of neuronal nuclei at the ultrastructural level with irregular shape and severe invaginations, but no evidence of inclusions or aberrant tau in brain sections. Importantly, the nuclear distortions did not result in significant changes in gene expression in hippocampal neurons. This chapter will discuss both preclinical and clinical aspects of the genetics, pathobiology, clinical phenotype, clinical care, and treatment of HGPS, with special attention toward neurologic and cutaneous findings.

  13. Cloning and Characterization of a Putative CTR1 Gene from Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Cai-li; WEN Xiao-jie; ZHANG Xue-yong; LIU Xu

    2010-01-01

    CTR1 is a key negative regulator in ethylene signal transduction.A salt-induced CTR1 like gene(TaCTR1)was cloned from wheat,its expression under abiotie stresses,subcellular localization and the effect of overexpression of TaCTR1 on salt tolerance in tobacco was studied.A putative CTR1 gene was cloned and characterized from wheat via rapid amplification of cDNA ends(RACE)and RT-PCR.TaCTR1 expression under stresses was analyzed using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and the effect of overexpression of TaCTR1 on salt tolerance was conducted in tobacco.The full-length cDNA of TaCTR1is 2635 bp which codes for a polypeptide of 759 amino acids.There is a conserved serine/threonine protein kinase domain at the carboxyl terminus containing an ATP-binding site.Southern blot analysis revealed that TaCTR1 consisted of a gene family in wheat.The amino acid homologies of CTR1 among different organisms share higher similarities.Expression analysis revealed that TaCTR1 was induced by NaCl and drought stress but inhibited by ABA treatment.Transient expression of TaCTR1-GFP in the onion epidermal cells indicated that TaCTR1 was probably targeted to the plasma membrane.Overexpression of TaCTR1 decreased salt tolerance in transgenic tobacco(Nicotiana tabacum L.)plants compared with the control.To our knowledge,TaCTR1 is the first CTR1 gene cloned in wheat and may be involved in various abiotic stresses.Overexpression of TaCTR1 decreased the salt tolerance in tobacco suggested that TaCTR1 may act as a negative regulator of salt stress in plants.

  14. Molecular Characterization of CTR-type Copper Transporters in an Oceanic Diatom, Thalassiosira oceanica 1005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, L.; Price, N. M.

    2016-02-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient for phytoplankton growth because of its role as a redox cofactor in electron transfer proteins in photosynthesis and respiration, and a potentially limiting resource in parts of the open sea. Thalassiosira oceanica 1005 can grow at inorganic copper concentrations varying from 10 fmol/L to 10 nmol/L by regulating copper uptake across plasma membrane. Four putative CTR-type copper transporter genes (ToCTR1, ToCTR2, ToCTR3.1 and ToCTR3.2) were identified by BLASTP search against the T. oceanica genome. Predicted gene models were revised by assembled mRNA sequencing transcripts and updated gene models contained all conserved features of characterized CTR-type copper transporters. ToCTR3.1 and ToCTR3.2 may arise from one another by gene duplication as they shared a sequence similarity of 97.6% with a peptide insertion of 5 amino acids at N-terminus of ToCTR3.1. The expression of ToCTR1, ToCTR2 and ToCTR3.1/3.2 was upregulated in low copper concentrations, but only ToCTR3.1/3.2 showed a significant increase (2.5 fold) in copper-starved cells. Both ToCTR3.1 and ToCTR3.2 restored growth of a yeast double mutant, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ctrctr3Δ, in copper deficient medium. GFP-fused ToCTR expression showed that some ToCTR3.1 localized to the plasma membrane but a large portion was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Inefficient targeting of ToCTR3.1 to the yeast outer membrane may explain poorer growth compared to the Saccharomyces native ScCTR1 transformant. Thus, diatom CTR genes encoding CTR-type copper transporters show high-affinity copper uptake and their regulation may enable diatoms to survive in ocean environments containing a wide range of copper concentrations.

  15. Geodetic Control Points, Hutchinson, KS Benchmarks created by city surveyor at that time, Published in 1980, City of Hutchinson.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 1980. It is described as 'Hutchinson, KS Benchmarks created...

  16. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome through the lens of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokocimer, Miron; Barkan, Rachel; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2013-08-01

    Lamins are nuclear intermediate filaments. In addition to their structural roles, they are implicated in basic nuclear functions such as chromatin organization, DNA replication, transcription, DNA repair, and cell-cycle progression. Mutations in human LMNA gene cause several diseases termed laminopathies. One of the laminopathic diseases is Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), which is caused by a spontaneous mutation and characterized by premature aging. HGPS phenotypes share certain similarities with several apparently comparable medical conditions, such as aging and atherosclerosis, with the conspicuous absence of neuronal degeneration and cancer rarity during the short lifespan of the patients. Cell lines from HGPS patients are characterized by multiple nuclear defects, which include abnormal morphology, altered histone modification patterns, and increased DNA damage. These cell lines provide insight into the molecular pathways including senescence that require lamins A and B1. Here, we review recent data on HGPS phenotypes through the lens of transcriptional deregulation caused by lack of functional lamin A, progerin accumulation, and lamin B1 silencing.

  17. Expression profiles of a MhCTR1 gene in relation to banana fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huei-Lin; Do, Yi-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling

    2012-07-01

    The banana (Musa spp.) is a typical climacteric fruit of high economic importance. The development of bananas from maturing to ripening is characterized by increased ethylene production accompanied by a respiration burst. To elucidate the signal transduction pathway involved in the ethylene regulation of banana ripening, a gene homologous to Arabidopsis CTR1 (constitutive triple response 1) was isolated from Musa spp. (Hsien Jin Chiao, AAA group) and designated as MhCTR1. MhCTR1 spans 11.5 kilobases and consists of 15 exons and 14 introns with consensus GT-AG nucleotides situated at their boundaries. MhCTR1 encodes a polypeptide of 805 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 88.6 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of MhCTR1 demonstrates 55%, 56% and 55% homology to AtCTR1, RhCTR1, and LeCTR1, respectively. MhCTR1 is expressed mostly in the mature green pulp and root organs. During fruit development MhCTR1 expression increases just before ethylene production rises. Moreover, MhCTR1 expression was detected mainly in the pulps at ripening stage 3, and correlated with the onset of peel yellowing, while MhCTR1 was constitutively expressed in the peels. MhCTR1 expression could be induced by ethylene treatment (0.01 μL L(-1)), and MhCTR1 expression decreased in both peel and pulp 24 h after treatment. Overall, changes observed in MhCTR1 expression in the pulp closely related to the regulation of the banana ripening process.

  18. Ctr2 Regulates Mast Cell Maturation by Affecting the Storage and Expression of Tryptase and Proteoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhrvik, Helena; Logeman, Brandon; Noguchi, Glyn; Eriksson, Inger; Kjellén, Lena; Thiele, Dennis J; Pejler, Gunnar

    2015-10-15

    Copper (Cu) is essential for multiple cellular functions. Cellular uptake of Cu(+) is carried out by the Ctr1 high-affinity Cu transporter. The mobilization of endosomal Cu pools is regulated by a protein structurally similar to Ctr1, called Ctr2. It was recently shown that ablation of Ctr2 caused an increase in the concentration of Cu localized to endolysosomes. However, the biological significance of excess endolysosomal Cu accumulation has not been assessed. In this study, we addressed this issue by investigating the impact of Ctr2 deficiency on mast cells, a cell type unusually rich in endolysosomal organelles (secretory granules). We show that Ctr2(-/-) mast cells have increased intracellular Cu concentrations and that the absence of Ctr2 results in increased metachromatic staining, the latter indicating an impact of Ctr2 on the storage of proteoglycans in the secretory granules. In agreement with this, the absence of Ctr2 caused a skewed ratio between proteoglycans of heparin and chondroitin sulfate type, with increased amounts of heparin accompanied by a reduction of chondroitin sulfate. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed a higher number of electron-dense granules in Ctr2(-/-) mast cells than in wild-type cells. The increase in granular staining and heparin content is compatible with an impact of Ctr2 on mast cell maturation and, in support of this, the absence of Ctr2 resulted in markedly increased mRNA expression, storage, and enzymatic activity of tryptase. Taken together, the present study introduces Ctr2 and Cu as novel actors in the regulation of mast cell maturation and granule homeostasis.

  19. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalegowda Deepadarshan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Progeroid syndromes are characterised by clinical features of physiological aging at an early age. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a type of progeroid syndrome, characterised by abnormal facies, bone abnormalities, sclerodermatous skin changes and retarded physical development. Average life expectancy of progeria patients is 13 years. Herein we are reporting a case of progeria who is 21 years old.

  20. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome%Hutchinson-Gilford早老综合征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张韡; 苏忠兰; 吴侃; 宋昊; 温斯健; 杨莹; 刘白; 林志淼; 孙建方

    2016-01-01

    To report a case of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS).Peripheral blood samples were collected from a 5-year-old boy with HGPS and his parents.DNA was extracted from these samples,and PCR was performed to amplify exon 11 of the LMNA gene and its flanking sequences followed by DNA sequencing.The patient presented with scleroderma-like skin changes all over the body,growth retardation,distinctive facial features and hypotrichosis.His hip and knee joints could not be straightened completely,giving a horse-riding stance.A heterozygous mutation C.1824C > T was identified in exon 11 of the LMNA gene in the patient but not in either of his parents.A retrospective analysis was carried out on 18 Chinese patients with genetically diagnosed HPGS.Of them,9 classical cases were all sporadic with a heterozygous mutation of C.1824C>T.None of the patients with classical HPGS showed abnormality at birth,but all of them developed symptoms within 1 year after birth.Boys were more frequent to be affected by classical HPGS than girls,with the male/female ratio being 2:1.There was a familial tendency for the occurrence of atypical HPGS,and boys and girls appeared to be affected by HPGS at a similar probability.Three families with atypical HPGS all showed a homozygous LMNA mutation c.1579C>T.%报告1例Hutchinson-Gilford早老综合征(HGPS).对1例患儿及其父母外周血LMNA基因11号外显子和侧翼序列进行测序.患者男,5岁,全身皮肤呈硬皮病样改变,生长迟滞,特殊面容,毛发稀少.髋、膝关节均不能完全伸直,呈“骑马样站姿”.患儿LMNA基因11号外显子c.1824C>T杂合点突变,父母均未检测到该位点突变.文中还通过回顾性分析,探讨中国人群中通过基因学诊断的18例病例的疾病特点.我国基因学诊断的18例HGPS中,9例经典型HGPS均为散发病例,基因表型均上出现c.1824C>T杂合突变.患儿均在1岁以内发病,出生时基本未表现出“异常”.

  1. Role of the copper transporter, CTR1, in platinum-induced ototoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Swati S.; Akil, Omar; Ianculescu, Alexandra G.; Geier, Ethan G.; Lustig, Lawrence R.; Giacomini, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the role of an influx copper transporter, CTR1, in the ototoxicity induced by cisplatin, a potent anticancer platinum analog used in the treatment of a variety of solid tumors. As determined through RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR), Western blot and immunohistochemistry, mouse CTR1 (Ctr1) was found to be abundantly expressed and highly localized at the primary sites of cisplatin toxicity in the inner ear; mainly outer hair cells (OHC), inner hair cells (IHC), stria vascularis (SV), spiral ganglia (SG) and surrounding nerves in the mouse cochlea. A CTR1 substrate, copper sulfate, decreased the uptake and cytotoxicity of cisplatin in HEI-OC1, a cell line that expresses many molecular markers reminiscent of OHCs. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Ctr1 in this cell line caused a corresponding decrease in cisplatin uptake. In mice, intratympanic administration of copper sulfate 30 min before intraperitoneal administration of cisplatin was found to prevent hearing loss at click stimulus and 8, 16 and 32 kHz frequencies. To date, the utility of cisplatin remains severely limited due to its ototoxic effects. The studies described in this report suggest that cisplatin induced ototoxicity and cochlear uptake can be modulated by administration of a CTR1 inhibitor, copper sulfate. The possibility of local administration of CTR1 inhibitors during cisplatin therapy as a means of otoprotection is thereby raised. PMID:20631178

  2. Membrane Structure of CtrA3, a Copper-transporting P-type-ATPase from Aquifex aeolicus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chintalapati, Sivaram; Kurdi, Rana Al; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C.; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2008-01-01

    We have produced and characterized two new copper-transporting ATPases, CtrA2 and CtrA3 from Aquifex aeolicus, that belong to the family of heavy metal ion-transporting PIB-type ATPases. CtrA2 has a CPC metal-binding sequence in TM6 and a CxxC metal-binding N-terminal domain, while CtrA3 has a CPH m

  3. Membrane Structure of CtrA3, a Copper-transporting P-type-ATPase from Aquifex aeolicus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chintalapati, Sivaram; Kurdi, Rana Al; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C.; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2008-01-01

    We have produced and characterized two new copper-transporting ATPases, CtrA2 and CtrA3 from Aquifex aeolicus, that belong to the family of heavy metal ion-transporting PIB-type ATPases. CtrA2 has a CPC metal-binding sequence in TM6 and a CxxC metal-binding N-terminal domain, while CtrA3 has a CPH m

  4. Advanced postbuckling and imperfection sensitivity of the elastic-plastic Shanley-Hutchinson model column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Dencker; Byskov, Esben

    2008-01-01

    The postbuckling behavior and imperfection sensitivity of the Shanley-Hutchinson plastic model column introduced by Hutchinson in 1973 are examined. The study covers the initial, buckled state and the advanced postbuckling regime of the geometrically perfect realization as well as its sensitivity...

  5. Prematurely aged children: molecular alterations leading to Hutchinson-Gilford progeria and Werner syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Gerpe, Lourdes; Araújo-Vilar, David

    2008-12-01

    Ageing is thought to be a polygenic and stochastic process in which multiple mechanisms operate at the same time. At the level of the individual organism ageing is associated with a progressive deterioration of health and quality of life, sharing common features such as: alopecia and grey hair, loss of audition, macular degeneration, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, cataract formation, type-2 diabetes, lipodystrophies; a generally increased susceptibility to infection, autoimmune disorders and diseases such as cancer; and an impaired ability to cope with stress. Recent studies of mechanisms involved in the ageing process are contributing to the identification of genes involved in longevity. Monogenic heritable disorders causing premature ageing, and animal models have contributed to the understanding of some of the characteristic organism-level features associated with human ageing. Werner syndrome and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome are the best characterized human disorders. Werner syndrome patients have a median life expectancy of 47 years with clinical conditions from the second decade of life. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome patients die at a median age of 11-13 years with clinical conditions appearing soon after birth. In both syndromes, alterations in specific genes have been identified, with mutations in the WRN and LMNA genes respectively being the most closely associated with each syndrome. Results from molecular studies strongly suggest an increase in DNA damage and cell senescence as the underlying mechanism of pathological premature ageing in these two human syndromes. The same general mechanism has also been observed in human cells undergoing the normal ageing process. In the present article the molecular mechanisms currently proposed for explaining these two syndromes, which may also partly explain the normal ageing process, are reviewed.

  6. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome: A Rare Genetic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Rajat G.; Panigrahi, Antarmayee; Vijayakumar, Poornima; Choudhury, Priyadarshini; Bhuyan, Sanat K.; Bhuyan, Ruchi; Maragathavalli, G.; Pati, Abhishek Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare pediatric genetic syndrome with incidence of one per eight million live births. The disorder is characterised by premature aging, generally leading to death at approximately 13.4 years of age. This is a follow-up study of a 9-year-old male with clinical and radiographic features highly suggestive of HGPS and presented here with description of differential diagnosis and dental consideration. This is the first case report of HGPS which showed pectus carinatum structure of chest. PMID:24288630

  7. Hutchinson - Gilford progeria syndrome: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Subhash; Shanker, Vinay; Sharma, Neeraj

    2014-10-01

    Hutchinson - Gilford Progeria Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging involving the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a three-year-old boy with clinical manifestations characteristic of this syndrome. He had a characteristic "plucked-bird" appearance, prominent eyes and scalp veins, senile look, loss of scalp hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes, stunted growth, and mottled pigmentation with sclerodermatous changes over the trunk and lower limbs. Radiological changes and decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were also characteristic of the syndrome. This interesting case is reported for its rarity.

  8. Hutchinson – Gilford progeria syndrome: A rare case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Subhash; Shanker, Vinay; Sharma, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson – Gilford Progeria Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging involving the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a three-year-old boy with clinical manifestations characteristic of this syndrome. He had a characteristic “plucked-bird” appearance, prominent eyes and scalp veins, senile look, loss of scalp hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes, stunted growth, and mottled pigmentation with sclerodermatous changes over the trunk and lower limbs. Radiological changes and decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were also characteristic of the syndrome. This interesting case is reported for its rarity. PMID:25396134

  9. Hutchinson - Gilford progeria syndrome: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Kashyap

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson - Gilford Progeria Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging involving the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a three-year-old boy with clinical manifestations characteristic of this syndrome. He had a characteristic "plucked-bird" appearance, prominent eyes and scalp veins, senile look, loss of scalp hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes, stunted growth, and mottled pigmentation with sclerodermatous changes over the trunk and lower limbs. Radiological changes and decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL levels were also characteristic of the syndrome. This interesting case is reported for its rarity.

  10. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome: A Rare Genetic Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat G. Panigrahi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare pediatric genetic syndrome with incidence of one per eight million live births. The disorder is characterised by premature aging, generally leading to death at approximately 13.4 years of age. This is a follow-up study of a 9-year-old male with clinical and radiographic features highly suggestive of HGPS and presented here with description of differential diagnosis and dental consideration. This is the first case report of HGPS which showed pectus carinatum structure of chest.

  11. Cell Cycle Control by the Master Regulator CtrA in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In all domains of life, proper regulation of the cell cycle is critical to coordinate genome replication, segregation and cell division. In some groups of bacteria, e.g. Alphaproteobacteria, tight regulation of the cell cycle is also necessary for the morphological and functional differentiation of cells. Sinorhizobium meliloti is an alphaproteobacterium that forms an economically and ecologically important nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with specific legume hosts. During this symbiosis S. meliloti undergoes an elaborate cellular differentiation within host root cells. The differentiation of S. meliloti results in massive amplification of the genome, cell branching and/or elongation, and loss of reproductive capacity. In Caulobacter crescentus, cellular differentiation is tightly linked to the cell cycle via the activity of the master regulator CtrA, and recent research in S. meliloti suggests that CtrA might also be key to cellular differentiation during symbiosis. However, the regulatory circuit driving cell cycle progression in S. meliloti is not well characterized in both the free-living and symbiotic state. Here, we investigated the regulation and function of CtrA in S. meliloti. We demonstrated that depletion of CtrA cause cell elongation, branching and genome amplification, similar to that observed in nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. We also showed that the cell cycle regulated proteolytic degradation of CtrA is essential in S. meliloti, suggesting a possible mechanism of CtrA depletion in differentiated bacteroids. Using a combination of ChIP-Seq and gene expression microarray analysis we found that although S. meliloti CtrA regulates similar processes as C. crescentus CtrA, it does so through different target genes. For example, our data suggest that CtrA does not control the expression of the Fts complex to control the timing of cell division during the cell cycle, but instead it negatively regulates the septum-inhibiting Min system. Our

  12. Cell Cycle Control by the Master Regulator CtrA in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Francesco; De Nisco, Nicole J; Ferri, Lorenzo; Penterman, Jon; Fioravanti, Antonella; Brilli, Matteo; Mengoni, Alessio; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Viollier, Patrick H; Walker, Graham C; Biondi, Emanuele G

    2015-05-01

    In all domains of life, proper regulation of the cell cycle is critical to coordinate genome replication, segregation and cell division. In some groups of bacteria, e.g. Alphaproteobacteria, tight regulation of the cell cycle is also necessary for the morphological and functional differentiation of cells. Sinorhizobium meliloti is an alphaproteobacterium that forms an economically and ecologically important nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with specific legume hosts. During this symbiosis S. meliloti undergoes an elaborate cellular differentiation within host root cells. The differentiation of S. meliloti results in massive amplification of the genome, cell branching and/or elongation, and loss of reproductive capacity. In Caulobacter crescentus, cellular differentiation is tightly linked to the cell cycle via the activity of the master regulator CtrA, and recent research in S. meliloti suggests that CtrA might also be key to cellular differentiation during symbiosis. However, the regulatory circuit driving cell cycle progression in S. meliloti is not well characterized in both the free-living and symbiotic state. Here, we investigated the regulation and function of CtrA in S. meliloti. We demonstrated that depletion of CtrA cause cell elongation, branching and genome amplification, similar to that observed in nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. We also showed that the cell cycle regulated proteolytic degradation of CtrA is essential in S. meliloti, suggesting a possible mechanism of CtrA depletion in differentiated bacteroids. Using a combination of ChIP-Seq and gene expression microarray analysis we found that although S. meliloti CtrA regulates similar processes as C. crescentus CtrA, it does so through different target genes. For example, our data suggest that CtrA does not control the expression of the Fts complex to control the timing of cell division during the cell cycle, but instead it negatively regulates the septum-inhibiting Min system. Our findings provide valuable

  13. Cell Cycle Control by the Master Regulator CtrA in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Lorenzo; Penterman, Jon; Fioravanti, Antonella; Brilli, Matteo; Mengoni, Alessio; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Viollier, Patrick H.; Walker, Graham C.; Biondi, Emanuele G.

    2015-01-01

    In all domains of life, proper regulation of the cell cycle is critical to coordinate genome replication, segregation and cell division. In some groups of bacteria, e.g. Alphaproteobacteria, tight regulation of the cell cycle is also necessary for the morphological and functional differentiation of cells. Sinorhizobium meliloti is an alphaproteobacterium that forms an economically and ecologically important nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with specific legume hosts. During this symbiosis S. meliloti undergoes an elaborate cellular differentiation within host root cells. The differentiation of S. meliloti results in massive amplification of the genome, cell branching and/or elongation, and loss of reproductive capacity. In Caulobacter crescentus, cellular differentiation is tightly linked to the cell cycle via the activity of the master regulator CtrA, and recent research in S. meliloti suggests that CtrA might also be key to cellular differentiation during symbiosis. However, the regulatory circuit driving cell cycle progression in S. meliloti is not well characterized in both the free-living and symbiotic state. Here, we investigated the regulation and function of CtrA in S. meliloti. We demonstrated that depletion of CtrA cause cell elongation, branching and genome amplification, similar to that observed in nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. We also showed that the cell cycle regulated proteolytic degradation of CtrA is essential in S. meliloti, suggesting a possible mechanism of CtrA depletion in differentiated bacteroids. Using a combination of ChIP-Seq and gene expression microarray analysis we found that although S. meliloti CtrA regulates similar processes as C. crescentus CtrA, it does so through different target genes. For example, our data suggest that CtrA does not control the expression of the Fts complex to control the timing of cell division during the cell cycle, but instead it negatively regulates the septum-inhibiting Min system. Our findings provide valuable

  14. CTR1 silencing inhibits angiogenesis by limiting copper entry into endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomathy Narayanan

    Full Text Available Increased levels of intracellular copper stimulate angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Copper transporter 1 (CTR1 is a copper importer present in the cell membrane and plays a major role in copper transport. In this study, three siRNAs targeting CTR1 mRNA were designed and screened for gene silencing. HUVECs when exposed to 100 µM copper showed 3 fold increased proliferation, migration by 1.8-fold and tube formation by 1.8-fold. One of the designed CTR1 siRNA (si 1 at 10 nM concentration decreased proliferation by 2.5-fold, migration by 4-fold and tube formation by 2.8-fold. Rabbit corneal packet assay also showed considerable decrease in matrigel induced blood vessel formation by si 1 when compared to untreated control. The designed si 1 when topically applied inhibited angiogenesis. This can be further developed for therapeutic application.

  15. Ocular manifestations in the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandravanshi, Shivcharan L; Rawat, Ashok Kumar; Dwivedi, Prem Chand; Choudhary, Pankaj

    2011-01-01

    The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGP) syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. The word progeria is derived from the Greek word progeros meaning 'prematurely old'. It is caused by de novo dominant mutation in the LMNA gene (gene map locus 1q21.2) and characterized by growth retardation and accelerated degenerative changes of the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. The most common ocular manifestations are prominent eyes, loss of eyebrows and eyelashes, and lagophthalmos. In the present case some additional ocular features such as horizontal narrowing of palpebral fissure, superior sulcus deformity, upper lid retraction, upper lid lag in down gaze, poor pupillary dilatation, were noted. In this case report, a 15-year-old Indian boy with some additional ocular manifestations of the HGP syndrome is described.

  16. Stem cell depletion in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengardten, Ylva; McKenna, Tomás; Grochová, Diana; Eriksson, Maria

    2011-12-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS or progeria) is a very rare genetic disorder with clinical features suggestive of premature aging. Here, we show that induced expression of the most common HGPS mutation (LMNA c.1824C>T, p.G608G) results in a decreased epidermal population of adult stem cells and impaired wound healing in mice. Isolation and growth of primary keratinocytes from these mice demonstrated a reduced proliferative potential and ability to form colonies. Downregulation of the epidermal stem cell maintenance protein p63 with accompanying activation of DNA repair and premature senescence was the probable cause of this loss of adult stem cells. Additionally, upregulation of multiple genes in major inflammatory pathways indicated an activated inflammatory response. This response has also been associated with normal aging, emphasizing the importance of studying progeria to increase the understanding of the normal aging process.

  17. Ocular manifestations in the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandravanshi, Shivcharan L; Rawat, Ashok Kumar; Dwivedi, Prem Chand; Choudhary, Pankaj

    2011-01-01

    The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGP) syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. The word progeria is derived from the Greek word progeros meaning ‘prematurely old’. It is caused by de novo dominant mutation in the LMNA gene (gene map locus 1q21.2) and characterized by growth retardation and accelerated degenerative changes of the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. The most common ocular manifestations are prominent eyes, loss of eyebrows and eyelashes, and lagophthalmos. In the present case some additional ocular features such as horizontal narrowing of palpebral fissure, superior sulcus deformity, upper lid retraction, upper lid lag in down gaze, poor pupillary dilatation, were noted. In this case report, a 15-year-old Indian boy with some additional ocular manifestations of the HGP syndrome is described. PMID:22011502

  18. Ocular manifestations in the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivcharan L Chandravanshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGP syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. The word progeria is derived from the Greek word progeros meaning ′prematurely old′. It is caused by de novo dominant mutation in the LMNA gene (gene map locus 1q21.2 and characterized by growth retardation and accelerated degenerative changes of the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. The most common ocular manifestations are prominent eyes, loss of eyebrows and eyelashes, and lagophthalmos. In the present case some additional ocular features such as horizontal narrowing of palpebral fissure, superior sulcus deformity, upper lid retraction, upper lid lag in down gaze, poor pupillary dilatation, were noted. In this case report, a 15-year-old Indian boy with some additional ocular manifestations of the HGP syndrome is described.

  19. [Three cases of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubaj, Y; Lamzouri, A; Elalaoui, S-C; Laarabi, F-Z; Sefiani, A

    2011-02-01

    Progeria, or Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome, is a rare genetic disease, characterized by several clinical features that develop in childhood, in particular, an accelerated aging aspect. Its incidence is 1-4 per 8 million newborns. Children with progeria syndrome usually appear normal at birth and in early infancy. Profound failure to thrive occurs during the 1st year. Characteristic facies, partial alopecia progressing to total alopecia, loss of subcutaneous fat, stiffness of joints, bone changes, and abnormal tightness of the skin over the abdomen and upper thighs usually become apparent during the 2nd to 3rd years. Motor and mental development is normal. Patients develop severe atherosclerosis. Death occurs as a result of complications of cardiac or cerebrovascular disease (heart attack or stroke) generally between ages 6 and 20 years. The diagnosis of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is based on recognition of common clinical features and the detection of the recurrent p.Gly608Gly mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, which is present in almost all individuals with HGPS. We present here 3 patients aged 5, 11, and 12 years referred to genetic consultation for dysmorphic facies and failure to thrive. After careful clinical examination and paraclinical assessment, the diagnosis of progeria syndrome was raised. We performed molecular analysis for the 3 patients by searching for the recurrent mutation c.1824C>T (p.Gly608Gly) of the LMNA gene, which was found only in 1 patient. We discuss the geneticist's role in the diagnosis of rare dysmorphic syndromes and their genetic counseling. We also analyze the clinical spectrum of HGPS by comparing the 3 patients.

  20. Molecular modulation of the copper and cisplatin transport function of CTR1 and its interaction with IRS-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Larson, Christopher A.; Safaei, Roohangiz

    2015-01-01

    The copper influx transporter CTR1 is also a major influx transporter for cisplatin (cDDP) in tumor cells. It influences the cytotoxicity of cDDP both in vivo and in vitro. Whereas Cu triggers internalization of CTR1 from the plasma membrane, cDDP does not. To investigate the mechanisms of these effects, myc-tagged forms of wild type hCTR1 and variants in which Y103 was converted to alanine, C189 was converted to serine, or the K178/K179 dilysine motif was converted to alanines were re-expressed in mouse embryo cells in which both alleles of CTR1 had been knocked out and also in HEK293T cells. The Y103A mutation and to a lesser extent the C189S mutation reduced internalization of CTR1 induced by Cu while the K178A/K179A had little effect. Both Y103 and C189 were required for Cu and cDDP transport whereas the K178/K179 motif was not. While Y103 lies in an YXXM motif that, when phosphorylated, is a potential docking site for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and other proteins involved in endocytosis, Western blot analysis of immunoprecipitated myc-CTR1, and proteomic analysis of peptides derived from CTR1, failed to identify any basal or Cu-induced phosphorylation. However, proteomic analysis did identify an interaction of CTR1 with IRS-4 and this was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation from HEK cells expressing either FLAG-CTR1 or myc-CTR1. The interaction was greater in the Y103A-expressing cells. We conclude that Y103 is required for the internalization of hCTR1 in response to Cu, that this occurs by a mechanism other than phosphorylation and that mutation of Y103 modulates the interaction with IRS-4. PMID:24967972

  1. Drug screening on Hutchinson Gilford progeria pluripotent stem cells reveals aminopyrimidines as new modulators of farnesylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, S; Egesipe, A-L; Picardi, P; Jaskowiak, A-L; Notarnicola, M; Ragot, J; Tournois, J; Le Corf, A; Brinon, B; Poydenot, P; Georges, P; Navarro, C; Pitrez, P R; Ferreira, L; Bollot, G; Bauvais, C; Laustriat, D; Mejat, A; De Sandre-Giovannoli, A; Levy, N; Bifulco, M; Peschanski, M; Nissan, X

    2016-02-18

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by a dramatic appearance of premature aging. HGPS is due to a single-base substitution in exon 11 of the LMNA gene (c.1824C>T) leading to the production of a toxic form of the prelamin A protein called progerin. Because farnesylation process had been shown to control progerin toxicity, in this study we have developed a screening method permitting to identify new pharmacological inhibitors of farnesylation. For this, we have used the unique potential of pluripotent stem cells to have access to an unlimited and relevant biological resource and test 21,608 small molecules. This study identified several compounds, called monoaminopyrimidines, which target two key enzymes of the farnesylation process, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase and farnesyl transferase, and rescue in vitro phenotypes associated with HGPS. Our results opens up new therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of HGPS by identifying a new family of protein farnesylation inhibitors, and which may also be applicable to cancers and diseases associated with mutations that involve farnesylated proteins.

  2. Metformin Alleviates Aging Cellular Phenotypes in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome Dermal Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seul-Ki; Shin, Ok Sarah

    2017-02-13

    Metformin is a popular antidiabetic biguanide, which has been considered as a candidate drug for cancer treatment and aging prevention. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a devastating disease characterized by premature aging and severe age-associated complications leading to death. The effects of metformin on HGPS dermal fibroblasts remain largely undefined. In this study, we investigated whether metformin could exert a beneficial effect on nuclear abnormalities and delay senescence in fibroblasts derived from HGPS patients. Metformin treatment partially restored normal nuclear phenotypes, delayed senescence, activated the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase, and decreased reactive oxygen species formation in HGPS dermal fibroblasts. Interestingly, metformin reduced the number of phosphorylated histone variant H2AX-positive DNA damage foci and suppressed progerin protein expression, compared to the control. Furthermore, metformin-supplemented aged mice showed higher splenocyte proliferation and mRNA expression of the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase 2 than the control mice. Collectively, our results show that metformin treatment alleviates the nuclear defects and premature aging phenotypes in HGPS fibroblasts. Thus, metformin can be considered a promising therapeutic approach for life extension in HGPS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Rapamycin activates autophagy in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziotto, John J; Cao, Kan; Collins, Francis S

    2012-01-01

    While rapamycin has been in use for years in transplant patients as an antirejection drug, more recently it has shown promise in treating diseases of aging, such as neurodegenerative disorders and atherosclerosis. We recently reported that rapamycin reverses the cellular phenotype of fibroblasts from children with the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). We found that the causative aberrant protein, progerin, was cleared through autophagic mechanisms when the cells were treated with rapamycin, suggesting a new potential treatment for HGPS. Recent evidence shows that progerin is also present in aged tissues of healthy individuals, suggesting that progerin may contribute to physiological aging. While it is intriguing to speculate that rapamycin may affect normal aging in humans, as it does in lower organisms, it will be important to identify safer analogs of rapamycin for chronic treatments in humans in order to minimize toxicity. In addition to its role in HGPS and normal aging, we discuss the potential of rapamycin for the treatment of age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22170152

  4. Sulforaphane enhances progerin clearance in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Diana; Roedl, Daniela; Gordon, Leslie B; Djabali, Karima

    2015-02-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670) is a rare multisystem childhood premature aging disorder linked to mutations in the LMNA gene. The most common HGPS mutation is found at position G608G within exon 11 of the LMNA gene. This mutation results in the deletion of 50 amino acids at the carboxyl-terminal tail of prelamin A, and the truncated protein is called progerin. Progerin only undergoes a subset of the normal post-translational modifications and remains permanently farnesylated. Several attempts to rescue the normal cellular phenotype with farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) and other compounds have resulted in partial cellular recovery. Using proteomics, we report here that progerin induces changes in the composition of the HGPS nuclear proteome, including alterations to several components of the protein degradation pathways. Consequently, proteasome activity and autophagy are impaired in HGPS cells. To restore protein clearance in HGPS cells, we treated HGPS cultures with sulforaphane (SFN), an antioxidant derived from cruciferous vegetables. We determined that SFN stimulates proteasome activity and autophagy in normal and HGPS fibroblast cultures. Specifically, SFN enhances progerin clearance by autophagy and reverses the phenotypic changes that are the hallmarks of HGPS. Therefore, SFN is a promising therapeutic avenue for children with HGPS.

  5. Temsirolimus Partially Rescues the Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Cellular Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Diana; Gordon, Leslie B.

    2016-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670, a rare premature aging disorder that leads to death at an average age of 14.7 years due to myocardial infarction or stroke, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene. Lamins help maintain the shape and stability of the nuclear envelope in addition to regulating DNA replication, DNA transcription, proliferation and differentiation. The LMNA mutation results in the deletion of 50 amino acids from the carboxy-terminal region of prelamin A, producing the truncated, farnesylated protein progerin. The accumulation of progerin in HGPS nuclei causes numerous morphological and functional changes that lead to premature cellular senescence. Attempts to reverse this HGPS phenotype have identified rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), as a drug that is able to rescue the HGPS cellular phenotype by promoting autophagy and reducing progerin accumulation. Rapamycin is an obvious candidate for the treatment of HGPS disease but is difficult to utilize clinically. To further assess rapamycin’s efficacy with regard to proteostasis, mitochondrial function and the degree of DNA damage, we tested temsirolimus, a rapamycin analog with a more favorable pharmacokinetic profile than rapamycin. We report that temsirolimus decreases progerin levels, increases proliferation, reduces misshapen nuclei, and partially ameliorates DNA damage, but does not improve proteasome activity or mitochondrial dysfunction. Our findings suggest that future therapeutic strategies should identify new drug combinations and treatment regimens that target all the dysfunctional hallmarks that characterize HGPS cells. PMID:28033363

  6. Initial cutaneous manifestations of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rork, Jillian F; Huang, Jennifer T; Gordon, Leslie B; Kleinman, Monica; Kieran, Mark W; Liang, Marilyn G

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare, uniformly fatal, premature aging disease with distinct dermatologic features. We sought to identify and describe the initial skin and hair findings as potential diagnostic signs of the disease. We performed a chart review of the structured initial intake histories of 39 individuals with HGPS enrolled in clinical trials from 2007 to 2010 at Boston Children's Hospital, limited to cutaneous history from birth to 24 months. Medical photographs were provided through the clinical trials and the Progeria Research Foundation Medical and Research Database at Brown University Center for Gerontology and Healthcare Research. All 39 patients reported skin and hair abnormalities within the first 24 months of life. Pathologies included sclerodermoid change, prominent superficial veins, dyspigmentation, and alopecia. The mean age of presentation for each finding was <12 months. The most frequently reported skin feature was sclerodermoid change, which commonly involved the abdomen and bilateral lower extremities. Prominent superficial vasculature manifested as circumoral cyanosis and pronounced veins on the scalp and body. Hypo- and hyperpigmentation were observed over areas of sclerodermoid change. Scalp alopecia progressed in a distinct pattern, with preservation of the hair over the midscalp and vertex areas for the longest period of time. HGPS has distinct cutaneous manifestations during the first 2 years of life that may be the first signs of disease. Awareness of these findings could expedite diagnosis.

  7. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, cardiovascular disease and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigueros-Motos, Laia; Gonzalez, Jose M; Rivera, Jose; Andres, Vicente

    2011-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), a rare human disease characterized by premature aging, is mainly caused by the abnormal accumulation of progerin, a mutant form of the mammalian nuclear envelope component lamin A. HGPS patients exhibit vascular alterations and die at an average age of 13 years, predominantly from myocardial infarction or stroke. Animal models of HGPS have been a valuable tool in the study of the pathological processes implicated in the origin of this disease and its associated cardiovascular alterations. Some of the molecular mechanisms of HGPS might be relevant to the process of normal aging, since progerin is detected in cells from normal elderly humans. Conversely, processes linked to normal aging, such as the increase in oxidative stress, might be relevant to the pathogenic mechanisms of HGPS. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular alterations associated with HGPS, the potential role of oxidative stress, and therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this devastating disease.

  8. Telomere length in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Michelle L; Chavez, Elizabeth; Vulto, Irma; Lansdorp, Peter M

    2009-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder caused by mutations in the gene LMNA, which encodes the nuclear matrix protein lamin A. Previous research has shown that the average telomere length in fibroblasts from HGPS patients is shorter than in age-matched controls. How mutations in lamin A lead to shortened telomere lengths is not known nor is the contribution of individual chromosome ends to the low average length understood. To measure the telomere length of individual chromosomes, we used quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (Q-FISH). In agreement with previous studies, we found that the average telomere length in HPGS fibroblasts is greatly reduced; however, the telomere length at chromosome ends was variable. In contrast, the telomere length in hematopoietic cells which typically do not express lamin A, was within the normal range for three out of four HGPS patient samples. Our results suggest that mutant lamin A decreases telomere length via a direct effect and that expression of mutant LMNA is necessary for telomere loss in HGPS.

  9. Hardy-Petrovitch-Hutchinson's problem and partial theta function

    CERN Document Server

    Kostov, Vladimir Petrov

    2011-01-01

    In 1907 M.Petrovitch initiated the study of a class of entire functions all whose finite sections are real-rooted polynomials. An explicit description of this class in terms of the coefficients of a series is impossible since it is determined by an infinite number of discriminantal inequalities one for each degree. However, interesting necessary or sufficient conditions can be formulated. In particular, J.I.Hutchinson has shown that an entire function p(x)=a_0+a_1x+...+a_nx^n+... with strictly positive coefficients has the property that any its finite segment a_ix^i+...+a_jx^j has all real roots if and only if for all i=1,2,... one has a_i^2/a_{i-1}a_{i+1} is greater than or equal to 4. In the present paper we give sharp lower bounds on the ratios a_i^2/a_{i-1}a_{i+1} for the class considered by M.Petrovitch. In particular, we show that the limit of these minima when i tends to infinity equals the inverse of the maximal positive value of the parameter for which the classical partial theta function belongs to ...

  10. Advances in the study of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome%Hutchinson-Gilford早老症的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李燕辉; 吴白燕

    2006-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford早老症(HGPS)为一种极为罕见的遗传性疾病,发生率1/8000000,特征性表现为患儿以极快速度衰老,多数死于冠脉病变引起的心肌梗死或广泛动脉粥样硬化导致的卒中,平均寿命13岁.绝大多数HGPS病例病因为LMNA基因第11个外显子发生点突变(G608G),生成的突变lamin A由显性负效应造成细胞核结构和功能受损.目前该病已有几种动物模型,实验性治疗可以在体外将出泡的细胞核恢复正常.HGPS是研究衰老和心血管疾病机制的一个极好的模型.

  11. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome with G608G LMNA Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hui Kwon; Lee, Jong Yoon; Bae, Eun Ju; Oh, Phil Soo; Park, Won Il; Lee, Dong Sung; Kim, Jong-Il

    2011-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare condition originally described by Hutchinson in 1886. Death result from cardiac complications in the majority of cases and usually occurs at average age of thirteen years. A 4-yr old boy had typical clinical findings such as short stature, craniofacial disproportion, alopecia, prominent scalp veins and sclerodermatous skin. This abnormal appearance began at age of 1 yr. On serological and hormonal evaluation, all values are within normal range. He was neurologically intact with motor and mental development. An echocardiogram showed calcification of aortic and mitral valves. Hypertrophy of internal layer at internal carotid artery suggesting atherosclerosis was found by carotid doppler sonography. He is on low dose aspirin to prevent thromboembolic episodes and on regular follow up. Gene study showed typical G608G (GGC- > GGT) point mutation at exon 11 in LMNA gene. This is a rare case of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome confirmed by genetic analysis in Korea. PMID:22148005

  12. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with G608G LMNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hui Kwon; Lee, Jong Yoon; Bae, Eun Ju; Oh, Phil Soo; Park, Won Il; Lee, Dong Sung; Kim, Jong-Il; Lee, Hong Jin

    2011-12-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare condition originally described by Hutchinson in 1886. Death result from cardiac complications in the majority of cases and usually occurs at average age of thirteen years. A 4-yr old boy had typical clinical findings such as short stature, craniofacial disproportion, alopecia, prominent scalp veins and sclerodermatous skin. This abnormal appearance began at age of 1 yr. On serological and hormonal evaluation, all values are within normal range. He was neurologically intact with motor and mental development. An echocardiogram showed calcification of aortic and mitral valves. Hypertrophy of internal layer at internal carotid artery suggesting atherosclerosis was found by carotid doppler sonography. He is on low dose aspirin to prevent thromboembolic episodes and on regular follow up. Gene study showed typical G608G (GGC- > GGT) point mutation at exon 11 in LMNA gene. This is a rare case of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome confirmed by genetic analysis in Korea.

  13. Otologic and Audiologic Manifestations of Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardiani, Elizabeth; Zalewski, Christopher; Brewer, Carmen; Merideth, Melissa; Introne, Wendy; Smith, Ann C.M; Gordon, Leslie; Gahl, William; Kim, H. Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To define the audiologic and otologic phenotype of Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS). Study Design Prospective case series. Methods Fifteen patients with HGPS were enrolled in a prospective natural history study; fourteen were evaluated in the neurotology clinic and eleven received audiologic evaluations. The physical exam and audiologic findings of these patients were reviewed to define an otologic and audiologic phenotype for HGPS in the largest series of subjects in the literature. Results All patients were noted to have stiff auricular cartilages, small or absent lobules and hypoplasia of the lateral soft tissue portion of the external ear canal leading to a shortened canal. Ten of 14 patients (71%) had dry cerumen impaction and four of 14 patients (29%) reported a history of recurrent otitis media. Nineteen of 22 ears (86.4%) demonstrated low frequency conductive hearing loss in the 250 Hz to 500 Hz range. Sixteen of 22 ears (73%) had type A tympanograms; three of 22 ears (14%) displayed bimodal or "W" peaked tympanograms; two of 22 ears (9%) had type B tympanograms; one of 22 ears (4%) had a type C tympanogram. Nine of 10 patients had distortion product otoacoustic emissions consistent with normal peripheral hearing sensitivity. Conclusions HGPS is caused by a mutation in the LMNA gene resulting in the production of an abnormal nuclear protein; this in turn affects nuclear structure and function. Patients with HGPS have characteristic otologic features due to cartilaginous and subcutaneous tissue abnormalities and typically demonstrate low frequency conductive hearing loss despite largely normal tympanometry. It is important to be aware of these conditions in managing these patients. PMID:21898437

  14. Protective mechanism against cancer found in progeria patient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have studied cells of patients with an extremely rare genetic disease that is characterized by drastic premature aging and discovered a new protective cellular mechanism against cancer. They found that cells from patients with Hutchinson Gi

  15. Advanced postbuckling and imperfection sensitivity of the elastic-plastic Shanley-Hutchinson model column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Dencker; Byskov, Esben

    2008-01-01

    The postbuckling behavior and imperfection sensitivity of the Shanley-Hutchinson plastic model column introduced by Hutchinson in 1973 are examined. The study covers the initial, buckled state and the advanced postbuckling regime of the geometrically perfect realization as well as its sensitivity...... and the solution to an actual problem is determined by an asymptotic expansion involving hyperbolic trial functions (instead of polynomials) which fulfill general boundary conditions at bifurcation and infinity. The method provides an accurate estimate of the maximum load even if it occurs in an advanced...

  16. CtrA response regulator binding to the Caulobacter chromosome replication origin is required during nutrient and antibiotic stress as well as during cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastedo, D Patrick; Marczynski, Gregory T

    2009-04-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus chromosome replication origin (Cori) has five binding sites for CtrA, an OmpR/PhoB family 'response regulator'. CtrA is degraded in replicating 'stalked' cells but is abundant in the non-replicating 'swarmer' cells, where it was proposed to repress replication by binding to Cori. We systematically mutated all Cori CtrA binding sites, and examined their consequences in the contexts of autonomous Cori-plasmid replication and in the natural chromosome locus. Remarkably, the C. crescentus chromosome tolerates severe mutations in all five CtrA binding sites, demonstrating that CtrA is not essential for replication. Further physiological and cell cycle experiments more rigorously supported the original hypothesis that CtrA represses replication. However, our experiments argued against another hypothesis that residual and/or replenished CtrA protein in stalked cells might prevent extra or unscheduled chromosome replication before cell division. Surprisingly, we also demonstrated that Cori CtrA binding sites are very advantageous and can become essential when cells encounter nutrients and antibiotics. Therefore, the CtrA cell cycle regulator co-ordinates replication with viable cell growth in stressful and rapidly changing environments. We argue that this new role for CtrA provided the primary selective pressure for evolving control by CtrA.

  17. The Caulobacter crescentus ctrA P1 promoter is essential for the coordination of cell cycle events that prevent the overinitiation of DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schredl, Alexander T; Perez Mora, Yannet G; Herrera, Anabel; Cuajungco, Math P; Murray, Sean R

    2012-10-01

    The master regulator CtrA oscillates during the Caulobacter cell cycle due to temporally regulated proteolysis and transcription. It is proteolysed during the G1-S transition and reaccumulates in predivisional cells as a result of transcription from two sequentially activated promoters, P1 and P2. CtrA reinforces its own synthesis by directly mediating the activation of P2 concurrently with repression of P1. To explore the role of P1 in cell cycle control, we engineered a mutation into the native ctrA locus that prevents transcription from P1 but not P2. As expected, the ctrA P1 mutant exhibits striking growth, morphological and DNA replication defects. Unexpectedly, we found CtrA and its antagonist SciP, but not DnaA, GcrA or CcrM accumulation to be dramatically reduced in the ctrA P1 mutant. SciP levels closely paralleled CtrA accumulation, suggesting that CtrA acts as a rheostat to modulate SciP abundance. Furthermore, the reappearance of CtrA and CcrM in predivisional cells was delayed in the P1 mutant by 0.125 cell cycle unit in synchronized cultures. High levels of ccrM transcription despite low levels of CtrA and increased transcription of ctrA P2 in the ctrA P1 mutant are two examples of robustness in the cell cycle. Thus, Caulobacter can adjust regulatory pathways to partially compensate for reduced and delayed CtrA accumulation in the ctrA P1 mutant.

  18. The Contributions of Kenelm Hutchinson Digby to Orthopaedics in Hong Kong Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-tai Louis Fu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As the first professor of surgery in Hong Kong, Kenelm Hutchinson Digby had the tremendous task of building a new clinical department in the infant University of Hong Kong from scratch. Despite his heavy commitments in clinical, administrative, and teaching responsibilities, he pioneered novel orthopaedic treatment principles and techniques, in addition to that of general surgery.

  19. Mechanisms of premature vascular aging in children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard-Herman, Marie; Smoot, Leslie B; Wake, Nicole; Kieran, Mark W; Kleinman, Monica E; Miller, David T; Schwartzman, Armin; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Neuberg, Donna; Gordon, Leslie B

    2012-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare, segmental premature aging syndrome of accelerated atherosclerosis and early death from myocardial infarction or stroke. This study sought to establish comprehensive characterization of the fatal vasculopathy in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and its relevance to normal aging. We performed cardiovascular assessments at a single clinical site on the largest prospectively studied cohort to date. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was dramatically elevated (mean: 13.00±3.83 m/s). Carotid duplex ultrasound echobrightness, assessed in predefined tissue sites as a measure of arterial wall density, was significantly greater than age- and sex-matched controls in the intima-media (Pnormalizing trends of these noninvasive cardiovascular measures. The data demonstrate that, along with peripheral vascular occlusive disease, accelerated vascular stiffening is an early and pervasive mechanism of vascular disease in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. There is considerable overlap with cardiovascular changes of normal aging, which reinforces the view that defining mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome provides a unique opportunity to isolate a subset of factors influencing cardiovascular disease in the general aging population.

  20. Going the distance for certified cancer registrars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, Amanda; Kolender, Ellen R

    2009-01-01

    Cancer registry departments are using electronic technology to solve the local and national Certified Tumor Registrar (CTR) shortages. As demand for CTRs continues to increase without an accompanied increase in the supply of qualified personnel, cancer registry departments are looking for new solutions to this growing local and national trend. In order to solve this problem, some cancer registries have started using telecommunication to fill the empty positions within their departments. This is the case at Roper St. Francis Healthcare (RSFH) in Charleston, SC, where Cancer Registry Manager, Ellen Kolender, RHIA, CTR, used telecommuting to fill one full-time and one part-time CTR position.

  1. A dual binding site for integration host factor and the response regulator CtrA inside the Caulobacter crescentus replication origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siam, Rania; Brassinga, Ann Karen C; Marczynski, Gregory T

    2003-09-01

    The response regulator CtrA controls chromosome replication by binding to five sites, a, b, c, d, and e, inside the Caulobacter crescentus replication origin (Cori). In this study, we demonstrate that integration host factor (IHF) binds Cori over the central CtrA binding site c. Surprisingly, IHF and CtrA share DNA recognition sequences. Rather than promoting cooperative binding, IHF binding hinders CtrA binding to site c and nearby site d. Unlike other CtrA binding sites, DNA mutations in the CtrA c/IHF site uniquely impair autonomous Cori plasmid replication. These mutations also alter transcription from distant promoters more than 100 bp away. When the CtrA c/IHF site was deleted from the chromosome, these cells grew slowly and became selectively intolerant to a CtrA phosphor-mimic allele (D51E). Since CtrA protein concentration decreases during the cell cycle as IHF protein concentration increases, we propose a model in which IHF displaces CtrA in order to bend Cori and promote efficient chromosome replication.

  2. Single TRAM domain RNA-binding proteins in Archaea: functional insight from Ctr3 from the Antarctic methanogen Methanococcoides burtonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha; Siddiqui, K S; Campanaro, S; Najnin, T; Deshpande, N; Williams, T J; Aldrich-Wright, J; Wilkins, M; Curmi, P M G; Cavicchioli, R

    2016-09-01

    TRAM domain proteins present in Archaea and Bacteria have a β-barrel shape with anti-parallel β-sheets that form a nucleic acid binding surface; a structure also present in cold shock proteins (Csps). Aside from protein structures, experimental data defining the function of TRAM domains is lacking. Here, we explore the possible functional properties of a single TRAM domain protein, Ctr3 (cold-responsive TRAM domain protein 3) from the Antarctic archaeon Methanococcoides burtonii that has increased abundance during low temperature growth. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) bound by Ctr3 in vitro was determined using RNA-seq. Ctr3-bound M. burtonii RNA with a preference for transfer (t)RNA and 5S ribosomal RNA, and a potential binding motif was identified. In tRNA, the motif represented the C loop; a region that is conserved in tRNA from all domains of life and appears to be solvent exposed, potentially providing access for Ctr3 to bind. Ctr3 and Csps are structurally similar and are both inferred to function in low temperature translation. The broad representation of single TRAM domain proteins within Archaea compared with their apparent absence in Bacteria, and scarcity of Csps in Archaea but prevalence in Bacteria, suggests they represent distinct evolutionary lineages of functionally equivalent RNA-binding proteins.

  3. Accumulation of Mutant Lamin A Causes Progressive Changes in Nuclear Architecture in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robert D. Goldman; Dale K. Shumaker; Michael R. Erdos; Maria Eriksson; Anne E. Goldman; Leslie B. Gordon; Yosef Gruenbaum; Satya Khuon; Melissa Mendez; Renée Varga; Francis S. Collins

    2004-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a premature aging disorder, commonly caused by a point mutation in the lamin A gene that results in a protein lacking 50 aa near the C terminus, denoted LAΔ50...

  4. Mutation analysis of the LMNA gene in a child with Hutchinson-Gifford progeria syndrome%Hutchinson-Gilford早老综合征LMNA基因突变研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳芳; 李乾; 郑利雄; 冯思航; 房思宁; 姚勇丰

    2014-01-01

    目的 报告1例Hutchinson-Gilford早老综合征,并进行分子遗传学诊断.方法 提取1例Hutchinson-Gilford早老综合征患儿及其父母外周血DNA,对LMNA基因1 1号外显子和侧翼序列进行测序,并以150例无关系健康人作为对照.结果 患者男,12月龄.出现躯干部紧张如硬皮病样改变、脱发,头皮静脉明显9个月.身高和体重低于同龄儿童平均值2个标准差.头部皮肤菲薄,头皮静脉清晰可见.躯干皮肤紧张变硬有光泽,干燥,少许细小脱屑,皮肤有斑点状色素加深和色素减退夹杂,鹅卵石样的皮肤硬化肥厚,下肢有皮下脂肪凹陷.X线片示指骨末端吸收.患儿LMNA基因11号外显子c.1824C>T杂合点突变(dbSNP:m58596362),父母及健康人对照均未检测到该位点突变.结论 LMNA基因1 1号外显子的c.1824C>T突变为该例Hutchinson-Gilford早老综合征的发病原因.%Objective To report a case of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome,and to make a molecular genetic diagnosis.Methods Peripheral blood samples were collected from a 12-month-old child with HutchinsonGilford progeria syndrome,his parents,and 150 unrelated healthy controls.DNA was extracted from these samples,and PCR was performed to amplify exon 11 of the LMNA gene and its flanking sequence followed by sequencing.Results The patient presented with scleroderma-like tight skin on the trunk,hair loss and prominent scalp veins for 9 months,whose body height and weight were two standard deviations below the mean.Physical examination showed thin skin and prominent superficial veins over the scalp.The skin over the trunk was tight,hard,shiny and dry with a small number of tiny scales,mottled pigmentation and hypopigmentation,induration and hypertrophy giving a cobblestone-like appearance.The subcutaneous fat was diminished on the lower limbs.Skeletal X-ray examination of the left hand revealed phalangeal acroosteolysis.A known heterozygous mutation c.1824C > T (dbSNP:rs58596362

  5. Loss of the Response Regulator CtrA Causes Pleiotropic Effects on Gene Expression but Does Not Affect Growth Phase Regulation in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, Ryan; Callister, Stephen J.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Strnad, Hynek; Paces, Vaclav; Beatty, J. T.; Lang, Andrew S.

    2010-06-01

    The purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus has been extensively studied for its diverse metabolic capabilities, as well as for its production of a Gene Transfer Agent (RcGTA). Production of RcGTA requires the response regulator protein CtrA. We have used whole genome transcript and whole cell proteome analyses of wild type and ctrA mutant cultures to completely characterize the regulatory role of CtrA in R. capsulatus.

  6. [Structure-functional organization of eukaryotic high-affinity copper importer CTR1 determines its ability to transport copper, silver and cisplatin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsov, A N; Zatulovskiĭ, E A; Puchkova, L V

    2012-01-01

    It was shown recently, that high affinity Cu(I) importer eukaryotic protein CTR1 can also transport in vitro abiogenic Ag(I) ions and anticancer drug cisplatin. At present there is no rational explanation how CTR1 can transfer platinum group, which is different by coordination properties from highly similar Cu(I) and Ag(I). To understand this phenomenon we analyzed 25 sequences of chordate CTR1 proteins, and found out conserved patterns of organization of N-terminal extracellular part of CTR1 which correspond to initial metal binding. Extracellular copper-binding motifs were qualified by their coordination properties. It was shown that relative position of Met- and His-rich copper-binding motifs in CTR1 predisposes the extracellular CTR1 part to binding of copper, silver and cisplatin. Relation between tissue-specific expression of CTR1 gene, steady-state copper concentration, and silver and platinum accumulation in organs of mice in vivo was analyzed. Significant positive but incomplete correlation exists between these variables. Basing on structural and functional peculiarities of N-terminal part of CTR1 a hypothesis of coupled transport of copper and cisplatin has been suggested, which avoids the disagreement between CTR1-mediated cisplatin transport in vitro, and irreversible binding of platinum to Met-rich peptides.

  7. Differential expression of ATP7A, ATP7B and CTR1 in adult rat dorsal root ganglion tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ip Virginia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP7A, ATP7B and CTR1 are metal transporting proteins that control the cellular disposition of copper and platinum drugs, but their expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG tissue and their role in platinum-induced neurotoxicity are unknown. To investigate the DRG expression of ATP7A, ATP7B and CTR1, lumbar DRG and reference tissues were collected for real time quantitative PCR, RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis from healthy control adult rats or from animals treated with intraperitoneal oxaliplatin (1.85 mg/kg or drug vehicle twice weekly for 8 weeks. Results In DRG tissue from healthy control animals, ATP7A mRNA was clearly detectable at levels similar to those found in the brain and spinal cord, and intense ATP7A immunoreactivity was localised to the cytoplasm of cell bodies of smaller DRG neurons without staining of satellite cells, nerve fibres or co-localisation with phosphorylated heavy neurofilament subunit (pNF-H. High levels of CTR1 mRNA were detected in all tissues from healthy control animals, and strong CTR1 immunoreactivity was associated with plasma membranes and vesicular cytoplasmic structures of the cell bodies of larger-sized DRG neurons without co-localization with ATP7A. DRG neurons with strong expression of ATP7A or CTR1 had distinct cell body size profiles with minimal overlap between them. Oxaliplatin treatment did not alter the size profile of strongly ATP7A-immunoreactive neurons but significantly reduced the size profile of strongly CTR1-immunoreactive neurons. ATP7B mRNA was barely detectable, and no specific immunoreactivity for ATP7B was found, in DRG tissue from healthy control animals. Conclusions In conclusion, adult rat DRG tissue exhibits a specific pattern of expression of copper transporters with distinct subsets of peripheral sensory neurons intensely expressing either ATP7A or CTR1, but not both or ATP7B. The neuron subtype-specific and largely non

  8. La presa di parola di Anne Hutchinson. Insubordinazione e conflitto nella giovane America puritana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itala Vivan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Anne Hutchinson lasciò l’Inghilterra nel 1634 per emigrare nel Massachusetts puritano, dove nel 1637 e 1638 fu processata, condannata, scomunicata ed espulsa come donna insubordinata, deviante e pericolosa. Il suo ruolo intellettuale e politico nell’alba incandescente della prima America viene qui analizzato e discusso ascoltando da presso il racconto che promana dalla voce della stessa Anne Hutchinson attraverso i verbali dei due processi, trascritti dai contemporanei con la fedeltà letterale che era tipica del puritanesimo americano. La drammatica controversia che ebbe al centro la presa di parola di questa donna segnò la prima grande crisi della neonata società coloniale – la cosiddetta crisi antinomiana -- e ne determinò gli sviluppi futuri, indirizzandoli verso un sistema di potere politico su basi teocratiche.

  9. Molecular ageing in progeroid syndromes: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Nóbrega Raphael

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging disorder that belongs to a group of conditions called laminopathies which affect nuclear lamins. Mutations in two genes, LMNA and ZMPSTE24, have been found in patients with HGPS. The p.G608G LMNA mutation is the most commonly reported mutation. The aim of this work was to compile a comprehensive literature review of the clinical features and genetic mutations and mechanisms of this syndrome as a contribution to health care workers. This review shows the necessity of a more detailed clinical identification of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and the need for more studies on the pharmacologic and pharmacogenomic approach to this syndrome.

  10. Aging of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome fibroblasts is characterised by hyperproliferation and increased apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridger, Joanna M; Kill, Ian R

    2004-05-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare genetic disorder that mimics certain aspects of aging prematurely. Recent work has revealed that mutations in the lamin A gene are a cause of the disease. We show here that cellular aging of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome fibroblasts is characterised by a period of hyperproliferation and terminates with a large increase in the rate of apoptosis. The occurrence of cells with abnormal nuclear morphology reported by others is shown to be a result of cell division since the fraction of these abnormalities increases with cellular age. Similarly, the proportion of cells with an abnormal or absent A-type lamina increases with age. These data provide clues as to the cellular basis for premature aging in HGPS and support the view that cellular senescence and tissue homeostasis are important factors in the normal aging process.

  11. Werner and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndromes: mechanistic basis of human progeroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudlow, Brian A; Kennedy, Brian K; Monnat, Raymond J

    2007-05-01

    Progeroid syndromes have been the focus of intense research in part because they might provide a window into the pathology of normal ageing. Werner syndrome and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome are two of the best characterized human progeroid diseases. Mutated genes that are associated with these syndromes have been identified, mouse models of disease have been developed, and molecular studies have implicated decreased cell proliferation and altered DNA-damage responses as common causal mechanisms in the pathogenesis of both diseases.

  12. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome alters nuclear shape and reduces cell motility in three dimensional model substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth-Gauthier, Elizabeth A; Du, Vicard; Ghibaudo, Marion; Rape, Andrew D; Dahl, Kris Noel; Ladoux, Benoit

    2013-03-01

    Cell migration through tight interstitial spaces in three dimensional (3D) environments impacts development, wound healing and cancer metastasis and is altered by the aging process. The stiffness of the extracellular matrix (ECM) increases with aging and affects the cells and cytoskeletal processes involved in cell migration. However, the nucleus, which is the largest and densest organelle, has not been widely studied during cell migration through the ECM. Additionally, the nucleus is stiffened during the aging process through the accumulation of a mutant nucleoskeleton protein lamin A, progerin. By using microfabricated substrates to mimic the confined environment of surrounding tissues, we characterized nuclear movements and deformation during cell migration into micropillars where interspacing can be tuned to vary nuclear confinement. Cell motility decreased with decreased micropillar (μP) spacing and correlated with increased dysmorphic shapes of nuclei. We examined the effects of increased nuclear stiffness which correlates with cellular aging by studying Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome cells which are known to accumulate progerin. With the expression of progerin, cells showed a threshold response to decreased μP spacing. Cells became trapped in the close spacing, possibly from visible micro-defects in the nucleoskeleton induced by cell crawling through the μP and from reduced force generation, measured independently. We suggest that ECM changes during aging could be compounded by the increasing stiffness of the nucleus and thus changes in cell migration through 3D tissues.

  13. hCTR1、FHIT与PCNA在子宫颈上皮内瘤变和子宫颈鳞癌中表达及意义%Expression of hCTR1, FHIT and PCNA in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical invasive squamous cell carcinoma and their clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪博; 何春年; 李聪; 杜红丽

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To study the expression of human copper transporters 1 ( hCTRl ), fragile histidine triad ( FHIT ) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen ( PCNA ) in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia ( CIN ) and cervical invasive squamous cell carcinoma ( SCC ) and investigate their correlativity in SCC. Methods hCTRl, FHIT and PCNA were examined by immunohistochemical staining ( SP method ) in 94 cases of CIN, 40 cases of cervical invasive SCC, and 23 cases of normal cervical squamous epithelia. Results The positive rates of hCTRl in SCC ( 87. 50% ) and in the level CIN 2 ~ 3 ( 74. 63% ) were significantly higher than those of normal cervical squamous epitheliums ( 17. 39% ) and CIN I ( 29.63% ) ( P 0. 05 , r = - 0. 296 ) or hCTRl and PCNA ( P > 0. 05 , r = 0. 026 ). Conclusions hCTRl expression intensity and positive rate in cervical carcinoma in situ were higher than that in early invasive cancer in cervix, which may prove that there is a negative correlation between hCTRl expression and malignant biological characteristics of invasiveness. There is a balance between FHIT and PCNA, which take part in the regulation of cell proliferation. Therefore, the detection of hCTRl and FHIT expression plays an important role in screening and predicting high-grade CIN and SCC.%目的 观察人类铜转运蛋白(human copper transporters 1,hCTR1)、脆性组氨酸三联体(fragile histidine triad,FHIT)和增殖细胞核抗原(proliferating cell nuclear antigen,PCNA)在子宫颈上皮内瘤变(cervical intraepithelial neoplasia,CIN)及子宫颈鳞癌(squamous cell carcinoma,SCC)中的表达,探讨SCC中三指标之间的相关性.方法 采用免疫组化SP法检测94例CIN、40例SCC及23例正常宫颈组织中hCTR1、FHIT和PCNA的表达.结果 (1)hCTR1在SCC(87.50%)及CIN 2~3(74.63%)的阳性率均明显高于正常组(17.39%)、CIN 1(29.63%),差异有统计学意义(P<0.001).(2)FHIT从正常组(100%)、CIN 1(74.07%)、CIN 2~3(44.78%)到SCC(32.50%),FHIT阳性细胞表达逐

  14. Mammary gland copper transport is stimulated by prolactin through alterations in Ctr1 and Atp7A localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Shannon L; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2006-10-01

    Milk copper (Cu) concentration declines and directly reflects the stage of lactation. Three Cu-specific transporters (Ctr1, Atp7A, Atp7B) have been identified in the mammary gland; however, the integrated role they play in milk Cu secretion is not understood. Whereas the regulation of milk composition by the lactogenic hormone prolactin (PRL) has been documented, the specific contribution of PRL to this process is largely unknown. Using the lactating rat as a model, we determined that the normal decline in milk Cu concentration parallels declining Cu availability to the mammary gland and is associated with decreased Atp7B protein levels. Mammary gland Cu transport was highest during early lactation and was stimulated by suckling and hyperprolactinemia, which was associated with Ctr1 and Atp7A localization at the plasma membrane. Using cultured mammary epithelial cells (HC11), we demonstrated that Ctr1 stains in association with intracellular vesicles that partially colocalize with transferrin receptor (recycling endosome marker). Atp7A was primarily colocalized with mannose 6-phosphate receptor (M6PR; late endosome marker), whereas Atp7B was partially colocalized with protein disulfide isomerase (endoplasmic reticulum marker), TGN38 (trans-Golgi network marker) and M6PR. Prolactin stimulated Cu transport as a result of increased Ctr1 and Atp7A abundance at the plasma membrane. Although the molecular mechanisms responsible for these posttranslational changes are not understood, transient changes in prolactin signaling play a role in the regulation of mammary gland Cu secretion during lactation.

  15. Identification and functional characterization of the Lactococcus lactis CodY-regulated branched-chain amino acid permease BcaP (CtrA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hengst, CD; Groeneveld, M; Kuipers, OP; Kok, J; Hengst, Chris D. den

    2006-01-01

    Transcriptome analyses have previously revealed that a gene encoding the putative amino acid transporter CtrA (YhdG) is one of the major targets of the pleiotropic regulator CodY in Lactococcus lactis and Bacillus subtilis. The role of ctrA in L. lactis was further investigated with respect to both

  16. Insights into the CtrA Regulon in Development of Stress Resistance in Obligatory Intracellular Pathogen Ehrlichia chaffeensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhihui; Miura, Koshiro; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Kumagai, Yumi; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Ehrlichiae have a biphasic developmental cycle consisting of dense-cored cells (DCs) and reticulate cells (RCs). Isolated DCs are more stress resistant and infectious than RCs. Here, we report that a response regulator, CtrA was upregulated in human monocytes at the late growth stage when DCs develop. E. chaffeensis CtrA bound to the promoters of late-stage transcribed genes: ctrA, ompA (peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein), bolA (stress-induced morphogen), and surE (stationary phase survival protein), which contain CtrA-binding motifs, and transactivated ompA, surE, and bolA promoter-lacZ fusions in Escherichia coli. OmpA was predominantly expressed in DCs. E. chaffeensis binding to and subsequent infection of monocytes were inhibited by anti-OmpA IgG. E. chaffeensis BolA bound to the promoters of genes encoding outer surface proteins TRP120 and ECH_1038, which were expressed in DCs, and transactivated trp120 and ECH_1038 promoter-lacZ fusions. E. chaffeensis bolA complemented a stress-sensitive E. coli bolA mutant. E. coli expressing E. chaffeensis surE exhibited increased resistance to osmotic stress. Our results suggest that E. chaffeensis CtrA plays a role in coordinating development of the stress resistance for passage from the present to the next host cells through its regulon. PMID:22014113

  17. Relative contribution of CTR1 and DMT1 in copper transport by the blood–CSF barrier: Implication in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Gang [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shanxi 710032 (China); Chen, Jingyuan [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shanxi 710032 (China); Zheng, Wei, E-mail: wzheng@purdue.edu [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    The homeostasis of copper (Cu) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is partially regulated by the Cu transporter-1 (CTR1) and divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) at the blood–CSF barrier (BCB) in the choroid plexus. Data from human and animal studies suggest an increased Cu concentration in blood, CSF, and brains following in vivo manganese (Mn) exposure. This study was designed to investigate the relative role of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport under normal or Mn-exposed conditions using an immortalized choroidal Z310 cell line. Mn exposure in vitro resulted in an increased cellular {sup 64}Cu uptake and the up-regulation of both CTR1 and DMT1. Knocking down CTR1 by siRNA counteracted the Mn-induced increase of {sup 64}Cu uptake, while knocking down DMT1 siRNA resulted in an increased cellular {sup 64}Cu uptake in Mn-exposed cells. To distinguish the roles of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport, the Z310 cell-based tetracycline (Tet)-inducible CTR1 and DMT1 expression cell lines were developed, namely iZCTR1 and iZDMT1 cells, respectively. In iZCTR1 cells, Tet induction led to a robust increase (25 fold) of {sup 64}Cu uptake with the time course corresponding to the increased CTR1. Induction of DMT1 by Tet in iZDMT1 cells, however, resulted in only a slight increase of {sup 64}Cu uptake in contrast to a substantial increase in DMT1 mRNA and protein expression. These data indicate that CTR1, but not DMT1, plays an essential role in transporting Cu by the BCB in the choroid plexus. Mn-induced cellular overload of Cu at the BCB is due, primarily, to Mn-induced over-expression of CTR1. -- Highlights: ► This study compares the relative role of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport by the BCB. ► Two novel tetracycline-inducible CTR1 and DMT1 expression cell lines are created. ► CTR1, but not DMT1, plays an essential role in transporting Cu by the BCB. ► Mn-induced cellular Cu overload is due to its induction of CTR1 rather than DMT1. ► Induction of CTR1 by Mn in the BCB

  18. Radiological Diagnosis of a Rare Premature Aging Genetic Disorder: Progeria (Hutchinson-Gilford Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haji Mohammed Nazir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare disease with a combination of short stature, bone abnormalities, premature ageing, and skin changes. Though the physical appearance of these patients is characteristic, there is little emphasis on the characteristic radiological features. In this paper, we report a 16-year-old boy with clinical and radiological features of this rare genetic disorder. He had a characteristic facial appearance with a large head, large eyes, thin nose with beaked tip, small chin, protruding ears, prominent scalp veins, and absence of hair.

  19. Dental and craniofacial characteristics in a patient with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Christoph; Gölz, Lina; Götz, Werner; Wolf, Michael; Deschner, James; Jäger, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an exceptionally rare medical disorder caused by mutations in the lamin A/C gene. Affected patients display typical features of premature aging. Beside general medical disorders, these patients have several specific features related to the craniofacial phenotype and the oral cavity. In this article, the dental and craniofacial characteristics of a 9-year-old girl with HGPS are presented. It is the first report addressing orthodontic tooth movement and microbiological features in a HGPS patient. We describe and discuss pathologic findings and provide a detailed histology of the teeth which had to be extracted during initial treatment.

  20. The CckA-ChpT-CtrA phosphorelay system is regulated by quorum sensing and controls flagellar motility in the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11.

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    Jindong Zan

    Full Text Available Bacteria respond to their environment via signal transduction pathways, often two-component type systems that function through phosphotransfer to control expression of specific genes. Phosphorelays are derived from two-component systems but are comprised of additional components. The essential cckA-chpT-ctrA phosphorelay in Caulobacter crescentus has been well studied and is important in orchestrating the cell cycle, polar development and flagellar biogenesis. Although cckA, chpT and ctrA homologues are widespread among the Alphaproteobacteria, relatively few is known about their function in the large and ecologically significant Roseobacter clade of the Rhodobacterales. In this study the cckA-chpT-ctrA system of the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11 was investigated. Our results reveal that the cckA, chpT and ctrA genes positively control flagellar biosynthesis. In contrast to C. crescentus, the cckA, chpT and ctrA genes in Ruegeria sp. KLH11 are non-essential and do not affect bacterial growth. Gene fusion and transcript analyses provide evidence for ctrA autoregulation and the control of motility-related genes. In KLH11, flagellar motility is controlled by the SsaRI system and acylhomoserine lactone (AHL quorum sensing. SsaR and long chain AHLs are required for cckA, chpT and ctrA gene expression, providing a regulatory link between flagellar locomotion and population density in KLH11.

  1. Model of human aging: Recent findings on Werner’s and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shian-ling Ding

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Shian-ling Ding1, Chen-Yang Shen2,3,41Department of Nursing, Kang-Ning Junior College of Medical Care and Management, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Institute of Biomedical Sciences, and 3Life Science Library, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Graduate Institute of Environmental Science, China Medical University, Taichong, TaiwanAbstract: The molecular mechanisms involved in human aging are complicated. Two progeria syndromes, Werner’s syndrome (WS and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, characterized by clinical features mimicking physiological aging at an early age, provide insights into the mechanisms of natural aging. Based on recent findings on WS and HGPS, we suggest a model of human aging. Human aging can be triggered by two main mechanisms, telomere shortening and DNA damage. In telomere-dependent aging, telomere shortening and dysfunction may lead to DNA damage responses which induce cellular senescence. In DNA damage-initiated aging, DNA damage accumulates, along with DNA repair deficiencies, resulting in genomic instability and accelerated cellular senescence. In addition, aging due to both mechanisms (DNA damage and telomere shortening is strongly dependent on p53 status. These two mechanisms can also act cooperatively to increase the overall level of genomic instability, triggering the onset of human aging phenotypes.Keywords: human aging, Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome, Werner syndrome

  2. All-trans retinoic acid and rapamycin normalize Hutchinson Gilford progeria fibroblast phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Camilla; Columbaro, Marta; Capanni, Cristina; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Cavallo, Carola; Murdocca, Michela; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Squarzoni, Stefano

    2015-10-06

    Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome is a fatal disorder characterized by accelerated aging, bone resorption and atherosclerosis, caused by a LMNA mutation which produces progerin, a mutant lamin A precursor. Progeria cells display progerin and prelamin A nuclear accumulation, altered histone methylation pattern, heterochromatin loss, increased DNA damage and cell cycle alterations. Since the LMNA promoter contains a retinoic acid responsive element, we investigated if all-trans retinoic acid administration could lower progerin levels in cultured fibroblasts. We also evaluated the effect of associating rapamycin, which induces autophagic degradation of progerin and prelamin A. We demonstrate that all-trans retinoic acid acts synergistically with low-dosage rapamycin reducing progerin and prelamin A, via transcriptional downregulation associated with protein degradation, and increasing the lamin A to progerin ratio. These effects rescue cell dynamics and cellular proliferation through recovery of DNA damage response factor PARP1 and chromatin-associated nuclear envelope proteins LAP2α and BAF. The combined all-trans retinoic acid-rapamycin treatment is dramatically efficient, highly reproducible, represents a promising new approach in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria therapy and deserves investigation in ageing-associated disorders.

  3. Treatment considerations in hutchinson-gilford progeria syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazan-Molina, H; Aizenbud, D; Dror, Aizenbud D

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Guilford progeria syndrome is an extremely rare condition classified as one of the premature ageing syndromes. This case presents a 16-year-old Israeli female patient, suffering from a variant of Hutchinson-Guilford progeria with a history of treatment with oral biphosphnates. The patient presented with typical cranial and facial features of the syndrome including delayed teeth eruption and root development probably due to insufficient jaw growth and severs retrognatic position of the maxilla and mandible. Orthodontic treatment considerations are described along with those required in light of the previous treatment by oral biphosphonates.All primary teeth were extracted in three appointments while creating as minimal trauma as possible to the surrounding tissue and alveolar bone. For now, the patient refuses to begin the orthodontic treatment course. There are no limitations to conduct any dental procedures in progeria patients, however, extreme caution must be exercised during oral surgery due to the inelasticity of tissues and dermal atrophy. Orthodontic procedure commencement should be early enough to manage the delayed development and eruption of teeth. Patients taking oral biphosphonates should be advised of this potential complication. If orthodontic treatment is considered appropriate, plans should be assessed and modified to include compromises.

  4. Salinity-dependent copper accumulation in the guppy Poecilia vivipara is associated with CTR1 and ATP7B transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Evelise Sampaio; Abril, Sandra Isabel Moreno; Zanette, Juliano; Bianchini, Adalto

    2014-07-01

    Copper (Cu) accumulation and regulation of key-genes involved in Cu homeostasis were evaluated in freshwater- and saltwater-acclimated guppies Poecilia vivipara. Fish were exposed (96h) to environmentally relevant concentrations of dissolved Cu (0, 5.0, 9.0 and 20.0μg/L). In freshwater guppies, gill and liver Cu accumulation was dependent on Cu concentration in the exposure medium. In saltwater guppies, this dependence was observed only in the gut. These findings indicate that Cu accumulation was salinity- and tissue-dependent. Key genes involved in Cu metabolism were sequenced for the first time in P. vivipara. Transcripts coding for the high-affinity copper transporter (CTR1) and copper-transporting ATPase (ATP7B) were identified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene sequencing. The full-length CTR1 open reading frame (1560bp) and a partial ATP7B (690bp) were discovered. Predicted amino acid sequences shared high identities with the CTR1 of Fundulus heteroclitus (81%) and the ATP7B of Sparus aurata (87%). Basal transcriptional levels addressed by RT-qPCR in control fish indicate that CTR1 and ATP7B was highly transcribed in liver of freshwater guppies while CTR1 was highly transcribed in gut of saltwater guppies. This could explain the higher Cu accumulation observed in liver of freshwater guppies and in gut of saltwater guppies, because CTR1 is involved in Cu uptake. Reduced gill mRNA expression of CTR1 was observed in freshwater guppies exposed to 20.0μg/L Cu and in saltwater guppies exposed to 5.0μg/L Cu. In turn, reduced mRNA expression of gut ATP7B was observed in freshwater and salt water guppies exposed to 9.0 and 20.0μg/L Cu. Liver CTR1 and ATP7B transcription were not affected by Cu exposure. These findings suggest that gill CTR1 and gut ATP7B are down-regulated to limit Cu absorption after exposure to dissolved Cu, while liver CTR1 and ATP7B levels are maintained to allow Cu storage and detoxification. In conclusion, findings reported here

  5. Ann Hutchinson (as subject), Dr. Joan Vernikos (R), Dee O'Hara (L), J. Evans and E. Lowe pose for

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Ann Hutchinson (as subject), Dr. Joan Vernikos (R), Dee O'Hara (L), J. Evans and E. Lowe pose for pictures in the NASA Magazine aritcle 'How it Feels to be a Human Test Subject' as they prepare for a bed rest study to simulate the efects of microgravity on the human body.

  6. Model peptides provide new insights into the role of histidine residues as potential ligands in human cellular copper acquisition via Ctr1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Kathryn L; Putterman, Allison B; White, Daniel R; Thiele, Dennis J; Franz, Katherine J

    2011-03-30

    Cellular acquisition of copper in eukaryotes is primarily accomplished through the Ctr family of copper transport proteins. In both humans and yeast, methionine-rich "Mets" motifs in the amino-terminal extracellular domain of Ctr1 are thought to be responsible for recruitment of copper at the cell surface. Unlike yeast, mammalian Ctr1 also contains extracellular histidine-rich motifs, although a role for these regions in copper uptake has not been explored in detail. Herein, synthetic model peptides containing the first 14 residues of the extracellular domain of human Ctr1 (MDHSHHMGMSYMDS) have been prepared and evaluated for their apparent binding affinity to both Cu(I) and Cu(II). These studies reveal a high affinity Cu(II) binding site (log K = 11.0 ± 0.3 at pH 7.4) at the amino-terminus of the peptide as well as a high affinity Cu(I) site (log K = 10.2 ± 0.2 at pH 7.4) that utilizes adjacent HH residues along with an additional His or Met ligand. These model studies suggest that the histidine domains may play a direct role in copper acquisition from serum copper-binding proteins and in facilitating the reduction of Cu(II) to the active Ctr1 substrate, Cu(I). We tested this hypothesis by expressing a Ctr1 mutant lacking only extracellular histidine residues in Ctr1-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Results from live cell studies support the hypothesis that extracellular amino-terminal His residues directly participate in the copper transport function of Ctr1.

  7. Aging Study, Hints from Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome%Hutchinson-Gilford早老症在衰老研究中的意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋昱; 郭翯; 郑璐; 陈琳; 黄昱

    2009-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford早老症是一种散发的常染体显性遗传病,是研究人类正常衰老理想的疾病模型.其发病机制在于核纤层蛋白A的基因发生突变,使其翻译产物缺少了50个氨基酸而变成早老蛋白,该蛋白质在细胞内积累,导致细胞增殖异常、端粒缩短、基因表达调控异常、基因组不稳定等,这些表现与正常衰老有诸多相似之处.正常衰老细胞中同样发现早老蛋白的存在,且随年龄增长而积累.本文比较了HGPS与正常衰老在表型上的异同,综述了HGPS加速衰老的分子机制研究进展,并着重介绍了HGPS研究成果对衰老研究的借鉴意义.%time. By comparing and contrasting the phenotype of HGPS with that of normal aging, we summarize the research progress in the molec-ular mechanism of HGPS, and focus on the results from HGPS which can be used on aging research.

  8. Elevated glutathione levels confer cellular sensitization to cisplatin toxicity by up-regulation of copper transporter hCtr1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Helen H W; Song, Im-Sook; Hossain, Anwar; Choi, Min-Koo; Yamane, Yoshiaki; Liang, Zheng D; Lu, Jia; Wu, Lily Y-H; Siddik, Zahid H; Klomp, Leo W J; Savaraj, Niramol; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2008-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that treating cultured cells with cisplatin (CDDP) up-regulated the expression of glutathione (GSH) and its de novo rate-limiting enzyme glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), which consists of a catalytic (GCLC) and a modifier (GCLM) subunit. It has also been shown that many CDDP-resistant cell lines exhibit high levels of GCLC/GCLM and GSH. Because the GSH system is the major intracellular regulator of redox conditions that serve as an important detoxification cytoprotector, these results have been taken into consideration that elevated levels of GCL/GSH are responsible for the CDDP resistance. In contrast to this context, we demonstrated here that overexpression of GSH by transfection with an expression plasmid containing the GCLC cDNA conferred sensitization to CDDP through up-regulation of human copper transporter (hCtr) 1, which is also a transporter for CDDP. Depleting GSH levels in these transfected cells reversed CDDP sensitivity with concomitant reduction of hCtr1 expression. Although rates of copper transport were also up-regulated in the transfected cells, these cells exhibited biochemical signature of copper deficiency, suggesting that GSH functions as an intracellular copper-chelator and that overexpression of GSH can alter copper metabolism. More importantly, our results reveal a new role of GSH in the regulation of CDDP sensitivity. Overproduction of GSH depletes the bioavailable copper pool, leading to up-regulation of hCtr1 and sensitization of CDDP transport and cell killing. These findings also have important implications in that modulation of the intracellular copper pool may be a novel strategy for improving chemotherapeutic efficacy of platinum-based antitumor agents.

  9. Aberrant DNA methylation profiles in the premature aging disorders Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria and Werner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyn, Holger; Moran, Sebastian; Esteller, Manel

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation gradiently changes with age and is likely to be involved in aging-related processes with subsequent phenotype changes and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. The Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGP) and Werner Syndrome (WS) are two premature aging diseases showing features of common natural aging early in life. Mutations in the LMNA and WRN genes were associated to disease onset; however, for a subset of patients the underlying causative mechanisms remain elusive. We aimed to evaluate the role of epigenetic alteration on premature aging diseases by performing comprehensive DNA methylation profiling of HGP and WS patients. We observed profound changes in the DNA methylation landscapes of WRN and LMNA mutant patients, which were narrowed down to a set of aging related genes and processes. Although of low overall variance, non-mutant patients revealed differential DNA methylation at distinct loci. Hence, we propose DNA methylation to have an impact on premature aging diseases. PMID:23257959

  10. Extradural hematoma surgery in a child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: Perioperative concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansda, Upendra; Agarwal, Jyotsna; Patra, Chitralekha; Ganjoo, Pragati

    2013-05-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a very rare genetic disorder characterized by premature ageing, severe growth failure, and very early onset atherosclerosis. Psychologically and emotionally child-like, these patients suffer from physiological changes of old age. Early and progressive atherosclerosis of intra-cranial vessels in HGPS patients, along with a thin skin and fragile vessels, make these patients susceptible to intra-cranial hematomas following relatively trivial injuries and to severe intra-cranial disease. Anesthetizing HGPS patients for surgery can be challenging due to the presence of a possible difficult airway, multi-system derangements, and associated skin, bone and joint disease. We report here one such child with HGPS who underwent craniotomy and evacuation of an extradural hematoma that developed after minor head trauma. Securing his airway during surgery was difficult.

  11. Vascular disease modeling using induced pluripotent stem cells: Focus in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitrez, P R; Rosa, S C; Praça, C; Ferreira, L

    2016-05-06

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent today an invaluable tool to create disease cell models for modeling and drug screening. Several lines of iPSCs have been generated in the last 7 years that changed the paradigm for studying diseases and the discovery of new drugs to treat them. In this article we focus our attention to vascular diseases in particular Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), a devastating premature aging disease caused by a mutation in the lamin A gene. In general, patients die because of myocardial infarction or stroke. Because the patients are fragile the isolation of a particular type of cells is very difficult. Therefore in the last 5 years, researchers have used cells derived from iPSCs to model aspects of the HGPS and to screen libraries of chemicals to retard or treat the disease.

  12. Aberrant DNA methylation profiles in the premature aging disorders Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria and Werner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyn, Holger; Moran, Sebastian; Esteller, Manel

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation gradiently changes with age and is likely to be involved in aging-related processes with subsequent phenotype changes and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. The Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGP) and Werner Syndrome (WS) are two premature aging diseases showing features of common natural aging early in life. Mutations in the LMNA and WRN genes were associated to disease onset; however, for a subset of patients the underlying causative mechanisms remain elusive. We aimed to evaluate the role of epigenetic alteration on premature aging diseases by performing comprehensive DNA methylation profiling of HGP and WS patients. We observed profound changes in the DNA methylation landscapes of WRN and LMNA mutant patients, which were narrowed down to a set of aging related genes and processes. Although of low overall variance, non-mutant patients revealed differential DNA methylation at distinct loci. Hence, we propose DNA methylation to have an impact on premature aging diseases.

  13. Extradural hematoma surgery in a child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: Perioperative concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra Hansda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a very rare genetic disorder characterized by premature ageing, severe growth failure, and very early onset atherosclerosis. Psychologically and emotionally child-like, these patients suffer from physiological changes of old age. Early and progressive atherosclerosis of intra-cranial vessels in HGPS patients, along with a thin skin and fragile vessels, make these patients susceptible to intra-cranial hematomas following relatively trivial injuries and to severe intra-cranial disease. Anesthetizing HGPS patients for surgery can be challenging due to the presence of a possible difficult airway, multi-system derangements, and associated skin, bone and joint disease. We report here one such child with HGPS who underwent craniotomy and evacuation of an extradural hematoma that developed after minor head trauma. Securing his airway during surgery was difficult.

  14. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome caused by an LMNA mutation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yan; Xu, Zi-Gang; Xu, Zhe; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging of the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a 6-year-old boy who was born at full term but presented with scleroderma-like appearance at 1 month of age and gradually developed clinical manifestations of progeria. He had characteristic facial features of prominent eyes, scalp, and leg veins; loss of scalp hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes; stunted growth; scleroderma-like changes of the skin; and a premature aged appearance. Metabolic investigations showed transient methylmalonic aciduria, and genetic testing of the peripheral blood identified the c.1824C>T heterozygous LMNA mutation. The present case is reported because of its rarity.

  15. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with severe calcific aortic valve stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natesh B Hanumanthappa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging syndrome that results from mutation in the Laminin A gene. This case report of a 12-year-old girl with HGPS is presented for the rarity of the syndrome and the classical clinical features that were observed in the patient. All patients with this condition should undergo early and periodic evaluation for cardiovascular diseases. However, the prognosis is poor and management is mainly conservative. There is no proven therapy available. Mortality in this uniformly fatal condition is primarily due to myocardial infarction, strokes or congestive cardiac failure between ages 7 and 21 years due to the rapidly progressive arteriosclerosis involving the large vessels.

  16. A 36 years old woman with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akrami S M

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a very rare genetic disorder with a frequency of 1 in 8 million live births. It is characterised by premature aging phenotype. The median age at death is 13.4 years. It is an autosomal dominat disease due to a de novo point mutation in the Lamin A gene exon 11 in the majority of cases. More than 100 cases have been reported world wide."nCase report: We describe here an exceptionally long-lived patient with HGPS, who is alive at age 36. She was referred by a cardiologist to our endocrinology clinic to be worked up for presence of a metabolic or genetic disorder before a heart surgery."nResults: Having more attention of clinicians about very rare diseases and referring the patients to geneticist are the main goals of this case report as well as describing the disease.

  17. DNA repair defects and genome instability in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Susana; Kreienkamp, Ray

    2015-06-01

    The integrity of the nuclear lamina has emerged as an important factor in the maintenance of genome stability. In particular, mutations in the LMNA gene, encoding A-type lamins (lamin A/C), alter nuclear morphology and function, and cause genomic instability. LMNA gene mutations are associated with a variety of degenerative diseases and devastating premature aging syndromes such as Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) and Restrictive Dermopathy (RD). HGPS is a severe laminopathy, with patients dying in their teens from myocardial infarction or stroke. HGPS patient-derived cells exhibit nuclear shape abnormalities, changes in epigenetic regulation and gene expression, telomere shortening, genome instability, and premature senescence. This review highlights recent advances in identifying molecular mechanisms that contribute to the pathophysiology of HGPS, with a special emphasis on DNA repair defects and genome instability.

  18. Hip pathology in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a report of two children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhbari, Pouya; Jha, Shilpa; James, Kyle D; Hinves, Barry L; Buchanan, Jamie A F

    2012-11-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder. The estimated incidence is one in 4 million births. Orthopaedic manifestations include abnormality of the hips occurring early in the disease process. Severe coxa valga can be apparent by the age of 2 years. We report two cases of HGPS, one in a 7-year-old girl with avascular necrosis of the left hip and the second in a 13-year-old girl with recurrent traumatic hip dislocations. We demonstrate the pathoanatomical changes in the hip with HGPS using a combination of imaging modalities including radiographic, computed tomographic and MRI scans. These include coxa magna, coxa valga and acetabular dysplasia. We also comment on how these would affect the surgical management of this high-risk group of patients.

  19. Oral and maxillofacial surgical considerations for a case of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batstone, M D; Macleod, A W G

    2002-11-01

    Hutchinson-Guilford progeria is a rare genetic condition showing the stigmata of accelerated ageing combined with severe growth retardation. Patients with this condition show a classical facies and clinical features with an average age of death of 13, usually due to atherosclerotic changes. Craniofacial and dental manifestations include mandibular and maxillary hypoplasia, both vertically and horizontally. Delayed and abnormal tooth eruption and morphology are commonly present. The long-term medical prognosis and eruption potential of individual teeth is important when considering treatment. In addition to this, surgical planning and surgical technique must be modified by the abnormal facial morphology, dermal inelasticity, potential anaesthetic difficulties, and ongoing deterioration in the medical condition. These factors mandate early and definitive intervention for oral surgical conditions. We report the case of a 13-year-old male treated for pericoronitis and oral pain relating to delayed eruption of first permanent molars.

  20. Hypoparathyroidism in an Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. It is reported to be present in one in eight million and is characterized by severe growth failure, early loss of hair, lipodystrophy, scleroderma, decreased joint mobility, osteolysis, early atherosclerosis and facial features that resemble those of an aged person. Apart from diabetes mellitus, there are no reported abnormalities of thyroid, parathyroid, pituitary or adrenal function. Here, we report the case of a 10-year-old Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and hypoparathyroidism. Case presentation A 10-year-old Egyptian boy was referred to our institution for an evaluation of recurrent attacks of muscle cramps, paresthesia of his fingertips and perioral numbness of two months duration. On examination, we found dilated veins present over his scalp with alopecia and frontal bossing, a beaked nose, thin lips, protruding ears, a high pitched voice with sparse hair over his eyebrows and eyelashes and micrognathia but normal dentition. His eyes appeared prominent and our patient appeared to have poor sexual development. A provisional diagnosis of progeria was made, which was confirmed by molecular genetics study. Chvostek's and Trousseau's signs were positive. He had low total calcium (5.4 mg/dL), low ionized calcium (2.3 mg/dL), raised serum phosphate (7.2 mg/dL), raised alkaline phosphatase (118 U/L) and low intact parathyroid hormone (1.2 pg/mL) levels. He was started on oral calcium salt and vitamin D; his symptoms improved with the treatment and his serum calcium, urinary calcium and alkaline phosphates level were monitored every three months to ensure adequacy of therapy and to avoid hypercalcemia. Conclusion Routine checking of serum calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid hormone will help in the early detection of hypoparathyrodism among children with progeria. PMID:22251708

  1. A ceRNA analysis on LMNA gene focusing on the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare dominant human disease of genetic origin. The average life expectancy is about 20 years, patients’ life quality is still very poor and no efficient therapy has yet been developed. It is caused by mutation of the LMNA gene, which results in accumulation in the nuclear membrane of a particular splicing form of Lamin-A called progerin. The mechanism by which progerin perturbs cellular homeostasis and leads to the symptoms is still under debate. Micro-RNAs are able to negatively regulate transcription by coupling with the 3’ UnTranslated Region of messenger RNAs. Several Micro-RNAs recognize the same 3’ UnTranslated Region and each Micro-RNA can recognize multiple 3’ UnTranslated Regions of different messenger RNAs. When different messenger RNAs are co-regulated via a similar panel of micro-RNAs, these messengers are called Competing Endogenous RNAs, or ceRNAs. The 3’ UnTranslated Region of the longest LMNA transcript was analysed looking for its ceRNAs. The aim of this study was to search for candidate genes and gene ontology functions possibly influenced by LMNA mutations that may exert a role in progeria development. Results 11 miRNAs were isolated as potential LMNA regulators. By computational analysis, the miRNAs pointed to 17 putative LMNA ceRNAs. Gene ontology analysis of isolated ceRNAs showed an enrichment in RNA interference and control of cell cycle functions. Conclusion This study isolated novel genes and functions potentially involved in LMNA network of regulation that could be involved in laminopathies such as the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. PMID:23317481

  2. Hypoparathyroidism in an Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalil Kotb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. It is reported to be present in one in eight million and is characterized by severe growth failure, early loss of hair, lipodystrophy, scleroderma, decreased joint mobility, osteolysis, early atherosclerosis and facial features that resemble those of an aged person. Apart from diabetes mellitus, there are no reported abnormalities of thyroid, parathyroid, pituitary or adrenal function. Here, we report the case of a 10-year-old Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and hypoparathyroidism. Case presentation A 10-year-old Egyptian boy was referred to our institution for an evaluation of recurrent attacks of muscle cramps, paresthesia of his fingertips and perioral numbness of two months duration. On examination, we found dilated veins present over his scalp with alopecia and frontal bossing, a beaked nose, thin lips, protruding ears, a high pitched voice with sparse hair over his eyebrows and eyelashes and micrognathia but normal dentition. His eyes appeared prominent and our patient appeared to have poor sexual development. A provisional diagnosis of progeria was made, which was confirmed by molecular genetics study. Chvostek's and Trousseau's signs were positive. He had low total calcium (5.4 mg/dL, low ionized calcium (2.3 mg/dL, raised serum phosphate (7.2 mg/dL, raised alkaline phosphatase (118 U/L and low intact parathyroid hormone (1.2 pg/mL levels. He was started on oral calcium salt and vitamin D; his symptoms improved with the treatment and his serum calcium, urinary calcium and alkaline phosphates level were monitored every three months to ensure adequacy of therapy and to avoid hypercalcemia. Conclusion Routine checking of serum calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid hormone will help in the early detection of hypoparathyrodism among children with progeria.

  3. Impact of Farnesylation Inhibitors on Survival in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Leslie B.; Massaro, Joe; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Campbell, Susan E.; Brazier, Joan; Brown, W. Ted; Kleinman, Monica E; Kieran, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is an ultra-rare segmental premature aging disease resulting in early death from heart attack or stroke. There is no approved treatment, but starting in 2007, several recent single arm clinical trials have administered inhibitors of protein farnesylation aimed at reducing toxicity of the disease-producing protein progerin. No study has assessed whether treatments influence patient survival. The key elements necessary for this analysis are a robust natural history of survival and comparison with a sufficiently large patient population that has been treated for a sufficient time period with disease-targeting medications. Methods and Results We generated survival Kaplan-Meier survival analyses for the largest untreated Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome cohort to date. Mean survival was 14.6 years. Comparing survival for treated versus age-and-gender-matched untreated cohorts, hazard ratio was 0.13 (95% CI 0.04-0.37; P<0.001) with median follow-up of 5.3 years from time of treatment initiation. There were 21/43 deaths in untreated versus 5/43 deaths among treated subjects. Treatment increased mean survival by 1.6 years. Conclusions This study provides a robust untreated disease survival profile, which can be utilized for comparisons now and in the future to assess changes in survival with treatments for HGPS. The current comparisons estimating increased survival with protein farnesylation inhibitors provide the first evidence of treatments influencing survival for this fatal disease. Clinical Trial Registration Information www.clinicaltrials.gov. Indentifiers: NCT00425607, NCT00879034 and NCT00916747. PMID:24795390

  4. Ctr9, a Key Component of the Paf1 Complex, Affects Proliferation and Terminal Differentiation in the Developing Drosophila Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrampour, Shahrzad; Thor, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The Paf1 protein complex (Paf1C) is increasingly recognized as a highly conserved and broadly utilized regulator of a variety of transcriptional processes. These include the promotion of H3K4 and H3K36 trimethylation, H2BK123 ubiquitination, RNA Pol II transcriptional termination, and also RNA-mediated gene silencing. Paf1C contains five canonical protein components, including Paf1 and Ctr9, which are critical for overall complex integrity, as well as Rtf1, Leo1, and Cdc73/Parafibromin(Hrpt2)/Hyrax. In spite of a growing appreciation for the importance of Paf1C from yeast and mammalian studies, there has only been limited work in Drosophila. Here, we provide the first detailed phenotypic study of Ctr9 function in Drosophila. We found that Ctr9 mutants die at late embryogenesis or early larval life, but can be partly rescued by nervous system reexpression of Ctr9. We observed a number of phenotypes in Ctr9 mutants, including increased neuroblast numbers, increased nervous system proliferation, as well as downregulation of many neuropeptide genes. Analysis of cell cycle and regulatory gene expression revealed upregulation of the E2f1 cell cycle factor, as well as changes in Antennapedia and Grainy head expression. We also found reduction of H3K4me3 modification in the embryonic nervous system. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis points to additional downstream genes that may underlie these Ctr9 phenotypes, revealing gene expression changes in Notch pathway target genes, cell cycle genes, and neuropeptide genes. In addition, we find significant effects on the gene expression of metabolic genes. These findings reveal that Ctr9 is an essential gene that is necessary at multiple stages of nervous system development, and provides a starting point for future studies of the Paf1C in Drosophila. PMID:27520958

  5. Understanding Tiger –Human Conflict in Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR, India: Based on the genetic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeet Kumar Singh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Attacks of tigers on humans are a common feature of human-wildlife conflicts in India, and the individual identification of such animals has been an issue for management purposes. We document a case study where we established the species, sex and genetic identity of a man-eater tiger reported from Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR, India, using blood spots and other biological samples. A man-eater tiger killed 4 women within 2 months (December 2010 to January 2011 in different parts of CTR. The authorities decided to shoot the animal, and attempts were made to do so, but it escaped. After 16 days, a tiger was shot by the management, and biological samples were collected. The multi-locus genetic profile of an injured tiger based on blood from the injured tiger was compared with that from biological samples from the shot tiger. Our results indicate that the injured and shot tigers were the same individual. This study elucidates the potential of wildlife genetics in identification of tigers involved in fatal attacks and improves the wildlife management strategies employed where the greatest numbers of direct human- tiger conflicts are taking place.

  6. 早老症的分子机制%Molecular mechanism of Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘新光; 赵炜; 周中军

    2010-01-01

    @@ 儿童早老症(Hutchinson Giford Progeria Syn-drome,HGPS)是由于基因突变导致的疾病,它的发病率很低,大概是八百万分之一,患者出生的早期就开始出现衰老的容貌"[1]. 这种疾病最早由Hutchins于1886年报道"[2],1904年Gilford报道了第二例,他在文章中使用了progeria(早老)这个词[3].1962年,DeBusk总结了60例病例,其中包括4例他本人报道的病人,他将这种疾病命名为Hutchinson-Giford Progefia Syndrome,HGPS.

  7. Investigation into the human premature ageing disease, Hutchinson Gilford Progeria syndrome, using hTERT immortalised fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Worthington, Gemma Louise

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the award of Doctor of Philosophy and was awarded by Brunel University London Hutchinson Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature ageing disease affecting children. 80% of “classic” HGPS patients share the same mutation in the LMNA gene that gives rise to characteristics similar to normal human ageing and they usually die in their teens from heart attacks or strokes. Cells taken from progeria patients have a short replicative lifespan in culture an...

  8. MANAGEMENT OF STAKEHOLDERS IN HIGH COMPLEXITY PROJECTS: APPLICATIONS AND EMPIRIC EVIDENCES IN CTR NOVA IGUAÇU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Oliveira de Araujo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the case of implementation of the licensed landfill CTR Nova Iguaçu (the first initiative all around the world certified by the Clean Development Mechanism – CDM, from Kyoto Treaty, providing an analysis of the practices of management of stakeholders adopted with the neighboring communities surrounding the enterprise. Besides the local investigation at the enterprise concerned, the study is supported by technical-scientific literature, highlighting the themes of stakeholders management, change management, and processes of project management, based on the PMI’s 5th Ed PMBoK view. As conclusions, it is seen, in the situation displayed, that actions of identification, planning and monitoring of the stakeholders were crucial to the initiative success, under the economical perspective and concerning corporative image.

  9. Role of the human high-affinity copper transporter in copper homeostasis regulation and cisplatin sensitivity in cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Macus Tien; Fu, Siqing; Savaraj, Niramol; Chen, Helen H W

    2012-09-15

    The high-affinity copper transporter (Ctr1; SCLC31A1) plays an important role in regulating copper homeostasis because copper is an essential micronutrient and copper deficiency is detrimental to many important cellular functions, but excess copper is toxic. Recent research has revealed that human copper homeostasis is tightly controlled by interregulatory circuitry involving copper, Sp1, and human (hCtr1). This circuitry uses Sp1 transcription factor as a copper sensor in modulating hCtr1 expression, which in turn controls cellular copper and Sp1 levels in a 3-way mutual regulatory loop. Posttranslational regulation of hCtr1 expression by copper stresses has also been described in the literature. Because hCtr1 can also transport platinum drugs, this finding underscores the important role of hCtr1 in platinum-drug sensitivity in cancer chemotherapy. Consistent with this notion is the finding that elevated hCtr1 expression was associated with favorable treatment outcomes in cisplatin-based cancer chemotherapy. Moreover, cultured cell studies showed that elevated hCtr1 expression can be induced by depleting cellular copper levels, resulting in enhanced cisplatin uptake and its cell-killing activity. A phase I clinical trial using a combination of trientine (a copper chelator) and carboplatin has been carried out with encouraging results. This review discusses new insights into the role of hCtr1 in regulating copper homeostasis and explains how modulating cellular copper availability could influence treatment efficacy in platinum-based cancer chemotherapy through hCtr1 regulation.

  10. Clinical and radiographic features of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Daniel Berretta; Silva, Juliana Melo; Menezes, Tatiany Oliveira; Cavaleiro, Rosely Santos; Tuji, Fabrício Mesquita; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto; Coletta, Ricardo Della

    2014-03-16

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare dysmorphic syndrome characterized by several features of premature aging with clinical involvement of the skin, bones, and cardiovascular system. HGPS has an estimated incidence of one in four million to one in eight million births. The main clinical features of HGPS include short stature, craniofacial dimorphism, alopecia, bone fragility, and cardiovascular disorders. The most frequent cause of death is myocardial infarction at a mean age of 13 years old. Dental manifestations include delayed development and eruption of teeth, discoloration, crowding and rotation of teeth, and displaced teeth. Cone beam computed tomography images revealed the absence of the sphenoid, frontal, and maxillary sinus, flattening of the condyles and glenoid fossa, and bilateral hypoplasia of the mandibular condyles. The disease is caused by mutations in lamin A/C (LMNA). Here, we present a case report of an 11-year-old boy with classical features of HGPS, which was caused by a de novo germ-line mutation (C1824T, G608G) in exon 11 of the LMNA gene. Some uncommon HGPS-associated features in our patient, such as alterations in the facial sinuses and hypoplasia of the condyles, contributed to the expansion of the phenotypic spectrum of this syndrome from a dentomaxillofacial perspective.

  11. Abberent expression analysis of LMNA gene in hutchinson-gilford progeria syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navid, Afifa; Khan, Mohammad Haroon; Rashid, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by de novo dominant point mutations of the genes encoding nuclear lamina proteins, leading towards premature aging. A protein sequence is subjected to mutations in nature which can affect the function and folding pattern of the protein by different ways. Mutations involved in HGPS were identified and were substituted in the seed sequence retrieved from the UniProt database to get the mutated versions. Tertiary structure of the Lamin A protein was previously unpredicted so was performed for all the mutated as well as for the seed protein to analyze the effects of mutations on the protein structure, folding and interactions. All the predicted models were refined and validated through multiple servers for multiple parameters. The validated 3D structure of seed protein was then successfully submitted to the Protein Model Database and was assigned with the PMDB ID PM0077829. All the predicted structures were superimposed with a root mean square deviation value of 7.0 Å and a high Dali Z-score of 1.9. It was observed that mutations affected physiochemical properties as well as instability index and thus is affecting the domains in specific and the whole structure in general. It was further analyzed that HGPS is the result of affected Lamin a protein interactions with other integral and binding proteins in the inner nuclear membrane affecting the link in between the nuclear membrane and the network of the lamina. PMID:22493523

  12. Vitamin D receptor signaling improves Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome cellular phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreienkamp, Ray; Croke, Monica; Neumann, Martin A; Bedia-Diaz, Gonzalo; Graziano, Simona; Dusso, Adriana; Dorsett, Dale; Carlberg, Carsten; Gonzalo, Susana

    2016-05-24

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a devastating incurable premature aging disease caused by accumulation of progerin, a toxic lamin A mutant protein. HGPS patient-derived cells exhibit nuclear morphological abnormalities, altered signaling pathways, genomic instability, and premature senescence. Here we uncover new molecular mechanisms contributing to cellular decline in progeria. We demonstrate that HGPS cells reduce expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR) and DNA repair factors BRCA1 and 53BP1 with progerin accumulation, and that reconstituting VDR signaling via 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) treatment improves HGPS phenotypes, including nuclear morphological abnormalities, DNA repair defects, and premature senescence. Importantly, we discovered that the 1,25D/VDR axis regulates LMNA gene expression, as well as expression of DNA repair factors. 1,25D dramatically reduces progerin production in HGPS cells, while stabilizing BRCA1 and 53BP1, two key factors for genome integrity. Vitamin D/VDR axis emerges as a new target for treatment of HGPS and potentially other lamin-related diseases exhibiting VDR deficiency and genomic instability. Because progerin expression increases with age, maintaining vitamin D/VDR signaling could keep the levels of progerin in check during physiological aging.

  13. MECHANISMS OF PREMATURE VASCULAR AGING IN CHILDREN WITH HUTCHINSON-GILFORD PROGERIA SYNDROME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard-Herman, Marie; Smoot, Leslie B.; Wake, Nicole; Kieran, Mark W.; Kleinman, Monica E.; Miller, David T.; Schwartzman, Armin; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Neuberg, Donna; Gordon, Leslie B.

    2011-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare, segmental premature aging syndrome of accelerated atherosclerosis and early death from myocardial infarction or stroke. This study sought to establish comprehensive characterization of the fatal vasculopathy in HGPS and its relevance to normal aging. We performed cardiovascular assessments at a single clinical site on the largest prospectively studied cohort to date. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was dramatically elevated (mean 13.00±3.83 m/s). Carotid duplex ultrasound echobrightness, assessed in predefined tissue sites as a measure of arterial wall density, was significantly greater than age- and gender-matched controls in the intima-media (P<0.02), near adventitia (P<0.003) and deep adventitia (P<0.01), as was internal carotid artery mean flow velocity (p<0.0001). Ankle-brachial indices were abnormal in 78% of patients. Effective disease treatments may be heralded by normalizing trends of these noninvasive cardiovascular measures. The data demonstrates that, along with peripheral vascular occlusive disease, accelerated vascular stiffening is an early and pervasive mechanism of vascular disease in HGPS. There is considerable overlap with cardiovascular changes of normal aging, which reinforces the view that defining mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in HGPS provides a unique opportunity to isolate a subset of factors influencing cardiovascular disease in the general aging population. PMID:22083160

  14. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome as a model for vascular aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Jonathan A; Fekete, Natalie; Garnier, Alain; Hoesli, Corinne A

    2016-02-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a premature aging disorder caused by a de novo genetic mutation that leads to the accumulation of a splicing isoform of lamin A termed progerin. Progerin expression alters the organization of the nuclear lamina and chromatin. The life expectancy of HGPS patients is severely reduced due to critical cardiovascular defects. Progerin also accumulates in an age-dependent manner in the vascular cells of adults that do not carry genetic mutations associated with HGPS. The molecular mechanisms that lead to vascular dysfunction in HGPS may therefore also play a role in vascular aging. The vascular phenotypic and molecular changes observed in HGPS are strikingly similar to those seen with age, including increased senescence, altered mechanotransduction and stem cell exhaustion. This article discusses the similarities and differences between age-dependent and HGPS-related vascular aging to highlight the relevance of HGPS as a model for vascular aging. Induced pluripotent stem cells derived from HGPS patients are suggested as an attractive model to study vascular aging in order to develop novel approaches to treat cardiovascular disease.

  15. DNA-damage accumulation and replicative arrest in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musich, Phillip R; Zou, Yue

    2011-12-01

    A common feature of progeria syndromes is a premature aging phenotype and an enhanced accumulation of DNA damage arising from a compromised repair system. HGPS (Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome) is a severe form of progeria in which patients accumulate progerin, a mutant lamin A protein derived from a splicing variant of the lamin A/C gene (LMNA). Progerin causes chromatin perturbations which result in the formation of DSBs (double-strand breaks) and abnormal DDR (DNA-damage response). In the present article, we review recent findings which resolve some mechanistic details of how progerin may disrupt DDR pathways in HGPS cells. We propose that progerin accumulation results in disruption of functions of some replication and repair factors, causing the mislocalization of XPA (xeroderma pigmentosum group A) protein to the replication forks, replication fork stalling and, subsequently, DNA DSBs. The binding of XPA to the stalled forks excludes normal binding by repair proteins, leading to DSB accumulation, which activates ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related) checkpoints, and arresting cell-cycle progression.

  16. Rapamycin reverses cellular phenotypes and enhances mutant protein clearance in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kan; Graziotto, John J; Blair, Cecilia D; Mazzulli, Joseph R; Erdos, Michael R; Krainc, Dimitri; Collins, Francis S

    2011-06-29

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a lethal genetic disorder characterized by premature aging. HGPS is most commonly caused by a de novo single-nucleotide substitution in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA) that partially activates a cryptic splice donor site in exon 11, producing an abnormal lamin A protein termed progerin. Accumulation of progerin in dividing cells adversely affects the integrity of the nuclear scaffold and leads to nuclear blebbing in cultured cells. Progerin is also produced in normal cells, increasing in abundance as senescence approaches. Here, we report the effect of rapamycin, a macrolide antibiotic that has been implicated in slowing cellular and organismal aging, on the cellular phenotypes of HGPS fibroblasts. Treatment with rapamycin abolished nuclear blebbing, delayed the onset of cellular senescence, and enhanced the degradation of progerin in HGPS cells. Rapamycin also decreased the formation of insoluble progerin aggregates and induced clearance through autophagic mechanisms in normal fibroblasts. Our findings suggest an additional mechanism for the beneficial effects of rapamycin on longevity and encourage the hypothesis that rapamycin treatment could provide clinical benefit for children with HGPS.

  17. Progerin reduces LAP2α-telomere association in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnowski, Alexandre; Ong, Peh Fern; Wong, Esther S M; Lim, John S Y; Mutalif, Rafidah A; Navasankari, Raju; Dutta, Bamaprasad; Yang, Henry; Liow, Yi Y; Sze, Siu K; Boudier, Thomas; Wright, Graham D; Colman, Alan; Burke, Brian; Stewart, Colin L; Dreesen, Oliver

    2015-08-27

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGPS) is a premature ageing syndrome caused by a mutation in LMNA, resulting in a truncated form of lamin A called progerin. Progerin triggers loss of the heterochromatic marker H3K27me3, and premature senescence, which is prevented by telomerase. However, the mechanism how progerin causes disease remains unclear. Here, we describe an inducible cellular system to model HGPS and find that LAP2α (lamina-associated polypeptide-α) interacts with lamin A, while its interaction with progerin is significantly reduced. Super-resolution microscopy revealed that over 50% of telomeres localize to the lamina and that LAP2α association with telomeres is impaired in HGPS. This impaired interaction is central to HGPS since increasing LAP2α levels rescues progerin-induced proliferation defects and loss of H3K27me3, whereas lowering LAP2 levels exacerbates progerin-induced defects. These findings provide novel insights into the pathophysiology underlying HGPS, and how the nuclear lamina regulates proliferation and chromatin organization.

  18. Clinical trial of a farnesyltransferase inhibitor in children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Leslie B; Kleinman, Monica E; Miller, David T; Neuberg, Donna S; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Gerhard-Herman, Marie; Smoot, Leslie B; Gordon, Catherine M; Cleveland, Robert; Snyder, Brian D; Fligor, Brian; Bishop, W Robert; Statkevich, Paul; Regen, Amy; Sonis, Andrew; Riley, Susan; Ploski, Christine; Correia, Annette; Quinn, Nicolle; Ullrich, Nicole J; Nazarian, Ara; Liang, Marilyn G; Huh, Susanna Y; Schwartzman, Armin; Kieran, Mark W

    2012-10-09

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an extremely rare, fatal, segmental premature aging syndrome caused by a mutation in LMNA that produces the farnesylated aberrant lamin A protein, progerin. This multisystem disorder causes failure to thrive and accelerated atherosclerosis leading to early death. Farnesyltransferase inhibitors have ameliorated disease phenotypes in preclinical studies. Twenty-five patients with HGPS received the farnesyltransferase inhibitor lonafarnib for a minimum of 2 y. Primary outcome success was predefined as a 50% increase over pretherapy in estimated annual rate of weight gain, or change from pretherapy weight loss to statistically significant on-study weight gain. Nine patients experienced a ≥50% increase, six experienced a ≥50% decrease, and 10 remained stable with respect to rate of weight gain. Secondary outcomes included decreases in arterial pulse wave velocity and carotid artery echodensity and increases in skeletal rigidity and sensorineural hearing within patient subgroups. All patients improved in one or more of these outcomes. Results from this clinical treatment trial for children with HGPS provide preliminary evidence that lonafarnib may improve vascular stiffness, bone structure, and audiological status.

  19. Bilateral stenosis of carotid siphon in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narazaki, Ryo; Makimura, Mika; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Fukamachi, Shigeru; Akiyoshi, Hidetaka; So, Hidenori; Yamamura, Kenichiro; Doisaki, Sayoko; Kojima, Seiji; Ihara, Kenji; Hara, Toshiro; Ohga, Shouichi

    2013-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disease, caused by a de novo mutation of lamin-A gene, LMNA G608G. Accumulation of abnormal lamin-A (progerin) compromises nuclear membrane integrity and results in the accelerated senescence. Affected patients show a typical feature of birdlike face, alopecia, sclerotic skin, loss of subcutaneous fat, and short stature with advancing years. Neonatal scleroderma is the first presentation, although early diagnosis is challenging. The leading cause of death is cardio-/cerebro-vascular accidents associated with atherosclerosis. However, not all findings may recapitulate the aging process. We herein report a 9-year-old Japanese male with HGPS who developed cerebral infarction. The genetic study of peripheral blood-derived DNA determined a heterozygous c.1824C>T mutation, p.G608G. Telomere length of lymphocytes was normal. Bilateral stenosis of carotid siphons was prominent, while systemic arteriosclerosis was unremarkable assessed by the ankle-brachial index, carotid ultrasound imaging and funduscopic study. HGPS patients have marked loss and functional defects in vascular smooth muscle cells, leading to the vulnerability to circulatory stress. Symmetrical stenosis of siphons might occur as a distinctive cerebral vasculopathy of HGPS, rather than simple vascular senescence. Peripheral blood study on LMNA G608G and telomere length could screen progerias in infancy for early therapeutic intervention.

  20. Effect of progerin on the accumulation of oxidized proteins in fibroblasts from Hutchinson Gilford progeria patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viteri, Gabriela; Chung, Youn Wook; Stadtman, Earl R

    2010-01-01

    The mutation responsible for Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) causes abnormal nuclear morphology. Previous studies show that free radicals and reactive oxygen species play major roles in the etiology and/or progression of neurodegenerative diseases and aging. This study compares oxidative stress responses between progeric and normal fibroblasts. Our data revealed higher ROS levels in HGPS cells compared to age-matched controls. In response to oxidative challenge, progeric cells showed increased mRNA levels for mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD) and SOD protein content. However, this did not prevent a drop in the ATP content of progeria fibroblasts. Previous studies have shown that declines in human fibroblast ATP levels interfere with programmed cell death and promote necrotic inflammation. Notably, in our investigations the ATP content of progeria fibroblasts was only approximately 50% of that found in healthy controls. Furthermore, HGPS fibroblast analysis revealed a decrease in total caspase-like proteasome activity and in the levels of two active proteolytic complex subunits (beta(5) and beta(7)). A number of studies indicate that the molecular mechanisms causing accelerated aging in progeric patients also occur in healthy cells of older individuals. Thus, the results of this study may also help explain some of the cellular changes that accompany normal aging.

  1. A-type lamins and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: pathogenesis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jose M; Pla, Davinia; Perez-Sala, Dolores; Andres, Vicente

    2011-06-01

    Lamin A and lamin C (A-type lamins, both encoded by the LMNA gene) are major components of the mammalian nuclear lamina, a complex proteinaceous structure that acts as a scaffold for protein complexes that regulate nuclear structure and function. Abnormal accumulation of farnesylated-progerin, a mutant form of prelamin A, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a devastating disorder that causes the death of affected children at an average age of 13.5 years, predominantly from premature atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction or stroke. Remarkably, progerin is also present in normal cells and appears to progressively accumulate during aging of non-HGPS cells. Therefore, understanding how this mutant form of lamin A provokes HGPS may shed significant insight into physiological aging. In this review, we discuss recent advances into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying HGPS, the main murine models of the disease, and the therapeutic strategies developed in cellular and animal models with the aim of reducing the accumulation of farnesylated-progerin, as well as their use in clinical trials of HGPS.

  2. Interruption of progerin–lamin A/C binding ameliorates Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Jin; Jung, Youn-Sang; Yoon, Min-Ho; Kang, So-mi; Oh, Ah-Young; Lee, Jee-Hyun; Jun, So-Young; Woo, Tae-Gyun; Chun, Ho-Young; Kim, Sang Kyum; Chung, Kyu Jin; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Kyeong; Jin, Guanghai; Na, Min-Kyun; Ha, Nam Chul; Bárcena, Clea; Freije, José M.P.; López-Otín, Carlos; Song, Gyu Yong

    2016-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disease that is caused by a silent mutation of the LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C (lamin A/C). The G608G mutation generates a more accessible splicing donor site than does WT and produces an alternatively spliced product of LMNA called progerin, which is also expressed in normal aged cells. In this study, we determined that progerin binds directly to lamin A/C and induces profound nuclear aberrations. Given this observation, we performed a random screening of a chemical library and identified 3 compounds (JH1, JH4, and JH13) that efficiently block progerin–lamin A/C binding. These 3 chemicals, particularly JH4, alleviated nuclear deformation and reversed senescence markers characteristic of HGPS cells, including growth arrest and senescence-associated β-gal (SA–β-gal) activity. We then used microarray-based analysis to demonstrate that JH4 is able to rescue defects of cell-cycle progression in both HGPS and aged cells. Furthermore, administration of JH4 to LmnaG609G/G609G-mutant mice, which phenocopy human HGPS, resulted in a marked improvement of several progeria phenotypes and an extended lifespan. Together, these findings indicate that specific inhibitors with the ability to block pathological progerin–lamin A/C binding may represent a promising strategy for improving lifespan and health in both HGPS and normal aging. PMID:27617860

  3. Aggrecan expression is substantially and abnormally upregulated in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemire, Joan M; Patis, Carrie; Gordon, Leslie B; Sandy, John D; Toole, Bryan P; Weiss, Anthony S

    2006-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder that displays features of segmental aging. It is manifested predominantly in connective tissue, with most prominent histological changes occurring in the skin, cartilage, bone and cardiovascular tissues. Detailed quantitative real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction studies confirmed the previous observation that platelet-derived growth factor A-chain transcripts are consistently elevated 11+/-2- to 13+/-2-fold in two HGPS dermal fibroblast lines compared with age-matched controls. Furthermore, we identified two additional genes with substantially altered transcript levels. Nucleotide pyrophosphatase transcription was virtually shut down with decreased expression of 13+/-3- to 59+/-3-fold in HGPS, whereas aggrecan mRNA was elevated to 24+/-5 times to 41+/-4 times that of chronologically age-matched controls. Aggrecan, normally a component of cartilage and not always detectable in normal fibroblasts cultures, was secreted by HGPS fibroblast lines and was produced as a proteoglycan. This demonstrates that elevated aggrecan expression and its secretion are aberrant features of HGPS. We conclude that HGPS cells can display massively altered transcript levels leading to the secretion of inappropriate protein species.

  4. Interruption of progerin-lamin A/C binding ameliorates Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Jin; Jung, Youn-Sang; Yoon, Min-Ho; Kang, So-Mi; Oh, Ah-Young; Lee, Jee-Hyun; Jun, So-Young; Woo, Tae-Gyun; Chun, Ho-Young; Kim, Sang Kyum; Chung, Kyu Jin; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Kyeong; Jin, Guanghai; Na, Min-Kyun; Ha, Nam Chul; Bárcena, Clea; Freije, José M P; López-Otín, Carlos; Song, Gyu Yong; Park, Bum-Joon

    2016-10-03

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disease that is caused by a silent mutation of the LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C (lamin A/C). The G608G mutation generates a more accessible splicing donor site than does WT and produces an alternatively spliced product of LMNA called progerin, which is also expressed in normal aged cells. In this study, we determined that progerin binds directly to lamin A/C and induces profound nuclear aberrations. Given this observation, we performed a random screening of a chemical library and identified 3 compounds (JH1, JH4, and JH13) that efficiently block progerin-lamin A/C binding. These 3 chemicals, particularly JH4, alleviated nuclear deformation and reversed senescence markers characteristic of HGPS cells, including growth arrest and senescence-associated β-gal (SA-β-gal) activity. We then used microarray-based analysis to demonstrate that JH4 is able to rescue defects of cell-cycle progression in both HGPS and aged cells. Furthermore, administration of JH4 to LmnaG609G/G609G-mutant mice, which phenocopy human HGPS, resulted in a marked improvement of several progeria phenotypes and an extended lifespan. Together, these findings indicate that specific inhibitors with the ability to block pathological progerin-lamin A/C binding may represent a promising strategy for improving lifespan and health in both HGPS and normal aging.

  5. Increased expression of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome truncated lamin A transcript during cell aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Sofia; Coppedè, Fabio; Sagelius, Hanna; Eriksson, Maria

    2009-07-01

    Most cases of the segmental progeroid syndrome, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), are caused by a de novo dominant mutation within a single codon of the LMNA gene. This mutation leads to the increased usage of an internal splice site that generates an alternative lamin A transcript with an internal deletion of 150 nucleotides, called lamin A Delta 150. The LMNA gene encodes two major proteins of the inner nuclear lamina, lamins A and C, but not much is known about their expression levels. Determination of the overall expression levels of the LMNA gene transcripts is an important step to further the understanding of the HGPS. In this study, we have performed absolute quantification of the lamins A, C and A Delta 150 transcripts in primary dermal fibroblasts from HGPS patients and unaffected age-matched and parent controls. We show that the lamin A Delta 150 transcript is present in unaffected controls but its expression is >160-fold lower than that in samples from HGPS patients. Analysis of transcript expression during in vitro aging shows that although the levels of lamin A and lamin C transcripts remain unchanged, the lamin A Delta 150 transcript increases in late passage cells from HGPS patients and parental controls. This study provides a new method for LMNA transcript analysis and insights into the expression of the LMNA gene in HGPS and normal cells.

  6. Progeria of stem cells: stem cell exhaustion in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halaschek-Wiener, Julius; Brooks-Wilson, Angela

    2007-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare, fatal genetic disorder that is characterized by segmental accelerated aging. The major causal mutation associated with HGPS triggers abnormal messenger RNA splicing of the lamin A gene leading to changes in the nuclear architecture. To date, two models have been proposed to explain how mutations in the lamin A gene could lead to HGPS, structural fragility and altered gene expression. We favor a compatible model that links HGPS to stem cell-driven tissue regeneration. In this model, nuclear fragility of lamin A-deficient cells increases apoptotic cell death to levels that exhaust tissues' ability for stem cell-driven regeneration. Tissue-specific differences in cell death or regenerative potential, or both, result in the tissue-specific segmental aging pattern seen in HGPS. We propose that the pattern of aging-related conditions present or absent in HGPS can provide insight into the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to normal aging.

  7. Mercury and cadmium trigger expression of the copper importer Ctr1B, which enables Drosophila to thrive on heavy metal-loaded food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, Kuppusamy; Hua, Haiqing; Georgiev, Oleg; Schaffner, Walter

    2009-02-01

    Organisms from insects to mammals respond to heavy metal load (copper, zinc, cadmium, and mercury) by activating the metal-responsive transcription factor 1 (MTF-1). MTF-1 binds to short DNA sequence motifs, termed metal response elements, and boosts transcription of a number of genes, notably those for metallothioneins. In Drosophila, MTF-1 somewhat counter-intuitively also activates transcription of a copper importer gene (Ctr1B) in response to copper starvation. Here, we report that mutant flies lacking Ctr1B are extremely sensitive to cadmium and mercury treatment, but can be rescued by excess copper in the food. We thus propose that copper, by competing for binding sites on cellular proteins, alleviates the toxic effects of mercury and cadmium. Such a scenario also explains a seemingly fortuitous metal response, namely, that cadmium and mercury strongly induce the expression of a Ctr1B reporter gene. Thus, the transcription enhancer/promoter region of the Ctr1B copper importer gene is subject to three modes of regulation. All of them depend on MTF-1 and all make biological sense, namely, (i) induction by copper starvation, (ii) repression by copper abundance, and (iii), as shown here, induction by cadmium or mercury at normal copper supply.

  8. Inhibition of human high-affinity copper importer Ctr1 orthologous in the nervous system of Drosophila ameliorates Aβ42-induced Alzheimer's disease-like symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Minglin; Fan, Qiangwang; Wang, Lei; Zheng, Yajun; Xiao, Guiran; Wang, Xiaoxi; Wang, Wei; Zhong, Yi; Zhou, Bing

    2013-11-01

    Disruption of copper homeostasis has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) during the last 2 decades; however, whether copper is a friend or a foe is controversial. Within a genetically tractable Drosophila AD model, we manipulated the expression of human high-affinity copper importer orthologous in Drosophila to explore the in vivo roles of copper ions in the development of AD. We found that inhibition of Ctr1C expression by RNAi in Aβ-expressing flies significantly reduced copper accumulation in the brains of the flies as well as ameliorating neurodegeneration, enhancing climbing ability, and prolonging lifespan. Interestingly, Ctr1C inhibition led to a significant increase in higher-molecular-weight Aβ42 forms in brain lysates, whereas it was accompanied by a trend of decreased expression of amyloid-β degradation proteases (including NEP1-3 and IDE) with age and reduced Cu-Aβ interaction-induced oxidative stress in Ctr1C RNAi flies. Similar results were obtained from inhibiting another copper importer Ctr1B and overexpressing a copper exporter DmATP7 in the nervous system of AD flies. These results imply that copper may play a causative role in developing AD, as either Aβ oligomers or aggregates were less toxic in a reduced copper environment or one with less copper binding. Early manipulation of brain copper uptake can have a great effect on Aβ pathology.

  9. Interfacial binding and aggregation of lamin A tail domains associated with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Agnieszka; Yaron, Peter N; Qin, Zhao; Shenoy, Siddharth; Buehler, Markus J; Lösche, Mathias; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2014-12-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a premature aging disorder associated with the expression of ∆50 lamin A (∆50LA), a mutant form of the nuclear structural protein lamin A (LA). ∆50LA is missing 50 amino acids from the tail domain and retains a C-terminal farnesyl group that is cleaved from the wild-type LA. Many of the cellular pathologies of HGPS are thought to be a consequence of protein-membrane association mediated by the retained farnesyl group. To better characterize the protein-membrane interface, we quantified binding of purified recombinant ∆50LA tail domain (∆50LA-TD) to tethered bilayer membranes composed of phosphatidylserine and phosphocholine using surface plasmon resonance. Farnesylated ∆50LA-TD binds to the membrane interface only in the presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) at physiological ionic strength. At extremely low ionic strength, both the farnesylated and non-farnesylated forms of ∆50LA-TD bind to the membrane surface in amounts that exceed those expected for a densely packed protein monolayer. Interestingly, the wild-type LA-TD with no farnesylation also associates with membranes at low ionic strength but forms only a single layer. We suggest that electrostatic interactions are mediated by charge clusters with a net positive charge that we calculate on the surface of the LA-TDs. These studies suggest that the accumulation of ∆50LA at the inner nuclear membrane observed in cells is due to a combination of aggregation and membrane association rather than simple membrane binding; electrostatics plays an important role in mediating this association.

  10. Epigenetic involvement in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arancio, Walter; Pizzolanti, Giuseppe; Genovese, Swonild I; Pitrone, Maria; Giordano, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare human genetic disease that leads to a severe premature ageing phenotype, caused by mutations in the LMNA gene. The LMNA gene codes for lamin-A and lamin-C proteins, which are structural components of the nuclear lamina. HGPS is usually caused by a de novo C1824T mutation that leads to the accumulation of a dominant negative form of lamin-A called progerin. Progerin also accumulates physiologically in normal ageing cells as a rare splicing form of lamin-A transcripts. From this perspective, HGPS cells seem to be good candidates for the study of the physiological mechanisms of ageing. Progerin accumulation leads to faster cellular senescence, stem cell depletion and the progeroid phenotype. Tissues of mesodermic origin are especially affected by HGPS. HGPS patients usually have a bad quality of life and, with current treatments, their life expectancy does not exceed their second decade at best. Though progerin can be expressed in almost any tissue, when death occurs, it is usually due to cardiovascular complications. In HGPS, severe epigenetic alterations have been reported. Histone-covalent modifications are radically different from control specimens, with the tendency to lose the bipartition into euchromatin and heterochromatin. This is reflected in an altered spatial compartmentalization and conformation of chromatin within the nucleus. Moreover, it seems that microRNAs and microRNA biosynthesis might play a role in HGPS. Exemplary in this connection is the suggested protective effect of miR-9 on the central nervous system of affected individuals. This mini-review will report on the state of the art of HGPS epigenetics, and there will be a discussion of how epigenetic alterations in HGPS cells can alter the cellular metabolism and lead to the systemic syndrome.

  11. Pluripotent stem cells to model Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS): Current trends and future perspectives for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Cicero, Alessandra; Nissan, Xavier

    2015-11-01

    Progeria, or Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), is a rare, fatal genetic disease characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. This syndrome is typically caused by mutations in codon 608 (p.G608G) of the LMNA, leading to the production of a mutated form of lamin A precursor called progerin. In HGPS, progerin accumulates in cells causing progressive molecular defects, including nuclear shape abnormalities, chromatin disorganization, damage to DNA and delays in cell proliferation. Here we report how, over the past five years, pluripotent stem cells have provided new insights into the study of HGPS and opened new original therapeutic perspectives to treat the disease.

  12. Simultaneous Shoulder and Hip Dislocation in a 12-Year-Old Girl with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Mardookhpour

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature ageing disorder that is characterized by accelerated degenerative changes of the cutaneous, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. Mean age at diagnosis is 2.9 years and generally leading to death at approximately 13 years of age due to myocardial infarction or stroke. Orthopedic manifestations of HGPS are multiple and shoulder dislocation is a rare skeletal trauma in progeria syndrome. Our patient had simultaneous shoulder and hip dislocation associated with a low energy trauma. This subject has not been reported. Treatment accomplished as close reduction under general anesthesia and immobilization.

  13. 3M: Hutchinson Plant Focuses on Heat Recovery and Cogeneration during Plan-Wide Energy-Efficiency Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-06-01

    3M performed a plant-wide energy efficiency assessment at its Hutchinson, Minnesota, plant to identify energy- and cost-saving opportunities. Assessment staff developed four separate implementation packages that represented various combinations of energy-efficiency projects involving chiller consolidation, air compressor cooling improvements, a steam turbine used for cogeneration, and a heat recovery boiler for two of the plant's thermal oxidizers. Staff estimated that the plant could save 6 million kWh/yr in electricity and more than 200,000 MMBtu/yr in natural gas and fuel oil, and avoid energy costs of more than $1 million during the first year.

  14. Use of sodC versus ctrA for real-time polymerase chain reaction-based detection of Neisseria meningitidis in sterile body fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Takenori Higa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the use of a newly described sodC-based real-time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay for detecting Neisseria meningitidis in normally sterile sites, such as cerebrospinal fluid and serum. The sodC-based RT-PCR assay has an advantage over ctrA for detecting nongroupable N. meningitidis isolates, which are commonly present in asymptomatic pharyngeal carriage. However, in our study, sodC-based RT-PCR was 7.5% less sensitive than ctrA. Given the public health impact of possible false-negative results due to the use of the sodC target gene alone, sodC-based RT-PCR for the diagnosis of meningococcal meningitis should be used with caution.

  15. Genetic identification of a second site modifier of ctr1-1 that controls ethylene-responsive and gravitropic root growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kihye; Lee, Rin-A; Lee, Inhye; Lee, Sumin; Park, Soon Ki; Soh, Moon-Soo

    2013-07-01

    Ethylene controls myriad aspects of plant growth throughout developmental stages in higher plants. It has been well established that ethylene-responsive growth entails extensive crosstalk with other plant hormones, particularly auxin. Here, we report a genetic mutation, named 1-aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid (ACC) resistant root1-1 (are1-1) in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. The CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 (CTR1) encodes a Raf-related protein, functioning as an upstream negative regulator of ethylene signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that the ctr1-1, a kinase-inactive allele exhibited slightly, but significantly, longer root length, compared to ACC-treated wild-type or ctr1-3, a null allele. Our genetic studies unveiled the existence of are1-1 mutation in the ctr1-1 mutant, as a second-site modifier which confers root-specific ethylene-resistance. Based on well-characterized crosstalk between ethylene and auxin during ethylene-responsive root growth, we performed various physiological analyses. Whereas are1-1 displayed normal sensitivity to synthetic auxins, it showed modest resistance to an auxin transport inhibitor, 1-Nnaphthylphthalamic acid. In addition, are1-1 mutant exhibited ectopically altered DR5:GUS activity upon ethylenetreatment. The results implicated the involvement of are1-1 in auxin-distribution, but not in auxin-biosynthesis, -uptake, or -sensitivity. In agreement, are1-1 mutant exhibited reduced gravitropic root growth and defective redistribution of DR5:GUS activity upon gravi-stimulation. Taken together with genetic and molecular analysis, our results suggest that ARE1 defines a novel locus to control ethylene-responsive root growth as well as gravitropic root growth presumably through auxin distribution in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  16. Evaluation of the reliability of Si3N4-Al2O3 -CTR2O3 ceramics through Weibull analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Claudinei dos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work has been to compare the reliability of two Si3N4 ceramics, with Y2O3/Al2O3 or CTR2O3/Al2O3 mixtures as additives, in regard to their 4-point bending strength and to confirm the potential of the rare earth oxide mixture, CTR2O3, produced at FAENQUIL, as an alternative, low cost sinter additive for pure Y2O3 in the sintering of Si3N4 ceramics. The oxide mixture CTR2O3 is a solid solution formed mainly by Y2O3, Er2O3, Yb2O3 and Dy2O3 with other minor constituents and is obtained at a cost of only 20% of pure Y2O3. Samples were sintered by a gas pressure sintering process at 1900 °C under a nitrogen pressure of 1.5 MPa and an isothermal holding time of 2 h. The obtained materials were characterized by their relative density, phase composition and bending strength. The Weibull analysis was used to describe the reliability of these materials. Both materials produced presented relative densities higher than 99.5%t.d., b-Si3N4 and Y3Al5O12 (YAG as cristalline phases and bending strengths higher than 650 MPa, thus demonstrating similar behaviors regarding their physical, chemical and mechanical characteristics. The statistical analysis of their strength also showed similar results for both materials, with Weibull moduli m of about 15 and characteristic stress values s o of about 700 MPa. These results confirmed the possibility of using the rare earth oxide mixture, CTR2O3, as sinter additive for high performance Si3N4 ceramics, without prejudice of the mechanical properties when compared to Si3N4 ceramics sintered with pure Y2O3.

  17. Analysis of user model based on LDA and CTR%基于LDA和CTR的用户模型分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴飞飞; 姬东鸿; 吕超镇

    2016-01-01

    Personal service is a hot topic. But how to construct an integrated user model remains a challenge for us. This paper makes use of the topic model LDA to infer the user model. In order to improve precision, CTR is put into use for restrict of feature vector. With a few manual factors, the machine generates a training topic model. Based on this model, 100 users’micro-log messages regarded as test data will be applied for evaluating the quality of recommendation. The results show that the recommendation of celebrity performs better than the recommendation of news. Generally speaking, personal service is satisfying.%个性化服务一直是研究的热点,但是如何构建完整的用户模型是一个颇有挑战性的问题。将基于主体模型LDA对用户模型进行预测,在用户和推荐项目的特征向量上采用CTR进行约束,使结果更为准确。在只需要少量人为因素下,由机器来训练最初的主题模型,在训练模型的基础上,通过选取100名用户的微博作为测试,用等级打分制来对推荐的项目进行打分,最终的结果显示,在新闻推荐上,微观满意度达到82.5%;而在名人推荐上,微观满意度达到了84.3%,综合以上,推荐服务的满意度还是令人满意的。

  18. The Mitochondrial Metallochaperone SCO1 Is Required to Sustain Expression of the High-Affinity Copper Transporter CTR1 and Preserve Copper Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Hlynialuk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Human SCO1 fulfills essential roles in cytochrome c oxidase (COX assembly and the regulation of copper (Cu homeostasis, yet it remains unclear why pathogenic mutations in this gene cause such clinically heterogeneous forms of disease. Here, we establish a Sco1 mouse model of human disease and show that ablation of Sco1 expression in the liver is lethal owing to severe COX and Cu deficiencies. We further demonstrate that the Cu deficiency is explained by a functional connection between SCO1 and CTR1, the high-affinity transporter that imports Cu into the cell. CTR1 is rapidly degraded in the absence of SCO1 protein, and we show that its levels are restored in Sco1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts upon inhibition of the proteasome. These data suggest that mitochondrial signaling through SCO1 provides a post-translational mechanism to regulate CTR1-dependent Cu import into the cell, and they further underpin the importance of mitochondria in cellular Cu homeostasis.

  19. Ejendomsret ctr. forsyningssikkerhed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Karsten Naundrup

    2007-01-01

    Når man vil løse en bestemt opgave, er der aktiver det er nødvendigt at kunne råde over - vil man eksempelvis levere ambulanceberedskab, må mna have adgang til ambulancer. Udlicitering af offentlige opgaver kan føre til tab af rådighed over sådanne nødvendige aktiver, hvilket kan føre til forsyni...

  20. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Testicular cancer Thyroid cancer Uterine cancer Symptoms Symptoms of cancer ... tumor Obesity Pancreatic cancer Prostate cancer Stomach cancer Testicular cancer Throat or larynx cancer Thyroid cancer Patient Instructions ...

  1. Importance of molecular cell biology investigations in human medicine in the story of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raška, Ivan

    2010-09-01

    Ranged among laminopathies, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a syndrome that involves premature aging, leading usually to death at the age between 10 to 14 years predominatly due to a myocardial infarction or a stroke. In the lecture I shall overview the importance of molecular cell biology investigations that led to the discovery of the basic mechanism standing behind this rare syndrome. The genetic basis in most cases is a mutation at the nucleotide position 1824 of the lamin A gene. At this position, cytosine is substituted for thymine so that a cryptic splice site within the precursor mRNA for lamin A is generated. This results in a production of abnormal lamin A, termed progerin, its presence in cells having a deleterious dominant effect. Depending on the cell type and tissue, progerin induces a pleiotropy of defects that vary in different tissues. The present endeavour how to challenge this terrible disease will be also mentioned.

  2. Accumulation of mutant lamin A causes progressive changes in nuclear architecture in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Robert D; Shumaker, Dale K; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Maria; Goldman, Anne E; Gordon, Leslie B; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Khuon, Satya; Mendez, Melissa; Varga, Renée; Collins, Francis S

    2004-06-15

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a premature aging disorder, commonly caused by a point mutation in the lamin A gene that results in a protein lacking 50 aa near the C terminus, denoted LADelta50. Here we show by light and electron microscopy that HGPS is associated with significant changes in nuclear shape, including lobulation of the nuclear envelope, thickening of the nuclear lamina, loss of peripheral heterochromatin, and clustering of nuclear pores. These structural defects worsen as HGPS cells age in culture, and their severity correlates with an apparent increase in LADelta50. Introduction of LADelta50 into normal cells by transfection or protein injection induces the same changes. We hypothesize that these alterations in nuclear structure are due to a concentration-dependent dominant-negative effect of LADelta50, leading to the disruption of lamin-related functions ranging from the maintenance of nuclear shape to regulation of gene expression and DNA replication.

  3. Induced pluripotent stem cells reveal functional differences between drugs currently investigated in patients with hutchinson-gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, Sophie; Jaskowiak, Anne-Laure; Egesipe, Anne-Laure; Le Corf, Amelie; Navarro, Claire; Cordette, Véronique; Martinat, Cécile; Laabi, Yacine; Djabali, Karima; de Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Levy, Nicolas; Peschanski, Marc; Nissan, Xavier

    2014-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare congenital disease characterized by premature aging in children. Identification of the mutation and related molecular mechanisms has rapidly led to independent clinical trials testing different marketed drugs with a preclinically documented impact on those mechanisms. However, the extensive functional effects of those drugs remain essentially unexplored. We have undertaken a systematic comparative study of the three main treatments currently administered or proposed to progeria-affected children, namely, a farnesyltransferase inhibitor, the combination of an aminobisphosphonate and a statin (zoledronate and pravastatin), and the macrolide antibiotic rapamycin. This work was based on the assumption that mesodermal stem cells, which are derived from Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome-induced pluripotent stem cells expressing major defects associated with the disease, may be instrumental to revealing such effects. Whereas all three treatments significantly improved misshapen cell nuclei typically associated with progeria, differences were observed in terms of functional improvement in prelamin A farnesylation, progerin expression, defective cell proliferation, premature osteogenic differentiation, and ATP production. Finally, we have evaluated the effect of the different drug combinations on this cellular model. This study revealed no additional benefit compared with single-drug treatments, whereas a cytostatic effect equivalent to that of a farnesyltransferase inhibitor alone was systematically observed. Altogether, these results reveal the complexity of the modes of action of different drugs, even when they have been selected on the basis of a similar mechanistic hypothesis, and underscore the use of induced pluripotent stem cell derivatives as a critical and powerful tool for standardized, comparative pharmacological studies.

  4. Copper transporters and the cellular pharmacology of the platinum-containing cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Stephen B; Safaei, Roohangiz; Larson, Christopher A; Sailor, Michael J

    2010-06-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that the platinum-containing cancer drugs enter cells, are distributed to various subcellular compartments, and are exported from cells via transporters that evolved to manage copper homeostasis. The cytotoxicity of the platinum drugs is directly related to how much drug enters the cell, and almost all cells that have acquired resistance to the platinum drugs exhibit reduced drug accumulation. The major copper influx transporter, copper transporter 1 (CTR1), has now been shown to control the tumor cell accumulation and cytotoxic effect of cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin. There is a good correlation between change in CTR1 expression and acquired cisplatin resistance among ovarian cancer cell lines, and genetic knockout of CTR1 renders cells resistant to cisplatin in vivo. The expression of CTR1 is regulated at the transcriptional level by copper via Sp1 and at the post-translational level by the proteosome. Copper and cisplatin both trigger the down-regulation of CTR1 via a process that involves ubiquitination and proteosomal degradation and requires the copper chaperone antioxidant protein 1 (ATOX1). The cisplatin-induced degradation of CTR1 can be blocked with the proteosome inhibitor bortezomib, and this increases the cellular uptake and the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in a synergistic manner. Copper and platinum(II) have similar sulfur binding characteristics, and the presence of stacked rings of methionines and cysteines in the CTR1 trimer suggest a mechanism by which CTR1 selectively transports copper and the platinum-containing drugs via sequential transchelation reactions similar to the manner in which copper is passed from ATOX1 to the copper efflux transporters.

  5. Chemical screening identifies ROCK as a target for recovering mitochondrial function in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Tae; Park, Joon Tae; Choi, Kobong; Choi, Hyo Jei Claudia; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Gyu Ree; Lee, Young-Sam; Park, Sang Chul

    2017-03-19

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) constitutes a genetic disease wherein an aging phenotype manifests in childhood. Recent studies indicate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in HGPS phenotype progression. Thus, pharmacological reduction in ROS levels has been proposed as a potentially effective treatment for patient with this disorder. In this study, we performed high-throughput screening to find compounds that could reduce ROS levels in HGPS fibroblasts and identified rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y-27632) as an effective agent. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of ROCK in regulating ROS levels, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen and discovered that ROCK1 interacts with Rac1b. ROCK activation phosphorylated Rac1b at Ser71 and increased ROS levels by facilitating the interaction between Rac1b and cytochrome c. Conversely, ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 abolished their interaction, concomitant with ROS reduction. Additionally, ROCK activation resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, whereas ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 induced the recovery of mitochondrial function. Furthermore, a reduction in the frequency of abnormal nuclear morphology and DNA double-strand breaks was observed along with decreased ROS levels. Thus, our study reveals a novel mechanism through which alleviation of the HGPS phenotype is mediated by the recovery of mitochondrial function upon ROCK inactivation.

  6. Replication Factor C1, the Large Subunit of Replication Factor C, Is Proteolytically Truncated in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hui; Hilton, Benjamin; Musich, Phillip R.; Fang, Ding Zhi; Zou, Yue

    2011-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder due to a LMNA gene mutation which produces a mutant lamin A protein (progerin). Progerin also has been correlated to physiological aging and related diseases. However, how progerin causes the progeria remains unknown. Here we report that the large subunit (RFC1) of replication factor C is cleaved in HGPS cells, leading to the production of a truncated RFC1 of ~75 kDa which appears to be defective in loading PCNA and pol δ onto DNA for replication. Interestingly, the cleavage can be inhibited by a serine protease inhibitor, suggesting that RFC1 is cleaved by a serine protease. Due to the crucial role of RFC in DNA replication our findings provide a mechanistic interpretation for the observed replicative arrest and premature aging phenotypes of HPGS, and may lead to novel strategies in HGPS treatment. Furthermore, this unique truncated form of RFC1 may serve as a potential marker for HGPS. PMID:22168243

  7. Progerin impairs chromosome maintenance by depleting CENP-F from metaphase kinetochores in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisch, Veronika; Lu, Xiang; Gabriel, Diana; Djabali, Karima

    2016-04-26

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670) is a rare premature aging disorder that leads to death at an average age of 14.7 years due to myocardial infarction or stroke. The most common mutation in HGPS is at position G608G (GGC>GGT) within exon 11 of the LMNA gene. This mutation results in the deletion of 50 amino acids at the carboxyl-terminal tail of prelamin A, producing a truncated farnesylated protein called progerin. Lamins play important roles in the organization and structure of the nucleus. The nuclear build-up of progerin causes severe morphological and functional changes in interphase HGPS cells. In this study, we investigated whether progerin elicits spatiotemporal deviations in mitotic processes in HGPS fibroblasts. We analyzed the nuclear distribution of endogenous progerin during mitosis in relation to components of the nuclear lamina, nuclear envelope (NE) and nuclear pores. We found that progerin caused defects in chromosome segregation as early as metaphase, delayed NE reformation and trapped lamina components and inner NE proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum at the end of mitosis. Progerin displaced the centromere protein F (CENP-F) from metaphase chromosome kinetochores, which caused increased chromatin lagging, binucleated cells and genomic instability. This accumulation of progerin-dependent defects with each round of mitosis predisposes cells to premature senescence.

  8. Defective lamin A-Rb signaling in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome and reversal by farnesyltransferase inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackleen Marji

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging disorder caused by a de novo heterozygous point mutation G608G (GGC>GGT within exon 11 of LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins. This mutation elicits an internal deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A. The truncated protein, progerin, retains a farnesylated cysteine at its carboxyl terminus, a modification involved in HGPS pathogenesis. Inhibition of protein farnesylation has been shown to improve abnormal nuclear morphology and phenotype in cellular and animal models of HGPS. We analyzed global gene expression changes in fibroblasts from human subjects with HGPS and found that a lamin A-Rb signaling network is a major defective regulatory axis. Treatment of fibroblasts with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor reversed the gene expression defects. Our study identifies Rb as a key factor in HGPS pathogenesis and suggests that its modulation could ameliorate premature aging and possibly complications of physiological aging.

  9. Rapamycin activates autophagy in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: implications for normal aging and age-dependent neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziotto, John J; Cao, Kan; Collins, Francis S; Krainc, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    While rapamycin has been in use for years in transplant patients as an antirejection drug, more recently it has shown promise in treating diseases of aging, such as neurodegenerative disorders and atherosclerosis. We recently reported that rapamycin reverses the cellular phenotype of fibroblasts from children with the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). We found that the causative aberrant protein, progerin, was cleared through autophagic mechanisms when the cells were treated with rapamycin, suggesting a new potential treatment for HGPS. Recent evidence shows that progerin is also present in aged tissues of healthy individuals, suggesting that progerin may contribute to physiological aging. While it is intriguing to speculate that rapamycin may affect normal aging in humans, as it does in lower organisms, it will be important to identify safer analogues of rapamycin for chronic treatments in humans in order to minimize toxicity. In addition to its role in HGPS and normal aging, we discuss the potential of rapamycin for the treatment of age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Platinum (IV)-fatty acid conjugates overcome inherently and acquired Cisplatin resistant cancer cell lines: an in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzon, Einav; Najajreh, Yousef; Salem, Rami; Khamaisie, Hazem; Ruthardt, Martin; Mahajna, Jamal

    2016-02-23

    Platinum-based drugs are used as cancer chemotherapeutics for the last 40 years. However, drug resistance and nephrotoxicity are the major limitations of the use of platinum-based compounds in cancer therapy. Platinum (IV) complexes are believed to act as platinum prodrugs and are able to overcome some of platinum (II) limitations. A number of previously sensitized platinum (IV) complexes were evaluated for their anti-cancer activity by monitoring ability to affect proliferation, clonigenicity and apoptosis induction of Cisplatin sensitive and resistant cancer cells. In addition, the uptake of Cisplatin and the platinum (IV) derivatives to Cisplatin sensitive and resistant cancer cells was monitored. The bis-octanoatoplatinum (IV) complex (RJY13), a Cisplatin derivative with octanoate as axial ligand, exhibited strong anti-proliferative effect on the Cisplatin resistant and sensitive ovarian cells, A2780cisR and A2780, respectively. Moreover, RJY13 exhibited good activity in inhibiting clonigenicity of both cells. Anti-proliferative activity of RJY13 was mediated by induction of apoptosis. Interestingly, a bis-lauratopaltinum (IV) complex (RJY6) was highly potent in inhibiting clonigenicity of both Cisplatin sensitive and Cisplatin resistant cells, however, exhibited reduced activity in assays that utilize cells growing in two dimensional (2D) conditions. The uptake of Cisplatin was reduced by 30% in A2780 in which the copper transporter-1 (Ctr1) was silenced. Moreover, uptake of RJY6 was marginally dependent on Ctr1, while uptake of RJY13 was Ctr1-independent. Our data demonstrated the potential of platinum (IV) prodrugs in overcoming acquired and inherited drug resistance in cancer cell lines. Moreover, our data demonstrated that the uptake of Cisplatin is partially dependent on Ctr1 transporter, while uptake of RJY6 is marginally dependent on Ctr1 and RJY13 is Ctr1-independent. In addition, our data illustrated the therapeutic potential of platinum (IV) prodrugs

  11. Farnesyltransferase inhibitor treatment restores chromosome territory positions and active chromosome dynamics in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a premature ageing syndrome that affects children leading to premature death, usually from heart infarction or strokes, making this syndrome similar to normative ageing. HGPS is commonly caused by a mutation in the A-type lamin gene, LMNA (G608G). This leads to the expression of an aberrant truncated lamin A protein, progerin. Progerin cannot be processed as wild-type pre-lamin A and remains farnesylated, leading to its aberrant behavior during interphase and mitosis. Farnesyltransferase inhibitors prevent the accumulation of farnesylated progerin, producing a less toxic protein. Results We have found that in proliferating fibroblasts derived from HGPS patients the nuclear location of interphase chromosomes differs from control proliferating cells and mimics that of control quiescent fibroblasts, with smaller chromosomes toward the nuclear interior and larger chromosomes toward the nuclear periphery. For this study we have treated HGPS fibroblasts with farnesyltransferase inhibitors and analyzed the nuclear location of individual chromosome territories. We have found that after exposure to farnesyltransferase inhibitors mis-localized chromosome territories were restored to a nuclear position akin to chromosomes in proliferating control cells. Furthermore, not only has this treatment afforded chromosomes to be repositioned but has also restored the machinery that controls their rapid movement upon serum removal. This machinery contains nuclear myosin 1β, whose distribution is also restored after farnesyltransferase inhibitor treatment of HGPS cells. Conclusions This study not only progresses the understanding of genome behavior in HGPS cells but demonstrates that interphase chromosome movement requires processed lamin A. PMID:21838864

  12. New Lmna knock-in mice provide a molecular mechanism for the 'segmental aging' in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hea-Jin; Tu, Yiping; Yang, Shao H; Tatar, Angelica; Nobumori, Chika; Wu, Daniel; Young, Stephen G; Fong, Loren G

    2014-03-15

    Lamins A and C (products of the LMNA gene) are found in roughly equal amounts in peripheral tissues, but the brain produces mainly lamin C and little lamin A. In HeLa cells and fibroblasts, the expression of prelamin A (the precursor to lamin A) can be reduced by miR-9, but the relevance of those cell culture studies to lamin A regulation in the brain was unclear. To address this issue, we created two new Lmna knock-in alleles, one (Lmna(PLAO-5NT)) with a 5-bp mutation in a predicted miR-9 binding site in prelamin A's 3' UTR, and a second (Lmna(PLAO-UTR)) in which prelamin A's 3' UTR was replaced with lamin C's 3' UTR. Neither allele had significant effects on lamin A levels in peripheral tissues; however, both substantially increased prelamin A transcript levels and lamin A protein levels in the cerebral cortex and the cerebellum. The increase in lamin A expression in the brain was more pronounced with the Lmna(PLAO-UTR) allele than with the Lmna(PLAO-5NT) allele. With both alleles, the increased expression of prelamin A transcripts and lamin A protein was greater in the cerebral cortex than in the cerebellum. Our studies demonstrate the in vivo importance of prelamin A's 3' UTR and its miR-9 binding site in regulating lamin A expression in the brain. The reduced expression of prelamin A in the brain likely explains why children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (a progeroid syndrome caused by a mutant form of prelamin A) are spared from neurodegenerative disease.

  13. Cisplatin induces drug resistance in human esophageal squamous carcinoma cells by reducing CTR1 expression%顺铂降低铜离子转运蛋白1表达诱导人食管鳞癌细胞耐药

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余乐; 陈明辉; 古春萍; 李亦蕾; 曹之宪; 刘叔文

    2011-01-01

    目的 诱导对顺铂耐药的人食管鳞癌细胞株,并进一步研究细胞耐药性产生的机制.方法 逐渐增加顺铂浓度处理人食管鳞癌细胞HKESC-1,诱导顺铂耐药细胞株HKESC-1/cis.MTT法观察顺铂的细胞毒作用以及细胞的生长曲线.电感耦合等离子体质谱检测细胞内顺铂的蓄积和Pt-DNA加合物的形成.Western blot检测铜离子转运蛋白(copper transporter 1,CTR1)的表达.结果 顺铂耐药细胞株HKESC-1/cis较其亲代细胞HKESC-1对顺铂引起的细胞毒作用敏感性下降,耐药指数为2.9.顺铂耐药细胞株HKESC-1/cis与其亲代细胞HKESC-1的生长速度相似.然而,HKESC-1/cis细胞内顺铂蓄积和Pt-DNA加合物的形成较HKESC-1细胞减少,并且CTR1蛋白表达水平降低.结论 顺铂通过降低细胞膜CTR1蛋白的表达,抑制顺铂进入细胞,导致细胞耐药性的产生.%Aim To induce cisplatin-resistant esophageal squamous carcinoma cell line and investigate the mechanisms by which the cancer cells develop drug resistance. Methods The cisplatin-resistant subline.designated HKESC-1/cis , was originated by growing parental HKESC-1 cells with gradually increasing doses of cisplatin. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin and cell growth curves were determined by MTT assay. Whole-cell cisplatin accumulation and Pt-DNA adduct formation were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry ( ICP-MS ). Western blot was used to investigate the protein expression of copper transporter 1 ( CTRI ). Results HKESC-1/cis was 2.9 times more resistant to cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in comparison with its parental cell line HKESC-1. There was no significant difference in growth curves between HKESC-1/cis and HKESC-1. However, compared with HKESC-1 cells, HKESC-1/cis cells exhibited less cisplatin accumulation and Pt-DNA adduct formation, accompanied by decreased CTRI protein expression. Conclusion Cisplatin induces drug resistant phenotype by decreasing protein level of CTR1

  14. The Defective Nuclear Lamina in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome Disrupts the Nucleocytoplasmic Ran Gradient and Inhibits Nuclear Localization of Ubc9▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Joshua B.; Datta, Sutirtha; Snow, Chelsi J.; Chatterjee, Mandovi; Ni, Li; Spencer, Adam; Yang, Chun-Song; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Matunis, Michael J.; Paschal, Bryce M.

    2011-01-01

    The mutant form of lamin A responsible for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (termed progerin) acts as a dominant negative protein that changes the structure of the nuclear lamina. How the perturbation of the nuclear lamina in progeria is transduced into cellular changes is undefined. Using patient fibroblasts and a variety of cell-based assays, we determined that progerin expression in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome inhibits the nucleocytoplasmic transport of several factors with key roles in nuclear function. We found that progerin reduces the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration of the Ran GTPase and inhibits the nuclear localization of Ubc9, the sole E2 for SUMOylation, and of TPR, the nucleoporin that forms the basket on the nuclear side of the nuclear pore complex. Forcing the nuclear localization of Ubc9 in progerin-expressing cells rescues the Ran gradient and TPR import, indicating that these pathways are linked. Reducing nuclear SUMOylation decreases the nuclear mobility of the Ran nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 in vivo, and the addition of SUMO E1 and E2 promotes the dissociation of RCC1 and Ran from chromatin in vitro. Our data suggest that the cellular effects of progerin are transduced, at least in part, through reduced function of the Ran GTPase and SUMOylation pathways. PMID:21670151

  15. Blocking farnesylation of the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome alters the distribution of A-type lamins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuexia; Ӧstlund, Cecilia; Choi, Jason C.; Swayne, Theresa C.; Gundersen, Gregg G.; Worman, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the lamin A/C gene that cause Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome lead to expression of a truncated, permanently farnesylated prelamin A variant called progerin. Blocking farnesylation leads to an improvement in the abnormal nuclear morphology observed in cells expressing progerin, which is associated with a re-localization of the variant protein from the nuclear envelope to the nuclear interior. We now show that a progerin construct that cannot be farnesylated is localized primarily in intranuclear foci and that its diffusional mobility is significantly greater than that of farnesylated progerin localized predominantly at the nuclear envelope. Expression of non-farnesylated progerin in transfected cells leads to a redistribution of lamin A and lamin C away from the nuclear envelope into intranuclear foci but does not significantly affect the localization of endogenous lamin B1 at nuclear envelope. There is a similar redistribution of lamin A and lamin C into intranuclear foci in transfected cells expressing progerin in which protein farnesylation is blocked by treatment with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor. Blocking farnesylation of progerin can lead to a redistribution of normal A-type lamins away from the inner nuclear envelope. This may have implications for using drugs that block protein prenylation to treat children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. These findings also provide additional evidence that A-type and B-type lamins can form separate microdomains within the nucleus. PMID:22895092

  16. The defective nuclear lamina in Hutchinson-gilford progeria syndrome disrupts the nucleocytoplasmic Ran gradient and inhibits nuclear localization of Ubc9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Joshua B; Datta, Sutirtha; Snow, Chelsi J; Chatterjee, Mandovi; Ni, Li; Spencer, Adam; Yang, Chun-Song; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Matunis, Michael J; Paschal, Bryce M

    2011-08-01

    The mutant form of lamin A responsible for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (termed progerin) acts as a dominant negative protein that changes the structure of the nuclear lamina. How the perturbation of the nuclear lamina in progeria is transduced into cellular changes is undefined. Using patient fibroblasts and a variety of cell-based assays, we determined that progerin expression in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome inhibits the nucleocytoplasmic transport of several factors with key roles in nuclear function. We found that progerin reduces the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration of the Ran GTPase and inhibits the nuclear localization of Ubc9, the sole E2 for SUMOylation, and of TPR, the nucleoporin that forms the basket on the nuclear side of the nuclear pore complex. Forcing the nuclear localization of Ubc9 in progerin-expressing cells rescues the Ran gradient and TPR import, indicating that these pathways are linked. Reducing nuclear SUMOylation decreases the nuclear mobility of the Ran nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 in vivo, and the addition of SUMO E1 and E2 promotes the dissociation of RCC1 and Ran from chromatin in vitro. Our data suggest that the cellular effects of progerin are transduced, at least in part, through reduced function of the Ran GTPase and SUMOylation pathways.

  17. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that is most commonly caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, c.1824C>T, which results in an increased production of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. In this study, we used a mouse...... model to study the possibility of recovering from HGPS bone disease upon silencing of the HGPS mutation, and the potential benefits from treatment with resveratrol. We show that complete silencing of the transgenic expression of progerin normalized bone morphology and mineralization already after 7...... weeks. The improvements included lower frequencies of rib fractures and callus formation, an increased number of osteocytes in remodeled bone, and normalized dentinogenesis. The beneficial effects from resveratrol treatment were less significant and to a large extent similar to mice treated with sucrose...

  18. On Cultivation of Metaphoric Competence and Critical Thinking in ESP Course--- Thoughts on Course Design Model of Hutchinson & Waters%ESP 教学中隐喻能力与批判思维的培养--基于Hutchinson & Waters课程设计模型的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佳丽

    2015-01-01

    T he metaphoric competence and critical thinking are closely related to the comprehensive devel‐opment of learners .However ,little attention has been paid to postgraduate students of English major in ESP course .Based on the course design model by Hutchinson and Waters ,this paper attempts to ana‐lyze four segments ,identifying learners ,analyzing learning situations and target situations ,w riting syl‐labus and materials ,evaluation ,for bringing up some suggestions to develop learners’ metaphoric com‐petence and critical thinking ,thus offering reference to ESP course reform of high education English ma‐jor postgraduates .%隐喻能力与批判思维关系到学习者的全面发展,而长期以来英语专业研究生ES P教学对该能力培养重视不够。根据Hutchinson&Waters课程设计模式,分别从学习者鉴定、学习情景与目标情景、教学大纲设计与教材选择、课程评估四个环节对英语专业研究生ES P教学展开分析,为培养学习者隐喻能力与批判性思维提出可行性建议,对高校英语专业硕士研究生ES P教学课程改革具有参考价值。

  19. Defective DSB repair correlates with abnormal nuclear morphology and is improved with FTI treatment in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantinescu, Dan [Department of Cell Biology-Physiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Csoka, Antonei B. [Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Navara, Christopher S. [Division of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Schatten, Gerald P., E-mail: schattengp@upmc.edu [Division of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Cell Biology-Physiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Impaired DSB repair has been implicated as a molecular mechanism contributing to the accelerating aging phenotype in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), but neither the extent nor the cause of the repair deficiency has been fully elucidated. Here we perform a quantitative analysis of the steady-state number of DSBs and the repair kinetics of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs in HGPS cells. We report an elevated steady-state number of DSBs and impaired repair of IR-induced DSBs, both of which correlated strongly with abnormal nuclear morphology. We recreated the HGPS cellular phenotype in human coronary artery endothelial cells for the first time by lentiviral transduction of GFP-progerin, which also resulted in impaired repair of IR-induced DSBs, and which correlated with abnormal nuclear morphology. Farnesyl transferase inhibitor (FTI) treatment improved the repair of IR-induced DSBs, but only in HGPS cells whose nuclear morphology was also normalized. Interestingly, FTI treatment did not result in a statistically significant reduction in the higher steady-state number of DSBs. We also report a delay in localization of phospho-NBS1 and MRE11, MRN complex repair factors necessary for homologous recombination (HR) repair, to DSBs in HGPS cells. Our results demonstrate a correlation between nuclear structural abnormalities and the DSB repair defect, suggesting a mechanistic link that may involve delayed repair factor localization to DNA damage. Further, our results show that similar to other HGPS phenotypes, FTI treatment has a beneficial effect on DSB repair.

  20. Naïve adult stem cells from patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome express low levels of progerin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Vera; Roedl, Daniela; Gabriel, Diana; Gordon, Leslie B.; Herlyn, Meenhard; Schneider, Reinhard; Ring, Johannes; Djabali, Karima

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670) is a rare disorder characterized by segmental accelerated aging and early death from coronary artery disease or stroke. Nearly 90% of HGPS sufferers carry a G608G mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, producing a truncated form of prelamin A, referred to as “progerin”. Here, we report the isolation of naïve multipotent skin-derived precursor (SKP) cells from dermal fibroblast cultures from HGPS donors. These cells form spheres and express the neural crest marker, nestin, in addition to the multipotent markers, OCT4, Sox2, Nanog and TG30; these cells can self-renew and differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and fibroblasts. The SMCs derived from the HGPS-SKPs accumulate nuclear progerin with increasing passages. A subset of the HGPS-naïve SKPs express progerin in vitro and in situ in HGPS skin sections. This is the first in vivo evidence that progerin is produced in adult stem cells, and implies that this protein could induce stem cells exhaustion as a mechanism contributing to aging. Our study provides a basis on which to explore therapeutic applications for HGPS stem cells and opens avenues for investigating the pathogenesis of other genetic diseases. PMID:23213444

  1. Correlated alterations in genome organization, histone methylation, and DNA–lamin A/C interactions in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Rachel Patton; Nazario-Toole, Ashley; Zhang, Haoyue; Chines, Peter S.; Zhan, Ye; Erdos, Michael R.; Collins, Francis S.; Dekker, Job; Cao, Kan

    2013-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a premature aging disease that is frequently caused by a de novo point mutation at position 1824 in LMNA. This mutation activates a cryptic splice donor site in exon 11, and leads to an in-frame deletion within the prelamin A mRNA and the production of a dominant-negative lamin A protein, known as progerin. Here we show that primary HGPS skin fibroblasts experience genome-wide correlated alterations in patterns of H3K27me3 deposition, DNA-lamin A/C associations, and, at late passages, genome-wide loss of spatial compartmentalization of active and inactive chromatin domains. We further demonstrate that the H3K27me3 changes associate with gene expression alterations in HGPS cells. Our results support a model that the accumulation of progerin in the nuclear lamina leads to altered H3K27me3 marks in heterochromatin, possibly through the down-regulation of EZH2, and disrupts heterochromatin–lamina interactions. These changes may result in transcriptional misregulation and eventually trigger the global loss of spatial chromatin compartmentalization in late passage HGPS fibroblasts. PMID:23152449

  2. Expression of the Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Mutation during Osteoblast Development Results in Loss of Osteocytes, Irregular Mineralization, and Poor Biomechanical Properties*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eva; Nilsson, Ola; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a very rare genetic disorder that is characterized by multiple features of premature aging and largely affects tissues of mesenchymal origin. In this study, we describe the development of a tissue-specific mouse model that overexpresses the most common HGPS mutation (LMNA, c.1824C>T, p.G608G) in osteoblasts. Already at the age of 5 weeks, HGPS mutant mice show growth retardation, imbalanced gait and spontaneous fractures. Histopathological examination revealed an irregular bone structure, characterized by widespread loss of osteocytes, defects in mineralization, and a hypocellular red bone marrow. Computerized tomography analysis demonstrated impaired skeletal geometry and altered bone structure. The skeletal defects, which resemble the clinical features reported for bone disease in HGPS patients, was associated with an abnormal osteoblast differentiation. The osteoblast-specific expression of the HGPS mutation increased DNA damage and affected Wnt signaling. In the teeth, irregular dentin formation, as was previously demonstrated in human progeria cases, caused severe dental abnormalities affecting the incisors. The observed phenotype also shows similarities to reported bone abnormalities in aging mice and may therefore help to uncover general principles of the aging process. PMID:22893709

  3. Expression of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria mutation during osteoblast development results in loss of osteocytes, irregular mineralization, and poor biomechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eva; Nilsson, Ola; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2012-09-28

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a very rare genetic disorder that is characterized by multiple features of premature aging and largely affects tissues of mesenchymal origin. In this study, we describe the development of a tissue-specific mouse model that overexpresses the most common HGPS mutation (LMNA, c.1824C>T, p.G608G) in osteoblasts. Already at the age of 5 weeks, HGPS mutant mice show growth retardation, imbalanced gait and spontaneous fractures. Histopathological examination revealed an irregular bone structure, characterized by widespread loss of osteocytes, defects in mineralization, and a hypocellular red bone marrow. Computerized tomography analysis demonstrated impaired skeletal geometry and altered bone structure. The skeletal defects, which resemble the clinical features reported for bone disease in HGPS patients, was associated with an abnormal osteoblast differentiation. The osteoblast-specific expression of the HGPS mutation increased DNA damage and affected Wnt signaling. In the teeth, irregular dentin formation, as was previously demonstrated in human progeria cases, caused severe dental abnormalities affecting the incisors. The observed phenotype also shows similarities to reported bone abnormalities in aging mice and may therefore help to uncover general principles of the aging process.

  4. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that is most commonly caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, c.1824C>T, which results in an increased production of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. In this study, we used a mouse model to study the possibility of recovering from HGPS bone disease upon silencing of the HGPS mutation, and the potential benefits from treatment with resveratrol. We show that complete silencing of the transgenic expression of progerin normalized bone morphology and mineralization already after 7 weeks. The improvements included lower frequencies of rib fractures and callus formation, an increased number of osteocytes in remodeled bone, and normalized dentinogenesis. The beneficial effects from resveratrol treatment were less significant and to a large extent similar to mice treated with sucrose alone. However, the reversal of the dental phenotype of overgrown and laterally displaced lower incisors in HGPS mice could be attributed to resveratrol. Our results indicate that the HGPS bone defects were reversible upon suppressed transgenic expression and suggest that treatments targeting aberrant progerin splicing give hope to patients who are affected by HGPS.

  5. Blocking protein farnesylation improves nuclear shape abnormalities in keratinocytes of mice expressing the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuexia; Ostlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J

    2010-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA leading to expression of a truncated prelamin A variant termed progerin. Whereas a farnesylated polypeptide is normally removed from the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A during endoproteolytic processing to lamin A, progerin lacks the cleavage site and remains farnesylated. Cultured cells from human subjects with HGPS and genetically modified mice expressing progerin have nuclear morphological abnormalities, which are reversed by inhibitors of protein farnesylation. In addition, treatment with protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors improves whole animal phenotypes in mouse models of HGPS. However, improvement in nuclear morphology in tissues after treatment of animals has not been demonstrated. We therefore treated transgenic mice that express progerin in epidermis with the protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor FTI-276 or a combination of pravastatin and zoledronate to determine if they reversed nuclear morphological abnormalities in tissue. Immunofluorescence microscopy and "blinded" electron microscopic analysis demonstrated that systemic administration of FTI-276 or pravastatin plus zoledronate significantly improved nuclear morphological abnormalities in keratinocytes of transgenic mice. These results show that pharmacological blockade of protein prenylation reverses nuclear morphological abnormalities that occur in HGPS in vivo. They further suggest that skin biopsy may be useful to determine if protein farnesylation inhibitors are exerting effects in subjects with HGPS in clinical trials.

  6. Correlated alterations in genome organization, histone methylation, and DNA-lamin A/C interactions in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Rachel Patton; Nazario-Toole, Ashley; Zhang, Haoyue; Chines, Peter S; Zhan, Ye; Erdos, Michael R; Collins, Francis S; Dekker, Job; Cao, Kan

    2013-02-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a premature aging disease that is frequently caused by a de novo point mutation at position 1824 in LMNA. This mutation activates a cryptic splice donor site in exon 11, and leads to an in-frame deletion within the prelamin A mRNA and the production of a dominant-negative lamin A protein, known as progerin. Here we show that primary HGPS skin fibroblasts experience genome-wide correlated alterations in patterns of H3K27me3 deposition, DNA-lamin A/C associations, and, at late passages, genome-wide loss of spatial compartmentalization of active and inactive chromatin domains. We further demonstrate that the H3K27me3 changes associate with gene expression alterations in HGPS cells. Our results support a model that the accumulation of progerin in the nuclear lamina leads to altered H3K27me3 marks in heterochromatin, possibly through the down-regulation of EZH2, and disrupts heterochromatin-lamina interactions. These changes may result in transcriptional misregulation and eventually trigger the global loss of spatial chromatin compartmentalization in late passage HGPS fibroblasts.

  7. Naïve adult stem cells from patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome express low levels of progerin in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Wenzel

    2012-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare disorder characterized by segmental accelerated aging and early death from coronary artery disease or stroke. Nearly 90% of HGPS sufferers carry a G608G mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, producing a truncated form of prelamin A, referred to as “progerin”. Here, we report the isolation of naïve multipotent skin-derived precursor (SKP cells from dermal fibroblast cultures from HGPS donors. These cells form spheres and express the neural crest marker, nestin, in addition to the multipotent markers, OCT4, Sox2, Nanog and TG30; these cells can self-renew and differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMCs and fibroblasts. The SMCs derived from the HGPS-SKPs accumulate nuclear progerin with increasing passages. A subset of the HGPS-naïve SKPs express progerin in vitro and in situ in HGPS skin sections. This is the first in vivo evidence that progerin is produced in adult stem cells, and implies that this protein could induce stem cells exhaustion as a mechanism contributing to aging. Our study provides a basis on which to explore therapeutic applications for HGPS stem cells and opens avenues for investigating the pathogenesis of other genetic diseases.

  8. Unique Preservation of Neural Cells in Hutchinson- Gilford Progeria Syndrome Is Due to the Expression of the Neural-Specific miR-9 MicroRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Nissan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available One puzzling observation in patients affected with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, who overall exhibit systemic and dramatic premature aging, is the absence of any conspicuous cognitive impairment. Recent studies based on induced pluripotent stem cells derived from HGPS patient cells have revealed a lack of expression in neural derivatives of lamin A, a major isoform of LMNA that is initially produced as a precursor called prelamin A. In HGPS, defective maturation of a mutated prelamin A induces the accumulation of toxic progerin in patient cells. Here, we show that a microRNA, miR-9, negatively controls lamin A and progerin expression in neural cells. This may bear major functional correlates, as alleviation of nuclear blebbing is observed in nonneural cells after miR-9 overexpression. Our results support the hypothesis, recently proposed from analyses in mice, that protection of neural cells from progerin accumulation in HGPS is due to the physiologically restricted expression of miR-9 to that cell lineage.

  9. The mutant form of lamin A that causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria is a biomarker of cellular aging in human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayle McClintock

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare disorder characterized by accelerated aging and early death, frequently from stroke or coronary artery disease. 90% of HGPS cases carry the LMNA G608G (GGC>GGT mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, activating a splice donor site that results in production of a dominant negative form of lamin A protein, denoted progerin. Screening 150 skin biopsies from unaffected individuals (newborn to 97 years showed that a similar splicing event occurs in vivo at a low level in the skin at all ages. While progerin mRNA remains low, the protein accumulates in the skin with age in a subset of dermal fibroblasts and in a few terminally differentiated keratinocytes. Progerin-positive fibroblasts localize near the basement membrane and in the papillary dermis of young adult skin; however, their numbers increase and their distribution reaches the deep reticular dermis in elderly skin. Our findings demonstrate that progerin expression is a biomarker of normal cellular aging and may potentially be linked to terminal differentiation and senescence in elderly individuals.

  10. Unique preservation of neural cells in Hutchinson- Gilford progeria syndrome is due to the expression of the neural-specific miR-9 microRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, Xavier; Blondel, Sophie; Navarro, Claire; Maury, Yves; Denis, Cécile; Girard, Mathilde; Martinat, Cécile; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Levy, Nicolas; Peschanski, Marc

    2012-07-26

    One puzzling observation in patients affected with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), who overall exhibit systemic and dramatic premature aging, is the absence of any conspicuous cognitive impairment. Recent studies based on induced pluripotent stem cells derived from HGPS patient cells have revealed a lack of expression in neural derivatives of lamin A, a major isoform of LMNA that is initially produced as a precursor called prelamin A. In HGPS, defective maturation of a mutated prelamin A induces the accumulation of toxic progerin in patient cells. Here, we show that a microRNA, miR-9, negatively controls lamin A and progerin expression in neural cells. This may bear major functional correlates, as alleviation of nuclear blebbing is observed in nonneural cells after miR-9 overexpression. Our results support the hypothesis, recently proposed from analyses in mice, that protection of neural cells from progerin accumulation in HGPS is due to the physiologically restricted expression of miR-9 to that cell lineage.

  11. Genome-scale expression profiling of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome reveals widespread transcriptional misregulation leading to mesodermal/mesenchymal defects and accelerated atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csoka, Antonei B; English, Sangeeta B; Simkevich, Carl P; Ginzinger, David G; Butte, Atul J; Schatten, Gerald P; Rothman, Frank G; Sedivy, John M

    2004-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disease with widespread phenotypic features resembling premature aging. HGPS was recently shown to be caused by dominant mutations in the LMNA gene, resulting in the in-frame deletion of 50 amino acids near the carboxyl terminus of the encoded lamin A protein. Children with this disease typically succumb to myocardial infarction or stroke caused by severe atherosclerosis at an average age of 13 years. To elucidate further the molecular pathogenesis of this disease, we compared the gene expression patterns of three HGPS fibroblast cell strains heterozygous for the LMNA mutation with three normal, age-matched cell strains. We defined a set of 361 genes (1.1% of the approximately 33,000 genes analysed) that showed at least a 2-fold, statistically significant change. The most prominent categories encode transcription factors and extracellular matrix proteins, many of which are known to function in the tissues severely affected in HGPS. The most affected gene, MEOX2/GAX, is a homeobox transcription factor implicated as a negative regulator of mesodermal tissue proliferation. Thus, at the gene expression level, HGPS shows the hallmarks of a developmental disorder affecting mesodermal and mesenchymal cell lineages. The identification of a large number of genes implicated in atherosclerosis is especially valuable, because it provides clues to pathological processes that can now be investigated in HGPS patients or animal models.

  12. The mutant form of lamin A that causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria is a biomarker of cellular aging in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Dayle; Ratner, Desiree; Lokuge, Meepa; Owens, David M; Gordon, Leslie B; Collins, Francis S; Djabali, Karima

    2007-12-05

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670) is a rare disorder characterized by accelerated aging and early death, frequently from stroke or coronary artery disease. 90% of HGPS cases carry the LMNA G608G (GGC>GGT) mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, activating a splice donor site that results in production of a dominant negative form of lamin A protein, denoted progerin. Screening 150 skin biopsies from unaffected individuals (newborn to 97 years) showed that a similar splicing event occurs in vivo at a low level in the skin at all ages. While progerin mRNA remains low, the protein accumulates in the skin with age in a subset of dermal fibroblasts and in a few terminally differentiated keratinocytes. Progerin-positive fibroblasts localize near the basement membrane and in the papillary dermis of young adult skin; however, their numbers increase and their distribution reaches the deep reticular dermis in elderly skin. Our findings demonstrate that progerin expression is a biomarker of normal cellular aging and may potentially be linked to terminal differentiation and senescence in elderly individuals.

  13. Signaling pathway activation drift during aging: Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome fibroblasts are comparable to normal middle-age and old-age cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliper, Alexander M; Csoka, Antonei Benjamin; Buzdin, Anton; Jetka, Tomasz; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Moskalev, Alexy; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    For the past several decades, research in understanding the molecular basis of human aging has progressed significantly with the analysis of premature aging syndromes. Progerin, an altered form of lamin A, has been identified as the cause of premature aging in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), and may be a contributing causative factor in normal aging. However, the question of whether HGPS actually recapitulates the normal aging process at the cellular and organismal level, or simply mimics the aging phenotype is widely debated. In the present study we analyzed publicly available microarray datasets for fibroblasts undergoing cellular aging in culture, as well as fibroblasts derived from young, middle-age, and old-age individuals, and patients with HGPS. Using GeroScope pathway analysis and drug discovery platform we analyzed the activation states of 65 major cellular signaling pathways. Our analysis reveals that signaling pathway activation states in cells derived from chronologically young patients with HGPS strongly resemble cells taken from normal middle-aged and old individuals. This clearly indicates that HGPS may truly represent accelerated aging, rather than being just a simulacrum. Our data also points to potential pathways that could be targeted to develop drugs and drug combinations for both HGPS and normal aging.

  14. Defective DSB repair correlates with abnormal nuclear morphology and is improved with FTI treatment in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Dan; Csoka, Antonei B; Navara, Christopher S; Schatten, Gerald P

    2010-10-15

    Impaired DSB repair has been implicated as a molecular mechanism contributing to the accelerating aging phenotype in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), but neither the extent nor the cause of the repair deficiency has been fully elucidated. Here we perform a quantitative analysis of the steady-state number of DSBs and the repair kinetics of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs in HGPS cells. We report an elevated steady-state number of DSBs and impaired repair of IR-induced DSBs, both of which correlated strongly with abnormal nuclear morphology. We recreated the HGPS cellular phenotype in human coronary artery endothelial cells for the first time by lentiviral transduction of GFP-progerin, which also resulted in impaired repair of IR-induced DSBs, and which correlated with abnormal nuclear morphology. Farnesyl transferase inhibitor (FTI) treatment improved the repair of IR-induced DSBs, but only in HGPS cells whose nuclear morphology was also normalized. Interestingly, FTI treatment did not result in a statistically significant reduction in the higher steady-state number of DSBs. We also report a delay in localization of phospho-NBS1 and MRE11, MRN complex repair factors necessary for homologous recombination (HR) repair, to DSBs in HGPS cells. Our results demonstrate a correlation between nuclear structural abnormalities and the DSB repair defect, suggesting a mechanistic link that may involve delayed repair factor localization to DNA damage. Further, our results show that similar to other HGPS phenotypes, FTI treatment has a beneficial effect on DSB repair.

  15. Commentary on "common genetic polymorphisms modify the effect of smoking on absolute risk of bladder cancer." Garcia-Closas M, Rothman N, Figueroa JD, Prokunina-Olsson L, Han SS, Baris D, Jacobs EJ, Malats N, De Vivo I, Albanes D, Purdue MP, Sharma S, Fu YP, Kogevinas M, Wang Z, Tang W, Tardón A, Serra C, Carrato A, García-Closas R, Lloreta J, Johnson A, Schwenn M, Karagas MR, Schned A, Andriole G Jr., Grubb R 3rd, Black A, Gapstur SM, Thun M, Diver WR, Weinstein SJ, Virtamo J, Hunter DJ, Caporaso N, Landi MT, Hutchinson A, Burdett L, Jacobs KB, Yeager M, Fraumeni JF Jr., Chanock SJ, Silverman DT, Chatterjee N, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA.: Cancer Res 2013;73(7):2211-20 [Epub 2013 Mar 27].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Douglas S

    2014-02-01

    Bladder cancer results from the combined effects of environmental and genetic factors, smoking being the strongest risk factor. Evaluating absolute risks resulting from the joint effects of smoking and genetic factors is critical to assess the public health relevance of genetic information. Analyses included up to 3,942 cases and 5,680 controls of European background in seven studies. We tested for multiplicative and additive interactions between smoking and 12 susceptibility loci, individually and combined as a polygenic risk score (PRS). Thirty-year absolute risks and risk differences by levels of the PRS were estimated for U.S. males aged 50 years. Six of 12 variants showed significant additive gene-environment interactions, most notably NAT2 (P = 7×10(-4)) and UGT1A6 (P = 8×10(-4)). The 30-year absolute risk of bladder cancer in U.S. males was 6.2% for all current smokers. This risk ranged from 2.9% for current smokers in the lowest quartile of the PRS to 9.9% for current smokers in the upper quartile. Risk difference estimates indicated that 8,200 cases would be prevented if elimination of smoking occurred in 100,000 men in the upper PRS quartile compared with 2,000 cases prevented by a similar effort in the lowest PRS quartile (P(additive) = 1×10(-4)). Thus, the potential impact of eliminating smoking on the number of bladder cancer cases prevented is larger for individuals at higher than lower genetic risk. Our findings could have implications for targeted prevention strategies. However, other smoking-related diseases, as well as practical and ethical considerations, need to be considered before any recommendations could be made. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  17. Discordant gene expression signatures and related phenotypic differences in lamin A- and A/C-related Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Plasilova

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a genetic disorder displaying features reminiscent of premature senescence caused by germline mutations in the LMNA gene encoding lamin A and C, essential components of the nuclear lamina. By studying a family with homozygous LMNA mutation (K542N, we showed that HGPS can also be caused by mutations affecting both isoforms, lamin A and C. Here, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis in both, lamin A- (sporadic and lamin A and C-related (hereditary HGPS. For this, we performed detailed molecular studies on primary fibroblasts of hetero- and homozygous LMNA K542N mutation carriers, accompanied with clinical examinations related to the molecular findings. By assessing global gene expression we found substantial overlap in altered transcription profiles (13.7%; 90/657 in sporadic and hereditary HGPS, with 83.3% (75/90 concordant and 16.7% (15/90 discordant transcriptional changes. Among the concordant ones we observed down-regulation of TWIST2, whose inactivation in mice and humans leads to loss of subcutaneous fat and dermal appendages, and loss of expression in dermal fibroblasts and periadnexial cells from a LMNA(K542N/K542N patient further confirming its pivotal role in skin development. Among the discordant transcriptional profiles we identified two key mediators of vascular calcification and bone metabolism, ENPP1 and OPG, which offer a molecular explanation for the major phenotypic differences in vascular and bone disease in sporadic and hereditary HGPS. Finally, this study correlates reduced TWIST2 and OPG expression with increased osteocalcin levels, thereby linking altered bone remodeling to energy homeostasis in hereditary HGPS.

  18. Discordant Gene Expression Signatures and Related Phenotypic Differences in Lamin A- and A/C-Related Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasilova, Martina; Chattopadhyay, Chandon; Ghosh, Apurba; Wenzel, Friedel; Demougin, Philippe; Noppen, Christoph; Schaub, Nathalie; Szinnai, Gabor; Terracciano, Luigi; Heinimann, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a genetic disorder displaying features reminiscent of premature senescence caused by germline mutations in the LMNA gene encoding lamin A and C, essential components of the nuclear lamina. By studying a family with homozygous LMNA mutation (K542N), we showed that HGPS can also be caused by mutations affecting both isoforms, lamin A and C. Here, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis in both, lamin A- (sporadic) and lamin A and C-related (hereditary) HGPS. For this, we performed detailed molecular studies on primary fibroblasts of hetero- and homozygous LMNA K542N mutation carriers, accompanied with clinical examinations related to the molecular findings. By assessing global gene expression we found substantial overlap in altered transcription profiles (13.7%; 90/657) in sporadic and hereditary HGPS, with 83.3% (75/90) concordant and 16.7% (15/90) discordant transcriptional changes. Among the concordant ones we observed down-regulation of TWIST2, whose inactivation in mice and humans leads to loss of subcutaneous fat and dermal appendages, and loss of expression in dermal fibroblasts and periadnexial cells from a LMNAK542N/K542N patient further confirming its pivotal role in skin development. Among the discordant transcriptional profiles we identified two key mediators of vascular calcification and bone metabolism, ENPP1 and OPG, which offer a molecular explanation for the major phenotypic differences in vascular and bone disease in sporadic and hereditary HGPS. Finally, this study correlates reduced TWIST2 and OPG expression with increased osteocalcin levels, thereby linking altered bone remodeling to energy homeostasis in hereditary HGPS. PMID:21738662

  19. Loss of H3K9me3 Correlates with ATM Activation and Histone H2AX Phosphorylation Deficiencies in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoyue; Sun, Linlin; Wang, Kun; Wu, Di; Trappio, Mason; Witting, Celeste; Cao, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that defective DNA damage response (DDR) plays a key role in the premature aging phenotypes in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Studies document widespread alterations in histone modifications in HGPS cells, especially, the global loss of histone H3 trimethylated on lysine 9 (H3K9me3). In this study, we explore the potential connection(s) between H3K9me3 loss and the impaired DDR in HGPS. When cells are exposed to a DNA-damaging agent Doxorubicin (Dox), double strand breaks (DSBs) are generated that result in the phosphorylation of histone H2A variant H2AX (gammaH2AX) within an hour. We find that the intensities of gammaH2AX foci appear significantly weaker in the G0/G1 phase HGPS cells compared to control cells. This reduction is associated with a delay in the recruitment of essential DDR factors. We further demonstrate that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is responsible for the amplification of gammaH2AX signals at DSBs during G0/G1 phase, and its activation is inhibited in the HGPS cells that display significant loss of H3K9me3. Moreover, methylene (MB) blue treatment, which is known to save heterochromatin loss in HGPS, restores H3K9me3, stimulates ATM activity, increases gammaH2AX signals and rescues deficient DDR. In summary, this study demonstrates an early DDR defect of attenuated gammaH2AX signals in G0/G1 phase HGPS cells and provides a plausible connection between H3K9me3 loss and DDR deficiency. PMID:27907109

  20. Dermal fibroblasts in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with the lamin A G608G mutation have dysmorphic nuclei and are hypersensitive to heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worman Howard J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare sporadic disorder with an incidence of approximately 1 per 8 million live births. The phenotypic appearance consists of short stature, sculptured nose, alopecia, prominent scalp veins, small face, loss of subcutaneous fat, faint mid-facial cyanosis, and dystrophic nails. HGPS is caused by mutations in LMNA, the gene that encodes nuclear lamins A and C. The most common mutation in subjects with HGPS is a de novo single-base pair substitution, G608G (GGC>GGT, within exon 11 of LMNA. This creates an abnormal splice donor site, leading to expression of a truncated protein. Results We studied a new case of a 5 year-old girl with HGPS and found a heterozygous point mutation, G608G, in LMNA. Complementary DNA sequencing of RNA showed that this mutation resulted in the deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminal tail domain of prelamin A. We characterized a primary dermal fibroblast cell line derived from the subject's skin. These cells expressed the mutant protein and exhibited a normal growth rate at early passage in primary culture but showed alterations in nuclear morphology. Expression levels and overall distributions of nuclear lamins and emerin, an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane, were not dramatically altered. Ultrastructural analysis of the nuclear envelope using electron microscopy showed that chromatin is in close association to the nuclear lamina, even in areas with abnormal nuclear envelope morphology. The fibroblasts were hypersensitive to heat shock, and demonstrated a delayed response to heat stress. Conclusion Dermal fibroblasts from a subject with HGPS expressing a mutant truncated lamin A have dysmorphic nuclei, hypersensitivity to heat shock, and delayed response to heat stress. This suggests that the mutant protein, even when expressed at low levels, causes defective cell stability, which may be responsible for phenotypic

  1. Clinical evaluation on cardiac enlargement in patients with esophageal cancer treated by radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasamoto, Ryuta [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-09-01

    Recent literature on chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer report the comparable survival results as surgery, and suggest the importance of management for the late adverse effect of chemoradiotherapy. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence and risk factors of cardiomegaly after chemoradiotherapy using low dose continuous infusion of 5FU/CDDP+5FU for esophageal cancer. Fifty-one patients with stage I-IVA esophageal cancer who were treated by radiotherapy with more than 50 Gy with or without chemotherapy and followed up for more than 6 months were analyzed. Sixteen patients were treated by radiation alone and 35 patients were treated by chemoradiotherapy. A change of CTR (cardio-thoracic ratio) was defined as the difference between CTR in the pre-treatment X-ray film and CTR in the post-treatment X-ray film with maximum cardiac silhouette. A change of CTR by more than 10% was defined as ''significant cardiomegaly''. In this study cardiac area-dose'', which is the sum of the products of cardiac area within every radiation field and its target dose, was calculated in each patient as a radiation parameter. Significant cardiomegaly was noted in 1 patient (6%) in the radiation alone group, in 8 patients (23%) in the chemoradiotherapy group and in 9 patients (18%) in the total population. In cases with more than 0.4 m{sup 2}{center_dot}Gy in cardiac area-dose, CTR elevation was significantly higher than in cases with less than 0.4m{sup 2}{center_dot}Gy. More than moderate pleural effusion was noted in 5 patients (10%). Chronic pericardial effusion and subsequent cardiac tamponade was considered to be one of the contributing factors for pleural effusion, because increases of pleural effusion coincided with CTR elevations in 3 cases. In addition, the fact that no case had right-sided unilateral pleural effusion suggested the direct effect of radiation to the pleura. Significant cardiomegaly was seen in 18% of 51 patients with

  2. The Pathogenic Mechanisms and Therapeutic Strategies of Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome%早老症(HGPS)的发病机制与治疗策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾涛; 刘新光; 周中军

    2007-01-01

    早老症(Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome,HGPS)是一种早发而严重的过早老化性疾病.它是由于编码A/C型核纤层蛋白的LMNA基因发生点突变而引起.这个突变激活了基因11号外显子上一个隐蔽的剪接位点,产生了一种被截短了50个氨基酸的A型核纤层蛋白.然而,一个广泛分布于核膜上结构蛋白的突变,如何引起HGPS患者的早老表现,目前还不太清楚.最近研究发现,HGPS患者的细胞核结构与功能发生了各种异常,主要表现在:progerin蓄积与核变形、细胞核机械性质的改变、组蛋白修饰方式与外遗传控制的改变、基因表达调控异常、p53信号传导通路激活和基因组不稳定等方面.目前存在机械应激假说和基因表达失控假说两种假说解释HGPS的发病机制.对于HGPS患者,尚无有效的临床干预措施,但有学者提出了一些治疗策略,如应用法尼基化的抑制剂、反义寡核苷酸和RNA干扰方法.HGPS被认为是研究正常衰老机制的一个模型.对HGPS深入研究将有助于阐明A型核纤层蛋白和核膜的正常生理功能,及其在生理衰老和疾病中的作用.

  3. Expression Analysis of Copper Transporter-related Protein of Cancer in 75 Cases of Colon Cancer Patients%75例结肠癌患者癌组织铜转运相关蛋白表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓晓; 许建华; 张勇; 孙珏; 陆文秀

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship in the expression of copper transporter-related pro-tein such as ATP7A,ATP7B and CTR1, clinicopathological features and prognosis. Methods Expres-sion area ratio of CTR1, ATP7B and ATP7A of tissue microarray, from 75 cancerous tissues specimens which had not been treated, provided by Shanghai Outdo Biotech Co.,Ltd., were analyzed. The relation-ship of copper transporter-related protein and clinicopathological features, 26 cases of the relationship with the patient survival were also analyzed. Results There was no correlation between expression lev-els of ATP7A, ATP7B, CTR1 and sex and tumor stage(P>0.05),while age-related(P0.05). Conclusion In colon cancer,there were no relation in copper transporter-related protein expression levels, gender and tumor stage. But it was related to age. ATP7A,ATP7B was expressed in the cytoplasm of the nu-cleus,and no expression in the cell membrane;The ATP7A nucleus expression is higher than the cyto-plasm. ATP7B evenly was distributed in the cytoplasm and nucleus; CTR1 was expressed mainly in the cytoplasm,nucleus and cell membrane were almost no expression; The subcellular localization and ex-pression rate of CTR1,ATP7A and ATP7B are irrelevant with the survival time.%目的探讨结肠癌组织中铜转运相关蛋白ATP7A、ATP7B和CTR1的表达与患者临床病理特征及预后的关系。方法对上海芯超生物科技有限公司提供的75例未进行任何治疗的癌组织标本组织芯片的 CTR1、ATP7B 和ATP7A表达面积比率进行统计分析。分析铜转运相关蛋白表达与患者临床病理特征的关系,并分析其中26例与患者生存期的关系。结果 ATP7A、ATP7B和CTR1表达水平与性别及肿瘤分期均无相关性(P>0.05),与年龄有关(P0.05)。结论在结肠癌中铜转运相关蛋白表达水平与性别及肿瘤分期均无关,与年龄大小有关;ATP7A、ATP7B在胞浆、胞核中均有表达,在

  4. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... uses a surgical tool to remove the tumor.Mohs' surgery. Layers of cancer cells are removed one ... usually have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The medicine may have ...

  5. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal Uma; Sitaraman S; Mehta Sharad; Panse Gauri

    2010-01-01

    Progeria is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging, involving the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a 4-year-old boy who presented with clinical manifestations of progeria. He had characteristic facies, prominent eyes, scalp and leg veins, senile look, loss of scalp hair, eyebrows and eyelashes, stunted growth, and sclerodermatous changes. The present case is reported due to its rarity.

  6. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Uma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging, involving the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a 4-year-old boy who presented with clinical manifestations of progeria. He had characteristic facies, prominent eyes, scalp and leg veins, senile look, loss of scalp hair, eyebrows and eyelashes, stunted growth, and sclerodermatous changes. The present case is reported due to its rarity.

  7. CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kavoussi

    1973-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many carcinogenetic elements in industry and it is for this reason that study and research concerning the effect of these materials is carried out on a national and international level. The establishment and growth of cancer are affected by different factors in two main areas:-1 The nature of the human or animal including sex, age, point and method of entry, fat metabolism, place of agglomeration of carcinogenetic material, amount of material absorbed by the body and the immunity of the body.2 The different nature of the carcinogenetic material e.g. physical, chemical quality, degree of solvency in fat and purity of impurity of the element. As the development of cancer is dependent upon so many factors, it is extremely difficult to determine whether a causative element is principle or contributory. Some materials are not carcinogenetic when they are pure but become so when they combine with other elements. All of this creates an industrial health problem in that it is almost impossible to plan an adequate prevention and safety program. The body through its system of immunity protects itself against small amounts of carcinogens but when this amount increases and reaches a certain level the body is not longer able to defend itself. ILO advises an effective protection campaign against cancer based on the Well –equipped laboratories, Well-educated personnel, the establishment of industrial hygiene within factories, the regular control of safety systems, and the implementation of industrial health principles and research programs.

  8. Copper signaling axis as a target for prostate cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Rachid; Nelson, Erik R; Chitneni, Satish K; Franz, Katherine J; George, Daniel J; Zalutsky, Michael R; McDonnell, Donald P

    2014-10-15

    Previously published reports indicate that serum copper levels are elevated in patients with prostate cancer and that increased copper uptake can be used as a means to image prostate tumors. It is unclear, however, to what extent copper is required for prostate cancer cell function as we observed only modest effects of chelation strategies on the growth of these cells in vitro. With the goal of exploiting prostate cancer cell proclivity for copper uptake, we developed a "conditional lethal" screen to identify compounds whose cytotoxic actions were manifested in a copper-dependent manner. Emerging from this screen was a series of dithiocarbamates, which, when complexed with copper, induced reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis of malignant, but not normal, prostate cells. One of the dithiocarbamates identified, disulfiram (DSF), is an FDA-approved drug that has previously yielded disappointing results in clinical trials in patients with recurrent prostate cancer. Similarly, in our studies, DSF alone had a minimal effect on the growth of prostate cancer tumors when propagated as xenografts. However, when DSF was coadministered with copper, a very dramatic inhibition of tumor growth in models of hormone-sensitive and of castrate-resistant disease was observed. Furthermore, we determined that prostate cancer cells express high levels of CTR1, the primary copper transporter, and additional chaperones that are required to maintain intracellular copper homeostasis. The expression levels of most of these proteins are increased further upon treatment of androgen receptor (AR)-positive prostate cancer cell lines with androgens. Not surprisingly, robust CTR1-dependent uptake of copper into prostate cancer cells was observed, an activity that was accentuated by activation of AR. Given these data linking AR to intracellular copper uptake, we believe that dithiocarbamate/copper complexes are likely to be effective for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer whose

  9. Lung cancer trends: smoking, obesity, and sex assessed in the Staten Island University’s lung cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta S; Hassan S; Bhatt VR; Abdul Sater H; Dilawari A

    2014-01-01

    Shilpi Gupta,1 Samer Hassan,1 Vijaya R Bhatt,2 Houssein Abdul Sater,1 Asma Dilawari31Hematology-Oncology, Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, NY, USA; 2Hematology-Oncology, Nebraska Medical Ctr, Omaha, NE, USA; 3Hematology-Oncology, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Olney, Maryland, USAIntroduction: The incidence of lung cancer in the United States decreased by 1.8% from 1991 to 2005 while it increased by 0.5% in females. We assessed whether nonsmokers afflicted with lung ...

  10. Analysis of a case with typical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with scleroderma-like skin changes and review of literature%伴硬皮病样改变的典型Hutchinson-Gilford早老综合征一例并文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄姗; 梁雁; 吴薇; 付溪; 廖立红; 罗小平

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨典型Hutchinson-Gilford早老综合征(HGPS)的临床特点及诊断.方法 回顾性分析华中科技大学同济医学院附属同济医院儿科诊断的1例典型HGPS患儿,并复习相关文献,分析本病的临床表现、影像学特点、基因突变特点及诊疗方法.结果 患儿男,8月龄,身高65.6 cm,体重6.2 kg,前额突出,枕部秃发,头皮静脉显露,小颌畸形伴下颌纵向沟,胸部以下皮肤呈硬皮病样改变,双膝关节挛缩呈“骑马样站姿”,踝关节活动亦受限.血常规示血小板(416~490)×109/L;双下肢MRI发现皮下脂肪组织减少.家系外周血LMNA基因分析示患儿携带经典杂合突变:c.1824C>T,(p.G608G),其父母均正常.13月龄随访时X线检查示双手指骨及锁骨远端有骨质溶解改变.随访15个月后,患儿早老样外貌更明显.总结相关文献发现国内结合临床特征和基因分析明确诊断的典型HGPS有2例,其中1例有硬皮病样皮肤改变.结论 患儿呈典型HGPS表型;婴儿期皮肤出现硬皮病样改变,应考虑典型HGPS的可能,且LMNA基因分析有助于典型HGPS的早期确诊,避免其他不必要的检查.应对患儿长期进行随访,观察病情持续进展.%Objective To explore clinical,radiographical and genetic characteristics of classical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS).Method Data of a case of HGPS diagnosed at Tongji Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology was analyzed and related literature was reviewed.Result At the age of 8 months,the affected-infant presented with characteristic manifestation such as short stature,low weight,frontal bossing,alopecia,prominent scalp veins,micrognathia with a vertical midline groove in the chin,sclerodermatous skin,knee joints contracture with a horse-riding stance,and limited range of movement of ankle joints.Blood test showed blood platelet count (416-490) × 109/L.Lower extremities MRI showed reduced

  11. The 2011-2016 Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer (TREC) initiative: rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ruth E; Colditz, Graham A; Hu, Frank B; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Ahima, Rexford S; Brownson, Ross C; Carson, Kenneth R; Chavarro, Jorge E; Chodosh, Lewis A; Gehlert, Sarah; Gill, Jeff; Glanz, Karen; Haire-Joshu, Debra; Herbst, Karen Louise; Hoehner, Christine M; Hovmand, Peter S; Irwin, Melinda L; Jacobs, Linda A; James, Aimee S; Jones, Lee W; Kerr, Jacqueline; Kibel, Adam S; King, Irena B; Ligibel, Jennifer A; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Natarajan, Loki; Neuhouser, Marian L; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Proctor, Enola K; Redline, Susan; Rock, Cheryl L; Rosner, Bernard; Sarwer, David B; Schwartz, J Sanford; Sears, Dorothy D; Sesso, Howard D; Stampfer, Meir J; Subramanian, S V; Taveras, Elsie M; Tchou, Julia; Thompson, Beti; Troxel, Andrea B; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne; Wolin, Kathleen Y; Thornquist, Mark D

    2013-04-01

    Recognition of the complex, multidimensional relationship between excess adiposity and cancer control outcomes has motivated the scientific community to seek new research models and paradigms. The National Cancer Institute developed an innovative concept to establish a center grant mechanism in nutrition, energetics, and physical activity, referred to as the Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer (TREC) Initiative. This paper gives an overview of the 2011-2016 TREC Collaborative Network and the 15 research projects being conducted at the centers. Four academic institutions were awarded TREC center grants in 2011: Harvard University, University of California San Diego, University of Pennsylvania, and Washington University in St. Louis. The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center is the Coordination Center. The TREC research portfolio includes three animal studies, three cohort studies, four randomized clinical trials, one cross-sectional study, and two modeling studies. Disciplines represented by TREC investigators include basic science, endocrinology, epidemiology, biostatistics, behavior, medicine, nutrition, physical activity, genetics, engineering, health economics, and computer science. Approximately 41,000 participants will be involved in these studies, including children, healthy adults, and breast and prostate cancer survivors. Outcomes include biomarkers of cancer risk, changes in weight and physical activity, persistent adverse treatment effects (e.g., lymphedema, urinary and sexual function), and breast and prostate cancer mortality. The NIH Science of Team Science group will evaluate the value added by this collaborative science. However, the most important outcome will be whether this transdisciplinary initiative improves the health of Americans at risk of cancer as well as cancer survivors.

  12. 一个儿童早老症家系临床特征分析和致病基因研究%Analysis of clinical characteristics and causative genes of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome in a family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃霞; 罗彦彦; 袁广之; 畅荣妮; 赖青鸟; 杨益金; 华荣; 李福记; 方玲

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess clinicopathological features of and genetic factors in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) in a family.Methods General information was collected from 3 patients with HutchinsonGilford progeria syndrome in a family,which included 5 members over 2 generations with all the 3 children affected by HGPS.All the 3 patients underwent clinical investigation,image analysis of hands,lungs and mandibles,as well as karyotype analysis of chromosomes.LMNA gene mutations were analyzed in these family members.Results All the 3 patients developed skin sclerosis with severe growth retardation and appearance of extreme aging at about 6 months of age.Image analysis showed osteoporosis and mandibular hypoplasia in the elder patient.Karyotype analysis showed no abnormality in the patients or their parents.Mutation analysis revealed a homozygous mutation 1579 C > T (R527C) in exon 9 of the LMNA gene in all the patients,but a heterozygous mutation R527C in the LMNA gene in their parents.Conclusions The patients in this family present characteristic manifestations of HGPS,which may be caused by the homozygous LMNA mutation R527C.%目的 通过对一个罕见早老症家系的分析,探讨早老症患者的临床病理学特征和遗传学因素.方法 收集1个早老症家系(2代共5名家庭成员,子女3人均为患者)3例患者的基本资料,对其进行临床检查,并对患者手部、肺脏和下颌骨进行影像学分析;同时对3例患者进行染色体核型分析,对该家系进行LMNA基因突变分析.结果 家系中的3例患者半岁左右即可见皮肤硬化症,并表现出生长严重迟缓,极度衰老面容.年长患者影像学检查显示骨质疏松,下颌骨发育不全.染色体核型分析显示,3例患者及其父母核型正常.基因突变分析显示,3例患者均为LMNA基因第9号外显子的纯合突变1579C>T(R527C),父母均为LMNAR527C杂合突变.结论 该早老症家系患者符合儿童

  13. Potential use of custirsen to treat prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higano CS

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Celestia S Higano Department of Medicine, University of Washington, and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Over the last few years, five agents have demonstrated a survival benefit over a comparator treatment or placebo in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration: sipuleucel-T (a dendritic cell immunotherapy; cabazitaxel; abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide (both hormonal agents; and radium 223 (an alpha emitter. The development of these agents pivoted on whether patients had been treated with docetaxel, which remains the first-line chemotherapy of choice. To date, no combination of docetaxel and another active agent has demonstrated superiority to docetaxel alone despite numerous Phase III trials. Clusterin is a cytoprotective chaperone protein that is upregulated in response to various anticancer therapies. When overexpressed, clusterin interferes with apoptotic signaling, thereby promoting cell survival and conferring broad-spectrum resistance in cancer cell lines. Custirsen (OGX-011 is a second-generation 2´-methoxyethyl modified phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide that inhibits expression of clusterin. This review presents the preclinical and clinical data that provided the rationale for the combination of custirsen with chemotherapy in ongoing Phase III trials. Keywords: castration-resistant prostate cancer, clusterin, custirsen, OGX-011, antisense, OGX-427, apoptosis

  14. Cancer Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer ... Myths and Misconceptions Diet Hormones Immunosuppression Infectious Agents Obesity Radiation Sunlight Tobacco Genetics NCI Cancer Genetics Services ...

  15. Timing of antioxidant supplementation is critical in improving anorexia in an experimental model of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfino, Alessio; De Luca, Simona; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Citro, Gennaro; Fazi, Lucia; Mari, Alessia; Ramaccini, Cesarina; Rossi Fanelli, Filippo; Laviano, Alessandro

    2013-08-01

    Increased oxidative stress may contribute to cancer anorexia, which could be ameliorated by antioxidant supplementation. methylcholanthrene (MCA) sarcoma-bearing Fisher rats were studied. After tumour inoculation, rats were randomly assigned to standard diet (CTR group, n = 6), or to an antioxidant-enriched diet (AOX group, n = 8). Eight more rats (STD-AOX group) switched from standard to antioxidant diet when anorexia developed. At the end of the study, food intake (FI, g/d), body weight and tumour weight (g) were recorded, and plasma samples were obtained. On day 16, anorexia has appeared only in CTR and STD-AOX animals. At the end of the study, FI in AOX animals was still higher than in the other groups (p = 0.08). No differences in body and tumour weights were observed among groups. However, hydrogen peroxide and interleukin-1β levels were significantly reduced only in AOX rats. Data obtained suggest that early antioxidant supplementation improves cancer anorexia, ameliorates oxidative stress and reduces inflammation.

  16. An Upregulation in the Expression of Vanilloid Transient Potential Channels 2 Enhances Hypotonicity-Induced Cytosolic Ca2+ Rise in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Model of Hutchinson Gillford Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jenny Chung-Yee; Siu, Chung-Wah; Cheung, Sin-Ying; Tang, Nelson L.; Yu, Shan; Tse, Hung-Fat; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gillford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a fatal genetic disorder characterized by premature aging in multiple organs including the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. It is believed that an increased mechanosensitivity of HGPS cells is a causative factor for vascular cell death and vascular diseases in HGPS patients. However, the exact mechanism is unknown. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are cationic channels that can act as cellular sensors for mechanical stimuli. The aim of this present study was to examine the expression and functional role of TRP channels in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs) from the patients with HGPS. The mRNA and protein expression of TRP channels in HGPS and control (IMR90) iPSC-ECs were examined by semi-quantitative RT-PCRs and immunoblots, respectively. Hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) rise in iPSC-ECs was measured by confocal microscopy. RT-PCRs and immunoblots showed higher expressional levels of TRPV2 in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients than those from normal individuals. In functional studies, hypotonicity induced a transient [Ca2+]i rise in iPSC-ECs from normal individuals but a sustained [Ca2+]i elevation in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients. A nonselective TRPV inhibitor, ruthenium red (RuR, 20 µM), and a specific TRPV2 channel inhibitor, tranilast (100 µM), abolished the sustained phase of hypotonicity-induced [Ca2+]i rise in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients, and also markedly attenuated the transient phase of the [Ca2+]i rise in these cells. Importantly, a short 10 min hypotonicity treatment caused a substantial increase in caspase 8 activity in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients but not in cells from normal individuals. Tranilast could also inhibit the hypotonicity-induced increase in caspase 8 activity. Taken together, our data suggest that an up-regulation in TRPV2 expression causes a sustained [Ca2+]i elevation in HGPS-iPSC-ECs under hypotonicity, consequently

  17. An upregulation in the expression of vanilloid transient potential channels 2 enhances hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca²⁺ rise in human induced pluripotent stem cell model of Hutchinson-Gillford Progeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yin Lo

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gillford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a fatal genetic disorder characterized by premature aging in multiple organs including the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. It is believed that an increased mechanosensitivity of HGPS cells is a causative factor for vascular cell death and vascular diseases in HGPS patients. However, the exact mechanism is unknown. Transient receptor potential (TRP channels are cationic channels that can act as cellular sensors for mechanical stimuli. The aim of this present study was to examine the expression and functional role of TRP channels in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs from the patients with HGPS. The mRNA and protein expression of TRP channels in HGPS and control (IMR90 iPSC-ECs were examined by semi-quantitative RT-PCRs and immunoblots, respectively. Hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca²⁺ ([Ca²⁺](i rise in iPSC-ECs was measured by confocal microscopy. RT-PCRs and immunoblots showed higher expressional levels of TRPV2 in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients than those from normal individuals. In functional studies, hypotonicity induced a transient [Ca²⁺](i rise in iPSC-ECs from normal individuals but a sustained [Ca²⁺](i elevation in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients. A nonselective TRPV inhibitor, ruthenium red (RuR, 20 µM, and a specific TRPV2 channel inhibitor, tranilast (100 µM, abolished the sustained phase of hypotonicity-induced [Ca²⁺](i rise in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients, and also markedly attenuated the transient phase of the [Ca²⁺](i rise in these cells. Importantly, a short 10 min hypotonicity treatment caused a substantial increase in caspase 8 activity in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients but not in cells from normal individuals. Tranilast could also inhibit the hypotonicity-induced increase in caspase 8 activity. Taken together, our data suggest that an up-regulation in TRPV2 expression causes a sustained [Ca²⁺](i elevation in HGPS

  18. An upregulation in the expression of vanilloid transient potential channels 2 enhances hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca²⁺ rise in human induced pluripotent stem cell model of Hutchinson-Gillford Progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chun-Yin; Tjong, Yung-Wui; Ho, Jenny Chung-Yee; Siu, Chung-Wah; Cheung, Sin-Ying; Tang, Nelson L; Yu, Shan; Tse, Hung-Fat; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gillford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a fatal genetic disorder characterized by premature aging in multiple organs including the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. It is believed that an increased mechanosensitivity of HGPS cells is a causative factor for vascular cell death and vascular diseases in HGPS patients. However, the exact mechanism is unknown. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are cationic channels that can act as cellular sensors for mechanical stimuli. The aim of this present study was to examine the expression and functional role of TRP channels in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs) from the patients with HGPS. The mRNA and protein expression of TRP channels in HGPS and control (IMR90) iPSC-ECs were examined by semi-quantitative RT-PCRs and immunoblots, respectively. Hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca²⁺ ([Ca²⁺](i)) rise in iPSC-ECs was measured by confocal microscopy. RT-PCRs and immunoblots showed higher expressional levels of TRPV2 in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients than those from normal individuals. In functional studies, hypotonicity induced a transient [Ca²⁺](i) rise in iPSC-ECs from normal individuals but a sustained [Ca²⁺](i) elevation in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients. A nonselective TRPV inhibitor, ruthenium red (RuR, 20 µM), and a specific TRPV2 channel inhibitor, tranilast (100 µM), abolished the sustained phase of hypotonicity-induced [Ca²⁺](i) rise in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients, and also markedly attenuated the transient phase of the [Ca²⁺](i) rise in these cells. Importantly, a short 10 min hypotonicity treatment caused a substantial increase in caspase 8 activity in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients but not in cells from normal individuals. Tranilast could also inhibit the hypotonicity-induced increase in caspase 8 activity. Taken together, our data suggest that an up-regulation in TRPV2 expression causes a sustained [Ca²⁺](i) elevation in HGPS

  19. Promotion of tumor development in prostate cancer by progerin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nie Daotai

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Progerin is a truncated form of lamin A. It is identified in patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, a disease characterized by accelerated aging. The contribution of progerin toward aging has been shown to be related to increased DNA damages. Since aging is one major risk factor for carcinogenesis, and genomic instability is a hallmark of malignant cancers, we investigated the expression of progerin in human cancer cells, and whether its expression contributes to carcinogenesis. Using RT-PCR and Western blotting, we detected the expression of progerin in prostate PC-3, DU145 and LNCaP cells at mRNA and protein levels. Ectopic progerin expression did not cause cellular senescence in PC-3 or MCF7 cells. PC-3 cells progerin transfectants were sensitized to DNA damage agent camptothecin (CPT; and persistent DNA damage responses were observed, which might be caused by progerin induced defective DNA damage repair. In addition, progerin transfectants were more tumorigenic in vivo than vector control cells. Our study for the first time describes the expression of progerin in a number of human cancer cell lines and its contributory role in tumorigenesis.

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All Cancer Types ...

  1. The phenotype of polycythemia due to Croatian homozygous VHL (571C>G:H191D) mutation is different from that of Chuvash polycythemia (VHL 598C>T:R200W)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasic, Nikica Ljubas; Piterkova, Lucie; Huff, Chad; Bilic, Ernest; Yoon, Donghoon; Miasnikova, Galina Y.; Sergueeva, Adelina I.; Niu, Xiaomei; Nekhai, Sergei; Gordeuk, Victor; Prchal, Josef T.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of VHL (a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factors) have position-dependent distinct cancer phenotypes. Only two known inherited homozygous VHL mutations exist and they cause polycythemia: Chuvash R200W and Croatian H191D. We report a second polycythemic Croatian H191D homozygote distantly related to the first propositus. Three generations of both families were genotyped for analysis of shared ancestry. Biochemical and molecular tests were performed to better define their phenotypes, with an emphasis on a comparison with Chuvash polycythemia. The VHL H191D mutation did not segregate in the family defined by the known common ancestors of the two subjects, suggesting a high prevalence in Croatians, but haplotype analysis indicated an undocumented common ancestor ∼six generations ago as the founder of this mutation. We show that erythropoietin levels in homozygous VHL H191D individuals are higher than in VHL R200W patients of similar ages, and their native erythroid progenitors, unlike Chuvash R200W, are not hypersensitive to erythropoietin. This observation contrasts with a report suggesting that polycythemia in VHL R200W and H191D homozygotes is due to the loss of JAK2 regulation from VHL R200W and H191D binding to SOCS1. In conclusion, our studies further define the hematologic phenotype of VHL H191D and provide additional evidence for phenotypic heterogeneity associated with the positional effects of VHL mutations. PMID:23403324

  2. 150 Years of Blowing: Since John Hutchinson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Milic-Emili

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Three recent advances in assessment of routine lung function are reviewed. In both normal subjects and patients with obstructive lung disease, the flows during the forced vital capacity (FVC manoeuvre depend significantly on the pattern of the preceding inspiratory manoeuvre. Accordingly, the latter should be standardized in clinical and epidemiological studies. Although the nature of this phenomenon is not fully understood, stress relaxation of lung tissues probably plays the primary role. The negative expiratory pressure technique provides a simple and reliable tool for detecting expiratory flow limitation both at rest and during exercise. The method does not require body plethysmography or the patient’s cooperation and coordination, and can be applied in any desired body posture. A simple method for monitoring FVC performance has been developed. It allows detection of flow limitation during the FVC manoeuvre.

  3. Reactivation of latently infected HIV-1 viral reservoirs and correction of aberrant alternative splicing in the LMNA gene via AMPK activation: Common mechanism of action linking HIV-1 latency and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2015-09-01

    Although the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has proven highly effective in controlling and suppressing HIV-1 replication, the persistence of latent but replication-competent proviruses in a small subset of CD4(+) memory T cells presents significant challenges to viral eradication from infected individuals. Attempts to eliminate latent reservoirs are epitomized by the 'shock and kill' approach, a strategy involving the combinatorial usage of compounds that influence epigenetic modulation and initiation of proviral transcription. However, efficient regulation of viral pre-mRNA splicing through manipulation of host cell splicing machinery is also indispensible for HIV-1 replication. Interestingly, aberrant alternative splicing of the LMNA gene via the usage of a cryptic splice site has been shown to be the cause of most cases of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a rare genetic condition characterized by an accelerated aging phenotype due to the accumulation of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. Recent evidence has shown that inhibition of the splicing factors ASF/SF2 (or SRSF1) and SRp55 (or SRSF6) leads to a reduction or an increase in progerin at both the mRNA and protein levels, respectively, thus altering the LMNA pre-mRNA splicing ratio. It is also well-established that during the latter stages of HIV-1 infection, an increase in the production and nuclear export of unspliced viral mRNA is indispensible for efficient HIV-1 replication and that the presence of ASF/SF2 leads to excessive viral pre-mRNA splicing and a reduction of unspliced mRNA, while the presence of SRp55 inhibits viral pre-mRNA splicing and aids in the generation and translation of unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs. The splicing-factor associated protein and putative mitochondrial chaperone p32 has also been shown to inhibit ASF/SF2, increase unspliced HIV-1 viral mRNA, and enhance mitochondrial DNA replication and oxidative phosphorylation. It is our hypothesis that activation of

  4. Toward Rigorous Data Harmonization in Cancer Epidemiology Research: One Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Betsy; Reid, Suzanna; Stelling, Deanna; Warnick, Greg; Thornquist, Mark; Feng, Ziding; Potter, John D

    2015-12-15

    Cancer epidemiologists have a long history of combining data sets in pooled analyses, often harmonizing heterogeneous data from multiple studies into 1 large data set. Although there are useful websites on data harmonization with recommendations and support, there is little research on best practices in data harmonization; each project conducts harmonization according to its own internal standards. The field would be greatly served by charting the process of data harmonization to enhance the quality of the harmonized data. Here, we describe the data harmonization process utilized at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (Seattle, Washington) by the coordinating centers of several research projects. We describe a 6-step harmonization process, including: 1) identification of questions the harmonized data set is required to answer; 2) identification of high-level data concepts to answer those questions; 3) assessment of data availability for data concepts; 4) development of common data elements for each data concept; 5) mapping and transformation of individual data points to common data elements; and 6) quality-control procedures. Our aim here is not to claim a "correct" way of doing data harmonization but to encourage others to describe their processes in order that we can begin to create rigorous approaches. We also propose a research agenda around this issue. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. THE 2011-2016 TRANSDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH IN ENERGETICS AND CANCER (TREC) INITIATIVE: RATIONALE AND DESIGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ruth E.; Colditz, Graham A.; Hu, Frank B.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Ahima, Rexford S.; Brownson, Ross C.; Carson, Kenneth R.; Chavarro, Jorge E.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Gehlert, Sarah; Gill, Jeff; Glanz, Karen; Haire-Joshu, Debra; Herbst, Karen Louise; Hoehner, Christine M.; Hovmand, Peter S.; Irwin, Melinda L.; Jacobs, Linda A.; James, Aimee S.; Jones, Lee W.; Kerr, Jacqueline; Kibel, Adam S.; King, Irena B.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Natarajan, Loki; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Proctor, Enola K.; Redline, Susan; Rock, Cheryl L.; Rosner, Bernard; Sarwer, David B.; Schwartz, J. Sanford; Sears, Dorothy D.; Sesso, Howard D.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Subramanian, S. V.; Taveras, Elsie M.; Tchou, Julia; Thompson, Beti; Troxel, Andrea B.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne; Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Thornquist, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Recognition of the complex, multidimensional relationship between excess adiposity and cancer control outcomes has motivated the scientific community to seek new research models and paradigms. Methods The National Cancer Institute developed an innovative concept to establish a centers grant mechanism in nutrition, energetics, and physical activity; referred to as the Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer (TREC) Initiative. This paper gives an overview of the 2011-2016 TREC Collaborative Network and the 15 research projects being conducted at the Centers. Results Four academic institutions were awarded TREC center grants in 2011: Harvard University, University of California San Diego, University of Pennsylvania, and Washington University in St. Louis. The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center is the Coordination Center. The TREC research portfolio includes 3 animal studies, 3 cohort studies, 4 randomized clinical trials, 1 cross-sectional study, and 2 modeling studies. Disciplines represented by TREC investigators include basic science, endocrinology, epidemiology, biostatistics, behavior, medicine, nutrition, physical activity, genetics, engineering, health economics, and computer science. Approximately 41,000 participants will be involved in these studies, including children, healthy adults, and breast and prostate cancer survivors. Outcomes include biomarkers of cancer risk, changes in weight and physical activity, persistent adverse treatment effects (e.g., lymphedema, urinary and sexual function), and breast and prostate cancer mortality. Conclusion The NIH Science of Team Science group will evaluate the value-added by this collaborative science. However, the most important outcome will be whether this transdisciplinary initiative improves the health of Americans at risk for cancer as well as cancer survivors. PMID:23378138

  6. Anamorelin hydrochloride in the treatment of cancer anorexia–cachexia syndrome: design, development, and potential place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graf SA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Solomon A Graf,1–3 Jose M Garcia4,5 1Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, 2Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, 3Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 4Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, 5Department of Medicine, Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Cancer anorexia–cachexia syndrome (CACS is a complex and largely untreatable paraneoplastic complication common in advanced cancer. It is associated with profoundly deleterious effects on quality of life and survival. Since its discovery over a decade ago, anamorelin hydrochloride (anamorelin, a mimetic of the growth hormone secretagogue ghrelin, has shown considerable promise in ameliorating components of CACS when administered to patients with advanced cancer, including loss of lean body mass and reversal of anorexia. This review summarizes the development of anamorelin and its safety and efficacy in clinical investigations. The potential future role of anamorelin in treating CACS is also discussed. Keywords: anamorelin, cachexia, anorexia, ghrelin, non-small cell lung cancer

  7. Assessment of the Relation between the Expression of Oxaliplatin Transporters in Colorectal Cancer and Response to FOLFOX-4 Adjuvant Chemotherapy: A Case Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Bertrand; Tixier, Lucie; Pereira, Bruno; Sauvanet, Pierre; Buc, Emmanuel; Pétorin, Caroline; Déchelotte, Pierre; Pezet, Denis; Balayssac, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer is mainly based on the combination of 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX-4). The pharmacological target of oxaliplatin remains intracellular and therefore dependent on its entry into cells. The intracellular distribution of oxaliplatin is mediated by organic cation transporters 1, 2 and 3 (OCT1, 2 and 3), copper transporter 1 (CTR1) and ATPase Cu2+ transporting beta polypeptide (ATP7B) and may modulate the efficacy of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to perform a retrospective study to assess the relation between the expression of oxaliplatin transporters in colorectal cancer before chemotherapy and the response to FOLFOX-4 adjuvant chemotherapy in responder and non-responder patients. Methods This retrospective study was conducted at a single center (University Hospital of Clermont-Ferrand, France). The target population was patients with resectable colorectal cancer operated between 2006 and 2013. Inclusion criteria were defined for the responder patients as no cancer recurrence 3 years after the end of chemotherapy, and for the non-responder patients as cancer recurrence within 1 year. Other inclusion criteria were stages IIb–IV cancers, first-line adjuvant FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy, and the availability of resected primary tumor samples. Exclusion criteria were preoperative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, a targeted therapy, other anticancer drugs, cancer recurrence between the first and the third year after the end of chemotherapy and follow-up < 3 years. Immunostaining of oxaliplatin transporters (OCT1, 2, 3, CTR1 and ATP7B) and Ki-67 was assessed in tumor samples. Results Retrospectively, 31 patients have been selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria (15 responders and 16 non-responders). Before FOLFOX-4 regimen, OCT3 expression was significantly lower in responder patients compared to non-responders (p<0.001). According to multivariate analysis

  8. Colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  9. Lip cancer. Incidence trends in Connecticut, 1935-1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Katz, R V; Krutchkoff, D J; Eisenberg, E

    1992-10-15

    Suspicions have recently arisen that cancer of the lip may exert an undue influence on overall oral cancer statistics and, therefore, possibly distort the true image of intraoral cancer. The authors investigated this question through epidemiologic analysis. A total of 2291 cases of lip cancer accessioned by the Connecticut Tumor Registry (CTR) from 1935 to 1985 (23.6% of all oral cancer) were analyzed. Occurrence trends for males and females had different patterns: for men, the age-adjusted incidence rates showed a fivefold decrease during the 51-year study; for women, the rates were relatively low and constant during the same period. Analysis for age-specific rates revealed that the older the age group, the higher the incidence rates for both sexes. Squamous cell carcinoma accounted for at least 87.4% of all lip cancers (96.2% if nonspecified epithelial neoplasms are assumed to be squamous cell carcinoma). The vermilion border of lower lip was the most common site. Moderately differentiated tumors were most common (48.5%), closely followed by well-differentiated tumors (44.2%). Analysis by county showed that the crude incidence rates for males in New London and Windham counties exceeded the average Connecticut statewide rates. The authors concluded that the epidemiology of Connecticut lip cancer differs significantly from that of intraoral squamous cell carcinoma in the same population studied within the same period of time. Epidemiologic studies involving "oral cancer" should direct attention to anatomic subsite to consider differences in disease trends according to specific location.

  10. The use of targeted and non-targeted advertising to enrich skin cancer screening samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katris, P; Donovan, R J; Gray, B N

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the risk factor profile of persons attending skin cancer screening clinics could be enriched by appropriate advertising prior to the screening events. Eleven screening clinics were held in eight rural and three suburban communities. Matched communities were randomly assigned to either a target or non-target condition. Targeted communities received an advertisement designed to attract high-risk individuals. The advertisement listed a number of risk factors and encouraged readers with one or more of the listed risk factors to attend the screening. Non-targeted communities received a general advertisement requesting individuals who felt they were at risk of skin cancer to attend the clinic. Risk factor profiles of all participants were measured on the factors listed in the targeted advertisement. The risk factor profiles of screenees and the referral rates for skin lesions requiring attention were significantly higher in the targeted communities than in the non-targeted communities. Lesions suspicious of malignant melanoma or Hutchinson's melanotic freckle also were higher, but not statistically significant, in the targeted communities. Population samples attending community-based skin cancer screening clinics can be enriched by appropriate targeted advertising prior to the screening events. This has important implications for determining the potential cost-effectiveness of population screening programmes.

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Genomics Study Findings Metastatic Cancer Metastatic Cancer Research Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer ...

  12. Testicular cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - testes; Germ cell tumor; Seminoma testicular cancer; Nonseminoma testicular cancer; Testicular neoplasm ... There are two main types of testicular cancer: Seminomas Nonseminomas These cancers grow from germ cells, the ...

  13. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table ... Gilbert Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The ...

  14. Transcriptome analysis of copper homeostasis genes reveals coordinated upregulation of SLC31A1,SCO1, and COX11 in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barresi, Vincenza; Trovato-Salinaro, Angela; Spampinato, Giorgia; Musso, Nicolò; Castorina, Sergio; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Condorelli, Daniele Filippo

    2016-08-01

    Copper homeostasis and distribution is strictly regulated by a network of transporters and intracellular chaperones encoded by a group of genes collectively known as copper homeostasis genes (CHGs). In this work, analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas database for somatic point mutations in colorectal cancer revealed that inactivating mutations are absent or extremely rare in CHGs. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we found a strong increase in mRNA levels of the membrane copper transporter 1 protein [CTR1; encoded by the solute carrier family 31 member 1 gene (SLC31A1 gene)] in our series of colorectal carcinoma samples. CTR1 is the main copper influx transporter and changes in its expression are able to induce modifications of cellular copper accumulation. The increased SLC31A1 mRNA level is accompanied by a parallel increase in transcript levels for copper efflux pump ATP7A, copper metabolism Murr1 domain containing 1 (COMMD1), the cytochrome C oxidase assembly factors [synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 1 (SCO1) and cytochrome c oxidase copper chaperone 11 (COX11)], the cupric reductase six transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate (STEAP3), and the metal-regulatory transcription factors (MTF1, MTF2) and specificity protein 1 (SP1). The significant correlation between SLC31A1,SCO1, and COX11 mRNA levels suggests that this transcriptional upregulation might be part of a coordinated program of gene regulation. Transcript-level upregulation of SLC31A1,SCO1, and COX11 was also confirmed by the analysis of different colon carcinoma cell lines (Caco-2, HT116, HT29) and cancer cell lines of different tissue origin (MCF7, PC3). Finally, exon-level expression analysis of SLC31A1 reveals differential expression of alternative transcripts in colorectal cancer and normal colonic mucosa.

  15. Implementing a Death with Dignity program at a comprehensive cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loggers, Elizabeth Trice; Starks, Helene; Shannon-Dudley, Moreen; Back, Anthony L; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Stewart, F Marc

    2013-04-11

    The majority of Death with Dignity participants in Washington State and Oregon have received a diagnosis of terminal cancer. As more states consider legislation regarding physician-assisted death, the experience of a comprehensive cancer center may be informative. We describe the implementation of a Death with Dignity program at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, the site of care for the Fred Hutchinson-University of Washington Cancer Consortium, a comprehensive cancer center in Seattle that serves the Pacific Northwest. Institution-level data were compared with publicly available statewide data from Oregon and Washington. A total of 114 patients inquired about our Death with Dignity program between March 5, 2009, and December 31, 2011. Of these, 44 (38.6%) did not pursue the program, and 30 (26.3%) initiated the process but either elected not to continue or died before completion. Of the 40 participants who, after counseling and upon request, received a prescription for a lethal dose of secobarbital (35.1% of the 114 patients who inquired about the program), all died, 24 after medication ingestion (60% of those obtaining prescriptions). The participants at our center accounted for 15.7% of all participants in the Death with Dignity program in Washington (255 persons) and were typically white, male, and well educated. The most common reasons for participation were loss of autonomy (97.2%), inability to engage in enjoyable activities (88.9%), and loss of dignity (75.0%). Eleven participants lived for more than 6 months after prescription receipt. Qualitatively, patients and families were grateful to receive the lethal prescription, whether it was used or not. Overall, our Death with Dignity program has been well accepted by patients and clinicians.

  16. Electron holes appear to trigger cancer-implicated mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John; Villagran, Martha

    Malignant tumors are caused by mutations, which also affect their subsequent growth and evolution. We use a novel approach, computational DNA hole spectroscopy [M.Y. Suarez-Villagran & J.H. Miller, Sci. Rep. 5, 13571 (2015)], to compute spectra of enhanced hole probability based on actual sequence data. A hole is a mobile site of positive charge created when an electron is removed, for example by radiation or contact with a mutagenic agent. Peaks in the hole spectrum depict sites where holes tend to localize and potentially trigger a base pair mismatch during replication. Our studies of reveal a correlation between hole spectrum peaks and spikes in human mutation frequencies. Importantly, we also find that hole peak positions that do not coincide with large variant frequencies often coincide with cancer-implicated mutations and/or (for coding DNA) encoded conserved amino acids. This enables combining hole spectra with variant data to identify critical base pairs and potential cancer `driver' mutations. Such integration of DNA hole and variance spectra could also prove invaluable for pinpointing critical regions, and sites of driver mutations, in the vast non-protein-coding genome. Supported by the State of Texas through the Texas Ctr. for Superconductivity.

  17. Cancer Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Vaccines On This Page What is the immune system? ... cells recognized by the immune system? What are vaccines? What are cancer vaccines? How do cancer preventive ...

  18. Dual role of LRRC8A-containing transporters on cisplatin resistance in human ovarian cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Belinda Halling; Dam, Celina Støving; Stürup, Stefan;

    2016-01-01

    component of volume sensitive channels for organic osmolytes (VSOAC) and volume regulated anion channels (VRAC), which are activated during the apoptotic process. Here we illustrate that cisplatin resistance in human ovarian cancer cells (A2780) correlates with a reduced expression of LRRC8A and copper...... transporter receptor 1 (CTR1), as well as a concomitant increased expression of copper-transporting P-type ATPases (ATP7A/ATP7B). We also find that cisplatin (Pt) accumulation correlates with LRRC8A protein expression and channel activity, i.e., the cellular Pt content is high when VSOAC is activated...... expression in cisplatin-resistant A2780 cells ensures cell survival through limitation in cisplatin accumulation and a concomitant reduction in osmolytes loss via VSOAC/VRAC and hence instigation of the apoptotic process....

  19. Prevalence, sources, and predictors of soy consumption in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lis Christopher G

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of components in soy appear to have anticancer properties, including the isoflavones, genistein and daidzein. The use of soy by women with breast cancer is now being questioned because of the estrogen-like effects of isoflavones and possible interactions with tamoxifen. Clinicians providing nutrition counseling to these women are concerned because the availability of soy foods has increased dramatically in the past few years. The goal of this study was to quantify the intake of isoflavones in women with breast cancer. Methods A cross-sectional study of 100 women with breast cancer treated at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® between 09/03 and 02/04. Each patient completed a soy food frequency questionnaire (FFQ that was scored by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Demographic and clinical predictors of soy intake were evaluated using one-way non-parametric Mann Whitney test and non-parametric spearman's rank correlation. Results Mean age was 50.5 years (std. dev. = 9.4; range 31–70 and mean BMI was 27.3 kg/m2 (std. dev. = 6.75; range 17–59. Genistein and Daidzein consumption was limited to 65 patients with a mean intake of 11.6 mg/day (std. dev. = 21.9; range 0–97.4 and 7.6 mg/day (std. dev. = 14.1; range 0–68.9 respectively. Soy milk (37% and pills containing soy, isoflavones, or "natural" estrogen (24% were the two biggest contributors to isoflavone intake. Conclusion Our study suggests that the isoflavone intake of breast cancer patients at our hospital was quite variable. Thirty-five patients reported no soy intake. The mean daily intake of 11.6 mg genistein and 7.4 mg daidzein, is the equivalent of less than 1/4 cup of tofu per day. This amount is higher than what has been previously reported in non-Asian American women.

  20. Statins and Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer ... Myths and Misconceptions Diet Hormones Immunosuppression Infectious Agents Obesity Radiation Sunlight Tobacco Genetics NCI Cancer Genetics Services ...

  1. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ... Myths and Misconceptions Diet Hormones Immunosuppression Infectious Agents Obesity Radiation Sunlight Tobacco Genetics NCI Cancer Genetics Services ...

  2. Secondhand Smoke and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ... Myths and Misconceptions Diet Hormones Immunosuppression Infectious Agents Obesity Radiation Sunlight Tobacco Genetics NCI Cancer Genetics Services ...

  3. Preferences for oral versus intravenous adjuvant chemotherapy among early breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishitobi M

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Makoto Ishitobi,1 Kazuyo Shibuya,2 Yoshifumi Komoike,1 Hiroki Koyama,1 Hideo Inaji1 1Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, 2Department of Nursing, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka, Japan Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate preferences for oral versus intravenous adjuvant chemotherapy among early breast cancer patients (UMIN-CTR number UMIN000004696. Patients and methods: Eighty-two postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive, human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2-negative breast cancer who had completed adjuvant chemotherapy were asked about their preferred route of administration of chemotherapy and the reason. Women also answered questions about their physical and psychological status and quality of life during chemotherapy. Results: Patients who had received oral chemotherapy preferred it more frequently than those who had received intravenous chemotherapy (100% versus 37%, respectively, chi-square =15.5; P<0.001. Patients who preferred the same route of administration of chemotherapy as they had previously received showed a significantly better psychological status during chemotherapy compared with those who preferred a different route. Conclusion: Our study showed that preferences for oral and intravenous chemotherapy strongly depended on the actual prior administration of chemotherapy and patients' own experiences during chemotherapy. Keywords: breast cancer, adjuvant, chemotherapy, patient preference, oral, intravenous

  4. Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer? Cancer Treatment Coping With Cancer en español Cáncer infantil Every cell in the body has a system that controls its growth, interaction with other cells, and even its life span. ... cancer . Different kinds of cancer have different signs, symptoms, ...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and ... of Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research ...

  6. What Is Thymus Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer? Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer What Is Thymus Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body ... Research and Treatment for Thymus Cancer? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and ... of Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung ... need for different kinds of information about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View this ...

  9. What Is Colorectal Cancer?

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    ... Research? Colorectal Cancer About Colorectal Cancer What Is Colorectal Cancer? Colorectal cancer is a cancer that starts in ... and spread, see What Is Cancer? How does colorectal cancer start? Most colorectal cancers begin as a growth ...

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening ... Is Cancer Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening ...

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening ... Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening ...

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by ... Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s Role ...

  13. Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  14. Bone Cancer

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    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  15. Stomach Cancer

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    ... with stomach acid and helps digest protein. Stomach cancer mostly affects older people - two-thirds of people ... Smoke cigarettes Have a family history of stomach cancer It is hard to diagnose stomach cancer in ...

  16. Uterine Cancer

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    ... is pregnant. There are different types of uterine cancer. The most common type starts in the endometrium, ... the uterus. This type is also called endometrial cancer. The symptoms of uterine cancer include Abnormal vaginal ...

  17. Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunotherapy is a cancer treatment that helps your immune system fight cancer. It is a type of biological therapy. Biological therapy uses substances ... t yet use immunotherapy as often as other cancer treatments, such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. ...

  18. Anal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has just been diagnosed with anal cancer, this short, simple guide can help. More Resources Read more Cancer Basics Read more Finding Treatment Centers Read more Online Support Communities News & Stories Read More Latest Cancer News Read More Stories ...

  19. Cancer Moonshot

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Moonshot, led by Vice President Joe Biden, will marshal resources across the federal government to speed progress in cancer research and lead to improved cancer prevention, detection, and treatment.

  20. Cancer Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... controlled way. Cancer cells keep growing without control. Chemotherapy is drug therapy for cancer. It works by killing the cancer ... It depends on the type and amount of chemotherapy you get and how your body reacts. Some ...

  1. Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian ...

  2. Throat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... food. Surgery to remove cancerous lymph nodes (neck dissection). If throat cancer has spread deep within your ... neck cancers. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015. Freedman ND, et al. Fruit ...

  3. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types ... face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common. Anyone ...

  4. Cancer Disparities - Cancer Currents Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blog posts on cancer health disparities research—including factors that influence disparities, disparities-related research efforts, and diversity in the cancer research workforce—from NCI Cancer Currents.

  5. Cancer Technology - Cancer Currents Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blog posts on technologies that affect cancer research and care—including new technologies for detecting cancer, testing treatments, storing/analyzing data, and improving patient care—from NCI Cancer Currents.

  6. Cancer Treatment - Cancer Currents Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    A catalog of posts from NCI’s Cancer Currents blog on cancer treatment research. Includes posts on new treatments for cancer and their effects, clinical trial results, and overcoming treatment resistance.

  7. Cancer Prevention - Cancer Currents Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    A catalog of posts from NCI’s Cancer Currents blog on research related to cancer prevention. Includes posts on behavioral interventions and other ways to prevent cancer and prevention-related research programs.

  8. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table ... is unknown, but it is the second most common cause of death from cancer in men of ...

  9. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table ... you should know about six of the most common cancers and some of the NCI funded research ...

  10. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table ... the United States, it is the third most common cancer in men and women. Caught early, it ...

  11. How to research cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... summaries on pediatric cancer treatment -- www.cancer.gov/publications/pdq/information-summaries/pediatric-treatment American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org . The American Cancer Society (ACS) ...

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... to Z List of Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic ... National Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators ...

  13. Connexin 26 gene therapy of human bladder cancer: induction of growth suppression, apoptosis, and synergy with Cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M; Grossman, H B

    2001-12-10

    The connexin 26 (Cx26) gene encodes a protein involved in gap junctional intercellular communication and is a putative tumor suppressor. We constructed a Cx26 adenovirus vector (Ad-Cx26) and used it to infect human bladder cancer cell lines UM-UC-3, UM-UC-6, UM-UC-14, and T24. Infection with Ad-Cx26 suppressed the growth of these cell lines in vitro and prevented tumor formation in vivo. Cell cycle accumulation or arrest at the G(1) phase was noted in UM-UC-3 cells and at the G(2)/M phase in UM-UC-6, UM-UC-14, and T24 cells. Apoptosis was noted in UM-UC-3, UM-UC-6, and UM-UC-14 cells both in vitro and in vivo. These effects were not seen with control adenovirus (Ad-CTR) or mock infection. Ad-Cx26 did not significantly alter the growth of the immortalized normal human bladder cell line SV-HUC. Direct injection of Ad-Cx26 into established UM-UC-3 and UM-UC-14 tumors in nude mice resulted in Cx26 expression, apoptosis, and significantly decreased growth compared with Ad-CTR treated tumors. Delayed resumption of tumor growth was associated with loss of Cx26 expression. Combination therapy with Ad-Cx26 and cisplatin resulted in decreased growth in vitro compared with either agent alone. We explored combination therapy with Ad-Cx26 and cisplatin to improve the in vivo efficacy of Cx26 gene therapy. In vivo therapy with Ad-Cx26 and cisplatin resulted in long-term suppression of tumor growth. These data demonstrate that combining gene and chemotherapy can result in dramatic synergy in vivo.

  14. Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaginal cancer is a rare type of cancer. It is more common in women 60 and older. You are also more likely to get it if you have had a human ... test can find abnormal cells that may be cancer. Vaginal cancer can often be cured in its ...

  15. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood ... A to Z List of Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic ...

  17. National Comprehensive Cancer Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nervous System Cancers Cervical Cancer Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Colon Cancer Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans Esophageal and Esophagogastric Junction Cancers Gastric Cancer Hairy Cell Leukemia Head and Neck Cancer Hepatobiliary Cancers Hodgkin ...

  18. Diet and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiber and cancer; Cancer and fiber; Nitrates and cancer; Cancer and nitrates ... DIET AND BREAST CANCER The link between nutrition and breast cancer has been well studied. To reduce risk of breast cancer the American ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... about Your Advanced Cancer Coping with Your Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer and Caregivers Questions ... Talking About Advanced Cancer Coping With Your Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer ...

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All Cancer Types A to Z List of Cancers ... Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press Releases 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 ...

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Talking about Advanced Cancer Coping with Your Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer and Caregivers Questions ... Talking About Advanced Cancer Coping With Your Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer ...

  2. Surgery for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage Cervical Cancer Treating Cervical Cancer Surgery for Cervical Cancer Many women with cervical cancer will have some ... Options for Cervical Cancer, by Stage More In Cervical Cancer About Cervical Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  3. What Is Thyroid Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer What Is Thyroid Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... cell) Medullary Anaplastic (an aggressive undifferentiated tumor) Differentiated thyroid cancers Most thyroid cancers are differentiated cancers. The cells ...

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer ... grade, which refers to how abnormal the cancer cells look under a microscope. Grade provides clues about ...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic ... grade, which refers to how abnormal the cancer cells look under a microscope. Grade provides clues about ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancers Clinical Trials Global Cancer Research Key Initiatives The RAS Initiative Cancer ... Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancer Clinical Trials Global Health Key Initiatives Cancer Moonshot Genomic Data Commons ...

  7. Breast Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer > Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Overview Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  8. What Is Breast Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research? Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer What Is Breast Cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... spread, see our section on Cancer Basics . Where breast cancer starts Breast cancers can start from different parts ...

  9. American Institute for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Cancer By Cancer Site What Is Cancer Foods That Fight Cancer Tools You Can Use Cancer Infographics & Multimedia Studying ... About Cancer By Cancer Site What Is Cancer Foods That Fight Cancer Tools You Can Use Cancer Infographics & Multimedia Studying ...

  10. Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Prasad

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer screening is a means to detect cancer early with the goal of decreasing morbidity and mortality. At present, there is a reasonable consensus regarding screening for breast, cervical and colorectal cances and the role of screening is under trial in case of cancers of the lung,  ovaries and prostate. On the other hand, good screening tests are not available for some of the commonest cancers in India like the oral, pharyngeal, esophageal and stomach cancers.

  11. Cancer Screening

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna Prasad

    2004-01-01

    Cancer screening is a means to detect cancer early with the goal of decreasing morbidity and mortality. At present, there is a reasonable consensus regarding screening for breast, cervical and colorectal cances and the role of screening is under trial in case of cancers of the lung,  ovaries and prostate. On the other hand, good screening tests are not available for some of the commonest cancers in India like the oral, pharyngeal, esophageal and stomach cancers.

  12. Cancer Patients Versus Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Catherine E.; Danoff-Burg, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Two studies examined the social and emotional implications of different linguistic classifications of individuals with cancer. Undergraduates were randomly assigned to rate their reactions to either cancer patients or cancer survivors. Across studies, participants held more favorable perceptions of the character of cancer survivors relative to cancer patients and displayed more positive attitudes toward the former group. In addition, participants in Study 1 reported greater willingness to interact with cancer survivors compared with cancer patients. Positive perceptions of prognosis did not appear to account for favorable attitudes toward cancer survivors; most participants in Study 2 did not assume that cancer survivors were beyond the treatment phase of their illness or cured of their disease. Findings point to a potentially powerful effect of word choice on reactions to individuals with cancer. PMID:24371366

  13. Knowledge, Attitude and Health Seeking Behavior of Health Care Professionals regarding Breast and Cervical Cancer at Indian Medical College

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajal Thaker*

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Research article Knowledge, Attitude and Health Seeking Behavior of Health Care Professionals regarding Breast and Cervical Cancer at Indian Medical College Rajal Thaker*,Kay Perrin**, Ellen Daley *** ,Cheryl Vamos ****,Pankaj Patel ***** * Associate Professor Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ***** Dean; Smt N H L Municipal Medical College, Ahmedabad 380 006, India. ** Associate Professor, *** Associate Professor, Co-Director, Center for Transdisciplinary Research in Women’s Health (CTR-WH, **** Research Assistant Professor, Associate Director; Center for Transdisciplinary Research in Women’s Health (CTR-WH; University of South Florida College of Public Health, USA Abstract Background: Women’s preventative health is a major public health issue across the globe. From prenatal care to post-menopausal screenings, women’s preventative care covers a wide spectrum of issues and topics. There is limited data on knowledge and practices of screening methods of breast and cervical cancers among female health care professionals in India. This study examines health care professionals’ knowledge and practices regarding breast and cervical cancer screenings in India. Material and Methods After clearance from Institutional Review Board (IRB of University of South Florida (USF and permission from Smt N H L Municipal Medical College (NHLMMC, a cross- sectional interview based survey was conducted amongst female teaching faculty and female consultants of NHLMMC, two affiliated teaching hospitals (Sheth V S General Hospital and Smt S C L General Hospital, and SBB college of Physiotherapy during the year 2010-2011. Conclusion Findings highlight the critical need for education and practice with regards to women’s preventive health care. Practice of Breast Self Examination (BSE and Pap test amongst the health care professionals was quite low; however, those who were 40 year or older were more conscious about their health. Findings also highlight the need for

  14. Cancer Research Repository for Individuals With Cancer Diagnosis, High Risk Individuals, and Individuals With No History of Cancer (Control)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    Pancreatic Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Lung Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Thymus Cancer; Colon Cancer; Rectal Cancer; GIST; Anal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Liver Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Lynch Syndrome; Bladder Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Penile Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Cancer; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Laryngeal Cancer; Lip Cancer; Oral Cavity Cancer; Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Nasal Cavity Cancer; Salivary Gland Cancer; Skin Cancer; CNS Tumor; CNS Cancer; Mesothelioma; Breastcancer; Leukemia; Melanoma; Sarcoma; Unknown Primary Tumor; Multiple Myeloma; Ovarian Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Vaginal Cancer

  15. Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer ... Myths and Misconceptions Diet Hormones Immunosuppression Infectious Agents Obesity Radiation Sunlight Tobacco Genetics NCI Cancer Genetics Services ...

  16. Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ... Myths and Misconceptions Diet Hormones Immunosuppression Infectious Agents Obesity Radiation Sunlight Tobacco Genetics NCI Cancer Genetics Services ...

  17. Examples of Cancer Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ... for cancer (for example, tobacco smoking, physical inactivity, obesity, excessive alcohol intake, and health status), as well ...

  18. Vitamin D and Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ... Myths and Misconceptions Diet Hormones Immunosuppression Infectious Agents Obesity Radiation Sunlight Tobacco Genetics NCI Cancer Genetics Services ...

  19. Eye Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  20. Cancer treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000901.htm Cancer treatments To use the sharing features on this page, ... or IV. Immunotherapy Immunotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that relies on the body’s ability to fight ...

  1. Cancer Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the tumor is to grow and spread The TNM Staging System The TNM system is the most widely used cancer staging system. Most hospitals and medical centers use the TNM system as their main method for cancer reporting. ...

  2. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  3. Gallbladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your gallbladder and liver to your small intestine. Cancer of the gallbladder is rare. It is more ... the abdomen It is hard to diagnose gallbladder cancer in its early stages. Sometimes doctors find it ...

  4. Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  5. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  6. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  7. Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic information about cancer disparities in the U.S., factors that contribute to the disproportionate burden of cancer in some groups, and examples of disparities in incidence and mortality among certain populations.

  8. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  9. Nasal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the way to your throat as you breathe. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is ... be like those of infections. Doctors diagnose nasal cancer with imaging tests, lighted tube-like instruments that ...

  10. Thymus Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell. These cells help protect you from infections. Cancer of the thymus is rare. You are more ... Sometimes there are no symptoms. Other times, thymus cancer can cause A cough that doesn't go ...

  11. Endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be at a higher risk of endometrial cancer: Colon or breast cancer Diabetes Gallbladder disease High blood ... laparoscopic - discharge Hysterectomy - vaginal - discharge Pelvic radiation - discharge Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina Burd, ...

  12. Cancer prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction A 44 year old woman attends your surgery,distressed by the fact that her closest friend has just been given a diagnosis of colorectal cancer. She wants to know how to minimise her risk of developing cancer.

  13. Cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to cervical cancer. Other strains can cause genital warts . Others do not cause any problems at all. ... or radiation. Support Groups You can ease the stress of illness by joining a cancer support group . ...

  14. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, ...

  15. Throat or larynx cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocal cord cancer; Throat cancer; Laryngeal cancer; Cancer of the glottis; Cancer of oropharynx or hypopharynx ... use tobacco are at risk of developing throat cancer. Drinking too much alcohol over a long time ...

  16. Snapshot of Pediatric Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment Pediatric Supportive Care Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Childhood ... Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment Pediatric Supportive Care Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Childhood ...

  17. Lung Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease ...

  18. Cervical Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Cervical Cancer Prevention Cervical Cancer Screening Research Cervical Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Cervical Cancer Cervical cancer is a disease in which malignant ( ...

  19. Childhood Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid Cancer Cancer Resources Childhood Cancer Statistics Coping With Cancer CureSearch CancerCare App Late Effects ...

  20. What Is Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid Cancer Cancer Resources Childhood Cancer Statistics Coping With Cancer CureSearch CancerCare App Late Effects ...

  1. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Stomach Cancer Key Points Stomach (gastric) cancer is a ...

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and ... Annual Report to the Nation Cancer Snapshots Milestones in Cancer Research and Discovery Stories of Discovery R& ...

  3. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  4. Thyroid Cancer Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevented? Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Thyroid Cancer Risk Factors A risk factor is anything that ... Cancer? Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  5. Skin Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? ... prevent cancer are being studied. General Information About Skin Cancer Key Points Skin cancer is a disease ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment Pediatric Supportive Care Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Childhood Cancer Genomics Study ... Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood ...

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ...

  8. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Treatment Surgery for Breast Cancer Surgery is a common treatment for breast cancer, ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  9. Surgery for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage Testicular Cancer Treating Testicular Cancer Surgery for Testicular Cancer Surgery is typically the first treatment for all ... Testicular Cancer, by Type and Stage More In Testicular Cancer About Testicular Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  10. What Is Testicular Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment? Testicular Cancer About Testicular Cancer What Is Testicular Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... respond well to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Secondary testicular cancers Cancers that start in another organ and then ...

  11. Profiling cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciro, Marco; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2003-01-01

    In the past couple of years, several very exciting studies have demonstrated the enormous power of gene-expression profiling for cancer classification and prediction of patient survival. In addition to promising a more accurate classification of cancer and therefore better treatment of patients......, gene-expression profiling can result in the identification of novel potential targets for cancer therapy and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer....

  12. Prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  13. Profiling cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciro, Marco; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2003-01-01

    In the past couple of years, several very exciting studies have demonstrated the enormous power of gene-expression profiling for cancer classification and prediction of patient survival. In addition to promising a more accurate classification of cancer and therefore better treatment of patients......, gene-expression profiling can result in the identification of novel potential targets for cancer therapy and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer....

  14. Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of skin behind the penis. You can get cancer in one or both testicles. Testicular cancer mainly affects young men between the ages of ... undescended testicle Have a family history of the cancer Symptoms include pain, swelling, or lumps in your ...

  15. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  16. Breast cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Cancer specialists will soon be able to compare mammograms with computerized images of breast cancer from across Europe, in a bid to improve diagnosis and treatment....The new project, known as MammoGrid, brings together computer and medical imaging experts, cancer specialists, radiologists and epidemiologists from Bristol, Oxford, Cambridge, France and Italy" (1 page).

  17. Craniofacial abnormalities in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, N J; Silvera, V M; Campbell, S E; Gordon, L B

    2012-09-01

    HGPS is a rare syndrome of segmental premature aging. Our goal was to expand the scope of structural bone and soft-tissue craniofacial abnormalities in HGPS through CT or MR imaging. Using The Progeria Research Foundation Medical and Research Database, 98 imaging studies on 25 patients, birth to 14.1 years of age, were comprehensively reviewed. Eight newly identified abnormalities involving the calvaria, skull base, and soft tissues of the face and orbits were present with prevalences between 43% and 100%. These included J-shaped sellas, a mottled appearance and increased vascular markings of the calvaria, abnormally configured mandibular condyles, hypoplastic articular eminences, small zygomatic arches, prominent parotid glands, and optic nerve kinking. This expanded craniofacial characterization helps link disease features and improves our ability to evaluate how underlying genetic and cellular abnormalities culminate in a disease phenotype.

  18. A non-randomized confirmatory trial of segmentectomy for clinical T1N0 lung cancer with dominant ground glass opacity based on thin-section computed tomography (JCOG1211).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aokage, Keiju; Saji, Hisashi; Suzuki, Kenji; Mizutani, Tomonori; Katayama, Hiroshi; Shibata, Taro; Watanabe, Syunichi; Asamura, Hisao

    2017-05-01

    Lobectomy has been the standard surgery for even stage I lung cancer since the validity of limited resection for stage I lung cancer was denied by the randomized study reported in 1995. The aim of this non-randomized confirmatory going on since September 2013 is to confirm the efficacy of a segmentectomy for clinical T1N0 lung cancer with dominant ground glass opacity based on thin-slice computed tomography. A total of 390 patients from 42 Japanese institutions are recruited within 4 years. The primary endpoint of this study is a 5-year relapse-free survival in all of the patients who undergo a segmentectomy for a lung nodule. The secondary endpoints are overall survival, annual relapse-free survival, disease-free survival, proportion of local relapse, postoperative pulmonary function, proportion of segmentectomy completion, proportion of R0 resection completion by segmentectomy, adverse events, and serious adverse events. This trial has been registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000011819 ( http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/ ). Patient's accrual has been already finished in November, 2015 and the primary analysis will be performed in 2021. This study is one of the pivotal trial of lung segmentectomy for early lung cancer. The result will provide a clear evidence for our daily clinics and will be possible contribution to preserving pulmonary function for lung cancer patients.

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Talking About Advanced Cancer Coping With Your Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs ...

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staging Prognosis Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information ... Cancer Genomics Study Findings Metastatic Cancer Metastatic Cancer Research ... Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast ...

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening ...

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening ...

  3. Study of Three Cases of Hutchinson - Gilford Progeria Syndrome in A Guangxi Han Family:Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA D-loop Region Mutations%广西汉族早老症家系三例病例研究--线粒体 DNAD -环区突变分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李福记; 方玲; 胡启平; 袁志刚; 舒伟; 吴华裕; 韩焕钦; 陈凤平; 覃霞; 吕宇; 林有坤; 舒艳; 张伟峰

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨广西汉族1个早老症家系中3例儿童早老症(HGPS)患者线粒体 DNA D -环区(D - loop区)突变是否呈现年龄相关的突变累积。方法采用聚合酶链反应(PCR)对3例 HGPS 患者及其父母、8例正常老人(正常老人组)的线粒体 DNA D - loop 区进行扩增、测序。结果正常老年人线粒体 DNA D - loop 区较 Cambridge 序列存在较多的突变位点,HGPS 患者与正常老人组线粒体 DNA D - loop 区突变率差异具有统计学意义( P ﹤0.05);3例HGPS 患者线粒体 DNA D - loop 区单体型与其母亲一致;未检测到3例 HGPS 患者线粒体 DNA D - loop 区发生新突变,也未检测到3例 HGPS 患者线粒体 DNA D - loop 区存在差异。结论该家系3例 HGPS 患者在7岁前未发生线粒体DNA D - loop 突变累积,且不同年龄患者均未见年龄相关的突变累积,推论线粒体 DNA 突变不是该家系 HGPS 患者加速衰老的重要原因。%Objective To investigate whether age - related mutation accumulation occurs in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)D - loop region of three cases with Hutchinson - Gilford progeria syndrome( HGPS)in a Guangxi Han family. Methods Polymerase chain reaction(PCR)was used to amplify the mtDNA D - loop region of the three HGPS cases and their parents,as well as 8 normal seniors,and all the PCR products were sequenced and analyzed. Results The normal elders had more mutation sites in the mtDNA D - loop region compared with Cambridge standard sequence,and the three HGPS cases and the normal elders were significantly different in the mutation in the mtDNA D - loop region(P ﹤ 0. 05);the three HGPS cases had same haplotype with their mothers;no new mutations were noted in the mtDNA D - loop region of the three HGPS cases,and no differences were observed in the mtDNA D - loop region among the three HGPS cases. Conclusion No mutation accumulation was observed in the mtDNA D - loop region of the three HGPS cases

  4. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  5. Cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cairns, Linda; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Anichini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This report covers the Immunotherapy sessions of the 2016 Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) Oncology Days meeting, which was held on 15th-17th June 2016 in Brussels, Belgium. Immunotherapy is a potential cancer treatment that uses an individual's immune system to fight the tumour....... In recent years significant advances have been made in this field in the treatment of several advanced cancers. Cancer immunotherapies include monoclonal antibodies that are designed to attack a very specific part of the cancer cell and immune checkpoint inhibitors which are molecules that stimulate...... or block the inhibition of the immune system. Other cancer immunotherapies include vaccines and T cell infusions. This report will summarise some of the research that is going on in this field and will give us an update on where we are at present....

  6. Cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cairns, Linda; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Anichini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This report covers the Immunotherapy sessions of the 2016 Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) Oncology Days meeting, which was held on 15th-17th June 2016 in Brussels, Belgium. Immunotherapy is a potential cancer treatment that uses an individual's immune system to fight the tumour....... In recent years significant advances have been made in this field in the treatment of several advanced cancers. Cancer immunotherapies include monoclonal antibodies that are designed to attack a very specific part of the cancer cell and immune checkpoint inhibitors which are molecules that stimulate...... or block the inhibition of the immune system. Other cancer immunotherapies include vaccines and T cell infusions. This report will summarise some of the research that is going on in this field and will give us an update on where we are at present....

  7. Cancer in Patients With Gabapentin (GPRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    Pain, Neuropathic; Epilepsy; Renal Pelvis Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Breast Cancer; Nervous System Cancer; Chronic Pancreatitis; Stomach Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Diabetes; Bladder Cancer; Bone and Joint Cancer; Penis Cancer; Anal Cancer; Cancer; Renal Cancer

  8. Cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanapal, Raghu; Saraswathi, Tr; Govind, Rajkumar N

    2011-09-01

    Cancer cachexia is a wasting syndrome characterized by weight loss, anorexia, asthenia and anemia. The pathogenicity of this syndrome is multifactorial, due to a complex interaction of tumor and host factors. The signs and symptoms of cachexia are considered as the prognostic parameters in cancer patients. This review gives an emphasis on the various mechanisms involved in cachexia and an insight into head and neck cancer cachexia.

  9. Cancer cachexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Rotovnik Kozjek

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present article presents the Slovenian multidisciplinary agreement statement on the definition, staging, clinical classification and multimodal approach to the treatment of cachexia in cancer patients. The consensus was reached during a multidisciplinary plenary session, and is based on the international definition of cancer cachexia adopted in 2011. Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial metabolic syndrome defined by an ongoing loss of skeletal muscle with or without concomitant loss of fat, which cannot be fully reversed by conventional nutritional support and leads to progressive functional impairment. Its pathophysiology is characterized by a negative energy and protein balance due to a variable combination of reduced food intake and metabolic changes. In cancer patients, the cachexia syndrome can develop progressively through various stages – from precachexia to cachexia and finally, to refractory cachexia–represent-ing a continuum of metabolic changes, clini-cal signs and symptoms. Patients can progress from precachexia to cachexia, and reverse from cachexia into precachectic stages, while (as the term itself implies, the condition of refractory or irreversible cachexia has poor therapeutic response. A clinical algorithm for recognition and treatment of cachexia in cancer patients is presented. All cancer patients should be screened for cachexia and precachexia on presentation. Patients who fulfil diagnostic criteria for cancer cachexia should have its clinical stage determined. According to phenotype / clinical stage, a multimodal approach should be adopted in the treatment of all cases of cancer cachexia. A typical multimodal management plan in cachectic patients consists of early dietary intervention, exercise, anti-inflammatory therapy and early cancer-related symptom relief. The cachexia treatment pathway should be adopted as a pathway parallel to conventional cancer treatment. Practical implementation of cancer cachexia

  10. Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-03-06

    Did you know that cervical cancer rates differ by race/ethnicity and region? Or that cervical cancer can usually be prevented if precancerous cervical lesions are found by a Pap test and treated? Find out how getting regular Pap tests can save a woman's life.  Created: 3/6/2007 by National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.   Date Released: 4/25/2007.

  11. Testicular Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2016-01-01

    ...). Postorchiectomy management options for stage I testis cancer include retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, adjuvant radiotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, and initial active surveillance. Presented...

  12. Skin Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Skin Cancer ... clinical trials before, during, or after starting their cancer treatment. Some clinical trials only include patients who have ...

  13. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer ... clinical trials before, during, or after starting their cancer treatment. Some clinical trials only include patients who have ...

  14. Children's cancer centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Childhood Cancer Genomics Study Findings Metastatic Cancer Metastatic Cancer Research Common Cancer ... your prognosis. Survival statistics most often come from studies that compare treatments with each other, rather than ...

  16. Tests for Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Tests for Liver Cancer If you have some of the signs ... Health Care Team About Liver Cancer? More In Liver Cancer About Liver Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical Information Advance Directives Using ... Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs and Medical Information Advance ...

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics ... Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical Information Advance Directives Using ... Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs and Medical Information Advance ...

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  1. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease in ...

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... with Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for ... Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support ...

  3. Breast Cancer Research Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Research Update Winter 2017 Table of Contents National Cancer Institute ... Addressing Breast Cancer's Unequal Burden / Breast Cancer Research Update Winter 2017 Issue: Volume 11 Number 4 Page ...

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Caregivers Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical ... Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs ...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Research Cancer Genomics Research Research on Causes of ...

  6. Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Skin Cancer Key Points Skin cancer is a disease ...

  7. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/2015 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited ...

  8. What Is Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Graphics Infographic Stay Informed Cancer Home What Is Lung Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... cancer starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics ... Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics ...

  10. Testicular Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Professional Testicular Cancer Treatment Testicular Cancer Screening Testicular Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Testicular Cancer Key Points Testicular cancer is a disease in ...

  11. Learning about Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What do we know about heredity and colon cancer? Colon cancer, a malignant tumor of the large intestine, ... page Additional Resources for Information on Hereditary Colon Cancer Colon and Rectal Cancer Information [cancer.gov] The most ...

  12. Ontario-wide Cancer TArgeted Nucleic Acid Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-14

    Breast Cancer; Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Melanoma; Gynecological Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Cancer; Gastrointestinal Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Rare Cancer; Unknown Primary Cancer

  13. The formyl peptide receptor 1 exerts a tumor suppressor function in human gastric cancer by inhibiting angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevete, N; Liotti, F; Visciano, C; Marone, G; Melillo, R M; de Paulis, A

    2015-07-01

    N-formyl peptide receptors (FPR1, FPR2 and FPR3) are involved in innate immunity, inflammation and cancer. FPR expression, initially described in immune cells, was later observed in non-hematopoietic cell populations and tissues. Several studies suggested a role for FPRs in the progression of various tumor histotypes, including gastric cancer (GC), for which a positive association with a specific FPR1 polymorphism has recently been described. We previously showed that FPRs are expressed on gastric epithelium and are required for wound repair and restitution of barrier integrity. Here we assess the role of FPRs in GC. We characterized the functions of FPRs in GC epithelial cells (MKN28, AGS and MKN45) cultured in vitro by assessing migration, proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and activation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Activation of each FPR induced the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and migration of GC cells in culture. Blocking compounds or RNA interference of each FPR reverted these effects. We also defined the in vivo tumorigenic potential of GC epithelial cells silenced for FPRs by xenograft experiments in immunocompromised mice. Interestingly, FPR1 silencing in GC cells (shFPR1) significantly enhanced xenograft growth with respect to shCTR, shFPR2 and shFPR3 xenografts, because of augmented vessel density and cell proliferation. Accordingly, HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA levels were higher in shFPR1 xenografts than in controls. Moreover, the in vitro production of proangiogenic factors in response to FPR2/3 agonists (WKYMVm, LL-37, uPA, uPAR84-95, AnxA1) or to other proinflammatory mediators (IL-1α) was higher in shFPR1 GC cells than in shCTR, shFPR2 and shFPR3 cells, suggesting that FPR1 functions as an inhibitor of CG angiogenesis. Thus, we propose that FPR1 stimulation may represent a novel therapeutic approach to counteract tumor angiogenesis.

  14. Renal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corgna, Enrichetta; Betti, Maura; Gatta, Gemma; Roila, Fausto; De Mulder, Pieter H. M.

    2007-01-01

    In Europe, renal cancer (that is neoplasia of the kidney, renal pelvis or ureter (ICD-9 189 and ICD-10 C64-C66)) ranks as the seventh most common malignancy in men amongst whom there are 29,600 new cases each year (3.5% of all cancers). Tobacco, obesity and a diet poor in vegetables are all acknowle

  15. Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Eggener

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer continues to be a significant public health issue worldwide, particularly in countries where men have life expectancies long enough to clinically manifest the disease. In many countries, it remains one of the leading causes of cancer-related morbidity and mortality.

  16. Renal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corgna, E.; Betti, M.; Gatta, G.; Roila, F.; Mulder, P.H.M. de

    2007-01-01

    In Europe, renal cancer (that is neoplasia of the kidney, renal pelvis or ureter (ICD-9 189 and ICD-10 C64-C66)) ranks as the seventh most common malignancy in men amongst whom there are 29,600 new cases each year (3.5% of all cancers). Tobacco, obesity and a diet poor in vegetables are all

  17. Renal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corgna, Enrichetta; Betti, Maura; Gatta, Gemma; Roila, Fausto; De Mulder, Pieter H. M.

    2007-01-01

    In Europe, renal cancer (that is neoplasia of the kidney, renal pelvis or ureter (ICD-9 189 and ICD-10 C64-C66)) ranks as the seventh most common malignancy in men amongst whom there are 29,600 new cases each year (3.5% of all cancers). Tobacco, obesity and a diet poor in vegetables are all

  18. Occupational Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Regulation and Policy OSHA Standards Surveillance NIOSH Data & Statistics by Industry Sector - Cancer Click on one of the eight Sector Tabs at the top of the screen to find available cancer statistics for that Sector Work-Related Lung Disease Surveillance ...

  19. Expression of pim-1 in tumors, tumor stroma and tumor-adjacent mucosa co-determines the prognosis of colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yong-hai; Li, Jian-jun; Xie, Fang-wei; Chen, Jian-fang; Yu, Ying-hao; Ouyang, Xue-nong; Liang, Hou-jie

    2013-01-01

    Provirus integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus (pim-1) is a proto-oncogene that is linked to the development and progression of several cancers. In this study, we evaluated pim-1 expression in tumors, tumor stroma and tumor-adjacent mucosa together as an independent prognostic factor for colon cancer patients. The study included 343 colon cancer patients. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect pim-1. Multivariate cox regression for disease-free survival (DFS) were used to identify independent prognostic factors. Analytic hierarchy process (AHP) was used to calculate the weight of pim-1 in tumors, tumor stroma and tumor-adjacent mucosa in order to obtain a Pim-1 total score (PTS) for recurrence and survival. Kaplan-Meier DFS curves and OS curves for patients with different pim-1 expression levels were compared using the log-rank test. In this study, four independent prognostic factors were identified for colon cancer patients: pim-1 expression in tumors, tumor stroma, tumor-adjacent mucosa, as well as tumor stage. It has been established that clinical stage is an important prognostic factor for colon cancer patients. However, PTS can identify the patients who are likely to recur not only in the whole radical excision group but also within each stage of this group. Based on the results of this study we can conclude that the PTS combined with clinical staging system may be a better predictor of colon cancer patients' prognosis than using the clinical stage system alone. ClinicalTrials.gov Number: ChiCTR-PRCH-12002842.

  20. Early and late recurrence after intentional limited resection for cT1aN0M0, non-small cell lung cancer: from a multi-institutional, retrospective analysis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Yuki; Yano, Motoki; Yoshida, Junji; Koike, Terumoto; Kameyama, Kotaro; Shimamoto, Akira; Nishio, Wataru; Yoshimoto, Kentaro; Utsumi, Tomoki; Shiina, Takayuki; Watanabe, Atsushi; Yamato, Yasushi; Watanabe, Takehiro; Takahashi, Yusuke; Sonobe, Makoto; Kuroda, Hiroaki; Oda, Makoto; Inoue, Masayoshi; Tanahashi, Masayuki; Adachi, Hirofumi; Saito, Masao; Hayashi, Masataro; Otsuka, Hajime; Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Moriya, Yasumitsu; Takahashi, Mamoru; Nishikawa, Shigeto; Suzuki, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    In 2015, we reported the outcomes of patients undergoing intentional limited resection (ILR) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from a retrospective, multi-institutional large database in Japan. Here, we analyse the clinicopathological characteristics of the patients extracted from this database with late recurrence and compare them with those with early recurrence. Of 1538 patients in the database with cT1aN0M0 NSCLC, 92 (6%) had recurrence. In this study, early recurrence was defined as recurrence within 5 years and late recurrence as recurrence beyond 5 years after surgery. We compared the clinicopathological characteristics and post-recurrence survival (PRS) between patients with early and late recurrence. Of the 92 patients with recurrence, 21 (23%) had late recurrence. Compared with the early recurrence group, there were significantly more adenocarcinomas and local recurrences in the late recurrence group (P = 0.04 for both). The 3- and 5-year PRS rates were 53 and 24%, respectively, and the median PRS period was 38 months. There were no significant differences in the PRS curves between patients with early and late recurrence (P = 0.12). Only 3 patients (0.2%) had recurrence more than 10 years after ILR. Of the 21 late-recurrence patients, 17 (81%) had tumours with a consolidation/tumour ratio (CTR) >0.25. Late recurrence occurred in 21 (23%) of 92 patients with recurrence after ILR for cT1aN0M0 NSCLC. Late recurrence was more likely to involve adenocarcinoma and local recurrence. It is thus considered reasonable to follow patients with a CTR >0.25 for 10 years after ILR. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of aberrant methylation on promoter sequences of tumor suppressor genes and total DNA in sputum samples: a promising tool for early detection of COPD and lung cancer in smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzmán Leda

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a disorder associated to cigarette smoke and lung cancer (LC. Since epigenetic changes in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs are clearly important in the development of LC. In this study, we hypothesize that tobacco smokers are susceptible for methylation in the promoter region of TSGs in airway epithelial cells when compared with non-smoker subjects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of detection of genes promoter methylation in sputum specimens, as a complementary tool to identify LC biomarkers among smokers with early COPD. Methods We determined the amount of DNA in induced sputum from patients with COPD (n = 23, LC (n = 26, as well as in healthy subjects (CTR (n = 33, using a commercial kit for DNA purification, followed by absorbance measurement at 260 nm. The frequency of CDKN2A, CDH1 and MGMT promoter methylation in the same groups was determined by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP. The Fisher’s exact test was employed to compare frequency of results between different groups. Results DNA concentration was 7.4 and 5.8 times higher in LC and COPD compared to the (CTR (p  Conclusions We provide evidence that aberrant methylation of TSGs in samples of induced sputum is a useful tool for early diagnostic of lung diseases (LC and COPD in smoker subjects. Virtual slides The abstract MUST finish with the following text: Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1127865005664160

  2. Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after colorectal cancer. To help maintain good health, colorectal cancer survivors should also: Get to and stay at a healthy weight Keep physically active Eat a healthy diet , with an emphasis on plant foods Limit alcohol to no more than 1 drink per day ...

  3. Study of Three Cases of Hutchinson - Gilford Progeria Syndrome in A Guangxi Han Family:Analysis of Imaging Featu re%广西汉族早老症家系三例病例研究--影像学特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴华裕; 林有坤; 方玲; 覃霞; 舒艳; 张伟峰; 李福记; 舒伟; 马军; 胡启平; 袁志刚

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the imaging data of three cases of Hutchinson - Gilford Progeria Syndrome(HGPS) in Guangxi Han family,and to explore the patients' imaging features. Methods We collected the clinical data,CT,X - ray and MRI of three HGPS patients in Guangxi and made a summary of the imaging features. Results The proband was a 7 - year- old girl,and the other two patients were her younger sister(3 years old)and brother(1 years old). The proband neck radiograph showed abnormal scale between the calvarium and the mandible,mandibular hypoplasia,clavicle disappearing and pear shaped chest. The X - ray of 3 patients' hands showed that all the 3 cases were with flexion deformity in digintal joints and osteoporosis,and two older patients showed retardation of bone age and obvious osteolysis in distal phalanx. The lung CT scaning results of the 3 patients did not show lung fibrosis,but the chest and lung of the proband were smaller than normal children,and the fat thickness of the chest was thinner than normal girls. The brain MRI imaging of the proband showed the proportion of cerebral cranium became larger,but the pituitary size was normal. Conclusion The characteristic changes of the imaging occur in HGPS patients,including osteoporosis,mandibular hypoplasia,clavicle and distal phalanx disappearing and shortening, flexion deformity of digital joints and pear shaped chest. The findings have great significance on the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of progeria.%目的:分析广西汉族1个罕见早老症家系3例患者的影像学资料,探讨该家系早老症患者的影像学特征。方法收集广西汉族1个早老症家系3例患者的临床资料及 CT、X 线、MRI 影像学检查资料,对其影像学特点进行总结。结果先证者为7岁女孩,另2例患者分别为先证者的妹妹(3岁)和弟弟(1岁)。先证者颈部正侧位片示颅盖骨与下颌骨比例不协调,下颌骨发育不全,锁骨消失,梨形胸。3例患

  4. Get Tested for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print This Topic En español Get Tested for Cervical Cancer Browse Sections The Basics Overview Cervical Cancer Pap ... Cervical Cancer 1 of 5 sections The Basics: Cervical Cancer What is cervical cancer? Cervical cancer is cancer ...

  5. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? Most people with thyroid cancer have ... Cancer? Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  6. Breast Cancer -- Male

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  7. Vaginal Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Vaginal Cancer Vaginal Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Vaginal Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Vaginal Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  8. Other Considerations for Pregnancy and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Patient Breast Cancer Patient Breast Cancer Treatment Male Breast Cancer Treatment Breast Cancer Treatment & Pregnancy Breast Cancer Prevention Breast Cancer Screening Health Professional Breast Cancer Treatment Male ... Treatment Breast Cancer Treatment & Pregnancy Breast Cancer Prevention ...

  9. Lung cancer trends: smoking, obesity, and sex assessed in the Staten Island University’s lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Shilpi Gupta,1 Samer Hassan,1 Vijaya R Bhatt,2 Houssein Abdul Sater,1 Asma Dilawari31Hematology-Oncology, Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, NY, USA; 2Hematology-Oncology, Nebraska Medical Ctr, Omaha, NE, USA; 3Hematology-Oncology, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Olney, Maryland, USAIntroduction: The incidence of lung cancer in the United States decreased by 1.8% from 1991 to 2005 while it increased by 0.5% in females. We assessed whether nonsmokers afflicted with lung cancer at Staten Island University Hospital are disproportionately female in comparison to national averages. We also evaluated different factors including race, histology, and body mass index (BMI in correlation with smoking history.Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted from 2005 to 2011 on 857 patients. Patients were divided into two groups according to their smoking status: current or ever-smokers, and former or never-smokers. A chi-square test for categorical data and multivariate logistic regression analyses was used to study the relation between BMI and the other clinical and demographic data.Results: Forty-nine percent of patients were men and 51% were women with a mean age at diagnosis of 67.8 years. Current smokers were most common (50.2% followed by ever-smokers (18.2%, former smokers (15.8% and never-smokers (15.6%. Forty eight percent had stage IV lung cancer upon presentation. Never-smokers with lung cancer were 24 times more likely to be females. However, the proportion of female former smokers (31.6% was lower than the proportion of male former smokers (68.4% (P=0.001. There was no significant association between American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC stage, sex, race, and histological type in the two smoking groups. Current/ever-smokers tended to be younger at age of diagnosis (P=0.0003. BMI was lower in the current/ever-smokers (26.8 kg/m2 versus former/never-smokers (28.8 in males (P=0.0005. BMI was significantly higher in

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests Research Diagnosis and Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Questions ...

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Understanding Cancer What ...

  12. Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or testicles that aren't shaped normally.Have Klinefelter's syndrome (a genetic condition where male infants are born ... contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Tags: cryptorehidism, Klinefelter's syndrome, malignancies, scrotal mass, scrotal masses, testicular cancer, testicular ...

  13. Cancer Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inactivity, nutrition, sun exposure, and even exposure to infectious agents, such as hepatitis B, human papillomavirus, or helicobacter ... The extramural research program reaches nearly 650 universities, hospitals, cancer centers, and other sites in the United ...

  14. Cancer nanotheranostics

    CERN Document Server

    Gopinath, P; Matai, Ishita; Bhushan, Bharat; Malwal, Deepika; Sachdev, Abhay; Dubey, Poornima

    2015-01-01

    This Brief provides a clear insight of the recent advances in the field of cancer theranostics with special emphasis upon nano scale carrier molecules (polymeric, protein and lipid based) and imaging agents (organic and inorganic).

  15. Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you may be eligible to receive a medication (potassium iodide) that blocks the effects of radiation on the ... occur, you and your family could take the potassium iodide tablets to help prevent thyroid cancer. Contact your ...

  16. Vaginal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker NF. Vulvar and vaginal cancer. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker and Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 40. Jhingran ...

  17. Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  18. Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  19. Esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Nimish; Affi, Aboud

    2002-07-01

    Despite advances in our knowledge of esophageal cancer, 50% of patients present with incurable disease, and the overall survival after diagnosis is poor. The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus is rising at a rapid rate in developed countries. Recent advances in the epidemiology of esophageal cancer offer insights into preventive strategies in patients who are at risk. New developments in diagnosis may help detect the disease at an early stage. New diagnostic modalities permit more accurate staging procedures and allow appropriate selection of therapy. New studies provide more information on multimodality therapy for esophageal cancer, and new endoscopic techniques allow resection of small lesions without surgery. New stent designs provide better palliation by providing tumor ingrowth. These developments in the treatment of esophageal cancer are the focus of this review.

  20. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may help you cope with your distress, including: Art therapy Dance or movement therapy Exercise Meditation Music ... www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/prostate-cancer/basics/definition/CON-20029597 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  1. Stomach cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the stomach for a long time (chronic atrophic gastritis ) Have pernicious anemia (low number of red blood ... HealthProfessional . Accessed December 21, 2016. Read More Cancer Gastritis Malignancy Pernicious anemia Review Date 11/10/2016 ...

  2. Bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the way they grow: Papillary tumors look like warts and are attached to a stalk. Nonpapillary (sessile) ... urinary control. Support Groups You can ease the stress of illness by joining a cancer support group . ...

  3. Oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... papillomavirus (HPV) infection (same virus that causes genital warts ) Taking medicines that weaken the immune system (immunosuppressants) ... dry mouth Support Groups You can ease the stress of illness by joining a cancer support group . ...

  4. Cancer - penis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... smelling substance under the foreskin History of genital warts , or human papillomavirus (HPV). Smoking. Injury to the ... common experiences and problems may help relieve the stress associated with diagnosis and treatment of cancer of ...

  5. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vaginal, and vulvar cancers. It is recommended for preteens (both boys and girls) aged 11 to 12 ... index. • D on’t smoke. • Use condoms during sex. * • Limit your number of sexual partners. * HPV infection ...

  6. Eye Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... underneath the retina that contains connective tissue and melanocytes, which are pigmented (colored) cells, and nourishes the ... cancer in adults. It begins when cells called melanocytes grow uncontrollably. Intraocular melanoma is also called uveal ...

  7. Mouth Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rich in fruits and vegetables. The vitamins and antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables may help reduce your risk of mouth cancer. Avoid excessive sun exposure to your lips. Protect the skin on your lips from the sun by staying ...

  8. Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ovary, fallopian tube, and peritoneum: Epidemiology and risk factors. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 18, 2014. Havrilesky LJ, et al. Oral contraceptive pills as primary prevention for ovarian cancer: A systematic ...

  9. Adrenocortical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payabyab, Eden C.; Balasubramaniam, Sanjeeve; Edgerly, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    The development of new therapies has lagged behind for rare cancers without defined therapeutic targets. Adrenocortical cancer is no exception. Mitotane, an older agent considered "adrenolytic," is used both to control symptoms in advanced disease and as adjuvant therapy after surgical resection....... Molecular characterization of adrenocortical cancer has deepened our understanding of this genetically complex disease while identifying subgroups whose importance remains to be determined. Unfortunately, such studies have yet to demonstrate a therapeutic target for drug development, and to date......, no targeted therapy has achieved meaningful outcomes. Consequently, first-line therapy for metastatic disease remains a combination regimen of etoposide, doxorubicin, and cisplatinum established in a randomized clinical trial. In addition to evaluating recent studies in adrenocortical cancer, we raise one...

  10. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other things may increase the risk of developing cancer following a high-risk HPV infection. These other things include: Smoking Having HIV or reduced immunity Taking birth control pills for a long time ( ...

  11. Abiraterone in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostaghel EA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elahe A Mostaghel Division of Clinical Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Androgen deprivation therapy remains the single most effective treatment for the initial therapy of advanced prostate cancer, but is uniformly marked by progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Residual tumor androgens and androgen axis activation are now recognized to play a prominent role in mediating CRPC progression. Despite suppression of circulating testosterone to castrate levels, castration does not eliminate androgens from the prostate tumor microenvironment and residual androgen levels are well within the range capable of activating the androgen receptor (AR and AR-mediated gene expression. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that more effectively target production of intratumoral androgens are necessary. The introduction of abiraterone, a potent suppressor of cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-mediated androgen production, has heralded a new era in the hormonal treatment of men with metastatic CRPC. Herein, the androgen and AR-mediated mechanisms that contribute to CRPC progression and establish cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase as a critical therapeutic target are briefly reviewed. The mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of abiraterone are reviewed and its recently described activity against AR and 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase is discussed. The Phase I and II data initially demonstrating the efficacy of abiraterone and Phase III data supporting its approval for patients with metastatic CRPC are reviewed. The safety and tolerability of abiraterone, including the incidence and management of side effects and potential drug interactions, are discussed. The current place of abiraterone in CRPC therapy is reviewed and early evidence regarding cross-resistance of abiraterone with taxane therapy, mechanisms of resistance to abiraterone, and observations of an

  12. Midbody Accumulation in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Bio, CAC -TMD-PH-ATG); Atg7 (1:1000, ProSci, 3617); Actin (1:300, Sigma, AC-40); Aurora B (1:100, BD Trans Lab, 611082); CD13 (1:50, BioLegend...Figure 4 b MCF-7 H9 U I U I U I a hRPE-1 MCF-7 hRPE-1 Untreated E64d/PepA p62 Actin Ctr l MG 132 Lac tac yst in Ubiquitinated proteins Actin...5+ /+ M EF Supplementary Fig. 4b Ctr l MG 132 Lac tac yst in 100 150 200 50 75 37 Fig. 6d. All images here are horizontally inversed in main

  13. Prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Logager, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data.......To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data....

  14. Cancer nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdale Swati

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer nanotechnology is the latest trend in cancer therapy. It helps the pharmacist to formulate the product with maximum therapeutic value and minimum or negligible range side effects. Cancer is the disease in which the abnormal cells are quite similar to the normal cell with just minute functional or genetic change. Thus, it is very hard to target the abnormal cells by the conventional method of the drug delivery system. Nanotechnology is probably the only method that can be used for site-specific action without causing the side effects by killing the normal cells. This review article describes the possible way to exploit the nanotechnology to targeted drug therapy in cancer. The various methods used are: systemic delivery systems, passive targeting, active targeting, intracellular delivery, subcellular localization, and nanoparticle drugs. Different cancer detection techniques like carbon nanotubes, nanorods, and biosensors are also available. This review article gives an idea about the possible potential of nanotechnology in drug delivery, drug targeting, and the diagnosis of cancer.

  15. Copper Transporter 2 Content Is Lower in Liver and Heart of Copper-Deficient Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Bertinato

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Copper (Cu transporter 2 (Ctr2 is a transmembrane protein that transports Cu across cell membranes and increases cytosolic Cu levels. Experiments using cell lines have suggested that Ctr2 expression is regulated by Cu status. The importance of changes in Ctr2 expression is underscored by recent studies demonstrating that lower Ctr2 content in cells increases the cellular uptake of platinum-containing cancer drugs and toxicity to the drugs. In this study, we examined whether Ctr2 expression is altered by a nutritional Cu deficiency in vivo. Ctr2 mRNA and protein in liver and heart from rats fed a normal (Cu-N, moderately deficient (Cu-M or deficient (Cu-D Cu diet was measured. Rats fed the Cu-deficient diets showed a dose-dependent decrease in liver Ctr2 protein compared to Cu-N rats. Ctr2 protein was 42% and 85% lower in Cu-M and Cu-D rats, respectively. Liver Ctr2 mRNA was 50% lower in Cu-D rats and unaffected in Cu-M rats. In heart, Ctr2 protein was only lower in Cu-D rats (46% lower. These data show that Cu deficiency decreases Ctr2 content in vivo.

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self ...

  18. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated July 31, ...

  19. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam Video Oral Cancer Exam Video This video shows what happens during an oral cancer examination. Quick and painless, the exam can detect ...

  20. Breast cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  1. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  2. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam Video Oral Cancer Exam Video This video shows what happens during an oral cancer examination. Quick and painless, the exam can detect ...

  3. Esophageal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the lower part of the esophagus, near the stomach. See the following PDQ summaries for more information about esophageal cancer: Esophageal Cancer Screening Esophageal Cancer Treatment Esophageal cancer is found more ...

  4. What Is Liver Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research? Liver Cancer About Liver Cancer What Is Liver Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body ... structure and function of the liver. About the liver The liver is the largest internal organ. It ...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung ... may have questions about how serious your cancer is and your chances of survival. The estimate of how the disease will go for you is called prognosis. It ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests Research Diagnosis and Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis ... Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests ... Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Treatment Types ...

  7. Tests for Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Tests for Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is often found after symptoms appear, ... Report: Colon Pathology. Imaging tests to look for colorectal cancer Imaging tests use sound waves, x-rays, magnetic ...

  8. Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Type and Stage Thyroid Cancer Treating Thyroid Cancer Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer Chemotherapy (chemo) uses anti-cancer drugs that are injected ... vein or muscle, or are taken by mouth. Chemotherapy is systemic therapy, which means that the drug ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment Pediatric Supportive Care Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Childhood Cancer ... can talk about it in a clear and supportive way. Two viewer guides are also available: for ...

  10. What Causes Thyroid Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention What Causes Thyroid Cancer? Thyroid cancer is linked with a number of ... inside a cell, without an outside cause. Papillary thyroid cancer Several DNA mutations (changes) have been found in ...

  11. Anaplastic thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000352.htm Anaplastic thyroid cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... of cancer of the thyroid gland. Causes Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an invasive type of thyroid cancer that ...

  12. Uterine Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research AMIGAS Fighting Cervical Cancer Worldwide Stay Informed Statistics for Other Kinds of Cancer Breast Cervical Colorectal ( ... Skin Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer Home Uterine Cancer Statistics Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers Survivorship ... Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers ...

  14. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests Research Diagnosis and Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis ... Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests Diagnosis & Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Treatment Types ...

  15. Prostate Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Cancer screening is looking for cancer before you have any ... as an ultrasound, MRI, or a biopsy. Prostate cancer screening has risks: Finding prostate cancer may not improve ...

  16. Esophageal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Esophageal Cancer Prevention Esophageal Cancer Screening Research Esophageal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go to ... the esophagus and the stomach). Being overweight . Esophageal Cancer Screening Key Points Tests are used to screen for ...

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests Research Diagnosis and Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis ... Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests Diagnosis & Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Treatment Types ...

  19. Skin Cancer Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Host a Fundraising Event | About Us | Store The Skin Cancer Foundation The Skin Cancer Foundation is the only ... Handbook A "Sunscreen Gene"? Skin Cancer Facts & Statistics Skin Cancer Treatment Glossary Information on medications and procedures The ...

  20. Cancer Surgery: Physically Removing Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in cancer diagnosis, staging, treatment and symptom relief. Robotic surgery. In robotic surgery, the surgeon sits away from the operating table ... to maneuver surgical tools to perform the operation. Robotic surgery helps the surgeon operate in hard-to-reach ...

  1. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have revolutionized breast cancer treatment: tamoxifen (Nolvadex) and trastuzumab (Herceptin). Bernard Fisher, M.D., of the University of ... breast tumors. Dr. Slamon and his colleagues developed trastuzumab (Herceptin). Trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody, was the first ...

  2. Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ilic, Milena; Ilic, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the pancreas remains one of the deadliest cancer types. Based on the GLOBOCAN 2012 estimates, pancreatic cancer causes more than 331000 deaths per year, ranking as the seventh leading cause of cancer death in both sexes together. Globally, about 338000 people had pancreatic cancer in 2012, making it the 11th most common cancer. The highest incidence and mortality rates of pancreatic cancer are found in developed countries. Trends for pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality varied ...

  3. Combinations of platinums and selected phytochemicals as a means of overcoming resistance in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huq, Fazlul; Yu, Jun Q; Beale, Philip; Chan, Charles; Arzuman, Lalia; Nessa, Meher U; Mazumder, Mohammed E H

    2014-01-01

    Cancer sufferers are often found to use herbal products along with targeted therapy although not much information (whether beneficial or harmful) is available about the effects of such combinations. In this study, we investigated synergism from the combination of platinum drugs and a number of tumour-active phytochemicals including curcumin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, thymoquinone, genistein, resveratrol, betulinic acid and ursolic acid in three human ovarian cancer cell lines A2780, A2780(cisR) and A2780(ZD0473R), as a function of concentration and the sequence of administration. Both the dose-effect curves and combination indices show that the binary combinations of platinum drugs with the phytochemicals exert concentration- and sequence-dependent synergism in the cell lines. Generally the degree of synergism is found to be greater in sequenced administration such as 0/2 h, 2/0 h, 0/4 h and 4/0 h than the bolus. The variation in the nature of the combined drug action from being highly synergistic to antagonistic with the change in sequence of administration clearly indicates that the action of one drug modulates that of the other (towards the induction or inhibition of apoptosis). We have also used sequenced combinations of platinum drugs and bortezomib (a proteasome inhibitor that prevents cisplatin-induced proteasomal degration of copper transporter CTR1) to enhance cellular platinum accumulation and the level of platinum-DNA binding especially in the resistant human ovarian tumour models. Proteomic studies to identify the key proteins associated with platinum resistance are ongoing. We have identified 59 proteins associated with platinum resistance in ovarian tumor models.

  4. Afatinib in Advanced Refractory Urothelial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-06

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Ureter Cancer

  5. How Is Stomach Cancer Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Stomach Cancer Diagnosed? Stomach cancers are usually found when ... Ask Your Doctor About Stomach Cancer? More In Stomach Cancer About Stomach Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  6. How Is Thyroid Cancer Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Tests for Thyroid Cancer Thyroid cancer may be diagnosed after a person ... Health Care Team About Thyroid Cancer? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  7. Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer How common is thyroid cancer? ... remains very low compared with most other cancers. Statistics on survival rates for thyroid cancer are discussed ...

  8. How Is Ovarian Cancer Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Ovarian Cancer Diagnosed? If you have symptoms of ovarian cancer ... Ask Your Doctor About Ovarian Cancer? More In Ovarian Cancer About Ovarian Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  9. Radiation Therapy for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testicular Cancer Treating Testicular Cancer Radiation Therapy for Testicular Cancer Radiation therapy uses a beam of high-energy ... Testicular Cancer, by Type and Stage More In Testicular Cancer About Testicular Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  10. Resistance to paclitaxel in a cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line is mediated by P-glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Stordal

    Full Text Available The IGROVCDDP cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line is also resistant to paclitaxel and models the resistance phenotype of relapsed ovarian cancer patients after first-line platinum/taxane chemotherapy. A TaqMan low-density array (TLDA was used to characterise the expression of 380 genes associated with chemotherapy resistance in IGROVCDDP cells. Paclitaxel resistance in IGROVCDDP is mediated by gene and protein overexpression of P-glycoprotein and the protein is functionally active. Cisplatin resistance was not reversed by elacridar, confirming that cisplatin is not a P-glycoprotein substrate. Cisplatin resistance in IGROVCDDP is multifactorial and is mediated in part by the glutathione pathway and decreased accumulation of drug. Total cellular glutathione was not increased. However, the enzyme activity of GSR and GGT1 were up-regulated. The cellular localisation of copper transporter CTR1 changed from membrane associated in IGROV-1 to cytoplasmic in IGROVCDDP. This may mediate the previously reported accumulation defect. There was decreased expression of the sodium potassium pump (ATP1A, MRP1 and FBP which all have been previously associated with platinum accumulation defects in platinum-resistant cell lines. Cellular localisation of MRP1 was also altered in IGROVCDDP shifting basolaterally, compared to IGROV-1. BRCA1 was also up-regulated at the gene and protein level. The overexpression of P-glycoprotein in a resistant model developed with cisplatin is unusual. This demonstrates that P-glycoprotein can be up-regulated as a generalised stress response rather than as a specific response to a substrate. Mechanisms characterised in IGROVCDDP cells may be applicable to relapsed ovarian cancer patients treated with frontline platinum/taxane chemotherapy.

  11. [Gastrointestinal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yutaka

    2004-08-01

    Although their sensitivity is not high, SCC, TPA and IAP are useful for esophageal cancer. The sensitivity of CEA, CA 19-9, is relatively high, especially in well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of gastric cancer with lymph node metastasis. AFP is specific to liver metastasis from gastric cancer, and CA 125 is also specific to peritoneal dissemination. CA 72-4 and NCC-ST-439 are useful markers for advanced staging. CEA, CA 19-9, is useful for colon cancer, especially for predicting preoperative staging. Half-life and doubling time of tumor markers is useful in some cases for the evaluation of operation and chemotherapy. We showed our data concerning postoperative CEA and/or CA 19-9 monitoring after operation for gastric cancer in 120 recurrent patients. Positivities of CEA and CA 19-9 for recurrence were 65.8% and 85.0%, respectively, both of which were significantly higher than the preoperative sensitivities (28.3% and 45.0%, respectively). In most patients with high levels of preoperative CEA and/or CA 19-9, these tumor markers increased again at recurrence. Recurrent diseases were detected between 5 months after detection by diagnostic imagings and 12 months before detection by diagnostic imagings (mean of 3.1+/-3.6 months before detection by diagnostic imagings) and between 10 months after detection by diagnostic imagings and 13 months before detection by diagnostic imagings (mean 2.2+/-3.9 months before detection by diagnostic imagings) by CEA and CA 19-9 monitorings, respectively. These results suggest that CEA and/or CA 19-9 monitoring after operation was useful to predict the recurrence of gastric cancer, especially in almost all the patients with high preoperative levels of these markers.

  12. [Cervix cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointreau, Y; Ruffier Loubière, A; Denis, F; Barillot, I

    2010-11-01

    Cervix cancers declined in most developed countries in recent years, but remain, the third worldwide leading cause of cancer death in women. A precise staging, based on clinical exam, an abdominal and pelvic MRI, a possible PET-CT and a possible lymph node sampling is necessary to adapt the best therapeutic strategy. In France, the treatments of tumors of less than 4 cm without nodal involvement are often based on radiotherapy followed by surgery and, whereas tumors larger than 4 cm and involved nodes are treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Based on an illustrated clinical case, indications, delineation, dosimetry and complications expected with radiotherapy are demonstrated.

  13. Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Peter E.; Spiess, Philippe E.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Herr, Harry W.; Inman, Brant A.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Lele, Subodh M.; Michalski, Jeff; Pagliaro, Lance; Pal, Sumanta K.; Patterson, Anthony; Plimack, Elizabeth R.; Pohar, Kamal S.; Porter, Michael P.; Richie, Jerome P.; Sexton, Wade J.; Shipley, William U.; Small, Eric J.; Trump, Donald L.; Wile, Geoffrey; Wilson, Timothy G.; Dwyer, Mary; Ho, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the penis represents approximately 0.5% of all cancers among men in the United States and other developed countries. Although rare, it is associated with significant disfigurement, and only half of the patients survive beyond 5 years. Proper evaluation of both the primary lesion and lymph nodes is critical, because nodal involvement is the most important factor of survival. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Penile Cancer provide recommendations on the diagnosis and management of this devastating disease based on evidence and expert consensus. PMID:23667209

  14. Cancer cachexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunze Philipp

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years many efforts of researchers and clinicians were made to improve our knowledge of cachexia syndrome. Not only cancer, but also many chronic or end-stage diseases such as AIDS, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, rheumatoid arthritis, tuberculosis and Crohn's disease are associated with cachexia, a condition of abnormally low weight, weakness, and general bodily decline which deteriorates quality of life and reduces the prognosis of the patients who suffer from it. In the present editorial we will focus cachexia related on cancer and provide some insight into this prognosis-limiting syndrome.

  15. Cancer immunology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herberman, R.B. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (US))

    1986-01-01

    This book contains seven chapters. They are: Immunlogy of human T-cell leukemia/lymphonma (lymphotropic) viruses (the HTLV 'family'); Tumor specific antigens induced by mutagens and DNA hypomethylating agents: implications for the immunobiology of neoplasia; Destruction of tumor cells by macrophages: mechanisms of recognition and lysis and their regulation; Mechanisms of NK-cell mediated cytotoxicity; Role of natural killer (NK) cells in the control of tumor growth and metastatic spread; Monoclonal antibody therapy of cancer; preclinical models and investigations in humans; and Abnormalities in interleukin 2 production and response in cancer and possible therapeutic approaches.

  16. Trypsin/creatinine clearance ratio and serum immunoreactive trypsin in digestive and pancreatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Favero, G; Fabris, C; Bonvicini, P; Piccoli, A; Baccaglini, U; Pedrazzoli, S; Burlina, A; Naccarato, R

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of trypsin/creatinine clearance ratio (Ctr/Ccr) and serum immunoreactive trypsin (IRT) was evaluated in a total of 168 subjects with pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis and non-pancreatic digestive diseases. Amylase/creatinine clearance ratio (Cam/Ccr) and serum amylase levels were also evaluated in order to establish their possible relationship with Ctr/Ccr and IRT values. Elevated Ctr/Ccr and IRT values were observed in several patients with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis. Abnormal IRT and Ctr/Ccr values were found in 28.2 and 4% of non-pancreatic digestive diseases, respectively. IRT and amylase serum levels showed consensual modifications, while Ctr/Ccr showed a behavior different from that of Cam/Ccr. Liver damage seems to play a role in increasing serum IRT levels of patients without pancreatic involvement, while the increased Ctr/Ccr seems to depend on other factors, for instance renal tubular dysfunction.

  17. Prostate cancer is not breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Venniyoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers of the prostate and breast are hormone dependent cancers. There is a tendency to equate them and apply same algorithms for treatment. It is pointed out that metastatic prostate cancer with bone-only disease is a potentially fatal condition with a much poorer prognosis than metastatic breast cancer and needs a more aggressive approach.

  18. Breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... women: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med . 2014;160:271-281. PMID: 24366376 www.ncbi. ... Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med . [Epub ahead of print 12 January 2016] doi: ...

  19. Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    You have two kidneys. They are fist-sized organs on either side of your backbone above your waist. The tubes inside filter and ... blood, taking out waste products and making urine. Kidney cancer forms in the lining of tiny tubes ...

  20. Colon Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-11-05

    In this podcast, Dr. Tom Frieden, CDC Director, discusses colon cancer and the importance of early detection.  Created: 11/5/2013 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/6/2014.

  1. Lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H H; Rørth, M

    1999-01-01

    The results of the many clinical trials published in 1997 had only modest impact on the treatment results using either cytostatic agents alone or combined with radiotherapy in lung cancer. In SCLC, combination chemotherapy including platin-compounds (cisplatin, carboplatin) and the podophyllotoxins...

  2. Prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, Maria Carlsen; Andersen, Morten Heebøll; Høyer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Background Active surveillance (AS) of low-risk prostate cancer (PCa) is an accepted alternative to active treatment. However, the conventional diagnostic trans-rectal ultrasound guided biopsies (TRUS-bx) underestimate PCa aggressiveness in almost half of the cases, when compared with the surgical...... lesions. Significant cancer was defined as GS > 6 or GS 6 (3 + 3) lesions with ≥ 6 mm maximal cancer core length (MCCL). Results A total of 78 patients were included and in 21 patients a total of 22 PIRADS-score 4 or 5 lesions were detected. MRGB pathology revealed that 17 (81%) of these and 22......% of the entire AS population harbored significant cancers at AS inclusion. In eight (38%) cases, the GS was upgraded. Also, nine patients (43%) had GS 6 (3 + 3) foci with MCCL ≥ 6 mm. Conclusion In an AS cohort based on TRUS and TRUS-bx diagnostic strategies, supplemental mpMRI and in-bore MRGB were able...

  3. Esophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. B.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas in esophageal cancer (EC) has changed, and focus directed towards tumors of the distal esophagus and the esophagogastric junction. The genetic events leading to EC are not fully clarified, but important risk factors have been...

  4. Lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H H; Rørth, M

    1999-01-01

    The results of the many clinical trials published in 1997 had only modest impact on the treatment results using either cytostatic agents alone or combined with radiotherapy in lung cancer. In SCLC, combination chemotherapy including platin-compounds (cisplatin, carboplatin) and the podophyllotoxins...

  5. LA-CTR: A Limited Attention Collaborative Topic Regression for Social Media

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Jeon-Hyung

    2013-01-01

    Probabilistic models can learn users' preferences from the history of their item adoptions on a social media site, and in turn, recommend new items to users based on learned preferences. However, current models ignore psychological factors that play an important role in shaping online social behavior. One such factor is attention, the mechanism that integrates perceptual and cognitive features to select the items the user will consciously process and may eventually adopt. Recent research has shown that people have finite attention, which constrains their online interactions, and that they divide their limited attention non-uniformly over other people. We propose a collaborative topic regression model that incorporates limited, non-uniformly divided attention. We show that the proposed model is able to learn more accurate user preferences than state-of-art models, which do not take human cognitive factors into account. Specifically we analyze voting on news items on the social news aggregator and show that our...

  6. Electro-optic sampling of THz pulses at the CTR source at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderlich, Steffen

    2012-06-15

    Several applications in material science, non-linear optics and solid-state physics require short pulses with a high pulse energy of radiation in the far-infrared and in the terahertz (THz) regime in particular. As described in the following, coherent transition radiation generated by high-relativistic electron bunches at FLASH provides broadband single-cycle pulses of sub-picosecond length. The pulses are characterized using the quantitative and time-resolved technique of electro-optic sampling showing peak field strengths in the order of 1 MV/cm.

  7. CTR plasma engineering studies. Progress report, 1 September 1975--30 Jun 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miley, G.H.

    1976-04-15

    During the past contract period, this research has been concerned with three principal tasks, namely: (1) Fusion-product studies. The primary objective of this work is to study potential effects (e.g. instabilities, changes in heating profile and wall loadings, etc.) caused by high-energy fusion products. A second objective is to establish the operating conditions and measurements required for use of D-/sup 3/He in early experiments such as TFTR to simulate D-T burns. (2) Mirror system studies. The objective of this work is to provide specialized support for the mirror research and development effort at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Three topics are under study: charge-exchange losses during neutral beam injection; the dynamics of plasma build-up during start-up; new approaches to mirror systems such as the ''twin-beam'' mirror. (3) Exploratory studies. Several new studies have been initiated during this period. These include: extension of the mirror neutral-beam injection studies to toroidal geometry and preliminary studies of reversed field configurations. Further details about each of these areas are contained in subsequent sections.

  8. Vertebrate Ctr1 coordinates morphogenesis and progenitor cell fate and regulates embryonic stem cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Haremaki, Tomomi; Fraser, Stuart T.; Kuo, Yien-Ming; Baron, Margaret H.; Weinstein, Daniel C.

    2007-01-01

    Embryogenesis involves two distinct processes. On the one hand, cells must specialize, acquiring fates appropriate to their positions (differentiation); on the other hand, they must physically construct the embryo through coordinated mechanical activity (morphogenesis). In early vertebrate development, fibroblast growth factor (FGF) regulates multiple embryonic events, including germ layer differentiation and morphogenesis; the cellular components that direct FGF signaling to evoke these diff...

  9. CTR plasma engineering studies. Progress report, October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miley, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Plasma engineering studies at the Fusion Studies Laboratory of the University of Illinois, Urbana IL are described that deal with: fusion-product transport in plasmas and associated effects in tokamaks, neutral-beam injection and plasma build-up in mirrors, and studies of aspects of alternate confinement concepts including field-reversed mirrors, field-reversed pinches, and twin-beam mirrors.

  10. CTR plasma engineering studies. Annual progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miley, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    The current plasma engineering studies report on three major areas of fusion reactor development. Plasma engineering studies of the field-reversed mirror (FRM) have focused on stability, start-up, and fusion product heating and leakage. A Monte Carlo technique has been developed to study high-energy fusion product transport in the FRM. The stability studies involve use of a perturbation theory applied to orbits calculated with the SUPERLAYER code. Studies of the reversed-field pinches (RFP) have centered around development of a 1-D dynamic MHD code which is designed to investigate enhanced transport, cold particle fueling, fusion product heating, and stability limits. Rotation effects in the field-reversed theta pinch (FRTP) have been examined as a preliminary step in understanding its potential use in a reactor concept such as the moving plasmoid heater (MPH), also briefly examined here. Studies of fusion-product transport effects in tokamaks include plasma heating, blister-induced first wall erosion, and ash buildup limitations on burn time. Finally, other mirror systems studies have been concerned with both first-wall bombardment and plasma buildup during neutral beam injection.

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers ... Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for ...

  12. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gastric Cancer Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... from the . There is no standard or routine screening test for stomach cancer. Several types of screening tests have been ...

  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs and Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Quiz Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment ...

  14. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs and Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment ...

  15. Engagement of Patients With Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    End of Life; Advanced Cancer; Lung Neoplasm; Gastric Cancer; Colon Cancer; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Rectum Cancer; Melanoma; Kidney Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Neoplasms; Liver Cancer; Cancer of Unknown Origin

  16. Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage for Kidney Cancer Kidney Cancer Treating Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer The goal of biologic therapy ... Therapy for Kidney Cancer Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer Chemotherapy for Kidney Cancer Pain ...

  17. PANCREATIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The pancreatic cancer is quite common malignant tumor of gastointestinal tract and its incidence is increasing in well developed part of the world. Despite of all advanced diagnostic methods the disease is in most cases recognised too late when the tumor is not resectable.Conclusions. Only in 20–30% of patients with pancreatic cancer surgical resection is possible, and even in this group 5year survival is very low. In the patients where the tumor is not resectable, sometimes only palliative procedures are indicated and sometimes only simptomatic therapy is possible. The average survival period in this group of patients is 12–20 months. Adjuvant chemo and radiotherapy has not shown much of benefit and the prognosis is still very bad.

  18. cancers coliques

    OpenAIRE

    ali cherif, mohamed el amine; aliane, fatma

    2010-01-01

    - le cancer colique est un pathologie maligne de l'appareil digestif en plein recrudescence dont l'étiologies elle est polygénique = héréditaire et surtout le changement des habitudes alimentaires qui sont les principales causes d'apparition des polypes dont leurs dégénérescence évolue vers le cancer colique. D'après les étude faite dans notre service: - 07 cas sur oans d'étude (ig8i-i987). - 12 cas sur ians d' étude (1990-2002). Notre étude de oans (2005-2009) r...

  19. How Are Childhood Cancers Found?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... term effects of Cancer Treatment on Children References: Cancer in Children If Your Child Has Cancer Cancer in Children Finding Cancer in ... term effects of Cancer Treatment on Children References: Cancer in Children If Your Child Has Cancer Back To Top Imagine a world ...

  20. 1985 Cancer Facts and Figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Cancer Society, Inc., New York, NY.

    Information and statistical data about cancer are provided in seven categories. They include: (1) basic cancer data (considering how cancer works, trends in diagnosis and treatment, new cancer cases and deaths for 1985, and other areas); (2) major cancer sites (discussing lung cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, 5-year survival rates/trends…

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Program Cancer Reporting Fellowships Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents ... Media Contacts Multicultural Media Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog ...

  2. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... future bladder cancer research through the Patient Survey Network. Read More... The JPB Foundation 2016 Bladder Cancer ... 2016 Young Investigator Awardees The Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN) has announced the recipients of the 2016 ...

  3. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press Releases 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 ... Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer ...

  4. Working during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000834.htm Working during cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... JavaScript. Many people continue to work throughout their cancer treatment. Cancer, or the side effects of treatment, may ...

  5. Prostate Cancer Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... P 2 rovocative Questions PCCTC Scientific Retreat Coffey-Holden Research News Faces of Prostate Cancer [4] Survivors ... Foundation News The Prostate Cancer Foundation’s 2016 Coffey-Holden Prostate Cancer Academy Meeting accelerates advances in the ...

  6. Cancer in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer is a group related diseases. In all types of cancer, some of the body's cells begin to divide ... can be benign or malignant. Benign tumorsaren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  7. Snapshot of Stomach Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and vegetables. There is no standard or routine screening test for stomach cancer. Standard treatments for stomach cancer include surgery , ... NCI Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Home Page Information about stomach ... causes, screening, clinical trials, research and statistics from the National ...

  8. Cancer Nanotechnology Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Nanotechnology Plan serves as a strategic document to the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer as well as a guiding document to the cancer nanotechnology and oncology fields, as a whole.

  9. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early ...

  10. Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary liver cell carcinoma; Tumor - liver; Cancer - liver; Hepatoma ... Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for most liver cancers. This type of cancer occurs more often in men than women. It is usually diagnosed in people age 50 or ...

  11. Dealing with chronic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000933.htm Dealing with chronic cancer To use the sharing features on this ... be controlled for a period of time. Controlling Chronic Cancer When you have a chronic cancer, the ...

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Training at NCI Funding for Cancer Training Building a Diverse Workforce Other Fellowships and Internships Program ... at NCI (Intramural) Funding for Cancer Training (Extramural) Building a Diverse Workforce Other Fellowships & Internships Training Program ...

  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Outreach Program Cancer Reporting Fellowships Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer ... Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents ...

  14. Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Salivary Gland ... in diagnosing salivary gland cancer. Certain factors affect treatment options and prognosis (chance of recovery). The treatment ...

  15. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the body, such as the lymph nodes, lung, liver, intestine, or bone. Stage IVB cervical cancer. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Cancer Types -- Cervical Cancer Staging Type: Color, ...

  16. Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be ...

  17. Coping with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Most people face some degree of depression, anxiety, fear or distress when cancer becomes part of their ... who has cancer. Distress in People With Cancer Anxiety, Fear, and Depression Depression Anxiety, Fear, and Emotional Distress ...

  18. Cancer and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney Leukemia Liver Lung Lymphoma Myeloma Ovarian Prostate Skin Thyroid Uterine Vaginal and Vulvar How to Prevent Cancer or Find It Early Screening Tests Vaccines (Shots) Healthy Choices Data and Statistics For Different Kinds of Cancer Cancer Rates by ...

  19. Cancer and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney Leukemia Liver Lung Lymphoma Myeloma Ovarian Prostate Skin Thyroid Uterine Vaginal and Vulvar How to Prevent Cancer or Find It Early Screening Tests Vaccines (Shots) Healthy Choices Data and Statistics For Different Kinds of Cancer Cancer Rates by ...

  20. CDC's Cervical Cancer Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney Leukemia Liver Lung Lymphoma Myeloma Ovarian Prostate Skin Thyroid Uterine Vaginal and Vulvar How to Prevent Cancer or Find It Early Screening Tests Vaccines (Shots) Healthy Choices Data and Statistics For Different Kinds of Cancer Cancer Rates by ...

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about ... Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to ...

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... type Progress Annual Report to the Nation Cancer Portfolio Snapshots Milestones in Cancer Research & Discovery Stories of ... greatly. Also, it takes years to see the benefit of new treatments and ways of finding cancer. ...

  3. Chemotherapy for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Type and Stage Testicular Cancer Treating Testicular Cancer Chemotherapy for Testicular Cancer Chemotherapy (chemo) is the use of drugs to treat ... that is only in the testicle. Doctors give chemotherapy in cycles, with each period of treatment followed ...

  4. Ovarian Cancer FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... increased risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer. CA 125: A substance in the blood that may increase in the presence of some cancerous tumors. Colonoscopy: An exam of the entire colon using a small, lighted instrument. Computed Tomography: A ...

  5. Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... References Dolmans DE, Fukumura D, Jain RK. Photodynamic therapy for cancer. Nature Reviews Cancer 2003; 3(5):380–387. [PubMed Abstract] Wilson BC. Photodynamic therapy for cancer: principles. Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology 2002; ...

  6. SEER Cancer Stat Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Statistical Fact Sheets are summaries of common cancer types developed to provide an overview of frequently-requested cancer statistics including incidence, mortality, survival, stage, prevalence, and lifetime risk.

  7. Stages of Urethral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Urethral Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Urethral Cancer Go to Health Professional ... In men, the urethra also carries semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male urinary system (left panel) and ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Understanding Cancer ... Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs and Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about ... Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to ...

  10. Infectious Agents and Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    these agents on subsequent risk of cancer. There are currently ... tween genetic and environmental factors (that include infectious agents) .... opment of gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lym- phoma. However .... Lung cancer i. Skin cancers ...

  11. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 756x576 ... Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; drawing and inset ...

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risks of other cancers (or other health problems). Examples of genetic syndromes that can cause exocrine pancreatic cancer include: Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome , caused by mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes Familial atypical ...

  13. Nutrition for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Do I Stay Healthy Share this page: Nutrition for Lung Cancer Key Points There is no ... lung cancer symptoms, making them worse or better. Nutrition Goals Each person's nutritional needs during lung cancer ...

  14. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early ...

  15. Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer include exposure to radiation, a family history of breast cancer, and having high estrogen levels, which can happen with diseases like cirrhosis or Klinefelter's syndrome. Treatment for male breast cancer is usually ...

  16. Identifying cancer genes from cancer mutation profiles by cancer functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is of great importance to identify new cancer genes from the data of large scale genome screenings of gene mutations in cancers. Considering the alternations of some essential functions are indispensable for oncogenesis, we define them as cancer functions and select, as their approximations, a group of detailed functions in GO (Gene Ontology) highly enriched with known cancer genes. To evaluate the efficiency of using cancer functions as features to identify cancer genes, we define, in the screened genes, the known protein kinase cancer genes as gold standard positives and the other kinase genes as gold standard negatives. The results show that cancer associated functions are more efficient in identifying cancer genes than the selection pressure feature. Furthermore, combining cancer functions with the number of non-silent mutations can generate more reliable positive predictions. Finally, with precision 0.42, we suggest a list of 46 kinase genes as candidate cancer genes which are annotated to cancer functions and carry at least 3 non-silent mutations.

  17. Breast cancer in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Iris; Lindsay, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or in the first postpartum year. Breast cancer is one of the more common malignancies to occur during pregnancy and, as more women delay childbearing, the incidence of breast cancer in pregnancy is expected to increase. This article provides an overview of diagnosis, staging, and treatment of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Recommendations for management of breast cancer in pregnancy are discussed.

  18. Obesity and Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gribovskaja-Rupp, Irena; Kosinski, Lauren; Ludwig, Kirk A.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for colorectal cancer based on its molecular and metabolic effects on insulin and IGF-1, leptin, adipocytokines, and sex hormones. Obese men have a higher risk of colorectal cancer compared with normal weight men, but the association between obesity and rectal cancer is weaker than with colon cancer. There is a weaker association between obesity and colon cancer in women than in men, and no appreciable association between obesity and rectal cancer in women. Although o...

  19. Living with Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Cancer is regarded as a formidable threat to mankind. Every yem’ in Shanghai, which has a high cancer rate, 15,000 people are diagnosed with the disease and 12,000 die of cancer. Because many people believe that "cancer equals death," a special cancer rehabilitation center has appeared in Shanghai. The center creates an environment where cancer patients can exchange experiences and receive psychological group therapy. In this way those patients

  20. Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer A-Z Breast Cancer Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis If you’ve been diagnosed with breast cancer, ... Prevention Early Detection and Diagnosis Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis Treatment Breast Reconstruction Surgery Living as a Breast ...