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Sample records for husks fast pyrolysis

  1. Energy potential from rice husk through direct combustion and fast pyrolysis: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispe, Isabel; Navia, Rodrigo; Kahhat, Ramzy

    2017-01-01

    Rapid population growth and consumption of goods and services imply that demand for energy and resources increases continuously. Energy consumption linked to non-renewable resources contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and enhances resource depletion. In this context, the use of agricultural solid residues such as rice husk, coffee husk, wheat straw, sugar cane bagasse, among others, has been widely studied as an alternative energy source in order to decrease the use of fossil fuels. However, rice husk is among those agricultural residues that are least used to obtain energy in developing countries. Approximately 134 million tonnes of rice husk are produced annually in the world, of which over 90% are burned in open air or discharged into rivers and oceans in order to dispose of them. This review examines the energetic potential of agricultural residues, focused on rice husk. The review describes direct combustion and fast pyrolysis technologies to transform rice husk into energy considering its physical and chemical properties. In addition, a review of existing studies analyzing these technologies from an environmental life cycle thinking perspective, contributing to their sustainable use, is performed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of mineral bed materials during fast pyrolysis of rice husk to improve water-soluble organics production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R; Zhong, Z P; Jin, B S; Zheng, A J

    2012-09-01

    Fast pyrolysis of rice husk was performed in a spout-fluid bed to produce water-soluble organics. The effects of mineral bed materials (red brick, calcite, limestone, and dolomite) on yield and quality of organics were evaluated with the help of principal component analysis (PCA). Compared to quartz sand, red brick, limestone, and dolomite increased the yield of the water-soluble organics by 6-55% and the heating value by 16-19%. The relative content of acetic acid was reduced by 23-43% with calcite, limestone and dolomite when compared with quartz sand. The results from PCA showed all minerals enhanced the ring-opening reactions of cellulose into furans and carbonyl compounds rather than into monomeric sugars. Moreover, calcite, limestone, and dolomite displayed the ability to catalyze the degradation of heavy compounds and the demethoxylation reaction of guaiacols into phenols. Minerals, especially limestone and dolomite, were beneficial to the production of water-soluble organics.

  3. Product yields and characteristics of rice husk, rice straw and corncob during fast pyrolysis in a drop-tube/fixed-bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janewit Wannapeera

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Fast pyrolysis of rice husk, rice straw and corncob were investigated in a newly constructed drop-tube/fixed-bedreactor, which enables pyrolysis experiments under conditions closely simulating those occurring in commercial gasifierssuch as fluidised-bed gasifiers. Biomass samples were pyrolysed with a fast heating rate (i.e. > 1,000oC s-1, up to 850oC andholding times ranging from 1 to 10,800 seconds. Within 1 second after the biomass was injected into the reactor, considerableweight loss occurred instantaneously, leaving only a small amount of char, i.e. ~10-30 %. For all three samples, theweight loss continued throughout the range of holding times used but at an extremely slow rate, i.e. 1.3 % hr-1. The weightloss rates observed for the three biomass samples were affected by the proportion of the biomass chemical componentsas well as the metal species contents. Corncob, which had the lowest lignin content but highest cellulose content, had thehighest pyrolysis weight loss rate. On the other hand, rice husk containing a relatively high lignin content, had the lowestpyrolysis rate. The metal species (Na, K, Ca and Mg were found to increase devolatilisation yield depending on theircontents in biomass. The influence of the metal species was the most pronounced for rice straw, having the highest totalmetal species content. As the pyrolysis progressed, each biomass exhibited different char characteristics. Scanning electronmicroscopy (SEM pictures clearly showed the individual changes in geometry for all biomass-derived chars as well astheir decrease in combustion reactivities. The gas formation profiles for all three biomass samples showed almost the sametrend, with CO contributed by cellulose decomposition as the major gas product.

  4. Effect of hot vapor filtration on the characterization of bio-oil from rice husks with fast pyrolysis in a fluidized-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianju; Wu, Ceng; Liu, Ronghou; Fei, Wenting; Liu, Shiyu

    2011-05-01

    To produce high quality bio-oil from biomass using fast pyrolysis, rice husks were pyrolyzed in a 1-5 kg/h bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor. The effect of hot vapor filtration (HVF) was investigated to filter the solid particles and bio-char. The results showed that the total bio-oil yield decreased from 41.7% to 39.5% by weight and the bio-oil had a higher water content, higher pH, and lower alkali metal content when using HVF. One hundred and twelve different chemical compounds were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The molecular weight of the chemical compounds from the condenser and the EP when the cyclone was coupled with HVF in the separation system decreased compared with those from the condenser and EP when only cyclone was used.

  5. Properties of Bio-oil from Fast Pyrolysis of Rice Husk%稻壳快速热裂解生物油的特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭秀娟; 王树荣; 王琦; 郭祚刚; 骆仲泱

    2011-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of bio-oil obtained from fast pyrolysis of rice husk were studied in the present work. Molecular distillation was used to separate the crude bio-oil into three fractions viz. light fraction, middle fraction and heavy fraction. Their chemical composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph and mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The thermal behavior, including evaporation and decomposition, was investigated using thermogravimetric analyzer coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (TG-FT1R). The product distribution was significantly affected by contents of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. The bio-oil yield was 46.36% (by mass) and the yield of gaseous products was 27% (by mass). The chemicals in the bio-oil included acids, aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, phenols, sugars, etc. The light fraction was mainly composed of acids and compounds with lower boiling point temperature, the middle and heavy fractions were consisted of phenols and levoglucosan. The thermal stability of the bio-oil was determined by the interactions and intersolubility of compounds. It was found that the thermal stability of bio-oil was better than the light fraction, but worse than the middle and heavy fractions.

  6. Pyrolysis kinetics of hazelnut husk using thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Selim; Topçu, Yıldıray

    2014-03-01

    This study aims at investigating physicochemical properties and pyrolysis kinetics of hazelnut husk, an abundant agricultural waste in Turkey. The physicochemical properties were determined by bomb calorimeter, elemental analysis and FT-IR spectroscopy. Physicochemical analysis results showed that hazelnut husk has a high calorimetric value and high volatile matter content. Pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer under inert conditions and operated at different heating rates (5, 10, 20°C/min). Three different kinetic models, the iso-conversional Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) and Ozawa-Flynn-Wall (OFW) models and Coats-Redfern method were applied on TGA data of hazelnut husk to calculate the kinetic parameters including activation energy, pre-exponential factor and reaction order. Simulation of hazelnut husk pyrolysis using data obtained from TGA analysis showed good agreement with experimental data. Combining with physicochemical properties, it was concluded that this biomass can become useful source of energy or chemicals.

  7. Catalytic pyrolysis of waste rice husk over mesoporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Mi-Jin; Kim, Seung-Soo; Jeon, Jong-Ki; Park, Sung Hoon; Kim, Ji Man; Sohn, Jung Min; Lee, See-Hoon; Park, Young-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis of waste rice husk was carried out using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry [Py-GC/MS]. Meso-MFI zeolite [Meso-MFI] was used as the catalyst. In addition, a 0.5-wt.% platinum [Pt] was ion-exchanged into Meso-MFI to examine the effect of Pt addition. Using a catalytic upgrading method, the activities of the catalysts were evaluated in terms of product composition and deoxygenation. The structure and acid site characteristics of the catalysts were analyzed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption analysis. Catalytic upgrading reduced the amount of oxygenates in the product vapor due to the cracking reaction of the catalysts. Levoglucosan, a polymeric oxygenate species, was completely decomposed without being detected. While the amount of heavy phenols was reduced by catalytic upgrading, the amount of light phenols was increased because of the catalytic cracking of heavy phenols into light phenols and aromatics. The amount of aromatics increased remarkably as a result of catalytic upgrading, which is attributed to the strong Brönsted acid sites and the shape selectivity of the Meso-MFI catalyst. The addition of Pt made the Meso-MFI catalyst even more active in deoxygenation and in the production of aromatics.

  8. Pyrolysis of rice husk and sawdust for liquid fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The paper is focused on studying how to convert rice husk and sawdust into liquid fuel. Rice husk, sawdust and their mixture were pyrolyzed at the temperature between 420℃ and 540℃, and the main product of liquid fuel was obtained. The experimental result showed that the yield of liquid fuel heavily depended on the kind of feedstock and pyrolysis temperature. In the experiments, the maximum liquid yields for rice husk, sawdust and their mixture were 56% at 465℃, 61% at 490℃ and 60% at 475℃respectively. Analysis with GC-MS and other apparatus indicated that the liquid fuel is a complicated organic compound with low caloric value and can be directly used as fuel oil without any up-grading. As a crude oil, the liquid fuel can be refined to be vehicle oil.

  9. Influence of Pyrolysis Temperature on Rice Husk Char Characteristics and Its Tar Adsorption Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anchan Paethanom

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A biomass waste, rice husk, was inspected by thermoanalytical investigation to evaluate its capability as an adsorbent medium for tar removal. The pyrolysis process has been applied to the rice husk material at different temperatures 600, 800 and 1000 °C with 20 °C/min heating rate, to investigate two topics: (1 influence of temperature on characterization of rice husk char and; (2 adsorption capability of rice husk char for tar removal. The results showed that subsequent to high temperature pyrolysis, rice husk char became a highly porous material, which was suitable as tar removal adsorbent with the ability to remove tar effectively. In addition, char characteristics and tar removal ability were significantly influenced by the pyrolysis temperature.

  10. Pyrolysis kinetics of Melon (Citrullus colocynthis L.) seed husk

    CERN Document Server

    Nyakuma, Bemgba Bevan

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the thermochemical fuel characteristics and kinetic decomposition of melon seed husks (MSH) under inert (pyrolysis) conditions. The calorific value, elemental composition, proximate analyses and thermal kinetics of MSH was examined. The kinetic parameters; activation energy E and frequency factor A for MSH decomposition under pyrolysis conditions were determined using the Kissinger and isoconversional Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO) methods. The values of E for MSH ranged from 146.81 to 296 kJ/mol at degrees of conversion {\\alpha} = 0.15 to 0.60 for FWO. The decomposition of MSH process was fastest at {\\alpha} = 0.15 and slowest at {\\alpha} = 0.60 with average E and A values of 192.96 kJ/mol and 2.86 x 1026 min-1, respectively at correlation values of 0.9847. The kinetic values of MSH using the Kissinger method are E = 161.26 kJ/mol and frequency factor, A = 2.08 x 1010 min-1 with the correlation value, R2 = 0.9958. The results indicate that MSH possesses important characteristics ...

  11. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of tar compounds formed during pyrolysis of rice husks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Stevens, T.W.; Hovestad, A.; Skolnik, V.; Visser, R.

    1991-01-01

    Pyrolysis of agricultural waste to produce fuel gas involves formation of tars as noxious by-products. In this paper the qualitative analysis of tars formed during pyrolysis of rice husks is presented, based on identification by gas chromatography—mass spectrometry and interpolation of retention tim

  12. Exploratory studies on fast pyrolysis oil upgrading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahfud, Farchad Husein

    2007-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil is a dark brown liquid which can be produced in high yield from different kind of biomass sources by means of fast pyrolysis. Pyrolysis oil is considered as a promising second generation energy carrier and may play an important role in the future of "biobased economies". The energy

  13. Exploratory studies on fast pyrolysis oil upgrading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahfud, Farchad Husein

    2007-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil is a dark brown liquid which can be produced in high yield from different kind of biomass sources by means of fast pyrolysis. Pyrolysis oil is considered as a promising second generation energy carrier and may play an important role in the future of "biobased economies". The energy con

  14. Extent of pyrolysis impacts on fast pyrolysis biochar properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Catherine E; Hu, Yan-Yan; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Loynachan, Thomas E; Laird, David A; Brown, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    A potential concern about the use of fast pyrolysis rather than slow pyrolysis biochars as soil amendments is that they may contain high levels of bioavailable C due to short particle residence times in the reactors, which could reduce the stability of biochar C and cause nutrient immobilization in soils. To investigate this concern, three corn ( L.) stover fast pyrolysis biochars prepared using different reactor conditions were chemically and physically characterized to determine their extent of pyrolysis. These biochars were also incubated in soil to assess their impact on soil CO emissions, nutrient availability, microorganism population growth, and water retention capacity. Elemental analysis and quantitative solid-state C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed variation in O functional groups (associated primarily with carbohydrates) and aromatic C, which could be used to define extent of pyrolysis. A 24-wk incubation performed using a sandy soil amended with 0.5 wt% of corn stover biochar showed a small but significant decrease in soil CO emissions and a decrease in the bacteria:fungi ratios with extent of pyrolysis. Relative to the control soil, biochar-amended soils had small increases in CO emissions and extractable nutrients, but similar microorganism populations, extractable NO levels, and water retention capacities. Corn stover amendments, by contrast, significantly increased soil CO emissions and microbial populations, and reduced extractable NO. These results indicate that C in fast pyrolysis biochar is stable in soil environments and will not appreciably contribute to nutrient immobilization.

  15. Fast pyrolysis of biomass at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna

    This Ph.D. thesis describes experimental and modeling investigations of fast high temperature pyrolysis of biomass. Suspension firing of biomass is widely used for power generation and has been considered as an important step in reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by using less fossil fuels. Fast...... pyrolysis at high temperatures plays a significant role in the overall combustion process since the biomass type, the reaction kinetics and heat transfer rates during pyrolysis influence the volatile gas release. The solid residue yield and its properties in suspension firing, including particle size...... and shape, composition, reactivity and burnout depend significantly on the operating conditions of the fast pyrolysis. Biomass fast pyrolysis experiments were performed in a laboratory-scale wire mesh reactor and bench scale atmospheric pressure drop tube / entrained flow reactors with the aim...

  16. Effect of self-purging pyrolysis on yield of biochar from maize cobs, husks and leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intani, Kiatkamjon; Latif, Sajid; Kabir, A K M Rafayatul; Müller, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    In this study, biochar was produced from maize residues (cobs, husks, leaves) in a lab-scale pyrolysis reactor without using a purging gas. The physicochemical properties of biomass and biochar were analysed. Box-Behnken design was used to optimise operational conditions for biochar yields. Multivariate correlations of biochar yields were established using reduced quadratic models with R(2)=0.9949, 0.9801 and 0.9876 for cobs, husks and leaves, respectively. Biochar yields were negatively correlated with the temperature, which was significantly influenced by the exothermic reactions during the pyrolysis of maize residues. The heating rate was found to have the least effect on biochar yields. Under optimal conditions, the maximum biochar yields from cobs, husks and leaves were 33.42, 30.69 and 37.91%, respectively. The highest biochar yield from maize leaves was obtained at a temperature of 300°C, a heating rate of 15°C/min and a holding time of 30min.

  17. Refining fast pyrolysis of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil produced from biomass is a promising renewable alternative to crude oil. Such pyrolysis oil has transportation, storage, and processing benefits, none of which are offered by the bulky, inhomogeneous solid biomass from which it originates. However, pyrolysis oil has both a different

  18. Refining fast pyrolysis of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil produced from biomass is a promising renewable alternative to crude oil. Such pyrolysis oil has transportation, storage, and processing benefits, none of which are offered by the bulky, inhomogeneous solid biomass from which it originates. However, pyrolysis oil has both a different co

  19. On-line catalytic upgrading of biomass fast pyrolysis products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Qiang; ZHU XiFeng; LI WenZhi; ZHANG Ying; CHEN DengYu

    2009-01-01

    Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) was employed to achieve fast pyrolysis of biomass and on-line analysis of the pyrolysis vapors. Four biomass materials (poplar wood, fir wood, cotton straw and rice husk) were pyrolyzed to reveal the difference among their products. Moreover, catalytic cracking of the pyrolysis vapors from cotton straw was performed by using five catalysts, including two microporous zeolites (HZSM-5 and HY) and three mesoporous catalysts (ZrO2&TiO2, SBA-15 and AI/SBA-15). The results showed that the distribution of the pyrolytic products from the four materials differed a little from each other, while catalytic cracking could significantly alter the pyrolytic products. Those important primary pyrolytic products such as levoglucosen, hydroxyacetaldehyde and 1-hydroxy-2-propanone were decreased greatly after catalysis. The two microporous zeolites were ef-fective to generate high yields of hydrocarbons, while the three mesoporous materials favored the formation of furan, furfural and other furan compounds, as well as acetic acid.

  20. Upgrading of bio-oil from the pyrolysis of biomass over the rice husk ash catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutrisno, B.; Hidayat, A.

    2016-11-01

    The pyrolysis oils are complex mixtures of organic compounds that exhibit a wide spectrum of chemical functionality, and generally contain some water. Their direct use as fuels may present some difficulties due to their high viscosity, poor heating value, corrosiveness and instability. For possible future use as replacements for hydrocarbon chemical feedstocks and fuels, the liquids will require considerable upgrading to improve its characteristics. By esterification of the bio oil as the upgrading method, the properties of the bio-oil could be improved. In the paper, the upgrading of a bio-oil obtained by pyrolysis was studied over rice husk ash catalysts. The raw bio-oil was produced by pyrolysis of rice husk.From the experiment results, it can be concluded that the densities of upgraded bio-oil were reduced from 1.24 to 0.95 g.cm-3, and the higherheating value increased from 16.0 to 27.2 MJ/kg and the acidity of upgraded bio-oil was also alleviated from 2.3 to 4.4. The results of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and FT-IR analysis showed that the ester compounds in the upgraded bio-oil increased. It is possible to improve the properties of bio-oil by esterifying the raw bio-oil.

  1. Structural and Compositional Transformations of Biomass Chars during Fast Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Steibel, Markus; Spliethoff, Hartmut

    In this work the physical and chemical transformations of biomass chars during fast pyrolysis, considered as a 2nd stage of combustion, has been investigated. Seven biomasses containing different amount of ash and organic components were reacted at up to 1673 K with high heating rates in a wire......-mesh reactor and the resulting chars were retrieved. In order to obtain information on the structural and compositional transformations of the biomass chars, samples were subjected to elemental analysis, scanning electron microcopy with EDX and Raman spectrometry. The results show that there are significant...... changes in both the organic and inorganic constituents of the chars.Under high heating rates (> 100 K/s) char particles underwent different types of melting and pores of different size were developed in dependency on the temperature and biomass composition. The Si-rich rice husks char did not show any...

  2. Effects of water washing and torrefaction pretreatments on rice husk pyrolysis by microwave heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuping; Dong, Qing; Zhang, Li; Xiong, Yuanquan; Liu, Xinzhi; Zhu, Shuguang

    2015-10-01

    The influences of water washing, torrefaction and combined water washing-torrefaction pretreatments on microwave pyrolysis of rice husk samples were investigated. The results indicated that the process of combined water washing-torrefaction pretreatment could effectively remove a large portion of inorganics and improve the fuel characteristics to a certain extent. The gas products were rich in combustible compositions and the syngas quality was improved by pretreatment process. The liquid products contained less moisture content, acids and furans, while more concentrated phenols and sugars from microwave pyrolysis of rice husk after pretreatments, especially after the combined water washing-torrefaction pretreatment. Biochar, produced in high yield, has the alkaline pH (pH 8.2-10.0) and high surface area (S(BET) 157.81-267.84 m(2)/g), they have the potential to be used as soil amendments. It is noteworthy that water washing increased the pore surface area of biochar, but torrefaction reduced the pore surface area.

  3. Effects of pyrolysis temperature on the physicochemical properties of empty fruit bunch and rice husk biochars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claoston, N; Samsuri, A W; Ahmad Husni, M H; Mohd Amran, M S

    2014-04-01

    Biochar has received great attention recently due to its potential to improve soil fertility and immobilize contaminants as well as serving as a way of carbon sequestration and therefore a possible carbon sink. In this work, a series of biochars were produced from empty fruit bunch (EFB) and rice husk (RH) by slow pyrolysis at different temperatures (350, 500, and 650°C) and their physicochemical properties were analysed. The results indicate that porosity, ash content, electrical conductivity (EC), and pH value of both EFB and RH biochars were increased with temperature; however, yield, cation exchange capacity (CEC), and H, C, and N content were decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperature. The Fourier transform IR spectra were similar for both RH and EFB biochars but the functional groups were more distinct in the EFB biochar spectra. There were reductions in the amount of functional groups as pyrolysis temperature increased especially for the EFB biochar. However, total acidity of the functional groups increased with pyrolysis temperature for both biochars.

  4. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M.; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy Q3 carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel—bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating values, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly Q4 limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

  5. Influence of fast pyrolysis conditions on yield and structural transformation of biomass chars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2015-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass (wood, straw, rice husk) and its major components (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin) was conducted in a wire mesh reactor. The aim of this study was to understand the influence of temperature (350-1400 ° C), heating rate (10-3000 ° C/s), particle size (0.05-2 mm...... that the heat treatment temperature had a larger influence on the char yield than the heating rate. Scanning electron microscopy indicated different types of biomass char plasticization influenced by the applied temperatures, heating rates, particle sizes and holding times, except for the rice husk char...... that formed chars with a structure similar to the parental fuel at all conditions. The less severe morphological changes of rice husk char were attributed to a high silica content....

  6. Upgrading the rice husk char obtained by flash pyrolysis for the production of amorphous silica and high quality activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Jon; Lopez, Gartzen; Amutio, Maider; Bilbao, Javier; Olazar, Martin

    2014-10-01

    The overall valorization of rice husk char obtained by flash pyrolysis in a conical spouted bed reactor (CSBR) has been studied in a two-step process. Thus, silica has been recovered in a first step and the remaining carbon material has been subjected to steam activation. The char samples used in this study have been obtained by continuous flash pyrolysis in a conical spouted bed reactor at 500°C. Extraction with Na2CO3 allows recovering 88% of the silica contained in the rice husk char. Activation of the silica-free rice husk char has been carried out in a fixed bed reactor at 800°C using steam as activating agent. The porous structure of the activated carbons produced includes a combination of micropores and mesopores, with a BET surface area of up to 1365m(2)g(-1) at the end of 15min.

  7. Effects of water washing and torrefaction on the pyrolysis behavior and kinetics of rice husk through TGA and Py-GC/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuping; Dong, Qing; Zhang, Li; Xiong, Yuanquan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of water washing and torrefaction on the pyrolysis behavior and kinetics of rice husk were investigated through TGA and Py-GC/MS in this study. Two iso-conversional methods, i.e. Starink and FWO methods were applied for determination of the activation energy of original and pretreated rice husk samples at three different heating rates. It was found that activation energy of water washed rice husk was lower than that of original rice husk. Whereas, the activation energy increased with the increase of torrefaction temperature. The result of Py-GC/MS analysis indicated that both water washing and torrefaction pretreatments decreased the contents of acids, ketones, aldehydes and furans, while significantly increased the contents of sugars, especially levoglucosan. The relative content of released levoglucosan from pyrolysis of rice husk sample with combined water washing and 280°C torrefaction pretreatment is almost 9 times of that from original rice husk, which is about 3%.

  8. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Dickerson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical conversion route for lignocellulosic biomass that produces chemicals and fuels compatible with current, petrochemical infrastructure. Catalytic modifications to pyrolysis bio-oils are geared towards the elimination and substitution of oxygen and oxygen-containing functionalities in addition to increasing the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the final products. Recent progress has focused on both hydrodeoxygenation and hydrogenation of bio-oil using a variety of metal catalysts and the production of aromatics from bio-oil using cracking zeolites. Research is currently focused on developing multi-functional catalysts used in situ that benefit from the advantages of both hydrodeoxygenation and zeolite cracking. Development of robust, highly selective catalysts will help achieve the goal of producing drop-in fuels and petrochemical commodities from wood and other lignocellulosic biomass streams. The current paper will examine these developments by means of a review of existing literature.

  9. Characterization of Hydrotreated Fast Pyrolysis Liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oasmaa, A.; Kuoppala, E.; Ardiyanti, A.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Heeres, H. J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on analytical methods to determine the composition of hydrotreated fast pyrolysis liquids. With this information, it is possible to gain insights in the chemical transformations taking place during catalytic hydrotreatment (hydrogenation and/or hydrodeoxygenation, H DO) of pyrolys

  10. Fast Pyrolysis of Lignin Using a Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Sárossy, Zsuzsa

    2013-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of lignin from an ethanol plant was investigated on a lab scale pyrolysis centrifuge reactor (PCR) with respect to pyrolysis temperature, reactor gas residence time, and feed rate. A maximal organic oil yield of 34 wt % dry basis (db) (bio-oil yield of 43 wt % db) is obtained...... at temperatures of 500−550 °C, reactor gas residence time of 0.8 s, and feed rate of 5.6 g/min. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry and size-exclusion chromatography were used to characterize the Chemical properties of the lignin oils. Acetic acid, levoglucosan, guaiacol, syringols, and p-vinylguaiacol are found...... to be major chemical components in the lignin oil. The maximal yields of 0.62, 0.67, and 0.38 wt % db were obtained for syringol, p-vinylguaiacol, and guaiacol, respectively. The reactor temperature effect was investigated in a range of 450−600 °C and has a considerable effect on the observed chemical...

  11. Effect of Fast Pyrolysis Conditions on Structural Transformation and Reactivity of Herbaceous Biomasses at High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Anker D.; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    Fast pyrolysis of wheat straw and rice husks was carried out in an entrained-flow reactor (EFR) and compared with the results from the wire-mesh reactor (WMR) in terms of the char yield at high-temperatures (1000-1500°C) to study the effect of heating rate, final temperature, ash content and part......Fast pyrolysis of wheat straw and rice husks was carried out in an entrained-flow reactor (EFR) and compared with the results from the wire-mesh reactor (WMR) in terms of the char yield at high-temperatures (1000-1500°C) to study the effect of heating rate, final temperature, ash content...... and particle size on the char yield. X-ray diffractometry (XRD), N-adsorption (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), particle size analysis (CAMSIZER XT), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (29Si NMR; 13C NMR) and electron spinning resonance spectroscopy (ESR) were conducted to investigate the effect...... of organic and inorganic matter on the char structural transformations. The results indicate no influence of the free radicals on char reactivity and burnout. The formation of free radicals in fast pyrolysis is related to the differences in the ash composition, namely presence of K+ ions in the wheat straw...

  12. Cellulose-Lignin interactions during slow and fast pyrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilbers, T.J.; Wang, Z.; Pecha, B.; Westerhof, R.J.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Pelaez-Samaniego, M.R.; Garcia-Perez, M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between lignin and cellulose during the slow pyrolysis of their blends were studied by means of Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Fast pyrolysis was studied using Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (Py–GC/MS). Crystalline cellulose

  13. STUDY ON CONTINIOUS PYROLYSIS OF RICH HUSK%稻壳连续热解特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王明峰; 蒋恩臣; 李伯松; 张强; 许细微; 刘敏; 周岭

    2012-01-01

    The continuous pyrolysis and secondary cracking performance of rice husk was investigated in a biomass continuous pyrolysis reactor. The effects of pyrolysis temperature, residence time and secondary cracking tempera-ture on pyrolysis products were studied. When rice husk pyrolysis gas composes CO2 and CO mainly, the yield of CO2 reduced and yield of CH4, H2, C2H4, C2H6 increasesd, yield of CO is not much change with pyrolysis temper-ature increasing. Residence time has little effect on the composition of pyrolysis gas. The yield of H2, CH4, C2H4 increases significantly with increasing the temperature of secondary cracking. When secondary cracking temperature is 800℃, production rate of H2 was 12%. Rice husk pyrolysing at 500℃, then cracking at 600℃, acetic acid is as high as 49.44% in the wood vinegar, and acetone and isopropanol are the two more compositions detected in the tar.%在自行研制的生物质连续热解反应装置上进行稻壳连续热解和二次裂解实验研究.随着稻壳热解温度的提高,炭产率降低,气体产率增加,液体产率先增加后减少;随着滞留时间的减少,炭产率、液体产率增加,气体产率减少.稻壳热解气以CO2和CO为主,且二者为竞争关系,热解温度提高,CO2产量降低,CH4、H2、C2H4、C2 H6产量增加,CO的产率变化不大;滞留时间对热解气组分影响不大.二次裂解温度提高,裂解气中的H2、CH4、C2 H4含量明显增加,二次裂解温度为800℃时,H2产率达到12%.稻壳500℃热解挥发物600℃二次裂解木醋液中醋酸含量高达49.44%,焦油中检测到的物质主要为丙酮和异丙醇.

  14. Thermogravimetric-Mass Spectrometry Analysis and Pyrolysis Kinetic of Rice Husk and Rice Straw%稻壳和稻草的热重-质谱分析及其反应动力学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚锡文; 许开立; 贾彦强; 张秀敏

    2016-01-01

    In the nitrogen atmosphere,thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry(TG /MS)was used in combination to compare the pyrolysis behavior of rice husk and rice straw at the heating rates of 5 ℃/min and 20 ℃/min,and the release rule of small molecule gas (CO,CO2 ,CH4 ,H2 )product with the change of temperature and heating rates was obtained.The results show that the pyrolysis process of rice husk and rice straw can be divided into dewatering and drying warm-up solution stage,volatile component precipitation fast pyrolysis stage and residue pyrolysis carbonization stage.The total weight loss rate of rice straw pyrolysis is about 75%,while rice husk is about 55%,and the index value of rice straw pyrolysis characteristics is higher than that of rice husk. The release intensity of ion current of main biomass gas composition (CO,CH4 and H2 )in the rice straw pyrolysis process is obviously higher than that of rice husk.The pyrolysis kinetic parameters were calculated by using Coats-Redfern method.The apparent activation energy and volatile component initial precipitation temperature of rice straw are lower than those of rice husk, which accord with the results of experiment,and indicate that the pyrolysis performance of rice straw is better than that of rice husk under uniform conditions.%采用热重-质谱(TG -MS)联用对比研究了氮气气氛中稻壳和稻草在升温速率分别为5,20℃/min时的热解行为,分析得到了稻壳和稻草热裂解过程产生的小分子气相产物(CO,CO2,CH4,H2)随温度和升温速率变化的释放规律。结果表明:稻壳和稻草的热解过程可分为脱水干燥预热解阶段、挥发分析出快速热解阶段和残余物裂解炭化阶段;稻草热解总失重率约为75%,稻壳约为55%,而且稻草的热解特性指数高于稻壳;稻草热解释放生物质燃气主要成分(CO,CH4,H2)的离子流强度明显高于稻壳;用 Coats -Redfern法计算生物质的热解动力学参数,表观活化能和挥发

  15. Catalyst studies on the hydrotreatment of fast pyrolysis oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildschut, J.; Melian-Cabrera, I.; Heeres, H. J.

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic hydrotreatment is considered an attractive technology for fast pyrolysis oil upgrading to liquid transportation fuels. We here report an experimental study to gain insights in catalyst stability when using Ru/C catalysts for the hydrotreatment of fast pyrolysis oil (350 degrees C and 200 b

  16. Catalyst studies on the hydrotreatment of fast pyrolysis oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildschut, J.; Melian-Cabrera, I.; Heeres, H. J.

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic hydrotreatment is considered an attractive technology for fast pyrolysis oil upgrading to liquid transportation fuels. We here report an experimental study to gain insights in catalyst stability when using Ru/C catalysts for the hydrotreatment of fast pyrolysis oil (350 degrees C and 200 b

  17. Fast pyrolysis of oil palm shell (OPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nurhayati; Sulaiman, Fauziah; Aliasak, Zalila

    2015-04-01

    Biomass is an important renewable source of energy. Residues that are obtained from harvesting and agricultural products can be utilised as fuel for energy generation by conducting any thermal energy conversion technology. The conversion of biomass to bio oil is one of the prospective alternative energy resources. Therefore, in this study fast pyrolysis of oil palm shell was conducted. The main objective of this study was to find the optimum condition for high yield bio-oil production. The experiment was conducted using fixed-bed fluidizing pyrolysis system. The biomass sample was pyrolysed at variation temperature of 450°C - 650°C and at variation residence time of 0.9s - 1.35s. The results obtained were further discussed in this paper. The basic characteristic of the biomass sample was also presented here. The experiment shows that the optimum bio-oil yield was obtained at temperature of 500°C at residence time 1.15s.

  18. Biofuel from fast pyrolysis and catalytic hydrodeoxygenation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2015-09-04

    This review addresses recent developments in biomass fast pyrolysis bio-oil upgrading by catalytic hydrotreating. The research in the field has expanded dramatically in the past few years with numerous new research groups entering the field while existing efforts from others expand. The issues revolve around the catalyst formulation and operating conditions. Much work in batch reactor tests with precious metal catalysts needs further validation to verify long-term operability in continuous flow systems. The effect of the low level of sulfur in bio-oil needs more study to be better understood. Utilization of the upgraded bio-oil for feedstock to finished fuels is still in an early stage of understanding.

  19. Mass spectrometric studies of fast pyrolysis of cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degenstein, John; Hurt, Matt; Murria, Priya; Easton, McKay; Choudhari, Harshavardhan; Yang, Linan; Riedeman, James; Carlsen, Mark; Nash, John; Agrawal, Rakesh; Delgass, W.; Ribeiro, Fabio; Kenttämaa, Hilkka

    2015-01-01

    A fast pyrolysis probe/linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer combination was used to study the primary fast pyrolysis products (those that first leave the hot pyrolysis surface) of cellulose, cellobiose, cellotriose, cellotetraose, cellopentaose, and cellohexaose, as well as of cellobiosan, cellotriosan, and cellopentosan, at 600°C. Similar products with different branching ratios were found for the oligosaccharides and cellulose, as reported previously. However, identical products (with the exception of two) with similar branching ratios were measured for cellotriosan (and cellopentosan) and cellulose. This result demonstrates that cellotriosan is an excellent small-molecule surrogate for studies of the fast pyrolysis of cellulose and also that most fast pyrolysis products of cellulose do not originate from the reducing end. Based on several observations, the fast pyrolysis of cellulose is suggested to initiate predominantly via two competing processes: the formation of anhydro-oligosaccharides, such as cellobiosan, cellotriosan, and cellopentosan (major route), and the elimination of glycolaldehyde (or isomeric) units from the reducing end of oligosaccharides formed from cellulose during fast pyrolysis.

  20. Pyrolysis of fast-growing aquatic biomass -Lemna minor (duckweed): Characterization of pyrolysis products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Nazim; Fidalgo, Beatriz; Gujar, Amit C; T-Raissi, Ali

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this work was to conduct the experimental study of pyrolysis of fast-growing aquatic biomass -Lemna minor (commonly known as duckweed) with the emphasis on the characterization of main products of pyrolysis. The yields of pyrolysis gas, pyrolytic oil (bio-oil) and char were determined as a function of pyrolysis temperature and the sweep gas (Ar) flow rate. Thermogravimetric/differential thermogravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses of duckweed samples in inert (helium gas) and oxidative (air) atmosphere revealed differences in the TG/DTG patterns obtained for duckweed and typical plant biomass. The bio-oil samples produced by duckweed pyrolysis at different reaction conditions were analyzed using GC-MS technique. It was found that pyrolysis temperature had minor effect on the bio-oil product slate, but exerted major influence on the relative quantities of the individual pyrolysis products obtained. While, the residence time of the pyrolysis vapors had negligible effect on the yield and composition of the duckweed pyrolysis products.

  1. Stabilization of Fast Pyrolysis Oil: Post Processing Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Hart, Todd R.

    2012-03-01

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, assembled a comprehensive team for a two-year project to demonstrate innovative methods for the stabilization of pyrolysis oil in accordance with DOE Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) DE-PS36-08GO98018, Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil (Bio-oil) Stabilization. In collaboration with NREL, PNNL, the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Pall Fuels and Chemicals, and Ensyn Corporation, UOP developed solutions to the key technical challenges outlined in the FOA. The UOP team proposed a multi-track technical approach for pyrolysis oil stabilization. Conceptually, methods for pyrolysis oil stabilization can be employed during one or both of two stages: (1) during the pyrolysis process (In Process); or (2) after condensation of the resulting vapor (Post-Process). Stabilization methods fall into two distinct classes: those that modify the chemical composition of the pyrolysis oil, making it less reactive; and those that remove destabilizing components from the pyrolysis oil. During the project, the team investigated methods from both classes that were suitable for application in each stage of the pyrolysis process. The post processing stabilization effort performed at PNNL is described in this report. The effort reported here was performed under a CRADA between PNNL and UOP, which was effective on March 13, 2009, for 2 years and was subsequently modified March 8, 2011, to extend the term to December 31, 2011.

  2. Fast pyrolysis of lignin, macroalgae and sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung

    In the last twenty years, the fast pyrolysis process has been explored to produce bio-oil from biomass. Fast pyrolysis is a thermal conversion technology that is performed at a temperatures of 450 - 600 ºC, high biomass heating ratess (100 - 2000 K/s), a short gas residence time (less than 2 s......) with no presence of oxygen. Fast pyrolysis can convert a large fraction of the biomass to bio-oil, and smaller fractions of char and gas. The pyrolysis centrifuge reactor (PCR) has been developed at the CHEC center at DTU Department of Chemical Engineering. The reactor is a compact design that uses a low flow rate...... constructed as a mobile unit of a tractor-propelled vehicle that is used on straw fields. A lot of work on PCR straw and wood pyrolysis with respect to pyrolysis conditions, moisture feedstock content, bio-oil properties, and PCR modelling is done before this PhD project. The bio-oil yields of approximately...

  3. A new approach to study fast pyrolysis of pulverized coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Yao, J.; Lin, W. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemical Metallurgy Fast Reactions Laboratory, Beijing, BJ (China)

    2002-07-01

    An experimental study of the effects of varying bed temperature and coal particle size on the fast pyrolysis of pulverized coal in a downer reactor is described. A Datong bituminous coal (particle size 0.5 and 0.34 mm) was studied at temperatures ranging from 592{sup o} C to 720{sup o} C. The experiments were conducted in a batch apparatus. An on-line gas analyzer was used to measure carbon dioxide release curves. The experimental data were used to develop a pyrolysis model that quantifies the fast heating of fine coal particles. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. A Comparison of Lignin, Macroalgae, Wood and Straw Fast Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    with respect to carbon and oxygen contents, HHV, thermal behaviors and mean molecular weight. The HHV of wood, straw, lignin and algae oils were 24.0, 23.7, 29.7 and 25.7 MJ/kg db, respectively. The distributions of metals, Cl and S in char and bio-oil were investigated for the biomasses. Almost all the metals......A fast pyrolysis study on lignin and macroalgae (non-conventional biomass) and wood and straw (conventional biomass) were carried out in a pyrolysis centrifugal reactor at pyrolysis temperature of 550 ºC. The product distributions and energy recoveries were measured and compared among...... these biomasses. The fast pyrolysis of macroalgae showed a promising result with a bio-oil yield of 65 wt% dry ash free basis (daf) and 76 % energy recovery in the bio-oil while the lignin fast pyrolysis provides a bio-oil yield of 47 wt% daf and energy recovery in bio-oil of 45 %. The physiochemical properties...

  5. Thermogravimetric analysis and fast pyrolysis of Milkweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Soo; Agblevor, Foster A

    2014-10-01

    Pyrolysis of Milkweed was carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer and a bubbling fluidized bed reactor. Total liquid yield of Milkweed pyrolysis was between 40.74% and 44.19 wt% between 425 °C and 550 °C. The gas yield increased from 27.90 wt% to 33.33 wt% with increasing reaction temperature. The higher heating values (HHV) of the Milkweed bio-oil were relatively high (30.33-32.87 MJ/kg) and varied with reaction temperature, feeding rate and fluidization velocity. The selectivity for CO2 was highest within non-condensable gases, and the molar ratio of CO2/CO was about 3 at the different reaction conditions. The (13)C NMR analysis, of the bio-oil showed that the relative concentration carboxylic group and its derivatives was higher at 425 °C than 475 °C, which resulted in slightly higher oxygen content in bio-oil. The pH of aqueous phase obtained at 475 °C was 7.37 which is the highest reported for any lignocellulosic biomass pyrolysis oils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison for the compositions of fast and slow pyrolysis oils by NMR characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, Haoxi; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2013-11-01

    The pyrolysis of softwood (SW) kraft lignin and pine wood in different pyrolysis systems were examined at 400, 500 and 600 °C. NMR including quantitative (13)C and Heteronuclear Single-Quantum Correlation (HSQC)-NMR, and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC) were used to characterize various pyrolysis oils. The content of methoxyl groups decreased by 76% for pine wood and 70% for lignin when using fast pyrolysis system. The carbonyl groups also decreased by 76% and nearly completely eliminated in 600 °C pine wood fast pyrolysis oil. Compared to the slow pyrolysis process, fast pyrolysis process was found to improve the cleavage of methoxyl groups, aliphatic CC bonds and carbonyl groups and produce more polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from lignin and aliphatic CO bonds from carbohydrates. Another remarkable difference between fast and slow pyrolysis oils was the molecular weight of fast pyrolysis oils increased by 85-112% for pine wood and 104-112% for lignin.

  7. Fast pyrolysis of biomass thermally pretreated by torrefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrefied biomass samples were produced from hardwood and switchgrass pellets using the biochar experimenter’s kit (BEK) reactor and analyzed for their utility as pretreated feedstock for biofuels production via fast pyrolysis. The energy efficiency for the BEK torrefaction process with propane gas ...

  8. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  9. Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  10. Adiabatic Gasification and Pyrolysis of Coffee Husk Using Air-Steam for Partial Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Colombian coffee industry produces about 0.6 million tons of husk (CH per year which could serve as feedstock for thermal gasification to produce gaseous and liquid fuels. The current paper deals with: (i CH adiabatic gasification modeling using air-steam blends for partial oxidation and (ii experimental thermogravimetric analysis to determine the CH activation energy (E. The Chemical Equilibrium with Applications Program (CEA, developed by NASA, was used to estimate the effect of equivalence ratio (ER and steam to fuel ratio (S : F on equilibrium temperature and gas composition of ~150 species. Also, an atom balance model was developed for comparison purposes. The results showed that increased ER and (S : F ratios produce mixtures that are rich in H2 and CO2 but poor in CO. The value for the activation energy was estimated to be 221 kJ/kmol.

  11. Specialists' workshop on fast pyrolysis of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This workshop brought together most of those who are currently working in or have published significant findings in the area of fast pyrolysis of biomass or biomass-derived materials, with the goal of attaining a better understanding of the dominant mechanisms which produce olefins, oxygenated liquids, char, and tars. In addition, background papers were given in hydrocarbon pyrolysis, slow pyrolysis of biomass, and techniques for powdered-feedstock preparation in order that the other papers did not need to introduce in depth these concepts in their presentations for continuity. In general, the authors were requested to present summaries of experimental data with as much interpretation of that data as possible with regard to mechanisms and process variables such as heat flux, temperatures, partial pressure, feedstock, particle size, heating rates, residence time, etc. Separate abstracts have been prepared of each presentation for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  12. Biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidized bed : product cleaning by in-situ filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xiaoquan

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the subject of fast pyrolysis in a fluid bed reactor. A large part of the work is related to reactor design aspects of fast pyrolysis, a subject that has not been considered sufficiently. Past research efforts were focussed mainly on the kinetics of wood pyrolysis and the

  13. Biomass to hydrogen via fast pyrolysis and catalytic steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chornet, E.; Wang, D.; Montane, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass results in a pyrolytic oil which is a mixture of (a) carbohydrate-derived acids, aldehydes and polyols, (b) lignin-derived substituted phenolics, and (c) extractives-derived terpenoids and fatty acids. The conversion of this pyrolysis oil into H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} is thermodynamically favored under appropriate steam reforming conditions. Our efforts have focused in understanding the catalysis of steam reforming which will lead to a successful process at reasonable steam/carbon ratios arid process severities. The experimental work, carried out at the laboratory and bench scale levels, has centered on the performance of Ni-based catalysts using model compounds as prototypes of the oxygenates present in the pyrolysis oil. Steam reforming of acetic acid, hydroxyacetaldehyde, furfural and syringol has been proven to proceed rapidly within a reasonable range of severities. Time-on-stream studies are now underway using a fixed bed barometric pressure reactor to ascertain the durability of the catalysts and thus substantiate the scientific and technical feasibility of the catalytic reforming option. Economic analyses are being carried out in parallel to determine the opportunity zones for the combined fast pyrolysis/steam reforming approach. A discussion on the current state of the project is presented.

  14. Formulation and evaluation of glipizide-loaded fast-dissolving tablets using husk of Plantago ovata as a superdisintegrant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antesh Kumar Jha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to develop fast-dissolving tablets (FDTs of glipizide, a sulfonylurea antidiabetic drug. The husk of Plantago ovata and pregelatinized husk of P. ovata were used as disintegrating agents. Microcrystalline cellulose was used as binder and starch (soluble was used as bulk-forming agent. The powder blends were evaluated for angle of repose, compressibility index and Hausner ratio. The results of angle of repose, compressibility index (% and Hausner ratio ranged from 24.23±0.57 to 29.34±0.78, 15.76±0.82 to 20.12±1.25 and 1.18±0.011 to 1.25±0.019, respectively. The tablet blends were converted into tablets by using direct compression method. The tablets were evaluated for disintegration test, hardness test, friability test, drug entrapment efficiency, content uniformity tests and drug release study. Formulations, which contained pregelatinized husk of P. ovata as a superdisintegrant, showed faster disintegration, higher percentage friability and lesser hardness than formulations containing husk of P. ovata as a superdisintegrant. Drug entrapment efficiency was found to be uniform among different batches of the tablets and ranged from 97.53±0.52 to 99.72±0.45. The results of content uniformity test of all the batches were found in the official range. The batches containing husk of P. ovata as a superdisintegrant released 15%-27% of glipizide per minute and those containing pregelatinized husk of P. ovata as a superdisintegrant released more than 95% of the drug within a minute. These results revealed that pregelatinized husk of P. ovata can be used as a superdisintegrant for obtaining FDTs.

  15. Simulation of hydrocarbons pyrolysis in a fast-mixing reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MG Ktalkherman; IG Namyatov

    2015-01-01

    Currently, thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons for the production of basic petrochemicals (ethylene, propyl-ene) is carried out in steam-cracking processes. Aside from the conventional method, under consideration are alternative ways purposed for process intensification. In the context of these activities, the method of high-temperature pyrolysis of hydrocarbons in a heat-carrier flow is studied, which differs from previous ones and is based on the ability of an ultra-short time of feedstock/heat-carrier mixing. This enables to study the pyrolysis process at high temperature (up to 1500 K) at the reactor inlet. A set of model experiments is conducted on the lab scale facility. Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and naphtha are used as a feedstock. The detailed data are obtain-ed on temperature and product distributions within a wide range of the residence time. A theoretical model based on the detailed kinetics of the process is developed, too. The effect of governing parameters on the pyrolysis process is analyzed by the results of the simulation and experiments. In particular, the optimal temperature is detected which corresponds to the maximum ethylene yield. Product yields in our experiments are compared with the similar ones in the conventional pyrolysis method. In both cases (LPG and naphtha), ethylene selectivity in the fast-mixing reactor is substantial y higher than in current technology.

  16. Screening acidic zeolites for catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass and its components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeolites have been shown to effectively promote cracking reactions during pyrolysis resulting in highly deoxygenated and hydrocarbon-rich compounds and stable pyrolysis oil product. Py/GC-MS was employed to study the catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass samples comprising oak, corn...

  17. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of pine wood: Effect of successive catalyst regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yildiz, Guray; Lathouwers, Tom; Toraman, Hilal Ezgi; Geem, van Kevin M.; Marin, Guy B.; Ronsse, Frederik; Duren, van Ruben; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Prins, Wolter

    2014-01-01

    The main product of biomass fast pyrolysis is a liquid mixture of numerous organic molecules with water that is usually called pyrolysis oil or bio-oil. The research discussed in this paper was meant (1) to validate a new, semicontinuously operated pyrolysis setup and (2) to investigate the effect o

  18. Atmospheric Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Vapor by MoO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Guofeng; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Le, Duy Michael

    2016-01-01

    MoO3 has been tested as a catalyst in hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of both model compounds (acetone and guaiacol) and real biomass pyrolysis vapors under atmospheric pressure. The pyrolysis vapor was obtained by fast pyrolysis of wood or lignin in a continuous fast pyrolysis reactor at a fixed...... temperature of 500 °C, and it subsequently passed through a downstream, close coupled, fixed bed reactor containing the MoO3 catalyst. The influences of the catalyst temperature and the concentration of H2 on the HDO of the pyrolysis vapors were investigated. The level of HDO of the biomass pyrolysis vapors...... was not significant at temperatures below 400 °C. At 450 °C catalyst temperature and 93 vol % H2 concentration, the wood pyrolysis vapor was more active toward cracking forming gas species instead of performing the desired HDO forming hydrocarbons. The lignin pyrolysis vapor was more resistant to cracking and yielded...

  19. Catalytic hydroprocessing of fast pyrolysis oils: Impact of biomass feedstock on process efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, Daniel; Westover, Tyler; Howe, Daniel; Deutch, Steve; Starace, Anne; Emerson, Rachel; Hernandez, Sergio; Santosa, Daniel; Lukins, Craig; Kutnyakov, Igor

    2017-01-01

    We report here on an experimental study to produce refinery-ready fuel blendstocks via catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (upgrading) of pyrolysis oil using several biomass feedstocks and various blends. Blends were tested along with the pure materials to determine the effect of blending on product yields and qualities. Within experimental error, oil yields from fast pyrolysis and upgrading are shown to be linear functions of the blend components. Switchgrass exhibited lower fast pyrolysis and upgrading yields than the woody samples, which included clean pine, oriented strand board (OSB), and a mix of pinon and juniper (PJ). The notable exception was PJ, for which the poor upgrading yield of 18% was likely associated with the very high viscosity of the PJ fast pyrolysis oil (947 cp). The highest fast pyrolysis yield (54% dry basis) was obtained from clean pine, while the highest upgrading yield (50%) was obtained from a blend of 80% clean pine and 20% OSB (CP8OSB2). For switchgrass, reducing the fast pyrolysis temperature to 450 degrees C resulted in a significant increase to the pyrolysis oil yield and reduced hydrogen consumption during hydrotreating, but did not directly affect the hydrotreating oil yield. The water content of fast pyrolysis oils was also observed to increase linearly with the summed content of potassium and sodium, ranging from 21% for clean pine to 37% for switchgrass. Multiple linear regression models demonstrate that fast pyrolysis is strongly dependent upon the contents lignin and volatile matter as well as the sum of potassium and sodium.

  20. Fast Pyrolysis Process Development Unit for Validating Bench Scale Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Robert C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Biorenewables Research Lab.. Center for Sustainable Environmental Technologies. Bioeconomy Inst.; Jones, Samuel T. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Biorenewables Research Lab.. Center for Sustainable Environmental Technologies. Bioeconomy Inst.

    2010-03-31

    The purpose of this project was to prepare and operate a fast pyrolysis process development unit (PDU) that can validate experimental data generated at the bench scale. In order to do this, a biomass preparation system, a modular fast pyrolysis fluidized bed reactor, modular gas clean-up systems, and modular bio-oil recovery systems were designed and constructed. Instrumentation for centralized data collection and process control were integrated. The bio-oil analysis laboratory was upgraded with the addition of analytical equipment needed to measure C, H, O, N, S, P, K, and Cl. To provide a consistent material for processing through the fluidized bed fast pyrolysis reactor, the existing biomass preparation capabilities of the ISU facility needed to be upgraded. A stationary grinder was installed to reduce biomass from bale form to 5-10 cm lengths. A 25 kg/hr rotary kiln drier was installed. It has the ability to lower moisture content to the desired level of less than 20% wt. An existing forage chopper was upgraded with new screens. It is used to reduce biomass to the desired particle size of 2-25 mm fiber length. To complete the material handling between these pieces of equipment, a bucket elevator and two belt conveyors must be installed. The bucket elevator has been installed. The conveyors are being procured using other funding sources. Fast pyrolysis bio-oil, char and non-condensable gases were produced from an 8 kg/hr fluidized bed reactor. The bio-oil was collected in a fractionating bio-oil collection system that produced multiple fractions of bio-oil. This bio-oil was fractionated through two separate, but equally important, mechanisms within the collection system. The aerosols and vapors were selectively collected by utilizing laminar flow conditions to prevent aerosol collection and electrostatic precipitators to collect the aerosols. The vapors were successfully collected through a selective condensation process. The combination of these two mechanisms

  1. Fast microwave assisted pyrolysis of biomass using microwave absorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Fernanda Cabral; Du, Zhenyi; Xie, Qinglong; Trierweiler, Jorge Otávio; Cheng, Yanling; Wan, Yiqin; Liu, Yuhuan; Zhu, Rongbi; Lin, Xiangyang; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2014-03-01

    A novel concept of fast microwave assisted pyrolysis (fMAP) in the presence of microwave absorbents was presented and examined. Wood sawdust and corn stover were pyrolyzed by means of microwave heating and silicon carbide (SiC) as microwave absorbent. The bio-oil was characterized, and the effects of temperature, feedstock loading, particle sizes, and vacuum degree were analyzed. For wood sawdust, a temperature of 480°C, 50 grit SiC, with 2g/min of biomass feeding, were the optimal conditions, with a maximum bio-oil yield of 65 wt.%. For corn stover, temperatures ranging from 490°C to 560°C, biomass particle sizes from 0.9mm to 1.9mm, and vacuum degree lower than 100mmHg obtained a maximum bio-oil yield of 64 wt.%. This study shows that the use of microwave absorbents for fMAP is feasible and a promising technology to improve the practical values and commercial application outlook of microwave based pyrolysis.

  2. Thermogravimetric analysis and kinetics on co-pyrolysis of coal and rice husk%煤与稻壳共热解热重分析及动力学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严东; 周敏; 宋利强

    2012-01-01

    利用热重分析仪对长焰煤和稻壳分别单独及按不同掺混比例进行热质量损失实验研究.通过比较煤与稻壳共热解热质量损失曲线和计算得到的理论曲线发现,添加稻壳对共热解过程有促进作用,在不同的稻壳掺混比例下,共热解过程质量损失率和最大质量损失速率均较理论值有不同程度的增大,推测稻壳掺混对共热解存在促进作用,促进作用与稻壳掺混比例不成线性关系.对煤与稻壳及共热解过程进行动力学分析,获得了反应活化能和频率因子,分析计算热解动力学参数表明共热解过程存在动力学补偿效应.%The long flame coal and the rice husk were co-pyrolyzed in a thermogravimetric analyzer to investigate the pyrolysis performance of each material, as well as their mixtures. The comparison of the thermogravimetric analysis ( TGA) curves by testing and the theoretical curves by calculating shows that the adding of rice husk has a certain role in promoting co-pyrolysis process, and with the different coal/rice husk mixing ratio, the mass loss rate and the maximum mass loss rate of the co-pyrolysis process both increase in different extent compared with the theoretical values. It is speculated that there is the synergistic effect in co-pyrolysis of coal/rice husk, and the synergy has nonlinear relationship with the rice husk blend ratio. Through the kinetic analysis of he coal, the rice husk and the co-pyrolysis process, the activation energy and the frequency factor were obtained. It reveals that there is a kinetic compensation effect in the co-pyrolysis process by analysis.

  3. Dissolved phosphorus speciation of flash carbonization, slow pyrolysis, and fast pyrolysis biochars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrolysis of waste biomass is a promising technology to produce sterile and renewable organic phosphorus fertilizers. Systematic studies are necessary to understand how different pyrolysis platforms influence the chemical speciation of dissolved (bioavailable) phosphorus. This study employed solut...

  4. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline, diesel, and jet range blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  5. Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline , diesel and jet range blendstocks . Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  6. Pressurized pyrolysis of rice husk in an inert gas sweeping fixed-bed reactor with a focus on bio-oil deoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yangyang; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Jie

    2014-12-01

    The pyrolysis of rice husk was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor with a sweeping nitrogen gas to investigate the effects of pressure on the pyrolytic behaviors. The release rates of main gases during the pyrolysis, the distributions of four products (char, bio-oil, water and gas), the elemental compositions of char, bio-oil and gas, and the typical compounds in bio-oil were determined. It was found that the elevation of pressure from 0.1MPa to 5.0MPa facilitated the dehydration and decarboxylation of bio-oil, and the bio-oils obtained under the elevated pressures had significantly less oxygen and higher calorific value than those obtained under atmospheric pressure. The former bio-oils embraced more acetic acid, phenols and guaiacols. The elevation of pressure increased the formation of CH4 partially via the gas-phase reactions. An attempt is made in this study to clarify "the pure pressure effect" and "the combined effect with residence time".

  7. Fast Pyrolysis of Four Lignins from Different Isolation Processes Using Py-GC/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Lin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis is a promising approach that is being investigated to convert lignin into higher value products including biofuels and phenolic chemicals. In this study, fast pyrolysis of four types of lignin, including milled Amur linden wood lignin (MWL, enzymatic hydrolysis corn stover lignin (EHL, wheat straw alkali lignin (AL and wheat straw sulfonate lignin (SL, were performed using pyrolysis gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA showed that the four lignins exhibited widely different thermolysis behaviors. The four lignins had similar functional groups according to the FTIR analysis. Syringyl, guaiacyl and p-hydroxyphenylpropane structural units were broken down during pyrolysis. Fast pyrolysis product distributions from the four lignins depended strongly on the lignin origin and isolation process. Phenols were the most abundant pyrolysis products from MWL, EHL and AL. However, SL produced a large number of furan compounds and sulfur compounds originating from kraft pulping. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and time on the product distributions from corn stover EHL were also studied. At 350 °C, EHL pyrolysis mainly produced acids and alcohols, while phenols became the main products at higher temperature. No obvious influence of pyrolysis time was observed on EHL pyrolysis product distributions.

  8. Fast pyrolysis of biomass : an experimental study on mechanisms influencing yield and composition of the products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Elly

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil originating from biomass has the potential to replace ‘crude fossil oil’ and to produce fuels and chemicals in a more sustainable way. The favorable perspective of fast pyrolysis as biomass pre-treatment step is directly related to the production of a liquid as main product and the sig

  9. Summary of Fast Pyrolysis and Upgrading GHG Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Male, Jonathan L.

    2012-12-07

    by the rich dialogue and convergence around the energy content and GHG reduction of cellulosic ethanol (an example of these discussions can be found in Wang 2011). GHG analyses of fast pyrolysis technology routes are being developed and will require significant work to reach the levels of development and maturity of cellulosic ethanol models. This summary provides some of the first fast pyrolysis analyses and clarifies some of the reasons for differing results in an effort to begin the convergence on assumptions, discussion of quality of models, and harmonization.

  10. Effect of temperature and AAEM species on fast pyrolysis of biomass tar%热解温度及AAEM元素对生物质快速热解焦油的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯冬冬; 赵义军; 唐文博; 张宇; 钱娟; 孙绍增

    2016-01-01

    生物质热解受热解温度、热解速率和碱金属及碱土金属(AAEM)元素影响显著。利用热裂解气相色谱质谱联用法(Py-GC/MS)针对热解温度及AAEM元素对生物质快速热解焦油的影响展开深入研究,通过样品热解前后的失重情况分析了热解温度及AAEM元素对生物质(稻壳和木屑、酸洗稻壳和酸洗木屑)热解特性的影响规律,利用气相色谱质谱仪(GC/MS)对热解焦油组分及含量进行了在线半定量分析,并对热解焦油组分分子量分布情况展开了讨论。结果表明生物质Py-GC/MS快速热解实验,酸洗脱除AAEM元素致使热解失重率减小。500~900℃范围内随温度的升高,大分子焦油成分逐渐减少,逐渐转化为轻质组分。AAEM 元素限制了焦油前体的聚合,进一步抑制了含氧杂环类碳环(糠醛等)的生成。稻壳的热解焦油的相对分子质量主要分布在110~129。木屑快速热解焦油产率明显高于稻壳,且热解焦油中分子量分布广泛,含有更多较大分子量(150~209)的化合物成分。%Pyrolysis temperature, heating rate, alkali metal and alkaline earth metal (AAEM) species have significant effects on biomass pyrolysis. In this paper, by using the pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), the effect of temperature and AAEM species on fast pyrolysis of the biomass tar was investigated. The influence of pyrolysis temperature and AAEM species on the pyrolysis characteristics of biomass (rice husk and sawdust, H-form rice husk and H-form sawdust) was analyzed by means of mass loss of samples. The online semi quantitative analysis of pyrolysis tar was carried out by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The distribution of molecular weight of pyrolysis tar was discussed. The results showed that during fast pyrolysis of biomass, the removal of AAEM species reduced the mass loss rate. With increasing pyrolysis temperature in

  11. Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil to Produce Hydrocarbon Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adom, Felix K.; Cai, Hao; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Hartley, Damon; Searcy, Erin; Tan, Eric; Jones, Sue; Snowden-Swan, Lesley

    2016-03-31

    This report describes the supply chain sustainability analysis (SCSA) of renewable gasoline and diesel produced via fast pyrolysis of a blended woody feedstock. The metrics considered in this analysis include supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and water consumption.

  12. Tailoring ZSM-5 Zeolites for the Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass to Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Thomas C.; Gardner, David W.; Thilakaratne, Rajeeva

    2016-01-01

    The production of aromatic hydrocarbons from cellulose by zeolite-catalyzed fast pyrolysis involves a complex reaction network sensitive to the zeolite structure, crystallinity, elemental composition, porosity, and acidity. The interplay of these parameters under the reaction conditions represent...

  13. Combustion of coffee husks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenger, M.; Hartge, E.-U.; Werther, J. [Technical Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Chemical Engineering 1, Hamburg (Germany); Ogada, T.; Siagi, Z. [Moi Univ., Dept. of Production Engineering, Eldoret (Kenya)

    2001-05-01

    Combustion mechanisms of two types of coffee husks have been studied using single particle combustion techniques as well as combustion in a pilot-scale fluidized bed facility (FBC), 150 mm in diameter and 9 m high. Through measurements of weight-loss and particle temperatures, the processes of drying, devolatilization and combustion of coffee husks were studied. Axial temperature profiles in the FBC were also measured during stationary combustion conditions to analyse the location of volatile release and combustion as a function of fuel feeding mode. Finally the problems of ash sintering were analysed. The results showed that devolatilization of coffee husks (65-72% volatile matter, raw mass) starts at a low temperature range of 170-200degC and takes place rapidly. During fuel feeding using a non water-cooled system, pyrolysis of the husks took place in the feeder tube leading to blockage and non-uniform fuel flow. Measurements of axial temperature profiles showed that during under-bed feeding, the bed and freeboard temperatures were more or less the same, whereas for over-bed feeding, freeboard temperatures were much higher, indicating significant combustion of the volatiles in the freeboard. A major problem observed during the combustion of coffee husks was ash sintering and bed agglomeration. This is due to the low melting temperature of the ash, which is attributed to the high contents of K{sub 2}O (36-38%) of the coffee husks. (Author)

  14. Influence of pyrolysis temperature on physicochemical properties of biochar obtained from the fast pyrolysis of pitch pine (Pinus rigida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Ho; Kim, Jae-Young; Cho, Tae-Su; Choi, Joon Weon

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pyrolysis temperature on the physicochemical properties and structure of biochar. Biochar was produced by fast pyrolysis of pitch pine (Pinus rigida) using a fluidized bed reactor at different pyrolysis temperatures (300, 400 and 500 °C). The produced biochars were characterized by elemental analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, particle size distributions, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The yield of biochar decreased sharply from 60.7% to 14.4%, based on the oven-dried biomass weight, when the pyrolysis temperature rose from 300 °C to 500 °C. In addition, biochars were further carbonized with an increase in pyrolysis temperature and the char's remaining carbons were rearranged in stable form. The experimental results suggested that the biochar obtained at 400 and 500 °C was composed of a highly ordered aromatic carbon structure.

  15. Bio-oil production from palm fronds by fast pyrolysis process in fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Nino; Simanungkalit, Sabar P.; Kiky Corneliasari, S.

    2017-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis process of palm fronds has been conducted in the fluidized bed reactor to yield bio-oil product (pyrolysis oil). The process employed sea sand as the heat transfer medium. The objective of this study is to design of the fluidized bed rector, to conduct fast pyrolysis process to product bio-oil from palm fronds, and to characterize the feed and bio-oil product. The fast pyrolysis process was conducted continuously with the feeding rate around 500 g/hr. It was found that the biomass conversion is about 35.5% to yield bio-oil, however this conversion is still minor. It is suggested due to the heating system inside the reactor was not enough to decompose the palm fronds as a feedstock. Moreover, the acids compounds ware mostly observed on the bio-oil product.

  16. Stepwise Isothermal Fast Pyrolysis (SIFP of Biomass. Part III. SIFP of Olive Oil Industry Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia S. Luna

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis of olive oil industry wastes was carried out using stepwise isothermal fast pyrolysis (SIFP. SIFP consists of a succession of isothermal fast pyrolysis reactions in which the solid products obtained from the previous isothermal fast pyrolysis reaction become the substrates for subsequent reactions at higher temperatures. This article reports the results obtained from the SIFP of olive oil residue carried out between the temperatures of 300 and 500 °C using 100 °C intervals under reduced pressure (200 mm Hg. The maximum yield of liquid products occurred at 300 °C and consisted of around 35% bio-oil, which contained mainly phenols, furans, and fatty acid methyl esters (FAME. At 400 and 500 °C, FAME, which is derived from residual olive oil, was the major product.

  17. Quantitative Insights into the Fast Pyrolysis of Extracted Cellulose, Hemicelluloses, and Lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Marion; Windt, Michael; Ziegler, Bernhard; Appelt, Jörn; Saake, Bodo; Meier, Dietrich; Bridgwater, Anthony

    2017-08-24

    The transformation of lignocellulosic biomass into bio-based commodity chemicals is technically possible. Among thermochemical processes, fast pyrolysis, a relatively mature technology that has now reached a commercial level, produces a high yield of an organic-rich liquid stream. Despite recent efforts to elucidate the degradation paths of biomass during pyrolysis, the selectivity and recovery rates of bio-compounds remain low. In an attempt to clarify the general degradation scheme of biomass fast pyrolysis and provide a quantitative insight, the use of fast pyrolysis microreactors is combined with spectroscopic techniques (i.e., mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy) and mixtures of unlabeled and (13) C-enriched materials. The first stage of the work aimed to select the type of reactor to use to ensure control of the pyrolysis regime. A comparison of the chemical fragmentation patterns of "primary" fast pyrolysis volatiles detected by using GC-MS between two small-scale microreactors showed the inevitable occurrence of secondary reactions. In the second stage, liquid fractions that are also made of primary fast pyrolysis condensates were analyzed by using quantitative liquid-state (13) C NMR spectroscopy to provide a quantitative distribution of functional groups. The compilation of these results into a map that displays the distribution of functional groups according to the individual and main constituents of biomass (i.e., hemicelluloses, cellulose and lignin) confirmed the origin of individual chemicals within the fast pyrolysis liquids. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  18. Impact of thermal pretreatment on the fast pyrolysis conversion of Southern Pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler L. Westover; Manunya Phanphanich; Micael L. Clark; Sharna R. Rowe; Steven E. Egan; Christopher T Wright; Richard D. Boardman; Alan H. Zacher

    2013-01-01

    Background: Thermal pretreatment of biomass ranges from simple (nondestructive) drying to more severe treatments that cause devolatization, depolymerization and carbonization. These pretreatments have demonstrated promise for transforming raw biomass into feedstock material that has improved milling, handling, storage and conversion properties. In this work, southern pine material was pretreated at 120, 180, 230 and 270 degrees C, and then subjected to pyrolysis tests in a continuous-feed bubbling-fluid bed pyrolysis system. Results: High pretreatment temperatures were associated with lower specific grinding energies, higher grinding rates and lower hydrogen and oxygen contents. Higher pretreatment temperatures were also correlated with increased char production, decreased total acid number and slight decrease in the oxygen content of the pyrolysis liquid fraction. Conclusion: Thermal pretreatment has both beneficial and detrimental impacts on fast pyrolysis conversion of pine material to bio-oil, and the effect of thermal pretreatment on upgrading of pyrolysis bio-oil requires further attention.

  19. Results of the International Energy Agency Round Robin on Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Meier, Dietrich; Oasmaa, Anja; van de Beld, Bert; Bridgwater, Anthony V.; Marklund, Magnus

    2017-04-06

    An international round robin study of the production of fast pyrolysis bio-oil was undertaken. Fifteen institutions in six countries contributed. Three biomass samples were distributed to the laboratories for processing in fast pyrolysis reactors. Samples of the bio-oil produced were transported to a central analytical laboratory for analysis. The round robin was focused on validating the pyrolysis community understanding of production of fast pyrolysis bio-oil by providing a common feedstock for bio-oil preparation. The round robin included: •distribution of 3 feedstock samples from a common source to each participating laboratory; •preparation of fast pyrolysis bio-oil in each laboratory with the 3 feedstocks provided; •return of the 3 bio-oil products (minimum 500 ml) with operational description to a central analytical laboratory for bio-oil property determination. The analyses of interest were: density, viscosity, dissolved water, filterable solids, CHN, S, trace element analysis, ash, total acid number, pyrolytic lignin, and accelerated aging of bio-oil. In addition, an effort was made to compare the bio-oil components to the products of analytical pyrolysis through GC/MS analysis. The results showed that clear differences can occur in fast pyrolysis bio-oil properties by applying different reactor technologies or configurations. The comparison to analytical pyrolysis method suggested that Py-GC/MS could serve as a rapid screening method for bio-oil composition when produced in fluid-bed reactors. Furthermore, hot vapor filtration generally resulted in the most favorable bio-oil product, with respect to water, solids, viscosity, and total acid number. These results can be helpful in understanding the variation in bio-oil production methods and their effects on bio-oil product composition.

  20. STEPWISE ISOTHERMAL FAST PYROLYSIS (SIFP OF BIOMASS PART I. SIFP OF PINE SAWDUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia López Rivilli

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis of pine wood sawdust was carried out using stepwise isothermal fast pyrolysis (SIFP, focusing on the search of reaction conditions to obtain chemicals in good yields from biomass. SIFP consists of successive isothermal fast pyrolysis reactions, where solid products obtained in the previous isothermal fast pyrolysis become the substrate of the subsequent reaction at a higher temperature. This article reports results obtained by SIFP of pine sawdust between 200 and 600°C using 100°C intervals under vacuum (0.2 mm, using nitrogen as carrier gas. Both sets of reactions made it possible to obtain most of the compounds that have been previously described in conventional fast pyrolysis experiments; however this system produces a smaller number of chemical compounds in each isothermal FP, making it easier to obtain determined chemicals with industrial or research value. Maximum yield of liquid products occurred at 300°C, giving around 30% of bio-oil, which contained mainly phenols and furan derivatives. Liquid-Liquid extraction led to a rich mixture of phenol derivatives. Results showed that SIFP is an interesting technique to obtain enriched fractions of products derived from biomass pyrolysis.

  1. Influence of Crystal Allomorph and Crystallinity on the Products and Behavior of Cellulose during Fast Pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukarakate, Calvin; Mittal, Ashutosh; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Budhi, Sridhar; Thompson, Logan; Iisa, Kristiina; Nimlos, Mark R.; Donohoe, Bryon S.

    2016-09-06

    Cellulose is the primary biopolymer responsible for maintaining the structural and mechanical integrity of cell walls and, during the fast pyrolysis of biomass, may be restricting cell wall expansion and inhibiting phase transitions that would otherwise facilitate efficient escape of pyrolysis products. Here, we test whether modifications in two physical properties of cellulose, its crystalline allomorph and degree of crystallinity, alter its performance during fast pyrolysis. We show that both crystal allomorph and relative crystallinity of cellulose impact the slate of primary products produced by fast pyrolysis. For both cellulose-I and cellulose-II, changes in crystallinity dramatically impact the fast pyrolysis product portfolio. In both cases, only the most highly crystalline samples produced vapors dominated by levoglucosan. Cellulose-III, on the other hand, produces largely the same slate of products regardless of its relative crystallinity and produced as much or more levoglucosan at all crystallinity levels compared to cellulose-I or II. In addition to changes in products, the different cellulose allomorphs affected the viscoelastic properties of cellulose during rapid heating. Real-time hot-stage pyrolysis was used to visualize the transition of the solid material through a molten phase and particle shrinkage. SEM analysis of the chars revealed additional differences in viscoelastic properties and molten phase behavior impacted by cellulose crystallinity and allomorph. Regardless of relative crystallinity, the cellulose-III samples displayed the most obvious evidence of having transitioned through a molten phase.

  2. Estimating the Temperature Experienced by Biomass Particles during Fast Pyrolysis Using Microscopic Analysis of Biochars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Logan C. [National; Ciesielski, Peter N. [National; Jarvis, Mark W. [National; Mukarakate, Calvin [National; Nimlos, Mark R. [National; Donohoe, Bryon S. [National

    2017-07-12

    Biomass particles can experience variable thermal conditions during fast pyrolysis due to differences in their size and morphology, and from local temperature variations within a reactor. These differences lead to increased heterogeneity of the chemical products obtained in the pyrolysis vapors and bio-oil. Here we present a simple, high-throughput method to investigate the thermal history experienced by large ensembles of particles during fast pyrolysis by imaging and quantitative image analysis. We present a correlation between the surface luminance (darkness) of the biochar particle and the highest temperature that it experienced during pyrolysis. Next, we apply this correlation to large, heterogeneous ensembles of char particles produced in a laminar entrained flow reactor (LEFR). The results are used to interpret the actual temperature distributions delivered by the reactor over a range of operating conditions.

  3. Bio-oil production from fast pyrolysis of waste furniture sawdust in a fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Hyeon Su; Park, Hyun Ju; Park, Young-Kwon; Ryu, Changkook; Suh, Dong Jin; Suh, Young-Woong; Yim, Jin-Heong; Kim, Seung-Soo

    2010-01-01

    The amount of waste furniture generated in Korea was over 2.4 million tons in the past 3 years, which can be used for renewable energy or fuel feedstock production. Fast pyrolysis is available for thermo-chemical conversion of the waste wood mostly into bio-oil. In this work, fast pyrolysis of waste furniture sawdust was investigated under various reaction conditions (pyrolysis temperature, particle size, feed rate and flow rate of fluidizing medium) in a fluidized-bed reactor. The optimal pyrolysis temperature for increased yields of bio-oil was 450 degrees C. Excessively smaller or larger feed size negatively affected the production of bio-oil. Higher flow and feeding rates were more effective for the production of bio-oil, but did not greatly affect the bio-oil yields within the tested ranges. The use of product gas as the fluidizing medium had a potential for increased bio-oil yields.

  4. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) User Reference Guide: Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yimin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Goldberg, Marshall [MRG and Associates, Nevada City, CA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This guide -- the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model User Reference Guide -- was developed to assist users in operating and understanding the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model. The guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and data sources used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model estimates local (e.g., county- or state-level) job creation, earnings, and output from total economic activity for a given fast pyrolysis biorefinery. These estimates include the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the construction and operation phases of biorefinery projects.Local revenue and supply chain impacts as well as induced impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from the IMPLAN software program. By determining the local economic impacts and job creation for a proposed biorefinery, the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model can be used to field questions about the added value biorefineries might bring to a local community.

  5. Obtaining fermentable sugars by dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose and fast pyrolysis of cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liqun; Zheng, Anqing; Zhao, Zengli; He, Fang; Li, Haibin; Liu, Weiguo

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to get fermentable sugars by dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose and fast pyrolysis of cellulose from sugarcane bagasse. Hemicellulose could be easily hydrolyzed by dilute acid as sugars. The remained solid residue of acid hydrolysis was utilized to get levoglucosan by fast pyrolysis economically. Levoglucosan yield from crystalline cellulose could be as high as 61.47%. Dilute acid hydrolysis was also a promising pretreatment for levoglucosan production from lignocellulose. The dilute acid pretreated sugarcane bagasse resulted in higher levoglucosan yield (40.50%) in fast pyrolysis by micropyrolyzer, which was more effective than water washed (29.10%) and un-pretreated (12.84%). It was mainly ascribed to the effective removal of alkali and alkaline earth metals and the accumulation of crystalline cellulose. This strategy seems a promising route to achieve inexpensive fermentable sugars from lignocellulose for biorefinery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of fast pyrolysis conditions on biomass solid residues at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2016-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of wood and straw was conducted in a drop tube furnace (DTF) and compared with corresponding data from a wire mesh reactor (WMR) to study the influence of temperature (1000-1400)°C, biomass origin (pinewood, beechwood, wheat straw, alfalfa straw), and heating rate (103 °C/s, 104 °C...... in its half-width with respect to the parental fuel, whereas the alfalfa straw char particle size remained unaltered at higher temperatures. Soot particles in a range from 60 to 300 nm were obtained during fast pyrolysis. The soot yield from herbaceous fuels was lower than from wood samples, possibly due...

  7. Understanding the mechanism of catalytic fast pyrolysis by unveiling reactive intermediates in heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemberger, Patrick; Custodis, Victoria B. F.; Bodi, Andras; Gerber, Thomas; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-06-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising way to convert lignin into fine chemicals and fuels, but current approaches lack selectivity and yield unsatisfactory conversion. Understanding the pyrolysis reaction mechanism at the molecular level may help to make this sustainable process more economic. Reactive intermediates are responsible for product branching and hold the key to unveiling these mechanisms, but are notoriously difficult to detect isomer-selectively. Here, we investigate the catalytic pyrolysis of guaiacol, a lignin model compound, using photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, which allows for isomer-selective detection of reactive intermediates. In combination with ambient pressure pyrolysis, we identify fulvenone as the central reactive intermediate, generated by catalytic demethylation to catechol and subsequent dehydration. The fulvenone ketene is responsible for the phenol formation. This technique may open unique opportunities for isomer-resolved probing in catalysis, and holds the potential for achieving a mechanistic understanding of complex, real-life catalytic processes.

  8. Understanding the mechanism of catalytic fast pyrolysis by unveiling reactive intermediates in heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemberger, Patrick; Custodis, Victoria B. F.; Bodi, Andras; Gerber, Thomas; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-01-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising way to convert lignin into fine chemicals and fuels, but current approaches lack selectivity and yield unsatisfactory conversion. Understanding the pyrolysis reaction mechanism at the molecular level may help to make this sustainable process more economic. Reactive intermediates are responsible for product branching and hold the key to unveiling these mechanisms, but are notoriously difficult to detect isomer-selectively. Here, we investigate the catalytic pyrolysis of guaiacol, a lignin model compound, using photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, which allows for isomer-selective detection of reactive intermediates. In combination with ambient pressure pyrolysis, we identify fulvenone as the central reactive intermediate, generated by catalytic demethylation to catechol and subsequent dehydration. The fulvenone ketene is responsible for the phenol formation. This technique may open unique opportunities for isomer-resolved probing in catalysis, and holds the potential for achieving a mechanistic understanding of complex, real-life catalytic processes. PMID:28660882

  9. Gluconic acid from biomass fast pyrolysis oils: specialty chemicals from the thermochemical conversion of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanaraj, Daniel; Rover, Marjorie R; Resasco, Daniel E; Brown, Robert C; Crossley, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass to produce a bio-oil followed by catalytic upgrading is a widely studied approach for the potential production of fuels from biomass. Because of the complexity of the bio-oil, most upgrading strategies focus on removing oxygen from the entire mixture to produce fuels. Here we report a novel method for the production of the specialty chemical, gluconic acid, from the pyrolysis of biomass. Through a combination of sequential condensation of pyrolysis vapors and water extraction, a solution rich in levoglucosan is obtained that accounts for over 30% of the carbon in the bio-oil produced from red oak. A simple filtration step yields a stream of high-purity levoglucosan. This stream of levoglucosan is then hydrolyzed and partially oxidized to yield gluconic acid with high purity and selectivity. This combination of cost-effective pyrolysis coupled with simple separation and upgrading could enable a variety of new product markets for chemicals from biomass.

  10. Development of bio-fuel from palm frond via fast pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solikhah, M. D.; Raksodewanto, A. A.; Kismanto, A.; Karuana, F.; Heryana, Y.; Riza; Pratiwi, F. T.

    2017-05-01

    In order to fulfill the fuel demand in the future, Indonesia has to find a sustainable alternative for its energy. Energy source in the form of biomass is a promising alternative since its availability is abundance in this tropical country. Biomass can be converted into liquid fuel via fast pyrolysis by contacting the solid biomass into hot medium in the absence of oxygen. Hot sand is the common heat carrier for fast pyrolysis purposes but it is very abrasive and required high pyrolysis temperature (450-600 °C). This paper will discuss on the equipment design and experiment of fast pyrolysis of palm frond using high boiling point thermal oil as heat carrier. Experiments show that by using thermal oil as heat carrier, bio-oil can be produced at lower pyrolysis temperature of 350 °C, compared to the one using hot sand as heating carrier. The yield of bio-oil production is 36.4 % of biomass feeding. The water content of bio-oil is 52.77 % mass while heating value is 10.25 MJ/kg.

  11. Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Stevens, Don J.; Kinchin, Christopher; Czernik, Stefan

    2009-02-25

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels. This study has been conducted using similar methodology and underlying basis assumptions as the previous design cases for ethanol. The overall concept and specific processing steps were selected because significant data on this approach exists in the public literature. The analysis evaluates technology that has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale or is in early stages of commercialization. The fast pyrolysis of biomass is already at an early stage of commercialization, while upgrading bio-oil to transportation fuels has only been demonstrated in the laboratory and at small engineering development scale. Advanced methods of pyrolysis, which are under development, are not evaluated in this study. These may be the subject of subsequent analysis by OBP. The plant is designed to use 2000 dry metric tons/day of hybrid poplar wood chips to produce 76 million gallons/year of gasoline and diesel. The processing steps include: 1.Feed drying and size reduction 2.Fast pyrolysis to a highly oxygenated liquid product 3.Hydrotreating of the fast pyrolysis oil to a stable hydrocarbon oil with less than 2% oxygen 4.Hydrocracking of the heavy portion of the stable hydrocarbon oil 5.Distillation of the hydrotreated and hydrocracked oil into gasoline and diesel fuel blendstocks 6. Hydrogen production to support the hydrotreater reactors. The "as received" feedstock to the pyrolysis plant will be "reactor ready". This development will likely further decrease the cost of producing the fuel. An important sensitivity is the possibility of co-locating the plant with an existing refinery. In this case, the plant consists only of the first three steps: feed

  12. Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Stevens, Don J.; Kinchin, Christopher; Czernik, Stefan

    2009-02-28

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels. This study has been conducted using the same methodology and underlying basis assumptions as the previous design cases for ethanol. The overall concept and specific processing steps were selected because significant data on this approach exists in the public literature. The analysis evaluates technology that has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale or is in early stages of commercialization. The fast pyrolysis of biomass is already at an early stage of commercialization, while upgrading bio-oil to transportation fuels has only been demonstrated in the laboratory and at small engineering development scale. Advanced methods of pyrolysis, which are under development, are not evaluated in this study. These may be the subject of subsequent analysis by OBP. The plant is designed to use 2000 dry metric tons/day of hybrid poplar wood chips to produce 76 million gallons/year of gasoline and diesel. The processing steps include: 1.Feed drying and size reduction 2.Fast pyrolysis to a highly oxygenated liquid product 3.Hydrotreating of the fast pyrolysis oil to a stable hydrocarbon oil with less than 2% oxygen 4.Hydrocracking of the heavy portion of the stable hydrocarbon oil 5.Distillation of the hydrotreated and hydrocracked oil into gasoline and diesel fuel blendstocks 6. Hydrogen production to support the hydrotreater reactors. The “as received” feedstock to the pyrolysis plant will be “reactor ready.” This development will likely further decrease the cost of producing the fuel. An important sensitivity is the possibility of co-locating the plant with an existing refinery. In this case, the plant consists only of the first three steps

  13. Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Stevens, Don J.; Kinchin, Christopher; Czernik, Stefan

    2009-02-28

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels. This study has been conducted using the same methodology and underlying basis assumptions as the previous design cases for ethanol. The overall concept and specific processing steps were selected because significant data on this approach exists in the public literature. The analysis evaluates technology that has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale or is in early stages of commercialization. The fast pyrolysis of biomass is already at an early stage of commercialization, while upgrading bio-oil to transportation fuels has only been demonstrated in the laboratory and at small engineering development scale. Advanced methods of pyrolysis, which are under development, are not evaluated in this study. These may be the subject of subsequent analysis by OBP. The plant is designed to use 2000 dry metric tons/day of hybrid poplar wood chips to produce 76 million gallons/year of gasoline and diesel. The processing steps include: 1.Feed drying and size reduction 2.Fast pyrolysis to a highly oxygenated liquid product 3.Hydrotreating of the fast pyrolysis oil to a stable hydrocarbon oil with less than 2% oxygen 4.Hydrocracking of the heavy portion of the stable hydrocarbon oil 5.Distillation of the hydrotreated and hydrocracked oil into gasoline and diesel fuel blendstocks 6. Hydrogen production to support the hydrotreater reactors. The “as received” feedstock to the pyrolysis plant will be “reactor ready.” This development will likely further decrease the cost of producing the fuel. An important sensitivity is the possibility of co-locating the plant with an existing refinery. In this case, the plant consists only of the first three steps

  14. Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Stevens, Don J.; Kinchin, Christopher; Czernik, Stefan

    2009-02-25

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels. This study has been conducted using similar methodology and underlying basis assumptions as the previous design cases for ethanol. The overall concept and specific processing steps were selected because significant data on this approach exists in the public literature. The analysis evaluates technology that has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale or is in early stages of commercialization. The fast pyrolysis of biomass is already at an early stage of commercialization, while upgrading bio-oil to transportation fuels has only been demonstrated in the laboratory and at small engineering development scale. Advanced methods of pyrolysis, which are under development, are not evaluated in this study. These may be the subject of subsequent analysis by OBP. The plant is designed to use 2000 dry metric tons/day of hybrid poplar wood chips to produce 76 million gallons/year of gasoline and diesel. The processing steps include: 1.Feed drying and size reduction 2.Fast pyrolysis to a highly oxygenated liquid product 3.Hydrotreating of the fast pyrolysis oil to a stable hydrocarbon oil with less than 2% oxygen 4.Hydrocracking of the heavy portion of the stable hydrocarbon oil 5.Distillation of the hydrotreated and hydrocracked oil into gasoline and diesel fuel blendstocks 6. Hydrogen production to support the hydrotreater reactors. The "as received" feedstock to the pyrolysis plant will be "reactor ready". This development will likely further decrease the cost of producing the fuel. An important sensitivity is the possibility of co-locating the plant with an existing refinery. In this case, the plant consists only of the first three steps: feed

  15. Liquid-phase processing of fast pyrolysis bio-oil using platinum/HZSM-5 catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bjorn Sanchez

    Recent developments in converting biomass to bio-chemicals and liquid fuels provide a promising sight to an emerging biofuels industry. Biomass can be converted to energy via thermochemical and biochemical pathways. Thermal degradation processes include liquefaction, gasification, and pyrolysis. Among these biomass technologies, pyrolysis (i.e. a thermochemical conversion process of any organic material in the absence of oxygen) has gained more attention because of its simplicity in design, construction and operation. This research study focuses on comparative assessment of two types of pyrolysis processes and catalytic upgrading of bio-oil for production of transportation fuel intermediates. Slow and fast pyrolysis processes were compared for their respective product yields and properties. Slow pyrolysis bio-oil displayed fossil fuel-like properties, although low yields limit the process making it uneconomically feasible. Fast pyrolysis, on the other hand, show high yields but produces relatively less quality bio-oil. Catalytic transformation of the high-boiling fraction (HBF) of the crude bio-oil from fast pyrolysis was therefore evaluated by performing liquid-phase reactions at moderate temperatures using Pt/HZSM-5 catalyst. High yields of upgraded bio-oils along with improved heating values and reduced oxygen contents were obtained at a reaction temperature of 200°C and ethanol/HBF ratio of 3:1. Better quality, however, was observed at 240 °C even though reaction temperature has no significant effect on coke deposition. The addition of ethanol in the feed has greatly attenuated coke deposition in the catalyst. Major reactions observed are esterification, catalytic cracking, and reforming. Overall mass and energy balances in the conversion of energy sorghum biomass to produce a liquid fuel intermediate obtained sixteen percent (16 wt.%) of the biomass ending up as liquid fuel intermediate, while containing 26% of its initial energy.

  16. Characterization of biomass fast pyrolysis. Advantages and drawbacks of different possible criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lede, Jacques [LRGP-CNRS-INPL, 1, rue Grandville, BP 20451, Nancy Cedex (France); Authier, Olivier [LRGP-CNRS-INPL, 1, rue Grandville, BP 20451, Nancy Cedex (France); EDF-R and D, Departement Mecanique des Fluides, Energies et Environnement, 6, quai Watier, BP 49, Chatou Cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    The literature shows that different possible criteria are used for defining biomass fast pyrolysis. On the basis of a simplified modeling of a cellulose (biomass model compound) particle pyrolysis, the present paper points out that the most often considered parameters (i.e., temperature and heating rate) are inappropriate. They are very difficult to define and measure, and according to their definitions, important errors can be made (kinetic measurements and reactor scaling up). Other possible parameters are also examined such as particle initial size, available heat flux density, heat transfer coefficient, and products elimination efficiency. In order to be able to compare different experimental conditions on a similar basis, it is shown that at the biomass sample level, fast pyrolysis is favoured (enhancement of bio-oil fractions) if two necessary conditions are simultaneously fulfilled. They include high external heat transfer coefficient and efficient products removal. (orig.)

  17. Characterization of fast-pyrolysis bio-oil distillation residues and their potential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    A typical petroleum refinery makes use of the vacuum gas oil by cracking the large molecular weight compounds into light fuel hydrocarbons. For various types of fast pyrolysis bio-oil, successful analogous methods for processing heavy fractions could expedite integration into a petroleum refinery fo...

  18. Formation of nanocarbon spheres by thermal treatment of woody char from fast pyrolysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiangu Yan; Hossein Toghiani; Zhiyong Cai; Jilei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Influences of thermal treatment conditions of temperature, reaction cycle and time, and purge gas type on nanocarbon formation over bio-chars from fast pyrolysis and effects of thermal reaction cycle and purge gas type on bio-char surface functional groups were investigated by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and temperature programmed reduction methods....

  19. Characterization of fast pyrolysis products generated from several western USA woody species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacqueline M. Jarvis; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Nathaniel M. Anderson; Yuri Corilo; Ryan P. Rodgers

    2014-01-01

    Woody biomass has the potential to be utilized at an alternative fuel source through its pyrolytic conversion. Here, fast pyrolysis bio-oils derived from several western USA woody species are characterized by negative-ion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) to determine molecular-level composition. The...

  20. Effect of temperature in fluidized bed fast pyrolysis of biomass: oil quality assessment in test units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Pine wood was pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized bed fast pyrolysis reactor that allows a residence time of pine wood particles up to 25 min. The reactor temperature was varied between 330 and 580 °C to study the effect on product yields and oil composition. Apart from the physical−chemical analysis, a

  1. Fast pyrolysis in a novel wire-mesh reactor: decomposition of pine wood and model compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, E.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Hogendoorn, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    In fast pyrolysis, biomass decomposition processes are followed by vapor phase reactions. Experimental results were obtained in a unique wire-mesh reactor using pine wood, KCl impregnated pine wood and several model compounds (cellulose, xylan, lignin, levoglucosan, glucose). The wire-mesh reactor w

  2. Design Case Summary: Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating, and Hydrocracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Valkenburg, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Walkton, C. W. [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States); Elliott, D. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Holladay, J. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevens, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kinchin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Czernik, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2010-02-01

    The Biomass Program develops design cases to understand the current state of conversion technologies and to determine where improvements need to take place in the future. This design case is the first to establish detailed cost targest for the production of diesel and gasoline blendstock from biomass via a fast pyrolysis process.

  3. Catalytic Hydrotreatment of Fast Pyrolysis Oil : Model Studies on Reaction Pathways for the Carbohydrate Fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildschut, J.; Arentz, J.; Rasrendra, C. B.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Heeres, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis oil can be upgraded by a catalytic hydrotreatment (250-400 degrees C, 100-200 bar) using heterogeneous catalysts such as Ru/C to hydrocarbon-like products that can serve as liquid transportation fuels. Insight into the complex reaction pathways of the various component fractions durin

  4. Effect of the fast pyrolysis temperature on the primary and secondary products of lignin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Shuai; Garcia Perez, Manuel; Pecha, Brennan; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; McDonald, Armando G.; Westerhof, Roel J.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results on the primary pyrolysis products of organosolv lignin at temperatures between 360 and 700 °C. To study the primary products, a vacuum screen heater (heating rate of 8000 °C/s, deep vacuum of 0.7 mbar, and very fast cooling at the wall temperature of −100 °C) was used. Th

  5. Hydrotreatment of Fast Pyrolysis Oil Using Heterogeneous Noble-Metal Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildschut, Jelle; Mahfud, Farchad H.; Venderbosch, Robbie H.; Heeres, Hero J.

    2009-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis oils from lignocellulosic biomass are promising second-generation biofuels. Unfortunately, the application range for such oils is limited because of the high acidity (pH similar to 2.5) and the presence of oxygen in a variety of chemical functionalities, and upgrading of the oils is r

  6. Effect of Temperature in Fluidized Bed Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass: Oil Quality Assessment in Test Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, R.J.M.; Brilman, D.W.F.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Pine wood was pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized bed fast pyrolysis reactor that allows a residence time of pine wood particles up to 25 min. The reactor temperature was varied between 330 and 580 °C to study the effect on product yields and oil composition. Apart from the physical−chemical analysis, a

  7. Hydrotreating of fast pyrolysis oils from protein-rich pennycress seed presscake

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fast pyrolysis oils produced from proteinaceous biomass, such as pennycress presscake differ significantly from those produced from biomass with mostly lignocellulosic composition. Those from proteinaceous biomass tend to be deoxygenated, contain more nitrogen, be less acidic and be more stable...

  8. Activated Carbon Derived from Fast Pyrolysis Liquids Production of Agricultural Residues and Energy Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast pyrolysis is a thermochemical method that can be used for processing energy crops such as switchgrass, alfalfa, soybean straw, corn stover as well as agricultural residuals (broiler litter) for bio-oil production. Researchers with the Agriculture Research Service (ARS) of the USDA developed a 2...

  9. Effect of biomass ash in catalytic fast pyrolysis of pine wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yildiz, G.; Ronsse, F.; Venderbosch, R.H.; Duren, van R.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Prins, W.

    2015-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis experiments of pine wood have been performed in a continuously operated mechanically stirred bed reactor at 500 °C. The effects of the pine wood ash were studied by comparing non-catalytic and catalytic experiments (using a ZSM-5 based catalyst) with their ash-added counterparts. To s

  10. Insights in the hydrotreatment of fast pyrolysis oil using a ruthenium on carbon catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildschut, Jelle; Iqbal, Muhammad; Mahfud, Farchad H.; Melian-Cabrera, Ignacio; Venderbosch, Robbie H.; Heeres, Hero J.

    2010-01-01

    The use of Ru/C (5%-wt.) as a catalyst for the hydrogenation of fast pyrolysis oil was explored at 350 degrees C and 200 bar pressure in a batch reactor set-up with the main objective to determine the effect of the reaction time on the oil yield and elemental compositions of the product phases. High

  11. Effect of Fast Pyrolysis Conditions on Structural Transformation and Reactivity of Herbaceous Biomasses at High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Anker D.; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    of organic and inorganic matter on the char structural transformations. The results indicate no influence of the free radicals on char reactivity and burnout. The formation of free radicals in fast pyrolysis is related to the differences in the ash composition, namely presence of K+ ions in the wheat straw...

  12. Life Cycle Assessment of Gasoline and Diesel Produced via Fast Pyrolysis and Hydroprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, D. D.

    2011-03-01

    In this work, a life cycle assessment (LCA) estimating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and net energy value (NEV) of the production of gasoline and diesel from forest residues via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing, from production of the feedstock to end use of the fuel in a vehicle, is performed. The fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating and hydrocracking processes are based on a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) design report. The LCA results show GHG emissions of 0.142 kg CO2-equiv. per km traveled and NEV of 1.00 MJ per km traveled for a process using grid electricity. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis shows a range of results, with all values better than those of conventional gasoline in 2005. Results for GHG emissions and NEV of gasoline and diesel from pyrolysis are also reported on a per MJ fuel basis for comparison with ethanol produced via gasification. Although pyrolysis-derived gasoline and diesel have lower GHG emissions and higher NEV than conventional gasoline does in 2005, they underperform ethanol produced via gasification from the same feedstock. GHG emissions for pyrolysis could be lowered further if electricity and hydrogen are produced from biomass instead of from fossil sources.

  13. Microwave induced fast pyrolysis of scrap rubber tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ani, Farid Nasir; Mat Nor, Nor Syarizan

    2012-06-01

    Pyrolysis is the thermal degradation of carbonaceous solid by heat in the absence of oxygen. The feedstocks, such as biomass or solid wastes are heated to a temperature between 400 and 600°C, without introducing oxygen to support the reaction. The reaction produces three products: gas, pyro-fuel oil and char. This paper presents the techniques of producing pyro-oil from waste tires, as well as investigation of the fuel properties suitable for diesel engine applications. In this study, microwave heating technique is employed to pyrolyse the used rubber tires into pyro-oil. Thermal treatment of as received used rubber tires is carried out in a modified domestic microwave heated fixed bed technology. It has been found that, rubber tires, previously used by various researchers, are poor microwave absorbers. Studies have shown that an appropriate microwave-absorbing material, such as biomass char or activated carbon, could be added to enhance the pyrolysis process; thus producing the pyro-oil. The characteristics of pyro-oil, as well as the effect of microwave absorber on its yield, are briefly described in this paper. The temperature profiles during the microwave heating process are also illustratively emphasized. The study provides a means of converting scrap tires into pyro-oil and pyrolytic carbon black production. The proposed microwave thermal conversion process therefore has the potentials of substantially saving time and energy.

  14. Simultaneous fast pyrolysis and catalytic upgrading of lignin to obtain a marine diesel fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Guofeng

    The topic of this Ph.D. project is to convert lignin, a by-product from a 2nd generation bio-ethanol plant, into a marine diesel fuel by fast pyrolysis followed with catalytic upgrading of the pyrolysis vapor. Lignin, a major component of lignocellulosic biomass, is underutilized in the 2nd...... generation bio-ethanol plants. Shipping industry on the other hand is looking for clean alternative fuels in order to meet stricter fuel quality and emission standards. To convert lignin into a renewable marine diesel fuel will both accelerate the development of modern bio-refinery and transfer the marine...

  15. 生物质快速热解气相成分析出规律%STUDY ON RELEASE BEHAVIOR OF GAS COMPONENTS OF BIOMASS IN FAST PYROLYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴少华; 栾积毅; 孙锐; 姚娜

    2009-01-01

    利用恒温沉降炉对秸秆、稻壳、木屑及一种烟煤煤粉在900、1000、1100℃ 3个温度进行了快速热解试验,对4种燃料在快速热解过程中气相成分析出的规律进行了研究.生物质成分中高的挥发分、氧、H/C决定了其快速热解会取得比煤粉高的气相产率,木屑的气相产物产量最多,秸秆次之,稻壳最低.4种燃料热解气相产物中的主要成分是CO、H_2、CO_2、CH_4,少量的G_2H_4、C_2H_6、NO、HCN、COS,生物质和煤粉在快速热解及短的停留时间内,其析出的氮前驱物为HCN.快速热解析出的气相成分产量及组分分布与燃料种类、热解温度、热解停留时间相关.几种物料共同的规律是随停留时间的延长,气相产物的量不断地增加,当气相产物的产量趋于平稳时,相应的气相产物的各组分趋于恒定,这一停留时间标志着热解过程的结束,相同温度条件下煤粉的热解速率要慢于3种生物质.%The release behavior of gas components of straw、rice husk、sawdust and bituminous coal was investigated in a drop tube deposition furnace at fast pyrolysis temperature of 900、1000、1100℃ . The volatile, oxygen and H/C of biomass components was higher than that of bituminous coal, which determins a higher gas yield in the fast pyrolysis. The gas yield of sawdust is the greatest, that of straw is the second and that of rice husk is minimum. The main components of pyrolysis gas is CO, H_2, CO_2 and CH_4, while other components, such as C_2H_4、NO、HCN、COS are relatively less. HCN is the nitrogen precursors in short residence time for fast pyrolysis. The gas yield and compsition in the fast pyrolysis are related to the fuel types, pyrolysis temperature and residence time. The common law for several fuel are as follows: when the residence time increased and the gas yield stabilized, the corresponding components of gas product tend to be constant. This time can be considered as the end of

  16. FAST PYROLYSIS – EFFECT OF WOOD DRYING ON THE YIELD AND PROPERTIES OF BIO-OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriks Samulis

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The composition and properties of the products of fast pyrolysis of hardwood, obtained in a two-chamber (drying and pyrolytic ablation type reactor in the temperature range 450-600ºС, were investigated. It has been found that, upon the additional drying of wood at 200ºС and subsequent pyrolysis, the quality of bio-oil is improved owing to the decrease in the amount of water and acids. It has been shown that the increase of the drying temperature to 240ºС decreases the yield of the main product. Optimum parameters of the drying conditions and the temperature of the pyrolysis of wood, at which the bio-oil yield exceeds 60% and its calorific value makes up 17-20 МJ/kg, have been determined.

  17. Online upgrading of organic vapors from the fast pyrolysis of biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-yu; YAN Yong-jie; REN Zheng-wei

    2008-01-01

    The online upgrading process that combined the fast pyrolysis of biomass and catalytic cracking of bio-oil was developed to produce a high quality liquid product from the biomass. The installation consisted of a fluidized bed reactor for pyrolysis and a packed bed reactor for upgrading. The proper pyrolysis processing conditions with a temperature of 500℃ and a flow rate of 4m3·h-1 were determined in advance. Under such conditions, the effects of temperature and weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) on both the liquid yields and the oil qualities of the online catalytic cracking process were investigated. The results showed that such a combined process had the superiority of increasing the liquid yield and improving the product quality over the separate processes. Furthermore, when the temperature was 500℃, with a WHSV of 3h-1, the liquid yield reached the maximum and the oxygenic compounds also decreased obviously.

  18. Fast pyrolysis of wheat straw combined with SI-MCM-41 catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ates, Funda; Putun, Ayse Eren [Anadolu University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture (Turkey)], e-mail: fdivrikl@anadolu.edu.tr, email: aeputun@anadolu.edu.tr; Tophanecioglu, Sibel [Erkurt Holding (Turkey)], email: sibel8888@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give the results of an experiment in which the respective results from fast pyrolysis of wheat straw catalyzed with Si-MCM-4, and in the non-catalytic condition were compared. This experiment was carried out in a well-swept fixed-bed reactor with a heating rate of 300 degree C/min and in a nitrogen atmosphere after which, the main characteristics of pyrolyzed feedstock were determined by proximate, ultimate and component analysis. As the results of this experiment show, the maximum oil yield was 31.9% in a non-catalytic pyrolysis procedure and this gas yield increased in the pyrolysis experiment with catalyst, although the bio-oil yield decreased. On the other hand, the use of catalyst had the benefit of reducing the percentage of oxygen, the presence of which in the fuel is not desirable. Through testing pyrolysis oils, it was established that the use of a catalyst in the pyrolysis can improve fuel quality and produce valuable chemicals.

  19. Co-generated fast pyrolysis biochar mitigates green-house gas emissions and increases carbon sequestration in temperate soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar (BC) is a product of thermochemical conversion of biomass via pyrolysis, together with gas (syngas), liquid (bio-oil), and heat. Fast pyrolysis is a promising process for bio-oil generation, which leaves 10-30% of the original biomass as char. When applied to soils, BC may increase soil C s...

  20. Fast pyrolysis of eucalyptus waste in a conical spouted bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amutio, Maider; Lopez, Gartzen; Alvarez, Jon; Olazar, Martin; Bilbao, Javier

    2015-10-01

    The fast pyrolysis of a forestry sector waste composed of Eucalyptus globulus wood, bark and leaves has been studied in a continuous bench-scale conical spouted bed reactor plant at 500°C. A high bio-oil yield of 75.4 wt.% has been obtained, which is explained by the suitable features of this reactor for biomass fast pyrolysis. Gas and bio-oil compositions have been determined by chromatographic techniques, and the char has also been characterized. The bio-oil has a water content of 35 wt.%, and phenols and ketones are the main organic compounds, with a concentration of 26 and 10 wt.%, respectively. In addition, a kinetic study has been carried out in thermobalance using a model of three independent and parallel reactions that allows quantifying this forestry waste's content of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidised bed reactors, focusing different kinetic schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Panneerselvam; Gu, Sai

    2016-08-01

    The present work concerns with CFD modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in a fluidised bed reactor. Initially, a study was conducted to understand the hydrodynamics of the fluidised bed reactor by investigating the particle density and size, and gas velocity effect. With the basic understanding of hydrodynamics, the study was further extended to investigate the different kinetic schemes for biomass fast pyrolysis process. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach was used to model the complex multiphase flows in the reactor. The yield of the products from the simulation was compared with the experimental data. A good comparison was obtained between the literature results and CFD simulation. It is also found that CFD prediction with the advanced kinetic scheme is better when compared to other schemes. With the confidence obtained from the CFD models, a parametric study was carried out to study the effect of biomass particle type and size and temperature on the yield of the products.

  2. Influence of fast pyrolysis temperature on biochar labile fraction and short-term carbon loss in a loamy soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Esben; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Ibrahim, Norazana;

    2011-01-01

    Production of bio-oil, gas and biochar from pyrolysis of biomass is considered a promising technology for combined production of bioenergy and recalcitrant carbon (C) suitable for sequestration in soil. Using a fast pyrolysis centrifuge reactor (PCR) the present study investigated the relation......, emphasizing the importance of knowing the biochar labile fraction when evaluating a specific biochars C sequestration potential. The pyrolysis temperature influenced the outputs of biochar, bio-oil and syngas significantly, as well as the stability of the biochar produced. Contrary to slow pyrolysis a fast...... in soil. As these labile carbohydrates are rapidly mineralized, their presence lowers the biochar-C sequestration potential. By raising the pyrolysis temperature, biochar with none or low contents of these fractions can be produced, but this will be on the expense of the biochar quantity. The yield of CO2...

  3. The integration of dilute acid hydrolysis of xylan and fast pyrolysis of glucan to obtain fermentable sugars

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Liqun; Wu, Nannan; Zheng, Anqing; Zhao, Zengli; He, Fang; Li, Haibin

    2016-01-01

    Background Fermentable sugars are important intermediates in the biological conversion of biomass. Hemicellulose and amorphous cellulose are easily hydrolyzed to fermentable sugars in dilute acid, whereas crystalline cellulose is more difficult to be hydrolyzed. Cellulose fast pyrolysis is an alternative method to liberate valuable fermentable sugars from biomass. The amount of levoglucosan generated from lignocellulose by fast pyrolysis is usually lower than the theoretical yield based on th...

  4. Techno-economic assessment of fast pyrolysis for the valorization of short rotation coppice cultivated for phytoextraction

    OpenAIRE

    Kuppens, Tom; VAN DAEL, Miet; Vanreppelen, Kenny; Thewys, Theo; Yperman, Jan; Carleer, Robert; SCHREURS, Sonja; Van Passel, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The main barrier in the commercialization of phytoextraction as a sustainable alternative for remediating metal contaminated soils is its long time period, which can be countered by biomass valorization. From an environmental point of view, fast pyrolysis of the biomass is promising because its lower process temperature prevents metal volatilization. The remaining question is whether fast pyrolysis is also preferred from an economic point of view. Therefore, a techno-economic ass...

  5. Fast Pyrolysis Conversion Tests of Forest Concepts' Crumbles™. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santosa, Daniel M.; Zacher, Alan H.; Eakin, David E.

    2012-04-02

    The report describes the work done by PNNL on assessing Forest Concept's engineered feedstock using the bench-scale continuous fast pyrolysis system to produce liquid bio-oil, char and gas. Specifically, bio-oil from the following process were evaluated for its yield and quality to determine impact of varying feed size parameters. Furthermore, the report also describes the handling process of the biomass and the challenges of operating the system with above average particle size.

  6. 生物质快速热裂解炭的分析及活化研究%Characterization and Activation of Pyrolytic Char from Fast Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹倩倩; 王树荣

    2013-01-01

    采用化学(KOH)方法对两种具有代表性的生物质原料(花梨木和稻壳)的快速热裂解固体产物-热解炭进行了活化,并采用氮吸附、X射线衍射(XRD)、傅里叶红外光谱分析(FTIR)和扫描电镜(SEM)技术测试了热解炭的结构特性、表面特性以及物理化学性质.结果表明,这两种热解炭经过活化后可以获得许多优良的性质,固定碳含量增加,灰分含量减少.同时,活化后BET比表面积迅速增大,超过1100m2/g,而且热解炭的石墨化程度都有所加深.热解炭通过活化过程可以实现其高品质利用,有利于生物质热裂解技术的工业化发展.%The pyrolytic chars from fast pyrolysis of rosewood and rice husk have been activated with KOH solvent. The texture and structure, surface properties and physico-chemical properties of the pyrolytic chars have been characterized by N2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy ( FTIR) and Scanning electron microscope ( SEM). Compared with the original pyrolytic chars, the activated chars had higher fixed carbon content and lower ash content. The BET surface area increased beyond 1100m /g after activation. Moreover,the activated chars had higher graphitization degree. Through this activation process, high grade utilization of pyrolytic char will be achieved, as will benefit the industrialization of biomass fast pyrolysis technology.

  7. In vitro -in vivo performance evaluation of treated Plantago ovata husk based fast dissolving tablets of glipizide: Flashtab technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antesh Kumar Jha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians suggest premeal administration of glipizide (30 min before a meal because of longer disintegration time (approximately 15 min of conventional tablet. Hence, the dosage form was developed, called as fast dissolving tablet (FDT, which disintegrates rapidly within a minute. FDTs by Flashtab technology is based on a swellable agent and a superdisintegrant. In the current study, treated Plantago ovata husk (TPOH, and microcrystalline cellulose were utilized as natural superdisintegrant and swellable agent, respectively. FDT formulations were prepared by direct compression and evaluated for in vitro tablet performance, such as disintegration time, wetting time, hardness, friability, swelling and percent drug release. On the basis of finding, formulation with 15% TPOH concentration (TPOH 7 was selected as optimized formulation. To evaluate the in vitro performance, the formulation TPOH 7 and the marketed tablets (glynase were administered to rabbits. In the case of marketed tablet, the peak plasma-concentration of glipizide was obtained in 2.83 h of administration whereas it was 2 h for TPOH 7 indicating immediate absorption and therefore faster onset of action of the prepared FDT formulation than the marketed one. Drug interaction studies, performed by using FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry and differential scanning calorimetric methods, indicate that the glipizide is compatible with the formulation components. The accelerated stability study (40°C ± 2°C/75% ±5% relative humidity for the optimized formulation showed a negligible change over time for the in vitro parameters. The results suggest that TPOH has promising potential for faster disintegration and fulfills the requirement of FDTs.

  8. Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass Residues in a Twin-screw Mixing Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Axel; Richter, Daniel; Niebel, Andreas; Dahmen, Nicolaus; Sauer, Jörg

    2016-09-09

    Fast pyrolysis is being increasingly applied in commercial plants worldwide. They run exclusively on woody biomass, which has favorable properties for conversion with fast pyrolysis. In order to increase the synergies of food production and the energetic and/or material use of biomass, it is desirable to utilize residues from agricultural production, e.g., straw. The presented method is suitable for converting such a material on an industrial scale. The main features are presented and an example of mass balances from the conversion of several biomass residues is given. After conversion, fractionated condensation is applied in order to retrieve two condensates - an organic-rich and an aqueous-rich one. This design prevents the production of fast pyrolysis bio-oil that exhibits phase separation. A two phase bio-oil is to be expected because of the typically high ash content of straw biomass, which promotes the production of water of reaction during conversion. Both fractionated condensation and the use of biomass with high ash content demand a careful approach for establishing balances. Not all kind of balances are both meaningful and comparable to other results from the literature. Different balancing methods are presented, and the information that can be derived from them is discussed.

  9. Production of hydrogen from biomass by catalytic steam reforming of fast pyrolysis oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czernik, S.; Wang, D.; Chornet, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Center for Renewable Chemical Technologies and Materials

    1998-08-01

    Hydrogen is the prototype of the environmentally cleanest fuel of interest for power generation using fuel cells and for transportation. The thermochemical conversion of biomass to hydrogen can be carried out through two distinct strategies: (a) gasification followed by water-gas shift conversion, and (b) catalytic steam reforming of specific fractions derived from fast pyrolysis and aqueous/steam processes of biomass. This paper presents the latter route that begins with fast pyrolysis of biomass to produce bio-oil. This oil (as a whole or its selected fractions) can be converted to hydrogen via catalytic steam reforming followed by a water-gas shift conversion step. Such a process has been demonstrated at the bench scale using model compounds, poplar oil aqueous fraction, and the whole pyrolysis oil with commercial Ni-based steam reforming catalysts. Hydrogen yields as high as 85% have been obtained. Catalyst initial activity can be recovered through regeneration cycles by steam or CO{sub 2} gasification of carbonaceous deposits.

  10. Preliminary studies of bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of coconut fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Tarciana M; Bispo, Mozart D; Cardoso, Anne R T; Migliorini, Marcelo V; Schena, Tiago; de Campos, Maria Cecilia V; Machado, Maria Elisabete; López, Jorge A; Krause, Laiza C; Caramão, Elina B

    2013-07-17

    This work studied fast pyrolysis as a way to use the residual fiber obtained from the shells of coconut ( Cocos nucifera L. var. Dwarf, from Aracaju, northeastern Brazil). The bio-oil produced by fast pyrolysis and the aqueous phase (formed during the pyrolysis) were characterized by GC/qMS and GC×GC/TOF-MS. Many oxygenated compounds such as phenols, aldehydes, and ketones were identified in the extracts obtained in both phases, with a high predominance of phenolic compounds, mainly alkylphenols. Eighty-one compounds were identified in the bio-oil and 42 in the aqueous phase using GC/qMS, and 95 and 68 in the same samples were identified by GC×GC/TOF-MS. The better performance of GC×GC/TOF-MS was due to the possibility of resolving some coeluted peaks in the one-dimension gas chromatography. Semiquantitative analysis of the samples verified that 59% of the area on the chromatogram of bio-oil is composed by phenols and 12% by aldehydes, mainly furfural. Using the same criterion, 77% of the organic compounds in the aqueous phase are phenols. Therefore, this preliminary assessment indicates that coconut fibers have the potential to be a cost-effective and promising alternative to obtain new products and minimize environmental impact.

  11. The effect of torrefaction on the chemistry of fast-pyrolysis bio-oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jiajia; Park, Junyeong; Tilotta, David; Park, Sunkyu

    2012-05-01

    Fast pyrolysis was performed on torrefied loblolly pine and the collected bio-oils were analyzed to compare the effect of the torrefaction treatment on their quality. The results of the analyses show that bio-oils produced from torrefied wood have improved oxygen-to-carbon ratios compared to those from the original wood with the penalty of a decrease in bio-oil yield. The extent of this improvement depends on the torrefaction severity. Based on the GC/MS analysis of the pyrolysis bio-oils, bio-oils produced from torrefied biomass show different compositions compared to that from the original wood. Specifically, the former becomes more concentrated in pyrolytic lignin with less water content than the latter. It was considered that torrefaction could be a potential upgrading method to improve the quality of bio-oil, which might be a useful feedstock for phenolic-based chemicals.

  12. The Fate of Trace Elements in Yanshan Coal during Fast Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiatao Dang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a high-sulfur and high-ash yield coal sample obtained from the Yanshan coalfield in Yunnan, China was analyzed. A series of char samples was obtained by pyrolysis at various temperatures (300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, and 900 °C and at a fast heating rate (1000 °C/min. A comprehensive investigation using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, a mercury analyzer, ion-selective electrode (ISE measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy was performed to reveal the effects of the pyrolysis temperature on the transformation behavior of trace elements (TEs and the change in the mineralogical characteristics and functional groups in the samples. The results show that the TE concentrations in the raw coal are higher than the average contents of Chinese coal. The concentrations of Be, Li, and U in the char samples are higher than those in raw coal, while the opposite was observed for As, Ga, Hg, and Rb. The F and Se concentrations are initially higher but decrease with pyrolysis temperature, which is likely caused by associated fracturing with fluoride and selenide minerals. Uranium shows the highest enrichment degree, and Hg shows the highest volatilization degree compared to the other studied TEs. As the temperature increases, the number of OH groups decreases, and the mineral composition changes; for example, pyrite decomposes, while oldhamite and hematite occur in the chars. It is suggested that the behavior and fate of TEs in coal during fast pyrolysis are synergistically influenced by self-characteristic modes of occurrence and mineralogical characteristics.

  13. Bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of lignin: Effects of process and upgrading parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Liangliang; Zhang, Yaning; Liu, Shiyu; Zhou, Nan; Chen, Paul; Cheng, Yanling; Addy, Min; Lu, Qian; Omar, Muhammad Mubashar; Liu, Yuhuan; Wang, Yunpu; Dai, Leilei; Anderson, Erik; Peng, Peng; Lei, Hanwu; Ruan, Roger

    2017-10-01

    Effects of process parameters on the yield and chemical profile of bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of lignin and the processes for lignin-derived bio-oil upgrading were reviewed. Various process parameters including pyrolysis temperature, reactor types, lignin characteristics, residence time, and feeding rate were discussed and the optimal parameter conditions for improved bio-oil yield and quality were concluded. In terms of lignin-derived bio-oil upgrading, three routes including pretreatment of lignin, catalytic upgrading, and co-pyrolysis of hydrogen-rich materials have been investigated. Zeolite cracking and hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) treatment are two main methods for catalytic upgrading of lignin-derived bio-oil. Factors affecting zeolite activity and the main zeolite catalytic mechanisms for lignin conversion were analyzed. Noble metal-based catalysts and metal sulfide catalysts are normally used as the HDO catalysts and the conversion mechanisms associated with a series of reactions have been proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of non-catalytic and catalytic fast pyrolysis of corncob in a fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiyan; Xiao, Rui; Huang, He; Xiao, Gang

    2009-02-01

    Fast pyrolysis of corncob with and without catalyst was investigated in a fluidized bed to determine the effects of pyrolysis parameters (temperature, gas flow rate, static bed height and particle size) and a HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst on the product yields and the qualities of the liquid products. The result showed that the optimal conditions for liquid yield (56.8%) were a pyrolysis temperature of 550 degrees C, gas flow rate of 3.4 L/min, static bed height of 10 cm and particle size of 1.0-2.0mm. The presence of the catalyst increased the yields of non-condensable gas, water and coke, while decreased the liquid and char yields. The elemental analysis showed that more than 25% decrease in oxygen content of the collected liquid in the second condenser with HZSM-5 was observed compared with that without catalyst. The H/C, O/C molar ratios and the higher heating value of the oil fraction in the collected liquid with the catalyst were 1.511, 0.149 and 34.6 MJ/kg, respectively. It was indicated that the collected liquid in the second condenser had high qualities and might be used as transport oil.

  15. A CFD model for biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidized-bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qingluan; Heindel, T. J.; Fox, R. O.

    2010-11-01

    A numerical study is conducted to evaluate the performance and optimal operating conditions of fluidized-bed reactors for fast pyrolysis of biomass to bio-oil. A comprehensive CFD model, coupling a pyrolysis kinetic model with a detailed hydrodynamics model, is developed. A lumped kinetic model is applied to describe the pyrolysis of biomass particles. Variable particle porosity is used to account for the evolution of particle physical properties. The kinetic scheme includes primary decomposition and secondary cracking of tar. Biomass is composed of reference components: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Products are categorized into groups: gaseous, tar vapor, and solid char. The particle kinetic processes and their interaction with the reactive gas phase are modeled with a multi-fluid model derived from the kinetic theory of granular flow. The gas, sand and biomass constitute three continuum phases coupled by the interphase source terms. The model is applied to investigate the effect of operating conditions on the tar yield in a fluidized-bed reactor. The influence of various parameters on tar yield, including operating temperature and others are investigated. Predicted optimal conditions for tar yield and scale-up of the reactor are discussed.

  16. One-Dimensional Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Model with Reaction Kinetics Integrated in an Aspen Plus Biorefinery Process Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humbird, David; Trendewicz, Anna; Braun, Robert; Dutta, Abhijit

    2017-01-27

    A biomass fast pyrolysis reactor model with detailed reaction kinetics and one-dimensional fluid dynamics was implemented in an equation-oriented modeling environment (Aspen Custom Modeler). Portions of this work were detailed in previous publications; further modifications have been made here to improve stability and reduce execution time of the model to make it compatible for use in large process flowsheets. The detailed reactor model was integrated into a larger process simulation in Aspen Plus and was stable for different feedstocks over a range of reactor temperatures. Sample results are presented that indicate general agreement with experimental results, but with higher gas losses caused by stripping of the bio-oil by the fluidizing gas in the simulated absorber/condenser. This integrated modeling approach can be extended to other well-defined, predictive reactor models for fast pyrolysis, catalytic fast pyrolysis, as well as other processes.

  17. Sustainability assessment of water hyacinth fast pyrolysis in the Upper Paraguay River basin, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Luz Selene; Ortega, Enrique; Bergier, Ivan; Mesa-Pérez, Juan Miguel; Salis, Suzana Maria; Luengo, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Fast pyrolysis of naturally produced water hyacinth was assessed through Emergy accounting approach. Two analyses were carried out to evaluate the influence of additional services and externalities on Emergy indicators for a pyrolysis plant unit able to process 1000 kg of dry biomass per hour. The initial approach was a traditional Emergy assessment in which financial fluxes and externalities were not considered. The second approach included taxes and fees of the Brazilian government, interests related to financing operations and assumes a reserve financial fund of 5% of the total investment as externalities cost. For the first evaluation, the renewability of 86% indicates that local and renewable resources mainly support the process and the Emergy Yield Ratio of 3.2 shows that the system has a potential contribution to the regional economy due to the local resources use. The inclusion of financial fluxes and externalities in the second evaluation reduces both renewability and Emergy Yield Ratio, whereas it increases the Emergy Investment Ratio which means a higher dependence on external resources. The second analysis allows portraying significant forces of the industrial and financial systems and the evaluation of the externalities' impact on the general system Emergy behavior. A comparison of the renewability of water hyacinth fast pyrolysis with other biofuels like soybean biodiesel and sugarcane ethanol indicates that the former is less dependent on fossil fuel resources, machinery and fertilizers. To complement the sustainability assessment provided by the Emergy method, a regular financial analysis for the second defined system was done. It shows that the system is financially attractive even with the accounting of additional costs. The results obtained in this study could be used as the maximum and minimum thresholds to subsidize regulatory policies for new economic activities in tropical wetlands involving natural resources exploitation and bio

  18. Fast Pyrolysis of Tropical Biomass Species and Influence of Water Pretreatment on Product Distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Trevor James; Turn, Scott Q; Sun, Ning; George, Anthe

    2016-01-01

    The fast pyrolysis behaviour of pretreated banagrass was examined at four temperatures (between 400 and 600 C) and four residence times (between ~1.2 and 12 s). The pretreatment used water washing/leaching to reduce the inorganic content of the banagrass. Yields of bio-oil, permanent gases and char were determined at each reaction condition and compared to previously published results from untreated banagrass. Comparing the bio-oil yields from the untreated and pretreated banagrass shows that the yields were greater from the pretreated banagrass by 4 to 11 wt% (absolute) at all reaction conditions. The effect of pretreatment (i.e. reducing the amount of ash, and alkali and alkali earth metals) on pyrolysis products is: 1) to increase the dry bio-oil yield, 2) to decrease the amount of undetected material, 3) to produce a slight increase in CO yield or no change, 4) to slightly decrease CO2 yield or no change, and 5) to produce a more stable bio-oil (less aging). Char yield and total gas yield were unaffected by feedstock pretreatment. Four other tropical biomass species were also pyrolyzed under one condition (450°C and 1.4 s residence time) for comparison to the banagrass results. The samples include two hardwoods: leucaena and eucalyptus, and two grasses: sugarcane bagasse and energy-cane. A sample of pretreated energy-cane was also pyrolyzed. Of the materials tested, the best feedstocks for fast pyrolysis were sugarcane bagasse, pretreated energy cane and eucalyptus based on the yields of 'dry bio-oil', CO and CO2. On the same basis, the least productive feedstocks are untreated banagrass followed by pretreated banagrass and leucaena.

  19. Fast Pyrolysis of Tropical Biomass Species and Influence of Water Pretreatment on Product Distributions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor James Morgan

    Full Text Available The fast pyrolysis behaviour of pretreated banagrass was examined at four temperatures (between 400 and 600 C and four residence times (between ~1.2 and 12 s. The pretreatment used water washing/leaching to reduce the inorganic content of the banagrass. Yields of bio-oil, permanent gases and char were determined at each reaction condition and compared to previously published results from untreated banagrass. Comparing the bio-oil yields from the untreated and pretreated banagrass shows that the yields were greater from the pretreated banagrass by 4 to 11 wt% (absolute at all reaction conditions. The effect of pretreatment (i.e. reducing the amount of ash, and alkali and alkali earth metals on pyrolysis products is: 1 to increase the dry bio-oil yield, 2 to decrease the amount of undetected material, 3 to produce a slight increase in CO yield or no change, 4 to slightly decrease CO2 yield or no change, and 5 to produce a more stable bio-oil (less aging. Char yield and total gas yield were unaffected by feedstock pretreatment. Four other tropical biomass species were also pyrolyzed under one condition (450°C and 1.4 s residence time for comparison to the banagrass results. The samples include two hardwoods: leucaena and eucalyptus, and two grasses: sugarcane bagasse and energy-cane. A sample of pretreated energy-cane was also pyrolyzed. Of the materials tested, the best feedstocks for fast pyrolysis were sugarcane bagasse, pretreated energy cane and eucalyptus based on the yields of 'dry bio-oil', CO and CO2. On the same basis, the least productive feedstocks are untreated banagrass followed by pretreated banagrass and leucaena.

  20. Fast Pyrolysis of Tropical Biomass Species and Influence of Water Pretreatment on Product Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Trevor James; Turn, Scott Q.; Sun, Ning; George, Anthe

    2016-01-01

    The fast pyrolysis behaviour of pretreated banagrass was examined at four temperatures (between 400 and 600 C) and four residence times (between ~1.2 and 12 s). The pretreatment used water washing/leaching to reduce the inorganic content of the banagrass. Yields of bio-oil, permanent gases and char were determined at each reaction condition and compared to previously published results from untreated banagrass. Comparing the bio-oil yields from the untreated and pretreated banagrass shows that the yields were greater from the pretreated banagrass by 4 to 11 wt% (absolute) at all reaction conditions. The effect of pretreatment (i.e. reducing the amount of ash, and alkali and alkali earth metals) on pyrolysis products is: 1) to increase the dry bio-oil yield, 2) to decrease the amount of undetected material, 3) to produce a slight increase in CO yield or no change, 4) to slightly decrease CO2 yield or no change, and 5) to produce a more stable bio-oil (less aging). Char yield and total gas yield were unaffected by feedstock pretreatment. Four other tropical biomass species were also pyrolyzed under one condition (450°C and 1.4 s residence time) for comparison to the banagrass results. The samples include two hardwoods: leucaena and eucalyptus, and two grasses: sugarcane bagasse and energy-cane. A sample of pretreated energy-cane was also pyrolyzed. Of the materials tested, the best feedstocks for fast pyrolysis were sugarcane bagasse, pretreated energy cane and eucalyptus based on the yields of 'dry bio-oil', CO and CO2. On the same basis, the least productive feedstocks are untreated banagrass followed by pretreated banagrass and leucaena. PMID:26978265

  1. Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions analysis of catalysts for hydrotreating of fast pyrolysis bio-oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Spies, Kurt A.; Lee, Guo-Shuh J.; Zhu, Yuanyuan

    2016-03-01

    Bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of biomass requires multi-stage catalytic hydroprocessing to produce hydrocarbon drop-in fuels. The current proposed process design involves fixed beds of ruthenium-based catalyst and conventional petroleum hydrotreating catalyst. Similar to petroleum processing, the catalyst is spent as a result of coking and other deactivation mechanisms, and must be changed out periodically. Biofuel life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) assessments typically ignore the impact of catalyst consumed during fuel conversion as a result of limited lifetime, representing a data gap in the analyses. To help fill this data gap, life cycle GHGs were estimated for two representative examples of fast pyrolysis bio-oil hydrotreating catalyst, NiMo/Al2O3 and Ru/C, and integrated into the conversion-stage GHG analysis. Life cycle GHGs for the NiMo/Al2O3 and Ru/C catalysts are estimated at 5.5 and 81 kg CO2-e/kg catalyst, respectively. Contribution of catalyst consumption to total conversion-stage GHGs is 0.5% for NiMo/Al2O3 and 5% for Ru/C. This analysis does not consider secondary sourcing of metals for catalyst manufacture and therefore these are likely to be conservative estimates compared to applications where a spent catalyst recycler can be used.

  2. Catalytic hydrotreatment of fast-pyrolysis oil using non-sulfided bimetallic Ni-Cu catalysts on a delta-Al2O3 support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardiyanti, A. R.; Khromova, S. A.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Yakovlev, V. A.; Heeres, H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis oil from lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive energy carrier. However, to improve the product characteristics such as a reduced polarity and higher thermal stability, upgrading is required. We here report activities on the catalytic hydrotreatment of fast pyrolysis oil using bimet

  3. FAST PYROLYSIS PROCESS OF ORANGE SOLID WASTE. FACTORS INFLUENCE IN THE PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Aguiar Trujillo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The orange processing industry generates high volumes of solid residue. This residue has been used in animal feeding and biochemical processes. A possible energy use of the waste can be thermochemical fast pyrolysis process. The objective was to determine the influence of the heating rate and temperature in the process of rapid pyrolysis of orange solid residue. In the process a design, 2k full factorial experiment was used, evaluating the influence of the independent variables and its interactions on the answers, using a 95 % significance level. We found that temperature is the most significant influence on the responses parameter having significant influence on the yields to: gas, coal, tar and the calorific value of the gas and the heating rate does not influence the answers. Finally, the interaction affects the gas yield. The results obtained in this study are: Rgas (19 – 38 %, Rchar (25 – 42 %, Ralq (6 – 12 %, PCIgas entre (140 – 1050 kJ/m3N.

  4. Fast microwave-assisted pyrolysis of microalgae using microwave absorbent and HZSM-5 catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Fernanda Cabral; Xie, Qinglong; Min, Min; Muniz, Luis Antônio Rezende; Farenzena, Marcelo; Trierweiler, Jorge Otávio; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2014-08-01

    Fast microwave-assisted pyrolysis (fMAP) in the presence of a microwave absorbent (SiC) and catalyst (HZSM-5) was tested on a Chlorella sp. strain and on a Nannochloropsis strain. The liquid products were characterized, and the effects of temperature and catalyst:biomass ratio were analyzed. For Chlorella sp., a temperature of 550 °C, with no catalyst were the optimal conditions, resulting in a maximum bio-oil yield of 57 wt.%. For Nannochloropsis, a temperature of 500 °C, with 0.5 of catalyst ratio were shown to be the optimal condition, resulting in a maximum bio-oil yield of 59 wt.%. These results show that the use of microwave absorbents in fMAP increased bio-oil yields and quality, and it is a promising technology to improve the commercial application and economic outlook of microwave pyrolysis technology. Additionally, the use of a different catalyst needs to be considered to improve the bio-oil characteristics.

  5. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Wild Reed Over Nanoporous SBA-15 Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y K; Yoo, Myung Lang; Park, Sung Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Wild reed was pyrolyzed over two nanoporous SBA-15 catalysts with different acid characteristics: Si-SBA-15 and Al-SBA-15. Al was grafted on Si-SBA-15 to increase the acidity and enhance the catalytic activity. Fast pyrolysis was carried out using a pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system at 550 degrees C for real-time analysis of the products. Significant improvement of the product bio-oil quality was attained by catalytic reforming over nanoporous Al-SBA-15. The fraction of total oxygenates was reduced because of the decrease in. the fraction of ketones, aldehydes, and carboxylates, which deteriorate the fuel quality of bio-oil. On the other hand, the fractions of furans and aromatics, which are the chemicals with high value-added, were increased by the catalytic reforming. The catalytic activity of Al-SBA-15 was considerably higher than that of Si-SBA-15 because the incorporation of Al increased the catalyst acidity.

  6. Biofuels via Fast Pyrolysis of Perennial Grasses: A Life Cycle Evaluation of Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaimes, George G; Soratana, Kullapa; Harden, Cheyenne L; Landis, Amy E; Khanna, Vikas

    2015-08-18

    A well-to-wheel (WTW) life cycle assessment (LCA) model is developed to evaluate the environmental profile of producing liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis of perennial grasses: switchgrass and miscanthus. The framework established in this study consists of (1) an agricultural model used to determine biomass growth rates, agrochemical application rates, and other key parameters in the production of miscanthus and switchgrass biofeedstock; (2) an ASPEN model utilized to simulate thermochemical conversion via fast pyrolysis and catalytic upgrading of bio-oil to renewable transportation fuel. Monte Carlo analysis is performed to determine statistical bounds for key sustainability and performance measures including life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and Energy Return on Investment (EROI). The results of this work reveal that the EROI and GHG emissions (gCO2e/MJ-fuel) for fast pyrolysis derived fuels range from 1.52 to 2.56 and 22.5 to 61.0 respectively, over the host of scenarios evaluated. Further analysis reveals that the energetic performance and GHG reduction potential of fast pyrolysis-derived fuels are highly sensitive to the choice of coproduct scenario and LCA allocation scheme, and in select cases can change the life cycle carbon balance from meeting to exceeding the renewable fuel standard emissions reduction threshold for cellulosic biofuels.

  7. Report - Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Valkenburg, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Walton, C. W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Elliott, D. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Holladay, J. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevens, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kinchin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Czernik, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this design case study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels.

  8. Slow and fast pyrolysis of Douglas-fir lignin: Importance of liquid-intermediate formation on the distribution of products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Shuai; Pecha, Brennan; Kuppevelt, van Michiel; McDonald, Armando G.; Garcia-Perez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The formation of liquid intermediates and the distribution of products were studied under slow and fast pyrolysis conditions. Results indicate that monomers are formed from lignin oligomeric products during secondary reactions, rather than directly from the native lignin. Lignin from Douglas-fir (Ps

  9. Biological mineral range effects on biomass conversion to aromatic hydrocarbons via catalytic fast pyrolysis over HZSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    A set of 20 biomass samples, comprising 10 genotypes of switchgrass, sorghum and miscanthus grown in two different soils with high and low poultry manure input conditions, and having a wide biological range of mineral content, were subjected to catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) over HZMS-5 using py-G...

  10. Report - Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Valkenburg, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Walton, C. W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Elliott, D. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Holladay, J. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevens, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kinchin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Czernik, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this design case study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels.

  11. Integrated supply chain design for commodity chemicals production via woody biomass fast pyrolysis and upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanan; Hu, Guiping; Brown, Robert C

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the optimal supply chain design for commodity chemicals (BTX, etc.) production via woody biomass fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing pathway. The locations and capacities of distributed preprocessing hubs and integrated biorefinery facilities are optimized with a mixed integer linear programming model. In this integrated supply chain system, decisions on the biomass chipping methods (roadside chipping vs. facility chipping) are also explored. The economic objective of the supply chain model is to maximize the profit for a 20-year chemicals production system. In addition to the economic objective, the model also incorporates an environmental objective of minimizing life cycle greenhouse gas emissions, analyzing the trade-off between the economic and environmental considerations. The capital cost, operating cost, and revenues for the biorefinery facilities are based on techno-economic analysis, and the proposed approach is illustrated through a case study of Minnesota, with Minneapolis-St. Paul serving as the chemicals distribution hub.

  12. Fast Pyrolysis Behavior of Banagrass as a Function of Temperature and Volatiles Residence Time in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A reactor was designed and commissioned to study the fast pyrolysis behavior of banagrass as a function of temperature and volatiles residence time. Four temperatures between 400 and 600°C were examined as well as four residence times between ~1.0 and 10 seconds. Pyrolysis product distributions of bio-oil, char and permanent gases were determined at each reaction condition. The elemental composition of the bio-oils and chars was also assessed. The greatest bio-oil yield was recorded when work...

  13. Production of p-xylene from biomass by catalytic fast pyrolysis using ZSM-5 catalysts with reduced pore openings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Wang, Zhuopeng; Gilbert, Christopher J; Fan, Wei; Huber, George W

    2012-10-29

    Pores for thought: Chemical liquid deposition of silica onto ZSM-5 catalysts led to smaller pore openings that resulted in >90% selectivity for p-xylene over the other xylenes in the catalytic fast pyrolysis of furan and 2-methylfuran (see scheme). The p-xylene selectivity increased from 51% with gallium spray-dried ZSM-5 to 72% with a pore-mouth-modified catalyst in the pyrolysis of pine wood. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Fast pyrolysis of palm kernel cake in a closed-tubular reactor: product compositions and kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Thanh-An; Kim, Jinsoo; Kim, Seung-Soo

    2011-03-01

    In this study, fast pyrolysis of palm kernel cake (PKC) was carried out in a closed-tubular reactor over a temperature range of 550 to 750°C with various retention times. The pyrolyzing gas products mainly included CO, CO(2), and light hydrocarbons; it is noted that no hydrogen was detected in the product. In order to investigate the reaction pathway, the kinetic lump model of Liden was applied to verify and calculate all rate constants. The results obtained at different temperatures indicated that the rate constant increased with pyrolysis temperature. Furthermore, the experimental results were in good agreement with the proposed mechanism.

  15. Biomass Conversion to Produce Hydrocarbon Liquid Fuel Via Hot-vapor Filtered Fast Pyrolysis and Catalytic Hydrotreating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huamin; Elliott, Douglas C; French, Richard J; Deutch, Steve; Iisa, Kristiina

    2016-12-25

    Lignocellulosic biomass conversion to produce biofuels has received significant attention because of the quest for a replacement for fossil fuels. Among the various thermochemical and biochemical routes, fast pyrolysis followed by catalytic hydrotreating is considered to be a promising near-term opportunity. This paper reports on experimental methods used 1) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass to produce bio-oils in a fluidized-bed reactor and 2) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for catalytic hydrotreating of bio-oils in a two-stage, fixed-bed, continuous-flow catalytic reactor. The configurations of the reactor systems, the operating procedures, and the processing and analysis of feedstocks, bio-oils, and biofuels are described in detail in this paper. We also demonstrate hot-vapor filtration during fast pyrolysis to remove fine char particles and inorganic contaminants from bio-oil. Representative results showed successful conversion of biomass feedstocks to fuel-range hydrocarbon biofuels and, specifically, the effect of hot-vapor filtration on bio-oil production and upgrading. The protocols provided in this report could help to generate rigorous and reliable data for biomass pyrolysis and bio-oil hydrotreating research.

  16. Production of technical silicon and silicon carbide from rice-husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Z. Issagulov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the article there are studied physical and chemical properties of silicon-carbonic raw material – rice-husk, thermophysical characteristics of the process of rice-husk pyrolysis in nonreactive and oxidizing environment; structure and phase composition of products of the rice-husk pyrolysis in interval of temperatures 150 – 850 °С and high temperature pyrolysis in interval of temperatures 900 – 1 500 °С. There are defined the silicon-carbon production conditions, which meet the requirements applicable to charging materials at production of technical silicon and silicon carbide.

  17. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Cellulose Using Nano Zeolite and Zeolite/Matrix Catalysts in a GC/Micro-Pyrolyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyong-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Cellulose, as a model compound of biomass, was catalyzed over zeolite (HY,.HZSM-5) and zeolite/matrix (HY/Clay, HM/Clay) in a GC/micro-pyrolyzer at 500 degrees C, to produce the valuable products. The catalysts used were pure zeolite and zeolite/matrix including 20 wt% matrix content, which were prepared into different particle sizes (average size; 0.1 mm, 1.6 mm) to study the effect of the particle size of the catalyst for the distribution of product yields. Catalytic pyrolysis had much more volatile products as light components and less content of sugars than pyrolysis only. This phenomenon was strongly influenced by the particle size of the catalyst in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Also, in zeolite and zeolite/matrix catalysts the zeolite type gave the dominant impact on the distribution of product yields.

  18. Carbon abatement via treating the solid waste from the Australian olive industry in mobile pyrolysis units: LCA with uncertainty analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hanandeh, Ali

    2013-04-01

    The olive oil industry in Australia has been growing at a rapid rate over the past decade. It is forecast to continue growing due to the steady increase in demand for olive oil and olive products in the local and regional market. However, the olive oil extraction process generates large amounts of solid waste called olive husk which is currently underutilized. This paper uses life-cycle methodology to analyse the carbon emission reduction potential of utilizing olive husk as a feedstock in a mobile pyrolysis unit. Four scenarios, based on different combinations of pyrolysis technologies (slow versus fast) and end-use of products (land application versus energy utilization), are constructed. The performance of each scenario under conditions of uncertainty was also investigated. The results show that all scenarios result in significant carbon emission abatement. Processing olive husk in mobile fast pyrolysis units and the utilization of bio-oil and biochar as substitutes for heavy fuel oil and coal is likely to realize a carbon offset greater than 32.3 Gg CO2-eq annually in 90% of the time. Likewise, more than 3.2 Gg-C (11.8 Gg CO2-eq) per year could be sequestered in the soil in the form of fixed carbon if slow mobile pyrolysis units were used to produce biochar.

  19. Adding nickel formate in alkali lignin to increase contents of alkylphenols and aromatics during fast pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jing; Wang, Wen-Liang; Yu, Yu-Xiang; Chang, Jian-Min; Cai, Li-Ping; Shi, Sheldon Q

    2017-03-01

    The composition of pyrolysis vapors obtained from alkali lignin pyrolysis with the additive of nickel formate was examined using the pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). Characterization of bio-chars was performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that the nickel formate significantly increased liquid yield, simplified the types of alkali lignin pyrolysis products and increased individual component contents. The additive of nickel formate increased contents of alkylphenols and aromatics from alkali lignin pyrolysis. With an increase in temperature, a greater amount of the relative contents can be achieved. The nickel formate was thermally decomposed to form hydrogen, resulting in hydrodeoxygenation of alkali lignin during pyrolysis. It was also found that Ni is in favor of producing alkylphenols. The analysis based on the experimental result provided evidences used to propose reaction mechanism for pyrolysis of nickel formate-assisted alkali lignin. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Biomass fast pyrolysis for bio-oil production in a fluidized bed reactor under hot flue atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Wang, Xiang; Bai, Xueyuan; Li, Zhihe; Zhang, Ying

    2015-10-01

    Fast pyrolysis experiments of corn stalk were performed to investigate the optimal pyrolysis conditions of temperature and bed material for maximum bio-oil production under flue gas atmosphere. Under the optimized pyrolysis conditions, furfural residue, xylose residue and kelp seaweed were pyrolyzed to examine their yield distributions of products, and the physical characteristics of bio-oil were studied. The best flow rate of the flue gas at selected temperature is obtained, and the pyrolysis temperature at 500 degrees C and dolomite as bed material could give a maximum bio-oil yield. The highest bio-oil yield of 43.3% (W/W) was achieved from corn stalk under the optimal conditions. Two main fractions were recovered from the stratified bio-oils: light oils and heavy oils. The physical properties of heavy oils from all feedstocks varied little. The calorific values of heavy oils were much higher than that of light oils. The pyrolysis gas could be used as a gaseous fuel due to a relatively high calorific value of 6.5-8.5 MJ/m3.

  1. Supported molybdenum oxides as effective catalysts for the catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugappan, Karthick; Mukarakate, Calvin; Budhi, Sridhar; Shetty, Manish; Nimlos, Mark R.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) of pine was investigated over 10 wt% MoO3/TiO2 and MoO3/ZrO2 at 500 degrees C and H2 pressures =0.75 bar. The product distributions were monitored in real time using a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS). Both supported MoO3 catalysts show different levels of deoxygenation based on the cumulative biomass to MoO3 mass ratio exposed to the catalytic bed. For biomass to MoO3 mass ratios <1.5, predominantly olefinic and aromatic hydrocarbons are produced with no detectable oxygen-containing species. For ratios =1.5, partially deoxygenated species comprised of furans and phenols are observed, with a concomitant decrease of olefinic and aromatic hydrocarbons. For ratios =5, primary pyrolysis vapours break through the bed, indicating the onset of catalyst deactivation. Product quantification with a tandem micropyrolyzer-GCMS setup shows that fresh supported MoO3 catalysts convert ca. 27 mol% of the original carbon into hydrocarbons comprised predominantly of aromatics (7 C%), olefins (18 C%) and paraffins (2 C%), comparable to the total hydrocarbon yield obtained with HZSM-5 operated under similar reaction conditions. Post-reaction XPS analysis on supported MoO3/ZrO2 and MoO3/TiO2 catalysts reveal that ca. 50% of Mo surface species exist in their partially reduced forms (i.e., Mo5+ and Mo3+), and that catalyst deactivation is likely associated to coking.

  2. Application of fast pyrolysis biochar to a loamy soil - Effects on carbon and nitrogen dynamics and potential for carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruun, E.W.

    2011-05-15

    Thermal decomposition of biomass in an oxygen-free environment (pyrolysis) produces bio-oil, syngas, and char. All three products can be used to generate energy, but an emerging new use of the recalcitrant carbon-rich char (biochar) is to apply it to the soil in order to enhance soil fertility and at the same time mitigate climate change by sequestering carbon in the soil. In general, the inherent physicochemical characteristics of biochars make these materials attractive agronomic soil conditioners. However, different pyrolysis technologies exist, i.e. slow pyrolysis, fast pyrolysis, and full gasification systems, and each of these influence the biochar quality differently. As of yet, there is only limited knowledge on the effect of applying fast pyrolysis biochar (FP-biochar) to soil. This PhD project provides new insights into the short-term impacts of adding FP-biochar to soil on the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. The FP-biochars investigated in the thesis were generated at different reactor temperatures by fast pyrolysis of wheat straw employing a Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor (PCR). The carbohydrate content ranged from more than 35 % in FP-biochars made at a low reactor temperature (475 deg. C) down to 3 % in FP-biochars made at high temperatures (575 deg. C). The relative amount of carbohydrates in the FP-biochar was found to be correlated to the short-term degradation rates of the FP-biochars when applied to soil. Fast and slow pyrolysis of wheat straw resulted in two different biochar types with each their distinct physical structures and porosities, carbohydrate contents, particle sizes, pH values, BET surface areas, and elemental compositions. These different physicochemical properties obviously have different impacts on soil processes, which underscores that results obtained from soil studies using slow pyrolysis biochars (SP-biochar) are not necessarily applicable for FP-biochars. For example, the incorporation

  3. Biomass fast pyrolysis in a fluidized bed reactor under N2, CO2, CO, CH4 and H2 atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiyan; Xiao, Rui; Wang, Denghui; He, Guangying; Shao, Shanshan; Zhang, Jubing; Zhong, Zhaoping

    2011-03-01

    Biomass fast pyrolysis is one of the most promising technologies for biomass utilization. In order to increase its economic potential, pyrolysis gas is usually recycled to serve as carrier gas. In this study, biomass fast pyrolysis was carried out in a fluidized bed reactor using various main pyrolysis gas components, namely N(2), CO(2), CO, CH(4) and H(2), as carrier gases. The atmosphere effects on product yields and oil fraction compositions were investigated. Results show that CO atmosphere gave the lowest liquid yield (49.6%) compared to highest 58.7% obtained with CH(4). CO and H(2) atmospheres converted more oxygen into CO(2) and H(2)O, respectively. GC/MS analysis of the liquid products shows that CO and CO(2) atmospheres produced less methoxy-containing compounds and more monofunctional phenols. The higher heating value of the obtained bio-oil under N(2) atmosphere is only 17.8 MJ/kg, while that under CO and H(2) atmospheres increased to 23.7 and 24.4 MJ/kg, respectively.

  4. Effect of Fast Pyrolysis Conditions on the Biomass Solid Residues at High Temperatures (1000-1400°C)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Anker D.; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    Fast pyrolysis of wood and straw was conducted in a drop tube furnace (DTF) and compared with the experimental work on the wire-mesh reactor (WMR) to study the influence of temperature (1000-1400°C), biomass origin (softwood, hardwood, grass) and heating rate (1000°C/s, 10^4 °C/s) on the char yield...... to the parental fuel, whereas alfalfa straw char particle size remained unaltered with the higher temperatures. In this study, the retained shape of beechwood and herbaceous biomass samples is related to the presence of extractives and formation of silicates. Soot yield from herbaceous fuels occurs lower than...... and morphology. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), elementary analysis, CAMSIZER XT, ash compositional analysis were applied to characterize the effect of operational conditions on the solid and gas products. Char yield from fast pyrolysis in the DFT setup was 2 to 6 % (daf) lower than in the WMR apparatus...

  5. Field-to-Fuel Performance Testing of Lignocellulosic Feedstocks: An Integrated Study of the Fast Pyrolysis/Hydrotreating Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, Daniel T.; Westover, Tyler; Carpenter, Daniel; Santosa, Daniel M.; Emerson, Rachel; Deutch, Steve; Starace, Anne; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Lukins, Craig D.

    2015-05-21

    Feedstock composition can affect final fuel yields and quality for the fast pyrolysis and hydrotreatment upgrading pathway. However, previous studies have focused on individual unit operations rather than the integrated system. In this study, a suite of six pure lignocellulosic feedstocks (clean pine, whole pine, tulip poplar, hybrid poplar, switchgrass, and corn stover) and two blends (equal weight percentages whole pine/tulip poplar/switchgrass and whole pine/clean pine/hybrid poplar) were prepared and characterized at Idaho National Laboratory. These blends then underwent fast pyrolysis at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and hydrotreatment at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Although some feedstocks showed a high fast pyrolysis bio-oil yield such as tulip poplar at 57%, high yields in the hydrotreater were not always observed. Results showed overall fuel yields of 15% (switchgrass), 18% (corn stover), 23% (tulip poplar, Blend 1, Blend 2), 24% (whole pine, hybrid poplar) and 27% (clean pine). Simulated distillation of the upgraded oils indicated that the gasoline fraction varied from 39% (clean pine) to 51% (corn stover), while the diesel fraction ranged from 40% (corn stover) to 46% (tulip poplar). Little variation was seen in the jet fuel fraction at 11 to 12%. Hydrogen consumption during hydrotreating, a major factor in the economic feasibility of the integrated process, ranged from 0.051 g/g dry feed (tulip poplar) to 0.070 g/g dry feed (clean pine).

  6. Comparison of high temperature chars of wheat straw and rice husk with respect to chemistry, morphology and reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2016-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of wheat straw and rice husk was carried out in an entrained flow reactor at hightemperatures(1000e1500) C. The collected char was analyzed using X-ray diffractometry, N2-adsorption,scanning electron microscopy, particle size analysis with CAMSIZER XT, 29Si and 13C solid......-statenuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis to investigate the effect ofinorganic matter on the char morphology and oxygen reactivity. The silicon compounds were dispersedthroughout the turbostratic structure of rice husk char in an amorphous phase with a low meltingtemperature (z730 C......), which led to the formation of a glassy char shell, resulting in a preserved particlesize and shape of chars. The high alkali content in the wheat straw resulted in higher char reactivity,whereas the lower silicon content caused variations in the char shape from cylindrical to near...

  7. Liquid–Liquid Equilibrium Measurements for Model Systems Related to Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasperson, Louis V.; McDougal, Rubin J.; Diky, Vladimir; Paulechka, Eugene; Chirico, Robert D.; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Iisa, Kristiina; Dutta, Abhijit

    2017-01-12

    We report liquid-liquid mutual solubilities for binary aqueous mixtures involving 2-, 3-, and 4-ethylphenol, 2-, 3-, and 4-methoxyphenol, benzofuran, and 1H-indene for the temperature range (300 < T/K < 360). Measurements in the water-rich phase for (2-ethylphenol + water) were extended to T = 440 K to facilitate comparison with literature values. Liquid-liquid equilibrium tie-line determinations were made for four ternary systems involving (water + toluene) mixed with a third component; phenol, 3-ethylphenol, 4-methoxyphenol, or 2,4-dimethylphenol. Literature values at higher temperatures are available for the three (ethylphenol + water) systems, and, in general, good agreement is seen. The ternary system (water + toluene + phenol) has been studied previously with inconsistent results reported in the literature, and one report is shown to be anomalous. All systems are modeled with the predictive methods NIST-Modified-UNIFAC and NIST-COSMO-SAC, with generally good success in the temperature range of interest (300 < T/K < 360). This work is part of a larger project on the testing and development of predictive phase equilibrium models for compound types occurring in catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass, and background information for the larger project is provided.

  8. Techno-Economic Analysis of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, M. M.; Satrio, J. A.; Brown, R. C.; Daugaard, D. E.; Hsu, D. D.

    2010-11-01

    This study develops techno-economic models for assessment of the conversion of biomass to valuable fuel products via fast pyrolysis and bio-oil upgrading. The upgrading process produces a mixture of naphtha-range (gasoline blend stock) and diesel-range (diesel blend stock) products. This study analyzes the economics of two scenarios: onsite hydrogen production by reforming bio-oil, and hydrogen purchase from an outside source. The study results for an nth plant indicate that petroleum fractions in the naphtha distillation range and in the diesel distillation range are produced from corn stover at a product value of $3.09/gal ($0.82/liter) with onsite hydrogen production or $2.11/gal ($0.56/liter) with hydrogen purchase. These values correspond to a $0.83/gal ($0.21/liter) cost to produce the bio-oil. Based on these nth plant numbers, product value for a pioneer hydrogen-producing plant is about $6.55/gal ($1.73/liter) and for a pioneer hydrogen-purchasing plant is about $3.41/gal ($0.92/liter). Sensitivity analysis identifies fuel yield as a key variable for the hydrogen-production scenario. Biomass cost is important for both scenarios. Changing feedstock cost from $50-$100 per short ton changes the price of fuel in the hydrogen production scenario from $2.57-$3.62/gal ($0.68-$0.96/liter).

  9. ASPEN+ and economic modeling of equine waste utilization for localized hot water heating via fast pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASPEN Plus based simulation models have been developed to design a pyrolysis process for the on-site production and utilization of pyrolysis oil from equine waste at the Equine Rehabilitation Center at Morrisville State College (MSC). The results indicate that utilization of all available Equine Reh...

  10. Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass in a Fluidized Bed Reactor: In Situ Filtering of the Vapors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Elly; Hogendoorn, Kees J.A.; Wang, Xiaoquan; Westerhof, Roel J.M.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Swaaij, van Wim P.M.; Groeneveld, Michiel J.

    2009-01-01

    A system to remove in situ char/ash from hot pyrolysis vapors has been developed and tested at the University of Twente. The system consists of a continuous fluidized bed reactor (0.7 kg/h) with immersed filters (wire mesh, pore size 5 μm) for extracting pyrolysis vapors. Integration of the filter s

  11. Catalytic cracking of fast and tail gas reactive pyrolysis bio-oils over HZSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    While hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of pyrolysis oil is well understood as an upgrading method, the high processing pressures associated with it alone justify the exploration of alternative upgrading solutions, especially those that could adapt pyrolysis oils into the existing refinery infrastructure. Ca...

  12. Influences of Temperature and Coal Particle Size on the Flash Pyrolysis of Coal in a Fast-entrained Bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The experiments on the flash pyrolysis of a lignite were carried out in a fast-entrained bed reactor as a basic study on a so-called 'coal topping process'. The investigation focused on the effects of pyrolysis temperature and coal particle size on the product distribution and composition. The experimental results show that an increase in the pyrolysis temperature results in a higher yield of gaseous products while a larger particle size leads to a decrease of the liquid yield. An optimum temperature for the liquid yield was found to be 650 ℃. A certain amount of phenol groups was found in the liquid products, which may be used to produce high-valued fine chemicals. The FTIR analyses of the coal and chars show that aliphatic structures in the chars are gradually replaced by aromatic structures with the increasing of pyrolysis temperature and coal particle size. The results of this study provide fundamental data and optimal conditions to maximize light oils yields for the coal topping process.

  13. Catalytic fast co-pyrolysis of biomass and food waste to produce aromatics: Analytical Py-GC/MS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhong, Zhaoping; Min, Min; Ding, Kuan; Xie, Qinglong; Ruan, Roger

    2015-01-01

    In this study, catalytic fast co-pyrolysis (co-CFP) of corn stalk and food waste (FW) was carried out to produce aromatics using quantitative pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), and ZSM-5 zeolite in the hydrogen form was employed as the catalyst. Co-CFP temperature and a parameter called hydrogen to carbon effective ratio (H/C(eff) ratio) were examined for their effects on the relative content of aromatics. Experimental results showed that co-CFP temperature of 600 °C was optimal for the formation of aromatics and other organic pyrolysis products. Besides, H/C(eff) ratio had an important influence on product distribution. The yield of total organic pyrolysis products and relative content of aromatics increased non-linearly with increasing H/C(eff) ratio. There was an apparent synergistic effect between corn stalk and FW during co-CFP process, which promoted the production of aromatics significantly. Co-CFP of biomass and FW was an effective method to produce aromatics and other petrochemicals.

  14. Upgraded bio-oil production via catalytic fast co-pyrolysis of waste cooking oil and tea residual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Zhong, Zhaoping; Zhang, Bo; Ding, Kuan; Xue, Zeyu; Deng, Aidong; Ruan, Roger

    2017-02-01

    Catalytic fast co-pyrolysis (co-CFP) offers a concise and effective process to achieve an upgraded bio-oil production. In this paper, co-CFP experiments of waste cooking oil (WCO) and tea residual (TR) with HZSM-5 zeolites were carried out. The influences of pyrolysis reaction temperature and H/C ratio on pyrolytic products distribution and selectivities of aromatics were performed. Furthermore, the prevailing synergetic effect of target products during co-CFP process was investigated. Experimental results indicated that H/C ratio played a pivotal role in carbon yields of aromatics and olefins, and with H/C ratio increasing, the synergetic coefficient tended to increase, thus led to a dramatic growth of aromatics and olefins yields. Besides, the pyrolysis temperature made a significant contribution to carbon yields, and the yields of aromatics and olefins increased at first and then decreased at the researched temperature region. Note that 600°C was an optimum temperature as the maximum yields of aromatics and olefins could be achieved. Concerning the transportation fuel dependence and security on fossil fuels, co-CFP of WCO and TR provides a novel way to improve the quality and quantity of pyrolysis bio-oil, and thus contributes bioenergy accepted as a cost-competitive and promising alternative energy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Production of bio-oil and biochar from soapstock via microwave-assisted co-catalytic fast pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Leilei; Fan, Liangliang; Liu, Yuhuan; Ruan, Roger; Wang, Yunpu; Zhou, Yue; Zhao, Yunfeng; Yu, Zhenting

    2017-02-01

    In this study, production of bio-oil and biochar from soapstock via microwave-assisted co-catalytic fast pyrolysis combining the advantages of in-situ and ex-situ catalysis was performed. The effects of catalyst and pyrolysis temperature on product fractional yields and bio-oil chemical compositions were investigated. From the perspective of bio-oil yield, the optimal pyrolysis temperature was 550°C. The use of catalysts reduced the water content, and the addition of bentonite increased the bio-oil yield. Up to 84.16wt.% selectivity of hydrocarbons in the bio-oil was obtained in the co-catalytic process. In addition, the co-catalytic process can reduce the proportion of oxygenates in the bio-oil to 15.84wt.% and eliminate the N-containing compounds completely. The addition of bentonite enhanced the BET surface area of bio-char. In addition, the bio-char removal efficiency of Cd(2+) from soapstock pyrolysis in presence of bentonite was 27.4wt.% higher than without bentonite.

  16. Bio-oil production from dry sewage sludge by fast pyrolysis in an electrically-heated fluidized bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato O. Arazo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of bio-oil produced from sewage sludge using fast pyrolysis in a fluidized bed reactor was investigated. Effects of temperature, sludge particle size and vapor residence time on bio-oil properties, such as yield, high heating value (HHV and moisture content were evaluated through experimental and statistical analyses. Characterization of the pyrolysis products (bio-oil and biogas was also done. Optimum conditions produced a bio-oil product with an HHV that is nearly twice as much as lignocellulosic-derived bio-oil, and with properties comparable to heavy fuel oil. Contrary to generally acidic bio-oil, the sludge-derived bio-oil has almost neutral pH which could minimize the pipeline and engine corrosions. The Fourier Transform Infrared and gas-chromatography and mass spectrometry analyses of bio-oil showed a dominant presence of gasoline-like compounds. These results demonstrate that fast pyrolysis of sewage sludge from domestic wastewater treatment plant is a favorable technology to produce biofuels for various applications.

  17. Lignin depolymerization and upgrading via fast pyrolysis and electrocatalysis for the production of liquid fuels and value-added products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garedew, Mahlet

    The production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass is needed to replace fossil fuels, which are decreasing in supply at an unsustainable rate. Renewable fuels also address the rising levels of greenhouse gases, an issue for which the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change implicated humanity in 2013. In response, the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) mandates the production of 21 billion gallons of advanced biofuels by 2022. Biomass fast pyrolysis (BFP) uses heat (400-600 °C) without oxygen to convert biomass to liquids fuel precursors offering an alternative to fossil fuels and a means to meet the EISA mandate. The major product, bio-oil, can be further upgraded to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, while biochar can serve as a solid fuel or soil amendment. The combustible gas co-product is typically burned for process heat. Though the most valuable of the pyrolysis products, the liquid bio-oil is highly oxygenated, corrosive, low in energy content and unstable during storage. As a means of improving bio-oil properties, electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) is employed to reduce and deoxygenate reactive compounds. This work specifically focuses on lignin as a feed material for BFP. As lignin comprises up to 30% of the mass and 40% of the energy stored in biomass, it offers great potential for the production of liquid fuels and value-added products by utilizing fast pyrolysis as a conversion method coupled with electrocatalysis as an upgrading method.

  18. Bio-Oil Production from Fast Pyrolysis of Corn Wastes and Eucalyptus Wood in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A Ebrahimi-Nik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fast pyrolysis is an attractive technology for biomass conversion, from which bio-oil is the preferred product with a great potential for use in industry and transport. Corn wastes (cob and stover and eucalyptus wood are widely being produced throughout the world. In this study, fast pyrolysis of these two materials were examined under the temperature of 500 °C; career gas flow rate of 660 l h-1; particle size of 1-2 mm; 80 and 110 g h-1 of feed rate. The experiments were carried out in a continuous fluidized bed reactor. Pyrolysis vapor was condensed in 3 cooling traps (15, 0 and -40 °C plus an electrostatic one. Eucalyptus wood was pyrolyised to 12.4, 61.4, and 26.2 percent of bio-char, bio-oil and gas, respectively while these figures were as 20.15, 49.9, and 29.95 for corn wastes. In all experiments, the bio-oil obtained from electrostatic trap was a dark brown and highly viscose liquid.

  19. Fast pyrolysis of microalgae remnants in a fluidized bed reactor for bio-oil and biochar production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaige; Brown, Robert C; Homsy, Sally; Martinez, Liliana; Sidhu, Sukh S

    2013-01-01

    In this study, pyrolysis of microalgal remnants was investigated for recovery of energy and nutrients. Chlorella vulgaris biomass was first solvent-extracted for lipid recovery then the remnants were used as the feedstock for fast pyrolysis experiments using a fluidized bed reactor at 500 °C. Yields of bio-oil, biochar, and gas were 53, 31, and 10 wt.%, respectively. Bio-oil from C. vulgaris remnants was a complex mixture of aromatics and straight-chain hydrocarbons, amides, amines, carboxylic acids, phenols, and other compounds with molecular weights ranging from 70 to 1200 Da. Structure and surface topography of the biochar were analyzed. The high inorganic content (potassium, phosphorous, and nitrogen) of the biochar suggests it may be suitable to provide nutrients for crop production. The bio-oil and biochar represented 57% and 36% of the energy content of the microalgae remnant feedstock, respectively.

  20. Investigation on the quality of bio-oil produced through fast pyrolysis of biomass-polymer waste mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourabchi, S. A.; Ng, H. K.; Gan, S.; Yap, Z. Y.

    2016-06-01

    A high-impact poly-styrene (HIPS) was mixed with dried and ground coconut shell (CS) at equal weight percentage. Fast pyrolysis was carried out on the mixture in a fixed bed reactor over a temperature range of 573 K to 1073 K, and a nitrogen (N2) linear velocity range of 7.8x10-5 m/s to 6.7x10-2 m/s to produce bio-oil. Heat transfer and fluid dynamics of the pyrolysis process inside the reactor was visualised by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The CFD modelling was validated by experimental results and they both indicated that at temperature of 923 K and N2 linear velocity of 7.8x10-5 m/s, the maximum bio-oil yield of 52.02 wt% is achieved.

  1. Characteristic of fly ash derived-zeolite and its catalytic performance for fast pyrolysis of Jatropha waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichaphund, S; Aht-Ong, D; Sricharoenchaikul, V; Atong, D

    2014-01-01

    Fly ash from pulp and paper industries was used as a raw material for synthesizing zeolite catalyst. Main compositions of fly ash consisted of 41 wt%SiO2, 20 wt%Al2O3, 14 wt%CaO, and 8 wt% Fe2O3. High content of silica and alumina indicated that this fly ash has potential uses for zeolite synthesis. Fly ash was mixed with 1-3 M NaOH solution. Sodium silicate acting as silica source was added into the solution to obtain the initial SiO2/Al2O3 molar ratio of 23.9. The mixtures were then crystallized at 160 degrees C for 24 and 72 h. Zeolites synthesized after a long synthesis time of 72 h showed superior properties in terms of high crystallinity, less impurity, and small particle size. The catalytic activities of fly ash-derived zeolites were investigated via fast pyrolysis of Jatropha wastes using analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). Pyrolysis temperature was set at 500 degrees C with Jatropha wastes to catalyst ratio of 1:1, 1:5, and 1:10. Results showed that higher amounts of catalyst have a positive effect on enhancing aromatic hydrocarbons as well as decreasing in the oxygenated and N-containing compounds. Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 (ZSM-5) treated with 3 M NaOH at 72 h showed the highest hydrocarbon yield of 97.4%. The formation of hydrocarbon led to the high heating value of bio-oils. In addition, the presence of ZSM-5 derived from fly ash contributed to reduce the undesirable oxygenated compounds such as aldehydes, acids, and ketones which cause poor quality of bio-oil to only 0.8% while suppressed N-compounds to 1.7%. Overall, the ZSM-5 synthesized from fly ash proved to be an effective catalyst for catalytic fast pyrolysis application.

  2. Fast pyrolysis of sunflower-pressed bagasse: effects of sweeping gas flow rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gercel, H.F.; Putun, E.

    2002-05-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annus L.)-pressed bagasse pyrolysis experiments were performed in a fixed-bed tubular reactor. The effects of nitrogen flow rate and final pyrolysis temperature on the pyrolysis product yields and chemical compositions have been investigated. The maximum bio-oil yield of 52.85 wt% was obtained in a nitrogen atmosphere and a nitrogen flow rate of 50 cm{sup 3} min{sup -1} and at a pyrolysis temperature of 550{sup o}C and heating rate of 5{sup o}C s{sup -1}. The chemical characterization has shown that the oil obtained from sunflower-pressed bagasse may be potentially valuable as fuel and chemical feedstocks. (author)

  3. The effect of a sweeping gas flow rate on the fast pyrolysis of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gercel, H.F.

    2002-07-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annus L.)-pressed bagasse pyrolysis experiments were performed in a fixed-bed tubular reactor. The effects of nitrogen flow rate and final pyrolysis temperature on the pyrolysis product yields and chemical compositions have been investigated. The maximum bio-oil yield of 46.62 wt% was obtained in a nitrogen atmosphere with a nitrogen flow rate of 25 cm{sup 3}min{sup -1} and at a pyrolysis temperature of 550{sup o}C with a heating rate of 300{sup o}C min{sup -1}. The chemical characterization showed that the oil obtained from sunflower-pressed bagasse may be potentially valuable as fuel and chemical feedstocks. (author)

  4. Measurements of Temperature and Gas Generation during Fast Pyrolysis of Single Biomass Particle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MURATA, Shoma; IRII, Toshihide; TANOUE, Ken-ichiro; NISHIMURA, Tatsuo; UEMURA, Yoshimitsu; TANIGUCHI, Miki; SASAUCHI, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    .... From the time courses of the temperature at the center TC of a cornel particle, there could be two regions due to the endothermic reactions of biomass during pyrolysis and exothermic char formation from tar...

  5. Well-to-wheels analysis of fast pyrolysis pathways with the GREET model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, J.; Elgowainy, A.; Palou-Rivera, I.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M.Q. (Energy Systems)

    2011-12-01

    The pyrolysis of biomass can help produce liquid transportation fuels with properties similar to those of petroleum gasoline and diesel fuel. Argonne National Laboratory conducted a life-cycle (i.e., well-to-wheels [WTW]) analysis of various pyrolysis pathways by expanding and employing the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The WTW energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the pyrolysis pathways were compared with those from the baseline petroleum gasoline and diesel pathways. Various pyrolysis pathway scenarios with a wide variety of possible hydrogen sources, liquid fuel yields, and co-product application and treatment methods were considered. At one extreme, when hydrogen is produced from natural gas and when bio-char is used for process energy needs, the pyrolysis-based liquid fuel yield is high (32% of the dry mass of biomass input). The reductions in WTW fossil energy use and GHG emissions relative to those that occur when baseline petroleum fuels are used, however, is modest, at 50% and 51%, respectively, on a per unit of fuel energy basis. At the other extreme, when hydrogen is produced internally via reforming of pyrolysis oil and when bio-char is sequestered in soil applications, the pyrolysis-based liquid fuel yield is low (15% of the dry mass of biomass input), but the reductions in WTW fossil energy use and GHG emissions are large, at 79% and 96%, respectively, relative to those that occur when baseline petroleum fuels are used. The petroleum energy use in all scenarios was restricted to biomass collection and transportation activities, which resulted in a reduction in WTW petroleum energy use of 92-95% relative to that found when baseline petroleum fuels are used. Internal hydrogen production (i.e., via reforming of pyrolysis oil) significantly reduces fossil fuel use and GHG emissions because the hydrogen from fuel gas or pyrolysis oil (renewable sources) displaces that from fossil fuel

  6. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Tan, Eric; Dutta, Abhijit; Jacobson, Jacob; Cafferty, Kara

    2013-11-01

    This report describes a proposed thermochemical process for converting biomass into liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis followed by hydroprocessing of the condensed pyrolysis oil. As such, the analysis does not reflect the current state of commercially-available technology but includes advancements that are likely, and targeted to be achieved by 2017. The purpose of this study is to quantify the economic impact of individual conversion targets to allow a focused effort towards achieving cost reductions.

  7. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-oil Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.; Meyer, P.; Snowden-Swan, L.; Padmaperuma, A.; Tan, E.; Dutta, A.; Jacobson, J.; Cafferty, K.

    2013-11-01

    This report describes a proposed thermochemical process for converting biomass into liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis followed by hydroprocessing of the condensed pyrolysis oil. As such, the analysis does not reflect the current state of commercially-available technology but includes advancements that are likely, and targeted to be achieved by 2017. The purpose of this study is to quantify the economic impact of individual conversion targets to allow a focused effort towards achieving cost reductions.

  8. Catalytic Upgrading of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Vapors with Nano Metal Oxides: An Analytical Py-GC/MS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Lu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Fast pyrolysis of poplar wood followed with catalytic cracking of the pyrolysis vapors was performed using analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS. The catalysts applied in this study were nano MgO, CaO, TiO2, Fe2O3, NiO and ZnO. These catalysts displayed different catalytic capabilities towards the pyrolytic products. The catalysis by CaO significantly reduced the levels of phenols and anhydrosugars, and eliminated the acids, while it increased the formation of cyclopentanones, hydrocarbons and several light compounds. ZnO was a mild catalyst, as it only slightly altered the pyrolytic products. The other four catalysts all decreased the linear aldehydes dramatically, while the increased the ketones and cyclopentanones. They also reduced the anhydrosugars, except for NiO. Moreover, the catalysis by Fe2O3 resulted in the formation of various hydrocarbons. However, none of these catalysts except CaO were able to greatly reduce the acids.

  9. Fast Pyrolysis Behavior of Banagrass as a Function of Temperature and Volatiles Residence Time in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Trevor James; Turn, Scott Q.; George, Anthe

    2015-01-01

    A reactor was designed and commissioned to study the fast pyrolysis behavior of banagrass as a function of temperature and volatiles residence time. Four temperatures between 400 and 600°C were examined as well as four residence times between ~1.0 and 10 seconds. Pyrolysis product distributions of bio-oil, char and permanent gases were determined at each reaction condition. The elemental composition of the bio-oils and chars was also assessed. The greatest bio-oil yield was recorded when working at 450°C with a volatiles residence time of 1.4 s, ~37 wt% relative to the dry ash free feedstock (excluding pyrolysis water). The amounts of char (organic fraction) and permanent gases under these conditions are ~4 wt% and 8 wt% respectively. The bio-oil yield stated above is for 'dry' bio-oil after rotary evaporation to remove solvent, which results in volatiles and pyrolysis water being removed from the bio-oil. The material removed during drying accounts for the remainder of the pyrolysis products. The 'dry' bio-oil produced under these conditions contains ~56 wt% carbon which is ~40 wt% of the carbon present in the feedstock. The oxygen content of the 450°C, 1.4 s 'dry' bio-oil is ~38 wt%, which accounts for ~33 wt% of the oxygen in the feedstock. At higher temperature or longer residence time less bio-oil and char is recovered and more gas and light volatiles are produced. Increasing the temperature has a more significant effect on product yields and composition than increasing the volatiles residence time. At 600°C and a volatiles residence time of 1.2 seconds the bio-oil yield is ~21 wt% of the daf feedstock, with a carbon content of 64 wt% of the bio-oil. The bio-oil yield from banagrass is significantly lower than from woody biomass or grasses such as switchgrass or miscanthus, but is similar to barley straw. The reason for the low bio-oil yield from banagrass is thought to be related to its high ash content (8.5 wt% dry basis) and high concentration of alkali

  10. Fast Pyrolysis Behavior of Banagrass as a Function of Temperature and Volatiles Residence Time in a Fluidized Bed Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Trevor James; Turn, Scott Q; George, Anthe

    2015-01-01

    A reactor was designed and commissioned to study the fast pyrolysis behavior of banagrass as a function of temperature and volatiles residence time. Four temperatures between 400 and 600°C were examined as well as four residence times between ~1.0 and 10 seconds. Pyrolysis product distributions of bio-oil, char and permanent gases were determined at each reaction condition. The elemental composition of the bio-oils and chars was also assessed. The greatest bio-oil yield was recorded when working at 450°C with a volatiles residence time of 1.4 s, ~37 wt% relative to the dry ash free feedstock (excluding pyrolysis water). The amounts of char (organic fraction) and permanent gases under these conditions are ~4 wt% and 8 wt% respectively. The bio-oil yield stated above is for 'dry' bio-oil after rotary evaporation to remove solvent, which results in volatiles and pyrolysis water being removed from the bio-oil. The material removed during drying accounts for the remainder of the pyrolysis products. The 'dry' bio-oil produced under these conditions contains ~56 wt% carbon which is ~40 wt% of the carbon present in the feedstock. The oxygen content of the 450°C, 1.4 s 'dry' bio-oil is ~38 wt%, which accounts for ~33 wt% of the oxygen in the feedstock. At higher temperature or longer residence time less bio-oil and char is recovered and more gas and light volatiles are produced. Increasing the temperature has a more significant effect on product yields and composition than increasing the volatiles residence time. At 600°C and a volatiles residence time of 1.2 seconds the bio-oil yield is ~21 wt% of the daf feedstock, with a carbon content of 64 wt% of the bio-oil. The bio-oil yield from banagrass is significantly lower than from woody biomass or grasses such as switchgrass or miscanthus, but is similar to barley straw. The reason for the low bio-oil yield from banagrass is thought to be related to its high ash content (8.5 wt% dry basis) and high concentration of alkali

  11. Fast Pyrolysis Behavior of Banagrass as a Function of Temperature and Volatiles Residence Time in a Fluidized Bed Reactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor James Morgan

    Full Text Available A reactor was designed and commissioned to study the fast pyrolysis behavior of banagrass as a function of temperature and volatiles residence time. Four temperatures between 400 and 600°C were examined as well as four residence times between ~1.0 and 10 seconds. Pyrolysis product distributions of bio-oil, char and permanent gases were determined at each reaction condition. The elemental composition of the bio-oils and chars was also assessed. The greatest bio-oil yield was recorded when working at 450°C with a volatiles residence time of 1.4 s, ~37 wt% relative to the dry ash free feedstock (excluding pyrolysis water. The amounts of char (organic fraction and permanent gases under these conditions are ~4 wt% and 8 wt% respectively. The bio-oil yield stated above is for 'dry' bio-oil after rotary evaporation to remove solvent, which results in volatiles and pyrolysis water being removed from the bio-oil. The material removed during drying accounts for the remainder of the pyrolysis products. The 'dry' bio-oil produced under these conditions contains ~56 wt% carbon which is ~40 wt% of the carbon present in the feedstock. The oxygen content of the 450°C, 1.4 s 'dry' bio-oil is ~38 wt%, which accounts for ~33 wt% of the oxygen in the feedstock. At higher temperature or longer residence time less bio-oil and char is recovered and more gas and light volatiles are produced. Increasing the temperature has a more significant effect on product yields and composition than increasing the volatiles residence time. At 600°C and a volatiles residence time of 1.2 seconds the bio-oil yield is ~21 wt% of the daf feedstock, with a carbon content of 64 wt% of the bio-oil. The bio-oil yield from banagrass is significantly lower than from woody biomass or grasses such as switchgrass or miscanthus, but is similar to barley straw. The reason for the low bio-oil yield from banagrass is thought to be related to its high ash content (8.5 wt% dry basis and high

  12. Combining asphalt-rubber (AR) and fast-pyrolysis bio-oil to create a binder for flexible pavements

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Best paper award of the conference The bio-oil from fast pyrolysis is mainly a product of the recycling of waste materials. This is a viscoelastic material, and after a heat treatment it has a viscosity similar to many types of asphalt used in the paving industry. Although bio-oil showed very good high temperature performance, the same was not verified at low temperatures. Therefore, GTR from cryogenic milling was used to modify the bio-oil. Then, a blend was produced by adding 20% (w/w) o...

  13. [Adsorption mechanism of furfural onto modified rice husk charcoals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yong; Wang, Xianhua; Li, Yunchao; Shao, Jing'ai; Yang, Haiping; Chen, Hanping

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the absorptive characteristics of furfural onto biomass charcoals derived from rice husk pyrolysis, we studied the information of the structure and surface chemistry properties of the rice husk charcoals modified by thermal treatment under nitrogen and carbon dioxide flow and adsorption mechanism of furfural. The modified samples are labeled as RH-N2 and RH-CO2. Fresh rice husk charcoal sample (RH-450) and modified samples were characterized by elemental analysis, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and Boehm titration. The results show that fresh rice husk charcoal obtained at 450 degrees C had a large number of organic groups on its surface and poor pore structure. After the modification under nitrogen and carbon dioxide flow, oxygenic organics in rice husk charcoals decompose further, leading to the reduction of acidic functional groups on charcoals surface, and the increase of the pyrone structures of the basic groups. Meanwhile, pore structure was improved significantly and the surface area was increased, especially for the micropores. This resulted in the increase of π-π dispersion between the surfaces of rice husk charcoals and furfural molecular. With making comprehensive consideration of π-π dispersion and pore structure, the best removal efficiency of furfural was obtained by rice husk charcoal modified under carbon dioxide flow.

  14. Fast pyrolysis in a novel wire-mesh reactor: design and initial results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, E.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Hogendoorn, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrolysis is known to occur by decomposition processes followed by vapour phase reactions. The goal of this research is to develop a novel device to study the initial decomposition processes. For this, a novel wire-mesh reactor was constructed. A small sample (<0.1 g) was clamped between two meshes

  15. Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating: 2015 State of Technology R&D and Projections to 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Pimphan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zacher, Alan H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Olarte, Mariefel V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Huamin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Drennan, Corinne [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report details the nth plant modeled results for experimentally demonstrated improvements to the upgrading of pyrolysis derived bio-oil as achieved during FY15 and compares them to the previous year. Also included is a brief update on university, national laboratory and commercial publications and demonstrations.

  16. Life cycle analysis of fuel production from fast pyrolysis of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jeongwoo; Elgowainy, Amgad; Dunn, Jennifer B; Wang, Michael Q

    2013-04-01

    A well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis of pyrolysis-based gasoline was conducted and compared with petroleum gasoline. To address the variation and uncertainty in the pyrolysis pathways, probability distributions for key parameters were developed with data from literature. The impacts of two different hydrogen sources for pyrolysis oil upgrading and of two bio-char co-product applications were investigated. Reforming fuel gas/natural gas for H2 reduces WTW GHG emissions by 60% (range of 55-64%) compared to the mean of petroleum fuels. Reforming pyrolysis oil for H2 increases the WTW GHG emissions reduction up to 112% (range of 97-126%), but reduces petroleum savings per unit of biomass used due to the dramatic decline in the liquid fuel yield. Thus, the hydrogen source causes a trade-off between GHG reduction per unit fuel output and petroleum displacement per unit biomass used. Soil application of biochar could provide significant carbon sequestration with large uncertainty. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fast pyrolysis of organic acid leached wood, straw, hay and bagasse: Improved oil and sugar yields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudenhoven, S.R.G; Westerhof, R.J.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Organic acid leaching of pine wood, straw, bagasse and hay effectively reduced the amount of catalytically active alkali and alkaline earth metals (AAEMs). Using the (acetic) acid produced by pyrolysis as leaching agent, the AAEMs content could be reduced to 90–600 mg/kg. Tests with AAEMs impregnate

  18. Evaluation of Brazilian biomasses as potential feedstocks for fuel production via fast pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The utilization of lignocellulosic materials to generate energy is constantly expanding around the world. In addition to the well-known biofuels such as ethanol and biodiesel, advanced biofuels obtained by thermochemical conversion routes have been explored, including pyrolysis oil, biochar and syng...

  19. Fast pyrolysis in a novel wire-mesh reactor: design and initial results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, E.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Hogendoorn, Kees

    2012-01-01

    Pyrolysis is known to occur by decomposition processes followed by vapour phase reactions. The goal of this research is to develop a novel device to study the initial decomposition processes. For this, a novel wire-mesh reactor was constructed. A small sample (<0.1 g) was clamped between two meshes

  20. ECOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY OF PEAT FAST PYROLYSIS PROJECTS AS AN ALTERNATIVE SOURCE OF RAW ENERGY RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Tcvetkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this review is to find ecologically and economically reasonable method of biomass processing to produce electricity and thermal energy. The major causes of the annual increase in the volume of consumed electricity and thermal energy are the current pace of scientific and technological progress, the overcrowding of cities and industrial agglomeration. Traditional energy sources (coal, oil, gas have a significant negative impact on the environment, which leads to the deterioration of sanitary-hygienic indicators of the human environment. Besides, prices for traditional energy resources are increasing due to the decline of easy produced stocks. The goal of this article is the investigation and evaluation of environmental and economic efficiency of biomass fast pyrolysis methods for as modern energy resources. The result of the review is the choice of biomass fast pyrolysis as the most environmentally reasonable and economically viable local method of producing electricity and thermal energy in Russia. This method is more eco-friendly, compared to other alternative energy sources, for example using peat as solid fuel.

  1. Highly selective BTX from catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignin over supported mesoporous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfadly, A M; Zeid, I F; Yehia, F Z; Rabie, A M; Aboualala, M M; Park, Sang-Eon

    2016-10-01

    The post synthesis of Al(3+) or Zr(4+) substituted MCM-48 framework with controlled acidity is challenging because the functional groups exhibiting acidity often jeopardize the framework integrity. Herein, we report the post-synthesis of two hierarchically porous MCM-48 composed of either aluminum (Al(3+)) or zirconium (Zr(4+)) clusters with high throughput. All prepared catalysts have been characterized by HR-TEM, XRD, IR, N2-adsorption, NH3-TPD, TGA and MAS NMR. They exhibit BET surface areas of 597 and 1112m(2)g(-1) for 8.4% Al/MCM-48 and 2.9% Zr/MCM-48, respectively. XRD analysis reveals that the hierarchical porosity of parental MCM-48 is reserved even after incorporation of Al(3+)or Zr(4+). Zr/MCM-48 catalysts are demonstrate a superior performance versus that of Al/MCM-48 and MCM-48 because of the mild (ZrO2) or nil (SiO2) Lewis acidity contributed from Zr-μ2-O group as well as smaller pore sizes suitable for the restriction of unwanted side reactions. The reaction conditions which were affecting the catalytic pyrolysis and final products were gas flow rate, pyrolysis temperature, and catalyst to lignin ratio. A total of 49% of BTX product were obtained over 2.9% Zr/MCM-48 at 600°C. The Lewis acid character was the governing factor which helps in pyrolysis and directly affects the BTX formation.

  2. Novel Fast Pyrolysis/Catalytic Technology for the Production of Stable Upgraded Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Ted; Agblevor, Foster; Battaglia, Francine; Klein, Michael

    2013-01-18

    The objective of the proposed research is the demonstration and development of a novel biomass pyrolysis technology for the production of a stable bio-oil. The approach is to carry out catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and upgrading together with pyrolysis in a single fluidized bed reactor with a unique two-level design that permits the physical separation of the two processes. The hydrogen required for the HDO will be generated in the catalytic section by the water-gas shift reaction employing recycled CO produced from the pyrolysis reaction itself. Thus, the use of a reactive recycle stream is another innovation in this technology. The catalysts will be designed in collaboration with BASF Catalysts LLC (formerly Engelhard Corporation), a leader in the manufacture of attrition-resistant cracking catalysts. The proposed work will include reactor modeling with state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics in a supercomputer, and advanced kinetic analysis for optimization of bio-oil production. The stability of the bio-oil will be determined by viscosity, oxygen content, and acidity determinations in real and accelerated measurements. A multi-faceted team has been assembled to handle laboratory demonstration studies and computational analysis for optimization and scaleup.

  3. Bio-oil production of softwood and hardwood forest industry residues through fast and intermediate pyrolysis and its chromatographic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torri, Isadora Dalla Vecchia; Paasikallio, Ville; Faccini, Candice Schmitt; Huff, Rafael; Caramão, Elina Bastos; Sacon, Vera; Oasmaa, Anja; Zini, Claudia Alcaraz

    2016-01-01

    Bio-oils were produced through intermediate (IP) and fast pyrolysis (FP), using Eucalyptus sp. (hardwood) and Picea abies (softwood), wood wastes produced in large scale in Pulp and Paper industries. Characterization of these bio-oils was made using GC/qMS and GC×GC/TOFMS. The use of GC×GC provided a broader characterization of bio-oils and it allowed tracing potential markers of hardwood bio-oil, such as dimethoxy-phenols, which might co-elute in 1D-GC. Catalytic FP increased the percentage of aromatic hydrocarbons in P. abies bio-oil, indicating its potential for fuel production. However, the presence of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) draws attention to the need of a proper management of pyrolysis process in order to avoid the production of toxic compounds and also to the importance of GC×GC/TOFMS use to avoid co-elutions and consequent inaccuracies related to identification and quantification associated with GC/qMS. Ketones and phenols were the major bio-oil compounds and they might be applied to polymer production.

  4. Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: 2012 State of Technology and Projections to 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.

    2013-08-27

    This report summarizes the economic impact of the work performed at PNNL during FY12 to improve fast pyrolysis oil upgrading via hydrotreating. A comparison is made between the projected economic outcome and the actual results based on experimental data. Sustainability metrics are also included.

  5. Biomass-to-hydrogen via fast pyrolysis and catalytic steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chornet, E.; Wang, D.; Czernik, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass and reforming the pyroligneous oils is being studied as a strategy for producing hydrogen. Novel technologies for the rapid pyrolysis of biomass have been developed in the past decade. They provide compact and efficient systems to transform biomass into vapors that are condensed to oils, with yields as high as 75-80 wt.% of the anhydrous biomass. This {open_quotes}bio-oil{close_quotes} is a mixture of aldehydes, alcohols, acids, oligomers from the constitutive carbohydrates and lignin, and some water derived from the dehydration reactions. Hydrogen can be produced by reforming the bio-oil or its fractions with steam. A process of this nature has the potential to be cost competitive with conventional means of producing hydrogen. The reforming facility can be designed to handle alternate feedstocks, such as natural gas and naphtha, if necessary. Thermodynamic modeling of the major constituents of the bio-oil has shown that reforming is possible within a wide range of temperatures and steam-to-carbon ratios. Existing catalytic data on the reforming of oxygenates have been studied to guide catalyst selection. Tests performed on a microreactor interfaced with a molecular beam mass spectrometer showed that, by proper selection of the process variables: temperature, steam-to-carbon ratio, gas hourly space velocity, and contact time, almost total conversion of carbon in the feed to CO and CO{sub 2} could be obtained. These tests also provided possible reaction mechanisms where thermal cracking competes with catalytic processes. Bench-scale, fixed bed reactor tests demonstrated high hydrogen yields from model compounds and carbohydrate-derived pyrolysis oil fractions. Reforming bio-oil or its fractions required proper dispersion of the liquid to avoid vapor-phase carbonization of the feed in the inlet to the reactor. A special spraying nozzle injector was designed and successfully tested with an aqueous fraction of bio-oil.

  6. Corn stalks char from fast pyrolysis as precursor material for preparation of activated carbon in fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqi; Wu, Jingli; He, Tao; Wu, Jinhu

    2014-09-01

    Corn stalks char from fast pyrolysis was activated by physical and chemical activation process in a fluidized bed reactor. The structure and morphology of the carbons were characterized by N2 adsorption and SEM. Effects of activation time and activation agents on the structure of activation carbon were investigated. The physically activated carbons with CO2 have BET specific surface area up to 880 m(2)/g, and exhibit microporous structure. The chemically activated carbons with H3PO4 have BET specific surface area up to 600 m(2)/g, and exhibit mesoporous structure. The surface morphology shows that physically activated carbons exhibit fibrous like structure in nature with long ridges, resembling parallel lines. Whereas chemically activated carbons have cross-interconnected smooth open pores without the fibrous like structure.

  7. Organic compounds leached from fast pyrolysis mallee leaf and bark biochars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Caroline; Mourant, Daniel; Gunawan, Richard; Hu, Xun; Wang, Yi

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of organic compounds leached from biochars is essential in assessing the possible toxicity of the biochar to the soils' biota. In this study the nature of the leached organic compounds from Mallee biochars, produced from pyrolysis of Mallee leaf and bark in a fluidised-bed pyrolyser at 400 and 580°C was investigated. Light bio-oil compounds and aromatic organic compounds were investigated. The 'bio-oil like' light compounds from leaf and bark biochars 'surfaces were obtained after leaching the chars with a solvent, suitable to dissolve the respective bio-oils. GC/MS was implemented to investigate the leachates. Phenolics, which are potentially harmful toxins, were detected and their concentration shown to be dependent on the char's origin and the char production temperature. Further, to simulate biochars amendment to soils, the chars were leached with water. The water-leached aromatic compounds from leaf and bark biochars were characterized using UV-fluorescence spectroscopy. Those results suggested that biochars contain leachable compounds of which the nature and amount is dependent on the biomass feedstock, pyrolysis temperature and leaching time.

  8. Fast co-pyrolysis of biomass and lignite in a micro fluidized bed reactor analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yebing; Dong, Lei; Dong, Yuping; Liu, Wenping; Chang, Jiafu; Yang, Shuai; Lv, Zhaochuan; Fan, Pengfei

    2015-04-01

    The co-pyrolysis characteristic of biomass and lignite were investigated in a Micro Fluidized Bed Reaction Analyzer under isothermal condition. The synergetic effect was evaluated by comparing the experimental gas yields and distributions with the calculated values, and iso-conversional method was used to calculate the kinetic parameters of formation of each gas component. The results showed that synergetic effect was manifested in co-pyrolysis. For the range of conversion investigated, the activation energies for H2, CH4, CO and CO2 were 72.90 kJ/mol, 43.90 kJ/mol, 18.51 kJ/mol and 13.44 kJ/mol, respectively; the reactions for CH4 and CO2 conformed to 2 order chemical reaction model, and for H2 and CO conformed to 1.5 order chemical reaction model; the pre-exponential factors for CH4, CO2, H2 and CO were 249.0 S(-1), 5.290 S(-1), 237.4 S(-1) and 2.693 S(-1), respectively. The discrepancy of the kinetic parameters implied that there were different pathways for forming the different gas.

  9. 水洗-烘焙联合预处理对稻壳微波热解产品特性的影响%Effect of combining washing and torrefaction pretreatment on properties of product from microwave-induced pyrolysis of rice husk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张理; 张书平; 董庆; 熊源泉

    2015-01-01

    预处理技术能提高生物质热解产物的品质.本文研究了水洗-烘焙联合预处理技术对稻壳微波热解的产物特性的影响,结果表明:水洗-烘焙联合预处理技术增加了固体产率,而减少了液体和气体的产率;联合预处理技术提高了稻壳微波热解气体产物的品质,气体产物中CO2含量减少,CH4和H2的含量增加,气体产物的热值提高到13MJ/m3;联合预处理技术提高了稻壳微波热解液体产物的品质,增大了液体产物中苯酚类和糖类的含量,减少了液体产物中酸的含量,简化了液体产物的成分.%Pretreatment can improve the qualities of biomass pyrolysis products. This study investigated the effect of combining washing and torrefaction methods on properties of product from microwave- induced pyrolysis of rice husk. It was found that combining washing and torrefaction pretreatment could increase the yields of solid,but decrease the yields of liquid and gas from microwave-induced pyrolysis. The product qualities of liquid and gas were improved by pretreatment,the gas products contained more concentrated H2 and CH4 with higherLHV up to 13MJ/m3,the liquid products contained more concentrated phenols and sugars with less acids content,and the compounds in liquid were simplified by combining washing and torrefaction pretreatment.

  10. Sugar cane bagasse as a feedstock for an industrial fast pyrolysis process under development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, R.; Magne, P.; Deglise, X.

    1987-11-01

    In order to determine if it is possible to use sugar cane bagasse in an industrial pyrolysis process (developed by the TNEE Company, a subsidiary of St. Gobain, France) to obtain a medium heating value gas, a comparative study of this material with pine bark, already used in the process, and with oak sawdust has been performed. The study showed only some minor differences between the three materials, essentially due to a difference of structure and a higher H/sub 2/ content for bagasse. In addition it is noticeable that the heating value of bagasse is higher than that of pine bark. Consequently sugar cane bagasse can be considered as a good feedstock for the TNEE industrial process. 20 figs., 2 tabs., 7 refs.

  11. Properties of slurries made of fast pyrolysis oil and char or beech wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The properties of slurries made of pyrolysis oil mixed with wood, char or ground char were investigated with respect to phase transitions, rheological properties, elemental compositions, and energy density. Also the pumping properties of the slurries were investigated at temperatures of 25, 40...... and 60 C and solid loadings from 0 to 20 wt%. The phase transitions of the wood slurry samples were observed at lower solid loadings compared to the char slurry samples. The apparent viscosity of the slurry samples was found to be considerably impacted by solid loading (0e20 wt%) and temperature (25e60 C......), especially in the phase transition region. The slurry viscosities with 20 wt% char loading, 20 wt% ground char loading and 15 wt% wood loading (at a shear rate of 100 s1) are 0.7, 1.0 and 1.7 Pa.s, respectively at 60 C and these values increases 1.2e1.4 times at 40 C and 3e4 times at 25 C. The wood, char...

  12. Production Cost Assessment of Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Conversion to Bio-Oil via Fast Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoga Peryoga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Production cost assessment was based on palm oil mill of 30 metrics tons FFB/h capacity that produced EFB residue at app. 20 % wt of the initial FFB fed to the plant. The bio-oil plant will be located in the palm oil mill complex to eliminate the transportation cost of the EFB feedstock. The process included in this calculation is chopping, drying, grinding, pyrolysis, solid removal, bio oil recovery, and storage. The production cost is influenced by the amount of bio-oil production, material cost, operational cost including labor and utility cost. The sensitivity analysis shows that feedstock price drives the production cost. The result concludes that for the current condition, the bio-oil production cost from palm empty fruit bunch seems promising to be implemented in Indonesia. The best option is to have the bio-oil plant integrated with the palm oil mill, where in this case the EFB can be kept at no cost, off the market influence.

  13. Techno-economic and uncertainty analysis of in situ and ex situ fast pyrolysis for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Boyan; Ou, Longwen; Dang, Qi; Meyer, Pimphan; Jones, Susanne; Brown, Robert; Wright, Mark

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluates the techno-economic uncertainty in cost estimates for two emerging technologies for biofuel production: in situ and ex situ catalytic pyrolysis. The probability distributions for the minimum fuel-selling price (MFSP) indicate that in situ catalytic pyrolysis has an expected MFSP of $1.11 per liter with a standard deviation of 0.29, while the ex situ catalytic pyrolysis has a similar MFSP with a smaller deviation ($1.13 per liter and 0.21 respectively). These results suggest that a biorefinery based on ex situ catalytic pyrolysis could have a lower techno-economic uncertainty than in situ pyrolysis compensating for a slightly higher MFSP cost estimate. Analysis of how each parameter affects the NPV indicates that internal rate of return, feedstock price, total project investment, electricity price, biochar yield and bio-oil yield are parameters which have substantial impact on the MFSP for both in situ and ex situ catalytic pyrolysis.

  14. 农业废弃物稻壳快速热解动力学研究%A Study on Rapid Pyrolysis Dynamic Model of Agricultural Waste Rice Husk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栾积毅; 武雪梅; 翁志刚; 吴贵福; 唐正坤; 刘远军; 邵东伟; 马常友

    2011-01-01

    针对前期采用沉降炉对农业废弃物稻壳高温快速热解的试验结果,提出动力学模型,求出稻壳快速热解反应动力学参数,并对试验过程进行了模拟.计算结果与实测值吻合良好,表明建立的稻壳高温快速热解动力学模型合理.%As for experimental result of rapid pyrolysis for agricultural wastes using drop tube furnace,this thesis built Dynamic model,calculated dynamic parameter of rapid high temperature pyrolysis reaction,and simulated the experimental process.The calculated results were consistent with measurements,which indicated the rationality of rapid pyrolysis dynamic model.

  15. Physicochemical properties of bio-oil and biochar produced by fast pyrolysis of stored single-pass corn stover and cobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ajay; Darr, Matthew J; Dalluge, Dustin; Medic, Dorde; Webster, Keith; Brown, Robert C

    2012-12-01

    Short harvest window of corn (Zea mays) stover necessitates its storage before utilization; however, there is not enough work towards exploring the fast pyrolysis behavior of stored biomass. This study investigated the yields and the physicochemical properties (proximate and ultimate analyses, higher heating values and acidity) of the fast pyrolysis products obtained from single-pass stover and cobs stored either inside a metal building or anaerobically within plastic wraps. Biomass samples were pyrolyzed in a 183 cm long and 2.1cm inner diameter free-fall fast pyrolysis reactor. Yields of bio-oil, biochar and non-condensable gases from different biomass samples were in the ranges of 45-55, 25-37 and 11-17 wt.%, respectively, with the highest bio-oil yield from the ensiled single-pass stover. Bio-oils generated from ensiled single-pass cobs and ensiled single-pass stover were, respectively, the most and the least acidic with the modified acid numbers of 95.0 and 65.2 mg g(-1), respectively.

  16. Life cycle assessment of the production of hydrogen and transportation fuels from corn stover via fast pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanan; Hu, Guiping; Brown, Robert C.

    2013-06-01

    This life cycle assessment evaluates and quantifies the environmental impacts of the production of hydrogen and transportation fuels from the fast pyrolysis and upgrading of corn stover. Input data for this analysis come from Aspen Plus modeling, a GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model database and a US Life Cycle Inventory Database. SimaPro 7.3 software is employed to estimate the environmental impacts. The results indicate that the net fossil energy input is 0.25 MJ and 0.23 MJ per km traveled for a light-duty vehicle fueled by gasoline and diesel fuel, respectively. Bio-oil production requires the largest fossil energy input. The net global warming potential (GWP) is 0.037 kg CO2eq and 0.015 kg CO2eq per km traveled for a vehicle fueled by gasoline and diesel fuel, respectively. Vehicle operations contribute up to 33% of the total positive GWP, which is the largest greenhouse gas footprint of all the unit processes. The net GWPs in this study are 88% and 94% lower than for petroleum-based gasoline and diesel fuel (2005 baseline), respectively. Biomass transportation has the largest impact on ozone depletion among all of the unit processes. Sensitivity analysis shows that fuel economy, transportation fuel yield, bio-oil yield, and electricity consumption are the key factors that influence greenhouse gas emissions.

  17. Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, George W.; Upadhye, Aniruddha A.; Ford, David M.; Bhatia, Surita R.; Badger, Phillip C.

    2012-10-19

    This University of Massachusetts, Amherst project, "Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils" started on 1st February 2009 and finished on August 31st 2011. The project consisted following tasks: Task 1.0: Char Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The presence of char particles in the bio-oil causes problems in storage and end-use. Currently there is no well-established technology to remove char particles less than 10 micron in size. This study focused on the application of a liquid-phase microfiltration process to remove char particles from bio-oil down to slightly sub-micron levels. Tubular ceramic membranes of nominal pore sizes 0.5 and 0.8m were employed to carry out the microfiltration, which was conducted in the cross-flow mode at temperatures ranging from 38 to 45 C and at three different trans-membrane pressures varying from 1 to 3 bars. The results demonstrated the removal of the major quantity of char particles with a significant reduction in overall ash content of the bio-oil. The results clearly showed that the cake formation mechanism of fouling is predominant in this process. Task 2.0 Acid Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The feasibility of removing small organic acids from the aqueous fraction of fast pyrolysis bio-oils using nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes was studied. Experiments were carried out with a single solute solutions of acetic acid and glucose, binary solute solutions containing both acetic acid and glucose, and a model aqueous fraction of bio-oil (AFBO). Retention factors above 90% for glucose and below 0% for acetic acid were observed at feed pressures near 40 bar for single and binary solutions, so that their separation in the model AFBO was expected to be feasible. However, all of the membranes were irreversibly damaged when experiments were conducted with the model AFBO due to the presence of guaiacol in the feed solution. Experiments

  18. Sulfur-Tolerant Molybdenum Carbide Catalysts Enabling Low-Temperature Stabilization of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-Oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhenglong; Choi, Jae Soon; Wang, Huamin; Lepore, Andrew W.; Connatser, Raynella M.; Lewis, Sam; Meyer, Harry; Santosa, Daniel M.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2017-08-18

    Low-temperature hydrogenation of carbonyl fractions can greatly improve the thermal stability of fast pyrolysis bio-oil which is crucial to achieve long-term operation of high-temperature upgrading reactors. The current state of the art, precious metals such as ruthenium, although highly effective in carbonyl hydrogenation, rapidly loses performance due to sulfur sensitivity. The present work showed that molybdenum carbides were active and sulfur-tolerant in low-temperature conversion carbonyl compounds. Furthermore, due to surface bifunctionality (presence of both metallic and acid sites), carbides catalyzed both C-O bond hydrogenation and C-C coupling reactions retaining most of carbon atoms in liquid products as more stable and higher molecular weight oligomeric compounds while consuming less hydrogen than ruthenium. The carbides proved to be resistant to other deactivation mechanisms including hydrothermal aging, oxidation, coking and leaching. These properties enabled carbides to achieve and maintain good catalytic performance in both aqueous-phase furfural conversion and real bio-oil stabilization with sulfur present. This finding strongly suggests that molybdenum carbides can provide a catalyst solution necessary for the development of commercially viable bio-oil stabilization technology.

  19. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of mushroom waste to upgraded bio-oil products via pre-coked modified HZSM-5 catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Zhong, Zhaoping; Ding, Kuan; Xue, Zeyu

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, HZSM-5 catalyst was modified by pre-coked to cover the strong external acid sites by methanol to olefins reaction, and the modified catalysts were then applied to conduct the catalyst fast pyrolysis of mushroom waste for upgraded bio-fuel production. Experiment results showed that the strong external acid sites and specific surface area decreased with pre-coked percentage increasing from 0% to 5.4%. Carbon yields of hydrocarbons increased at first and then decreased with a maximum value of 53.47%. While the obtained oxygenates presented an opposite variation tendency, and the minimum values could be reached when pre-coked percentage was 2.7%. Among the achieved hydrocarbons, toluene and p-xylene were found to be the main products, and the selectivity of p-xylene increased at first and then decreased with a maximum value of 34.22% when the pre-coked percentage was 1.3%, and the selectivity of toluene showed the opposite tendency with a minimum value of 25.47%.

  20. Acetic acid recovery from fast pyrolysis oil. An exploratory study on liquid-liquid reactive extraction using aliphatic tertiary amines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahfud, F. H.; van Geel, F. P.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Heeres, H. J.

    2008-01-01

    Flash pyrolysis oil or Bio-oil (BO), obtained by flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, is very acidic in nature. The major component responsible for this acidity is acetic acid, present in levels up to 2-10 wt%. Here, we report an exploratory study on BO upgrading by reactive extraction of ace

  1. Using pyrolytic acid leaching as a pretreatment step in a biomass fast pyrolysis plant: process design and economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudenhoven, S.R.G; Ham, van der A.G.J.; Berg, van den H.; Westerhof, R.J.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Removing alkali and alkaline earth metals (AAEMs) from biomass, with pyrolytic acids, before pyrolysis leads to increased organic oil and sugar yields. These pyrolytic acids are produced and concentrated within the pyrolysis process itself. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate under which condi

  2. Acetic acid recovery from fast pyrolysis oil. An exploratory study on liquid-liquid reactive extraction using aliphatic tertiary amines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahfud, F. H.; van Geel, F. P.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Heeres, H. J.

    2008-01-01

    Flash pyrolysis oil or Bio-oil (BO), obtained by flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, is very acidic in nature. The major component responsible for this acidity is acetic acid, present in levels up to 2-10 wt%. Here, we report an exploratory study on BO upgrading by reactive extraction of

  3. Acetic acid recovery from fast pyrolysis oil. An exploratory study on liquid-liquid reactive extraction using aliphatic tertiary amines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahfud, F. H.; van Geel, F. P.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Heeres, H. J.

    2008-01-01

    Flash pyrolysis oil or Bio-oil (BO), obtained by flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, is very acidic in nature. The major component responsible for this acidity is acetic acid, present in levels up to 2-10 wt%. Here, we report an exploratory study on BO upgrading by reactive extraction of ace

  4. Co-production of furfural and acetic acid from corncob using ZnCl2 through fast pyrolysis in a fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung-Jin; Jung, Su-Hwa; Kim, Joo-Sik

    2013-09-01

    Corncob was pyrolyzed using ZnCl2 in a pyrolysis plant equipped with a fluidized bed reactor to co-produce furfural and acetic acid. The effects of reaction conditions, the ZnCl2 content and contacting method of ZnCl2 with corncob on the yields of furfural and acetic acid were investigated. The pyrolysis was performed within the temperature range between 310 and 410°C, and the bio-oil yield were 30-60 wt% of the product. The furfural yield increased up to 8.2 wt%. The acetic acid yield was maximized with a value of 13.1 wt%. A lower feed rate in the presence of ZnCl2 was advantageous for the production of acetic acid. The fast pyrolysis of a smaller corncob sample mechanically mixed with 20 wt% of ZnCl2 gave rise to a distinct increase in furfural. A high selectivity for furfural and acetic acid in bio-oil would make the pyrolysis of corncob with ZnCl2 very economically attractive.

  5. Study of the potential valorisation of heavy metal contaminated biomass via phytoremediation by fast pyrolysis: Part I. Influence of temperature, biomass species and solid heat carrier on the behaviour of heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Lievens; J. Yperman; J. Vangronsveld; R. Carleer [Hasselt University, Diepenbeek (Belgium). Laboratory of Applied Chemistry

    2008-08-15

    Presently, little or no information of implementing fast pyrolysis for looking into the potential valorisation of heavy metal contaminated biomass is available. Fast pyrolysis of heavy metal contaminated biomass (birch and sunflower), containing high amounts of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn, resulting from phytoremediation, is investigated. The effect of the pyrolysis temperature (623, 673, 773 and 873 K) and the type of solid heat carrier (sand and fumed silica) on the distribution of the heavy metals in birch and sunflower pyrolysis fractions are studied. The goal of the set-up is 'concentrating' heavy metals in the ash/char fraction after thermal treatment, preventing them to be released in the condensable and/or volatile fractions. The knowledge of the behaviour of heavy metals affects directly future applications and valorisation of the pyrolysis products and thus contaminated biomass. They are indispensable for making and selecting the proper thermal conditions for their maximum recovery. In view of the future valorisation of these biomasses, the amounts of the pyrolysis fractions and the calorific values of the obtained liquid pyrolysis products, as a function of the pyrolysis temperature, are determined. 46 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass in a Spout-fluidized Bed Reactor--Analysis of Composition and Combustion Characteristics of Liquid Product from Biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈明强; 王君; 王新运; 张学才; 张素平; 任铮伟; 颜涌捷

    2006-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the fast pyrolysis mechanism of biomass and the relationship between bio-oil composition and pyrolysis reaction conditions, to assess the possibility for the raw bio-oil to be used as fuel, and to evaluate the concept of spout-fluidized bed reactor as the reactor for fast pyrolysis of biomass to prepare fuel oil, the composition and combustion characteristics of bio-oil prepared in a spout-fluidized bed reactor with a designed maximum capacity 5 kg/h of sawdust as feeding material, were investigated by GC-MS and thermogravimetry. 14 aromatic series chemicals were identified. The thermogravimetric analysis indicated that the bio-oil was liable to combustion, the combustion temperature increased with the heating rate, and only minute ash was generated when it burned. The kinetics of the combustion reaction was studied and the kinetic parameters were calculated by both Ozawa-Flynn-Wall and Popsecu methods. The results agree well with each other. The most probable combustion mechanism functions determined by Popescu method are f(α)=k(1-α)2(400~406 ℃), f(α)=1/2k(1-α)3 (406~416 ℃) and f( α)=2k(1-α)3/2 (416~430 ℃) respectively.

  7. Catalyst Residence Time Distributions in Riser Reactors for Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis. Part 2: Pilot-Scale Simulations and Operational Parameter Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foust, Thomas D.; Ziegler, Jack L.; Pannala, Sreekanth; Ciesielski, Peter; Nimlos, Mark R.; Robichaud, David J.

    2017-02-21

    Using the validated simulation model developed in part one of this study for biomass catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP), we assess the functional utility of using this validated model to assist in the development of CFP processes in fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) reactors to a commercially viable state. Specifically, we examine the effects of mass flow rates, boundary conditions (BCs), pyrolysis vapor molecular weight variation, and the impact of the chemical cracking kinetics on the catalyst residence times. The factors that had the largest impact on the catalyst residence time included the feed stock molecular weight and the degree of chemical cracking as controlled by the catalyst activity. Because FCC reactors have primarily been developed and utilized for petroleum cracking, we perform a comparison analysis of CFP with petroleum and show the operating regimes are fundamentally different.

  8. Molybdenum Carbides, Active and In Situ Regenerable Catalysts in Hydroprocessing of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-Oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae-Soon; Zacher, Alan H.; Wang, Huamin; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Armstrong, Beth L.; Meyer, Harry M.; Soykal, I. Ilgaz; Schwartz, Viviane

    2016-06-16

    We assessed molybdenum carbides as a potential catalyst for fast pyrolysis bio-oil hydroprocessing. Currently, high catalyst cost, short catalyst lifetime, and lack of effective regeneration methods are hampering the development of this otherwise attractive renewable hydrocarbon technology. A series of metal-doped bulk Mo carbides were synthesized, characterized and evaluated in sequential low-temperature stabilization and high-temperature deoxygenation of a pine-derived bio-oil. During a typical 60-h run, Mo carbides were capable of upgrading raw bio-oil to a level suitable for direct insertion into the current hydrocarbon infrastructure with residual oxygen content and total acid number of upgraded oils below 2 wt% and 0.01 mg KOH g-1, respectively. The performance was shown to be sensitive to the type of metal dopant, Ni-doped Mo carbides outperforming Co-, Cu-, or Ca-doped counterparts; a higher Ni loading led to a superior catalytic performance. No bulk oxidation or other significant structural changes were observed. Besides the structural robustness, another attractive property of Mo carbides was in situ regenerability. The effectiveness of regeneration was demonstrated by successfully carrying out four consecutive 60-h runs with a reductive decoking between two adjacent runs. These results strongly suggest that Mo carbides are promising catalytic materials which could lead to a significant cost reduction in hydroprocessing bio-oils. This paper highlights areas for future research which will be needed to further understand carbide structure-function relationships and help design practical bio-oil upgrading catalysts based on Mo carbides.

  9. Effect of torrefaction on structure and fast pyrolysis behavior of corncobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Anqing; Zhao, Zengli; Chang, Sheng; Huang, Zhen; Wang, Xiaobo; He, Fang; Li, Haibin

    2013-01-01

    Pretreatment of corncobs using torrefaction was conducted in an auger reactor at 250-300 °C and residence times of 10-60 min. The torrefied corncobs were fast pyrolyzed in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor at 470 °C to obtain high-quality bio-oil. The heating value and pH of the bio-oil improved when the torrefaction as pretreatment was applied; however, increasing bio-oil yield penalties were observed with increasing torrefaction severity. Fourier transform infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and quantitative solid (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR) analysis of torrefied corncobs showed that the devolatilization, crosslinking and charring of corncobs during torrefaction could be responsible for the bio-oil yield penalties. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis showed that the acetic acid and furfural contents of the bio-oil decreased with torrefaction temperature or residence time. The results showed that torrefaction is an effective method of pretreatment for improving bio-oil quality if the crosslinking and charring of biomass can be restricted.

  10. Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, George W.; Upadhye, Aniruddha A.; Ford, David M.; Bhatia, Surita R.; Badger, Phillip C.

    2012-10-19

    This University of Massachusetts, Amherst project, "Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils" started on 1st February 2009 and finished on August 31st 2011. The project consisted following tasks: Task 1.0: Char Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The presence of char particles in the bio-oil causes problems in storage and end-use. Currently there is no well-established technology to remove char particles less than 10 micron in size. This study focused on the application of a liquid-phase microfiltration process to remove char particles from bio-oil down to slightly sub-micron levels. Tubular ceramic membranes of nominal pore sizes 0.5 and 0.8m were employed to carry out the microfiltration, which was conducted in the cross-flow mode at temperatures ranging from 38 to 45 C and at three different trans-membrane pressures varying from 1 to 3 bars. The results demonstrated the removal of the major quantity of char particles with a significant reduction in overall ash content of the bio-oil. The results clearly showed that the cake formation mechanism of fouling is predominant in this process. Task 2.0 Acid Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The feasibility of removing small organic acids from the aqueous fraction of fast pyrolysis bio-oils using nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes was studied. Experiments were carried out with a single solute solutions of acetic acid and glucose, binary solute solutions containing both acetic acid and glucose, and a model aqueous fraction of bio-oil (AFBO). Retention factors above 90% for glucose and below 0% for acetic acid were observed at feed pressures near 40 bar for single and binary solutions, so that their separation in the model AFBO was expected to be feasible. However, all of the membranes were irreversibly damaged when experiments were conducted with the model AFBO due to the presence of guaiacol in the feed solution. Experiments

  11. Techno-economic and uncertainty analysis of in situ and ex situ fast pyrolysis for biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Boyan; Ou, Longwen; Dang, Qi; Meyer, Pimphan A.; Jones, Susanne B.; Brown, Robert C.; Wright, Mark

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluates the techno-economic uncertainty in cost estimates for two emerging biorefinery technologies for biofuel production: in situ and ex situ catalytic pyrolysis. Stochastic simulations based on process and economic parameter distributions are applied to calculate biorefinery performance and production costs. The probability distributions for the minimum fuel-selling price (MFSP) indicate that in situ catalytic pyrolysis has an expected MFSP of $4.20 per gallon with a standard deviation of 1.15, while the ex situ catalytic pyrolysis has a similar MFSP with a smaller deviation ($4.27 per gallon and 0.79 respectively). These results suggest that a biorefinery based on ex situ catalytic pyrolysis could have a lower techno-economic risk than in situ pyrolysis despite a slightly higher MFSP cost estimate. Analysis of how each parameter affects the NPV indicates that internal rate of return, feedstock price, total project investment, electricity price, biochar yield and bio-oil yield are significant parameters which have substantial impact on the MFSP for both in situ and ex situ catalytic pyrolysis.

  12. Procedural investigations concerning the fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose in the Lurgi-Ruhrgas double-lead screw mixing reactor; Verfahrenstechnische Untersuchungen zur Schnellpyrolyse von Lignocellulose im Lurgi-Ruhrgas-Doppelschnecken-Mischreaktor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornmayer, C.; Dinjus, E.; Henrich, E.; Weirich, F. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Reimert, R. [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Engler-Bunte-Institut

    2008-07-01

    The 'Bioliq' technology (Froschungszentrum Karlsruhe) is a 2-step process to produce synthesis gas from lignocellulose. During the first decentralized step the biomass is liquefied by fast pyrolysis, the product is a coke/oil slurry or paste. Main part of the pyrolysis facility is the Lurgi-Ruhrgas mixing reactor with a circular flow of solid heat carriers. The paper describes the procedural characteristics of the reactor and the yield structure of the fast pyrolysis process for different typical biomasses. The specific heat requirement in the reactor for pyrolysis and the conversion of the product to 500 deg C is based on process data for different dry charges. The results are based on experimental data from a test facility with up to 15 kg/h biomass input.

  13. Aspen Plus® and economic modeling of equine waste utilization for localized hot water heating via fast pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Nicole L; Boateng, Akwasi A; Mullen, Charles A; Wheeler, M Clayton

    2013-10-15

    Aspen Plus(®) based simulation models have been developed to design a pyrolysis process for on-site production and utilization of pyrolysis oil from equine waste at the Equine Rehabilitation Center at Morrisville State College (MSC). The results indicate that utilization of all the available waste from the site's 41 horses requires a 6 oven dry metric ton per day (ODMTPD) pyrolysis system but it will require a 15 ODMTPD system for waste generated by an additional 150 horses at the expanded area including the College and its vicinity. For this a dual fluidized bed combustion reduction integrated pyrolysis system (CRIPS) developed at USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) was identified as the technology of choice for pyrolysis oil production. The Aspen Plus(®) model was further used to consider the combustion of the produced pyrolysis oil (bio-oil) in the existing boilers that generate hot water for space heating at the Equine Center. The model results show the potential for both the equine facility and the College to displace diesel fuel (fossil) with renewable pyrolysis oil and alleviate a costly waste disposal problem. We predict that all the heat required to operate the pyrolyzer could be supplied by non-condensable gas and about 40% of the biochar co-produced with bio-oil. Techno-economic Analysis shows neither design is economical at current market conditions; however the 15 ODMTPD CRIPS design would break even when diesel prices reach $11.40/gal. This can be further improved to $7.50/gal if the design capacity is maintained at 6 ODMTPD but operated at 4950 h per annum.

  14. 生物质快速热解液化技术研究进展%Progresses in Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass to Liquid Fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱锡锋; 李明

    2013-01-01

    总结了生物质热解液化技术在原料预处理、热解工艺和生物油精制3个方面的最新研究成果.在原料预处理方面,介绍了干燥、烘焙、压缩成型和酸洗4种方法;在热解工艺方面,列举了国内外具有代表性的热解反应器类型,重点介绍了催化热解和混合热解两种新工艺;在生物油精制方面,介绍了包括催化加氢、催化裂解、催化酯化和乳化等几种常用的生物油精制方法,并分析了各精制技术发展的关键问题.%The recent progresses in raw materials pretreatment,pyrolytic process and biooil upgrading for the fast pyrolysis of biomass to liquid fuel were reviewed.In the raw materials pretreatment,drying,torrefaction,compression moulding and acid-washing were introduced.In the pyrolytic process,typical fast pyrolysis reactors are enumerated and two novel pyrolytic processes,namely fast catalytic pyrolysis and co-liquefaction of both biomass and coal,were discussed.Finally,some upgrading methods were discussed,which included catalytic hydroprocessing,catalytic cracking,catalytic esterification,and emulsification with diesel.The key problems involved in these upgrading methods were also analyzed.

  15. Effect of operating parameters on production of bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of maize stalk in bubbling fluidized bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Najaf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The yield and composition of pyrolysis products depend on the characteristics of feed stock and process operating parameters. Effect of particle size, reaction temperature and carrier gas flow rate on the yield of bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of Pakistani maize stalk was investigated. Pyrolysis experiments were performed at temperature range of 360-540°C, feed particle size of 1-2 mm and carrier gas fl ow rate of 7.0-13.0 m3/h (0.61.1 m/s superficial velocity. Bio-oil yield increased with the increase of temperature followed by a decreasing trend. The maximum yield of bio-oil obtained was 42 wt% at a temperature of 490°C with the particle size of around 1.0 mm and carrier gas flow rate of 11.0 m3/h (0.9 m/s superficial velocity. High temperatures resulted in the higher ratios of char and non-condensable gas.

  16. Bio-oil production via fast pyrolysis of biomass residues from cassava plants in a fluidised-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattiya, Adisak

    2011-01-01

    Biomass residues from cassava plants, namely cassava stalk and cassava rhizome, were pyrolysed in a fluidised-bed reactor for production of bio-oil. The aims of this work were to investigate the yields and properties of pyrolysis products produced from both feedstocks as well as to identify the optimum pyrolysis temperature for obtaining the highest organic bio-oil yields. Results showed that the maximum yields of the liquid bio-oils derived from the stalk and rhizome were 62 wt.% and 65 wt.% on dry basis, respectively. The pyrolysis temperatures that gave highest bio-oil yields for both feedstocks were in the range of 475-510 °C. According to the analysis of the bio-oils properties, the bio-oil derived from cassava rhizome showed better quality than that derived from cassava stalk as the former had lower oxygen content, higher heating value and better storage stability.

  17. Federal Air Pollutant Emission Regulations and Preliminary Estimates of Potential-to-Emit from Biorefineries, Pathway #2: Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-oil Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatt, Arpit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States). Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group; Zhang, Yimin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States). Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group; Heath, Garvin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States). Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group; Thomas, Mae [Eastern Research Group, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Renzaglia, Jason [Eastern Research Group, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Biorefineries are subject to environmental laws, including complex air quality regulations that aim to protect and improve the quality of the air. These regulations govern the amount of certain types of air pollutants that can be emitted from different types of emission sources. To determine which federal air emission regulations potentially apply to the fast pyrolysis biorefinery, we first identified the types of regulated air pollutants emitted to the ambient environment by the biorefinery or from specific equipment. Once the regulated air pollutants are identified, we review the applicability criteria of each federal air regulation to determine whether the fast pyrolysis biorefinery or specific equipment is subject to it. We then estimate the potential-to-emit of pollutants likely to be emitted from the fast pyrolysis biorefinery to understand the air permitting requirements.

  18. Characterization and Comparison of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oils from Pinewood, Rapeseed Cake, and Wheat Straw Using 13C NMR and Comprehensive GC × GC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis bio-oils are feasible energy carriers and a potential source of chemicals. Detailed characterization of bio-oils is essential to further develop its potential use. In this study, quantitative 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) was used to characterize fast pyrolysis bio-oils originated from pinewood, wheat straw, and rapeseed cake. The combination of both techniques provided new information on the chemical composition of bio-oils for further upgrading. 13C NMR analysis indicated that pinewood-based bio-oil contained mostly methoxy/hydroxyl (≈30%) and carbohydrate (≈27%) carbons; wheat straw bio-oil showed to have high amount of alkyl (≈35%) and aromatic (≈30%) carbons, while rapeseed cake-based bio-oil had great portions of alkyl carbons (≈82%). More than 200 compounds were identified and quantified using GC × GC coupled to a flame ionization detector (FID) and a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Nonaromatics were the most abundant and comprised about 50% of the total mass of compounds identified and quantified via GC × GC. In addition, this analytical approach allowed the quantification of high value-added phenolic compounds, as well as of low molecular weight carboxylic acids and aldehydes, which exacerbate the unstable and corrosive character of the bio-oil. PMID:27668136

  19. Two-step fast microwave-assisted pyrolysis of biomass for bio-oil production using microwave absorbent and HZSM-5 catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhong, Zhaoping; Xie, Qinglong; Liu, Shiyu; Ruan, Roger

    2016-07-01

    A novel technology of two-step fast microwave-assisted pyrolysis (fMAP) of corn stover for bio-oil production was investigated in the presence of microwave absorbent (SiC) and HZSM-5 catalyst. Effects of fMAP temperature and catalyst-to-biomass ratio on bio-oil yield and chemical components were examined. The results showed that this technology, employing microwave, microwave absorbent and HZSM-5 catalyst, was effective and promising for biomass fast pyrolysis. The fMAP temperature of 500°C was considered the optimum condition for maximum yield and best quality of bio-oil. Besides, the bio-oil yield decreased linearly and the chemical components in bio-oil were improved sequentially with the increase of catalyst-to-biomass ratio from 1:100 to 1:20. The elemental compositions of bio-char were also determined. Additionally, compared to one-step fMAP process, two-step fMAP could promote the bio-oil quality with a smaller catalyst-to-biomass ratio.

  20. Characterization and Comparison of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oils from Pinewood, Rapeseed Cake, and Wheat Straw Using (13)C NMR and Comprehensive GC × GC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdar, Leila; Gonzalez-Quiroga, Arturo; Otyuskaya, Daria; Toraman, Hilal E; Liu, Li; Jastrzebski, Johann T B H; Van Geem, Kevin M; Marin, Guy B; Thybaut, Joris W; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-06

    Fast pyrolysis bio-oils are feasible energy carriers and a potential source of chemicals. Detailed characterization of bio-oils is essential to further develop its potential use. In this study, quantitative (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR) combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) was used to characterize fast pyrolysis bio-oils originated from pinewood, wheat straw, and rapeseed cake. The combination of both techniques provided new information on the chemical composition of bio-oils for further upgrading. (13)C NMR analysis indicated that pinewood-based bio-oil contained mostly methoxy/hydroxyl (≈30%) and carbohydrate (≈27%) carbons; wheat straw bio-oil showed to have high amount of alkyl (≈35%) and aromatic (≈30%) carbons, while rapeseed cake-based bio-oil had great portions of alkyl carbons (≈82%). More than 200 compounds were identified and quantified using GC × GC coupled to a flame ionization detector (FID) and a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Nonaromatics were the most abundant and comprised about 50% of the total mass of compounds identified and quantified via GC × GC. In addition, this analytical approach allowed the quantification of high value-added phenolic compounds, as well as of low molecular weight carboxylic acids and aldehydes, which exacerbate the unstable and corrosive character of the bio-oil.

  1. The impacts of biomass properties on pyrolysis yields, economic and environmental performance of the pyrolysis-bioenergy-biochar platform to carbon negative energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenqin; Dang, Qi; Brown, Robert C; Laird, David; Wright, Mark M

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluated the impact of biomass properties on the pyrolysis product yields, economic and environmental performance for the pyrolysis-biochar-bioenergy platform. We developed and applied a fast pyrolysis, feedstock-sensitive, regression-based chemical process model to 346 different feedstocks, which were grouped into five types: woody, stalk/cob/ear, grass/plant, organic residue/product and husk/shell/pit. The results show that biomass ash content of 0.3-7.7wt% increases biochar yield from 0.13 to 0.16kg/kg of biomass, and decreases biofuel yields from 87.3 to 40.7 gallons per tonne. Higher O/C ratio (0.88-1.12) in biomass decreases biochar yield and increases biofuel yields within the same ash content level. Higher ash content of biomass increases minimum fuel selling price (MFSP), while higher O/C ratio of biomass decreases MFSP within the same ash content level. The impact of ash and O/C ratio of biomass on GHG emissions are not consistent for all feedstocks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of Fast Pyrolysis Biochar to a Loamy soil - Effects on carbon and nitrogen dynamics and potential for carbon sequestration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Esben

    Thermal decomposition of biomass in an oxygen-free environment (pyrolysis) produces bio-oil, syngas, and char. All three products can be used to generate energy, but an emerging new use of the recalcitrant carbon-rich char (biochar) is to apply it to the soil in order to enhance soil fertility...... for agricultural soil, e.g. it improves soil WHC, adds minerals, enhances microbial activity/biomass, and increases the N and C turnover dynamics....

  3. Fast co-pyrolysis of waste newspaper with high-density polyethylene for high yields of alcohols and hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weimin; Shi, Shukai; Chen, Minzhi; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2017-09-01

    Waste newspaper (WP) was first co-pyrolyzed with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) to enhance the yields of alcohols and hydrocarbons. The effects of WP: HDPE feed ratio (100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, 0:100) and temperature (500-800°C) on products distribution were investigated and the interaction mechanism during co-pyrolysis was also proposed. Maximum yields of alcohols and hydrocarbons reached 85.88% (feed ratio 50:50wt.%, 600°C). Hydrogen supplements and deoxidation by HDPE and subsequently fragments recombination result in the conversion of aldehydes and ketones into branched hydrocarbons. Radicals from WP degradation favor the secondary crack for HDPE products resulting in the formation of linear hydrocarbons with low carbon number. Hydrocarbons with activated radical site from HDPE degradation were interacted with hydroxyl from WP degradation promoting the formation of linear long chain alcohols. Moreover, co-pyrolysis significantly enhanced condensable oil qualities, which were close to commercial diesel No. 0. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Production of bio-oil rich in acetic acid and phenol from fast pyrolysis of palm residues using a fluidized bed reactor: Influence of activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae-Yong; Lee, Uen-Do; Chang, Won-Seok; Jeong, Soo-Hwa

    2016-11-01

    In this study, palm residues were pyrolyzed in a bench-scale (3kg/h) fast pyrolysis plant equipped with a fluidized bed reactor and bio-oil separation system for the production of bio-oil rich in acetic acid and phenol. Pyrolysis experiments were performed to investigate the effects of reaction temperature and the types and amounts of activated carbon on the bio-oil composition. The maximum bio-oil yield obtained was approximately 47wt% at a reaction temperature of 515°C. The main compounds produced from the bio-oils were acetic acid, hydroxyacetone, phenol, and phenolic compounds such as cresol, xylenol, and pyrocatechol. When coal-derived activated carbon was applied, the acetic acid and phenol yields in the bio-oils reached 21 and 19wt%, respectively. Finally, bio-oils rich in acetic acid and phenol could be produced separately by using an in situ bio-oil separation system and activated carbon as an additive.

  5. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels. Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, A.; Sahir, A.; Tan, E.; Humbird, D.; Snowden-Swan, L. J.; Meyer, P.; Ross, J.; Sexton, D.; Yap, R.; Lukas, J.

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructurecompatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis.

  6. Field-to-Fuel Performance Testing of Lignocellulosic Feedstocks for Fast Pyrolysis and Upgrading: Techno-economic Analysis and Greenhouse Gas Life Cycle Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Pimphan A.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Rappé, Kenneth G.; Jones, Susanne B.; Westover, Tyler L.; Cafferty, Kara G.

    2016-11-17

    This work shows preliminary results from techno-economic analysis and life cycle greenhouse gas analysis of the conversion of seven (7) biomass feedstocks to produce liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis and upgrading via hydrodeoxygenation. The biomass consists of five (5) pure feeds (pine, tulip poplar, hybrid poplar, switchgrass, corn stover) and two blends. Blend 1 consists of equal weights of pine, tulip poplar and switchgrass, and blend 2 is 67% pine and 33% hybrid poplar. Upgraded oil product yield is one of the most significant parameters affecting the process economics, and is a function of both fast pyrolysis oil yield and hydrotreating oil yield. Pure pine produced the highest overall yield, while switchgrass produced the lowest. Interestingly, herbaceous materials blended with woody biomass performed nearly as well as pure woody feedstock, suggesting a non-trivial relationship between feedstock attributes and production yield. Production costs are also highly dependent upon hydrotreating catalyst-related costs. The catalysts contribute an average of ~15% to the total fuel cost, which can be reduced through research and development focused on achieving performance at increased space velocity (e.g., reduced catalyst loading) and prolonging catalyst lifetime. Green-house-gas reduction does not necessarily align with favorable economics. From the greenhouse gas analysis, processing tulip poplar achieves the largest GHG emission reduction relative to petroleum (~70%) because of its lower hydrogen consumption in the upgrading stage that results in a lower natural gas requirement for hydrogen production. Conversely, processing blend 1 results in the smallest GHG emission reduction from petroleum (~58%) because of high natural gas demand for hydrogen production.

  7. Utilization Of Rice Husk Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Nagrale

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available India is a major rice producing country, and the husk generated during milling is mostly used as a fuel in the boilers for processing paddy, producing energy through direct combustion and / or by gasification. About 20 million tones of Rice Husk Ash (RHA is produced annually. This RHA is a great environment threat causing damage to the land and the surrounding area in which it is dumped. Lots of ways are being thought of for disposing them by making commercial use of this RHA. RHA can be used as a replacement for concrete (15 to 25%.This paper evaluates how different contents of Rice Husk Ash added to concrete may influence its physical and mechanical properties. Sample Cubes were tested with different percentage of RHA and different w/c ratio, replacing in mass the cement. Properties like Compressive strength, Water absorption and Slump retention were evaluated.

  8. Fast microwave-assisted catalytic co-pyrolysis of lignin and low-density polyethylene with HZSM-5 and MgO for improved bio-oil yield and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Liangliang; Chen, Paul; Zhang, Yaning; Liu, Shiyu; Liu, Yuhuan; Wang, Yunpu; Dai, Leilei; Ruan, Roger

    2017-02-01

    Fast microwave-assisted catalytic co-pyrolysis of lignin and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) with HZSM-5 and MgO was investigated. Effects of pyrolysis temperature, lignin to LDPE ratio, MgO to HZSM-5 ratio, and feedstock to catalyst ratio on the products yields and chemical profiles were examined. 500°C was the optimal co-pyrolysis temperature in terms of the maximum bio-oil yield. The proportion of aromatics increased with increasing LDPE content. In addition, with the addition of LDPE (lignin/LDPE=1/2), methoxyl group in the phenols was completely removed. A synergistic effect was found between lignin and LDPE. The proportion of aromatics increased and alkylated phenols decreased with increasing HZSM-5 to MgO ratio. The bio-oil yield increased with the addition of appropriate amount of catalyst and the proportion of alkylated phenols increased with increasing catalyst to feedstock ratio.

  9. Flash pyrolysis properties of algae and lignin residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Sørensen, Hanne Risbjerg

    A fast pyrolysis study on lignin and macroalgae (non-conventional biomass) and wood and straw (conventional biomass) were carried out in a pyrolysis centrifugal reactor. The product distributions and energy recoveries were measured and compared among these biomasses. The fast pyrolysis...

  10. Characterization of upgraded fast pyrolysis oak oil distillate fractions from sulfided and non-sulfided catalytic hydrotreating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olarte, Mariefel V.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Ferrell, Jack R.; Christensen, Earl D.; Hallen, Richard T.; Lucke, Richard B.; Burton, Sarah D.; Lemmon, Teresa L.; Swita, Marie S.; Fioroni, Gina; Elliott, Douglas C.; Drennan, Corinne

    2017-08-01

    Catalytic hydroprocessing of pyrolysis oils from biomass produces hydrocarbons that can be considered for liquid fuel production. This process requires removal of oxygen and cracking of the heavier molecular weight bio-oil constituents into smaller fragments at high temperatures and pressures under hydrogen. A comprehensive understanding of product oils is useful to optimize cost versus degree of deoxygenation. Additionally, a better understanding of the chemical composition of the distillate fractions can open up other uses of upgraded oils for potentially higher-value chemical streams. We present in this paper the characterization data for five well-defined distillate fractions of two hydroprocessed oils with different oxygen levels: a low oxygen content (LOC, 1.8% O, wet basis) oil and a medium oxygen content (MOC, 6.4% O, wet basis) oil. Elemental analysis and 13C NMR results suggest that the distillate fractions become more aromatic/unsaturated as they become heavier. Our results also show that the use of sulfided catalysts directly affects the S content of the lightest distillate fraction. Carbonyl and carboxylic groups were found in the MOC light fractions, while phenols were present in the heavier fractions for both MOC and LOC. PIONA analysis of the light LOC fraction shows a predominance of paraffins with a minor amount of olefins. These results can be used to direct future research on refinery integration and production of value-added product from specific upgraded oil streams.

  11. Characteristics of products from fast pyrolysis of fractions of waste square timber and ordinary plywood using a fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Su-Hwa; Kim, Seon-Jin; Kim, Joo-Sik

    2012-06-01

    Fractions of waste square timber and waste ordinary plywood were pyrolyzed in a pyrolysis plant equipped with a fluidized bed reactor and a dual char separation system. The maximum bio-oil yield of about 65 wt.% was obtained at reaction temperatures of 450-500 °C for both feed materials. For quantitative analysis of bio-oil, the relative response factor (RRF) of each component was calculated using an effective carbon number (ECN) that was multiplied by the peak area of each component detected by a GC-FID. The predominant compounds in the bio-oils were methyl acetate, acids, hydroxyacetone, furfural, non-aromatic ketones, levoglucosan and phenolic compounds. The WOP-derived bio-oil showed it to have relatively high nitrogen content. Increasing the reaction temperature was shown to have little effect on nitrogen removal. The ash and solid contents of both bio-oils were below 0.1 wt.% due to the excellent performance of the char separation system.

  12. Feedstock Supply System Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels Conversion Pathway: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil Pathway "The 2017 Design Case"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin L. Kenney; Kara G. Cafferty; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ian J. Bonner; Garold L. Gresham; J. Richard Hess; William A. Smith; David N. Thompson; Vicki S. Thompson; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Neal Yancey

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy promotes the production of liquid fuels from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass sustainable supply, logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. Between 2000 and 2012, INL quantified and the economics and sustainability of moving biomass from the field or stand to the throat of the conversion process using conventional equipment and processes. All previous work to 2012 was designed to improve the efficiency and decrease costs under conventional supply systems. The 2012 programmatic target was to demonstrate a biomass logistics cost of $55/dry Ton for woody biomass delivered to fast pyrolysis conversion facility. The goal was achieved by applying field and process demonstration unit-scale data from harvest, collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation operations into INL’s biomass logistics model.

  13. Bactericidal Mechanism of Bio-oil Obtained from Fast Pyrolysis of Pinus densiflora Against Two Foodborne Pathogens, Bacillus cereus and Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Jayanta Kumar; Hwang, Hyewon; Choi, Joon Weon; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    Foodborne bacteria are the leading cause of food spoilage and other related diseases. In the present study, the antibacterial activity of bio-oil (BO) manufactured by fast pyrolysis of pinewood sawdust (Pinus densiflora Siebold and Zucc.) against two disease-causing foodborne pathogens (Bacillus cereus and Listeria monocytogenes) was evaluated. BO at a concentration of 1000 μg/disc was highly active against both B. cereus (10.0-10.6 mm-inhibition zone) and L. monocytogenes (10.6-12.0-mm inhibition zone). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration values of BO were 500 and 1000 μg/mL, respectively, for both pathogens. At the MIC concentration, BO exhibited an inhibitory effect on the viability of the bacterial pathogens. The mechanism of action of BO revealed its strong impairing effect on the membrane integrity of bacterial cells, which was confirmed by a marked release of 260-nm absorbing material, leakage of electrolytes and K(+) ions, and reduced capacity for osmoregulation under high salt concentration. Scanning electron microscopy clearly showed morphological alteration of the cell membrane due to the effect of BO. Overall, the results of this study suggest that BO exerts effective antibacterial potential against foodborne pathogens and can therefore potentially be used in food processing and preservation.

  14. Direct determination of arsenic in soil samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation using sodium formate as a reductant followed by nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xuchuan; Zhang, Jingya; Bu, Fanlong

    2015-09-01

    This new study shows for the first time that sodium formate can react with trace arsenic to form volatile species via fast pyrolysis - chemical vapor generation. We found that the presence of thiourea greatly enhanced the generation efficiency and eliminated the interference of copper. We studied the reaction temperature, the volume of sodium formate, the reaction acidity, and the carried argon rate using nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under optimal conditions of T = 500 °C, the volumes of 30% sodium formate and 10% thiourea were 0.2 ml and 0.05 ml, respectively. The carrier argon rate was 300 ml min- 1 and the detection limit and precision of arsenic were 0.39 ng and 3.25%, respectively. The amount of arsenic in soil can be directly determined by adding trace amount of hydrochloric acid as a decomposition reagent without any sample pretreatment. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amount of arsenic in two soil-certified reference materials (GBW07453 and GBW07450), and the results were found to be in agreement with certified reference values.

  15. A Short Historical Review of Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass Une brève revue historique de la pyrolyse rapide de la biomasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlein D.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this short review, we survey the historical progress of fast pyrolysis technologies for thermochemical liquefaction of biomass to produce so-called "bio-oil". Our focus is on the potential applications of bio-oil as a liquid fuel for heat and power generation. We point out some of the inherent properties of bio-oil that create difficulties standing in the way of these applications. Finally, we take a brief look at some processes that aim to valorize bio-oil by conversion to higher value liquid fuel products. Dans cette revue nous nous proposons de dresser un rappel historique des progrès relatifs aux technologies de liquéfaction thermochimiques par pyrolyse rapide, encore appelée pyrolyse flash, de la biomasse pour produire ce que l’on appelle communément une "bio-huile". Nous insisterons sur ses applications comme combustible liquide pour la production de chaleur et d’électricité. Nous ferons ressortir quelques propriétés spécifiques aux bio-huiles qui peuvent créer des difficultés d’usage. Nous terminerons par un bref aperçu de quelques procédés permettant de valoriser la bio-huile en carburants liquides de plus forte valeur ajoutée.

  16. Consecutively preparing d-xylose, organosolv lignin, and amorphous ultrafine silica from rice husk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxi; Ding, Xuefeng; Wang, Zichen; Zhao, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Rice husk is an abundant agricultural by-product reaching the output of 80 million tons annually in the world. The most common treatment method of rice husk is burning or burying, which caused serious air pollution and resource waste. In order to solve this problem, a new method is proposed to comprehensively utilize the rice husk in this paper. Firstly, the D-xylose was prepared from the semicellulose via dilute acid hydrolysis. Secondly, the lignin was separated via organic solvent pulping from the residue. Finally, the amorphous ultrafine silica was prepared via pyrolysis of the residue produced in the second process. In this way, the three main contents of rice husk (semicellulose, lignin, and silica) are consecutively converted to three fine chemicals, without solid waste produced. The yields of D-xylose and organosolv lignin reach 58.2% and 58.5%, respectively. The purity and specific surface of amorphous ultrafine silica reach 99.92% and 225.20 m(2)/g.

  17. Consecutively Preparing D-Xylose, Organosolv Lignin, and Amorphous Ultrafine Silica from Rice Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxi Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice husk is an abundant agricultural by-product reaching the output of 80 million tons annually in the world. The most common treatment method of rice husk is burning or burying, which caused serious air pollution and resource waste. In order to solve this problem, a new method is proposed to comprehensively utilize the rice husk in this paper. Firstly, the D-xylose was prepared from the semicellulose via dilute acid hydrolysis. Secondly, the lignin was separated via organic solvent pulping from the residue. Finally, the amorphous ultrafine silica was prepared via pyrolysis of the residue produced in the second process. In this way, the three main contents of rice husk (semicellulose, lignin, and silica are consecutively converted to three fine chemicals, without solid waste produced. The yields of D-xylose and organosolv lignin reach 58.2% and 58.5%, respectively. The purity and specific surface of amorphous ultrafine silica reach 99.92% and 225.20 m2/g.

  18. Fast pyrolysis of biomass in fluidized bed reactor UNICAMP, Brazil: problems, causes and solutions; Pirolise rapida de biomassa em reator de leito fluidizado UNICAMP-Brasil: problemas, causas e solucoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesa Perez, Juan Miguel; Marin Mesa, Henry Ramon [Bioware Tecnologia, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Rocha, Jose Dilcio; Olivares Gomez, Edgardo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (NIPE/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Nucleo Interdisciplinar de Planejamento Energetico; Cortez, Luis Augusto Barbosa; Shimabukuro, Fabio Rodrigo; Vallin, Marco Jim Gui [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEAGRI/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Agricola

    2006-07-01

    The fluidized bed reactor developed by the researchers of the UNICAMP in the installations of the Sugar Cane Technology Center (CTC), in Piracicaba-SP, is the first reactor of biomass fast pyrolysis in Brazil to produce bio-oil. In this work the problems of operation with the reactor in functioning are presented as the emptying of gases produced in the pyrolysis by means of the biomass feeding system, the block of the thread of biomass feeding, the inert material sintering in the bed, etc. The possible causes are described. Thus it, the first ones could be solved, either by the reduction of the height of the inert bed, or by the increase of the wadding percentage of the thread, among others. These results of the exploratory tests make possible the steady work of the plant, greater knowledge of the phenomena that occur during the fast pyrolysis in flutizide bed, as well as the establishment of adjusted levels for the identified independent factors during the remaining experimental works. (author)

  19. Bio-oil from Flash Pyrolysis of Agricultural Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Norazana

    bio-oils. Mainly the influence of feedstock type (wheat straw, rice husk and pine wood), feedstock water content and reactor temperature on the yield of char, bio-oil and gas were investigated. The storage stability of bio-oils with respect to changes in viscosity, water content and pH were...... liquid organics yield. In addition, the chemical compositions of the bio-oils and the chars of the investigated feedstocks were also analyzed. The utilization of the pyrolysis oil in static combustion equipments such as boilers and turbine have shown that the suitability of the pyrolysis oil...... to substitute fossil fuel. However, several limitations still arise due to the instability of the pyrolysis oil that may cause problems with transport and storage. Pyrolysis oil contains more than hundred of chemical compounds and has a wide range of volatility (different boiling points). The stability...

  20. Pyrolysis Model of Single Biomass Pellet in Downdraft Gasifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛爱军; 潘继红; 田茂诚; 伊晓璐

    2016-01-01

    By coupling the heat transfer equation with semi-global chemical reaction kinetic equations, a one-dimensional, unsteady mathematical model is developed to describe the pyrolysis of single biomass pellet in the pyrolysis zone of downdraft gasifier. The simulation results in inert atmosphere and pyrolysis zone agree well with the published experimental results. The pyrolysis of biomass pellets in pyrolysis zone is investigated, and the results show that the estimated convective heat transfer coefficient and emissivity coefficient are suitable. The mean pyro-lysis time is 15.22%, shorter than that in inert atmosphere, and the pellet pyrolysis process in pyrolysis zone belongs to fast pyrolysis. Among the pyrolysis products, tar yield is the most, gas the second, and char the least. During pyrolysis, the temperature change near the center is contrary to that near the surface. Pyrolysis gradually moves inwards layer by layer. With the increase of pyrolysis temperature and pellet diameter, the total pyrolysis time, tar yield, char yield and gas yield change in different ways. The height of pyrolysis zone is calculated to be 1.51—3.51 times of the characteristic pellet diameter.

  1. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Abhijit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sahir, A. H. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Humbird, David [DWH Process Consulting, Denver, CO (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Pimphan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ross, Jeff [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Sexton, Danielle [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Yap, Raymond [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Lukas, John [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructure-compatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis. Both the in situ and ex situ conceptual designs, using the underlying assumptions, project MFSPs of approximately $3.5/gallon gasoline equivalent (GGE). The performance assumptions for the ex situ process were more aggressive with higher distillate (diesel-range) products. This was based on an assumption that more favorable reaction chemistry (such as coupling) can be made possible in a separate reactor where, unlike in an in situ upgrading reactor, one does not have to deal with catalyst mixing with biomass char and ash, which pose challenges to catalyst performance and maintenance. Natural gas was used for hydrogen production, but only when off gases from the process was not sufficient to meet the needs; natural gas consumption is insignificant in both the in situ and ex situ base cases. Heat produced from the burning of char, coke, and off-gases allows for the production of surplus electricity which is sold to the grid allowing a reduction of approximately 5¢/GGE in the MFSP.

  2. Hydrogen production via catalytic steam reforming of fast pyrolysis bio-oil in a two-stage fixed bed reactor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.; Huang, Q.; Sui, M.; Yan, Y.; Wang, F. [Research Center for Biomass Energy, State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2008-12-15

    Hydrogen production was prepared via catalytic steam reforming of fast pyrolysis bio-oil in a two-stage fixed bed reactor system. Low-cost catalyst dolomite was chosen for the primary steam reforming of bio-oil in consideration of the unavoidable deactivation caused by direct contact of metal catalyst and bio-oil itself. Nickel-based catalyst Ni/MgO was used in the second stage to increase the purity and the yield of desirable gas product further. Influential parameters such as temperature, steam to carbon ratio (S/C, S/CH{sub 4}), and material space velocity (W{sub B}HSV, GHSV) both for the first and the second reaction stages on gas product yield, carbon selectivity of gas product, CH{sub 4} conversion as well as purity of desirable gas product were investigated. High temperature (> 850 C) and high S/C (> 12) are necessary for efficient conversion of bio-oil to desirable gas product in the first steam reforming stage. Low W{sub B}HSV favors the increase of any gas product yield at any selected temperature and the overall conversion of bio-oil to gas product increases accordingly. Nickel-based catalyst Ni/MgO is effective in purification stage and 100% conversion of CH{sub 4} can be obtained under the conditions of S/CH{sub 4} no less than 2 and temperature no less than 800 C. Low GHSV favors the CH{sub 4} conversion and the maximum CH{sub 4} conversion 100%, desirable gas product purity 100%, and potential hydrogen yield 81.1% can be obtained at 800 C provided that GHSV is no more than 3600 h{sup -} {sup 1}. Carbon deposition behaviors in one-stage reactor prove that the steam reforming of crude bio-oil in a two-stage fixed bed reaction system is necessary and significant. (author)

  3. Feasibility of ethanol production from coffee husks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouvea, B M; Torres, C; Franca, A S; Oliveira, L S; Oliveira, E S

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of ethanol production by fermentation of coffee husks by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Batch fermentation studies were performed employing whole and ground coffee husks, and aqueous extract from ground coffee husks. It was observed that fermentation yield decreased with an increase in yeast concentration. The best results were obtained for the following conditions: whole coffee husks, 3 g yeast/l substrate, temperature of 30 degrees C. Under these conditions ethanol production was 8.49 +/- 0.29 g/100 g dry basis (13.6 +/- 0.5 g ethanol/l), a satisfactory value in comparison to literature data for other residues such as corn stalks, barley straw and hydrolyzed wheat stillage (5-11 g ethanol/l). Such results indicate that coffee husks present excellent potential for residue-based ethanol production.

  4. Suspension Combustion of Wood: Influence of Pyrolysis Conditions on Char Yield, Morphology, and Reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall'Ora, Michelangelo; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2008-01-01

    Chars from pine and beech wood were produced by fast pyrolysis in an entrained flow reactor and by slow pyrolysis in a thermogravimetric analyzer. The influence of pyrolysis temperature, heating rate and particle size on char yield and morphology was investigated. The applied pyrolysis temperatur...

  5. Chapter 8: Biomass Pyrolysis Oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Robert L.; Baldwin, Robert M.; Arbogast, Stephen; Bellman, Don; Paynter, Dave; Wykowski, Jim

    2016-09-06

    Fast pyrolysis is heating on the order of 1000 degrees C/s in the absence of oxygen to 40-600 degrees C, which causes decomposition of the biomass. Liquid product yield from biomass can be as much as 80% of starting dry weight and contains up to 75% of the biomass energy content. Other products are gases, primarily carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane, as well as solid char and ash. Residence time in the reactor is only 0.5-2 s so that relatively small, low-capital-cost reactors can be used. The low capital cost combined with greenhouse gas emission reductions relative to petroleum fuels of 50-95% makes pyrolysis an attractive process. The pyrolysis liquids have been investigated as a refinery feedstock and as stand-alone fuels. Utilization of raw pyrolysis oil has proven challenging. The organic fraction is highly corrosive because of its high organic acid content. High water content lowers the net heating value and can increase corrosivity. It can be poorly soluble in petroleum or petroleum products and can readily absorb water. Distillation residues can be as high as 50%, viscosity can be high, oils can exhibit poor stability in storage, and they can contain suspended solids. The ignition quality of raw pyrolysis oils is poor, with cetane number estimates ranging from 0 to 35, but more likely to be in the lower end of that range. While the use of raw pyrolysis oils in certain specific applications with specialized combustion equipment may be possible, raw oils must be significantly upgraded for use in on-highway spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engines. Upgrading approaches most often involve catalytic hydrodeoxygenation, one of a class of reactions known as hydrotreating or hydroprocessing. This chapter discusses the properties of raw and upgraded pyrolysis oils, as well as the potential for integrating biomass pyrolysis with a petroleum refinery to significantly reduce the hydroprocessing cost.

  6. Identification of components in fast pyrolysis oil and upgraded products by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and flame ionisation detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, J.H.; Wildschut, J.; Mahfud, F.; Heeres, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil and upgraded products are promising energy carriers. Characterisation of the oils is hampered due to the presence of a large number of components (>400) belonging to a broad variety of chemical compound classes (i.e., acids, aldehydes, ketones). In this study, a comparison of the capab

  7. Identification of components in fast pyrolysis oil and upgraded products by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and flame ionisation detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, J.H.; Wildschut, J.; Mahfud, F.; Heeres, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil and upgraded products are promising energy carriers. Characterisation of the oils is hampered due to the presence of a large number of components (>400) belonging to a broad variety of chemical compound classes (i.e., acids, aldehydes, ketones). In this study, a comparison of the

  8. The influence of activating agents on the performance of rice husk-based carbon for sodium lauryl sulfate and chrome (Cr) metal adsorptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneli; Safitri, Z. F.; Pangestika, A. W.; Fauziah, F.; Wahyuningrum, V. N.; Astuti, Y.

    2017-02-01

    This research aims to study the influence of activating agents to produce rice husk based-carbon with high adsorption capacity and efficiency for either hazardous organic molecules or heavy metals which are unfriendly for the environment. Firstly, rice husk was burned by pyrolysis at different temperatures to produce rice husk-based carbon. To improve its ability as an adsorbent, carbon was treated with activating agents, namely, H3PO4 and KOH at room and high temperature (420 °C). The performance of carbon was then tested by contacting it with surfactant (SLS). Finally, the surfactant-modified active carbon was applied for chrome metal removal. The result shows that activation of carbon using phosphate acid (H3PO4) was more effective than potassium hydroxide (KOH) conducted at high temperature to adsorb sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and chrome metal with the adsorption capacity 1.50 mgg-1 and 0.375 mgg-1, respectively.

  9. Pyrolysis Oil Biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Dietrich

    2017-03-14

    In biorefineries several conversion processes for biomasses may be applied to obtain maximum value from the feed materials. One viable option is the liquefaction of lignocellulosic feedstocks or residues by fast pyrolysis. The conversion technology requires rapid heating of the biomass particles along with rapid cooling of the hot vapors and aerosols. The main product, bio-oil, is obtained in yields of up to 75 wt% on a dry feed basis, together with by-product char and gas which are used within the process to provide the process heat requirements; there are no waste streams other than flue gas and ash. Bio-oils from fast pyrolysis have a great potential to be used as renewable fuel and/or a source for chemical feedstocks. Existing technical reactor designs are presented together with actual examples. Bio-oil characterization and various options for bio-oil upgrading are discussed based on the potential end-use. Existing and potential utilization alternatives for bio-oils are presented with respect to their use for heat and power generation as well as chemical and material use.

  10. Total Acid Value Titration of Hydrotreated Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil: Determination of Carboxylic Acids and Phenolics with Multiple End-Point Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, E.; Alleman, T. L.; McCormick, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    Total acid value titration has long been used to estimate corrosive potential of petroleum crude oil and fuel oil products. The method commonly used for this measurement, ASTM D664, utilizes KOH in isopropanol as the titrant with potentiometric end point determination by pH sensing electrode and Ag/AgCl reference electrode with LiCl electrolyte. A natural application of the D664 method is titration of pyrolysis-derived bio-oil, which is a candidate for refinery upgrading to produce drop in fuels. Determining the total acid value of pyrolysis derived bio-oil has proven challenging and not necessarily amenable to the methodology employed for petroleum products due to the different nature of acids present. We presented an acid value titration for bio-oil products in our previous publication which also utilizes potentiometry using tetrabutylammonium hydroxide in place of KOH as the titrant and tetraethylammonium bromide in place of LiCl as the reference electrolyte to improve the detection of these types of acids. This method was shown to detect numerous end points in samples of bio-oil that were not detected by D664. These end points were attributed to carboxylic acids and phenolics based on the results of HPLC and GC-MS studies. Additional work has led to refinement of the method and it has been established that both carboxylic acids and phenolics can be determined accurately. Use of pH buffer calibration to determine half-neutralization potentials of acids in conjunction with the analysis of model compounds has allowed us to conclude that this titration method is suitable for the determination of total acid value of pyrolysis oil and can be used to differentiate and quantify weak acid species. The measurement of phenolics in bio-oil is subject to a relatively high limit of detection, which may limit the utility of titrimetric methodology for characterizing the acidic potential of pyrolysis oil and products.

  11. Determination of the intrinsic reactivities for carbon dioxide gasification of rice husk chars through using random pore model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yaning; Li, Bingxi; Zhao, Yijun; Jiang, Baocheng

    2016-10-01

    Rice husk is abundantly available and environmentally friendly, and char-CO2 gasification is of great importance for the biomass gasification process. The intrinsic reaction rates of carbon dioxide gasification with rice husk chars derived from different pyrolysis temperatures were investigated in this study by conducting thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) measurements. The effects of gasification temperature and reactant partial pressure on the char-CO2 gasification were investigated and the random pore model (RPM) was used to determine the intrinsic kinetic parameters based on the experimental data. The results obtained from this study show that the activation energy, reaction order and pre-exponential factor varied in the ranges of 226.65-232.28kJ/mol, 0.288-0.346 and 2.38×10(5)-2.82×10(5)1/sPa(n) for the rice husk chars pyrolyzed at 700-900°C, respectively. All the determination coefficients between the RPM predictions and experimental results were higher than 0.906, indicating the RPM is reliable for determining and evaluating the intrinsic reactivities of rice husk chars.

  12. Chemical Looping Combustion of Rice Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmeet Singh Monga

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A thermodynamic investigation of direct chemical looping combustion (CLC of rice husk is presented in this paper. Both steam and CO2 are used for gasification within the temperature range of 500–1200˚C and different amounts of oxygen carriers. Chemical equilibrium model was considered for the CLC fuel reactor. The trends in product compositions of the fuel reactor, were determined. Rice husk gasification using 3 moles H2O and 0 moles CO2 per mole carbon (in rice husk at 1 bar pressure and 900˚C was found to be the best operating point for hundred percent carbon conversion in the fuel reactor. Such detailed thermodynamic studies can be useful to design chemical looping combustion processes using different fuels.

  13. Self-heating co-pyrolysis of excessive activated sludge with waste biomass: energy balance and sludge reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong-Sheng; Jiang, Hong

    2013-04-01

    In this work, co-pyrolysis of sludge with sawdust or rice husk was investigated. The results showed that the co-pyrolysis technology could be used to dispose of the excessive activated sludge without external energy input. The results also demonstrated that no obvious synergistic effect occurred except for heat transfer in the co-pyrolysis if the co-feeding biomass and sludge had similar thermogravimetric characteristics. The experimental results combined with calculation showed that adding sawdust accounting for 49.6% of the total feedstock or rice husk accounting for 74.7% could produce bio-oil to keep the energy balance of the co-pyrolysis system and self-heat it. The sludge from solar drying bed can be further reduced by 38.6% and 35.1% by weight when co-pyrolyzed with rice husk and sawdust, respectively. This study indicates that sludge reduction without external heat supply through co-pyrolysis of sludge with waste biomass is practically feasible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Isolation, characterization and investigation of Plantago ovata husk polysaccharide as superdisintegrant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Harshal; Varkhade, Chhaya

    2014-08-01

    Psyllium husk (Plantago ovata, Family: Plantaginaceae) contains a high proportion of hemicellulose, composed of a xylan backbone linked with arabinose, rhamnose, and galacturonic acid units (arabinoxylans). Polysaccharide was isolated from Psyllium husk using solvent precipitation method. The isolated polysaccharide was evaluated for various physicochemical parameters. The rheological behavior of polysaccharide (1% w/v in water) was studied using Brookfield viscometer. Polysaccharide derived from the husk of P. ovata was investigated as superdisintegrant in the fast dissolving tablets. Valsartan, an antihypertensive drug, was selected as a model drug. The tablets of Valsartan were prepared separately using different concentrations (1, 2.5, 5, 7.5% w/w) of isolated Plantago ovata (P. ovata) husk polysaccharide (Natural) and crospovidone as a synthetic superdisintegrant by direct compression method. The prepared tablets were evaluated for various pre-compression and post-compression parameters. The drug excipient interactions were characterized by FTIR studies. The formulation F4 containing7.5% polysaccharide showed rapid wetting time and disintegration time as compared to formulation prepared using synthetic superdisintegrant at the same concentration level. Hence batch F4 was considered as optimized formulation. The stability studies were performed on formulation F4. The disintegration time and in vitro drug release of the optimized formulation was compared with the marketed formulation (Conventional tablets).

  15. Effects of several types of biomass fuels on the yield, nanostructure and reactivity of soot from fast pyrolysis at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn;

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the effect of biomass origin on the yield, nanostructure and reactivity of soot. Soot was produced from wood and herbaceous biomass pyrolysis at high heating rates and at temperatures of 1250 and 1400 °C in a drop tube furnace. The structure of solid residues was characterized...... demonstrated differences in alkali content, particle size and nanostructure. Potassium was incorporated in the soot matrix and significantly influenced soot reactivity. Pinewood soot particles produced at 1250 °C had a broader particle size range (27.2–263 nm) compared to beechwood soot (33.2–102 nm) and wheat...

  16. 不同快速裂解气氛下的烟煤表面微观特性%Investigation into microscopic characteristics of bituminous surface under different fast pyrolysis conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐亮; 齐永锋; 张冬冬; 李正明; 马丽; 常轩; 马强

    2013-01-01

    采用实验工况与电站煤粉锅炉相近的管式炉实验装置,分别制取了N2,(ψ)(N2)=83.4%∶(ψ)(CO2)=16.6%,(ψ)(N2)=81.6%∶(ψ)(CO2)=16.6%∶(ψ)(O2)=1.8%3种气氛下神木烟煤快速裂解的煤焦.结合扫描电子显微镜和烟气分析仪检测发现,与煤粉处于堆积态的慢速热解不同,3种气氛下煤快速热解时破碎的小颗粒较多,随着停留时间的增加,煤焦表面的小孔结构逐渐增多;与N2气氛下相比,加入CO2后煤焦表面变得更致密,再加入O2后,随着停留时间的增加,煤焦表面发生微弱燃烧.%In a drop tube furnace with the combustion conditions similar to those of actual pulverized coal furnace,ShenMu bituminous coal char of fast pyrolysis conditions are prepared under different reaction atmospheres of N2,(ψ)(N2) = 83.4% ∶ (ψ)(CO2) = 16.6%,(ψ)(N2) = 81.6% ∶ (ψ)(CO2) =16.6% ∶ (ψ)(O2)= 1.8%.By means of scanning electron microscopy and flue gas analyzer,the achieved experimental results are quite different from slow pyrolysis of packing pulverized coal.Under fast pyrolysis conditions,more small particles of coal crushing are found.With increasing residence time,the small holes on the surface of char gradually increase.Compared with N2 atmosphere,the surface of the char under (ψ)(N2) = 83.4 % ∶ (ψ)(CO2) = 16.6 % atmosphere becomes more densely.Finally,with increasing residence time,under (ψ)(N2) = 81.6% ∶ (ψ)(CO2) = 16.6% ∶ (ψ)(O2) =1.8% atmosphere,some weak fire is found on the surface of the coal char.

  17. Life cycle assessment of biochar application in Vietnam using two pyrolysis technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Ali; Cowie, Annette; Mai, Thi Lan Anh; Anaya de la Rosa, Ruy; Kristiansen, Paul; Brandão, Miguel; Joseph, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a comparative analysis of the environmental impacts of biochar systems in Vietnam using household scale and district scale pyrolysis technologies. At the household scale, pyrolytic cook-stoves were assumed to be used by households to produce biochar. The pyrolytic cook-stoves burn pyrolysis gases and use the heat for cooking. At the district scale, the BIGchar 2200 unit, a continuous operation system, is utilised to convert rice husk to biochar. This unit allows for easy capture of produced gases, which can be used to generate energy products, adding value to biochar production and decreasing environmental costs through the displacement of fossil fuels. The biochar produced from each system was assumed to be applied to paddy rice fields. Results from Life Cycle Assessment showed that biochar production at the both scales for application to the soil significantly improved environmental performance of 1 Mg of rice husk relative to the reference scenario (open burning of husk) across a range of impacts including climate change (CC), particulate matter and non-renewable energy (NRE) use. Net carbon abatement of biochar systems ranged from 355 to 427 kg CO2-eq Mg-1 of spring rice husk at the household scale and district scale, respectively. The district scale offered greater carbon abatement primarily due to the higher rate of LPG displaced by this unit.

  18. Pyrolysis oil upgrading by high pressure thermal treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miguel Mercader, de F.; Groeneveld, M.J.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Venderbosch, R.H.; Hogendoorn, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    High pressure thermal treatment (HPTT) is a new process developed by BTG and University of Twente with the potential to economically reduce the oxygen and water content of oil obtained by fast pyrolysis (pyrolysis oil), properties that currently complicate its co-processing in standard refineries. D

  19. Pyrolysis oil utilization in 50KWE gas turbine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozarlik, Artur; Bijl, Anton; Alst, van Niek; Bramer, Eddy; Brem, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    The concept of using pyrolysis oil (PO) derived from biomass via a fast pyrolysis route for power and heat generation encounters problems due to an incompatibility between properties (physical and chemical) of bio-oil and gas turbines designed for fossil fuels. An extensive research has been perform

  20. Pyrolysis oil utilization in 50KWE gas turbine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof; Bijl, Antonie; van Alst, Niek; Bramer, Eduard A.; Brem, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    The concept of using pyrolysis oil (PO) derived from biomass via a fast pyrolysis route for power and heat generation encounters problems due to an incompatibility between properties (physical and chemical) of bio-oil and gas turbines designed for fossil fuels. An extensive research has been perform

  1. Pyrolysis oil utilization in 50KWE gas turbine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof; Bijl, Antonie; van Alst, Niek; Bramer, Eduard A.; Brem, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    The concept of using pyrolysis oil (PO) derived from biomass via a fast pyrolysis route for power and heat generation encounters problems due to an incompatibility between properties (physical and chemical) of bio-oil and gas turbines designed for fossil fuels. An extensive research has been

  2. Co-pyrolysis of Chinese lignite and biomass in a vacuum reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Yuan, Chengyong; Xu, Jiao; Zhang, Weijiang

    2014-12-01

    A vacuum fixed bed reactor was applied to pyrolyze lignite, biomass (rice husk) and their blend with high temperature (900 °C) and low heating rate (10 °C/min). Pyrolytic products were kept in the vacuum reactor during the whole pyrolysis process, guaranteeing a long contact time (more than 2 h) for their interactions. Remarkable synergetic effects were observed. Addition of biomass obviously influenced the tar and char yields, gas volume yield, gas composition, char structure and tar composition during co-pyrolysis. It was highly possible that char gasification, gaseous phase interactions, and secondary tar cracking were facilitated when lignite and biomass were co-pyrolyzed.

  3. FAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections with aqu......ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections...... with aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused...... in depth serological and cellular immune analyses will be performed, allowing identification of novel biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. FAST aims at improving the quality of life of food allergic patients by providing a safe and effective treatment that will significantly lower their threshold...

  4. Microwave-assisted pyrolysis of biomass for liquid biofuels production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2012-01-01

    Production of 2nd-generation biofuels from biomass residues and waste feedstock is gaining great concerns worldwide. Pyrolysis, a thermochemical conversion process involving rapid heating of feedstock under oxygen-absent condition to moderate temperature and rapid quenching of intermediate products......, is an attractive way for bio-oil production. Various efforts have been made to improve pyrolysis process towards higher yield and quality of liquid biofuels and better energy efficiency. Microwave-assisted pyrolysis is one of the promising attempts, mainly due to efficient heating of feedstock by ‘‘microwave...... dielectric heating’’ effects. This paper presents a state-of-the-art review of microwave-assisted pyrolysis of biomass. First, conventional fast pyrolysis and microwave dielectric heating is briefly introduced. Then microwave-assisted pyrolysis process is thoroughly discussed stepwise from biomass...

  5. Pyrolysis Recovery of Waste Shipping Oil Using Microwave Heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Adibah Wan Mahari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the use of microwave pyrolysis as a recovery method for waste shipping oil. The influence of different process temperatures on the yield and composition of the pyrolysis products was investigated. The use of microwave heating provided a fast heating rate (40 °C/min to heat the waste oil at 600 °C. The waste oil was pyrolyzed and decomposed to form products dominated by pyrolysis oil (up to 66 wt. % and smaller amounts of pyrolysis gases (24 wt. % and char residue (10 wt. %. The pyrolysis oil contained light C9–C30 hydrocarbons and was detected to have a calorific value of 47–48 MJ/kg which is close to those traditional liquid fuels derived from fossil fuel. The results show that microwave pyrolysis of waste shipping oil generated an oil product that could be used as a potential fuel.

  6. Recycling rice husks for high-capacity lithium battery anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dae Soo; Ryou, Myung-Hyun; Sung, Yong Joo; Park, Seung Bin; Choi, Jang Wook

    2013-07-23

    The rice husk is the outer covering of a rice kernel and protects the inner ingredients from external attack by insects and bacteria. To perform this function while ventilating air and moisture, rice plants have developed unique nanoporous silica layers in their husks through years of natural evolution. Despite the massive amount of annual production near 10(8) tons worldwide, so far rice husks have been recycled only for low-value agricultural items. In an effort to recycle rice husks for high-value applications, we convert the silica to silicon and use it for high-capacity lithium battery anodes. Taking advantage of the interconnected nanoporous structure naturally existing in rice husks, the converted silicon exhibits excellent electrochemical performance as a lithium battery anode, suggesting that rice husks can be a massive resource for use in high-capacity lithium battery negative electrodes.

  7. Production of bio-based phenolic resin and activated carbon from bio-oil and biochar derived from fast pyrolysis of palm kernel shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gyung-Goo; Oh, Seung-Jin; Lee, Soon-Jang; Kim, Joo-Sik

    2015-02-01

    A fraction of palm kernel shells (PKS) was pyrolyzed in a fluidized bed reactor. The experiments were performed in a temperature range of 479-555 °C to produce bio-oil, biochar, and gas. All the bio-oils were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively by GC-FID and GC-MS. The maximum content of phenolic compounds in the bio-oil was 24.8 wt.% at ∼500 °C. The maximum phenol content in the bio-oil, as determined by the external standard method, was 8.1 wt.%. A bio-oil derived from the pyrolysis of PKS was used in the synthesis of phenolic resin, showing that the bio-oil could substitute for fossil phenol up to 25 wt.%. The biochar was activated using CO2 at a final activation temperature of 900 °C with different activation time (1-3 h) to produce activated carbon. Activated carbons produced were microporous, and the maximum surface area of the activated carbons produced was 807 m(2)/g.

  8. Dewatering and low-temperature pyrolysis of oily sludge in the presence of various agricultural biomasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Zhou, Xiehong; Wang, Chuanyi; Jia, Hanzhong

    2017-08-24

    Pyrolysis is potentially an effective treatment of waste oil residues for recovery of petroleum hydrocarbons, and the addition of biomass is expected to improve its dewatering and pyrolysis behavior. In this study, the dewatering and low-temperature co-pyrolysis of oil-containing sludge in the presence of various agricultural biomasses, such as rice husk, walnut shell, sawdust, and apricot shell, were explored. As a result, the water content gradually decreases with the increase of biomass addition within 0-1.0 wt % in original oily sludge. Comparatively, the dewatering efficiency of sludge in the presence of four types of biomasses follows the order of apricot shell > walnut shell > rice husk > sawdust. On the other hand, rice husk and sawdust are relatively more efficient in the recovery of petroleum hydrocarbons compared with walnut shell and apricot shell. The recovery efficiency generally increased with the increase in the biomass content in the range of 0-0.2 wt %, then exhibited a gradually decreasing trend with the increase in the biomass content from 0.2 to 1.0 wt %. The results suggest that optimum amount of biomass plays an important role in the recovery efficiency. In addition, the addition of biomass (such as rice husk) also promotes the formation of CxHy and CO, increasing the calorific value of pyrolysis residue, and controlled the pollution components of the exhaust gas discharged from residue incineration. The present work implies that biomass as addictive holds great potential in the industrial dewatering and pyrolysis of oil-containing sludge.

  9. The influence of rice husk and tobacco waste biochars on soil quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hamzah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal pollution in agricultural land threatens soil and food quality. Soil pollution could be remediate using biochar, but the effectiveness of biochar on soil quality improvement is determined by types of feedstock and pyrolysis temperature. This study was aimed to explore the effect of different types of biochar on soil properties.  Biochar from rice husk and tobacco waste was applied to soil contaminated with lead and mercury. This study was conducted at Sumber Brantas, Malang East Java, and used a completely randomized design with three replicates. Heavy metals content was measured using AAS. The results of measurements were analyzed using analysis of variance at 5% and 1% significance levels. The initial analysis of the soil properties at the research site showed that the soil nutrient status was low, i.e. N (0.2 %, K (0.50 cmol+/kg, and CEC (5.9 me/100g respectively, but soil pH was neutral (6.8. The research site also has crossed the threshold of heavy metal content for Hg (0.5 ppm, Pb (25.22 ppm, Cd (1.96 ppm, and As (0.78 ppm. Biochar added had a positive influence on soil characteristics improvement. It could increase the content of organic C, i.e. 35.12% and 31.81% and CEC (cation exchange capacity, i.e.30.56 me/100g and 28.13 me/100 g for rice husk biochar and tobacco waste biochar, respectively.  However, N, P, and K contents were low i.e. N ( 0.33 and 0.30 %; P2O5 (148.79 and 152 ppm; K (1.58 and 2.11 mg/100g for rice husk biochar and tobacco waste biochar, respectively.

  10. Physical and thermochemical characterization of rice husk char as a potential biomass energy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, S.; Dey, S.; Purakayastha, S.; Ghosh, B. [Jadavpur Univ., Kolkata (India). School of Energy Studies

    2006-11-15

    The fixed bed pyrolysis of rice husk was studied under conventional conditions with the aim of determining the characteristics of the charcoal formed for its applicability as a solid fuel. Thermoanalytic methods were used to determine the kinetic parameters of its combustion. Palletisation using different binders and techniques to improve the time of sustained combustion of the char pallets were investigated. The optimum temperature for carbonization to obtain a char having moderately high heating value was found as 400 {sup o}C. For the active char combustion zone, the order of reaction was nearly 1, the activation energy 73.403 kJ/mol and the pre-exponential factor 4.97 x 10{sup 4} min{sup -1}. Addition of starch as a binder and 10% ferrous sulphate heptahydrate or sodium hypophosphite as an additive enhanced the ignitibility of the char pallets. (author)

  11. Physical and thermochemical characterization of rice husk char as a potential biomass energy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, S; Dey, S; Purakayastha, S; Ghosh, B

    2006-11-01

    The fixed bed pyrolysis of rice husk was studied under conventional conditions with the aim of determining the characteristics of the charcoal formed for its applicability as a solid fuel. Thermoanalytic methods were used to determine the kinetic parameters of its combustion. Palletisation using different binders and techniques to improve the time of sustained combustion of the char pallets were investigated. The optimum temperature for carbonization to obtain a char having moderately high heating value was found as 400 degrees C. For the active char combustion zone, the order of reaction was nearly 1, the activation energy 73.403 kJ/mol and the pre-exponential factor 4.97 x 10(4)min(-1). Addition of starch as a binder and 10% ferrous sulphate heptahydrate or sodium hypophosphite as an additive enhanced the ignitibility of the char pallets.

  12. Bioethanol production from coconut husk fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirelle Márcio Santos Cabral

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Population growth and the increasing search for healthy foods have led to a major consumption of coconut water and, hence, to an environmental impact caused by the inappropriate disposal of green coconut husks. This lignocellulosic biomass has deserved attention of researchers concerning the seeking of new usages, as, for example, in renewable fuels production technologies. This study examines the potential of green coconut husk fibers as a feedstock for the production of bioethanol. The coconut fibers were pretreated through an alkaline method, hydrolyzed enzymatically and submitted to ethanol fermentation with commercial yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Despite the significant loss of cellulose (4.42% in relation to the fiber and 17.9% concerning the original cellulose content, the alkaline pretreatment promoted an efficient solubilization of lignin (80%, turning the coconut fibers into a feasible raw material for 2G ethanol production studies. Enzymatic hydrolysis converted 87% of the sugars and the ethanolic fermentation consumed 81% of the substrate in the hydrolyzate, leading to a sugar to ethanol convertion efficiency of 59.6%. These results points out that green coconut husks are a promising alternative to the production of renewable energy.

  13. Bioethanol produced from Moringa oleifera seeds husk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, E. N.; Kemat, S. Z.

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents the potential of bioethanol production from Moringa oleifera seeds husk which contains lignocellulosic through Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF) process by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This paper investigates the parameters which produce optimum bioethanol yield. The husk was hydrolyzed using NaOH and fermented using Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast. Batch fermentation was performed with different yeast dosage of 1, 3, and 5 g/L, pH value was 4.5, 5.0 and 5.5, and fermentation time of 3, 6, 9 and 12 hours. The temperature of fermentation process in incubator shaker is kept constant at 32ºC. The samples are then filtered using a 0.20 μm nylon filter syringe. The yield of bioethanol produced was analysed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that the highest yield of 29.69 g/L was obtained at 3 hours of fermentation time at pH of 4.5 and using 1g/L yeast. This research work showed that Moringa oleifera seeds husk can be considered to produce bioethanol.

  14. Pyrolysis temperature affects phosphorus transformation in biochar: Chemical fractionation and (31)P NMR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Zhang, You; Shao, Hongbo; Sun, Junna

    2016-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) recycling or reuse by pyrolyzing crop residue has recently elicited increased research interest. However, the effects of feedstock and pyrolysis conditions on P species have not been fully understood. Such knowledge is important in identifying the agronomic and environmental uses of biochar. Residues of three main Chinese agricultural crops and the biochars (produced at 300°C-600°C) derived from these crops were used to determine P transformations during pyrolysis. Hedley sequential fractionation and (31)P NMR analyses were used in the investigation. Our results showed that P transformation in biochar was significantly affected by pyrolysis temperature regardless of feedstock (Wheat straw, maize straw and peanut husk). Pyrolysis treatment transformed water soluble P into a labile (NaHCO3-Pi) or semi-labile pool (NaOH-Pi) and into a stable pool (Dil. HCl P and residual-P). At the same time, organic P was transformed into inorganic P fractions which was identified by the rapid decomposition of organic P detected with solution (31)P NMR. The P transformation during pyrolysis process suggested more stable P was formed at a higher pyrolysis temperature. This result was also evidenced by the presence of less soluble or stable P species, such as such as poly-P, crandallite (CaAl3(OH)5(PO4)2) and Wavellite (Al3(OH)3(PO4)2·5H2O), as detected by solid-state (31)P NMR in biochars formed at a higher pyrolysis temperature. Furthermore, a significant proportion of less soluble pyrophosphate was identified by solution (2%-35%) and solid-state (8%-53%) (31)P NMR, which was also responsible for the stable P forms at higher pyrolysis temperature although their solubility or stability requires further investigation. Results suggested that a relatively lower pyrolysis temperature retains P availability regardless of feedstock during pyrolysis process. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. CHEMICAL AND THERMAL STABILITY OF RICE HUSKS AGAINST ALKALI TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bwire S. Ndazi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemical and thermal stability of rice husks against alkali treatment with 2 to 8% w/v NaOH are presented and discussed in this paper. The thermal stability of the rice husks was examined by using a thermal gravimetric analysis instrument. Chemical stability was evaluated by examining the organic components of rice husks using proximate analysis. The results indicated that the proportion of lignin and hemicellulose in rice husks treated with NaOH ranging from 4 to 8% decreased significantly by 96% and 74%, respectively. The thermal stability and final degradation temperatures of the alkali-treated rice husks were also lowered by 24-26°C due to degradation of hemicellulose and lignin during alkali treatment. Absence of the onset degradation zones in the alkali-treated rice husks was a further indication that hemicellulose and other volatile substances degraded during alkali treatment. This leads to a conclusion that alkali treatment of rice husks with more than 4% NaOH causes a substantial chemical degradation of rice husks, which subsequently decreases their thermal stability.

  16. Cost-benefit analysis of replacing maize with rice husk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cost-benefit analysis of replacing maize with rice husk supplemented with grindazyme, nutrsea ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Rice husk was added at the expense of maize in the control diet and each experimental ...

  17. CH4 release character from pressurized fast pyrolysis of lignite in CO atmosphere%CO气氛下褐煤加压快速热解过程中CH4的逸出规律

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高松平; 王建飞; 赵建涛; 王志青; 房倚天; 黄戒介

    2014-01-01

    在管式反应器上进行了霍林河褐煤加压快速热解实验,研究了CO气氛下CH4逸出规律。在加压快速热解条件下,由于CO解离态吸附的O( a)吸附在煤上,提供了活性中心,电负性强的O( a)诱发其周围其他原子的电子云向O( a)偏移,减弱了原来化学键的强度,导致芳香环的开裂,侧链、醚键和脂肪链的断裂提供更多的自由基,稳定煤热解生成的碎片,促进了CH4的生成和逸出。因此,CO气氛下CH4产率较N2气氛下的高,在900℃、1.0 MPa时,50%CO气氛下的CH4产率较N2气氛下的提高了12.5%,并且CH4产率随着温度升高、压力的增大而增大。%Fast pyrolysis of Huolinhe lignite was carried out under pressure in a tubular reactor, and the CH4 evolution at CO atmosphere was examined. CO dissociation state O( a) adsorbed on coal is an active center. The stronger electronegative O could induce the electron cloud of other atoms around O ( a ) atom to offset to it, which could weaken the strength of original chemical bonds and promote their breaking. These result in the cracks of the aromatic ring, side chain, ether linkages and aliphatic chain in the char, which could produce more free radicals. The free radicals could stabilize the fragments produced in the pyrolysis, and lead to more CH4 generated and involved. Therefore, the CH4 yield is higher under CO than it in N2 . The CH4 yield increases by 12. 5% under CO compared with N2 at 900℃ and 1. 0 MPa. The CH4 yield increases with raise of temperature and pressure.

  18. Studies on Thermal Degradation Behavior of Siliceous Agriculture Waste (Rice Husk, Wheat Husk and Bagasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Syed H.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Various siliceous agriculture waste (SAW such as rice husk, wheat husk and bagasse have been investigated to study their thermal degradation behavior using Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA technique. The focus of this research is to conduct TGA of raw and acid treated (20% HCl & 1M H2SO4 SAW at heating rate 10°C/min in the atmosphere of nitrogen. The results were analyzed on the basis of thermograms and it was inferred that 24 hours soaking with 20% HCl prior to thermal degradation enhanced the percent weight loss. The process also improved the percentage of residual weight of SAW indicating the extraction of amorphous silica with increased purity. The effect of acid treatment was verified by determining chemical composition of SAW samples before and after soaking with 20% HCl. Proximate analysis, thermal degradation temperature ranges and percentage of residual weight at 800°C for each of rice husk, wheat husk and bagasse were also quantified to observe the thermal degradation behavior. XRF analysis was performed to observe the effect of acid treatment for extraction of pure silica.

  19. Incorporation of hazelnut shell and husk in MDF production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cöpür, Yalçin; Güler, Cengiz; Taşçioğlu, Cihat; Tozluoğlu, Ayhan

    2008-10-01

    Hazelnut shell and husk (Coryllus arellana L.) is an abundant agricultural residue in Turkey and investigating the possibilities of utilizing husk and shell in panel production might help to overcome the raw material shortage that the panel industry is facing. The aim of this work was to investigate the possibilities of utilizing hazelnut shell and husk in medium density fiberboard (MDF) production. To produce general purpose fiberboards, fiber-husk and fiber-shell mixtures at various percentages were examined in this study. The results indicated that panels could be produced utilizing hazelnut husk up to 20% addition without falling below the properties required in the standards. Shell addition was restricted up to 10%, because higher addition levels diminished the elastic modulus and internal bond strength below the acceptable level.

  20. Mechanical properties of rice husk flour reinforced epoxy biocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Bisht

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A bio-composite reinforced with rice husk flour in epoxy resin has been developed. The effect of fibre treatment and weight percentage of rice husk on the mechanical properties was studied and compared with wood dust reinforced epoxy composite. It was observed that addition of rice husk as filler is detrimental to almost all the mechanical properties. About 51% and 26.8% decrease in ultimate strength and Young’s Modulus for 40 wt% untreated rice husk reinforcement was observed. The corresponding decrease in flexural strength and flexural modulus was 51%. Similar trend was also observed in hardness and impact strength. However the mechanical properties of rice husk reinforced biocomposites are found to be superior than wood dust reinforced epoxy composite. SEM microscopy was also done to corroborate the results.

  1. Study on pyrolysis characteristics of lignocellulosic biomass impregnated with ammonia source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Zhu, Changpeng; Zhang, Liqiang; Zhu, Xifeng

    2016-06-01

    The current study presents the pyrolysis characteristics of rice husk impregnated with different kinds of ammonia source (ammonium acetate, urea, ammonium sulfate and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate) in a fixed bed reactor. The introduction of ammonia source in pyrolysis process achieved the conversation from carbonyl compounds to nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds. The liquid product of urea-impregnated biomass has higher content of nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds (8.35%) and phenols (30.4%). For ammonium sulfate and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate-impregnated biomass, the quantity of compounds in liquid products reduces remarkably, and the gas products are rich in CO and H2. All the solid products of pyrolysis have great potential application in biochar-based fertilizer and activated carbon for their high N content.

  2. Intermediate pyrolysis of agro-industrial biomasses in bench-scale pyrolyser: Product yields and its characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinwala, Farha; Mohanty, Pravakar; Parmar, Snehal; Patel, Anant; Pant, Kamal K

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis of woody biomass, agro-residues and seed was carried out at 500 ± 10 °C in a fixed bed pyrolyser. Bio-oil yield was found varying from 20.5% to 47.5%, whereas the biochar and pyrolysis gas ranged from 27.5% to 40% and 24.5% to 40.5%, respectively. Pyrolysis gas was measured for flame temperature along with CO, CO2, H2, CH4 and other gases composition. HHV of biochar (29.4 MJ/kg) and pyrolitic gas (8.6 MJ/kg) of woody biomass was higher analogous to sub-bituminous coal and steam gasification based producer gas respectively, whereas HHV of bio-oil obtained from seed (25.6 MJ/kg) was significantly more than husks, shells and straws. TGA-DTG studies showed the husks as potential source for the pyrolysis. Bio-oils as a major by-product of intermediate pyrolysis have several applications like substitute of furnace oil, extraction of fine chemicals, whereas biochar as a soil amendment for enhancing soil fertility and gases for thermal application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. EKSTRAKSI SELULOSA DARI POD HUSK KAKAO MENGGUNAKAN SODIUM HIDROKSIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gatot Siswo Hutomo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available EKSTRAKSI SELULOSA DARI POD HUSK KAKAO MENGGUNAKAN SODIUMHIDROKSIDA Cellulose Extraction from Cacao Pod Husk Using Sodium Hydroxide Gatot Siswo Hutomo, Djagal Wiseso Marseno, Sri Anggrahini, Supriyanto ABSTRAK Pod husk kakao banyak mengandung komponen kimia seperti pektin, lignin, hemiselulosa dan selulosa serta beberapakomponen yang lain yaitu caffein dan theobromine. Khusus selulosa dapat dilakukan modiÞ kasi sebagai turunanselulosa yang mempunyai banyak fungsi serta dapat diaplikasikan untuk pangan. Penelitian ekstraksi selulosa dari podhusk kakao telah dilakukan. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk memperoleh konsentrasi sodium hidroksida sebagaibahan untuk ekstraksi selulosa dari pod husk kakao. Selulosa pada pod husk kakao terikat sangat kuat dengan lignin,sodium hidroksida akan memutus dengan baik ikatan antara selulosa dengan lignin. Bleaching pada selulosa jugadilakukan dengan menggunakan sodium hipoklorida 3% dan sodium bisulÞ t 3% untuk meningkatkan lightness. SpektraFT-IR dan X-ray juga dilakukan untuk pendeteksian pada selulosa hasil ekstraksi. Hasil ekstraksi selulosa dari pod huskkakao menggunakan sodiumhidroksida 12% menghasilkan rendemen sekitar 26,09% (db dengan kristalinitas 27,14%,kadar abu 6,56% (db, WHC 5,87 g/g dan OHC 2,74 g/g. Dapat disimpulkan bahwa sodium hidroksida 12% adalahkonsentrasi yang paling baik untuk mengekstraksi selulosa dari pod husk kakao.Kata kunci: Selulosa, pod husk, kakao, ekstraksi ABSTRACT Cacao pod husk contains some compounds like pectin, lignin, hemicelluloses and cellulose, and other compounds suchas caffeine and theobromine. Especially for cellulose should be modiÞ ed as derivates which it have multi functionsin food application. Extraction cellulose from pod husk cacao was investigated. The aim of the research was to Þ ndthe concentration of sodium hydroxide for cellulose extraction from pod husk cacao. Bleaching for cellulose werecarried out twice using sodium hypochlorite 3% (oxydator and

  4. Characterization and Stabilisation of Biochars Obtained from Empty Fruit Bunch, Wood, and Rice Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdan Jol

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural production in Malaysia has been continually growing. Most of the agricultural waste has been discarded or burnt on land; however, these agricultural wastes can serve as a feedstock for biochar production, which contributes an insignificant net amount of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere after soil incorporation. Three kinds of primary biochar were used in this study: empty fruit bunch biochar (EFB, wood biochar (WB, and rice husk biochar (RHB. EFB and WB were produced by slow pyrolysis, whereas RHB was produced by gasification. This study aimed to understand how pyrolysis technologies of native feedstocks impact the chemical characteristics and short-term soil stability of biochar. The kinetic parameters of C-mineralization suggested a tri-phasic C-mineralization process (labile, unstable, and recalcitrant carbon. The estimates indicated the existence of a very labile C-fraction in RHB with a very small decay constant K3. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction showed the three phases of the biochar, from the microcrystalline C of the labile fraction to the largely amorphous intermediate C of the unstable fraction, and lastly the formation of turbostratic crystallite C in the recalcitrant fraction. It has been concluded that RHB had a higher degree of aromaticity and greater stability, and therefore should be more recalcitrant to biological and chemical degradation.

  5. Pyrolysis and Gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Bilitewski, B.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis and gasification include processes that thermally convert carbonaceous materials into products such as gas, char, coke, ash, and tar. Overall, pyrolysis generates products like gas, tar, and char, while gasification converts the carboncontaining materials (e.g. the outputs from pyrolysis......) into a mainly gaseous output. The specific output composition and relative amounts of the outputs greatly depend on the input fuel and the overall process configuration. Although pyrolysis processes in many cases also occur in gasification (however prior to the gasification processes), the overall technology...... may often be described as gasification only. Pyrolysis, however, can also be employed without proceeding with gasification. Gasification is by no means a novel process; in the 19th century so-called ‘town gas’ was produced by the gasification of coal and for example used for illumination purposes...

  6. 生物质快速热裂解主要参数对产物产率及其分布的影响%Effects of biomass fast pyrolysis key parameters on yields and distributions of products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘荣厚; 牛卫生; 于晓芳; 李天舒; 张春梅; 李金洋

    2003-01-01

    Sawdust fast pyrolysis experiments were conducted in a fluidized bed reactor at a biomass feed rate of 0.80~2.00 kg*h-1. The effects of process conditions, like fluidized bed reactor temperature, feed size and vapor residence time on the product yields were studied. When reactor temperatures were varied from 450℃ to 600℃, a maximum bio-oil yield of 53.33%wt was achieved at 500℃ with a char and gaseous yields of 8.97 %wt and 37.70%wt respectively. The particle size of sawdust varied in the range of 0~0.90 mm. The yield of bio-oil was maximum (58.23%wt of biomass feed) for the particle size of 0.45~0.60 mm with a char yield of 8.23%wt. Vapor residence times were ranged from 0.80 to 1.50 s at temperature of 500℃ with a particle size less than 0.20 mm. A maximum bio-oil yield of 62.60%wt was achieved at 500℃ when the vapor residence time was held constant at 0.80 s. However, at the longer residence time(1.50 s), bio-oil yield was slightly lower. Bio-oil is a miscible mixture of polar organics with water. The results showed the potential of sawdust fast pyrolysis for liquid hydrocarbon fuels production.%在生物质喂入率为0.8~2.0 kg*h-1的流化床上以木屑为原料进行了快速热裂解试验,系统研究了木屑热裂解过程中的流化床反应器温度、生物质粒径和气相滞留期三个主要参数对热裂解产物产率的影响.结果表明,当反应器温度在450~600℃之间变化时,在500℃条件下,生物油产率最高,其值为53.33%,而木炭及不可冷凝气体产率分别为8.97%和37.70%.当温度为500℃,木屑粒径在0.90 mm以下时,粒径在0.45~0.60 mm范围内的生物油产率最大,达到58.23%,这时木炭产率为8.23%.对粒径小于0.20 mm的木屑在温度500℃,气相滞留期0.80, 1.20, 1.50 s三个量级上的热裂解表明,气相滞留期为0.80 s时,生物油产率达到最大值为62.60%.但是,当气相滞留期较长时(1.50 s),生物油产率稍有下降.生物油是极性有机物

  7. Mesoporous Silica from Rice Husk Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.R. Shelke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silica is used as a raw material in several areas: in preparation of catalysts, in inks, as a concrete hardening accelerator, as a component of detergents and soaps, as a refractory constituent etc. Sodium silicate is produced by reacting rice hull ash (RHA with aqueous NaOH and silica is precipitated from the sodium silicate by acidification. In the present work, conversion of about 90% of silica contained in RHA into sodium silicate was achieved in an open system at temperatures of about 100 °C. The results showed that silica obtained from RHA is mesoporous, has a large surface area and small particle size. Rice Husk is usually mixed with coal and this mixture is used for firing boilers. The RHA therefore, usually contains carbon particles. Activated carbon embedded on silica has been prepared using the carbon already present in RHA. This carbon shows good adsorption capacity. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 25th April 2010, Revised: 17th June 2010, Accepted: 24th June 2010[How to Cite: V.R. Shelke, S.S. Bhagade, S.A. Mandavgane. (2010. Mesoporous Silica from Rice Husk Ash. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 5 (2: 63-67. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.2.793.63-67][DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.2.793.63-67

  8. Effect of hydrothermal pretreatment on properties of bio-oil produced from fast pyrolysis of eucalyptus wood in a fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sheng; Zhao, Zengli; Zheng, Anqing; Li, Xiaoming; Wang, Xiaobo; Huang, Zhen; He, Fang; Li, Haibin

    2013-06-01

    Eucalyptus wood powder was first subjected to hydrothermal pretreatment in a high-pressure reactor at 160-190°C, and subsequently fast pyrolyzed in a fluidized bed reactor at 500°C to obtain high quality bio-oil. This study focused on investigating effect of hydrothermal pretreatment on bio-oil properties. Hemicellulose and some metals were effectively removed from eucalyptus wood, while cellulose content was enhanced. No significant charring and carbonization of constituents was observed during hydrothermal pretreatment. Thus pretreated eucalyptus wood gave higher bio-oil yield than original eucalyptus wood. Chemical composition of bio-oil was examined by GC/MS and (13)C NMR analyses. Bio-oil produced from pretreated eucalyptus wood exhibited lower contents of ketones and acids, while much higher levoglucosan content than bio-oil produced from original eucalyptus wood, which would help to improve thermal stability of bio-oil and extract levoglucosan from bio-oil. Hydrothermal pretreatment also improved bio-oil fuel quality through lowering water content and enhancing heating value.

  9. 农作物秸秆快速热解生物油主要成分分析%Analysis of Main Components in Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil from Crop Straws

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡文静; 郑冰漪; 何亮; 李瑞

    2012-01-01

    The platform of self-developed vacuum fast pyrolysis system was used for fast pryrolysis reaction of corn straw, rice straws and cotton straws. GC-MS was used to analyze the products of three different kinds of feedstock. The results show that the content of phenol in cotton stalk, corn straw and straw stem are 24.34 %, 21.21% and 17.22 %, and the content of acid are 14.78 % , 13.95 % and 16.69 % , respectively. The hio-oils from different kinds of straw have certain differences in compounds and contents, but main components are base on phenols, aldehydes, ketones and organic acids etc. The content is similar, and especially the differences between corn straw and cotton stalk are the smallest. Therefore, the different types of materials which have similar components can be mixed in practical product.%采用自行研发的真空快速热解反应平台对棉秆、玉米秸秆和稻草秆进行了快速热解,并用气质联用(GC-MS)分析法分别对3种秸秆快速热解液相产物的化学组分进行了测定。实验结果表明:棉秆、玉米秸秆和稻草秆3种热解油中酚类GC含量分别为24.34%、21.21%和17.22%,酸类GC含量分别为14.78%、13.95%和16.69%;不同种类秸秆其热解液化产物在组分及含量上存在一定差别,但其成分均以苯酚类、醛类、酮类、有机酸类等化合物为主,且含量差异不大,其中玉米秸秆和棉秆各类化合物含量差异相对较小,因此,生产中可以将成分类似却不同种类的原料混合热解。

  10. Pyrolysis of Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rađenović, A.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a review of relevant literature on coal pyrolysis.Pyrolysis, as a process technology, has received considerable attention from many researchers because it is an important intermediate stage in coal conversion.Reactions parameters as the temperature, pressure, coal particle size, heating rate, soak time, type of reactor, etc. determine the total carbon conversion and the transport of volatiles and therebythe product distribution. Part of the possible environmental pollutants could be removed by optimising the pyrolysis conditions. Therefore, this process will be subsequently interesting for coal utilization in the future

  11. Pyrolysis and Gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Bilitewski, B.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis and gasification include processes that thermally convert carbonaceous materials into products such as gas, char, coke, ash, and tar. Overall, pyrolysis generates products like gas, tar, and char, while gasification converts the carboncontaining materials (e.g. the outputs from pyrolysis....... Today gasification is used within a range of applications, the most important of which are conversion of coal into syngas for use as chemical feedstock or energy production; but also gasification of biomass and waste is gaining significant interest as emerging technologies for sustainable energy. From...

  12. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bio-crudes from induction-heating pyrolysis of biomass wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Mi, Hsiao-Hsuan; Chang, Yuan-Ming; Yang, Shyh-Yu; Chang, Jeng-Hung

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare the bio-crudes from agricultural wastes (i.e., rice straw, rice husk, sugarcane bagasse and coconut shell) by using induction-heating pyrolysis at specified conditions. The quantitative analysis of 21 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bio-crudes examined using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) revealed that the PAHs in bio-crudes were primarily dominant in the low molecular weight (LMW) PAHs, including naphthalene (1.10-2.45 mg/L) and acenaphthene (0.72-7.61 mg/L). However, by considering carcinogenic potency, the bio-crudes from rice husk and sugarcane bagasse contained higher contents of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) (0.52 and 0.92 mg/L, respectively) as compared to those from rice straw and coconut shell.

  13. Process for production of high density/high performance binderless boards from whole coconut husk: Part 2: Coconut husk morphology, composition and properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.E.G.; Oever, van den M.J.A.; Keijsers, E.R.P.; Putten, van der J.C.; Anayron, C.; Josol, F.; Peralta, A.

    2006-01-01

    For production of compression moulded boards from whole coconut husk the auto-adhesive properties are derived from the intrinsic high lignin content. Since the properties of manufactured boards for a large part will depend on the input husk material these properties are studied here. Husks of differ

  14. influence of addition of rice husk ash on porcelain composition

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Porcelain powder was grounded separately in a ball mill. The powder was sieved using ... The mixed powder .... combustion at 7000C produces a very good reactive material. The .... rice husk-berk ash on mechanical properties of of concrete.

  15. Concrete with Highly Active Rice Husk Ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Qing-ge; LIN Qing-yu; YU Qi-jun; ZHAO San-ying; YANG Lu-feng; Shuichi Sugita

    2004-01-01

    The overall aim was to investigate the effect of highly active rice husk ash (RHA) produced by an industrial furnace on some properties of concrete. The strength, pore volume and pore distribution of concrete and the Ca(OH)2 content in concrete were investigated by JIS A 1108 (Method of test for compressive strength of concrete), a mercury instrument porosimeter, and the thermogravimetric analysis, respectively. The results show that,with RHA replacement of cement,the compressive strength of concrete is increased evidently;the average pore radius of concrete is greatly decreased, especially the portion of the pores greater than 20nm in radius is decreased while the amount of smaller pores is increased, and the more the RHA replacement, the less the amount of Ca(OH)2 in concrete. The latter two results are the main reasons for the strength enhancement of concrete.

  16. SUNFLOWER HUSKS AS A SOURCE OF FUNCTIONAL FEED ADDITIVES

    OpenAIRE

    Khusid S. B.; Gneush A. N.; Nesterenko E. E.

    2015-01-01

    The article describes the results of the complex feed additive based on sunflower husk, enriched with beer wort with the addition of pumpkin pulp. We have studied the chemical composition of sunflower husk, which is the secondary resource of the processing plant raw material, selected methods of enrichment of this raw material with the help of fungi Trichoderma harzianum. Cellulolytic enzyme preparations on the basis of fungi of the genus Trichoderma for use in agriculture and animal feed pro...

  17. Coconut husk-fueled pilot plant put to test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    A pilot electric-power plant, running on coconut husks, was successfully demonstrated in Laguna, Philippines. This 30-kW biomass-fed plant provides electricity for 50 remote households and a wood-carving shop using a motor. The system involves: burning coconut husks to obtain producer gas; filtering this gas and driving a generator with the power of the combusted gas. The village is saving 65 to 75% of their diesel fuel consumption with this system.

  18. Extraction of Silica and other related products from Rice Husk

    OpenAIRE

    Abhishek Mehta,; Dr. R. P Ugwekar

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the present work is the synthesis of silica from rice husk and to study its characterization studies. The alkaline method succeeded by acid precipitation is done for the extraction of silica. The optimization of the concentration of sodium hydroxide and the amount of rice husk ash that goes with it for attaining the maximum yield of silica is done. X-ray Diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry studies are executed for acquiring its characteris...

  19. Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Reactors: A Review of a Few Scientific Challenges and of Related Recommended Research Topics Réacteur de pyrolyse rapide de la biomasse : une revue de quelques verrous scientifiques et d’actions de recherches recommandées

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lédé J.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of biomass as an alternative energy resource requires its prior processing. Many options are possible. The present paper focuses on thermochemical routes and more specifically on fast pyrolysis carried out for the preparation of so called bio-oils. The optimization and scaling up of fast pyrolysis processes for improving bio oils yields and properties come up against several difficulties. The aim of the paper is to show that some of them are related to the lack of several basic scientific knowledges, more specifically at the level of the high temperature fast pyrolysis reactor. The analysis of these challenges (biomass sample thermal decomposition, biomass-reactor interactions, secondary reactions suggests the development of several research topics. L’utilisation de la biomasse en tant que ressource énergétique de substitution nécessite sa transformation préalable. De nombreuses options sont possibles. Cet article s’intéresse aux voies thermochimiques et plus spécifiquement à la pyrolyse rapide mise en oeuvre pour la préparation d’huiles de pyrolyse. L’optimisation et l’extrapolation des procédés de pyrolyse rapide pour améliorer les rendements et propriétés des huiles de pyrolyse se heurtent à plusieurs difficultés. Le but de cet article est de montrer que certaines sont liées au manque de certaines connaissances scientifiques de base, plus précisément au niveau du réacteur haute température. L’analyse de ces verrous (décomposition thermique d’un grain de biomasse, interactions biomasse-réacteur, réactions secondaires suggère le développement de plusieurs axes de recherche.

  20. Formate-assisted pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSisto, William Joseph; Wheeler, Marshall Clayton; van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2015-03-17

    The present invention provides, among other thing, methods for creating significantly deoxygenated bio-oils form biomass including the steps of providing a feedstock, associating the feedstock with an alkali formate to form a treated feedstock, dewatering the treated feedstock, heating the dewatered treated feedstock to form a vapor product, and condensing the vapor product to form a pyrolysis oil, wherein the pyrolysis oil contains less than 30% oxygen by weight.

  1. Formate-assisted pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSisto, William Joseph; Wheeler, Marshall Clayton; van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2015-03-17

    The present invention provides, among other thing, methods for creating significantly deoxygenated bio-oils form biomass including the steps of providing a feedstock, associating the feedstock with an alkali formate to form a treated feedstock, dewatering the treated feedstock, heating the dewatered treated feedstock to form a vapor product, and condensing the vapor product to form a pyrolysis oil, wherein the pyrolysis oil contains less than 30% oxygen by weight.

  2. Value addition of corn husks through enzymatic production of xylooligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashis Kumar Samanta

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Corn husks are the major wastes of corn industries with meagre economic significance. The present study was planned for value addition of corn husk through extraction of xylan, followed by its enzymatic hydrolysis into xylooligosaccharides, a pentose based prebiotic. Compositional analysis of corn husks revealed neutral detergent fibre 68.87%, acid detergent fibre 31.48%, hemicelluloses 37.39%, cellulose 29.07% and crude protein 2.68%. Irrespective of the extraction conditions, sodium hydroxide was found to be more effective in maximizing the yield of xylan from corn husks than potassium hydroxide (84% vs. 66%. Application of xylanase over the xylan of corn husks resulted into production of xylooligosaccharides with different degree of polymerization namely, xylobiose and xylotriose in addition to xylose monomer. On the basis of response surface model analysis, the maximum yield of xylobiose (1.9 mg/ml was achieved with the enzymatic hydrolysis conditions of pH 5.8, temperature 44°C, enzyme dose 5.7U/ml and hydrolysis time of 17.5h. Therefore, the corn husks could be used as raw material for xylan extraction vis a vis its translation into prebiotic xylooligosaccharides.

  3. Biotechnological potential of coffee pulp and coffee husk for bioprocesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey; Soccol; Nigam; Brand; Mohan; Roussos

    2000-10-01

    Advances in industrial biotechnology offer potential opportunities for economic utilization of agro-industrial residues such as coffee pulp and coffee husk. Coffee pulp or husk is a fibrous mucilagenous material (sub-product) obtained during the processing of coffee cherries by wet or dry process, respectively. Coffee pulp/husk contains some amount of caffeine and tannins, which makes it toxic in nature, resulting the disposal problem. However, it is rich in organic nature, which makes it an ideal substrate for microbial processes for the production of value-added products. Several solutions and alternative uses of the coffee pulp and husk have been attempted. These include as fertilizers, livestock feed, compost, etc. However, these applications utilize only a fraction of available quantity and are not technically very efficient. Attempts have been made to detoxify it for improved application as feed, and to produce several products such as enzymes, organic acids, flavour and aroma compounds, and mushrooms, etc. from coffee pulp/husk. Solid state fermentation has been mostly employed for bioconversion processes. Factorial design experiments offer useful information for the process optimization. This paper reviews the developments on processes and products developed for the value-addition of coffee pulp/husk through the biotechnological means.

  4. Avaliação de biocombustível derivado do bio-óleo obtido por pirólise rápida de biomassa lignocelulósica como aditivo para gasolina Evaluation of biofuel derived from lignocellulosic biomass fast pyrolysis bio-oil for use as gasoline addictive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Luisa Barbosa Guedes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A biofuel was prepared from acid aqueous fraction (pH = 2 of bio-oil produced by fast pyrolysis (Bioware Technology of lignocellulosic biomass (sugar cane residue and tested in blends (2, 5, 10 e 20% v/v with gasoline type C (common marketed in Brazil. The specification tests made in the Refinery President Getúlio Vargas (PETROBRAS showed increasing in the octane number (MON and antiknock index (AKI with reduction in the residue generation during the combustion. The physicochemical characteristics of the biofuel were similar that combustible alcohol allowing its use as gasoline additive.

  5. Perspective on Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass Pyrolysis Oils: Essential Roles of Fe-based Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Yongchun; Hensley, Alyssa; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Wang, Yong

    2016-06-27

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis is the most promising approach for biofuel production, due to its simple process and versatility to handle lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks with varying and complex compositions. Compared with in situ catalytic fast pyrolysis, ex situ catalytic pyrolysis has the flexibility of optimizing the pyrolysis step and catalytic process individually to improve the quality of pyrolysis oil (stability, oxygen content, acid number, etc.) and to maximize the carbon efficiency in the conversion of biomass to pyrolysis oil. Hydrodeoxygenation is one of the key catalytic functions in ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recently, Fe-based catalysts have been reported to exhibit superior catalytic properties in hydrodeoxygenation of model compounds in pyrolysis oil, which potentially makes the ex situ pyrolysis of biomass commercially viable due to the abundance and low cost of Fe. Here, we briefly summarize the recent progress on Fe-based catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation of biomass, and provide perspectives on how to further improve Fe-based catalysts (activity and stability) for their potential applications in the emerging area of biomass conversion.

  6. Hydrotreatment of wood-based pyrolysis oil using zirconia-supported mono- and bimetallic (Pt, Pd, Rh) catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardiyanti, A. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Honkela, M. L.; Krause, A. O. I.; Heeres, H. J.

    2011-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis oil (PO), the liquid product of fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, requires upgrading to extent its application range and for instance to allow for co-feeding in an existing oil-refinery. Catalytic hydrotreatment reactions (350 degrees C, 20 MPa total pressure, and 4h reaction

  7. Preparation of Renewable Fuel from Saponificated China Tallow Oil by Fast Pyrolysis Reaction Assisted with Microwave%乌桕油皂微波催化快速裂解制备可再生燃油研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王允圃; 程方园; 刘玉环; 阮榕生; 刘英语; 马雯; 杨倩; 黄伊宁

    2015-01-01

    Preparation of renewable fuel was studied with saponificated China tallow seed oil and stillingia oil as raw materials using microwave pyrolysis. The effects of reaction power and temperature on the yield of pyrolysis products were investigated. The optimum conditions were obtained as pyrolysis power 700 W, pyrolysis temperature 450 ℃. The corresponding liquid yields were 75. 26% and 77. 01% for microwave pyrolysis oil from saponificated China tallow seed oil and stillingia oil, respectively. The GC-MS analysis indicated that the main components of the product were C8-C18 alkanes, alkenes, ring-containing alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbon. Pyrolysis oil properties were also determined. The results indicated that the pyrolysis oil from saponificated China tallow seed oil had higher heat value, lower density and viscosity with the comparation of pyrolysis oil from saponificated China tallow stillingia oil, which was similar to 0# diesel. Freezing point and cold filter plugging point of the pyrolytic products have good low temperature fluidity, which are better than those of the biodiesel.%采用微波催化快速裂解技术,以乌桕木油皂和乌桕梓油皂为原料,利用其强极性羧基端吸收微波迅速的特点,研究了其制备可再生燃油的技术。考察了裂解功率、裂解温度对裂解产物得率的影响。结果表明:裂解功率700 W,裂解温度450℃,乌桕木油皂和乌桕梓油皂微波裂解液体燃料的得率分别为75.26%和77.01%, GC-MS分析表明,产物的主要成分为C8~C18的正构烷烃、烯烃、环烷烃以及芳香烃等烃类化合物。产物的部分燃料油性能测定结果表明,乌桕木油皂裂解燃油比乌桕梓油皂裂解燃油热值略高,密度和运动黏度略低,基本符合0#柴油的标准,冷凝点和冷滤点均优于生物柴油,低温流动性好。

  8. Effects of various reactive gas atmospheres on the properties of bio-oil using microwave pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass produces organic liquids (bio-oil), bio-char, water, and non-condensable gases. The non-condensable gas component typically contains syngas (H2, CO and CO2) as well as small hydrocarbons (CH4, C2H6, and C3H8). Tail Gas Reactive Pyrolysis (TGRP), a patent p...

  9. Hydrogen-rich gas production via CaO sorption-enhanced steam gasification of rice husk: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Sayyed Mohsen; Ghassemi, Hojat; Shahsavan-Markadeh, Rasoul; Fremaux, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Gasification is a thermochemical process in which solid or liquid fuels are transformed into synthesis gas through partial oxidation. In this paper, a kinetic model of rice husk gasification has been developed, which is interesting for the applications of the syngas produced. It is a zero-dimensional, steady-state model based on global reaction kinetic, empirical correlation of pyrolysis and is capable of predicting hydrogen yield in the presence of sorbent CaO. The model can also be used as a useful tool to investigate the influence of process parameters including steam/biomass ratio, CaO/fuel ratio (CaO/Fuel), and gasification temperature on hydrogen efficiency, CO2 capture ratio (CCR), and average carbonation conversion (Save). Similar to hydrogen formation, CCR also increases with increasing CaO/Fuel, but an opposite trend is exhibited in Save. Model predictions were compared with available data from the literature, which showed fairly good agreement.

  10. Effect of pyrolysis conditions and composition on the char structure and char yield of biomass chars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Steibel, Markus; Spliethoff, Hartmut

    electron microscopy indicated different types of softening and melting of the biomass chars at all applied temperatures, heating rates and holding times, except for rice husks, which formed chars with a structure similar to the parent fuel. The char particles generated at high pyrolysis temperatures had...... many small pores and showed complete melting, while the biomasses like wheat straw and beech wood showed larger pores and not complete melting with the remaining carbon skeleton of different forms. FTIR analysis was conducted to estimate the remaining organic composition of the char consisting mainly...

  11. Treatment of Lignin and Waste residues by Flash Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Arendt; Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    Lignin, sewage sludge and macroalg ae (nonconventional biomasses) fast pyrolysis properties has been studied through experimental investigations on a la boratory Pyrolysis Centrifugal Reactor (PCR) and a model on lignin pyrolysis have been developed. Fu rthermore the nonconventional biomass...... ethanol plant a bio-oil can be produced with oil yields of 36% (daf) and an oil en ergy recovery of 45%. This is a relatively low bio-oil yield compared to other feedstock’s, however, it may increase the value of the lignin residual product, such that the lignin char is used for combustion on the ethanol...... plant, and the bio-oil is sold for use on heavy oil burners. The macroalgae is a promising feedstock w ith a high bio-oil yield of 54 wt% daf and an energy recovery of 76 % in the liquid oil. Detailed characteriza tion of the pyrolysis products in the form of bio-oil, gas and char has been performed...

  12. USABILITY OF RICE HUSKS lN'TIlE'PRODUCTION/OF ROOFING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    husk To carry out the study, the researcher used risk husk, cement, waste paper and ... treatment. The samples produced were tested for water absorption, water ... I conventional building materials, efforts have been directed towards the local ...

  13. The application of water-soluble ruthenium catalysts for the hydrogenation of the dichloromethane soluble fraction of fast pyrolysis oil and related model compounds in a two phase aqueous-organic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahfud, F.H.; Bussemaker, S.; Kooi, B.J.; ten Brink, Gert; Heeres, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    The hydrogenation of a dichloromethane soluble fraction of flash pyrolysis oil (bio-oil, BO), obtained by treatment of BO with a water–dichloromethane solvent mixture, was investigated using a water-soluble homogeneous ruthenium catalyst (RuCl3·3H2O/tris(m-sulfonatophenyl)phosphine, TPPTS). The

  14. Pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis of coal and oil shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiumin Zhang; Demin He; Jun Guan [Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China). Institute of Coal Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis of coal and oil shale was investigated by using Yilan oil shale, Longkou oil shale, Huolinhe lignite, Taiji gas coal and Ruqigou anthracite as raw materia1s. A fixed-bed pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis of these coal and oil shale were investigated. The results indicated that synergetic effect existed with the oil yield increased, water yield decreased, and the synergetic effect varied with the mass percentage of coal differed. The co-pyrolysis oil yield of Yilan oil shale and Ruqigou anthracite is a little higher than the linear sum of their oil yield in the pyrolysis process. But for the co-pyrolysis of Taiji gas coal and Yilan oil shale, no significant change of the oil yield was found. Huolinhe lignite and Longkou oil shale were chosen as the material for the solid heat carrier experiment. Synergetic effect analyses of both the fixed-bed pyrolysis and the retorting process with solid heat carrier were given. Huolinhe lignite is an ideal material for oil recovery by pyrolysis, with high volatile and low ash, its oil content is 8.55%. Longkou oil shale is an ideal material for oil recovery by pyrolysis, with high oil content of 14.38%. The optimum co-pyrolysis temperature for Huolinhe lignite and Longkou oil shale is 510{sup o}C. Synergetic effect was found with the oil increased 9% and water decreased 36%. 5 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Pyrolysis based bio-refinery for the production of bioethanol from demineralized ligno-cellulosic biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luque, L.; Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; van Rossum, G.; Oudenhoven, Stijn; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Berruti, F.; Rehmann, L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates a novel biorefinery approach for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass from pinewood. A combination of thermochemical and biochemical conversion was chosen with the main product being ethanol. Fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomasss with fractional condensation of the

  16. Pyrolysis of Pine Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2005-01-01

    In this study, pinewood has been pyrolyzed using a fixed heating rate with a variable end-temperature. The pyrolysis process has been simulated using a mechanism with three parallel reactions for the formation of char, gas and tar. First order irreversible kinetics is assumed. This kind of model...

  17. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: PYROLYSIS TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrolysis is formally defined as chemical decomposition induced in organic materials by heat in the absence of oxygen. In practice, it is not possible to achieve a completely oxygen-free atmosphere; actual pyrolytic systems are operated with less than stoichiometric quantities of...

  18. Rice Husk Ash Sandcrete Block as Low Cost Building Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P.Sangeetha,

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a widely used construction material for various types of structures due to its structural stability and strength. The construction industry is today consuming more than 400 million tonnes of concrete every year .Most of the increase in cement demand will be met by the use of supplementary cementing materials, as each ton of Portland cement clinker production is associated with similar amount of CO2 emission, which is a major source of global warming. Partial replacement of ordinary Portland cement with mineral admixtures like fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, metakaolin, Rice husk Ash (RHA,etc with plasticizers eliminates these drawbacks. The use of rice husk modifies the physical qualities of fresh cement paste as well as microstructure of paste after hardening. By burning the rice husk under a uncontrolled temperature in the atmosphere, a highly reactive RHA was obtained and the ash was utilized as a supplementary cementing material. This paper presents the effects of using Rice Husk Ash (RHA as a partial cement replacement material in mortar mixes. This work is based on an experimental study of mortar made with replacement of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC with 10%, 20% 30% & 40% RHA. The properties investigated were the compressive strength, setting time, consistency, workability and specific gravity. Finally, a cost analysis was also done to compare the efficiency of rice husk ash sandcrete blocks. From the test results it can be concluded that rice husk ash can be utilized in day today life of manufacturing building blocks which are more economical and more eco-friendly than the cement concrete blocks which are produced now-a-days.

  19. 生物质快速热解制车用燃料过程的能值分析%Emergy analysis of biomass fast pyrolysis for production of vehicle fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘长奇; 黄亚继; 刘培刚; 王昕晔; 邵志伟

    2014-01-01

    基于能值分析理论和考虑环境投入,从可持续发展的角度对玉米秸秆热解加氢制精制油过程的2个方案进行综合评价,获得生产效率、环境影响、可持续性方面的能值指标.方案1中的氢气来自初级生物油水相重整,方案2中氢气来自外部市场购买.结果表明:2个方案能值转换率分别为5.00×105 sej/J和1.37×105 sej/J,从能值转换率的角度分析,与方案1、玉米燃料乙醇及生物柴油相比,方案2生产等量燃料消耗的太阳能最少,更有优势;2个方案的能值产出率均为1.07,生产效率较低;环境负载率分别是1.02和1.05,对环境影响较小;可持续发展系数分别是1.05和1.02,可持续性属于中等水平.%Considering the environmental inputs,two schemes of corn stover fast pyrolysis and hy-drogenation are evaluated by means of emergy accounting methodology from the viewpoint of sus-tainable development.The first scenario employs bio-oil reforming to generate requisite hydrogen for bio-oil upgrading,and the second scenario uses merchant hydrogen for bio-oil upgrading.The emer-gy indices of two schemes are respectively as follows:the transformities of the first scenario and the second scenario are 5.00 ×105 and 1.37 ×105 sej/J,respectively;the environment load ratio are 1 .02 and 1 .05;the emergy sustainable indices are 1 .05 and 1 .02;the emergy yield ratios are 1 .07 and 1 .07 .The second scheme has more advantages than the first scheme,corn-based fuel ethanol and biodiesel from the emergy analysis for its lower solar energy to produce the equal amount of fu-el.Both scenarios have little impact on the environment,their production efficiency are low and the sustainability of the production process belongs to the medium level.

  20. Steam reforming of fast pyrolysis-derived aqueous phase oxygenates over Co, Ni, and Rh metals supported on MgAl2O4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Rong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Inst. for Integrated Catalysis; Dagle, Vanessa Lebarbier [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Inst. for Integrated Catalysis; Flake, Matthew [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Inst. for Integrated Catalysis; Kovarik, Libor [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Albrecht, Karl O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Inst. for Integrated Catalysis; Deshmane, Chinmay [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Inst. for Integrated Catalysis; Dagle, Robert A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Inst. for Integrated Catalysis

    2016-07-01

    In this study we examine feasibility for steam reforming the mixed oxygenate aqueous fraction derived from mildly hydrotreated fast pyrolysis bio-oils. Catalysts selective towards hydrogen formation and resistant to carbon formation utilizing feeds with relatively low steam-to-carbon (S/C) ratios are desired. Rh (5 wt%), Pt (5 wt%), Ru (5 wt%), Ir (5 wt%), Ni (15 wt%), and Co (15 wt%) metals supported on MgAl2O4 were evaluated for catalytic performance at 500°C and 1 atm using a complex feed mixture comprising of acids, polyols, cycloalkanes, and phenolic compounds. The Rh catalyst was found to be the most active and resistant to carbon formation. The Ni and Co catalysts were found to be more active than the other noble metal catalysts investigated (Pt, Ru, and Ir). However, Ni was found to form significantly more carbon (coke) on the catalyst surface. Furthermore, Co was found to be the most selective towards H2 formation. Evaluating the effect of temperature on stability for the Rh catalyst we found that catalyst stability was best when operated at 500°C as compared to the higher temperatures investigated (700, 800°C). When operating at 700°C significantly more graphitic formation was observed on the spent catalyst surface. Operating at 800°C resulted in reactor plugging as a result of thermal decomposition of the reactants. Thus, a concept analogous to the petroleum industries’ use of a pre-reformer, operated at approximately 500°C for steam reforming of the heavier naphtha components, followed by a high temperature methane reforming operated in the 600-850°C temperature range, could be applied in the case of steam reforming biomass derived oxygenates. Moreover, stability evaluations were performed over the Rh, Ni, and Co catalysts at 500°C and 1 atm, under similar initial conversions, reveal the Co catalyst to be the most stable and selective towards H2 production. Conversion and selectivity to CH4

  1. 精制生物油和柴油混合燃料的柴油机性能%Performance of diesel engine running on diesel fuel and its blends with refined biomass fast pyrolysis bio-oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麻剑; 谢阳; 罗麒元; 许沧粟

    2015-01-01

    Experimental tests were conducted to evaluate the engine performance and emission of a diesel engine with diesel fuel and simulated bio‐oil blends . The simulated bio‐oil was prepared based on the refined biomass fast pyrolysis bio‐oil with pure substances (analytically grade ) , and the fuel blends containing 10% and 20% by volume of simulated bio‐oil were named as B10 and B20 .Results indicate that the engine power for the B10 and B20 are about 3% and 7% lower than for the pure diesel fuel .The average drop of brake specific energy consumption for the B10 and B20 is about 7% at full‐load . The measured products of the imperfect combustion of fuel ,such as CO and HC ,were reduced notably for the B10 and B20 compared with the diesel fuel at medium and high loads ,which the NMHC emission decrease was about 75% at full‐load . Under full load conditions , the smoke emission characteristics of B10 and B20 were different with diesel fuel ,and the average reduction of smoke opacity was about 10% for B20 relative to B10 .%在柴油机上通过试验研究精制生物质热裂解油和柴油混合燃料的动力性、经济性和排放性等性能,其中试验用精制生物质热裂解油是根据其主要成分的比例由分析纯的单质配制的模型油。结果表明,在不改变柴油机参数的情况下,模型油代用部分柴油导致发动机外特性输出功率略有下降,模型油体积掺混比10%与20%的混合燃料(分别简称为B10和B20)降幅分别约为3%与7%;经济性略有改善,B10和B20的当量油耗率在外特性工况中相对纯柴油的平均降幅约为7%;在中高负荷工况中,混合燃料的不完全燃烧产物如CO、HC等排放下降明显,其中外特性下NM HC排放只有纯柴油的25%左右;外特性下B20的排气不透光度相对B10下降约10%。

  2. Preparation and characterization of rice husk/ferrite composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A novel ferrite composite using rice husk as substrate has been prepared via high temperature treatment under nitrogen atmosphere.The rice husk substrate consists of porous activated carbon and silica,where spinel ferrite particles with average diameter of 59 nm are distributed.The surface area of the composite is greater than 170 m~2 g~(-1) and the bulk density is less than 0.6 g cm~(-3).Inert atmosphere is indispensable for the synthesis of pure ferrite composites,while different preparation temperatur...

  3. Microbially-enhanced composting of wet olive husks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, M C; Cardelli, R; Bedini, S; Colombini, A; Incrocci, L; Castagna, A; Agnolucci, M; Cristani, C; Ranieri, A; Saviozzi, A; Nuti, M

    2012-01-01

    The production of a compost from olive wet husks is described. The process is enhanced through the use of starters prepared with virgin husks enriched with selected microbial cultures. This approach, with respect to composting without the use of starters, allows to achieve faster start of the process (10 vs. 45 days), deeper humification (humification rate 19.2 vs. 12.2), shorter maturation time (2 vs. 4-5 months) and better detoxification of the starting material. Furthermore, the compost produced can effectively substitute for turf as a cultivation substrate in horticulture at greenhouse level, with beneficial effects on nutraceutical traits of tomato fruits.

  4. Extraction of Silica and other related products from Rice Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Mehta,

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present work is the synthesis of silica from rice husk and to study its characterization studies. The alkaline method succeeded by acid precipitation is done for the extraction of silica. The optimization of the concentration of sodium hydroxide and the amount of rice husk ash that goes with it for attaining the maximum yield of silica is done. X-ray Diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry studies are executed for acquiring its characteristic. Activated carbon and silica gel are the intermediate products formed during the synthesis process of silica.

  5. Solid waste utilization: pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boegly, W.J. Jr.; Mixon, W.R.; Dean, C.; Lizdas, D.J.

    1977-08-01

    As a part of the Integrated Community Energy System (ICES) Program, a number of technology evaluations are being prepared on various current and emerging sources of energy. This evaluation considers the use of pyrolysis as a method of producing energy from municipal solid waste. The energy can be in the form of a gas, oil, chars, or steam. Pyrolysis, the decomposition of organic matter in the absence of oxygen (or in an oxygen-deficient atmosphere), has been used to convert organic matter to other products or fuels. This process is also described as ''destructive distillation''. Four processes are described in detail: the ''Landgard'' System (Monsanto Environ-Chem Systems, Inc.); the Occidental Research Corporation Process (formerly the Garrett Research and Development Company; The ''Purox'' System (Union Carbide Corporation); and the ''Refu-Cycler'' (Hamilton Standard Corporation). ''Purox'' and ''Refu-Cycler'' produce a low-Btu gas; the Occidental process produces an oil, and the ''Landgard'' process produces steam using on-site auxiliary boilers to burn the fuel gases produced by the pyrolysis unit. Also included is a listing of other pyrolysis processes currently under development for which detailed information was not available. The evaluation provides information on the various process flowsheets, energy and material balances, product characteristics, and economics. Pyrolysis of municipal solid waste as an energy source can be considered a potential for the future; however little operational or economic information is available at this time.

  6. Study of silica templates in the rice husk and the carbon-silica nanocomposites produced from rice husk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larichev, Yu. V.; Yeletsky, P. M.; Yakovlev, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon-silica nanocomposites obtained by rice husk carbonization in a fluidized-bed reactor using a deep oxidation copper-chromium catalyst were studied. Dispersion characteristics of the silica phase in these systems were determined by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) using the full contrast technique. SiO2 was found in the initial rice husk as compact nanoparticles having a wide size distribution. This distribution consists of a narrow fraction with particle sizes from 1 to 7 nm and a wider fraction with particle sizes from 8 to 22 nm. Oxidative heat treatment of rice husk in a fluidized bed in the presence of the catalyst decreased the fraction of small SiO2 particles and increased the fraction of large ones. It was demonstrated that the particle size of silica in the carbon matrix can be determined selectively for deliberate design of porous carbon materials with desired properties.

  7. Variability in pyrolysis product yield from novel shrub willow genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast pyrolysis is becoming a more attractive conversion option for the production of biofuels, due to the potential for directly producing hydrocarbon fuels seamlessly compatible with petroleum products (drop-in fuels). Dedicated bioenergy crops, like perennial grasses and short-rotation woody crop...

  8. Heterogeneous and homogeneous reactions of pyrolysis vapors from pine wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, E.; Westerhof, R.J.M.; Brilman, D.W.F.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Hogendoorn, J.A.; Windt, M.

    2012-01-01

    To maximize oil yields in the fast pyrolysis of biomass it is generally accepted that vapors need to be rapidly quenched. The influence of the heterogeneous and homogeneous vapor-phase reactions on yields and oil composition were studied using a fluidized-bed reactor. Even high concentrations of min

  9. Catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapours using Faujasite zeolite catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.S.; Zabeti, M.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Brem, Gerrit; Seshan, Kulathuiyer

    2012-01-01

    Bio-oil produced via fast pyrolysis of biomass has the potential to be processed in a FCC (fluid catalytic cracking) unit to generate liquid fuel. However, this oil requires a significant upgrade to become an acceptable feedstock for refinery plants due to its high oxygen content. One promising

  10. Catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapours using Faujasite zeolite catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.S.; Zabeti, M.; Lefferts, L.; Brem, G.; Seshan, K.

    2012-01-01

    Bio-oil produced via fast pyrolysis of biomass has the potential to be processed in a FCC (fluid catalytic cracking) unit to generate liquid fuel. However, this oil requires a significant upgrade to become an acceptable feedstock for refinery plants due to its high oxygen content. One promising rout

  11. Properties of silica from rice husk and rice husk ash and their utilization for zeolite y synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Jan-Jezreel F. Saceda; Leon,Rizalinda L. de; Kamolwan Rintramee; Sanchai Prayoonpokarach; Jatuporn Wittayakun

    2011-01-01

    This study compared properties of silica (SiO2) from rice husk (RH) and rice husk ash (RHA) extracted by acid- and heat-treatment. The SiO2 from RH was in amorphous phase with nearly 100% purity while that from RHA was in crystalline phase with 97.56% purity. Both extracted SiO2 were used in the synthesis of zeolite NaY but that from RH was better due to the efficiency in product recovery and simplicity of extraction. After the NaY was exchanged to NH4Y and calcined to convert to HY, the prod...

  12. Kinetic study of solid waste pyrolysis using distributed activation energy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavanam, Anjireddy; Sastry, R C

    2015-02-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics of municipal solid waste, agricultural residues such as ground nut shell, cotton husk and their blends are investigated using non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with in a temperature range of 30-900 °C at different heating rates of 10 °C, 30 °C and 50 °C/min in inert atmosphere. From the thermograms obtained from TGA, it is observed that the maximum rate of degradation occurred in the second stage of the pyrolysis process for all the solid wastes. The distributed activation energy model (DAEM) is used to study the pyrolysis kinetics of the solid wastes. The kinetic parameters E (activation energy), k0 (frequency factor) are calculated from this model. It is found that the range of activation energies for agricultural residues are lower than the municipal solid waste. The activation energies for the municipal solid waste pyrolysis process drastically decreased with addition of agricultural residues. The proposed DAEM is successfully validated with TGA experimental data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Binderless board and moulded products produced from whole coconut husks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.E.G.; Snijder, M.H.B.

    2002-01-01

    A simple and efficient technology has been developed to produce high strength - high density board materials from whole coconut husks, without the addition of chemical binders. The board material has been shown to exhibit excellent properties, which are comparable with or even superior to commercial

  14. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cocoa pod husks. [Trichoderma reesei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.K.; Oldham, J.H.; Martin, A.M

    1984-07-01

    Laboratory results are presented of the bioconversion of cellulose from cocoa pod husks, utilizing cellulase from three mutants of Trichoderma reesei. Total reducing sugars in filtered hydrolysates were estimated by the dinitrosalicylic acid method. The sugars present were identified by paper chromatography as glucose and xylose.

  15. Removal of arsenic from drinking water using rice husk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Zunaira; Chen, Zhi

    2017-06-01

    Rice husk adsorption column method has proved to be a promising solution for arsenic (As) removal over the other conventional methods. The present work investigates the potential of raw rice husk as an adsorbent for the removal of arsenic [As(V)] from drinking water. Effects of various operating parameters such as diameter of column, bed height, flow rate, initial arsenic feed concentration and particle size were investigated using continuous fixed bed column to check the removal efficiency of arsenic. This method shows maximum removal of As, i.e., 90.7 % under the following conditions: rice husk amount 42.5 g; 7 mL/min flow rate in 5 cm diameter column at the bed height of 28 cm for 15 ppb inlet feed concentration. Removal efficiency was increased from 83.4 to 90.7 % by reducing the particle size from 1.18 mm to 710 µm for 15 ppb concentration. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were employed to discuss the adsorption behavior. The effect of different operating parameters on the column adsorption was determined using breakthrough curves. In the present study, three kinetic models Adam-Bohart, Thomas and Yoon-Nelson were applied to find out the saturated concentration, fixed bed adsorption capacity and time required for 50 % adsorbate breakthrough, respectively. At the end, solidification was done for disposal of rice husk.

  16. Pyrolysis process and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Kuei

    1983-01-01

    This invention discloses a process and apparatus for pyrolyzing particulate coal by heating with a particulate solid heating media in a transport reactor. The invention tends to dampen fluctuations in the flow of heating media upstream of the pyrolysis zone, and by so doing forms a substantially continuous and substantially uniform annular column of heating media flowing downwardly along the inside diameter of the reactor. The invention is particularly useful for bituminous or agglomerative type coals.

  17. Synthesis optimization of oil palm empty fruit bunch and rice husk biochars for removal of imazapic and imazapyr herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, Saba; Malakahmad, Amirhossein; Sapari, Nasiman B; Yavari, Sara

    2017-02-18

    Imidazolinones are a family of herbicides that are used to control a broad range of weeds. Their high persistence and leaching potential make them probable risk to the ecosystems. In this study, biochar, the biomass-derived solid material, was produced from oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) and rice husk (RH) through pyrolysis process. Feedstock and pyrolysis variables can control biochar sorption capacity. Therefore, the present study attempts to evaluate effects of three pyrolysis variables (temperature, heating rate and retention time) on abilities of biochars for removal of imazapic and imazapyr herbicides from soil. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for optimizing the variables to achieve maximum sorption performance of the biochars. Experimental data were interpreted accurately by quadratic models. Based on the results, sorption capacities of both biochars raised when temperature decreased to 300 °C, mainly because of increased biochars effective functionality in sorption of polar molecules. Heating rate of 3°C/min provided optimum conditions to maximize the sorption capacities of both biochars. Retention time of about 1 h and 3 h were found to be the best for EFB and RH biochars, respectively. EFB biochar was more efficient in removal of the herbicides, especially imazapyr due to its chemical composition and higher polarity index (0.42) rather than RH biochar (0.39). Besides, higher cation exchange capacity (CEC) values of EFB biochar (83.90 cmolc/kg) in comparison with RH biochar (70.73 cmolc/kg) represented its higher surface polarity effective in sorption of the polar herbicides.

  18. Study of Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Dilute Acid Pretreated Coconut Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Agustriyanto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Coconut husk is classified as complex lignocellulosic material that contains cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and some other extractive compounds. Cellulose from coconut husk can be used as fermentation substrate after enzymatic hydrolysis. In contrary, lignin content from the coconut husk will act as an inhibitor in this hydrolysis process. Therefore, a pretreatment process is needed to enhance the hydrolysis of cellulose. The objective of this research is to investigate the production of the glucose through dilute acid pretreatment and to obtain its optimum operating conditions. In this study, the pretreatment was done using dilute sulfuric acid in an autoclave reactor. The pretreatment condition were varied at 80°C, 100°C, 120°C and 0.9%, 1.2%, 1.5% for temperature and acid concentration respectively. The acid pretreated coconut husk was then hydrolyzed using commercial cellulase (celluclast and β-glucosidase (Novozyme 188. The hydrolysis time was 72 hours and the operating conditions were varied at several temperature and pH. From the experimental results it can be concluded that the delignification temperature variation has greater influence than the acid concentration. The optimum operating condition was obtained at pH 4 and 50°C which was pretreated at 100°C using 1.5% acid concentration. Copyright © 2012 by BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved. (Selected Paper from International Conference on Chemical and Material Engineering (ICCME 2012Received: 28th September 2012, Revised: 2nd October 2012, Accepted: 4th October 2012[How to Cite: R. Agustriyanto, A. Fatmawati, Y. Liasari. (2012. Study of Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Dilute Acid Pretreated Coconut Husk. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7(2: 137-141. doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.2.4046.137-141] [How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.2.4046.137-141 ] | View in 

  19. 用废弃生物质快速生产生物燃油新工艺及转锥式裂解装置设计%Study on Fast Producting Bio-fuel-oil New Technology and Designon ZKR500 Rotating Cone Reactor for Flash Pyrolysis/Liquefaction of Biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王述洋; 谭文英; 陈爱军

    2000-01-01

    研究探讨了一种能够将废弃生物质快速液化转换成生物质液化燃油的新技术方法,并研究设计出适用于该工艺的关键设备"ZKR-500型转锥式废弃生物质快速裂解液化反应器"·%A new process for fast producing bio-fuel-oil by solid biomass and design of the key equipment of the process ZKR500 Rotating Cone Reactor for Flash Pyrolysis Liquefaction of Biomass were studied in the paper.

  20. Aqueous extractive upgrading of bio-oils created by tail-gas reactive pyrolysis to produce pure hydrocarbons and phenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tail-gas reactive pyrolysis (TGRP) of biomass produces bio-oil that is lower in oxygen (~15 wt% total) and significantly more hydrocarbon-rich than traditional bio-oils or even catalytic fast pyrolysis. TGRP bio-oils lend themselves toward mild and inexpensive upgrading procedures. We isolated oxyge...

  1. Pyrolysis of microalgal biomass in carbon dioxide environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong-Heon; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Jeon, Young Jae; Kwon, Eilhann E

    2015-10-01

    This work mechanistically investigated the influence of CO2 in the thermo-chemical process of microalgal biomass (Chlorella vulgaris and Microcystis aeruginosa) to achieve a fast virtuous cycle of carbon via recovering energy. This work experimentally justified that the influence of CO2 in pyrolysis of microalgal biomass could be initiated at temperatures higher than 530 °C, which directly led to the enhanced generation of syngas. For example, the concentration of CO from pyrolysis of M. aeruginosa increased up to ∼ 3000% at 670 °C in the presence of CO2. The identified universal influence of CO2 could be summarized by the expedited thermal cracking of VOCs evolved from microalgal biomass and by the unknown reaction between VOCs and CO2. This identified effectiveness of CO2 was different from the Boudouard reaction, which was independently occurred with dehydrogenation. Thus, microalgal biomass could be a candidate for the thermo-chemical process (pyrolysis and gasification).

  2. Mechanism of Xylan Pyrolysis by Py-GC/MS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu-rong; LIANG Tao; RU Bin; GUO Xiu-juan

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate the decomposition behavior of hemicellulose,xylan was chosen as the representative of hemicellulose to study the fast pyrolysis on the combination system of analytical pyrolyzer and gas chromatograph coupled with mass spectrometer(Py-GC/MS).The main condensable products of xylan pyrolysis consisted of acids,aldehydes,and ketones; while gas products contained CO2,CO,CH4 and H2.Acetic acid and furfural were the most abundant products with the highest contents of 20.11% and 20.24% respectively.While furfural and acetic acid were formed competitively with residence time and temperature increases,the distribution of xylan pyrolysis products did not vary with the residence time and temperature,while the total content of several kinds of products changed a lot.According to the analysis of experimental data,a reaction pathway of xylan decomposition was deduced so as to illustrate the formation mechanism of main products.

  3. Microwave Heating Applied to Pyrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Yolanda; Arenillas, Ana; Menendez, J. Angel

    2011-01-01

    the MW pyrolysis as an original thermochemical process of materials is presented. This chapter comprises a general overview of the thermochemical and quantifying aspects of the pyrolysis process, including current application togethe with a compilation of the most frequently used materials

  4. Pyrolysis oil as diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gros, S. [Wartsila Diesel International Ltd., Vaasa (Finland). Diesel Technology

    1996-12-31

    Wood waste pyrolysis oil is an attractive fuel alternative for diesel engine operation. The main benefit is the sustainability of the fuel. No fossil reserves are consumed. The fact that wood waste pyrolysis oil does not contribute to CO{sub 2} emissions is of utmost importance. This means that power plants utilising pyrolysis oil do not cause additional global warming. Equally important is the reduced sulphur emissions that this fuel alternative implies. The sulphur content of pyrolysis oil is extremely low. The high water content and low heating value are also expected to result in very low NO{sub x} emissions. Utilisation of wood waste pyrolysis oil in diesel engines, however, involves a lot of challenges and problems to be solved. The low heating value requires a new injection system with high capacity. The corrosive characteristics of the fluid also underline the need for new injection equipment materials. Wood waste pyrolysis oil contains solid particles which can clog filters and cause abrasive wear. Wood waste pyrolysis oil has proven to have extremely bad ignition properties. The development of a reliable injection system which is able to cope with such a fuel involves a lot of optimisation tests, redesign and innovative solutions. Successful single-cylinder tests have already been performed and they have verified that diesel operation on wood pyrolysis oil is technically possible. (orig.)

  5. Time resolved pyrolysis of char

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    pyrolysis, and slow heating in direct combination with mass spectrometry, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and flame ionization detection, respectively. Characteristic ions derived from the flash pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry data enable the release of volatiles to be time and, hence...

  6. Co-pyrolysis of lignite and sugar beet pulp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilgin, M.; Deveci Duranay, N.; Pehlivan, D. [Firat University, Chemical Engineering Department, 23279 Elazig (Turkey)

    2010-05-15

    Today, worldwide studies have been undertaken on the biomass usage and co-conversion of biomass and coal to seek out alternative fuels for supplying energy in an environmental friendly way. The objective of this work is to study co-pyrolysis of lignite and sugar beet pulp in 50/50 (wt./wt.) ratio of blend pellets, to elucidate their thermal behaviour under pyrolysis conditions and to assess major decomposition products in terms of their yields. A special chamber, which has enabled very fast heating rates, was used in the pyrolysis experiments carried at 600 C. The results were interpreted in the light of liquid, solid and gaseous yields, resulting from thermal decomposition, and kinetics of thermogravimetric analysis. Proximate volatile matter and ash contents of the blends were different compared to those found by using individual values. Sugar beet pulp decomposed faster within a relatively narrow temperature range than lignite and underwent a significant shrinkage during pyrolysis. It was found that the chars left behind after the flash pyrolysis of these pellets at 600 C have substantial amounts of volatile matter that would evolve upon further heating. (author)

  7. Beneficial synergetic effect on gas production during co-pyrolysis of sewage sludge and biomass in a vacuum reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijiang; Yuan, Chengyong; Xu, Jiao; Yang, Xiao

    2015-05-01

    A vacuum fixed bed reactor was used to pyrolyze sewage sludge, biomass (rice husk) and their blend under high temperature (900°C). Pyrolytic products were kept in the vacuum reactor during the whole pyrolysis process, guaranteeing a long contact time (more than 2h) for their interactions. Remarkable synergetic effect on gas production was observed. Gas yield of blend fuel was evidently higher than that of both parent fuels. The syngas (CO and H2) content and gas lower heating value (LHV) were obviously improved as well. It was highly possible that sewage sludge provided more CO2 and H2O during co-pyrolysis, promoting intense CO2-char and H2O-char gasification, which benefited the increase of gas yield and lower heating value. The beneficial synergetic effect, as a result, made this method a feasible one for gas production.

  8. Coffee husk waste for fermentation production of mosquitocidal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poopathi, Subbiah; Abidha, S

    2011-12-01

    Coffee husk waste (CHW) discarded as bio-organic waste, from coffee industries, is rich in carbohydrates. The current study emphasizes the management of solid waste from agro-industrial residues for the production of biopesticides (Bacillus sphaericus, and B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis), to control disease transmitting mosquito vectors. An experimental culture medium was prepared by extracting the filtrates from coffee husk. A conventional culture medium (NYSM) also was prepared. The studies revealed that the quantity of mosquitocidal toxins produced from CHW is at par with NYSM. The bacteria produced in these media, were bioassayed against mosquito vectors (Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles stephensi, and Aedes aegypti) and it was found that the toxic effect was statistically comparable. Cost-effective analysis have revealed that, production of biopesticides from CHW is highly economical. Therefore, the utilization of CHW provides dual benefits of effective utilization of environmental waste and efficient production of mosquitocidal toxins.

  9. Energy Efficient Dryer with Rice Husk Fuel for Agriculture Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Djaeni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Energy usage is crucial aspect on agriculture drying process. This step spends about 70% of total energy in post harvest treatment. The design of efficient dryer with renewable energy source is urgently required due to the limitation of fossil fuel energy. This work discusses the performance of air dehumidification using rice husk fuel as heat source for onion, and paddy drying. Unlike conventional dryer, the humidity of air during the drying was dehumidified by adsorbent. Hence, the driving force of drying can be  kept high.  As consequences, the drying time and energy usage can be reduced. Here, the research was conducted in two step: laboratory and pilot scale tests. Results showed that the lowering air humidity with rice husk fuel has improved the energy efficiency. At operational temperature 60oC, the heat efficiency of 75%  was achieved. 

  10. EFFECT OF RICE HUSKS AS FILLER IN POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hardinnawirda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, rice husk-filled polyester composites were produced with rice husks (RH as the filler and unsaturated polyester resin (UPR as the matrix. Several percentages of filler loadings were used (10, 15, 20 and 25 wt % in order to gain insights into the effect of filler content on the mechanical properties and water intake of the composites. The tensile strength of the RH-filled UPR composites was found to decrease as the filler loading increased; however, as it reached 25 wt %, the strength showed a moderate increase. The Young’s modulus showed a remarkable increase for 15 wt % of RH but decreased as the RH percentage increased further to 25 wt %. A water absorption test was conducted and the results showed that the composites absorb more water as the percentage weight of RH increased, which is attributed to the ability of the RH filler to absorb water.

  11. Processing Methods of Alkaline Hydrolysate from Rice Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga D. Arefieva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper devoted to finding processing methods of alkaline hydrolysate produced from rice husk pre-extraction, and discusses alkaline hydrolysate processing schemed and disengagement of some products: amorphous silica of various quality, alkaline lignin, and water and alkaline extraction polysaccharides. Silica samples were characterized: crude (air-dried, burnt (no preliminary water treatment, washed in distilled water, and washed in distilled water and burnt. Waste water parameters upon the extraction of solids from alkaline hydrolysate dropped a few dozens or thousand times depending on the applied processing method. Color decreased a few thousand times, turbidity was virtually eliminated, chemical oxygen demanded about 20–136 times; polyphenols content might decrease 50% or be virtually eliminated. The most prospective scheme obtained the two following solid products from rice husk alkaline hydrolysate: amorphous silica and alkaline extraction polysaccharide. Chemical oxygen demand of the remaining waste water decreased about 140 times compared to the silica-free solution.

  12. NANOCELLULOSE FROM RICE HUSK FOLLOWING ALKALINE TREATMENT TO REMOVE SILICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Ludueña

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the use of multiple-step procedures to obtain valuable sub-products, including nanocellulose, from rice husk. Each sub-product was characterized after every step by analyzing the chemical composition (mainly based on thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transformed infrared spectra, and X-ray diffraction and morphology (using visual observations and scanning electron microscopy. The results clearly showed that the selected procedure gave the possibility to separate silica in the first step and then to purify the resultant material, leading to nanocellulose production. All acquired sub-products can be used as additives and fillers in a very wide range of applications. The obtained results will be useful both from technological and academic points of view, mainly for people working in the field of biocomposites. The final material could give added value to a raw biomass material source such as rice husk.

  13. Co-pyrolysis mechanism of seaweed polysaccharides and cellulose based on macroscopic experiments and molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Xia, Zhen; Hu, Yamin; He, Zhixia; Uzoejinwa, Benjamin Bernard; Wang, Qian; Cao, Bin; Xu, Shanna

    2017-03-01

    Co-pyrolysis conversion of seaweed (Enteromorpha clathrat and Sargassum fusiforme) polysaccharides and cellulose has been investigated. From the Py-GC/MS results, Enteromorpha clathrata (EN) polysaccharides pyrolysis mainly forms furans; while the products of Sargassum fusiforme (SA) polysaccharides pyrolysis are mainly acid esters. The formation mechanisms of H2O, CO2, and SO2 during the pyrolysis of seaweed polysaccharides were analyzed using the thermogravimetric-mass spectrometry. Meanwhile the pyrolysis of seaweed polysaccharide based on the Amber and the ReaxFF force fields, has also been proposed and simulated respectively. The simulation results coincided with the experimental results. During the fast pyrolysis, strong synergistic effects among cellulose and seaweed polysaccharide molecules have been simulated. By comparing the experimental and simulation value, it has been found that co-pyrolysis could increase the number of molecular fragments, increase the pyrolysis conversion rate, and increase gas production rate at the middle temperature range. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pyrolysis of polystyrene - polyphenylene oxide to recover styrene and useful products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert J.; Chum, Helena L.

    1995-01-01

    A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide plastic waste to a given polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature range to cause pyrolysis of given polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide and its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and a support and treating the feed stream with the catalyst to affect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of high value monomeric constituent of styrene from polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide in the first temperature range; differentially heating the feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of the high value monomeric constituent of styrene from polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomer constituent of styrene; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis to a different derived high value product of polyphenylene oxide from the plastic waste and differentially heating the feed stream at the higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of the plastic into a polyphenylene oxide derived product; and separating the different derived high value polyphenylene oxide product.

  15. UTILIZATION OF HAZELNUT HUSKS, TEA AND TOBACCO WASTES, AS RAW MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ş. İsmail KIRBAŞLAR

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, moisture, ash, oil and cellulose of hazelnut husks, tea and tobacco wastes were analyzed. The amounts of pentosan, pentose and furfural were determined in the hazelnut husks, tea and tobacco wastes. Furfural was produced from each three waste products by a steam distillation method. IR spectra of each furfural product were measured and compared with standard furfural. Activated carbon prepared from the hazelnut husks at the different temperature, and organic and inorganic pollutants were removed by using the adsorbent obtained from hazelnut husk.

  16. Kinetics Analysis of Coconut Shell Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Xue-mei; JIANG; Jian-chun; SUN; Kang; XU; Fan; XU; Yu

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The paper aimed to study kinetics analysis of coconut shell pyrolysis. [Method] Thermo gravimetric analysis was used to study the pyrolysis characteristic of coconut shell at different pyrolysis rates (5, 10, 20 K/min). [Result] The pyrolysis process included 3 stages, water loss, pyrolysis, and thermal condensation. The pyrolysis process can be described through first-order reaction model. With the increasing pyrolysis rate, activation energy in the first stage rose, but activation energy in the second stage reduced. [Conclusion] The study provided theoretical basis for the promotion and application of biomass energy.

  17. Making sense of HUSK: practice implications for social change initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeath, Bowen

    2015-01-01

    As an exemplar of bottom-up progressive social experimentation, HUSK provides opportunities to examine how innovative practice is supported and challenged in bureaucratic settings. In this analysis the author uses a sensemaking lens to identify critical issues and questions for those seeking to promote progressive change initiative in social welfare systems. Findings identify essential organizational and managerial supports needed to support service user voice and participation and reinforce the importance of reflexivity in practice and research.

  18. Efficacy of Locust Beans Husk Char in Heavy Metal Sequestration

    OpenAIRE

    Ademola Ayodeji Ajayi-Banji; Temitayo Ewemoje; Adeniyi Ajimo

    2016-01-01

    Most solid waste management schemes minimally consider low concentration biodegradable agricultural waste management, though the environmental impact of this waste category is significant over a time frame. The column-mode study seeks to address the issue by suggesting potential utilisation of post-harvest waste for heavy metal sequestering. Locust beans husk char of 100 and 200 g was employed to inspect removal efficiency, isotherm and kinetic models of some heavy metals at 30, 60, 90, 120 a...

  19. Coal flash pyrolysis. 5. Pyrolysis in an atmosphere of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calkins, W.H.; Bonifaz, C.

    1984-12-01

    Flash pyrolysis of coal at temperatures above 700/sup 0/C and in the presence of methane produces substantially more ethylene and other low molecular weight hydrocarbons than are produced by pyrolysis of coal in the presence of nitrogen alone. Evidence is presented to show that the increase is due to pyrolysis of the methane quite independently of the coal, except with the possible catalysis by the coal, coke or mineral matter in the coal ash. This is contrary to recent reports in the literature.

  20. Kinetics and isotherms of Neutral Red adsorption on peanut husk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Runping; HAN Pan; CAI Zhaohui; ZHAO Zhenhui; TANG Mingsheng

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption of Neutral Red (NR) onto peanut husk in aqueous solutions was investigated at 295 K. Experiments were carded out as function of pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time, and initial concentration. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich, and Toth isotherm models. The results indicated that the Toth and Langmuir models provided the best correlation of the experimental data. The adsorption capacity of peanut husk for the removal of NR was determined with the Langmuir and found to be 37.5 mg/g at 295 K. The adsorption kinetic data were modeled using the pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic equations. It was seen that the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic equations could describe the adsorption kinetics. The intraparticle diffusion model was also used to express the adsorption process at the two-step stage. It was implied that peanut husk may be suitable as adsorbent material for adsorption of NR from aqueous solutions.

  1. Sorption of Lead (II Ions on Activated Coconut Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Jahangard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, various toxic chemicals/compounds have been widely detected at dangerous levels in drinking water in many parts of the world posing a variety of serious health risks to human beings. One of these toxic chemicals is lead, so this paper aimed to evaluate of efficiency coconut husk as cheap adsorbent for removal lead under different conditions. Methods: In the spring of 2015, batch studies were performed in laboratory (Branch of Hamadan, Islamic Azad University, to evaluate the influences of various experimental parameters like pH, initial concentration, adsorbent dosage, contact time and the effect of temperature on the adsorption capacity of coconut husk for removal lead from aqueous solution. Results: Optimum conditions for Pb (II removal were pH 6, adsorbent dosage 1g/100ml of solution and equilibrium time 120 min. The adsorption isotherm was also affected by temperature since the adsorption capacity was increased by raising the temperature from 25 to 45 °C. The equilibrium adsorption isotherm was better described by Freuindlich adsorption isotherm model. Conclusion: It is evident from the literature survey that coconut-based biosorbents have shown good potential for the removal of various aquatic pollutants. Coconut husk-based activated carbon can be a promising adsorbent for removal of Pb from aqueous solutions.

  2. Properties of silica from rice husk and rice husk ash and their utilization for zeolite y synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Jezreel F. Saceda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared properties of silica (SiO2 from rice husk (RH and rice husk ash (RHA extracted by acid- and heat-treatment. The SiO2 from RH was in amorphous phase with nearly 100% purity while that from RHA was in crystalline phase with 97.56% purity. Both extracted SiO2 were used in the synthesis of zeolite NaY but that from RH was better due to the efficiency in product recovery and simplicity of extraction. After the NaY was exchanged to NH4Y and calcined to convert to HY, the product did not carry over the textural properties of the parent NaY and NH4Y.

  3. 76 FR 78231 - Notice of Decision To Authorize the Importation of Fresh Cape Gooseberry Fruit With Husks From Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... continental United States of fresh Cape gooseberry fruit (Physalis peruviana L.) with husks from Chile. Based... fresh Cape gooseberry fruit (Physalis peruviana L.) with husks from Chile. We solicited comments on...

  4. A review of the toxicity of biomass pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, J P [Thermalchemie, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The scaleup of biomass fast pyrolysis systems to large pilot and commercial scales will expose an increasingly large number of personnel to potential health hazards, especially during the evaluation of the commercial use of the pyrolysis condensates. Although the concept of fast pyrolysis to optimize liquid products is relatively new, low-temperature pyrolysis processes have been used over the aeons to produce charcoal and liquid by-products, e.g., smoky food flavors, food preservatives, and aerosols containing narcotics, e.g., nicotine. There are a number of studies in the historical literature that concern the hazards of acute and long-term exposure to smoke and to the historical pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures. The reported toxicity of smoke, smoke food flavors, and fast pyrolysis oils is reviewed. The data found for these complex mixtures suggest that the toxicity may be less than that of the individual components. It is speculated that there may be chemical reactions that take place that serve to reduce the toxicity during aging. 81 refs.

  5. Hydrogenation of fast pyrolyis oil and model compounds in a two-phase aqueous organic system using homogeneous ruthenium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahfud, F. H.; Ghijsen, F.; Heeres, H. J.

    2007-01-01

    The use of homogeneous ruthenium catalysts to hydrogenate the water-soluble fraction of pyrolysis oil is reported. Pyrolysis oil, which is obtained by fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass at 450-600 degrees C, contains significant amounts of aldehydes and ketones (e.g. 1-hydroxy-2-propanone (1)

  6. Adsorption Studies of Phenol Using Thermally and Chemically Modified Rice Husk as Adsorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *M. M. Yousaf

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Most of the Phenols are hazardous substances and some are supposed to have carcinogenic activity. Thus it is necessary to remove Phenolics and other aromatics from the aqueous ecosystem. Traditional processes for the removal of Phenolics compounds are extraction, adsorption on granulated activated carbon, steam distillation, chemical and bacterial techniques. Literature survey show a number of methods like oxidation, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, electrochemical oxidation and adsorption. Phenol removal by process like, adsorption is the best method of choice as it can remove most of phenols in simple and easy way. In recent past; agricultural by-products such as, maize cob, date stone, apricot Stones, rice bran, and bagass pith have been extensively studied and used as adsorbents for the adsorption of hazardous substances from wastewater. In the present study we tried modified rice husks as potential adsorbents for the removal of Phenol from aqueous system. Batch mode studies were carried out. Isotherm data was generated and fitted in Freundlich and Langmuir equation to explain the phenomenon of adsorption. The adsorption capacities based on Langmuir model (Qm of the 3 adsorbents were found to be 0.81 for raw husk (RH, 0.395 for the Grafted (G and 2.306 mg/g for the Charred (C. The R2 values were 0.92 for raw husk, 0.97 for grafted and 0.91 for charred husk. Based on Freundlich model the adsorption capacities (K were 2.94, 2.29 and 1.25mg/g for Raw husk, grafted husk and charred husk. The R2 values were found to be 0.72, 0.95 and 0.83 for the raw husk, grafted husk and charred husk respectively. Our result showed that modified rice husks could be used as potential adsorbents for Phenol removal from aqueous system.

  7. Pyrolysis of Indonesian coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachimoellah; Endah [Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopemba, Surabaya (Indonesia). Department of Chemical Engineering; Karaman, N.; Kusuma, S.A. [UPN Surabaya, (Indonesia). Department of Chemical Engineering

    1997-04-01

    It has been estimated that there is 36 billion tons of coal resource potential in Indonesia. Over 21.4 billion tons is classified as low rank (lignitic) coal. The coal deposits are located mainly in Sumatra and Kalimantan. As an energy source, low rank coals are not widely used, because of their high moisture content, low calorific value and variable ash content. One of the key questions for utilizing low rank coal is whether lignite can be upgraded into another form which is more economically viable. In this study tests were carried out in a pilot plant fixed bed pyrolysis reactor unit provided with hopper, electric heater, coolers and product receivers. The yield of char, tar and gases was found to depend on temperature which also affected the composition of gas produced. Results also indicated the temperature and particle size giving maximum tar yield, gas concentration, and the atmosphere of inert nitrogen. 1 tab., 2 figs., 10 refs.

  8. Nutritive Value of Coffee Husk Fermented with Pleurotus ostreatus as Ruminant Feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Badarina

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Coffee husks is an abundant crop residue but the content of anti nutritional substances such as caffeine, tannin, and lignin limit its utilization as feed ingredients. Higher fungi such as Pleurotus ostreatus have the ability to biotransform lignocellulosic materials through their extracellular enzyme activities. This study was carried out to assess the effect of solid state fermentation by using P. ostreatus on nutrient composition of coffee husk and to evaluate its potency as ruminant feed in vitro. The in vitro experiment was conducted to determine fermentability of treated coffee husk. The usage rate of fermented coffee husk was mimicked feeding level to mid lactation dairy cows; 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% (R0 to R4. Fermentation of coffee husk by P. ostreatus increased its protein, from 10.36% to 12.14%, and cellulose, from 19.51% to 24.80%, and decreased its lignin, from 65.42% to 45.04%, tannin from 1.02% to 0.18%, and caffeine, from 1.39% to 0.20%, concentrations. There were no differences in ruminal pH and N-ammonia production but volatile fatty acid production and dry matter digestibility decreased as the fermented coffee husk level increased. The ruminal protozoa population in fermented coffee husk diets was lower than the control diets (P<0.05. In conclusion, it is possible to use 20% of fermented coffee husk in the ration.

  9. Frictional and heat resistance characteristics of coconut husk particle filled automotive brake pad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, Shahril Anuar; Chik, Mohd Syahrizul; Kassim, Masitah Abu; Som Said, Che Mohamad; Misnon, Mohd Iqbal; Mohamed, Zulkifli; Othman, Eliasidi Abu

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the friction and heat resistance characteristics of automotive brake pad composed with different sizes and percentages of coconut husk particle. The materials used were phenolic resin (phenol formaldehyde) as binder, copper, graphite and brass as friction producer/modifiers, magnesium oxide as abrasive material, steel and barium sulfate as reinforcement while coconut husk particle as filler. To obtain particle, the coconut husk was ground and dried to 3% moisture content. Then the coconut husk particle was screened using 80 mesh (to obtain coarse dust) and 100 mesh (to obtain fine dust). Different percentages of particle, such as 10 and 30% were used in the mixture of brake pad materials. Then the mixture was hot-pressed to produce brake pad. Chase machine was used to determine the friction coefficient in friction resistance testing, while thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) machine was used to determine the heat decomposition values in heat resistance testing. Results showed that brake pad with 100 mesh and 10% composition of coconut husk particle showed the highest friction coefficient. For heat resistance, brake pad with 100 mesh and 30% composition of coconut husk dust showed the highest decomposition temperature, due to the high percentage of coconut husk particle in the composition, thus increased the thermal stability. As a comparison, brake pad composed with coconut husk particle showed better heat resistance results than commercial brake pad.

  10. Design and modeling of a novel continuous open core downdraft rice husk gasifier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manurung, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Rice husk is one of the most widely available agricultural wastes in many rice producing countries around the world. Conversion of the abundant supply of rice husk into clean energy is an opportunity to expand the energy resource base while reducing the environmental burden now associated with the d

  11. Alkaline peroxide assisted wet air oxidation pretreatment approach to enhance enzymatic convertibility of rice husk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Saumita; Sen, Ramkrishna; Mudliar, Sandeep; Pandey, R A; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Satpute, Dewanand

    2011-01-01

    Pretreatment of rice husk by alkaline peroxide assisted wet air oxidation (APAWAO) approach was investigated with the aim to enhance the enzymatic convertibility of cellulose in pretreated rice husk. Rice husk was presoaked overnight in 1% (w/v) H(2)O(2) solution (pH adjusted to 11.5 using NaOH) (equivalent to 16.67 g H(2)O(2) and 3.63 g NaOH per 100 g dry, untreated rice husk) at room temperature, followed by wet air oxidation (WAO). APAWAO pretreatment resulted in solubilization of 67 wt % of hemicellulose and 88 wt % of lignin initially present in raw rice husk. Some amount of oligomeric glucose (˜8.3 g/L) was also observed in the APAWAO liquid fraction. APAWAO pretreatment resulted in 13-fold increase in the amount of glucose that could be obtained from otherwise untreated rice husk. Up to 86 wt % of cellulose in the pretreated rice husk (solid fraction) could be converted into glucose within 24 hours, yielding over 21 g glucose per 100 g original rice husk. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to visualize changes in biomass structure following the APAWAO pretreatment. Enzymatic cellulose convertibility of the pretreated slurry at high dry matter loadings was also investigated.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Thermal Characteristics of Kiwira Coal Waste with Rice Husk Blends for Gasification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deodatus Kazawadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eminent depletion of fossil fuels and environmental pollution are the key forces driving the implementation cofiring of fossil fuels and biomass. Cogasification as a technology is known to have advantages of low cost, high energy recovery, and environmental friendliness. The performance/efficiency of this energy recovery process substantially depends on thermal properties of the fuel. This paper presents experimental study of thermal behavior of Kiwira coal waste/rice husks blends. Compositions of 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100% weight percentage rice husk were studied using thermogravimetric analyzer at the heating rate of 10 K/min to 1273 K. Specifically, degradation rate, conversion rate, and kinetic parameters have been studied. Thermal stability of coal waste was found to be higher than that of rice husks. In addition, thermal stability of coal waste/rice husk blend was found to decrease with an increase of rice husks. In contrast, both the degradation and devolatilization rates increased with the amount of rice husk. On the other hand, the activation energy dramatically reduced from 131 kJ/mol at 0% rice husks to 75 kJ/mol at 100% rice husks. The reduction of activation energy is advantageous as it can be used to design efficient performance and cost effective cogasification process.

  13. Production of Liquid Fuel by Fast Pyrolysis of Lignocellulose and Its Upgrading by Hydrotreating%木质纤维素快速热裂解及加氢提质制备液体燃料的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉军; 毛贵涛; 骆广生

    2012-01-01

    以秸秆、草和木材等农林废弃物中的木质纤维素为原料的第二代生物燃料生产技术是未来可再生能源的重要发展趋势,该技术的关键是如何去除生物质中的氧,加氢脱氧提质是重要的手段之一.综述了近年来国内外以木质纤维素为原料,通过快速热裂解工艺先制备生物油,并进一步加氢提质以获得氧含量很低的生物液体燃料的应用基础研究及工业化进展.由快速热裂解和加氢脱氧相结合的工艺制备得到的产物只含碳、氢元素以及少量的氧元素,可以与当前的石油炼制工艺很好地结合,因此该组合工艺具有广阔的应用前景.%With the depletion of crude oil, the renewable energy sources has caught much more attention, and the first generation biofuel technology has got much complaint because of the competition with human food, thus, the second generation biomass conversion technology using straw, grass, wood as raw materials has become a more important trend. The challenge of the second generation technologies is how to remove the oxygen element from the bio-oil, and the hydrodeoxygenation is one of the most important solutions. In this paper, we review the production of bio-oil through the fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose, and the fundamental research and industrial development of bio-oil's upgrading technology by the hydrotreating to produce biofuels with a low oxygen content. The products produced by the combination of fast pyrolysis and the hydrodeoxygenation only contain carbon, hydrogen and little oxygen, and has a very good compatibility with the refinery process of fossil oil, therefore, the combination process has the broad prospect of application.

  14. Combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, and liquefaction of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, T.B.

    1980-09-01

    All the products now obtained from oil can be provided by thermal conversion of the solid fuels biomass and coal. As a feedstock, biomass has many advantages over coal and has the potential to supply up to 20% of US energy by the year 2000 and significant amounts of energy for other countries. However, it is imperative that in producing biomass for energy we practice careful land use. Combustion is the simplest method of producing heat from biomass, using either the traditional fixed-bed combustion on a grate or the fluidized-bed and suspended combustion techniques now being developed. Pyrolysis of biomass is a particularly attractive process if all three products - gas, wood tars, and charcoal - can be used. Gasification of biomass with air is perhaps the most flexible and best-developed process for conversion of biomass to fuel today, yielding a low energy gas that can be burned in existing gas/oil boilers or in engines. Oxygen gasification yields a gas with higher energy content that can be used in pipelines or to fire turbines. In addition, this gas can be used for producing methanol, ammonia, or gasoline by indirect liquefaction. Fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a gas rich in ethylene that can be used to make alcohols or gasoline. Finally, treatment of biomass with high pressure hydrogen can yield liquid fuels through direct liquefaction.

  15. Wood pyrolysis oil for diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paro, D.; Gros, S.; Hellen, G.; Jay, D.; Maekelae, T.; Rantanen, O.; Tanska, T. [Wartsila Diesel International Ltd Oy, Vaasa (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    Wood Pyrolysis oil (WPO) has been identified by the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) as the most competitive biofuel product which can be produced from biomass. The fuel is produced by a fast pyrolysis technique, using wood chipping`s or sawdust. The process can be applied to other recycling products such as straw etc. The use of WPO as a Diesel power plant fuel has been studied, and a fuel specification has been developed. The fuel characteristics have been analysed. There are several fuel properties addressed in the paper which have had to be overcome. New materials have been used in the fuel injection system. The fuel injection system development has progressed from a pump-line-pipe system to a common rail system. The fuel requires a pilot fuel oil injection to initiate combustion. The targets for the fuel injection system have been 1500 bar and 30 deg C injection period with a fuel of 15 MJ/kg lower heating value and 1220 Kg/m{sup 3} density. The combustion characteristics from both a small 80 mm bore engine initially, and then later with a single cylinder test of a 320 mm bore Waertsilae engine, have been evaluated. (author)

  16. Combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, and liquefaction of biomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, T. B.

    1980-09-01

    The advantages of biomass as a feedstock are examined and biomass conversion techniques are described. Combustion is the simplest method of producing heat from biomass, using either the traditional fixed bed combustion on a grate or the fluidized bed and suspended combustion techniques now being developed. Pyrolysis of biomass is a particularly attractive process if all three products gas, wood tars, and charcoal can be used. Gasification of biomass with air is perhaps the most flexible and best developed process for conversion of biomass to fuel, yielding a low energy gas that can be burned in existing gas/oil boilers or in engines. Oxygen gasification yields a gas with higher energy content that can be used in pipelines or to fire turbines. In addition, this gas can be used for producing methanol, ammonia, or gasoline by indirect liquefaction. Fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a gas rich in ethylene that can be used to make alcohols or gasoline. Finally, treatment of biomass with high pressure hydrogen can yield liquid fuels through direct liquefaction.

  17. Effect of recycling on properties of rice husk-filled-polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutarat Prachayawarakorn

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This research concerned with the use of rice husk (Oryza sativa as a filler for polypropylene and its recycle ability. Rice husk (200 mesh and 40% by weight and polypropylene were compounded in a twinscrew extruder and injection moulding technique was applied in order to obtain testing specimens. It was found that tensile, flexural and impact properties as well as % water absorption of the rice husk-filled polypropylene were only slightly dropped upon recycling process, presenting the ability of the rice husk- filledpolypropylene samples to recycle. The increase in melt flow index of the samples was also obtained. In addition, SEM micrographs revealed the reduction of rice husk particle size by the recycling process. Moreover, FTIR spectroscopy and TGA technique were performed for characterizing the filled specimens.

  18. Study on the Pyrolysis Behavior of Polycarbosilane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wenyi; ZHOU Jian

    2015-01-01

    The pyrolysis behavior of polycarbosilane (PCS) and chemical reaction mechanism during the pyrolysis process were studied by thermogravimetric-mass spectrometry (TG-MS) combined with X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopic analysis methods. The experimental results indicate that the main gas phase products generated during pyrolysis of PCS in nitrogen atmosphere include H2, -CH3 and CH4. The heating rate has a large effect on the pyrolysis process of PCS, the lower heating rate releases more small molecule gases and gets bigger rate of pyrolysis mass loss, demonstrating that the lower heating rate is beneifcial to fully pyrolysis of PCS and obtain ceramics products with better microstructure.

  19. Pyrolysis as a key process in biomass combustion and thermochemical conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvero Petar M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass is a fuel with a highly volatile content and due to that, pyrolysis as a part of the combustion process, has a dominant role in the overall process development, as well as on final products and the process efficiency. It is of key importance to investigate the influence of the process parameters; as temperature, furnace/reactor environment, fuel properties, type, particle size, geometry, and the structure of the pyrolysis process has an influence regards the design of the combustion/pyrolysis equipment and the final products of the processes. This paper gives some results of the investigation’s related to this problem, mainly focussing on wooden biomass as the most important biomass type, as well as a comparison with relevant documented literature. Besides that, pyrolysis based technologies are one of the key directions in synthetic fuels production based on biomass. Biomass pyrolysis process parameters are crucial in reactor design as well as the quantity and quality of the final products. This paper provides discussion dedicated to this aspect with a focus on slow pyrolysis, targeting charcoal as the key product, and fast pyrolysis, targeting synthetic gas as the key product.

  20. [Application of analytical pyrolysis in air pollution control for green sand casting industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-jue; Zhao, Qi; Chen, Ying; Wang, Cheng-wen

    2010-02-01

    Analytic pyrolysis was conducted to simulate the heating conditions that the raw materials of green sand would experience during metal casting process. The volatile organic compound (VOC) and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions from analytical pyrolysis were analyzed by gas chromatograph-flame ionization detector/mass spectrometry (GC-FID/MS). The emissions from analytical pyrolysis exhibited some similarity in the compositions and distributions with those from actual casting processes. The major compositions of the emissions included benzene, toluene and phenol. The relative changes of emission levels that were observed in analytical pyrolysis of the various raw materials also showed similar trends with those observed in actual metal casting processes. The emission testing results of both analytic pyrolysis and pre-production foundry have shown that compared to the conventional phenolic urethane binder, the new non-naphthalene phenolic urethane binder diminished more than 50% of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions, and the protein-based binder diminished more than 90% of HAP emissions. The similar trends in the two sets of tests offered promise that analytical pyrolysis techniques could be a fast and accurate way to establish the emission inventories, and to evaluate the relative emission levels of various raw materials of casting industry. The results of analytical pyrolysis could provide useful guides for the foundries to select and develop proper clean raw materials for the casting production.

  1. Thermogravimetric and Kinetic Analysis of Melon (Citrullus colocynthis L. Seed Husk Using the Distributed Activation Energy Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyakuma Bemgba Bevan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to characterize the thermochemical fuel properties of melon seed husk (MSH as a potential biomass feedstock for clean energy and power generation. It examined the ultimate analysis, proximate analysis, FTIR spectroscopy and thermal decomposition of MSH. Thermogravimetric (TG analysis was examined at 5, 10, 20 °C/min from 30-800 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. Subsequently, the Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM was applied to determine the activation energy, E, and frequency factor, A. The results revealed that thermal decomposition of MSH occurs in three (3 stages; drying (30-150 °C, devolatization (150-400 °C and char degradation (400-800 °C. Kinetic analysis revealed that the E values fluctuated from 145.44-300 kJ/mol (Average E = 193 kJ/mol while A ranged from 2.64 × 1010 to 9.18 × 1020 min-1 (Average E = 9.18 × 1019 min-1 highlighting the complexity of MSH pyrolysis. The fuel characterization and kinetics of MSH showed it is an environmentally friendly solid biofuel for future thermal biomass conversion.

  2. Thermogravimetric and Kinetic Analysis of Melon (Citrullus colocynthis L.) Seed Husk Using the Distributed Activation Energy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyakuma, Bemgba Bevan

    2015-12-01

    This study seeks to characterize the thermochemical fuel properties of melon seed husk (MSH) as a potential biomass feedstock for clean energy and power generation. It examined the ultimate analysis, proximate analysis, FTIR spectroscopy and thermal decomposition of MSH. Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis was examined at 5, 10, 20 °C/min from 30-800 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. Subsequently, the Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM) was applied to determine the activation energy, E, and frequency factor, A. The results revealed that thermal decomposition of MSH occurs in three (3) stages; drying (30-150 °C), devolatization (150-400 °C) and char degradation (400-800 °C). Kinetic analysis revealed that the E values fluctuated from 145.44-300 kJ/mol (Average E = 193 kJ/mol) while A ranged from 2.64 × 1010 to 9.18 × 1020 min-1 (Average E = 9.18 × 1019 min-1) highlighting the complexity of MSH pyrolysis. The fuel characterization and kinetics of MSH showed it is an environmentally friendly solid biofuel for future thermal biomass conversion.

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of Zea mays L. husk extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Kyung-Baeg; Kim, Hyoyoung; Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Young-Soo; Lee, Jung-A; Kim, Mi Ok; Jung, Eunsun; Lee, Jongsung; Park, Deokhoon

    2016-08-19

    Zea mays L. (Z. mays) has been used for human consumption in the various forms of meal, cooking oil, thickener in sauces and puddings, sweetener in processed food and beverage products, bio-disel. However, especially, in case of husk extract of Z. mays, little is known about its anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, in this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of Z. mays husk extract (ZMHE) and its mechanisms of action were investigated. The husks of Z. Mays were harvested in kangwondo, Korea. To assess the anti-inflammatory activities of ZMHE, we examined effects of ZMHE on nitric oxide (NO) production, and release of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and eotaxin-1. The expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene was also determined by Western blot and luciferase reporter assays. To determine its mechanisms of action, a luciferase reporter assay for nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) was introduced. ZMHE inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of NO in RAW264.7 cells. In addition, expression of iNOS gene was reduced, as confirmed by Western blot and luciferase reporter assays. Effects of ZMHE on the AP-1 and NF-kB promoters were examined to elucidate the mechanism of its anti-inflammatory activity. Activation of AP-1 and NF-kB promoters induced by LPS was significantly reduced by ZMHE treatment. In addition, LPS-induced production of sICAM-1 and IL-4-induced production of eotaxin-1 were all reduced by ZMHE. Our results indicate that ZMHE has anti-inflammatory effects by downregulating the expression of iNOS gene and its downregulation is mediated by inhibiting NF-kB and AP-1 signaling.

  4. Magnesiothermic reduction of rice husk ash for electromagnetic wave adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shu-Ting; Yan, Kang-kang; Zhang, Yuan hu; Jin, Shi-di; Ye, Ying; Chen, Xue-Gang, E-mail: chenxg83@zju.edu.cn

    2015-11-15

    The increase in electromagnetic pollution due to the extensive exploitation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in modern technology creates correspondingly urgent need for developing effective EM wave absorbers. In this study, we carried out the magnesiothermic reduced the rice husk ash under different temperatures (400–800 °C) and investigated the electromagnetic wave adsorption of the products. The EM absorbing for all samples are mainly depend on the dielectric loss, which is ascribed to the carbon and silicon carbide content. RA samples (raw rice husk ashed in air and was magesiothermic reduced in different temperatures) exhibit poor dielectric properties, whereas RN samples (raw rice husk ashed in nitrogen and was magesiothermic reduced in different temperatures) with higher content of carbon and silicon carbide display considerable higher dielectric loss values and broader bandwidth for RL<−5 dB and −10 dB. For RN samples, the maximum bandwidth for −5 dB and −10 dB decrease with carbon contents, while the optimum thickness decrease with increasing SiC content. The optimum thickness of RN400–800 for EM absorption is 1.5–2.0 mm, with maximum RL of between −28.9 and −68.4 dB, bandwidth of 6.7–13 GHz for RL<−5 dB and 3.2–6.2 GHz for RL<−10 dB. The magnesiothermic reduction will enhance the potential application of rice husk ash in EM wave absorption and the samples benefited from low bulk density and low thickness. With the advantages of light-weight, high EM wave absorption, low cost, RN400–800 could be promising candidates for light-weight EM wave absorption materials over many conventional EM wave absorbers. - Highlights: • RN400–800 samples are potential light-weight electromagnetic absorbers. • Carbon and SiC are considered as dominating contributions for the dielectric loss. • Magnesiumothermic reduction extends the EM wave absorption potential of RHN.

  5. Possible use of psyllium husk as a release retardant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai Angira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Various hydrophilic polymers from synthetic origin such as methylcellulose, PEGs, HPMC as well as those from natural world such as guar gum, tragacanth, xanthan gum have been used to formulate oral sustained release formulations. Psyllium husk has the ability to swell 10-14 times of its original volume and form a hydrogel. It is biocompatible, inexpensive, inert, non-absorbable, environment friendly and easily available. However, its use as a release retardant has not been fully explored. Owing to large dose, high sensitivity to light, moisture and heat and also very short half-life of 1-2 h; formulation of sustained release dosage form of amoxicillin trihydrate is a challenge. Hence the present study has been undertaken to develop sustained release granules as well as matrix tablets of amoxicillin trihydrate using psyllium husk as a primary release retardant. The drug release of these formulations was compared with those containing HPMC K4M.The results showed insignificant difference in t80% value for drug release as assessed by student′s t-test at 5% level of significance. Selected formulations were kept at controlled conditions of 40o/75% RH and 30o/65% RH for a period of 3 mo. Microbiological assay was used as a stability indicating method of assay. Sustained release granules and tablet formulations containing HPMC alone were found to be more stable than the similar formulations containing husk with percent drug content at the end of 3 mo at 40o/ 75% RH being 92.66%, 93.81%, 86.74%, 88.31% and the rate of degradation being 8.46x10-4 d-1, 7.1x10-4 d-1, 1.58x10-3 d-1 and 1.38x10-3 d-1, respectively. Thus it was concluded that psyllium husk can be effectively used as a hydrogel polymer in sustained release formulations. However, there is a need to keep moisture level under control during and after formulation.

  6. Characterization of free radicals by electron spin resonance spectroscopy in biochars from pyrolysis at high heating rates and at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2016-01-01

    chars were related to the decreased mobility of potassium in the char matrix, leading to the less efficient catalytic effects of potassiumon the bond-breaking and radical re-attachments. The high Si levels in the rice husk caused an increase in the char radical concentration compared to the wheat straw...... that the biomass major constituents (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin) had a minor effect on remaining radical concentrations comparedto potassium and silica contents. The higher radical concentrations in the wheat straw chars from thedecay stage of pyrolysis in the entrained flow reactor compared to the wood...

  7. Characterization of Free Radicals By Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy in Biochars from Pyrolysis at High Heating Rates and at High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Anker Degn; Larsen Andresen, Mogens

    to the less efficient catalytic effects of potassium on the bond-breaking and radical re-attachments. The high Si levels in the rice husk caused an increase in the char radical concentration compared to the wheat straw because the free radicals were trapped in a char consisting of a molten amorphous silica...... on remaining radical concentrations compared to potassium and silica contents. The higher radical concentrations in the wheat straw chars from the decay stage of pyrolysis in the entrained flow reactor compared to the wood chars were related to the decreased mobility of potassium in the char matrix, leading...

  8. Preliminary Economics for the Production of Pyrolysis Oil from Lignin in a Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2009-04-01

    Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery economics can be potentially improved by converting by-product lignin into high valued products. Cellulosic biomass is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery, cellulose and hemicellullose are converted to ethanol via fermentation. The raw lignin portion is the partially dewatered stream that is separated from the product ethanol and contains lignin, unconverted feed and other by-products. It can be burned as fuel for the plant or can be diverted into higher-value products. One such higher-valued product is pyrolysis oil, a fuel that can be further upgraded into motor gasoline fuels. While pyrolysis of pure lignin is not a good source of pyrolysis liquids, raw lignin containing unconverted feed and by-products may have potential as a feedstock. This report considers only the production of the pyrolysis oil and does not estimate the cost of upgrading that oil into synthetic crude oil or finished gasoline and diesel. A techno-economic analysis for the production of pyrolysis oil from raw lignin was conducted. comparing two cellulosic ethanol fermentation based biorefineries. The base case is the NREL 2002 cellulosic ethanol design report case where 2000 MTPD of corn stover is fermented to ethanol (NREL 2002). In the base case, lignin is separated from the ethanol product, dewatered, and burned to produce steam and power. The alternate case considered in this report dries the lignin, and then uses fast pyrolysis to generate a bio-oil product. Steam and power are generated in this alternate case by burning some of the corn stover feed, rather than fermenting it. This reduces the annual ethanol production rate from 69 to 54 million gallons/year. Assuming a pyrolysis oil value similar to Btu-adjusted residual oil, the estimated ethanol selling price ranges from $1.40 to $1.48 (2007 $) depending upon the yield of pyrolysis oil. This is considerably above the target minimum ethanol selling

  9. 热过滤对流化床快速热解制取生物油产率和品质的影响%Effects of Hot Filtration on Yield and Quality of Bio-oil from Fast Pyrolysis of Chinese Fir in Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱沈嘉; 刘运权; 王夺; 叶跃元; 李水荣

    2015-01-01

    A hot filter was added to a 1 kg/h bench-scale continuous bubbling fluidized bed system for the fast pyrolysis of Chinese fir to get bio-oils. The effects of hot filter on the yield and stability of bio-oils were studied. The results indicated that both the yields of pyrolysis oil ( without hot filtration ) and filtered oil ( after hot filtration ) increased with the increase of pyrolysis temperature,and decreased after 475 ℃,at which the maximum yields were 58. 1% and 50. 7%,respectively. The addition of hot filter resulted in lower oil yield ( approximate 5% -10% decrease) ,which became worse when pyrolysis temperature increased. Compared to the pyrolysis-oilⅠ,the water content of filtered-oilⅠincreased from 13. 77% to 15. 83%,pH value increased from 2. 18 to 2. 23,and high-heating value decreased from 20. 47 MJ/kg to 19. 53 MJ/kg. However,it also showed significant reduction in solids contents,alkali and alkaline earth metals,and the overall decline was about 75%,which suppressed the happening of self-polymerization in bio-oils. During the aging tests,water content and kinematic viscosity of filtered-oilⅠincreased by 10. 2%and 57. 6%,but the fluctuation was less than that of pyrolysis-oilⅠ. GC/MS analysis of the bio-oils showed that less fluctuation in composition was observed in the filtered-oil Ⅰ. This indicated a positive impact of the hot filter on the quality of bio-oil.%在1 kg/h的小型鼓泡流化床热解反应装置中增设一热过滤装置,对杉木快速热解制取生物油进行了研究,考察了热过滤装置对生物油产率和品质的影响。结果表明:热解油(未经热过滤)和过滤油(经过热过滤)的产率随热解温度的升高先上升后下降,并都在475℃时达到最大值,分别为58.1%和50.7%。热过滤装置的引入降低了生物油的产率(下降5%~10%),且热解温度越高,过滤油产率下降越明显。相比于热解油Ⅰ,过滤油Ⅰ的含水率从13.77%增加到15.83%,pH值从2.18

  10. Molecular products from the pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis of tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibet, Joshua K; Khachatryan, Lavrent; Dellinger, Barry

    2013-05-01

    The thermal degradation of tyrosine at a residence time of 0.2s was conducted in a tubular flow reactor in flowing N2 and 4% O2 in N2 for a total pyrolysis time of 3min. The fractional pyrolysis technique, in which the same sample was heated continuously at each pyrolysis temperature, was applied. Thermal decomposition of tyrosine between 350 and 550°C yielded predominantly phenolic compounds (phenol, p-cresol, and p-tyramine), while decomposition between 550 and 800°C yielded hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, and ethyl benzene as the major reaction products. For the first time, the identification of p-tyramine, a precursor for the on of formation of p-tyramine and its degradation to phenol and p-cresol, and toxicological discussion of some of the harmful reaction products is also presented.

  11. Effects of biomass type, blend composition, and co-pyrolysis temperature on hybrid coal quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasongko, Dwiwahju; Wulandari, Winny; Rubani, Inga Shaffira; Rusydiansyah, Rifqi

    2017-01-01

    An experimental study on co-pyrolysis of coal with biomass wastes to produce hybrid coal was conducted to investigate the effects of important process variables, namely biomass type (rice husk and sawdust), blend composition, and co-pyrolysis temperature on the quality of hybrid coal. The experiments were carried out using a vertical tubular furnace equipped with temperature controller to maintain the co-pyrolysis reactor at a given temperature. Nitrogen gas was introduced into the furnace to create an inert environment preventing the sample from burning. A known mass of solid sample consisting of manually granulated blend of coal and biomass with binder in spherical shape was contained in a basket made of stainless sieve. After a given residence time, the sample was taken from the furnace. The blend sample prior to experiment and the produced hybrid coal were then characterized for its proximate analysis, ultimate analysis and calorific value. Experimental findings suggested that by increasing co-pyrolysis temperature from 200 to 400 °C, the calorific value of hybrid coal will increase by 14.5-17.7% to be 5585-7060 kcal/kg. It was also showed that 30% increase in the biomass content in the fuel blend would produce a hybrid coal that emitting up to 25.9% less in CO2 when used for combustion, although its calorific value decreased down to 8% compared to the biomass blend. It is shown that hybrid coal obtained from this study is comparable in calorific value to bituminous coal, thus suitable for power plant while being more environmentally friendly.

  12. Pyrolysis characteristic of tobacco stem studied by Py-GC/MS, TG-FTIR, and TG-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Liu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis characteristics and mechanism of tobacco stem were studied by pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS, thermogravimetric analyzer coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and mass spectrometry (TG-FTIR and TG-MS techniques. The composition of evolved volatiles from fast pyrolysis of tobacco stem was determined by Py-GC/MS analysis, and the evolution patterns of the major products were investigated by TG-FTIR and TG-MS. Py-GC/MS data indicated that furfural and phenol were the major products in low temperature pyrolysis, and these were generated from depolymerization of cellulose. Indene and naphthalene were the major products in high temperature pyrolysis. TG-FTIR and TG-MS results showed that CO, CO2, phenols, aldehydes, and ketones were released between 167ºC and 500ºC; at temperatures >500ºC, CO and CO2 were the main gaseous products.

  13. Preparation of food grade carboxymethyl cellulose from corn husk agrowaste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Md Ibrahim H; Yeasmin, Mst Sarmina; Rahman, Md Saifur

    2015-08-01

    Alpha-cellulose extracted from corn husks was used as the raw material for the production of food-grade carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). Preparation of CMC from husk cellulose was carried out by an etherification process, using sodium hydroxide and monochloroacetic acid (MCA), with ethanol as the supporting medium. Characterizations of CMC were carried out by analyzing the spectra of FTIR, XRD patterns and SEM photomicrographs. Degree of substitution (DS) was determined with respect to particle size using chemical methods. Solubility, molecular weight and DS of CMC increased with decreased cellulose particle sizes. Microbiological testing of the prepared CMC was done by the pour plate method. Concentrations of heavy metals such as arsenic, lead, cadmium and mercury in the purified CMC were measured by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy technique and found to be within the WHO/FAO recommended value. A comparative study with CMC available in the international market was conducted. The purity of the prepared CMC was higher, at 99.99% well above the purity of 99.5% for standard CMC. High purity CMC showed a yield 2.4 g/g with DS 2.41, water holding capacity 5.11 g/g, oil holding capacity 1.59 g/g. The obtained product is well suited for pharmaceutical and food additives.

  14. Rice husk ash as corrective of soil acidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia Oliveira Islabão

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rice husk ash (RHA is a by-product from the burning of rice husk that can have favorable effects on the soil in terms of acidity correction. The objectives of this study were to determine the effective calcium carbonate equivalent (ECC of RHA under field conditions, and establish technical criteria as a basis for estimating the overall ECC of RHA. The 12 treatments of the experiment consisted of 10 RHA dosages (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, and 140 Mg ha-1 and two references, one of which was an absolute control (AC and the other a plot limed and fertilized according to official recommendations (recommended fertilization - RF. The soil was sampled twice (15 and 210 days after incorporating RHA, in the layers 0.00-0.10 and 0.10-0.20 m, to determine the pH(H2O and base saturation (V%. The ECC and neutralizing value (NV of RHA were also determined. The results showed that RHA neutralizes soil acidity, in a faster reaction than conventional limestone, despite a low ECC (around 3 %.

  15. Property Optimization of Kaolin-Rice Husk Insulating Fire Bricks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.O.Onche; B.I.Ugheoke; G.A.Asikpo

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the suitability of using Kaolin-Rice husk-plastic clay to produce insulating firebrick was experimentally investigated and the optimal ratio of these constituents determined. Ten brick samples of different compositions were fired at 1200℃. Three of the samples(samples 6, 7, and 8) crumbled during firing. The surviving samples gave the following limits of results:shrinkage: 9.7% - 13.6%; effective moisture content:28. 34% -32.52%; modulus of rupture: 4.26kgf/cm2 - 19. 10kgf/cm2; apparent porosity: 56%-95. 93%;water absorption: 42.27% - 92. 12%; bulk density:1.04g/cm3 - 1.41g/cm3; apparent density: 2. 56g/cm3 -5. 77g/cm3 ; and thermal conductivity: 0. 005 W/mK 0. 134W/mK. The results showed that they all had good insulating characteristics. Samples 1 -5 and 10 showed good level of refractoriness, while mixing ratio of 4∶1∶2 ( representing weight in grams of Kaolin, plastic clay and rice husk respectively) for sample 4 gave the optimum performance values in terms of refractoriness,thermal conductivity, modulus of rupture, shrinkage and bulk density and the effective moisture content.

  16. Production of activated carbon from rice husk Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobochkin, V. V.; Tu, N. V.; Hieu, N. M.

    2016-09-01

    This work is dedicated to the production of activated carbon from rice husk from Delta of the Red River in Viet Nam. At the first stage, carbonization of a rice husk was carried out to obtain material containing 43.1% carbon and 25 % silica with a specific surface area of 51.5 m2/g. After separating of silica (the second stage), the specific surface area of the product increased to 204 m2/g and the silica content decreased to 1.23% by weight as well. The most important stage in the formation of the porous structure of the material is the activation. The products with the high specific surface area in the range of 800-1345 m2/g were obtained by activation of carbonized product with water vapour or carbon dioxide at temperatures of 700 °C and 850 °C, with varying the flow rate of the activating agent and activation time. The best results were achieved by activation of carbon material with water vapour at the flow rate of 0.08 dm3/min per 500 g of material and the temperature of 850 °C.

  17. SUNFLOWER HUSKS AS A SOURCE OF FUNCTIONAL FEED ADDITIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khusid S. B.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the results of the complex feed additive based on sunflower husk, enriched with beer wort with the addition of pumpkin pulp. We have studied the chemical composition of sunflower husk, which is the secondary resource of the processing plant raw material, selected methods of enrichment of this raw material with the help of fungi Trichoderma harzianum. Cellulolytic enzyme preparations on the basis of fungi of the genus Trichoderma for use in agriculture and animal feed production is often obtained when the surface method of cultivation. These drugs are cheap and contain a significant number of related hydrolytic enzymes, 29 such as amylase, protease, pectinase and hemicellulase, which are also important and valuable to the consumer. As a vitamin component of the feed additive we have selected a pumpkin pulp, which is a valuable feed for livestock and poultry is a source of carotene, fat and nitrogenous substances. We have also developed elements of technology for complex feed additive. We have created a comprehensive feed additive which can be used in the composition of diets in the feeding of farm animals and poultry

  18. Efficacy of Locust Beans Husk Char in Heavy Metal Sequestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademola Ayodeji Ajayi-Banji

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Most solid waste management schemes minimally consider low concentration biodegradable agricultural waste management, though the environmental impact of this waste category is significant over a time frame. The column-mode study seeks to address the issue by suggesting potential utilisation of post-harvest waste for heavy metal sequestering. Locust beans husk char of 100 and 200 g was employed to inspect removal efficiency, isotherm and kinetic models of some heavy metals at 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 min contact time. Elemental composition of the biosorbent was investigated using the SEM-EDX machine. The results obtained depict that over 85% aluminium and nickel removal was achieved at 150 min detention time. The Freundlich isotherm well described most of the sorbates sorption (R2 ≥ 0.91. The sorption rate equally fitted into the second-order pseudo kinetic model (R2 ≥ 0.88. Ion exchange took place during the sorption. Locust beans husk has promising adsorption potential in heavy metal ions removal from fouled surface water. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.71.4.13081

  19. Antimicrobial activity of fermented Theobroma cacao pod husk extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, R X; Oliveira, D A; Sodré, G A; Gosmann, G; Brendel, M; Pungartnik, C

    2014-09-26

    Theobroma cacao L. contains more than 500 different chemical compounds some of which have been traditionally used for their antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, immunomodulatory, vasodilatory, analgesic, and antimicrobial activities. Spontaneous aerobic fermentation of cacao husks yields a crude husk extract (CHE) with antimicrobial activity. CHE was fractioned by solvent partition with polar solvent extraction or by silica gel chromatography and a total of 12 sub-fractions were analyzed for chemical composition and bioactivity. CHE was effective against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa. Antibacterial activity was determined using 6 strains: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Bacillus subtilis (Gram-positive) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Salmonella choleraesuis (Gram-negative). At doses up to 10 mg/mL, CHE was not effective against the Gram-positive bacteria tested but against medically important P. aeruginosa and S. choleraesuis with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 5.0 mg/mL. Sub-fractions varied widely in activity and strongest antibacterial activity was seen with CHE8 against S. choleraesuis (MIC of 1.0 mg/mL) and CHE9 against S. epidermidis (MIC of 2.5 mg/mL). All bioactive CHE fractions contained phenols, steroids, or terpenes, but no saponins. Fraction CHE9 contained flavonoids, phenolics, steroids, and terpenes, amino acids, and alkaloids, while CHE12 had the same compounds but lacked flavonoids.

  20. Effects Of Storage Conditions On The Quality Of Unripe Hazelnuts In The Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markuszewski Bogumił

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to assess the storability of unripe hazelnuts in the husk of four cultivars: ‘Hall’s Giant’, ‘Catalan’, ‘Webb’s Prize Cob’ and ‘Cosford’. The nuts were stored in normal and controlled atmospheres, and in Xtend® bags for three months. A quality assessment was performed based on the following parameters: weight of the nut in the husk and without the husk, weight of the kernel, percentage of nuts with husk attached, dry matter content in kernels, infection with fungal diseases, and the presence of physiological disorders. The study demonstrated that hazelnuts stored in Xtend® bags and under a controlled atmosphere had a higher weight for the nut in the husk and without the husk, as well as a higher weight of the kernel and water content when compared to batches of hazelnuts stored in a normal atmosphere. The percentage of nuts remaining in the husk was also higher when stored under such conditions. For the majority of investigated cultivars the storage in Xtend® bags, and to a lesser extent under normal atmosphere conditions, resulted in a substantial increase in nuts infected with fungal and abiotic diseases. Among investigated cultivars, ‘Hall’s Giant’ turned out to be the most resistant to storage diseases.

  1. Increased water resistance of CTMP fibers by oat (Avena sativa L.) husk lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipponen, Mika H; Pastinen, Ossi A; Strengell, Reetta; Hyötyläinen, Juha M I; Heiskanen, Isto T; Laakso, Simo

    2010-12-13

    The insertion of oat husk lignin onto chemithermomechanical pulp (CTMP) fibers was studied to increase fiber hydrophobicity. The pretreated pulp samples were subsequently used for preparation of handsheets for characterization. Treatment of CTMP with laccase in the presence of oat husk lignin resulted in a significant increase in hydrophobicity of the handsheet surface, as indicated by dynamic contact angle analysis. Water absorption time of 8 s was obtained with initial contact angle of 118°. Although the handsheet's brightness was reduced by 33%, tensile index was only subtly decreased. Neither laccase nor oat husk lignin alone gave much improved water absorption times. Therefore, handsheets made of laccase-treated pulp with and without oat husk lignin were further examined by XPS, which suggested that both laccase and oat husk lignin were inserted onto CTMP fibers. The oat husk lignin was distributed as heterogeneous aggregates on the handsheet surface whereas laccase was uniformly distributed. Evidence was obtained that the adsorbed laccase layer formed a noncovalent base for the insertion of oat husk lignin onto fiber surfaces.

  2. Stability studies of immobilized lipase on rice husk and eggshell membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, R.; Sanny, S. A.; Derman, E.

    2017-06-01

    Lipase immobilization for biodiesel production is gaining importance day by day. In this study, lipase from Burkholderia cepacia was immobilized on activated support materials namely rice husk and egg shell membrane. Both rice husk and eggshell membrane are natural wastes that holds a lot of potential as immobilization matrix. Rice husk and eggshell membrane were activated with glutaraldehyde. Lipase was immobilized on the glutaraldehyde-activated support material through adsorption. Immobilization efficiency together with enzyme activity was observed to choose the highest enzyme loading for further stability studies. Immobilization efficiency of lipase on rice husk was 81 as compared to an immobilization efficiency of 87 on eggshell membrane. Immobilized lipase on eggshell membrane exhibited higher enzyme activity as compared to immobilized lipase on rice husk. Eggshell membrane also reported higher stability than rice husk as immobilization matrix. Both types of immobilized lipase retatined its activity after ten cycles of reuse. In short, eggshell membrane showed to be a better immobilization platform for lipase as compared to rice husk. However, with further improvement in technique of immobilization, the stability of both types of immobilized lipase can be improved to a greater extent.

  3. Production of Flammulina velutipes on coffee husk and coffee spent-ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leifa Fan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid state cultivation (SSC was carried out to evaluate the feasibility of using coffee husk and spent-ground as substrates for the production of edible mushroom Flammulina under different conditions of moisture and spawn rate. The strain of F. velutipes LPB 01 was adapted for a coffee husk extract medium. Best results were obtained with 25% spawn rate, though there was not much difference when lower spawn rates (10-20% were used. Ideal moisture content for mycelial growth was 60% and 55% for coffee husk and spent-ground, respectively. With coffee husk as substrate, first fructification occurred after 25 days of inoculation and the biological efficiency reached about 56% with two flushes after 40 days. With spent-ground as substrate, first fructification occurred 21 days after inoculation and the biological efficiency reached about 78% in 40 days. There was decrease in the caffeine and tannins contents (10.2 and 20.4%, respectively in coffee husk after 40 days. In coffee spent-ground, the tannin contents decreased by 28% after 40 days. These decrease was attributed to the degradation of caffeine or tannins by the culture because these were not adsorbed in the fungal mycelia. Results showed the feasibility of using coffee husk and coffee spent-ground as substrate without any nutritional supplementation for cultivation of edible fungus in SSC. Spent ground appeared better than coffee husk.

  4. Digestibility, Milk Production, and Udder Health of Etawah Goats Fed with Fermented Coffee Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Badarina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to assess the utilization of coffee husk fermented by Pleurotus ostreatus as feed supplement by measuring the digestibility, milk production and udder health of Etawah goats suffered from subclinical mastitis (+1. There were three experimental diets consisted of T0 (control diet/basal diet without fermented coffee husk, T1 (basal diet with 6% fermented coffee husk and T2 (basal diet with 6% fermented coffee husk soaked in crude palm oil for an hour before using. Basal diet consisted of napier grass (60% and concentrate (40%. The results showed that supplementation of lactating Etawah does with fermented coffee husk did not affect the palatability of the diets, but increased the protein and crude fiber consumption (P<0.05. There was no significant effect on nutrient digestibility and milk production while milk composition (protein, fat, total solid increased in supplemented groups (P<0.05. The persistency of milk production and the somatic cells count were not different. There was an improvement of somatic cells count on supplemented groups. In conclusion, fermented coffee husk could be used as feed supplement without any negative effects on digestibility and milk production. The positive effects to udder health could be expected from including fermented coffee husk in diets.

  5. Pyrolysis of phenols from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryltsova, S.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Rozental, D.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.; Martynov, V.Y.; Chilachava, K.B.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of phenols from lignite semicoking tar at 750-900 {degree}C and contact time of 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbon, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group and component composition of the liquid products and pyrolysis gas were determined. The main groups of compounds in liquid products were analysed.

  6. Solid State production of manganese peroxidases using arecanut husk as substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhila Rajan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The lignocellulosic biomass from arecanut husk (Areca catechu Linnaeus was evaluated as a new substrate for cultivation of Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Phanerochaete sp for solid state fermentation of manganese peroxidase (MnP. Arecanut had a moisture content of 79.84 % for ripe nut husk whereas green nut husk had 68.39 % moisture and a pH of 5.0, 3.0 and 7.0 for raw, ripe and dry husk. Reducing sugar content was 14.31, 19.21 and 1.77(mg/g of husk for raw, ripe and dry nut husk, respectively. Non reducing sugar was 1.04(mg/g of husk for raw and 0.68 (mg/g of husk for dry husk. Solid state fermentation carried out at different pH showed optimum enzyme production at pH 6.0 (52.60 IU/g for P.chrysosporium and pH 5.0 (44.08 IU/g for Phanerochaete sp. Optimum temperature was 30 ± 2º C for both the organisms. Lower concentration of MnSO4 (0.1 mM MnSO4 induced maximum enzyme production in P.chrysosporium whereas Phanerochaete sp. required 1 mM MnSO4 for induction. Absence of carbon and nitrogen stimulated enzyme production in P.chrysosporium while Phanerochaete sp. needed nitrogen. Enzyme was partially purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by ion exchange chromatography.

  7. Kinetic investigation of wood pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurner, F.; Mann, U.; Beck, S. R.

    1980-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the kinetics of the primary reactions of wood pyrolysis. A new experimental method was developed which enabled us to measure the rate of gas, tar, and char production while taking into account the temperature variations during the wood heating up. The experimental method developed did not require any sophisticated instruments. It facilitated the collection of gas, tar and residue (unreacted wood and char) as well as accurate measurement of the temperature inside the wood sample. Expressions relating the kinetic parameters to the measured variables were derived. The pyrolysis kinetics was investigated in the range of 300 to 400/sup 0/C at atmospheric pressure and under nitrogen atmosphere. Reaction temperature and mass fractions of gas, tar, and residue were measured as a function of time. Assuming first-order reactions, the kinetic parameters were determined using differential method. The measured activation energies of wood pyrolysis to gas, tar, and char were 88.6, 112.7, and 106.5 kJ/mole, respectively. These kinetic data were then used to predict the yield of the various pyrolysis products. It was found that the best prediction was obtained when an integral-mean temperature obtained from the temperature-time curve was used as reaction temperature. The pyrolysis products were analyzed to investigate the influence of the pyrolysis conditions on the composition. The gas consisted mainly of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and C/sub 3//sup +/-compounds. The gas composition depended on reaction time as well as reactor temperature. The tar analysis indicated that the tar consisted of about seven compounds. Its major compound was believed to be levoglucosan. Elemental analysis for the char showed that the carbon content increased with increasing temperature.

  8. The potential of pyrolysis technology in climate change mitigation – influence of process design and –parameters, simulated in SuperPro Designer Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Tobias; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Bruun, Esben

    -balance is only robust for the slow pyrolysis scenario. The CO2 benefit of the most carbon-negative slow pyrolysis process is estimated to be around 10 % of the atmospheric carbon stored in the original biomass when natural gas is applied for energy substitution. This process avoids the emission of around 150...... production from the pyrolysis and the full energy potential of the biomass, quantified by complete conversion in either combustion or gasification systems. It was concluded that it is feasible to produce carbon-negative energy under a variation of different settings, but also that the negative carbon...... in commercial pyrolysis technology that focuses on fast pyrolysis processes with maximized bio-oil production, the twin challenge of climate mitigation and sustainable energy production is most efficiently addressed with a combination of slow pyrolysis and complete biomass conversion through combustion...

  9. Comet assay to assess the genotoxicity of Persian walnut (Juglans regia L.) husks with statistical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriccione, Milena; Ciniglia, Claudia

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to confirm the utility of the Comet assay as a genotoxicity screening test for evaluating the impact of walnut husk aqueous extract. Phytotoxicity assays using diluted and undiluted walnut husk aqueous extracts were performed on young roots of Raphanus sativus (radish), and the Comet assay was used to evaluate DNA integrity in isolated radish radicle nuclei. The results reveal a dose-dependent accumulation of DNA damage in radish radicles treated with walnut husks water extract and that the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test combined with Johnson SB distribution was the best approach for describing Comet assay data.

  10. An optically accessible pyrolysis microreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraban, J. H.; Ellison, G. Barney [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); David, D. E. [Integrated Instrument Development Facility, CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0216 (United States); Daily, J. W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We report an optically accessible pyrolysis micro-reactor suitable for in situ laser spectroscopic measurements. A radiative heating design allows for completely unobstructed views of the micro-reactor along two axes. The maximum temperature demonstrated here is only 1300 K (as opposed to 1700 K for the usual SiC micro-reactor) because of the melting point of fused silica, but alternative transparent materials will allow for higher temperatures. Laser induced fluorescence measurements on nitric oxide are presented as a proof of principle for spectroscopic characterization of pyrolysis conditions.

  11. Methods and apparatuses for preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandvold, Timothy A; Baird, Lance Awender; Frey, Stanley Joseph

    2013-10-01

    Methods and apparatuses for preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil are provided herein. In an embodiment, a method of preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil includes providing a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream having an original oxygen content. The biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream is hydrodeoxygenated under catalysis in the presence of hydrogen to form a hydrodeoxygenated pyrolysis oil stream comprising a cyclic paraffin component. At least a portion of the hydrodeoxygenated pyrolysis oil stream is dehydrogenated under catalysis to form the upgraded pyrolysis oil.

  12. An Environmental and Economic Evaluation of Pyrolysis for Energy Generation in Taiwan with Endogenous Land Greenhouse Gases Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Chih-Chun; McCarl, Bruce A.; Chen, Chi-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Taiwan suffers from energy insecurity and the threat of potential damage from global climate changes. Finding ways to alleviate these forces is the key to Taiwan’s future social and economic development. This study examines the economic and environmental impacts when ethanol, conventional electricity and pyrolysis-based electricity are available alternatives. Biochar, as one of the most important by-product from pyrolysis, has the potential to provide significant environmental benefits. Therefore, alternative uses of biochar are also examined in this study. In addition, because planting energy crops would change the current land use pattern, resulting in significant land greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions, this important factor is also incorporated. Results show that bioenergy production can satisfy part of Taiwan’s energy demand, but net GHG emissions offset declines if ethanol is chosen. Moreover, at high GHG price conventional electricity and ethanol will be driven out and pyrolysis will be a dominant technology. Fast pyrolysis dominates when ethanol and GHG prices are low, but slow pyrolysis is dominant at high GHG price, especially when land GHG emissions are endogenously incorporated. The results indicate that when land GHG emission is incorporated, up to 3.8 billion kWh electricity can be produced from fast pyrolysis, while up to 2.2 million tons of CO2 equivalent can be offset if slow pyrolysis is applied. PMID:24619159

  13. An environmental and economic evaluation of pyrolysis for energy generation in Taiwan with endogenous land greenhouse gases emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Chih-Chun; McCarl, Bruce A; Chen, Chi-Chung

    2014-03-11

    Taiwan suffers from energy insecurity and the threat of potential damage from global climate changes. Finding ways to alleviate these forces is the key to Taiwan's future social and economic development. This study examines the economic and environmental impacts when ethanol, conventional electricity and pyrolysis-based electricity are available alternatives. Biochar, as one of the most important by-product from pyrolysis, has the potential to provide significant environmental benefits. Therefore, alternative uses of biochar are also examined in this study. In addition, because planting energy crops would change the current land use pattern, resulting in significant land greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions, this important factor is also incorporated. Results show that bioenergy production can satisfy part of Taiwan's energy demand, but net GHG emissions offset declines if ethanol is chosen. Moreover, at high GHG price conventional electricity and ethanol will be driven out and pyrolysis will be a dominant technology. Fast pyrolysis dominates when ethanol and GHG prices are low, but slow pyrolysis is dominant at high GHG price, especially when land GHG emissions are endogenously incorporated. The results indicate that when land GHG emission is incorporated, up to 3.8 billion kWh electricity can be produced from fast pyrolysis, while up to 2.2 million tons of CO2 equivalent can be offset if slow pyrolysis is applied.

  14. Experimental and Modelling Studies of Biomass Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ka Leung Lam; Adetoyese Olajire Oyedu~; Chi Wai Hui

    2012-01-01

    The analysis on the feedstock pyrolysis characteristic and the impacts of process parameters on pyrolysis outcomes can assist in the designing, operating and optimizing pyrolysis processes. This work aims to utilize both experimental and modelling approaches to perform the analysis on three biomass feedstocks--wood sawdust, bamboo shred and Jatropha Curcas seed cake residue, and to provide insights for the design_and operation of pyro-lysis processes. For the experimental part, the study investigated the effect of heating rate, final pyrolysis tempera- ture and sample size on pyrolysis using common thermal analysis techniques. For the modelling part, a transient mathematical model that integrates the feedstock characteristic from the experimental study was used to simulate the pyrolysis progress of selected biomass feedstock particles for reactor scenarios. The model composes of several sub-models that describe pyrolysis kinetic and heat flow, particle heat transfer, particle shrinking and reactor opera-tion. With better understanding of the effects of process conditions and feedstock characteristics on pyrolysis through both experimental and modelling studies, this work discusses on the considerations of and interrelation between feedstock size, pyrolysis energy usage, processing time and product quality for the design and operation of pyrolysis processes.

  15. Production, properties and utilisation of pyrolysis oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipilae, K.; Oasmaa, A.; Arpiainen, V.; Solantausta, Y.; Leppaemaeki, E.; Kuoppala, E.; Levander, J.; Kleemola, J.; Saarimaeki, P. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-01

    In this project VTT Energy co-ordinates the EU JOULE Project `Biofuel oil for power plants and boilers` supporting the development projects of Finnish enterprises, and participates in the Pyrolysis Project of IEA Bioenergy Agreement. Presently two pyrolysis devices with capacities of 150 g/h and 1 kg/h are used for the project. Hot gas filtering tests by using one ceramic candle equipment have been carried out with the 1 kg/h device for pyrolysis oil. The solids and alkali contents of the product oil were reduced clearly. Suitable conditions are being defined for continuous hot gas filtering. A PDU device of 20 kg/h is being commissioned. The main aim of the chemical characterisation of pyrolysis oil was to develop as simple a method as possible for differentiating pyrolysis oils and for finding correlations between the characteristics and behaviour of pyrolysis oils. Pyrolysis oils produced from various raw materials (hardwood, pine, straw) were analysed and compared with each other. VTT Energy participates in the pyrolysis network (EU/PYNE) of EU, the aim of which is to collect and disseminate research results of pyrolysis studies, i.e., through a journal with a wide circulation. VTT also participates in the pyrolysis activity of IEA (PYRA), the other partners being Great Britain, EU, Canada and the United States. I.e., quality criteria and improvement, occupational safety and pyrolysis kinetics are discussed in IEA/PYRA

  16. Malaysian Rice Husk Ash – Improving the Durability and Corrosion Resistance of Concrete: Pre-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidi Abdulaziz

    2010-03-01

    construction materials is the outcome of the fast polluting environment. Supplementary cementitious materials prove to be effective to meet most of the requirements of durable concrete. Rice husk ash is found to be greater to other supplementary materials like silica fume and fly ash. Due to its high pozzolanic activity, both strength and durability of concrete are enriched. Addition of rice husk ash to Portland cement not only improves the early strength of concrete, but also forms a calcium silicate hydrate gel around the cement particles which is highly dense and less porous. This may increase the strength of concrete against cracking. Previously, investigation on the corrosion performance of rice husk ash blended concrete is very limited. Further researches are ongoing or have started recently by the authors to study the performance of RHA and corrosion of concrete mixes. Various tests were carried out to evaluate durability of concrete made with 10, 20, 30 and 40% replacements of RHA by weight of cement. Nevertheless, the results of compressive strength, absorption test and chloride penetration from previous investigation were presents in this study.

  17. Use or rice husk ash an addition in mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez de Rojas, M. Isabel

    1986-09-01

    Full Text Available With the aid of a 400-litre capacity pilot furnace, in which 40 Kg of rice husk is submitted to controlled combustion, an ash (RHA is obtained for use as an addition, the physicochemical properties of which form the focal point of this work. Results will also be presented for the combustion power of the husk ≃ 4000 kcal/kg, being greater than half the value for normal bituminous coals. Conglomerates have been obtained by mixing RHA with different proportions of lime and portland cement, and their properties are studied with regard to both mortars and concretes. The ultimate aim of the work is to demonstrate how rice husk (world production of which is estimated at 500.106 m3 per annum may be feasibly applied as an addition, without forgetting its excellent properties as a fuel, which makes it particularly suitable for developing countries with a shortage of cement and energy resources.

    Mediante la utilización de un horno-piloto de unos 400 litros de capacidad, en el que se realiza la combustión controlada de unos 40 kg de cáscara de arroz, se consigue una ceniza (RHA, sobre cuyas propiedades físico-químicas se centra el trabajo, para su empleo como adición. Se presentan igualmente resultados sobre el poder de combustión de la cascara ≃ 4.000 kcal/kg, superior a la mitad del valor de los carbones bituminosos normales. Mediante mezclas de RHA con distintas proporciones de cal o de cemento portland, se han conseguido conglomerantes cuyas propiedades se estudian, tanto sobre morteros, como sobre hormigones. El objetivo último del trabajo es mostrar la factible aplicabilidad de la cascara de arroz (cuya "producción" mundial se estima en 500.106 m3 anuales como adición, sin olvidar sus excelentes cualidades como combustible lo que hace especialmente idónea en países en vías de desarrollo, deficitarios en cemento y recursos energéticos.

  18. Soot morphology in laser pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandu, Ion C.; Pasuk, I.; Morjan, Ion G.; Voicu, Ion N.; Alexandrescu, Rodica; Fleaca, Claudiu T.; Ciupina, Victor; Dumitrache, Florian V.; Soare, Iuliana; Ploscaru, Mihaela I.; Daniels, H.; Westwood, A.; Rand, B.

    2004-10-01

    Soots obtained by laser pyrolysis of different gaseous/vapor hydrocarbons were investigated. The morphology variation of carbon soot versus process parameters and nature of reactants was analyzed and discussed. The role of oxygen is essential in obtaining soot particles having considerable curved-layer content.

  19. Cellulose nanowhiskers from coconut husk fibers: effect of preparation conditions on their thermal and morphological behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellulose nanowhiskers were prepared by sulfuric acid hydrolysis from coconut husk fibers which had previously been submitted to a delignification process. The effects of preparation conditions on the thermal and morphological behavior of the nanocrystals were investigated. Cellulose nanowhisker sus...

  20. Studies on the Effect of Rice Husk Ash as Cement Admixture * M.U ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    ABSTRACT: Compressive strength tests were carried out on six mortar cubes with cement replaced by rice husk ... This result, therefore, indicated that RHA can be used as cement substitute ..... The loss on ignition obtained (18.25%) is higher.

  1. Juglone Content in Leaf and Green Husk of Five Walnut (Juglans regia L. Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Niculina COSMULESCU

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Juglone (5-hydroxy-1,4-napthoquinone is a chemical compound released by walnut trees that can be toxic for surrounding plant species. In the present study, juglone was identified in leaves and green husk in five walnut cultivars: Germisara, Jupanesti, Franquette, Vina, Valcor by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-RP. Juglone was found predominant in green husk (average value of cultivars is about 31.308 mg/100 g. Significant differences in contents of identified juglone were observed among cultivars that ranged from 20.56 to 42.78 mg/100g for green husk, and 5.42 to 22.82 mg/100 g for leaves. It was also found that walnut green husk and leaves represent the most important source of walnut phenolics.

  2. Removal of Zn(II) and Pb (II) ions Using Rice Husk in Food Industrial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    Removal of Zn(II) and Pb (II) ions Using Rice Husk in Food Industrial Wastewater. *ASRARI, ELHAM; TAVALLALI ... Payame Noor University (PNU), Shiraz, 711955 -1368, Iran ... need to reconsider consumption patterns and the way resources ...

  3. Soil Incorporation of Silica-Rich Rice Husk Decreases Inorganic Arsenic in Rice Grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfferth, Angelia L; Morris, Andrew H; Gill, Rattandeep; Kearns, Kelli A; Mann, Jessica N; Paukett, Michelle; Leskanic, Corey

    2016-05-18

    Arsenic decreases rice yield, and inorganic grain As threatens human health; thus, strategies to decrease rice As are critically needed. Increased plant-available silica (Si) can decrease rice As, yet the source of Si matters. Rice husk, an underutilized and Si-rich byproduct of rice production that contains less labile C and an order of magnitude less As than rice straw, may be an economically viable Si resource to decrease rice As, yet the impact of rice husk incorporation on As in the rice-soil nexus has not been reported. This proof-of-concept study shows that rice husk incorporation to soil (1% w/w) decreases inorganic grain As by 25-50% without negatively affecting grain Cd, yield, or dissolved CH4 levels. Rice husk is a critical yet perhaps overlooked resource to improve soil quality through enhanced nutrient availability and attenuate human health risks through consumption of As-laden grain.

  4. Use of psyllium (isubgol) husk as an alternative gelling agent for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... microalgae (Cyanobacteria) Chroococcus limneticus and eukaryotic green ... psyllium husk were far lower than 722000 cells mL-1 on agar gelled ..... Evidence for the recognition of a secondary structure of carrageenan.

  5. effects of variability in the pozzolanic properties of rice husk ash on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Keywords: Compressive Strength, Concrete, Rice Husk Ash (RHA), ... When the material is mixed with lime in powdered .... that it was free from deleterious materials as required .... Properties and Drying Shrinkage”, Australian Journal of.

  6. Effect of rice husk ash on some geotechnical properties of lateritic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    The study is an investigation into the effect of rice husk ash (RHA) on some geotechnical properties of a ... Optimum Moisture Content (OMC), California Bearing Ratio (CBR) and Consistency indices. ... RHA used as overall binder system for.

  7. Conversion of rice husk ash to zeolite beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyoko, Didik; Ramli, Zainab; Endud, Salasiah; Hamdan, Halimaton; Sulikowski, Bogdan

    2006-01-01

    White rice husk ash (RHA), an agriculture waste containing crystalline tridymite and alpha-cristobalite, was used as a silica source for zeolite Beta synthesis. The crystallization of zeolite Beta from RHA at 150 degrees C in the presence of tetraethylammonium hydroxide was monitored by XRD, FTIR and (29)Si MAS NMR techniques. It was found that zeolite Beta started to form after 12h and the complete crystallization of zeolite Beta phase was achieved after 2d. XRD, (29)Si MAS NMR and solid yield studies indicate that the transformation mechanism of silica present in RHA to zeolite Beta involves dissolution of the ash, formation of an amorphous aluminosilicate after 6h of crystallization, followed by dissolution in the mother liquor and final transformation to pure zeolite Beta crystals.

  8. Effect of Rice Husk Ash on Cement Stabilized Laterite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa ALHASSAN

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Laterite soil collected from Maikunkele area of Minna, classified as an A-7-6 on AASHTO classification, was stabilized with 2-8% cement by weight of the dry soil. Using British Standard Light (BSL compaction energy, the effect of Rice Husk Ash (RHA on the soil was investigated with respect to compaction characteristics, California Bearing Ratio (CBR and Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS tests. Results obtained, indicate a general decrease in Maximum Dry Density (MDD and increase in Optimum Moisture Content (OMC, all with increase in RHA Content (2-8% at specified cement contents. There was also a tremendous improvement in the CBR and UCS with increase in the RHA content at specified cement contents to their peak values at between 4-6% RHA. The UCS values also improved with curing age. This indicates the potentials of using 4-6% RHA admixed with less cement contents for laterite soil stabilization.

  9. Nutritive Value of Coffee Husk Fermented with Pleurotus ostreatus as Ruminant Feed

    OpenAIRE

    I. Badarina; D. Evvyernie; T. Toharmat; E. N. Herliyana; L. K. Darusman

    2013-01-01

    Coffee husks is an abundant crop residue but the content of anti nutritional substances such as caffeine, tannin, and lignin limit its utilization as feed ingredients. Higher fungi such as Pleurotus ostreatus have the ability to biotransform lignocellulosic materials through their extracellular enzyme activities. This study was carried out to assess the effect of solid state fermentation by using P. ostreatus on nutrient composition of coffee husk and to evaluate its potency as ruminant feed ...

  10. Development of Briquette from Coir Dust and Rice Husk Blend: An Alternative Energy Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Hamidul Islam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Biomass is one of the predominant renewable energy sources and the use of biomass for the energy generation has got much attention due to its environmental friendliness. Densification of coir dust into fuel briquette can solve waste disposal problem as well as can serve as an alternative energy source. The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of producing briquette from coir dust and rice husk blend without binder. During this study, a briquetting experiment was conducted with different coir dust and rice husk blends (i.e. coir dust and rice husk ratio of 80:20, 60:40, 50:50, 40:60, 20:80 and 0:100. Briquetting operation was performed using a die-screw press type briquetting machine. The briquettes were tested to evaluate their density, compressive strength, calorific value, burning rate and water vaporizing capacity and it was found that mixing ratio had a significant effect on the physical, mechanical and combustion properties of the coir dust-rice husk briquettes. Density, compressive strength and calorific value and water vaporizing capacity were increased with increasing mixing ratio while burning rate was decreased. Coir dust-rice husk briquettes with mixing ratio of 20:80 had higher density (1.413 g/cm3, compressive strength (218.4 N/cm2, calorific value (4879 kcal/kg, water vaporizing capacity (0.853 l/kg and low burning rate (0.783 kg/hour followed by the mixing ratio 40:60, 50:50, 60:40 and 0:100. The results indicate that coir dust and rice husk blend briquettes were found to have better overall handling characteristics over rice husk briquette. However, production of briquettes from coir dust and rice husk at mixing ratio of 50:50 was found to be more suitable for commercial application in terms of cost effectiveness.

  11. Fixed bed pyrolysis of biomass solid waste for bio-oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Ali, Mohamed Hairol Md; Haziq, Miftah

    2017-08-01

    Biomass solid waste in the form of rice husk particle is pyrolyzed in a fixed bed stainless steel pyrolysis reactor of 50 mm diameter and 50 cm length. The biomass solid feedstock is prepared prior to pyrolysis. The reactor bed is heated by means of a cylindrical heater of biomass source. A temperature of 500°C is maintained with an apperent vapor residence time of 3-5 sec. The products obtained are liquid bio-oil, solid char and gases. The liquid product yield is found to be 30% by weight of solid biomass feedstock while the solid product yield is found to be 35% by weight of solid biomass feedtock, the rest is gas. The bio-oil is a single-phase brownish color liquid of acrid smell. The heating value of the oil is determined to be 25 MJ/kg. The density and pH value are found to be 1.125 kg/m3 and 3.78 respectively.

  12. Biomass Catalytic Pyrolysis with Ni Based Catalyst to Produce Hydrogen Rich Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mingfeng; LIU Min; XU Xiwei; LI Bosong; ZHANG Qiang; JIAN Enchen

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen rich gas was produced using rice husk as biomass material on the continuous biomass pyrolysis apparatus which consisted of continuous pyrolysis reactor and secondary catalytic cracking reactor. Ni based catalysts of different Ni/Al mass ratio and calcined temperature were prepared by impregnating method. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD),scan electron microscope (SEM) and FT-IR Spectrometer (FT-IR). Ni based catalyst showed good selectivity for H2 production from biomass. Catalysts prepared under different conditions had little influence on the yields of three states products when used at the same cracking temperature. Ni/Al mass ratio played an important role in products selectivity. However, the content of NiO increased further when Ni/Al mass ratio values reached 0.7 : 10, and the yield of H2 slightly increased. Hydrogen yield was greatly impacted by calcined temperature. Catalyst calcined at 550"C performed best. When the catalyst was calcined at high temperature, NiO in the catalyst transformed into NiAl2O4, and the acid site also changed, which caused the deactivation of the catalyst. The hydrogen yield increased with the cracking temperature. The highest stable yield of hydrogen was about 30% without increasing with the cracking temperature.

  13. Lignin Valorisation for Chemicals and (Transportation) Fuels via (Catalytic) Pyrolysis and Hydrodeoxygenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wild, Paul; Van der Laan, Ron; Kloekhorst, Arjan; Heeres, Hero

    2009-01-01

    New technology is needed to exploit the potential of lignin as a renewable feedstock for fuels, chemicals and performance products. Fast fluidized bed pyrolysis of different lignins at 400 degrees C yields up to 2.1 wt% (d.b.) of a phenolic fraction containing 10 wt%, (d.b.) of several phenols. Subs

  14. Pyrolysis oil combustion in a horizontal box furnace with an externally mixed nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combustion characteristics of neat biomass fast-pyrolysis oil were studied in a horizontal combustion chamber with a rectangular cross-section. An air-assisted externally mixed nozzle known to successfully atomize heavy fuel oils was installed in a modified nominal 100 kW (350,000 BTU/h nominal cap...

  15. Effect of grinding on chemical and physical properties of rice husk ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sumrerng Rukzon; Prinya Chindaprasirt; Rattana Mahachai

    2009-01-01

    The effect of grinding on the chemical and physical properties of rice husk ash was studied.Four rice husk ashes with dif-ferent finenesses, i.e.coarse original rice husk ash (RHA0), RHAI, RHA2, and RHA3 were used for the study.Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was partially replaced with rice husk ash at 20% by weight of binder.The water to binder ratio (W/B) of the mortar was maintained at 110%±5% with flow table test.Specific gravity, fineness, chemical properties, compressive strength, and porosity test of mortars were determined.The differences in chemical composition of the rice husk ashes with different finenesses from the same batch are small.The use of RHA3 produces the mortars with good strength and low porosity.The strength of the mortar im-proves with partial replacement of RHA3 in comparison with normal coarse rice husk ash.The use of RHA3 results in a strong anddense mortar, which is due to the better dispersion and filling effect, as well as an increase in the pozzolanic reaction.

  16. Physical, chemical and mechanical properties of pehuen cellulosic husk and its pehuen-starch based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño, J; Rodríguez-Llamazares, S; Carrasco, C; Bouza, R

    2012-11-01

    Pehuen cellulosic husk was characterized and employed as reinforcement for composite materials. In this research, thermoplastic pehuen starch (TPS) and TPS/poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composites, reinforced with 5 and 10% of pehuen husk, were prepared by melt-blending. Comparative samples of pehuen TPS and TPS/PLA/PVA blend were also studied. Physical, thermal, structural and mechanical properties of composites were evaluated. Pehuen husk mainly consists of cellulose (50 wt%), hemicellulose (30 wt%) and lignin (14 wt%). In respect to lipids, this husk has only a 0.6 wt%. Its surface is smooth and damage-free and it is decomposed above 325 °C. The incorporation of pehuen husk improved considerably the thermal stability and mechanical properties of the studied composites, mainly in TPS composites. Their thermal stability enhances since biofiber hinders the "out-diffusion" of volatile molecules from the polymer matrix, while mechanical properties could raise due to the natural affinity between husk and starch in the pehuen seed.

  17. Bioethanol production from steam-exploded rice husk by recombinant Escherichia coli KO11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Takamitsu; Yoshiba, Yusuke; Takashina, Tomonori; Hieda, Kazuo; Shimizu, Norio

    2017-03-01

    Rice husk is one of the most abundant types of lignocellulosic biomass. Because of its significant amount of sugars, such as cellulose and hemicellulose, it can be used for the production of biofuels such as bioethanol. However, the complex structure of lignocellulosic biomass, consisting of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, is resistant to degradation, which limits biomass utilization for ethanol production. The protection of cellulose by lignin contributes to the recalcitrance of lignocelluloses to hydrolysis. Therefore, we conducted steam-explosion treatment as pretreatment of rice husk. However, recombinant Escherichia coli KO11 did not ferment the reducing sugar solution obtained by enzymatic saccharification of steam-exploded rice husk. When the steam-exploded rice husk was washed with hot water to remove inhibitory substances and M9 medium (without glucose) was used as a fermentation medium, E. coli KO11 completely fermented the reducing sugar solution obtained by enzymatic saccharification of hot water washing-treated steam-exploded rice husk to ethanol. We report here the efficient production of bioethanol using steam-exploded rice husk.

  18. Medium-density particleboards from modified rice husks and soybean protein concentrate-based adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciannamea, Emiliano M; Stefani, Pablo M; Ruseckaite, Roxana A

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this work was to evaluate the technical feasibility of using rice husk (RH) as wood substitute in the production of environmentally sound medium-density particleboards using adhesives from soybean protein concentrate (SPC). Chemical modification of rice husk with sodium hydroxide and sodium hydroxide followed by hydrogen peroxide (bleaching) were undertaken to evaluate the effect of such treatments on the composition and topology of rice husk and the performance of produced panels. Both treatments were efficient in partially eliminating hemicelluloses, lignin and silica from RH, as evidenced by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). Scanning electron microscopy observations suggested that alkaline treatment resulted in a more damaged RH substrate than bleaching. The dependence of mechanical properties (modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, and internal bond) and the physical properties (water absorption and thickness swelling) on chemical treatments performed on both, rice husk and SPC was studied. Bleached-rice husk particleboards bonded with alkaline-treated soybean protein concentrate displayed the best set of final properties. Particleboards with this formulation met the minimum requirements of internal bond, modulus of elasticity and modulus of rupture recommended by the US Standard ANSI/A208.1 specifications for M1, MS and M2-grade medium-density particleboards, but failed to achieve the thickness swelling value recommended for general use panels. This limitation of soybean protein concentrate-bonded rice husk particleboards was counterbalanced by the advantage of being formaldehyde-free which makes them a suitable alternative for indoor applications.

  19. Biosorption of Am-241 and Cs-137 by radioactive liquid waste by coffee husk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Rafael Vicente de Padua; Sakata, Solange Kazumi; Bellini, Maria Helena; Marumo, Julio Takehiro, E-mail: jtmarumo@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Radioactive Waste Management Laboratory of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN/SP, has stored many types of radioactive liquid wastes, including liquid scintillators, mixed wastes from chemical analysis and spent decontamination solutions. These wastes need special attention, because the available treatment processes are often expensive and difficult to manage. Biosorption using biomass of vegetable using agricultural waste has become a very attractive technique because it involves the removal of heavy metals ions by low cost biossorbents. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential of the coffee husk to remove Am-241 and Cs-137 from radioactive liquid waste. The coffee husk was tested in two forms, treated and untreated. The chemical treatment of the coffee husk was performed with HNO{sub 3} and NaOH diluted solutions. The results showed that the coffee husk did not showed significant differences in behavior and capacity for biosorption for Am-241 and Cs-137 over time. Coffee husk showed low biosorption capacity for Cs-137, removing only 7.2 {+-} 1.0% in 4 hours of contact time. For Am-241, the maximum biosorption was 57,5 {+-} 0.6% in 1 hours. These results suggest that coffee husk in untreated form can be used in the treatment of radioactive waste liquid containing Am-241. (author)

  20. The influence of Rice Husk Fiber on The Properties of Epoxidized Natural Rubber/Rice Husk Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahham Omar S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, curing characteristics, tensile and physical properties of epoxidized natural rubber/rice husk (ENR-50/RH compounds were investigated. Different RH loading (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Phr and size (fine size at 100-300 μm and coarse size at 5-10 mm were prepared and used. Results indicated that the scorch time (t2 and cure time (t90 became shorter with increasing RH content. In contrast, minimum torque (ML and maximum torque (MH increased with increasing RH content in the rubber compounds. Hardness and crosslink density showed improvement with increasing RH content. Tensile strength (Ts and elongation at break (Eb decreased slightly as RH content increased. However, the fine size of RH recorded better overall properties compared to the RH coarse size at same loading the rubber compound.

  1. Simulation of coal pyrolysis in plasma jet by CPD model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Y.; Xie, K.; Zhu, S.; Fletcher, T.H. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China). State Key Lab. of C1 Chemistry and Technology

    2001-12-01

    Reaction of coal in a plasma jet is complex and extremely rapid, and acetylene and carbon monoxide are the main products in the pyrolysis gas. Coal pyrolysis is assumed as the first step reaction when coal is injected into hot plasma jet with initial average temperature of 3700 K. Chemical percolation devolatalization (CPD) is employed first to simulate this procedure in mechanism. The calculation results indicate coal pyrolysis rate in plasma jet is very fast and the retention time of coal staying in reactor is only several milliseconds. Comparing the calculation with experiment result, it was concluded that the CPD agree with the experiment well when the coal feed rate is larger than about 2.0 g s{sup -1}. As the coal feed rate was increased, the average temperature of coal particle during staying in reactor was reduced and the residual time became long, but it was not found that the residual time influenced the coal conversion evidently. 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Effect of Blended Feedstock on Pyrolysis Oil Composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kristin M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gaston, Katherine R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Current techno-economic analysis results indicate biomass feedstock cost represents 27% of the overall minimum fuel selling price for biofuels produced from fast pyrolysis followed by hydrotreating (hydro-deoxygenation, HDO). As a result, blended feedstocks have been proposed as a way to both reduce cost as well as tailor key chemistry for improved fuel quality. For this study, two feedstocks were provided by Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Both were pyrolyzed and collected under the same conditions in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU). The resulting oil properties were then analyzed and characterized for statistical differences.

  3. Pyrolysis of hydrocarbons from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryl' tsova, S.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Rozental, D.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of hydrocarbons from lignite semicoking tar in the range 750-900{degree}C at a contact time within 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbons, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group and component compositions of the liquid and gaseous products were determined. The optimal pyrolysis parameters from the viewpoint of obtaining the maximal yield of particular 'secondary' hydrocarbons were recommended.

  4. Pyrolysis of asphaltenes from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryl' tsova, S.V.; Rozental, D.A.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of asphaltenes from lignite semicoking tar in the range 750-900{degree}C at a contact time within 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbons, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group composition of the liquid products were determined. The total analysis of the major groups of compounds present in the liquid products was performed, and the optimal conditions of pyrolysis, from the viewpoint of preparation of particular compounds, were recommended.

  5. Modeling pyrolysis of charring material in fire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A modified model of pyrolysis for charring materials in fire has been proposed in this note. In this model some special factors which show the effect on pyrolysis are considered, i.e. heat loss by convection and radiation caused by surface temperature rise and shrinkage of char surface are considered. Experimental device is designed specially for validating the reliability of the model. Effects of density of materials and heat radiation on pyrolysis of materials have also been investigated.

  6. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    OpenAIRE

    Débora Almeida; Maria de Fátima Marques

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolit...

  7. Charcoal Production via Multistage Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adetoyese Olajire Oyedun; Ka Leung Lam; Chi Wai Hui

    2012-01-01

    Interests in charcoal usage have recently been re-ignited because it is believed that charcoal is a muchbetter fuel than wood. The conventional charcoal production consumes a large amount of energy due to the prolonged heating time and cooling time which contribute to the process completing in one to several days. Wood py-rolysis consists of both endothermic and exothermic reactions as well as the decomposition of the different components at different temperature range (hemicellulose: 200-260℃; cellulose: 240-350℃ and lignin: 280-500℃). Inthis study we propose a multistagepyrolysis which is an approach to carry out pyrolysis with multiple heating stages so as to gain certain processing benefits. We propose a three-stage approach which includes rapid stepwise heating stage to a variable target temperatures of 250 ℃, 300℃, 350 ℃ and 400 ℃, slow and gradual heatingstage to a tinal temperature of 400℃ and adiabatic with cooling stage. The multi-stage pyrolysis process can save 30% energy and the processing time by using a first temperature target of 300 ℃and heating rate of 5℃.min-1 to produce a fixed-carbon yield of 25.73% as opposed to the base case with a fixed-carbon yield of23.18%.

  8. Pyrolysis process for producing fuel gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serio, Michael A. (Inventor); Kroo, Erik (Inventor); Wojtowicz, Marek A. (Inventor); Suuberg, Eric M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Solid waste resource recovery in space is effected by pyrolysis processing, to produce light gases as the main products (CH.sub.4, H.sub.2, CO.sub.2, CO, H.sub.2O, NH.sub.3) and a reactive carbon-rich char as the main byproduct. Significant amounts of liquid products are formed under less severe pyrolysis conditions, and are cracked almost completely to gases as the temperature is raised. A primary pyrolysis model for the composite mixture is based on an existing model for whole biomass materials, and an artificial neural network models the changes in gas composition with the severity of pyrolysis conditions.

  9. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolites can be used as catalysts in catalytic pyrolysis and influence the final products obtained.

  10. Pyrolysis processing for solid waste resource recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serio, Michael A. (Inventor); Kroo, Erik (Inventor); Wojtowicz, Marek A. (Inventor); Suuberg, Eric M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Solid waste resource recovery in space is effected by pyrolysis processing, to produce light gases as the main products (CH.sub.4, H.sub.2, CO.sub.2, CO, H.sub.2O, NH.sub.3) and a reactive carbon-rich char as the main byproduct. Significant amounts of liquid products are formed under less severe pyrolysis conditions, and are cracked almost completely to gases as the temperature is raised. A primary pyrolysis model for the composite mixture is based on an existing model for whole biomass materials, and an artificial neural network models the changes in gas composition with the severity of pyrolysis conditions.

  11. Effects of Pyrolysis Temperature on Characteristics of Biomass Char%热解温度对生物质半焦特征的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁许鳌; 冉旭; 郑小龙; 阎维平

    2012-01-01

    Mechanism-based pyrolysis experiments were carried out on rice husk and straw, during which physicochemical properties of the char were studied using TG, SEM, EDX and XDR, such as the pore structure, slagging characteristics, migration of chlorine and sulfur, and crystalline phase of the inorganic compound, etc. Results show that the pore structure of biomass char changes a lot at 500-800 ℃. When the pyrolysis temperature gets up to 1 000 ℃, the convex side of rice husk char will appear in melting state, while the straw char in melting and bounding condition. Most remaining of chlorine and sulfur will precipitate from the char at 800-1 000 ℃. The phase changes greatly and amorphous inorganic compound appears at a final pyrolysis temperature of 1 000 ℃ in the process of rice husk and straw pyrolysis.%对稻壳和稻秸进行了机理性热解试验,并采用TG、SEM、EDS和XDR方法研究和分析了半焦的孔隙结构、结渣特性、氯和硫元素迁移和无机化合物晶相等物化特性的变化规律.结果表明:在500~800℃,生物质热解半焦孔隙结构的变化较大.当热解温度为1000℃时,稻壳半焦的凸面呈现熔融现象,稻秸半焦呈现熔融黏结现象.在800~1000℃,半焦中剩余的氯和硫大部分会析出;在稻壳和稻秸热解过程中,当终温为1000℃时,物相发生较大变化并且出现非晶态的无机化合物.

  12. Use of Rice Husk Ash as Partial Replacement with Cement In Concrete- A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav Ghosal,

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid increase in construction activities has resulted in shortage of conventional construction materials.In the present scenario, the high cost of conventional building materials is a major factor affecting housing delivery in the world.This has necessitated research into alternative materials of construction.The effective housing techniques deal with reduction in cost of construction as well as providing strength to buildings.Mainly gravel,sand and cement are used in the preparation of conventional concrete.While the use of agricultural by-product i.e. rice husk as a partial replacement with the conventional fine aggregates is expected to serve the purpose of encouraging housing developers in building construction.Rice husk is produced in about 100 million tons per annum in India. Twenty kg of rice husk are obtained from 100 kg of rice.It contains organic substances and 20% inorganic material.Ash from rice is obtained as a result of combustion of rice husk at suitable temperature. Proper utilization of it aims to save the environment,encourages the Government to find solutions regarding disposal to land fills of waste materials,and provides new knowledge to the contractors and developers on how to improve the construction industry by using rice husk, to sustain good product performance and to meet recycling goals.The rice husk ash concrete aims to prepare light weight structural concrete which may reduce considerably the self load of structures and permits large precast units to be handled.The main objective is therefore to encourage the use of these ‘seemingly’ waste products as construction materials in low cost housing.The various basic properties of rice husk concrete are reviewed in this paper.

  13. Elucidation of the effect of ionic liquid pretreatment on rice husk via structural analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang Teck

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the present study, three ionic liquids, namely 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([EMIM]OAc, and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethyl phosphate ([EMIM]DEP, were used to partially dissolve rice husk, after which the cellulose were regenerated by the addition of water. The aim of the investigation is to examine the implications of the ionic liquid pretreatments on rice husk composition and structure. Results From the attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform-infrared (ATR FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM results, the regenerated cellulose were more amorphous, less crystalline, and possessed higher structural disruption compared with untreated rice husk. The major component of regenerated cellulose from [BMIM]Cl and [EMIM]DEP pretreatments was cellulose-rich material, while cellulose regenerated from [EMIM]OAc was a matrix of cellulose and lignin. Cellulose regenerated from ionic pretreatments could be saccharified via enzymatic hydrolysis, and resulted in relatively high reducing sugars yields, whereas enzymatic hydrolysis of untreated rice husk did not yield reducing sugars. Rice husk residues generated from the ionic liquid pretreatments had similar chemical composition and amorphousity to that of untreated rice husk, but with varying extent of surface disruption and swelling. Conclusions The structural architecture of the regenerated cellulose and rice husk residues showed that they could be used for subsequent fermentation or derivation of cellulosic compounds. Therefore, ionic liquid pretreatment is an alternative in the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass in addition to the conventional chemical pretreatments.

  14. Development of carbon dioxide adsorbent from rice husk char

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abang, S.; Janaun, J.; Anisuzzaman, S. M.; Ikhwan, F. S.

    2016-06-01

    This study was mainly concerned about the development of carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorbent from rice husk (RH). Several chemical treatments were used to produce activated rice husk char (RHAC) from RH. Initially the RH was refluxed with 3M of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution, activation followed by using 0.5M of zinc chloride (ZnCl2) solution and finally acidic treatment by using 0.1M of hydrochloric acid (HCl). Then, the RHAC was functionalized by using 3-chloropropylamine hydrochloride (3-CPA) and noted as RHN. RHN samples were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Based on the SEM, the RHN sample had a large pore diameter compared to RH sample after being treated. Based on MIP data, the average pore diameter between RH and RHAC samples were increased significantly from 0.928 microns to 1.017 microns. The RHN sample also had higher total porosity (%) compared to RHAC and RH (58.45%, 47.82% and 45.57% respectively). The total specific surface area of the sample was much increasing from RHO to RHAC (29.17 m2/g and 62.94 m2/g respectively) and slightly being decreasing from RHAC to RHN (58.88 m2/g). FTIR result showed the present of weak band at 1587 cm-1 which demonstrating of the amine group present on the sample. The CO2 capture result showed that the decreasing of operating temperature can increase the breakthrough time of CO2 capture. On the contrary decreasing of CO2 gas flow rate can increase the breakthrough time of CO2 capture. The highest total amount of CO2 adsorbed was 25338.57 mg of CO2/g of RHN sample by using 100 mL/min of gas flow rate at 30oC. Based on adsorption isotherm analysis, the Freundlich isotherm was the best isotherm to describe the CO2 adsorption on the sample.

  15. Characterization of the pyrolysis oil produced in the slow pyrolysis of sunflower-extracted bagasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorgun, S.; Sensoz, S. [Osmangazi Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Kockar, O.M. [Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2001-07-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annus L.)-extracted bagasse pyrolysis experiments were performed in a fixed-bed reactor. The effects of heating rate, final pyrolysis temperature, particle size and pyrolysis atmosphere on the pyrolysis product yields and chemical compositions have been investigated. The maximum oil yield of 23% was obtained in N{sub 2} atmosphere at a pyrolysis temperature of 550 {sup o}C and a heating rate of 7 {sup o}C min {sup -1}. The chemical characterisation has shown that the oil obtained from sunflower-extracted bagasse may be potentially valuable as fuel and chemical feedstocks. (Author)

  16. Modelling solid-convective flash pyrolysis of straw and wood in the Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Niels; Larsen, Morten Boberg; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2009-01-01

    Less than a handful of solid-convective pyrolysis reactors for the production of liquid fuel from biomass have been presented and for only a single reactor a detailed mathematical model has been presented. In this article we present a predictive mathematical model of the pyrolysis process...... in the Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor, a novel solid-convective flash pyrolysis reactor. The model relies on the original concept for ablative pyrolysis of particles being pyrolysed through the formation of an intermediate liquid compound which is further degraded to form liquid organics, char, and gas. To describe...... that the reacting particle continuously shed the formed char layer....

  17. Microwave-assisted catalytic pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass for production of phenolic-rich bio-oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamaeva, Alisa; Tahmasebi, Arash; Tian, Lu; Yu, Jianglong

    2016-07-01

    Catalytic microwave pyrolysis of peanut shell (PT) and pine sawdust (PS) using activated carbon (AC) and lignite char (LC) for production of phenolic-rich bio-oil and nanotubes was investigated in this study. The effects of process parameters such as pyrolysis temperature and biomass/catalyst ratio on the yields and composition of pyrolysis products were investigated. Fast heating rates were achieved under microwave irradiation conditions. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of bio-oil showed that activated carbon significantly enhanced the selectivity of phenolic compounds in bio-oil. The highest phenolics content in the bio-oil (61.19 %(area)) was achieved at 300°C. The selectivity of phenolics in bio-oil was higher for PT sample compared to that of PS. The formation of nanotubes in PT biomass particles was observed for the first time in biomass microwave pyrolysis.

  18. Properties of chars from the gasification and pyrolysis of rice waste streams towards their valorisation as adsorbent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, D; Lapa, N; Bernardo, M; Godinho, D; Fonseca, I; Miranda, M; Pinto, F; Lemos, F

    2017-07-01

    Rice straw (RS), rice husk (RH) and polyethylene (PE) were blended and submitted to gasification and pyrolysis processes. The chars obtained were submitted to textural, chemical, and ecotoxic characterisations, towards their possible valorisation. Gasification chars were mainly composed of ashes (73.4-89.8wt%), while pyrolysis chars were mainly composed of carbon (53.0-57.6wt%). Silicon (Si) was the major mineral element in all chars followed by alkaline and alkaline-earth metal species (AAEMs). In the pyrolysis chars, titanium (Ti) was also a major element, as the feedstock blends contained high fractions of PE which was the main source of Ti. Gasification chars showed higher surface areas (26.9-62.9m(2)g(-1)) and some microporosity, attributed to porous silica. On the contrary, pyrolysis chars did not present a porous matrix, mainly due to their high volatile matter content. The gasification bed char produced with 100% RH, at 850°C, with O2 as gasification agent, was selected for further characterization. This char presented the higher potential to be valorised as adsorbent material (higher surface area, higher content of metal cations with exchangeable capacity, and lowest concentrations of toxic heavy metals). The char was submitted to an aqueous leaching test to assess the mobility of chemical species and the ecotoxic level for V. fischeri. It was observed that metallic elements were significantly retained in the char, which was attributed mainly to its alkaline character. This alkaline condition promoted some ecotoxicity level on the char eluate that was eliminated after the pH correction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Study on condensation of biomass pyrolysis gas by spray bio-oil droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Kun; Cheng, Wen-Long [University of Science and Technology of China (China)], email: wlcheng@ustc.edu.cn; Chen, Jing [Anhui Electric Power Design Institute (China); Shi, Wen-Jing [Anhui Heli Co., Ltd (China)

    2011-07-01

    This is a study of bio-oil generated by fast pyrolysis; a biomass feedstock is heated to pyrolyze at a rapid rate, the gas pyrolyzed is then condensed rapidly. The interesting result is a potential alternative fuel oil. An analysis was made of the effects of the initial pyrolysis gas temperatures, the initial bio-oil droplets temperatures and diameters, and the flow ratio of the gas and the liquid droplets on the heat and mass transfer between the gas and the liquid droplets. A few criterion equations were achieved with respect to the spray condenser. This paper established the gas-liquid phase equilibrium of an aqueous multi-composition system and the spray condensation model coupling heat and mass transfer. Model calculation and analysis showed that: spray condensation can effectively cool the high-temperature pyrolysis gas quickly; with gas liquid flowing, mass transfer rate reduces; and the relationship of gas and liquid flow ratio can achieve good accuracy.

  20. Effect of Catalytic Pyrolysis Conditions Using Pulse Current Heating Method on Pyrolysis Products of Wood Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sensho Honma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of catalysts on the compositions of char and pyrolysis oil obtained by pyrolysis of wood biomass with pulse current heating was studied. The effects of catalysts on product compositions were analyzed using GC-MS and TEM. The compositions of some aromatic compounds changed noticeably when using a metal oxide species as the catalyst. The coexistence or dissolution of amorphous carbon and iron oxide was observed in char pyrolyzed at 800°C with Fe3O4. Pyrolysis oil compositions changed remarkably when formed in the presence of a catalyst compared to that obtained from the uncatalyzed pyrolysis of wood meal. We observed a tendency toward an increase in the ratio of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the pyrolysis oil composition after catalytic pyrolysis at 800°C. Pyrolysis of biomass using pulse current heating and an adequate amount of catalyst is expected to yield a higher content of specific polyaromatic compounds.

  1. Effect of Catalytic Pyrolysis Conditions Using Pulse Current Heating Method on Pyrolysis Products of Wood Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Sensho; Hata, Toshimitsu; Watanabe, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The influence of catalysts on the compositions of char and pyrolysis oil obtained by pyrolysis of wood biomass with pulse current heating was studied. The effects of catalysts on product compositions were analyzed using GC-MS and TEM. The compositions of some aromatic compounds changed noticeably when using a metal oxide species as the catalyst. The coexistence or dissolution of amorphous carbon and iron oxide was observed in char pyrolyzed at 800°C with Fe3O4. Pyrolysis oil compositions changed remarkably when formed in the presence of a catalyst compared to that obtained from the uncatalyzed pyrolysis of wood meal. We observed a tendency toward an increase in the ratio of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the pyrolysis oil composition after catalytic pyrolysis at 800°C. Pyrolysis of biomass using pulse current heating and an adequate amount of catalyst is expected to yield a higher content of specific polyaromatic compounds. PMID:25614894

  2. Characterisation of silica derived from rice husk (Muar, Johor, Malaysia) decomposition at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, M. A.; Ismail, N. A. A.; Rizamarhaiza, M.; W. M. Hasif. A. A., K.; Taib, H.

    2016-07-01

    Rice husk was thermally decomposed to yield powder composed of silica (SiO2). Temperatures of 700°C and 1000°C were chosen as the decomposition temperatures. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Florescence (XRF), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analyses were conducted on a synthetic silica powder (SS-SiO2) and the rice husk ash as for the comparative characterisation study. XRD analyses clearly indicated that the decomposed rice husk yielded silica of different nature which are Crystalline Rice Husk Silica (C-RHSiO2) and Amorphous Rice Husk Silica (A-RHSiO2). Moreover, it was found that SS-SiO2 was of Quartz phase, C-RHSiO2 was of Trydimite and Cristobalite. Through XRF detection, the highest SiO2 purity was detected in SS-SiO2 followed by C-RHSiO2 and A-RHSiO2 with purity percentages of 99.60%, 82.30% and 86.30% respectively. FTIR results clearly indicated silica (SiO2) bonding 1056, 1064, 1047, 777, 790 and 798 cm-1) increased as the crystallinity silica increased. The Cristobalite phase was detected in C-RH SiO2 at the wavelength of 620 cm-1. Morphological features as observed by FESEM analyses confirmed that, SS-SiO2 and C-RH SiO2 showed prominent coarse granular morphology.

  3. Developing high-performance concrete incorporating highly-reactive rice husk ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Salas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present results of an investigation about the developing of a highperformance concrete (HPC using a highly reactive pozzolan made from chemically treated rice husk ash (ChRHA prepared by a chemical-thermal attack to the rice husk. This particular rice husk ash (RHA consists of 99% of silica, highly amorphous, white in color and of greater pozzolanic activity than the silica fume and another rice husk ash prepared with only by a thermal treatment. The results of the physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of ChRHA are analyzed. In this study, the compressive strength, flexural strength, water absorption, resistance to carbonation, total charge-passed derived from rapid chloride permeability test (RCPT and modulus of elasticity of hardened concrete were determined in the laboratory. Test results indicate that it is possible to produce HPC with the incorporation the chemically treated RHA. The incorporation of the chemically treated rice husk ash into the concrete enhances the compressive strengthand the durability properties being comparable to the properties of high performance concretes with silica fume (SF made with the same replacement levels.

  4. Performance Evaluation of Steel Fibres in Rice Husk Ash Substituted Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sivakumar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The potential use of supplementary cementitious materials in plain cement concrete for improving concrete properties has been a growing concern in recent years. In addition, the effective strengthening of the matrix by fibre reinforcements to avoid brittle failure is another requirement for plain concrete. This provided the motivation for exploring the benefits of rice husk ash (RHA as a cement replacement material and the addition of steel fibres for reducing brittleness in concrete. The rice husk ash used in this study was the residue of burnt raw rice husk sintered in a muffle furnace at 800 °C. The fine particle size of the rice husk ash provided an early pozzolanic reaction upon cement hydration and thus resulted in high cementing efficiency. This paper reports a systematic evaluation of the mechanical properties of rice husk ash substituted concrete mixtures containing RHA as a partial cement substitute at replacement levels of 10% and 20% by weight of cement, with different dosages of steel fibres. Our experimental results demonstrated that 10% RHA substitution led to improved compressive properties compared to plain concrete. The highest increase of split tensile and flexural strength was reported in the case of RHA substituted concrete with steel fibre added.

  5. Combined subcritical water and enzymatic hydrolysis for reducing sugar production from coconut husk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muharja, Maktum; Junianti, Fitri; Nurtono, Tantular; Widjaja, Arief

    2017-05-01

    Coconut husk wastes are abundantly available in Indonesia. It has a potential to be used into alternative renewable energy sources such as hydrogen using enzymatic hydrolysis followed by a fermentation process. Unfortunately, enzymatic hydrolysis is hampered by the complex structure of lignocellulose, so the cellulose component is hard to degrade. In this study, Combined Subcritical Water (SCW) and enzymatic hydrolysis are applied to enhance fermentable, thereby reducing production of sugar from coconut husk. There were two steps in this study, the first step was coconut husk pretreated by SCW in batch reactor at 80 bar and 150-200°C for 60 minutes reaction time. Secondly, solid fraction from the results of SCW was hydrolyzed using the mixture of pure cellulose and xylanase enzymes. Analysis was conducted on untreated and SCW-treated by gravimetric assay, liquid fraction after SCW and solid fraction after enzymatic hydrolysis using DNS assay. The maximum yield of reducing sugar (including xylose, arabinose glucose, galactose, mannose) was 1.254 gr per 6 gr raw material, representing 53.95% of total sugar in coconut husk biomass which was obtained at 150°C 80 bar for 60 minutes reaction time of SCW-treated and 6 hour of enzymatic hydrolysis using mixture of pure cellulose and xylanase enzymes (18.6 U /gram of coconut husk).

  6. Thermoelectric properties and nanostructures of materials prepared from rice husk ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pukird, S.; Tipparach, U.; Kasian, P. [Ubon Ratchathani Univ., Ubon Ratchathani (Thailand). Dept. of Physics; Limsuwan, P. [King Mongkut' s Univ. of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok (Thailand). Dept. of Physics

    2009-07-01

    Thailand produces large amounts of agricultural residues such as rice husk and coconut shells. Rice husk is considered to be a potential source for solar grade silicon. Studies have shown that reasonably pure polycrystalline silicon can be prepared from rice husk white ash by a metallothermic reduction process. This paper reported on a study that investigated the thermoelectric properties of ceramic material prepared by mixing silica from rice husk ash and carbon obtained from coconut shell charcoal. The thermoelectric properties of the materials were examined along with their microstructures. The materials were made from burning rice husk ash and coconut shell at different temperatures and then doped with metal oxides. Pellets were heated at temperature of 700 degrees C for 1-3 hours. The voltage on both sides of the pellets was observed. The electromotive force was found when different temperatures were applied on both sides of the pellet specimens. The Seebeck coefficient was then calculated. The results showed that these materials can be used as thermoelectric devices. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) were used to investigate the source of materials and the products on the substrates. The images of SEM and EDX showed nanostructures of materials such as nanowires, nanorods and nanoparticles of the products and sources. 22 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  7. Durability of Concrete Using Rice Husk Ash as Cement Substitution Exposed To Acid Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Ahmad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The acidity of rainfall in major areas of Indonesia is under neutral pH. Average pH of rainfall is between 3 and 5. Free lime within concrete will react with acid and cause a decrease in the strength of concrete. A means to anticipate the damage is to reduce the content of free lime within concrete. Silicon oxide contained in rice husk ash can react with free lime to form a new compound that is harder and denser. It became the basis for the use of rice husk ash in concrete mixtures. The mixtures were prepared by replacing 5% and 10% of cement with rice husk ash and the results were compared with a reference mix with 100% cement. This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on the mechanical characteristics of concrete specimens as durability parameters. Then to evaluate the mechanical characteristics, microstructure test was conducted. The lower the mechanical properties of the concrete, the higher the level of gypsum contained within concrete. The percentage of 5% rice husk ash of the cement weight has a lower compressive strength decrease than the 10% rice husk ash. In addition, the proposed durability model is a model of polynomial equation with two variables.

  8. Two new isoxazolines from the husks of Xanthoceras sorbifolia Bunge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hui-Qi; Wan, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Da; Wu, Ji-Ming; Sun, Bo-Hang; Wu, Li-Jun; Gao, Hui-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    Two new isoxazoline compounds, 1-oxa-2-azaspiro[4.5]dec-2-ene-8β-ol (1) and 1-oxa-2-azaspiro[4.5]dec-2-ene-8α-ol (2), were isolated from the husks of fruits of Xanthoceras sorbifolia Bunge and their structures were determined by spectroscopic analyses, including X-ray crystallography, HRESI-MS, UV, IR, and 1D and 2D NMR (HSQC, HMBC, NOESY) methods. Neither compound showed significant inhibitory effects on butyrylcholinesterase (BuchE) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), nor the selected tumor cells growth. Based on an online activity prediction program (PASS ONLINE), the structures with isoxazoline skeletons were found to show potential anti-asthmatic (AM) and anti-anaphylaxis (AP) activities; moreover, compounds 1 and 2 were predicted to possess high affinities for many enzymes involved in AM and AP according to the RCSB Protein Data Bank. High-affinity binding to phosphodiesterase IV (PDE-4), an important inflammatory modulator in asthma, was demonstrated experimentally, beside that, the predicted structures based on compounds 1 and 2 were analyzed for PDE-4 interactions using the molecular docking methodology of Discovery Studio 3.0 (DS 3.0). The predicted structure 2A-6 exhibited much higher affinity and stability of PDE-4 binding than the clinical PDE-4 inhibitor rolipram.

  9. Characterization of hydrochars produced by hydrothermal carbonization of rice husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kalderis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Biochar is the carbon-rich product obtained when biomass, such as wood, manure or leaves, is heated in a closed container with little or no available air. In more technical terms, biochar is produced by so-called thermal decomposition of organic material under limited supply of oxygen (O2, and at relatively low temperatures (<700 °C. Hydrochar differentiates from biochar because it is produced in an aqueous environment, at lower temperatures and longer retention times. This work describes the production of hydrochar from rice husks using a simple, safe and environmentally-friendly experimental set-up, previously used for degradation of various wastewaters. Hydrochars were obtained at 200°C and 300°C and at residence times ranging from 2 to 16 h. All samples were then characterized in terms of yield, surface area, pH, conductivity and elemental analysis and two of them were selected for further testing with respect to heating values and heavy metal content.

  10. Antimalarial Activity of Cocos nucifera Husk Fibre: Further Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. O. Adebayo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the antimalarial and toxicity potentials of husk fibre extracts of five Nigerian varieties of Cocos nucifera were evaluated in vitro. The only active extract fraction, West African Tall (WAT ethyl acetate extract fraction, was then evaluated for its phytochemical constituents, antimalarial and toxicity potentials at varying doses (31.25–500 mg/kg body weight using various organ function indices. The results revealed that WAT ethyl acetate extract fraction (WATEAEF contained alkaloids, tannins, and flavonoids and was active against Plasmodium falciparum W2 strain maintained in continuous culture, with a selectivity index of 30.3. The same extract fraction was active in vivo against Plasmodium berghei NK65, causing more than 50% reduction in parasitaemia on days 4 and 6 after inoculation at various doses administered. WATEAEF did not significantly alter (P>0.05 function indices of the liver and cardiovascular system at all doses administered but significantly increased (P<0.05 plasma creatinine concentration at 250 and 500 mg/Kg body weight compared to controls. The results of this study suggest that WATEAEF possesses antimalarial activity and may not adversely affect normal liver function nor predispose subjects to cardiovascular diseases but may impair normal kidney function at higher doses. Further studies are underway to isolate the active principles.

  11. The root system of the husk tomato (Physalis ixocarpa Brot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Mulato Brito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The husk tomato (Physalis ixocarpa Brot. is widely cultivated in central Mexico, and may be grown in countries with a temperate climate. The experiment was set up during the dry period of the year (average weekly temperature 17-22°C in the State of Morelos, Mexico, using the cv. 'Rendidora' in loamy clay soil and furrow irrigation. The roots were investigated by the pinboard method modified by Garcia Blancas and Grajeda Gómez (in print, partly adapted by us for quantitative estimation of root systems. Two plants were investigated every second week. They had a well developed tap root. Most of their lateral roots were found in the superficial soil layer, 0-20 cm. The root dry mass was also concentrated near the central axis of the plant. The majority of root apices were, however, found in the soil cylinders 10-40 em from the central axis. During the senescence of the aerial part (14th week after emergence the root system lost a large part of its small roots. The modification of the pinboard method, by Garcia Blancas and Grajeda Gómez (in print permited us investigating the root systems with very simple tools, in situ.

  12. Characterization of materials formed by rice husk for construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo-Rodríguez, A. M.

    2013-11-01

    This review article delves into the use of agro-industrial wastes, which in construction field provides alternatives for environmental problems with the use of them. This fact enables development and lower costs for new options in the brick, cluster, mortar and concrete industry, what represents benefits for environment, housing and generally everything related to construction, looking for sustainability. For that reason a literature review is made to support the theme focusing on the use of rice husk in its natural, ground or ash state for manufacturing elements with clay masonry, precast and optimization of concrete and mortars. The technique used is based on scientific articles and researches found in reliable databases that were analyzed and integrated into a synthesized structure, which summarized the objectives, analysis processes, the physical and mechanical properties and finally the results. The conclusions are focused on potentiality of elements production in the construction development based on the high effectiveness like thermal insulation, low density and various benefits offered by high silica content pozzolanic properties, etc.

  13. Properties of Rice Husk Ash Stabilized Laterite Roof Tiles

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    Momoh Omuya RAHEEM

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of work on the possibility of using of Rice Husk Ash (RHA in the production of clay roof tiles. The pozzolana content of the ash was determined using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF to confirm the key elements of RHA as a good pozzolanic material. The tiles were produced by moulding clay-RHA blends of various proportions of RHA used in wooden moulds. The percentages by weight of RHA added to various mixes were 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% RHA and the tiles were fired at 900°C, 1000°C and 1100°C in an electric furnace. The water absorption, density, permeability and Transverse Breaking Stress (TBS of the roof tile produced were tested using manual TBS testing apparatus and weighing balances. The relative trends of the properties tested were dependent on pozzolanic property of RHA and since the sum of the active pozzolanas - SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3 present in the ash is 86.01% and meets 70% minimum recommend by ASTM C618-92a for Class F pozzolana. Most optimal results were obtained at 15% RHA and 900°C temperature for water absorption, density, permeability and Transverse Breaking Stress (TBS.

  14. A Simple Method of Obtaining Spherical Nanosilica from Rice Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Noushad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the synthesis of nanosilica from rice husk. Synthesis was done by precipitation using different acids, namely, orthophosphoric acid and nitric acid which yielded nanosilica. The effect of different acids and different solvents (polar and non-polar on the size and degree of agglomeration of the silica particles were studied. When precipitation was done without the use of solvents, the silica particles  obtained were non-spherical in shape, whereas, when precipitation was done using polar solvents (ethanol or 2-propanol, the silica particles were spherical. The use of non-polar solvents (toluene and diethyl ether resulted in silica particles that were irregular in shape and in the case of orthophosphoric acid, a high degree of agglomeration was also noted. The degree of agglomeration was less when orthophosphoric acid was used with polar solvents as compared to nitric acid in conjunction with polar solvents. As regards the size, it ranged from approximately 70nm to 400nm when either acid was used in conjunction with polar solvents. When non-polar solvents were used, the silica particles were irregular in shape and the particle size was not estimated.

  15. Utilization of Rice Husk Ash for Sustainable Construction: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N.N. Khan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Applications of Supplementary Cementitious Materials (SCM in construction industry are getting priority due to environmental friendly behavior as well as enhanced mechanical and durability properties. Considering the characteristics of SCM, properly burnt and ground Rice Husk Ash (RHA has significant potential on account of rich reactive silica (SiO2 compound. When RHA is applied in cementitious system it improves the systems properties by two fold of effects; chemical or pozzlanic effect and physical or filler effect. The reactive silica compound present in RHA reacts with cement hydration products calcium hydroxide (Ca (OH2 and formed secondary C-S-H gel, which is counted as chemical or pozzolanic activity of RHA. The physical or filler effect of RHA is denoted as the proper distribution of finer RHA particles into the cementitious system. This study reviews the advantageous use of RHA for sustainable construction. The aim of this study is to promote the idea of using RHA by elaborating upon their various production processes, different properties, pozzolanic activity and its contribution to the cementitious system.

  16. OBTENCIÓN DE BIOCOMBUSTIBLES PRODUCTO DE LA PIROLISIS RÁPIDA DE RESIDUOS DE PALMA AFRICANA (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. OBTENÇÃO DE BICOMBUSTÍVEIS POR PIRÓLISE RÁPIDA DE RESÍDUOS DE PALMA DE DENDÊ (Elaeisg uineensis Jacq. BIOFUELS PRODUCTION BY FAST PYROLYSIS OF PALM OIL WASTES (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN C. ARTEAGA V.

    2012-12-01

    de 2.72 % vol. para o CO2, 0.706 % vol. para o H2, 1.289 % vol. para o CH4. A composição restante foi de N2. A maior quantidade de gases foi obtida quando o processofoifeito a 700 ºCembora o rendimento do bio-oilfoi de 14.9 % em peso. Os resultados mostraram que a temperatura no reator é um parâmetro importante na composição dos gases e no rendimento do bio-oil. Uma fase posterior consistiria na avaliação dos custos e os benefícios para re-configurar o reator a fim de otimizar o rendimentonaprodção do bio-oil, assim como de avaliar a possibilidade de usar a fração gasosa como fonte energética para levar a cabo o processo de pirólise.Biofuels were obtained by fast pyrolysis of palm oilwastes (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. in a free fall reactor. Previously, palm oil wastes were dried and sieved and then were fed to the reactor. As pyrolysis products, char, non-condensable gas and bio-oil, a condensed liquid composed by alcohols, carboxylic acids, alkanes and aromatics, were obtained. The experiments were carried out at temperature range 500-700°C. The highest bio-oil yield, 23.3%, was obtained at 600°C. The gas compositional analysis showed CO2,720%, H0,703 % , CH1,289%, CO 22 4 2,472 % and N2 for the non-condensable gas produced at 600°C. The highest gas yield was obtained at 700°C but bio-oil yield was 14.9%. Results indicate that temperature has an important effect on the product yields and composition. A future step will be an economical analysis in order to evaluate the possibility of using non-condensable gas as energy source for pyrolysis reactor.

  17. Thermal behavior of vehicle plastic blends contained acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) in pyrolysis using TG-FTIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guicai; Liao, Yanfen; Ma, Xiaoqian

    2017-03-01

    As important plastic blends in End-of-Life vehicles (ELV), pyrolysis profiles of ABS/PVC, ABS/PA6 and ABS/PC were investigated using thermogravimetric-Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (TG-FTIR). Also, CaCO3 was added as plastic filler to discuss its effects on the pyrolysis of these plastics. The results showed that the interaction between ABS and PVC made PVC pyrolysis earlier and HCl emission slightly accelerated. The mixing of ABS and PA6 made their decomposition temperature closer, and ketones in PA6 pyrolysis products were reduced. The presence of ABS made PC pyrolysis earlier, and phenyl compounds in PC pyrolysis products could be transferred into alcohol or H2O. The interaction between ABS and other polymers in pyrolysis could be attributed to the intermolecular radical transfer, and free radicals from the polymer firstly decomposed led to a fast initiation the decomposition of the other polymer. As plastic filler, CaCO3 promoted the thermal decomposition of PA6 and PC, and had no obvious effects on ABS and PVC pyrolysis process. Also, CaCO3 made the pyrolysis products from PA6 and PC further decomposed into small-molecule compounds like CO2. The kinetics analysis showed that isoconversional method like Starink method was more suitable for these polymer blends. Starink method showed the average activation energy of ABS50/PVC50, ABS50/PA50 and ABS50/PC50 was 186.63kJ/mol, 239.61kJ/mol and 248.95kJ/mol, respectively, and the interaction among them could be reflected by the activation energy variation.

  18. Degradation of caffeine by microorganisms and potential use of decaffeinated coffee husk and pulp in animal feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazzafera Paulo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffee husk and coffee pulp are coffee processing by-products. Coffee husk is obtained when harvested coffee is processed by the dry method, and coffee pulp is produced by the wet method. In Brazil, coffee is usually processed by the dry method, therefore an expressive amount of husk is obtained every year. Some of the husk is used as organic fertilizer but, other applications are very limited, mainly because it is a bulky product. The presence of tannins and caffeine diminish acceptability and palatability of husk by animals. This review discuss degradation of caffeine by microorganisms, with special attention to bacterial, biological decaffeination of coffee husk and pulp and its subsequent use on animal feeding. The known biochemical routes of caffeine degradation by microorganisms are initially discussed; problems concerning physiological effects in animals, focusing on the limitations imposed by caffeine as an antiphysiological component are raised; the use of microorganisms to decaffeinate coffee husk and pulp is discussed. The discussions offer a view on decreasing caffeine content of coffee husk and pulp, which would allow the use of larger amounts of these products in animal feeding, partially replacing traditional components such as cereal grains.

  19. Rotor for a pyrolysis centrifuge reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a rotor for a pyrolysis centrifuge reactor, said rotor comprising a rotor body having a longitudinal centre axis, and at least one pivotally mounted blade being adapted to pivot around a pivot axis under rotation of the rotor body around the longitudinal centre axis....... Moreover, the present invention relates to a pyrolysis centrifuge reactor applying such a rotor....

  20. The effect of mixing ratio on co-pyrolysis of lignite and rapeseed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onay, O [Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Porsuk Vocational School; Usta, C.; Kockar, O.M. [Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the influence of lignite on the yield and chemical structure of bio-oil produced from rapeseed using a fast pyrolysis technique. The rapeseed and lignite mixtures were pyrolyzed in a fixed bed reactor. Heating rates and temperatures were controlled by a PID controller. Char yield after pyrolysis was determined from the overall weight losses of the reactor tube, while the liquid phase was collected in a glass liner. Experiments were conducted using a range of blending ratios. While final pyrolysis temperatures were set at 550 degrees C. An elemental analyzer was used to characterize the rapeseed and pyrolysis bio-oils. Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR) was used to conduct functional group compositional analyses. The study showed that conversion degree increased with temperature increases. Yields of both conversion and oil increased with biomass concentration. However, distribution between conversion and oil was influenced by the blending ratio. A maximum yield of oil was obtained with a 5 per cent blending ratio of lignite. It was concluded that the co-pyrolysis of rapeseed and coal at a temperature of 550 degrees C increases production by more than 11 per cent. 14 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs.