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Sample records for hur regulates dna

  1. Different modes of interaction by TIAR and HuR with target RNA and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Henry S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Yoga, Yano M K; Pendini, Nicole R; Gunzburg, Menachem J; Cowieson, Nathan P; Wilson, Gerald M; Williams, Bryan R G; Gorospe, Myriam; Wilce, Jacqueline A

    2011-02-01

    TIAR and HuR are mRNA-binding proteins that play important roles in the regulation of translation. They both possess three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and bind to AU-rich elements (AREs), with seemingly overlapping specificity. Here we show using SPR that TIAR and HuR bind to both U-rich and AU-rich RNA in the nanomolar range, with higher overall affinity for U-rich RNA. However, the higher affinity for U-rich sequences is mainly due to faster association with U-rich RNA, which we propose is a reflection of the higher probability of association. Differences between TIAR and HuR are observed in their modes of binding to RNA. TIAR is able to bind deoxy-oligonucleotides with nanomolar affinity, whereas HuR affinity is reduced to a micromolar level. Studies with U-rich DNA reveal that TIAR binding depends less on the 2'-hydroxyl group of RNA than HuR binding. Finally we show that SAXS data, recorded for the first two domains of TIAR in complex with RNA, are more consistent with a flexible, elongated shape and not the compact shape that the first two domains of Hu proteins adopt upon binding to RNA. We thus propose that these triple-RRM proteins, which compete for the same binding sites in cells, interact with their targets in fundamentally different ways.

  2. Different modes of interaction by TIAR and HuR with target RNA and DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Henry S.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Yoga, Yano M. K.; Pendini, Nicole R.; Gunzburg, Menachem J.; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Wilson, Gerald M.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Gorospe, Myriam; Wilce, Jacqueline A.

    2011-01-01

    TIAR and HuR are mRNA-binding proteins that play important roles in the regulation of translation. They both possess three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and bind to AU-rich elements (AREs), with seemingly overlapping specificity. Here we show using SPR that TIAR and HuR bind to both U-rich and AU-rich RNA in the nanomolar range, with higher overall affinity for U-rich RNA. However, the higher affinity for U–rich sequences is mainly due to faster association with U-rich RNA, which we propose i...

  3. MicroRNA-16 Modulates HuR Regulation of Cyclin E1 in Breast Cancer Cells

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    Xun Guo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA binding protein (RBPs and microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that are implicated in development of cancers. Although their individual roles have been studied, the crosstalk between RBPs and miRNAs is under intense investigation. Here, we show that in breast cancer cells, cyclin E1 upregulation by the RBP HuR is through specific binding to regions in the cyclin E1 mRNA 3' untranslated region (3'UTR containing U-rich elements. Similarly, miR-16 represses cyclin E1, dependent on its cognate binding sites in the cyclin E1 3'UTR. Evidence in the literature indicates that HuR can regulate miRNA expression and recruit or dissociate RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC. Despite this, miR-16 and HuR do not affect the other’s expression level or binding to the cyclin E1 3'UTR. While HuR overexpression partially blocks miR-16 repression of a reporter mRNA containing the cyclin E1 3'UTR, it does not block miR-16 repression of endogenous cyclin E1 mRNA. In contrast, miR-16 blocks HuR-mediated upregulation of cyclin E1. Overall our results suggest that miR-16 can override HuR upregulation of cyclin E1 without affecting HuR expression or association with the cyclin E1 mRNA.

  4. The RNA binding protein HuR differentially regulates unique subsets of mRNAs in estrogen receptor negative and estrogen receptor positive breast cancer

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    Chen Jing

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discordance between steady-state levels of mRNAs and protein has been attributed to posttranscriptional control mechanisms affecting mRNA stability and translation. Traditional methods of genome wide microarray analysis, profiling steady-state levels of mRNA, may miss important mRNA targets owing to significant posttranscriptional gene regulation by RNA binding proteins (RBPs. Methods The ribonomic approach, utilizing RNA immunoprecipitation hybridized to microarray (RIP-Chip, provides global identification of putative endogenous mRNA targets of different RBPs. HuR is an RBP that binds to the AU-rich elements (ARE of labile mRNAs, such as proto-oncogenes, facilitating their translation into protein. HuR has been shown to play a role in cancer progression and elevated levels of cytoplasmic HuR directly correlate with increased invasiveness and poor prognosis for many cancers, including those of the breast. HuR has been described to control genes in several of the acquired capabilities of cancer and has been hypothesized to be a tumor-maintenance gene, allowing for cancers to proliferate once they are established. Results We used HuR RIP-Chip as a comprehensive and systematic method to survey breast cancer target genes in both MCF-7 (estrogen receptor positive, ER+ and MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor negative, ER- breast cancer cell lines. We identified unique subsets of HuR-associated mRNAs found individually or in both cell types. Two novel HuR targets, CD9 and CALM2 mRNAs, were identified and validated by quantitative RT-PCR and biotin pull-down analysis. Conclusion This is the first report of a side-by-side genome-wide comparison of HuR-associated targets in wild type ER+ and ER- breast cancer. We found distinct, differentially expressed subsets of cancer related genes in ER+ and ER- breast cancer cell lines, and noted that the differential regulation of two cancer-related genes by HuR was contingent upon the cellular

  5. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent retention of nuclear HuR suppresses cigarette smoke-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression independent of DNA-binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Michela; Sheridan, Jared A; Nair, Parameswaran; Rico de Souza, Angela; Gallouzi, Imed-Eddine; Rousseau, Simon; Di Marco, Sergio; Hamid, Qutayba; Eidelman, David H; Baglole, Carolyn J

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor that responds to man-made environmental toxicants, has emerged as an endogenous regulator of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) by a mechanism that is poorly understood. In this study, we first used AhR-deficient (AhR(-/-) ) primary pulmonary cells, together with pharmacological tools to inhibit new RNA synthesis, to show that the AhR is a prominent factor in the destabilization of Cox-2 mRNA. The destabilization of Cox-2 mRNA and subsequent suppression of cigarette smoke-induced COX-2 protein expression by the AhR was independent of its ability to bind the dioxin response element (DRE), thereby differentiating the DRE-driven toxicological AhR pathway from its anti-inflammatory abilities. We further describe that the AhR destabilizes Cox-2 mRNA by sequestering HuR within the nucleus. The role of HuR in AhR stabilization of Cox-2 mRNA was confirmed by knockdown of HuR, which resulted in rapid Cox-2 mRNA degradation. Finally, in the lungs of AhR(-/-) mice exposed to cigarette smoke, there was little Cox-2 mRNA despite robust COX-2 protein expression, a finding that correlates with almost exclusive cytoplasmic HuR within the lungs of AhR(-/-) mice. Therefore, we propose that the AhR plays an important role in suppressing the expression of inflammatory proteins, a function that extends beyond the ability of the AhR to respond to man-made toxicants. These findings open the possibility that a DRE-independent AhR pathway may be exploited therapeutically as an anti-inflammatory target.

  6. The stress-induced heat shock protein 70.3 expression is regulated by a dual-component mechanism involving alternative polyadenylation and HuR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraynik, Stephen M; Gabanic, Andrew; Anthony, Sarah R; Kelley, Melissa; Paulding, Waltke R; Roessler, Anne; McGuinness, Michael; Tranter, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Heat shock protein 70.3 (Hsp70.3) expression increases in response to cellular stress and plays a cytoprotective role. We have previously shown that Hsp70.3 expression is controlled through coordinated post-transcriptional regulation by miRNAs and alternative polyadenylation (APA), and APA-mediated shortening of the Hsp70.3 3'-UTR facilitates increased protein expression. A stress-induced increase in Hsp70.3 mRNA and protein expression is accompanied by alternative polyadenylation (APA)-mediated truncation of the 3'UTR of the Hsp70.3 mRNA transcript. However, the role that APA plays in stress-induced expression of Hsp70.3 remains unclear. Our results show that APA-mediated truncation of the Hsp70.3 3'UTR increases protein expression through enhanced polyribosome loading. Additionally, we demonstrate that the RNA binding protein HuR, which has been previously shown to play a role in mediating APA, is necessary for heat shock mediated increase in Hsp70.3 mRNA and protein. However, it is somewhat surprising to note that HuR does not play a role in APA of the Hsp70.3 mRNA, and these two regulatory events appear to be mutually exclusive regulators of Hsp70.3 expression. These results not only provide important insight to the regulation of stress response genes following heat shock, but also contribute an enhanced understanding of how alternative polyadenylation contributes to gene regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cooperative interplay of let-7 mimic and HuR with MYC RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzburg, Menachem J; Sivakumaran, Andrew; Pendini, Nicole R; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Gorospe, Myriam; Wilce, Matthew C J; Wilce, Jacqueline A

    2015-01-01

    Both RNA-binding proteins (RBP) and miRNA play important roles in the regulation of mRNA expression, often acting together to regulate a target mRNA. In some cases the RBP and miRNA have been reported to act competitively, but in other instances they function cooperatively. Here, we investigated HuR function as an enhancer of let-7-mediated translational repression of c-Myc despite the separation of their binding sites. Using an in vitro system, we determined that a let-7 mimic, consisting of single-stranded (ss)DNA complementary to the let-7 binding site, enhanced the affinity of HuR for a 122-nt MYC RNA encompassing both binding sites. This finding supports the biophysical principle of cooperative binding by an RBP and miRNA purely through interactions at distal mRNA binding sites.

  8. Downregulation of β-Adrenoceptors in Isoproterenol-Induced Cardiac Remodeling through HuR.

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    Qian Yin

    Full Text Available β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs play an important role in cardiac remodeling, which is the key pathological process in various heart diseases and leads to heart failure. However, the regulation of β-AR expression in remodeling hearts is still unclear. This study aims to clarify the possible mechanisms underlying the regulation of β1- and β2-AR expression in cardiac remodeling. The rat model of cardiac remodeling was established by subcutaneous injection of isoproterenol(ISO at the dose of 0.25 mg·kg(-1·d(-1 for 7 days. We found that the expression of β1- and β2-ARs decreased in the remodeling heart. The mechanisms may include the inhibition of DNA transcription and the increase of mRNA degradation. cAMP-response element binding protein(CREB is a well-known transcription factor of β-AR. However, the expression and activation of CREB was not changed in the remodeling heart. Further, human Antigen-R (HuR, a RNA binding protein, which binds to the 3'-untranslated region of the β-AR mRNA and promotes RNA degradation, was increased in the remodeling model. And in vitro, HuR deficiency reversed the reduction of β-AR mRNA induced by ISO. Therefore, the present findings indicate that HuR, but not CREB, is responsible for the reduction of β-AR expression in ISO induced cardiac remodeling.

  9. HuR binds to a single site on the C/EBPβ mRNA of 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Heath; Carver, Melinda; Pekala, Phillip H.

    2007-01-01

    HuR is a ligand for nuclear mRNAs containing adenylate-uridylate rich elements in the 3'-untranslated region. Once bound to the mRNA, HuR is recognized by adapter proteins which then facilitate nuclear export of the complex. In the cytosol HuR is thought to function to control stability and translation of its ligand message. In the 3T3-L1 cells HuR is constitutively expressed and localized predominantly to the nucleus in the preadipocytes. However within 30 min of exposure to the differentiation stimulus, the HuR content in the cytosol increases consistent with HuR regulating the availability of relevant mRNAs for translation. Using in vitro RNA gel shifts, we have demonstrated that the C/EBPβ message is a ligand for HuR and that the single binding site is an adenylate-uridylate rich element in the 3'-untranslated region

  10. Domain-specific phosphomimetic mutation allows dissection of different protein kinase C (PKC) isotype-triggered activities of the RNA binding protein HuR.

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    Schulz, Sebastian; Doller, Anke; Pendini, Nicole R; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2013-12-01

    The ubiquitous mRNA binding protein human antigen R (HuR) participates in the post-transcriptional regulation of many AU-rich element (ARE)-bearing mRNAs. Previously, by using in vitro kinase assay, we have identified serines (Ser) 158, 221 and 318 as targets of protein kinase C (PKC)-triggered phosphorylation. In this study, we tested whether GFP- or GST-tagged HuR constructs bearing a phosphomimetic Ser (S)-to-Asp (D) substitution at the different PKC target sites, would affect different HuR functions including HuR nucleo-cytoplasmic redistribution and binding to different types of ARE-containing mRNAs. The phosphomimetic GFP-tagged HuR protein bearing a phosphomimetic substitution in the hinge region of HuR (HuR-S221D) showed an increased cytoplasmic abundance when compared to wild-type HuR. Conversely, data from in vitro kinase assay and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), implicates that phosphorylation at Ser 221 is not relevant for mRNA binding of HuR. Quantification of in vitro binding affinities of GST-tagged wild-type HuR and corresponding HuR proteins bearing a phosphomimetic substitution in either RRM2 (HuR-S158D) or in RRM3 (HuR-S318D) by microscale thermophoresis (MST) indicates a specific binding of wild-type HuR to type I, II or type III-ARE-oligonucleotides in the high nanomolar range. Interestingly, phosphomimetic mutation at position 158 or 318 had a negative influence on HuR binding to type I- and type II-ARE-mRNAs whereas it significantly enhanced HuR affinity to a type III-ARE substrate. Our data suggest that differential phosphorylation of HuR by PKCs at different HuR domains coordinates subcellular HuR distribution and leads to a preferential binding to U-rich bearing target mRNA. © 2013.

  11. HuR represses Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity by promoting cytoplasmic localization of β-catenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Inae; Hur, Jung; Jeong, Sunjoo, E-mail: sjsj@dankook.ac.kr

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • Wnt signaling as well as β-catenin overexpression enhance HuR cytoplasmic export. • HuR overexpression promotes cytoplasmic localization of β-catenin from the perinuclear fraction. • Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity is repressesed by HuR. - Abstract: β-Catenin is the key transcriptional activator of canonical Wnt signaling in the nucleus; thus, nuclear accumulation of β-catenin is a critical step for expressing target genes. β-Catenin accumulates in the nucleus of cancer cells where it activates oncogenic target genes. Hu antigen R (HuR) is a RNA binding protein that regulates multiple post-transcriptional processes including RNA stability. Thus, cytoplasmic HuR protein may be involved in tumorigenesis by stabilizing oncogenic transcripts, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we observed that Wnt/β-catenin signaling induced export of the HuR protein, whereas HuR overexpression promoted accumulation of the β-catenin protein in the cytoplasm. Thus, Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity in the nucleus was reduced by overexpressing HuR. These results suggest novel and uncharacterized cytoplasmic β-catenin functions related to HuR-mediated RNA metabolism in cancer cells.

  12. HuR represses Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity by promoting cytoplasmic localization of β-catenin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Inae; Hur, Jung; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Wnt signaling as well as β-catenin overexpression enhance HuR cytoplasmic export. • HuR overexpression promotes cytoplasmic localization of β-catenin from the perinuclear fraction. • Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity is repressesed by HuR. - Abstract: β-Catenin is the key transcriptional activator of canonical Wnt signaling in the nucleus; thus, nuclear accumulation of β-catenin is a critical step for expressing target genes. β-Catenin accumulates in the nucleus of cancer cells where it activates oncogenic target genes. Hu antigen R (HuR) is a RNA binding protein that regulates multiple post-transcriptional processes including RNA stability. Thus, cytoplasmic HuR protein may be involved in tumorigenesis by stabilizing oncogenic transcripts, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we observed that Wnt/β-catenin signaling induced export of the HuR protein, whereas HuR overexpression promoted accumulation of the β-catenin protein in the cytoplasm. Thus, Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity in the nucleus was reduced by overexpressing HuR. These results suggest novel and uncharacterized cytoplasmic β-catenin functions related to HuR-mediated RNA metabolism in cancer cells

  13. The Elav-like protein HuR exerts translational control of viral internal ribosome entry sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivas-Aravena, Andrea; Ramdohr, Pablo; Vallejos, Maricarmen; Valiente-Echeverria, Fernando; Dormoy-Raclet, Virginie; Rodriguez, Felipe; Pino, Karla; Holzmann, Cristian; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo; Gallouzi, Imed-Eddine; Lopez-Lastra, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    The human embryonic-lethal abnormal vision (ELAV)-like protein, HuR, has been recently found to be involved in the regulation of protein synthesis. In this study we show that HuR participates in the translational control of the HIV-1 and HCV IRES elements. HuR functions as a repressor of HIV-1 IRES activity and acts as an activator of the HCV IRES. The effect of HuR was evaluated in three independent experimental systems, rabbit reticulocyte lysate, HeLa cells, and Xenopus laevis oocytes, using both overexpression and knockdown approaches. Furthermore, results suggest that HuR mediated regulation of HIV-1 and HCV IRESes does not require direct binding of the protein to the RNA nor does it need the nuclear translocation of the IRES-containing RNAs. Finally, we show that HuR has a negative impact on post-integration steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. Thus, our observations yield novel insights into the role of HuR in the post-transcriptional regulation of HCV and HIV-1 gene expression.

  14. Transcriptomic-Wide Discovery of Direct and Indirect HuR RNA Targets in Activated CD4+ T Cells.

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    Patsharaporn Techasintana

    Full Text Available Due to poor correlation between steady state mRNA levels and protein product, purely transcriptomic profiling methods may miss genes posttranscriptionally regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs and microRNAs (miRNAs. RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP methods developed to identify in vivo targets of RBPs have greatly elucidated those mRNAs which may be regulated via transcript stability and translation. The RBP HuR (ELAVL1 and family members are major stabilizers of mRNA. Many labs have identified HuR mRNA targets; however, many of these analyses have been performed in cell lines and oftentimes are not independent biological replicates. Little is known about how HuR target mRNAs behave in conditional knock-out models. In the present work, we performed HuR RIP-Seq and RNA-Seq to investigate HuR direct and indirect targets using a novel conditional knock-out model of HuR genetic ablation during CD4+ T activation and Th2 differentiation. Using independent biological replicates, we generated a high coverage RIP-Seq data set (>160 million reads that was analyzed using bioinformatics methods specifically designed to find direct mRNA targets in RIP-Seq data. Simultaneously, another set of independent biological replicates were sequenced by RNA-Seq (>425 million reads to identify indirect HuR targets. These direct and indirect targets were combined to determine canonical pathways in CD4+ T cell activation and differentiation for which HuR plays an important role. We show that HuR may regulate genes in multiple canonical pathways involved in T cell activation especially the CD28 family signaling pathway. These data provide insights into potential HuR-regulated genes during T cell activation and immune mechanisms.

  15. Cytoplasmic Hu-Antigen R (HuR) Expression is Associated with Poor Survival in Patients with Surgically Resected Cholangiocarcinoma Treated with Adjuvant Gemcitabine-Based Chemotherapy.

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    Toyota, Kazuhiro; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Naru; Uemura, Kenichiro; Nakagawa, Naoya; Takahashi, Shinya; Sueda, Taijiro

    2018-05-01

    Hu-antigen R (HuR) is an RNA-binding protein that regulates the stability, translation, and nucleus-to-cytoplasm translocation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs). The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of HuR in cholangiocarcinoma patients who received adjuvant gemcitabine-based chemotherapy (AGC) after surgical resection. Nuclear and cytoplasmic HuR expression was investigated immunohistochemically in 131 patients with resected cholangiocarcinoma, including 91 patients administered AGC and 40 patients who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. The correlation between HuR expression and survival was evaluated by statistical analysis. High nuclear and cytoplasmic HuR expression was observed in 67 (51%) and 45 (34%) patients, respectively. Cytoplasmic HuR expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (p < 0.01), while high cytoplasmic HuR expression was significantly associated with poor disease-free survival [DFS] (p = 0.03) and overall survival [OS] (p = 0.001) in the 91 patients who received AGC, but not in the 40 patients who did not receive AGC (DFS p = 0.17; OS p = 0.07). In the multivariate analysis of patients who received AGC, high cytoplasmic HuR expression was an independent predictor of poor DFS (hazard ratio [HR] 1.77; p = 0.04) and OS (HR 2.09; p = 0.02). Nuclear HuR expression did not affect the survival of enrolled patients. High cytoplasmic HuR expression was closely associated with the efficacy of AGC in patients with cholangiocarcinoma. The current findings warrant further investigations to optimize adjuvant chemotherapy regimens for resectable cholangiocarcinoma.

  16. Regulation Mechanism of HBV cccDNA

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    Cheng Jun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Covalently closed circular (ccc DNA of hepatitis B virus (HBV existed in the nuclei of HBV infected hepatocytes with a half-life time of 14.3 years in a mathematic model. Viral protein feedback regulation in HBV life cycle to maintain vital viral replication is an important mechanism. Interleukin-6, epithelial growth factor, heme oxygenase-1, histones, and hepatocyte nuclear factors are demonstrated as the key regulators for HBV life cycle. CpG island structure and methylation status are involved in the regulation of HBV DNA replication. Nucleos(tide analogues are widely used in the clinical practice for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B patients, although no evidence indicating a direct inhibiton of HBV cccDNA. In the future, along with the study of HBV life cycle, new drugs including RNA interference technique, will pave the way to eliminate the HBV cccDNA from infected hepatocytes resulting final cure of chronic hepatitis B.

  17. Changes in Cellular mRNA Stability, Splicing, and Polyadenylation through HuR Protein Sequestration by a Cytoplasmic RNA Virus

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    Michael D. Barnhart

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact of RNA viruses on the posttranscriptional regulation of cellular gene expression is unclear. Sindbis virus causes a dramatic relocalization of the cellular HuR protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in infected cells. This is to the result of the expression of large amounts of viral RNAs that contain high-affinity HuR binding sites in their 3′ UTRs effectively serving as a sponge for the HuR protein. Sequestration of HuR by Sindbis virus is associated with destabilization of cellular mRNAs that normally bind HuR and rely on it to regulate their expression. Furthermore, significant changes can be observed in nuclear alternative polyadenylation and splicing events on cellular pre-mRNAs as a result of sequestration of HuR protein by the 3′ UTR of transcripts of this cytoplasmic RNA virus. These studies suggest a molecular mechanism of virus-host interaction that probably has a significant impact on virus replication, cytopathology, and pathogenesis.

  18. Regulation of DNA repair by parkin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Shyan-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Mutation of parkin is one of the most prevalent causes of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that acts on a variety of substrates, resulting in polyubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome or monoubiquitination and regulation of biological activity. However, the cellular functions of parkin that relate to its pathological involvement in PD are not well understood. Here we show that parkin is essential for optimal repair of DNA damage. Parkin-deficient cells exhibit reduced DNA excision repair that can be restored by transfection of wild-type parkin, but not by transfection of a pathological parkin mutant. Parkin also protects against DNA damage-induced cell death, an activity that is largely lost in the pathological mutant. Moreover, parkin interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a protein that coordinates DNA excision repair. These results suggest that parkin promotes DNA repair and protects against genotoxicity, and implicate DNA damage as a potential pathogenic mechanism in PD.

  19. HuR and GRSF1 modulate the nuclear export and mitochondrial localization of the lncRNA RMRP

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    Noh, Ji Heon; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Panda, Amaresh C.; Munk, Rachel; Kim, Jiyoung; Curtis, Jessica; Moad, Christopher A.; Wohler, Christina M.; Indig, Fred E.; de Paula, Wilson; Dudekula, Dawood B.; De, Supriyo; Piao, Yulan; Yang, Xiaoling; Martindale, Jennifer L.; de Cabo, Rafael; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Some mitochondrial long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are encoded by nuclear DNA, but the mechanisms that mediate their transport to mitochondria are poorly characterized. Using affinity RNA pull-down followed by mass spectrometry analysis, we found two RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), HuR (human antigen R) and GRSF1 (G-rich RNA sequence-binding factor 1), that associated with the nuclear DNA-encoded lncRNA RMRP and mobilized it to mitochondria. In cultured human cells, HuR bound RMRP in the nucleus and mediated its CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-dependent export to the cytosol. After RMRP was imported into mitochondria, GRSF1 bound RMRP and increased its abundance in the matrix. Loss of GRSF1 lowered the mitochondrial levels of RMRP, in turn suppressing oxygen consumption rates and modestly reducing mitochondrial DNA replication priming. Our findings indicate that RBPs HuR and GRSF1 govern the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial localization of the lncRNA RMRP, which is encoded by nuclear DNA but has key functions in mitochondria. PMID:27198227

  20. Regulating DNA Self-assembly by DNA-Surface Interactions.

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    Liu, Longfei; Li, Yulin; Wang, Yong; Zheng, Jianwei; Mao, Chengde

    2017-12-14

    DNA self-assembly provides a powerful approach for preparation of nanostructures. It is often studied in bulk solution and involves only DNA-DNA interactions. When confined to surfaces, DNA-surface interactions become an additional, important factor to DNA self-assembly. However, the way in which DNA-surface interactions influence DNA self-assembly is not well studied. In this study, we showed that weak DNA-DNA interactions could be stabilized by DNA-surface interactions to allow large DNA nanostructures to form. In addition, the assembly can be conducted isothermally at room temperature in as little as 5 seconds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Cooperative interplay of let-7 mimic and HuR with MYC RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Gunzburg, Menachem J; Sivakumaran, Andrew; Pendini, Nicole R; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Gorospe, Myriam; Wilce, Matthew Cj; Wilce, Jacqueline A

    2015-01-01

    Both RNA-binding proteins (RBP) and miRNA play important roles in the regulation of mRNA expression, often acting together to regulate a target mRNA. In some cases the RBP and miRNA have been reported to act competitively, but in other instances they function cooperatively. Here, we investigated HuR function as an enhancer of let-7-mediated translational repression of c-Myc despite the separation of their binding sites. Using an in vitro system, we determined that a let-7 mimic, consisting of...

  2. Regulation and function of DNA methylation in plants and animals

    KAUST Repository

    He, Xinjian

    2011-02-15

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark involved in diverse biological processes. In plants, DNA methylation can be established through the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway, an RNA interference pathway for transcriptional gene silencing (TGS), which requires 24-nt small interfering RNAs. In mammals, de novo DNA methylation occurs primarily at two developmental stages: during early embryogenesis and during gametogenesis. While it is not clear whether establishment of DNA methylation patterns in mammals involves RNA interference in general, de novo DNA methylation and suppression of transposons in germ cells require 24-32-nt piwi-interacting small RNAs. DNA methylation status is dynamically regulated by DNA methylation and demethylation reactions. In plants, active DNA demethylation relies on the repressor of silencing 1 family of bifunctional DNA glycosylases, which remove the 5-methylcytosine base and then cleave the DNA backbone at the abasic site, initiating a base excision repair (BER) pathway. In animals, multiple mechanisms of active DNA demethylation have been proposed, including a deaminase- and DNA glycosylase-initiated BER pathway. New information concerning the effects of various histone modifications on the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation has broadened our understanding of the regulation of DNA methylation. The function of DNA methylation in plants and animals is also discussed in this review. © 2011 IBCB, SIBS, CAS All rights reserved.

  3. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of the RNA-binding domain of HuR and its poly(U)-binding properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hong; Li, Heng; Shi, Hui; Liu, Yang; Liu, Huihui; Zhao, Hui; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2011-01-01

    Here, the recombinant ARE-binding region of HuR (residues 18–186) was crystallized in space group P2 1 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.2, b = 133.1, c = 31.4 Å. Human antigen R (HuR), a ubiquitously expressed member of the Hu protein family, is an important post-transcriptional regulator which has three RNA-recognition motif (RRM) domains. The two tandem N-terminal RRM domains can selectively bind to the AU-rich element (ARE), while the third one interacts with the poly(A) tail and other proteins. Here, the recombinant ARE-binding region of HuR (residues 18–186) was crystallized in space group P2 1 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.2, b = 133.1, c = 31.4 Å. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.8 Å. Mutagenesis analysis and SPR assays revealed its poly(U)-binding properties

  4. Growth regulators, DNA content and anatomy in vitro -cultivated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth regulators, DNA content and anatomy in vitro -cultivated Curcuma longa ... Shoots were inoculated in MS culture medium with the addition of 30 g/L of sucrose ... flow cytometry, utilizing two reference standards, green pea, and tomato.

  5. Planering, progression, profession: hur studenter blir planerare

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    Lars Larsson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available De kunskaper som utvecklas med stöd i de nationella examensmålen för värderingsförmåga och förhållningssätt är de som ligger närmast den professionella identiteten. Denna kunskapskategori ges begränsat utrymme i de förväntade studieresultat som examineras inom samhällsplanerarprogrammet vid Umeå universitet. Trots detta får studenterna anställning som planerare, ofta kort efter att de tagit sin kandidatexamen. Syftet med denna studie är därför att undersöka hur kunskapsmässig progression underbyggs avseende värderingsförmåga och förhållningssätt i en planerarutbildning med kulturgeografi som huvudområde. I denna artikel redovisas en analys av samhällsplanerarprogrammet.De kurser i kulturgeografi som ingår i programmet analyseras utifrån förväntade studieresultat, läraktiviteter och examinationsformer i syfte att spåra den planerade progressionen. Särskild uppmärksamhet ägnas kunskapskategorin värderingsförmåga och förhållningssätt. Resultaten diskuteras utifrån en modell för att förstå vilka typer av kunskaper som används vid avvägningar och beslut i planeringsprofessionen. Analysen visar att samhällsplanerarprogrammets planerade progression följer principen att först ge studenterna breda ämneskunskaper, därefter utveckla metodfärdigheter och mot slutet utveckla mer komplexa och handlingsinriktade kunskaper. Den visar också att den planerade progressionen är begränsad i att underbygga normativa aspekter av studenternas värderingsförmåga och förhållningssätt.

  6. Mechanochemical regulations of RPA's binding to ssDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Le, Shimin; Basu, Anindita; Chazin, Walter J.; Yan, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein that serves to protect ssDNA from degradation and annealing, and as a template for recruitment of many downstream factors in virtually all DNA transactions in cell. During many of these transactions, DNA is tethered and is likely subject to force. Previous studies of RPA's binding behavior on ssDNA were conducted in the absence of force; therefore the RPA-ssDNA conformations regulated by force remain unclear. Here, using a combination of atomic force microscopy imaging and mechanical manipulation of single ssDNA tethers, we show that force mediates a switch of the RPA bound ssDNA from amorphous aggregation to a much more regular extended conformation. Further, we found an interesting non-monotonic dependence of the binding affinity on monovalent salt concentration in the presence of force. In addition, we discovered that zinc in micromolar concentrations drives ssDNA to a unique, highly stiff and more compact state. These results provide new mechanochemical insights into the influences and the mechanisms of action of RPA on large single ssDNA.

  7. DNA replication initiator Cdc6 also regulates ribosomal DNA transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shijiao; Xu, Xiaowei; Wang, Guopeng; Lu, Guoliang; Xie, Wenbing; Tao, Wei; Zhang, Hongyin; Jiang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2016-04-01

    RNA-polymerase-I-dependent ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription is fundamental to rRNA processing, ribosome assembly and protein synthesis. However, how this process is initiated during the cell cycle is not fully understood. By performing a proteomic analysis of transcription factors that bind RNA polymerase I during rDNA transcription initiation, we identified that the DNA replication initiator Cdc6 interacts with RNA polymerase I and its co-factors, and promotes rDNA transcription in G1 phase in an ATPase-activity-dependent manner. We further showed that Cdc6 is targeted to the nucleolus during late mitosis and G1 phase in a manner that is dependent on B23 (also known as nucleophosmin, NPM1), and preferentially binds to the rDNA promoter through its ATP-binding domain. Overexpression of Cdc6 increases rDNA transcription, whereas knockdown of Cdc6 results in a decreased association of both RNA polymerase I and the RNA polymerase I transcription factor RRN3 with rDNA, and a reduction of rDNA transcription. Furthermore, depletion of Cdc6 impairs the interaction between RRN3 and RNA polymerase I. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Cdc6 also serves as a regulator of rDNA transcription initiation, and indicate a mechanism by which initiation of rDNA transcription and DNA replication can be coordinated in cells. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Regulation of the DNA Damage Response by DNA-PKcs Inhibitory Phosphorylation of ATM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Jiang, Wenxia; Crowe, Jennie L; Zha, Shan; Paull, Tanya T

    2017-01-05

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) regulates the DNA damage response as well as DNA double-strand break repair through homologous recombination. Here we show that ATM is hyperactive when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is chemically inhibited or when the DNA-PKcs gene is deleted in human cells. Pre-incubation of ATM protein with active DNA-PKcs also significantly reduces ATM activity in vitro. We characterize several phosphorylation sites in ATM that are targets of DNA-PKcs and show that phospho-mimetic mutations at these residues significantly inhibit ATM activity and impair ATM signaling upon DNA damage. In contrast, phospho-blocking mutations at one cluster of sites increase the frequency of apoptosis during normal cell growth. DNA-PKcs, which is integral to the non-homologous end joining pathway, thus negatively regulates ATM activity through phosphorylation of ATM. These observations illuminate an important regulatory mechanism for ATM that also controls DNA repair pathway choice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tyrosine 370 phosphorylation of ATM positively regulates DNA damage response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Jen; Lan, Li; Peng, Guang; Chang, Wei-Chao; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Wang, Ying-Nai; Cheng, Chien-Chia; Wei, Leizhen; Nakajima, Satoshi; Chang, Shih-Shin; Liao, Hsin-Wei; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Lavin, Martin; Ang, K Kian; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) mediates DNA damage response by controling irradiation-induced foci formation, cell cycle checkpoint, and apoptosis. However, how upstream signaling regulates ATM is not completely understood. Here, we show that upon irradiation stimulation, ATM associates with and is phosphorylated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) at Tyr370 (Y370) at the site of DNA double-strand breaks. Depletion of endogenous EGFR impairs ATM-mediated foci formation, homologous recombination, and DNA repair. Moreover, pretreatment with an EGFR kinase inhibitor, gefitinib, blocks EGFR and ATM association, hinders CHK2 activation and subsequent foci formation, and increases radiosensitivity. Thus, we reveal a critical mechanism by which EGFR directly regulates ATM activation in DNA damage response, and our results suggest that the status of ATM Y370 phosphorylation has the potential to serve as a biomarker to stratify patients for either radiotherapy alone or in combination with EGFR inhibition. PMID:25601159

  10. Nuclear translocation contributes to regulation of DNA excision repair activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Lützen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    for regulation of nuclear import that is necessary for proper localization of the repair proteins. This review summarizes the current knowledge on nuclear import mechanisms of DNA excision repair proteins and provides a model that categorizes the import by different mechanisms, including classical nuclear import......DNA mutations are circumvented by dedicated specialized excision repair systems, such as the base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mismatch repair (MMR) pathways. Although the individual repair pathways have distinct roles in suppressing changes in the nuclear DNA......, it is evident that proteins from the different DNA repair pathways interact [Y. Wang, D. Cortez, P. Yazdi, N. Neff, S.J. Elledge, J. Qin, BASC, a super complex of BRCA1-associated proteins involved in the recognition and repair of aberrant DNA structures, Genes Dev. 14 (2000) 927-939; M. Christmann, M...

  11. DNA methylation regulates neurophysiological spatial representation in memory formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D. Roth

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms including altered DNA methylation are critical for altered gene transcription subserving synaptic plasticity and the retention of learned behavior. Here, we tested the idea that one role for activity-dependent altered DNA methylation is stabilization of cognition-associated hippocampal place cell firing in response to novel place learning. We observed that a behavioral protocol (spatial exploration of a novel environment known to induce hippocampal place cell remapping resulted in alterations of hippocampal Bdnf DNA methylation. Further studies using neurophysiological in vivo single-unit recordings revealed that pharmacological manipulations of DNA methylation decreased long-term but not short-term place field stability. Together, our data highlight a role for DNA methylation in regulating neurophysiological spatial representation and memory formation.

  12. DNA methylation regulates neurophysiological spatial representation in memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Eric D; Roth, Tania L; Money, Kelli M; SenGupta, Sonda; Eason, Dawn E; Sweatt, J David

    2015-04-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms including altered DNA methylation are critical for altered gene transcription subserving synaptic plasticity and the retention of learned behavior. Here we tested the idea that one role for activity-dependent altered DNA methylation is stabilization of cognition-associated hippocampal place cell firing in response to novel place learning. We observed that a behavioral protocol (spatial exploration of a novel environment) known to induce hippocampal place cell remapping resulted in alterations of hippocampal Bdnf DNA methylation. Further studies using neurophysiological in vivo single unit recordings revealed that pharmacological manipulations of DNA methylation decreased long-term but not short-term place field stability. Together our data highlight a role for DNA methylation in regulating neurophysiological spatial representation and memory formation.

  13. Regulated eukaryotic DNA replication origin firing with purified proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeeles, Joseph T P; Deegan, Tom D; Janska, Agnieszka; Early, Anne; Diffley, John F X

    2015-03-26

    Eukaryotic cells initiate DNA replication from multiple origins, which must be tightly regulated to promote precise genome duplication in every cell cycle. To accomplish this, initiation is partitioned into two temporally discrete steps: a double hexameric minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex is first loaded at replication origins during G1 phase, and then converted to the active CMG (Cdc45-MCM-GINS) helicase during S phase. Here we describe the reconstitution of budding yeast DNA replication initiation with 16 purified replication factors, made from 42 polypeptides. Origin-dependent initiation recapitulates regulation seen in vivo. Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibits MCM loading by phosphorylating the origin recognition complex (ORC) and promotes CMG formation by phosphorylating Sld2 and Sld3. Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) promotes replication by phosphorylating MCM, and can act either before or after CDK. These experiments define the minimum complement of proteins, protein kinase substrates and co-factors required for regulated eukaryotic DNA replication.

  14. Concentration and length dependence of DNA looping in transcriptional regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Han

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In many cases, transcriptional regulation involves the binding of transcription factors at sites on the DNA that are not immediately adjacent to the promoter of interest. This action at a distance is often mediated by the formation of DNA loops: Binding at two or more sites on the DNA results in the formation of a loop, which can bring the transcription factor into the immediate neighborhood of the relevant promoter. These processes are important in settings ranging from the historic bacterial examples (bacterial metabolism and the lytic-lysogeny decision in bacteriophage, to the modern concept of gene regulation to regulatory processes central to pattern formation during development of multicellular organisms. Though there have been a variety of insights into the combinatorial aspects of transcriptional control, the mechanism of DNA looping as an agent of combinatorial control in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes remains unclear. We use single-molecule techniques to dissect DNA looping in the lac operon. In particular, we measure the propensity for DNA looping by the Lac repressor as a function of the concentration of repressor protein and as a function of the distance between repressor binding sites. As with earlier single-molecule studies, we find (at least two distinct looped states and demonstrate that the presence of these two states depends both upon the concentration of repressor protein and the distance between the two repressor binding sites. We find that loops form even at interoperator spacings considerably shorter than the DNA persistence length, without the intervention of any other proteins to prebend the DNA. The concentration measurements also permit us to use a simple statistical mechanical model of DNA loop formation to determine the free energy of DNA looping, or equivalently, the for looping.

  15. DNA Tumor Virus Regulation of Host DNA Methylation and Its Implications for Immune Evasion and Oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss-Duerkop, Sharon K; Westrich, Joseph A; Pyeon, Dohun

    2018-02-13

    Viruses have evolved various mechanisms to evade host immunity and ensure efficient viral replication and persistence. Several DNA tumor viruses modulate host DNA methyltransferases for epigenetic dysregulation of immune-related gene expression in host cells. The host immune responses suppressed by virus-induced aberrant DNA methylation are also frequently involved in antitumor immune responses. Here, we describe viral mechanisms and virus-host interactions by which DNA tumor viruses regulate host DNA methylation to evade antiviral immunity, which may contribute to the generation of an immunosuppressive microenvironment during cancer development. Recent trials of immunotherapies have shown promising results to treat multiple cancers; however, a significant number of non-responders necessitate identifying additional targets for cancer immunotherapies. Thus, understanding immune evasion mechanisms of cancer-causing viruses may provide great insights for reversing immune suppression to prevent and treat associated cancers.

  16. DNA Tumor Virus Regulation of Host DNA Methylation and Its Implications for Immune Evasion and Oncogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon K. Kuss-Duerkop

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Viruses have evolved various mechanisms to evade host immunity and ensure efficient viral replication and persistence. Several DNA tumor viruses modulate host DNA methyltransferases for epigenetic dysregulation of immune-related gene expression in host cells. The host immune responses suppressed by virus-induced aberrant DNA methylation are also frequently involved in antitumor immune responses. Here, we describe viral mechanisms and virus–host interactions by which DNA tumor viruses regulate host DNA methylation to evade antiviral immunity, which may contribute to the generation of an immunosuppressive microenvironment during cancer development. Recent trials of immunotherapies have shown promising results to treat multiple cancers; however, a significant number of non-responders necessitate identifying additional targets for cancer immunotherapies. Thus, understanding immune evasion mechanisms of cancer-causing viruses may provide great insights for reversing immune suppression to prevent and treat associated cancers.

  17. Epigenetic regulation during fetal femur development: DNA methylation matters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María C de Andrés

    Full Text Available Epigenetic modifications are heritable changes in gene expression without changes in DNA sequence. DNA methylation has been implicated in the control of several cellular processes including differentiation, gene regulation, development, genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. Methylated cytosine residues at CpG dinucleotides are commonly associated with gene repression; conversely, strategic loss of methylation during development could lead to activation of lineage-specific genes. Evidence is emerging that bone development and growth are programmed; although, interestingly, bone is constantly remodelled throughout life. Using human embryonic stem cells, human fetal bone cells (HFBCs, adult chondrocytes and STRO-1(+ marrow stromal cells from human bone marrow, we have examined a spectrum of developmental stages of femur development and the role of DNA methylation therein. Using pyrosequencing methodology we analysed the status of methylation of genes implicated in bone biology; furthermore, we correlated these methylation levels with gene expression levels using qRT-PCR and protein distribution during fetal development evaluated using immunohistochemistry. We found that during fetal femur development DNA methylation inversely correlates with expression of genes including iNOS (NOS2 and COL9A1, but not catabolic genes including MMP13 and IL1B. Furthermore, significant demethylation was evident in the osteocalcin promoter between the fetal and adult developmental stages. Increased TET1 expression and decreased expression of DNA (cytosine-5--methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 in adult chondrocytes compared to HFBCs could contribute to the loss of methylation observed during fetal development. HFBC multipotency confirms these cells to be an ideal developmental system for investigation of DNA methylation regulation. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the role of epigenetic regulation, specifically DNA methylation, in bone development

  18. Nanosystems based on siRNA silencing HuR expression counteract diabetic retinopathy in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, Marialaura; Pascale, Alessia; Cupri, Sarha; Pignatello, Rosario; Osera, Cecilia; D Agata, Velia; D Amico, Agata Grazia; Leggio, Gian Marco; Ruozi, Barbara; Govoni, Stefano; Drago, Filippo; Bucolo, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated whether specifically and directly targeting human antigen R (HuR), a member of embryonic lethal abnormal vision (ELAV) proteins family, may represent a new potential therapeutic strategy to manage diabetic retinopathy. Nanosystems loaded with siRNA silencing HuR expression (lipoplexes), consisting of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and liposomes (SUV) were prepared. Photon correlation spectroscopy analysis, Zeta potential measurement and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies were carried out to characterize the complexation of siRNA with the lipid nanocarriers. Nanosystems were evaluated by using AFM and scanning electron microscopy. The lipoplexes were injected into the eye of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Retinal HuR and VEGF levels were detected by Western blot and ELISA, respectively. Retinal histology was also carried out. The results demonstrated that retinal HuR and VEGF are significantly increased in STZ-rats and are blunted by HuR siRNA treatment. Lipoplexes with a weak positive surface charge and with a 4:1 N/P (cationic lipid nitrogen to siRNA phosphate) ratio exert a better transfection efficiency, significantly dumping retinal HuR and VEGF levels. In conclusion, we demonstrated that siRNA can be efficiently delivered into the rat retina using lipid-based nanocarriers, and some of the lipoplexes loaded with siRNA silencing HuR expression are potential candidates to manage retinal diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanisms and regulation of DNA replication initiation in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Matthew W; Botchan, Michael R; Berger, James M

    2017-04-01

    Cellular DNA replication is initiated through the action of multiprotein complexes that recognize replication start sites in the chromosome (termed origins) and facilitate duplex DNA melting within these regions. In a typical cell cycle, initiation occurs only once per origin and each round of replication is tightly coupled to cell division. To avoid aberrant origin firing and re-replication, eukaryotes tightly regulate two events in the initiation process: loading of the replicative helicase, MCM2-7, onto chromatin by the origin recognition complex (ORC), and subsequent activation of the helicase by its incorporation into a complex known as the CMG. Recent work has begun to reveal the details of an orchestrated and sequential exchange of initiation factors on DNA that give rise to a replication-competent complex, the replisome. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that underpin eukaryotic DNA replication initiation - from selecting replication start sites to replicative helicase loading and activation - and describe how these events are often distinctly regulated across different eukaryotic model organisms.

  20. Blocking Breast Cancer Metastasis by Targeting RNA-Binding Protein HuR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0730 TITLE: Blocking Breast Cancer Metastasis by Targeting RNA-Binding Protein HuR PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Danny Welch...NUMBER Blocking Breast Cancer Metastasis by Targeting RNA-Binding Protein HuR 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...increased aggressiveness in breast cancer , the primary objective of this proposal is to assess whether HuR (or analogs) prevent and/or treat metastasis and/or

  1. Multiple conformational states of DnaA protein regulate its interaction with DnaA boxes in the initiation of DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Meera J; Bhatia, Lavesh; Yilmaz, Gulden; Biswas-Fiss, Esther E; Biswas, Subhasis B

    2017-09-01

    DnaA protein is the initiator of genomic DNA replication in prokaryotes. It binds to specific DNA sequences in the origin of DNA replication and unwinds small AT-rich sequences downstream for the assembly of the replisome. The mechanism of activation of DnaA that enables it to bind and organize the origin DNA and leads to replication initiation remains unclear. In this study, we have developed double-labeled fluorescent DnaA probes to analyze conformational states of DnaA protein upon binding DNA, nucleotide, and Soj sporulation protein using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). Our studies demonstrate that DnaA protein undergoes large conformational changes upon binding to substrates and there are multiple distinct conformational states that enable it to initiate DNA replication. DnaA protein adopted a relaxed conformation by expanding ~15Å upon binding ATP and DNA to form the ATP·DnaA·DNA complex. Hydrolysis of bound ATP to ADP led to a contraction of DnaA within the complex. The relaxed conformation of DnaA is likely required for the formation of the multi-protein ATP·DnaA·DNA complex. In the initiation of sporulation, Soj binding to DnaA prevented relaxation of its conformation. Soj·ADP appeared to block the activation of DnaA, suggesting a mechanism for Soj·ADP in switching initiation of DNA replication to sporulation. Our studies demonstrate that multiple conformational states of DnaA protein regulate its binding to DNA in the initiation of DNA replication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A new MCM modification cycle regulates DNA replication initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lei; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2016-03-01

    The MCM DNA helicase is a central regulatory target during genome replication. MCM is kept inactive during G1, and it initiates replication after being activated in S phase. During this transition, the only known chemical change to MCM is the gain of multisite phosphorylation that promotes cofactor recruitment. Because replication initiation is intimately linked to multiple biological cues, additional changes to MCM can provide further regulatory points. Here, we describe a yeast MCM SUMOylation cycle that regulates replication. MCM subunits undergo SUMOylation upon loading at origins in G1 before MCM phosphorylation. MCM SUMOylation levels then decline as MCM phosphorylation levels rise, thus suggesting an inhibitory role of MCM SUMOylation during replication. Indeed, increasing MCM SUMOylation impairs replication initiation, partly through promoting the recruitment of a phosphatase that decreases MCM phosphorylation and activation. We propose that MCM SUMOylation counterbalances kinase-based regulation, thus ensuring accurate control of replication initiation.

  3. Protein kinase CK2 localizes to sites of DNA double-strand break regulating the cellular response to DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Birgitte B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK is a nuclear complex composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs and a heterodimeric DNA-targeting subunit Ku. DNA-PK is a major component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ repair mechanism, which is activated in the presence of DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation, reactive oxygen species and radiomimetic drugs. We have recently reported that down-regulation of protein kinase CK2 by siRNA interference results in enhanced cell death specifically in DNA-PKcs-proficient human glioblastoma cells, and this event is accompanied by decreased autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at S2056 and delayed repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Results In the present study, we show that CK2 co-localizes with phosphorylated histone H2AX to sites of DNA damage and while CK2 gene knockdown is associated with delayed DNA damage repair, its overexpression accelerates this process. We report for the first time evidence that lack of CK2 destabilizes the interaction of DNA-PKcs with DNA and with Ku80 at sites of genetic lesions. Furthermore, we show that CK2 regulates the phosphorylation levels of DNA-PKcs only in response to direct induction of DNA double-strand breaks. Conclusions Taken together, these results strongly indicate that CK2 plays a prominent role in NHEJ by facilitating and/or stabilizing the binding of DNA-PKcs and, possibly other repair proteins, to the DNA ends contributing to efficient DNA damage repair in mammalian cells.

  4. Chl1 DNA helicase regulates Scc2 deposition specifically during DNA-replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Rudra

    Full Text Available The conserved family of cohesin proteins that mediate sister chromatid cohesion requires Scc2, Scc4 for chromatin-association and Eco1/Ctf7 for conversion to a tethering competent state. A popular model, based on the notion that cohesins form huge ring-like structures, is that Scc2, Scc4 function is essential only during G1 such that sister chromatid cohesion results simply from DNA replisome passage through pre-loaded cohesin rings. In such a scenario, cohesin deposition during G1 is temporally uncoupled from Eco1-dependent establishment reactions that occur during S-phase. Chl1 DNA helicase (homolog of human ChlR1/DDX11 and BACH1/BRIP1/FANCJ helicases implicated in Fanconi anemia, breast and ovarian cancer and Warsaw Breakage Syndrome plays a critical role in sister chromatid cohesion, however, the mechanism through which Chl1 promotes cohesion remains poorly understood. Here, we report that Chl1 promotes Scc2 loading unto DNA such that both Scc2 and cohesin enrichment to chromatin are defective in chl1 mutant cells. The results further show that both Chl1 expression and chromatin-recruitment are tightly regulated through the cell cycle, peaking during S-phase. Importantly, kinetic ChIP studies reveals that Chl1 is required for Scc2 chromatin-association specifically during S-phase, but not during G1. Despite normal chromatin enrichment of both Scc2 and cohesin during G1, chl1 mutant cells exhibit severe chromosome segregation and cohesion defects--revealing that G1-loaded cohesins is insufficient to promote cohesion. Based on these findings, we propose a new model wherein S-phase cohesin loading occurs during DNA replication and in concert with both cohesion establishment and chromatin assembly reactions--challenging the notion that DNA replication fork navigates through or around pre-loaded cohesin rings.

  5. DMPD: Innate immune recognition of, and regulation by, DNA. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16979939 Innate immune recognition of, and regulation by, DNA. Ishii KJ, Akira S. T...rends Immunol. 2006 Nov;27(11):525-32. Epub 2006 Sep 18. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Innate immune recognition... of, and regulation by, DNA. PubmedID 16979939 Title Innate immune recognition of, and regulation b

  6. Hemi-methylated DNA regulates DNA methylation inheritance through allosteric activation of H3 ubiquitylation by UHRF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Joseph S; Cornett, Evan M; Goldfarb, Dennis; DaRosa, Paul A; Li, Zimeng M; Yan, Feng; Dickson, Bradley M; Guo, Angela H; Cantu, Daniel V; Kaustov, Lilia; Brown, Peter J; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Erie, Dorothy A; Major, Michael B; Klevit, Rachel E; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Kuhlman, Brian; Strahl, Brian D; Rothbart, Scott B

    2016-09-06

    The epigenetic inheritance of DNA methylation requires UHRF1, a histone- and DNA-binding RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that recruits DNMT1 to sites of newly replicated DNA through ubiquitylation of histone H3. UHRF1 binds DNA with selectivity towards hemi-methylated CpGs (HeDNA); however, the contribution of HeDNA sensing to UHRF1 function remains elusive. Here, we reveal that the interaction of UHRF1 with HeDNA is required for DNA methylation but is dispensable for chromatin interaction, which is governed by reciprocal positive cooperativity between the UHRF1 histone- and DNA-binding domains. HeDNA recognition activates UHRF1 ubiquitylation towards multiple lysines on the H3 tail adjacent to the UHRF1 histone-binding site. Collectively, our studies are the first demonstrations of a DNA-protein interaction and an epigenetic modification directly regulating E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. They also define an orchestrated epigenetic control mechanism involving modifications both to histones and DNA that facilitate UHRF1 chromatin targeting, H3 ubiquitylation, and DNA methylation inheritance.

  7. Regulation of the activity of the dual-function DnaA protein in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Fernandez-Fernandez

    Full Text Available DnaA is a conserved essential bacterial protein that acts as the initiator of chromosomal replication as well as a master transcriptional regulator in Caulobacter crescentus. Thus, the intracellular levels of active DnaA need to be tightly regulated during the cell cycle. Our previous work suggested that DnaA may be regulated at the level of its activity by the replisome-associated protein HdaA. Here, we describe the construction of a mutant DnaA protein [DnaA(R357A]. The R357 residue in the AAA+ domain of the C. crescentus DnaA protein is equivalent to the R334 residue of the E. coli DnaA protein, which is required for the Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA (RIDA. We found that the expression of the DnaA(R357A mutant protein in C. crescentus, but not the expression of the wild-type DnaA protein at similar levels, causes a severe phenotype of over-initiation of chromosomal replication and that it blocks cell division. Thus, the mutant DnaA(R357A protein is hyper-active to promote the initiation of DNA replication, compared to the wild-type DnaA protein. DnaA(R357A could not replace DnaA in vivo, indicating that the switch in DnaA activity once chromosomal replication has started may be an essential process in C. crescentus. We propose that the inactivation of DnaA is the main mechanism ensuring that chromosomal replication starts only once per cell cycle. We further observed that the R357A substitution in DnaA does not promote the activity of DnaA as a direct transcriptional activator of four important genes, encoding HdaA, the GcrA master cell cycle regulator, the FtsZ cell division protein and the MipZ spatial regulator of cell division. Thus, the AAA+ domain of DnaA may play a role in temporally regulating the bifunctionality of DnaA by reallocating DnaA molecules from initiating DNA replication to transcribing genes within the unique DnaA regulon of C. crescentus.

  8. Autophagy Stimulus Promotes Early HuR Protein Activation and p62/SQSTM1 Protein Synthesis in ARPE-19 Cells by Triggering Erk1/2, p38MAPK, and JNK Kinase Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Marchesi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA-binding protein dysregulation and altered expression of proteins involved in the autophagy/proteasome pathway play a role in many neurodegenerative disease onset/progression, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD. HuR/ELAVL1 is a master regulator of gene expression in human physiopathology. In ARPE-19 cells exposed to the proteasomal inhibitor MG132, HuR positively affects at posttranscriptional level p62 expression, a stress response gene involved in protein aggregate clearance with a role in AMD. Here, we studied the early effects of the proautophagy AICAR + MG132 cotreatment on the HuR-p62 pathway. We treated ARPE-19 cells with Erk1/2, AMPK, p38MAPK, PKC, and JNK kinase inhibitors in the presence of AICAR + MG132 and evaluated HuR localization/phosphorylation and p62 expression. Two-hour AICAR + MG132 induces both HuR cytoplasmic translocation and threonine phosphorylation via the Erk1/2 pathway. In these conditions, p62 mRNA is loaded on polysomes and its translation in de novo protein is favored. Additionally, for the first time, we report that JNK can phosphorylate HuR, however, without modulating its localization. Our study supports HuR’s role as an upstream regulator of p62 expression in ARPE-19 cells, helps to understand better the early events in response to a proautophagy stimulus, and suggests that modulation of the autophagy-regulating kinases as potential therapeutic targets for AMD may be relevant.

  9. Global DNA methylation synergistically regulates the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Johnson, Jacqueline; St John, Justin C

    2018-05-02

    Replication of mitochondrial DNA is strictly regulated during differentiation and development allowing each cell type to acquire its required mtDNA copy number to meet its specific needs for energy. Undifferentiated cells establish the mtDNA set point, which provides low numbers of mtDNA copy but sufficient template for replication once cells commit to specific lineages. However, cancer cells, such as those from the human glioblastoma multiforme cell line, HSR-GBM1, cannot complete differentiation as they fail to enforce the mtDNA set point and are trapped in a 'pseudo-differentiated' state. Global DNA methylation is likely to be a major contributing factor, as DNA demethylation treatments promote differentiation of HSR-GBM1 cells. To determine the relationship between DNA methylation and mtDNA copy number in cancer cells, we applied whole genome MeDIP-Seq and RNA-Seq to HSR-GBM1 cells and following their treatment with the DNA demethylation agents 5-azacytidine and vitamin C. We identified key methylated regions modulated by the DNA demethylation agents that also induced synchronous changes to mtDNA copy number and nuclear gene expression. Our findings highlight the control exerted by DNA methylation on the expression of key genes, the regulation of mtDNA copy number and establishment of the mtDNA set point, which collectively contribute to tumorigenesis.

  10. Acetylation regulates WRN catalytic activities and affects base excision DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muftuoglu, Meltem; Kusumoto, Rika; Speina, Elzbieta

    2008-01-01

    The Werner protein (WRN), defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, participates in a number of DNA metabolic processes, and we have been interested in the possible regulation of its function in DNA repair by post-translational modifications. Acetylation mediated by histone...... acetyltransferases is of key interest because of its potential importance in aging, DNA repair and transcription....

  11. Reciprocal Regulation between DNA-PKcs and Snail1 Conferring Genomic Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Haeng Ran; Lee, Hae June; Jin, Yeung Bae; Bae, Sang Woo; Lee, Yun Sil; Kim, Nam Hee; Kim, Hyun Sil; Nam, Hyung Wook; Yook, Jong In

    2010-01-01

    Although the roles of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) involving non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) of DNA repair are well recognized, the biological mechanisms and regulators by which DNA-PKcs regulate genomic instability are not clearly defined. We show herein that DNA-PKcs activity resulting from DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation (IR) phosphorylates Snail1 at serine 100, which results in increased Snail1 expression and its function by inhibition of GSK-3-mediated phosphorylation. Furthermore, Snail1 phosphorylated at serine 100 can reciprocally inhibit kinase activity of DNA-PKcs, resulting in an inhibition to recruit DNA-PKcs or Ku70/80 to a DNA double-strand break site, and ultimately inhibition of DNA repair activity. The impairment of repair activity by a direct interaction between Snail1 and DNA-PKcs increases the resistance to DNA damaging agents, such as IR, and genomic instability. Our findings provide a novel cellular mechanism for induction of genomic instability by reciprocal regulation of DNA-PKcs and Snail1

  12. Regulation and function of DNA methylation in plants and animals

    KAUST Repository

    He, Xinjian; Chen, Taiping; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-01-01

    ) pathway. In animals, multiple mechanisms of active DNA demethylation have been proposed, including a deaminase- and DNA glycosylase-initiated BER pathway. New information concerning the effects of various histone modifications on the establishment

  13. Regulation of DNA repair processes in mammalian cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bil'din, V.N.; Sergina, T.B.; Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made of the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) in proliferating and quiescent mouse Swiss 3T6 cells and in those stimulated from the quiet status by epidermal growth factor in combination with insulin, in the presence of specific inhibitors of DNA polymerase α and β (aphidicolin) and DNA polymerase β (2', 3'-dideoxythjymidine-5'-triphosphate). The repair of DNA SSB induced by X-ray-irradiation (10 Gy) or by γ-ray irradiation (150 Gy) is more sensitive to aphidicolin and mitogen-simulated cells three times stronger than in proliferating cells. The influence of 2', 3'-dideoxythymidine-5'-triphosphate on the rate of DNA SSB repair in cells of all the three types does not differ. Thus, the decrease in DNA repair efficiency in quiescent cells is connected with a decrease in the activity of aphidicolin-sensitive DNA polymerase, apparently DNA polymerase α

  14. Dna2 nuclease-helicase structure, mechanism and regulation by Rpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chun; Pourmal, Sergei; Pavletich, Nikola P

    2015-11-02

    The Dna2 nuclease-helicase maintains genomic integrity by processing DNA double-strand breaks, Okazaki fragments and stalled replication forks. Dna2 requires ssDNA ends, and is dependent on the ssDNA-binding protein Rpa, which controls cleavage polarity. Here we present the 2.3 Å structure of intact mouse Dna2 bound to a 15-nucleotide ssDNA. The nuclease active site is embedded in a long, narrow tunnel through which the DNA has to thread. The helicase domain is required for DNA binding but not threading. We also present the structure of a flexibly-tethered Dna2-Rpa interaction that recruits Dna2 to Rpa-coated DNA. We establish that a second Dna2-Rpa interaction is mutually exclusive with Rpa-DNA interactions and mediates the displacement of Rpa from ssDNA. This interaction occurs at the nuclease tunnel entrance and the 5' end of the Rpa-DNA complex. Hence, it only displaces Rpa from the 5' but not 3' end, explaining how Rpa regulates cleavage polarity.

  15. DNA-PK, ATM and ATR collaboratively regulate p53-RPA interaction to facilitate homologous recombination DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, M A; Li, Z; Dangeti, M; Musich, P R; Patrick, S; Roginskaya, M; Cartwright, B; Zou, Y

    2013-05-09

    Homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) are two distinct DNA double-stranded break (DSB) repair pathways. Here, we report that DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), the core component of NHEJ, partnering with DNA-damage checkpoint kinases ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR), regulates HR repair of DSBs. The regulation was accomplished through modulation of the p53 and replication protein A (RPA) interaction. We show that upon DNA damage, p53 and RPA were freed from a p53-RPA complex by simultaneous phosphorylations of RPA at the N-terminus of RPA32 subunit by DNA-PK and of p53 at Ser37 and Ser46 in a Chk1/Chk2-independent manner by ATR and ATM, respectively. Neither the phosphorylation of RPA nor of p53 alone could dissociate p53 and RPA. Furthermore, disruption of the release significantly compromised HR repair of DSBs. Our results reveal a mechanism for the crosstalk between HR repair and NHEJ through the co-regulation of p53-RPA interaction by DNA-PK, ATM and ATR.

  16. Regulation of rDNA stability by sumoylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Lisby, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Repair of DNA lesions by homologous recombination relies on the copying of genetic information from an intact homologous sequence. However, many eukaryotic genomes contain repetitive sequences such as the ribosomal gene locus (rDNA), which poses a risk for illegitimate recombination. Therefore, t......6 complex and sumoylation of Rad52, which directs DNA double-strand breaks in the rDNA to relocalize from within the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm before association with the recombination machinery. The relocalization before repair is important for maintaining rDNA stability. The focus...

  17. Autophosphorylation of DNA-PKCS regulates its dynamics at DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Naoya; Weterings, Eric; Yano, Ken-ichi; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Jakob, Burkhard; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Mari, Pierre-Olivier; van Gent, Dik C; Chen, Benjamin P C; Chen, David J

    2007-04-23

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) plays an important role during the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). It is recruited to DNA ends in the early stages of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) process, which mediates DSB repair. To study DNA-PK(CS) recruitment in vivo, we used a laser system to introduce DSBs in a specified region of the cell nucleus. We show that DNA-PK(CS) accumulates at DSB sites in a Ku80-dependent manner, and that neither the kinase activity nor the phosphorylation status of DNA-PK(CS) influences its initial accumulation. However, impairment of both of these functions results in deficient DSB repair and the maintained presence of DNA-PK(CS) at unrepaired DSBs. The use of photobleaching techniques allowed us to determine that the kinase activity and phosphorylation status of DNA-PK(CS) influence the stability of its binding to DNA ends. We suggest a model in which DNA-PK(CS) phosphorylation/autophosphorylation facilitates NHEJ by destabilizing the interaction of DNA-PK(CS) with the DNA ends.

  18. Force regulated dynamics of RPA on a DNA fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmerich, Felix E; Daldrop, Peter; Pinto, Cosimo; Levikova, Maryna; Cejka, Petr; Seidel, Ralf

    2016-07-08

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA binding protein, involved in most aspects of eukaryotic DNA metabolism. Here, we study the behavior of RPA on a DNA substrate that mimics a replication fork. Using magnetic tweezers we show that both yeast and human RPA can open forked DNA when sufficient external tension is applied. In contrast, at low force, RPA becomes rapidly displaced by the rehybridization of the DNA fork. This process appears to be governed by the binding or the release of an RPA microdomain (toehold) of only few base-pairs length. This gives rise to an extremely rapid exchange dynamics of RPA at the fork. Fork rezipping rates reach up to hundreds of base-pairs per second, being orders of magnitude faster than RPA dissociation from ssDNA alone. Additionally, we show that RPA undergoes diffusive motion on ssDNA, such that it can be pushed over long distances by a rezipping fork. Generally the behavior of both human and yeast RPA homologs is very similar. However, in contrast to yeast RPA, the dissociation of human RPA from ssDNA is greatly reduced at low Mg(2+) concentrations, such that human RPA can melt DNA in absence of force. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doller, Anke; Badawi, Amel [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Schmid, Tobias; Brauß, Thilo [Institut für Biochemie I (Pathobiochemie), Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Pleli, Thomas [Medizinische Klinik 1, Schwerpunkt Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Piiper, Albrecht [Medizinische Klinik 1, Schwerpunkt Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Pfeilschifter, Josef [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Eberhardt, Wolfgang, E-mail: w.eberhardt@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D{sub 1} encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E{sub 2} synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC. - Highlights: • We tested the effects of latrunculin A and blebbistatin on

  20. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doller, Anke; Badawi, Amel; Schmid, Tobias; Brauß, Thilo; Pleli, Thomas; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar; Piiper, Albrecht; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D 1 encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E 2 synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC. - Highlights: • We tested the effects of latrunculin A and blebbistatin on different HuR

  1. För vilka finns kroppspositivismen? : En diskursanalytisk och semiotisk studie av hur kroppsaktivister på Instagram artikulerar kroppspositivism

    OpenAIRE

    Wallén, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    Denna studie har genomförts med syfte att undersöka hur kroppsaktivister artikulerar kropp och kroppspositivitet genom bilder och texter på deras Instagramkonton. Studien syftar även till att undersöka om, och i så fall hur, artikulationerna av kroppspositivitet skiljer sig mellan olika kroppsaktivister. Slutligen syftar studien till att studera hur kroppsaktivisterna artikulerar syftet med rörelsen. Det teoretiska ramverket består av tidigare forskning och etablerade teorier i postmodern fem...

  2. Hur fungerar datorer? : En fallstudie av att utveckla pedagogisk multimedia för ett datorhistoriskt museum.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahl, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Få människor vet hur datorer fungerar, vilka komponenter de är uppbyggda av och hur dessa samverkar. I detta examensarbete har en prototyp till en multimediepresentation utvecklats. Presentationen kommer att placeras på ett datorhistoriskt museum och dess syfte kommer där att vara att hjälpa människor förstå hur datorer fungerar. Prototypen är baserad på bilder och enklare animationer som förklarar samverkan och funktion hos de olika datorkomponenterna, bland annat genom att visa scenarier so...

  3. Collaborating functions of BLM and DNA topoisomerase I in regulating human rDNA transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grierson, Patrick M.; Acharya, Samir; Groden, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an inherited disorder caused by loss of function of the recQ-like BLM helicase. It is characterized clinically by severe growth retardation and cancer predisposition. BLM localizes to PML nuclear bodies and to the nucleolus; its deficiency results in increased intra- and inter-chromosomal recombination, including hyper-recombination of rDNA repeats. Our previous work has shown that BLM facilitates RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription in the nucleolus (Grierson et al., 2012 [18]). This study uses protein co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro transcription/translation (IVTT) to identify a direct interaction of DNA topoisomerase I with the C-terminus of BLM in the nucleolus. In vitro helicase assays demonstrate that DNA topoisomerase I stimulates BLM helicase activity on a nucleolar-relevant RNA:DNA hybrid, but has an insignificant effect on BLM helicase activity on a control DNA:DNA duplex substrate. Reciprocally, BLM enhances the DNA relaxation activity of DNA topoisomerase I on supercoiled DNA substrates. Our study suggests that BLM and DNA topoisomerase I function coordinately to modulate RNA:DNA hybrid formation as well as relaxation of DNA supercoils in the context of nucleolar transcription

  4. Collaborating functions of BLM and DNA topoisomerase I in regulating human rDNA transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grierson, Patrick M. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Acharya, Samir, E-mail: samir.acharya@osumc.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Groden, Joanna [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an inherited disorder caused by loss of function of the recQ-like BLM helicase. It is characterized clinically by severe growth retardation and cancer predisposition. BLM localizes to PML nuclear bodies and to the nucleolus; its deficiency results in increased intra- and inter-chromosomal recombination, including hyper-recombination of rDNA repeats. Our previous work has shown that BLM facilitates RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription in the nucleolus (Grierson et al., 2012 [18]). This study uses protein co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro transcription/translation (IVTT) to identify a direct interaction of DNA topoisomerase I with the C-terminus of BLM in the nucleolus. In vitro helicase assays demonstrate that DNA topoisomerase I stimulates BLM helicase activity on a nucleolar-relevant RNA:DNA hybrid, but has an insignificant effect on BLM helicase activity on a control DNA:DNA duplex substrate. Reciprocally, BLM enhances the DNA relaxation activity of DNA topoisomerase I on supercoiled DNA substrates. Our study suggests that BLM and DNA topoisomerase I function coordinately to modulate RNA:DNA hybrid formation as well as relaxation of DNA supercoils in the context of nucleolar transcription.

  5. Single-dose Toxicity of ShinYangHur Herbal Acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunhye Cha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was carried out to analyze the single-dose toxicity of ShinYangHur (SYH herbal acupuncture injected into the muscles of Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. Methods: The SYH herbal acupuncture was made in a clean room at the Korean Pharmacopuncture Institute (KPI, Korea-Good Manufacturing Practice, K-GMP. After the mixing process with sterile distilled water, the pH was controlled to between 7.0 and 7.5. Then, NaCl was added to make a 0.9% isotonic solution by using sterilized equipment. All experiments were conducted at Biotoxtech, an institution authorized to perform non clinical studies under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP. SD rats were chosen for the pilot study. Doses of SYH herbal acupuncture, 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mL, were administered to the experimental groups, and a dose of normal saline solution, 1.0 mL, was administered to the control group. This study was conducted under the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee. Results: No deaths or abnormalities occurred in any of the four groups. No significant changes in weight, hematological parameters or clinical chemistry between the control group and the experimental groups were observed. To check for abnormalities in organs and tissues, we used microscopy was used to examine representative histological sections of each specified organ; the results showed no significant differences in any of the organs or tissues. Conclusion: The above outcomes suggest that treatment with SYH herbal acupuncture is relatively safe. Further studies on this subject are needed to yield more concrete evidence.

  6. Topology of a Membrane Associated Regulator of Prokaryotic DNA Replication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Firshein, William

    1998-01-01

    This proposal has focused on a broad host range plasmid, RK2, as a model system to study how a pair of initiation proteins encoded by the plasmid for DNA replication function when replication occurs...

  7. Recombinational DNA repair is regulated by compartmentalization of DNA lesions at the nuclear pore complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Géli, Vincent; Lisby, Michael

    2015-01-01

    and colleagues shows that also physiological threats to genome integrity such as DNA secondary structure-forming triplet repeat sequences relocalize to the NPC during DNA replication. Mutants that fail to reposition the triplet repeat locus to the NPC cause repeat instability. Here, we review the types of DNA...... lesions that relocalize to the NPC, the putative mechanisms of relocalization, and the types of recombinational repair that are stimulated by the NPC, and present a model for NPC-facilitated repair....

  8. The regulation of transactivator of transcription on the activity of DNA-PKcs promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tianyi; Zhang Shimeng; Qin Xia; Li Bing; Liu Xiaodan; Zhou Pingkun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the influence of human immunodeficiency virus transactivator of transcription (TAT) on the promoter activity of DNA dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). Methods: The truncated promoters of DNA-PKcs were cloned by PCR from the template DNA from HeLa genomic DNA, and the pGL3-basic-DNA-PKcs promoter reporter plasmids were constructed. The activity of DNA-PKcs promoters was detected by dual-luciferase reporter assay system. A Lac-repressor and Lacoperator based green fluorescent protein imaging system was used to assay the chromatin remodeling activity. Results: A series of reporter plasmids harboring the truncated promoters of DNA-PKcs from -939 bp to -1 bp were constructed. The sequence of -64 bp to-1 bp was identified as a critical element for the activity of DNA-PKes promoter. TAT can suppress the activity of DNA-PKcs promoter. TAT participates in the regulation of the large scale chromatin relaxation. Ionizing radiation attenuates the activity of TAT played in the chromatin remodeling. Conclusion: TAT represses the promoter activity of DNA repair protein DNA-PKcs, and also play a role of large scale chromatin remodeling which can te attenuated by ionizing radiation. (authors)

  9. Transactivation domain of p53 regulates DNA repair and integrity in human iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Mattapally, Saidulu; Wagle, Pooja A; Zhang, Jianyi

    2018-05-18

    The role of p53 transactivation domain (p53-TAD), a multifunctional and dynamic domain, on DNA repair and retaining DNA integrity in human iPS cells has never been studied. p53-TAD was knocked out in iPS cells using CRISPR/Cas9 and was confirmed by DNA sequencing. p53-TAD KO cells were characterized by: accelerated proliferation, decreased population doubling time, and unaltered Bcl2, BBC3, IGF1R, Bax and altered Mdm2, p21, and PIDD transcripts expression. In p53-TAD KO cells p53 regulated DNA repair proteins XPA, DNA polH and DDB2 expression were found to be reduced compared to p53-WT cells. Exposure to low dose of doxorubicin (Doxo) induced similar DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) measured by RAD50 and MRE11 expression, Checkpoint kinase 2 activation and γH2A.X recruitment at DNA strand breaks in both the cell groups indicating silencing p53-TAD do not affect DDR mechanism upstream of p53. Following removal of Doxo p53-WT hiPS cells underwent DNA repair, corrected their damaged DNA and restored DNA integrity. Conversely, p53-TAD KO hiPS cells did not undergo complete DNA repair and failed to restore DNA integrity. More importantly continuous culture of p53-TAD KO hiPS cells underwent G2/M cell cycle arrest and expressed cellular senescent marker p16 INK4a . Our data clearly shows that silencing transactivation domain of p53 did not affect DDR but affected the DNA repair process implying the crucial role of p53 transactivation domain in maintaining DNA integrity. Therefore, activating p53-TAD domain using small molecules may promote DNA repair and integrity of cells and prevent senescence.

  10. Dynamic regulation of cerebral DNA repair genes by psychological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Kristin; Aalling, Nadia; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal genotoxic insults from oxidative stress constitute a putative molecular link between stress and depression on the one hand, and cognitive dysfunction and dementia risk on the other. Oxidative modifications to DNA are repaired by specific enzymes; a process that plays a critical role...... restraint stress (6h/day) or daily handling (controls), and sacrificed after 1, 7 or 21 stress sessions. The mRNA expression of seven genes (Ogg1, Ape1, Ung1, Neil1, Xrcc1, Ercc1, Nudt1) involved in the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA was determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction...

  11. DNA context represents transcription regulation of the gene in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Misook; Hong, Soondo

    2016-04-01

    Understanding gene regulatory information in DNA remains a significant challenge in biomedical research. This study presents a computational approach to infer gene regulatory programs from primary DNA sequences. Using DNA around transcription start sites as attributes, our model predicts gene regulation in the gene. We find that H3K27ac around TSS is an informative descriptor of the transcription program in mouse embryonic stem cells. We build a computational model inferring the cell-type-specific H3K27ac signatures in the DNA around TSS. A comparison of embryonic stem cell and liver cell-specific H3K27ac signatures in DNA shows that the H3K27ac signatures in DNA around TSS efficiently distinguish the cell-type specific H3K27ac peaks and the gene regulation. The arrangement of the H3K27ac signatures inferred from the DNA represents the transcription regulation of the gene in mESC. We show that the DNA around transcription start sites is associated with the gene regulatory program by specific interaction with H3K27ac.

  12. The ATPases of cohesin interface with regulators to modulate cohesin-mediated DNA tethering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çamdere, Gamze; Guacci, Vincent; Stricklin, Jeremiah; Koshland, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Cohesin tethers together regions of DNA, thereby mediating higher order chromatin organization that is critical for sister chromatid cohesion, DNA repair and transcriptional regulation. Cohesin contains a heterodimeric ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) ATPase comprised of Smc1 and Smc3 ATPase active sites. These ATPases are required for cohesin to bind DNA. Cohesin’s DNA binding activity is also promoted by the Eco1 acetyltransferase and inhibited by Wpl1. Recently we showed that after cohesin stably binds DNA, a second step is required for DNA tethering. This second step is also controlled by Eco1 acetylation. Here, we use genetic and biochemical analyses to show that this second DNA tethering step is regulated by cohesin ATPase. Furthermore, our results also suggest that Eco1 promotes cohesion by modulating the ATPase cycle of DNA-bound cohesin in a state that is permissive for DNA tethering and refractory to Wpl1 inhibition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11315.001 PMID:26583750

  13. Hda, a novel DnaA-related protein, regulates the replication cycle in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato , J; Katayama, T

    2001-08-01

    The bacterial DnaA protein binds to the chromosomal origin of replication to trigger a series of initiation reactions, which leads to the loading of DNA polymerase III. In Escherichia coli, once this polymerase initiates DNA synthesis, ATP bound to DnaA is efficiently hydrolyzed to yield the ADP-bound inactivated form. This negative regulation of DnaA, which occurs through interaction with the beta-subunit sliding clamp configuration of the polymerase, functions in the temporal blocking of re-initiation. Here we show that the novel DnaA-related protein, Hda, from E.coli is essential for this regulatory inactivation of DnaA in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that the hda gene is required to prevent over-initiation of chromosomal replication and for cell viability. Hda belongs to the chaperone-like ATPase family, AAA(+), as do DnaA and certain eukaryotic proteins essential for the initiation of DNA replication. We propose that the once-per-cell-cycle rule of replication depends on the timely interaction of AAA(+) proteins that comprise the apparatus regulating the activity of the initiator of replication.

  14. DNA demethylases target promoter transposable elements to positively regulate stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tuan-Ngoc; Schumann, Ulrike; Smith, Neil A; Tiwari, Sameer; Au, Phil Chi Khang; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Taylor, Jennifer M; Kazan, Kemal; Llewellyn, Danny J; Zhang, Ren; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2014-09-17

    DNA demethylases regulate DNA methylation levels in eukaryotes. Arabidopsis encodes four DNA demethylases, DEMETER (DME), REPRESSOR OF SILENCING 1 (ROS1), DEMETER-LIKE 2 (DML2), and DML3. While DME is involved in maternal specific gene expression during seed development, the biological function of the remaining DNA demethylases remains unclear. We show that ROS1, DML2, and DML3 play a role in fungal disease resistance in Arabidopsis. A triple DNA demethylase mutant, rdd (ros1 dml2 dml3), shows increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. We identify 348 genes differentially expressed in rdd relative to wild type, and a significant proportion of these genes are downregulated in rdd and have functions in stress response, suggesting that DNA demethylases maintain or positively regulate the expression of stress response genes required for F. oxysporum resistance. The rdd-downregulated stress response genes are enriched for short transposable element sequences in their promoters. Many of these transposable elements and their surrounding sequences show localized DNA methylation changes in rdd, and a general reduction in CHH methylation, suggesting that RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM), responsible for CHH methylation, may participate in DNA demethylase-mediated regulation of stress response genes. Many of the rdd-downregulated stress response genes are downregulated in the RdDM mutants nrpd1 and nrpe1, and the RdDM mutants nrpe1 and ago4 show enhanced susceptibility to F. oxysporum infection. Our results suggest that a primary function of DNA demethylases in plants is to regulate the expression of stress response genes by targeting promoter transposable element sequences.

  15. DNA damage tolerance pathway involving DNA polymerase ι and the tumor suppressor p53 regulates DNA replication fork progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampp, Stephanie; Kiessling, Tina; Buechle, Kerstin; Mansilla, Sabrina F; Thomale, Jürgen; Rall, Melanie; Ahn, Jinwoo; Pospiech, Helmut; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2016-07-26

    DNA damage tolerance facilitates the progression of replication forks that have encountered obstacles on the template strands. It involves either translesion DNA synthesis initiated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen monoubiquitination or less well-characterized fork reversal and template switch mechanisms. Herein, we characterize a novel tolerance pathway requiring the tumor suppressor p53, the translesion polymerase ι (POLι), the ubiquitin ligase Rad5-related helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF), and the SWI/SNF catalytic subunit (SNF2) translocase zinc finger ran-binding domain containing 3 (ZRANB3). This novel p53 activity is lost in the exonuclease-deficient but transcriptionally active p53(H115N) mutant. Wild-type p53, but not p53(H115N), associates with POLι in vivo. Strikingly, the concerted action of p53 and POLι decelerates nascent DNA elongation and promotes HLTF/ZRANB3-dependent recombination during unperturbed DNA replication. Particularly after cross-linker-induced replication stress, p53 and POLι also act together to promote meiotic recombination enzyme 11 (MRE11)-dependent accumulation of (phospho-)replication protein A (RPA)-coated ssDNA. These results implicate a direct role of p53 in the processing of replication forks encountering obstacles on the template strand. Our findings define an unprecedented function of p53 and POLι in the DNA damage response to endogenous or exogenous replication stress.

  16. Grekisk mytologi i film : En innehållsanalys om hur grekisk mytologi gestaltas i film

    OpenAIRE

    Ruther, Mathilda

    2017-01-01

    Religion är inte ett fenomen som nyligen börjat gestaltas i film, detta har gjorts länge. Forskning gällande skärningspunkten mellan religion och film har också funnits i den akademiska världen länge. Det är dock inte lika vanligt att undersöka hur mytologi gestaltas i film. Syftet med föreliggande studie är att undersöka hur den grekiska mytologin gestaltas i filmerna Percy Jackson – Kampen om åskviggen, Percy Jackson – Monsterhavet, Clash of the Titans och Wrath of the Titans. Detta görs ge...

  17. A DNA Origami Mechanical Device for the Regulation of Microcosmic Structural Rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Neng; Hong, Zhouping; Wang, Huading; Fu, Xin; Zhang, Ziyue; Li, Chao; Xia, Han; Fang, Yan; Li, Maoteng; Zhan, Yi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2017-11-01

    DNA origami makes it feasible to fabricate a tremendous number of DNA nanostructures with various geometries, dimensions, and functionalities. Moreover, an increasing amount of research on DNA nanostructures is focused on biological and biomedical applications. Here, the reversible regulation of microcosmic structural rigidity is accomplished using a DNA origami device in vitro. The designed DNA origami monomer is composed of an internal central axis and an external sliding tube. Due to the external tube sliding, the device transforms between flexible and rigid states. By transporting the device into the liposome, the conformational change of the origami device induces a structural change in the liposome. The results obtained demonstrate that the programmed DNA origami device can be applied to regulate the microcosmic structural rigidity of liposomes. Because microcosmic structural rigidity is important to cell proliferation and function, the results obtained potentially provide a foundation for the regulation of cell microcosmic structural rigidity using DNA nanostructures. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. DNA methylation patterns of candidate genes regulated by thymine DNA glycosylase in patients with TP53 germline mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, F.P. [CIPE, Laboratrio de Oncogentica Molecular, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kuasne, H. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Marchi, F.A. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Programa Inter-Institucional em Bioinformtica, Instituto de Matemtica e Estatstica, Universidade So Paulo, So Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miranda, P.M. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rogatto, S.R. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Achatz, M.I. [CIPE, Laboratrio de Oncogentica Molecular, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Oncogentica, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, So Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-04-28

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, hereditary cancer predisposition disorder. In Brazil, the p.R337H TP53 founder mutation causes the variant form of LFS, Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome. The occurrence of cancer and age of disease onset are known to vary, even in patients carrying the same mutation, and several mechanisms such as genetic and epigenetic alterations may be involved in this variability. However, the extent of involvement of such events has not been clarified. It is well established that p53 regulates several pathways, including the thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) pathway, which regulates the DNA methylation of several genes. This study aimed to identify the DNA methylation pattern of genes potentially related to the TDG pathway (CDKN2A, FOXA1, HOXD8, OCT4, SOX2, and SOX17) in 30 patients with germline TP53mutations, 10 patients with wild-type TP53, and 10 healthy individuals. We also evaluated TDG expression in patients with adrenocortical tumors (ADR) with and without the p.R337H TP53 mutation. Gene methylation patterns of peripheral blood DNA samples assessed by pyrosequencing revealed no significant differences between the three groups. However, increased TDG expression was observed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in p.R337H carriers with ADR. Considering the rarity of this phenotype and the relevance of these findings, further studies using a larger sample set are necessary to confirm our results.

  19. Nuclear sensing of viral DNA, epigenetic regulation of herpes simplex virus infection, and innate immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knipe, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. HSV viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. - Highlights: • HSV lytic and latent gene expression is regulated differentially by epigenetic processes. • The sensors of foreign DNA have not been defined fully. • IFI16 and cGAS cooperate to sense viral DNA in HSV-infected cells. • IFI16 plays a role in both innate sensing of HSV DNA and in restricting its expression

  20. Nuclear sensing of viral DNA, epigenetic regulation of herpes simplex virus infection, and innate immunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knipe, David M., E-mail: david_knipe@hms.harvard.edu

    2015-05-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. HSV viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. - Highlights: • HSV lytic and latent gene expression is regulated differentially by epigenetic processes. • The sensors of foreign DNA have not been defined fully. • IFI16 and cGAS cooperate to sense viral DNA in HSV-infected cells. • IFI16 plays a role in both innate sensing of HSV DNA and in restricting its expression.

  1. Viral and cellular SOS-regulated motor proteins: dsDNA translocation mechanisms with divergent functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Annie; Phipps, Kara; Weitao, Tao

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage attacks on bacterial cells have been known to activate the SOS response, a transcriptional response affecting chromosome replication, DNA recombination and repair, cell division and prophage induction. All these functions require double-stranded (ds) DNA translocation by ASCE hexameric motors. This review seeks to delineate the structural and functional characteristics of the SOS response and the SOS-regulated DNA translocases FtsK and RuvB with the phi29 bacteriophage packaging motor gp16 ATPase as a prototype to study bacterial motors. While gp16 ATPase, cellular FtsK and RuvB are similarly comprised of hexameric rings encircling dsDNA and functioning as ATP-driven DNA translocases, they utilize different mechanisms to accomplish separate functions, suggesting a convergent evolution of these motors. The gp16 ATPase and FtsK use a novel revolution mechanism, generating a power stroke between subunits through an entropy-DNA affinity switch and pushing dsDNA inward without rotation of DNA and the motor, whereas RuvB seems to employ a rotation mechanism that remains to be further characterized. While FtsK and RuvB perform essential tasks during the SOS response, their roles may be far more significant as SOS response is involved in antibiotic-inducible bacterial vesiculation and biofilm formation as well as the perspective of the bacteria-cancer evolutionary interaction.

  2. Parvovirus b19 DNA CpG dinucleotide methylation and epigenetic regulation of viral expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bonvicini

    Full Text Available CpG DNA methylation is one of the main epigenetic modifications playing a role in the control of gene expression. For DNA viruses whose genome has the ability to integrate in the host genome or to maintain as a latent episome, a correlation has been found between the extent of DNA methylation and viral quiescence. No information is available for Parvovirus B19, a human pathogenic virus, which is capable of both lytic and persistent infections. Within Parvovirus B19 genome, the inverted terminal regions display all the characteristic signatures of a genomic CpG island; therefore we hypothesised a role of CpG dinucleotide methylation in the regulation of viral genome expression.The analysis of CpG dinucleotide methylation of Parvovirus B19 DNA was carried out by an aptly designed quantitative real-time PCR assay on bisulfite-modified DNA. The effects of CpG methylation on the regulation of viral genome expression were first investigated by transfection of either unmethylated or in vitro methylated viral DNA in a model cell line, showing that methylation of viral DNA was correlated to lower expression levels of the viral genome. Then, in the course of in vitro infections in different cellular environments, it was observed that absence of viral expression and genome replication were both correlated to increasing levels of CpG methylation of viral DNA. Finally, the presence of CpG methylation was documented in viral DNA present in bioptic samples, indicating the occurrence and a possible role of this epigenetic modification in the course of natural infections.The presence of an epigenetic level of regulation of viral genome expression, possibly correlated to the silencing of the viral genome and contributing to the maintenance of the virus in tissues, can be relevant to the balance and outcome of the different types of infection associated to Parvovirus B19.

  3. Parvovirus B19 DNA CpG Dinucleotide Methylation and Epigenetic Regulation of Viral Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvicini, Francesca; Manaresi, Elisabetta; Di Furio, Francesca; De Falco, Luisa; Gallinella, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    CpG DNA methylation is one of the main epigenetic modifications playing a role in the control of gene expression. For DNA viruses whose genome has the ability to integrate in the host genome or to maintain as a latent episome, a correlation has been found between the extent of DNA methylation and viral quiescence. No information is available for Parvovirus B19, a human pathogenic virus, which is capable of both lytic and persistent infections. Within Parvovirus B19 genome, the inverted terminal regions display all the characteristic signatures of a genomic CpG island; therefore we hypothesised a role of CpG dinucleotide methylation in the regulation of viral genome expression. The analysis of CpG dinucleotide methylation of Parvovirus B19 DNA was carried out by an aptly designed quantitative real-time PCR assay on bisulfite-modified DNA. The effects of CpG methylation on the regulation of viral genome expression were first investigated by transfection of either unmethylated or in vitro methylated viral DNA in a model cell line, showing that methylation of viral DNA was correlated to lower expression levels of the viral genome. Then, in the course of in vitro infections in different cellular environments, it was observed that absence of viral expression and genome replication were both correlated to increasing levels of CpG methylation of viral DNA. Finally, the presence of CpG methylation was documented in viral DNA present in bioptic samples, indicating the occurrence and a possible role of this epigenetic modification in the course of natural infections. The presence of an epigenetic level of regulation of viral genome expression, possibly correlated to the silencing of the viral genome and contributing to the maintenance of the virus in tissues, can be relevant to the balance and outcome of the different types of infection associated to Parvovirus B19. PMID:22413013

  4. Caulobacter crescentus Cell Cycle-Regulated DNA Methyltransferase Uses a Novel Mechanism for Substrate Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Clayton B; Yakubov, Aziz B; Reich, Norbert O

    2017-08-01

    Caulobacter crescentus relies on DNA methylation by the cell cycle-regulated methyltransferase (CcrM) in addition to key transcription factors to control the cell cycle and direct cellular differentiation. CcrM is shown here to efficiently methylate its cognate recognition site 5'-GANTC-3' in single-stranded and hemimethylated double-stranded DNA. We report the K m , k cat , k methylation , and K d for single-stranded and hemimethylated substrates, revealing discrimination of 10 7 -fold for noncognate sequences. The enzyme also shows a similar discrimination against single-stranded RNA. Two independent assays clearly show that CcrM is highly processive with single-stranded and hemimethylated DNA. Collectively, the data provide evidence that CcrM and other DNA-modifying enzymes may use a new mechanism to recognize DNA in a key epigenetic process.

  5. When gene medication is also genetic modification--regulating DNA treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Grethe S; Rogne, Sissel

    2007-07-26

    The molecular methods used in DNA vaccination and gene therapy resemble in many ways the methods applied in genetic modification of organisms. In some regulatory regimes, this creates an overlap between 'gene medication' and genetic modification. In Norway, an animal injected with plasmid DNA, in the form of DNA vaccine or gene therapy, currently is viewed as being genetically modified for as long as the added DNA is present in the animal. However, regulating a DNA-vaccinated animal as genetically modified creates both regulatory and practical challenges. It is also counter-intuitive to many biologists. Since immune responses can be elicited also to alter traits, the borderline between vaccination and the modification of properties is no longer distinct. In this paper, we discuss the background for the Norwegian interpretation and ways in which the regulatory challenge can be handled.

  6. Self-regulation of recombinant DNA technology in Japan in the 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Hiroyuki; Nukaga, Yoshio; Saeki, Koji; Akabayashi, Akira

    2009-07-01

    Recombinant DNA technology was developed in the United States in the early 1970s. Leading scientists held an international Asilomar Conference in 1975 to examine the self regulation of recombinant DNA technology, followed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health drafting the Recombinant DNA Research Guidelines in 1976. The result of this conference significantly affected many nations, including Japan. However, there have been few historical studies on the self-regulation of recombinant technologies conducted by scientists and government officials in Japan. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the Science Council of Japan, the Ministry of Education, Science adn Culture, and the Science and Technology Agency developed self-regulation policies for recombinant DNA technology in Japan in the 1970s. Groups of molecular biologist and geneticists played a key role in establishing guidelines in cooperation with government officials. Our findings suggest that self-regulation policies on recombinant DNA technology have influenced safety management for the life sciences and establishment of institutions for review in Japan.

  7. Regulation of DNA Alkylation Damage Repair: Lessons and Therapeutic Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soll, Jennifer M; Sobol, Robert W; Mosammaparast, Nima

    2017-03-01

    Alkylation chemotherapy is one of the most widely used systemic therapies for cancer. While somewhat effective, clinical responses and toxicities of these agents are highly variable. A major contributing factor for this variability is the numerous distinct lesions that are created upon alkylation damage. These adducts activate multiple repair pathways. There is mounting evidence that the individual pathways function cooperatively, suggesting that coordinated regulation of alkylation repair is critical to prevent toxicity. Furthermore, some alkylating agents produce adducts that overlap with newly discovered methylation marks, making it difficult to distinguish between bona fide damaged bases and so-called 'epigenetic' adducts. Here, we discuss new efforts aimed at deciphering the mechanisms that regulate these repair pathways, emphasizing their implications for cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of the kinetic of expression of tristetraprolin and HuR by rheumatoid arthritis patients pheripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ferraccioli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Given the role of TNF-α in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA we decided to define the characteristics of the TNF- α synthesis by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs obtained from active-aggressive RA patients giving a particular attention to the modulation of the expression of two fundamental proteins in TNF-α mRNA stability regulation, Tristetraprolin (TTP and HuR. Methods. 11 RA patients with active disease were enrolled in the study before their entry in 2 double blind protocols: Infliximab versus MTX and Etanercept versus MTX. 9 healthy blood donors were taken as controls. PBMNCs obtained by Ficoll centrifugation and plastic adherence were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and TNF-α was measured in the supernatant during 8 hours by ELISA. At each time point the cells were harvested and analysed for TNF- α, TTP and HuR mRNA expression by semi-quantitative PCR. Results. MNCs TNF-α secretion after LPS stimulation did not differ significantly between RA and control subjects, even if a tendency towards a more prompt response was observed in the patients. More importantly only the DMARDs responsive patients (DAS <3.7 at the 6th month, with a minimal reduction of 1.2 points disclosed precociously (at the first month a significant change in the profile of TNF-α secretion and maintained it until the 6th month. The “normalization” of the synthetic behaviour was accompanied by the resetting in the regulation of the expression of the TTP, that appeared significantly different in the patients before and after therapy. Conclusions. Independently from the type of therapy, responsive patients demonstrate a rapid change in the cellular biology at the systemic level that might drive the resolution of the phlogistic process at the synovial level.

  9. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeated DNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  10. Characterization of Bombyx mori mitochondrial transcription factor A, a conserved regulator of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumitani, Megumi; Kondo, Mari; Kasashima, Katsumi; Endo, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Kaoru; Misawa, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Hiromitsu; Sezutsu, Hideki

    2017-04-15

    In the present study, we initially cloned and characterized a mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) homologue in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Bombyx mori TFAM (BmTFAM) localized to mitochondria in cultured silkworm and human cells, and co-localized with mtDNA nucleoids in human HeLa cells. In an immunoprecipitation analysis, BmTFAM was found to associate with human mtDNA in mitochondria, indicating its feature as a non-specific DNA-binding protein. In spite of the low identity between BmTFAM and human TFAM (26.5%), the expression of BmTFAM rescued mtDNA copy number reductions and enlarged mtDNA nucleoids in HeLa cells, which were induced by human Tfam knockdown. Thus, BmTFAM compensates for the function of human TFAM in HeLa cells, demonstrating that the mitochondrial function of TFAM is highly conserved between silkworms and humans. BmTfam mRNA was strongly expressed in early embryos. Through double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-based RNA interference (RNAi) in silkworm embryos, we found that the knockdown of BmTFAM reduced the amount of mtDNA and induced growth retardation at the larval stage. Collectively, these results demonstrate that BmTFAM is a highly conserved mtDNA regulator and may be a good candidate for investigating and modulating mtDNA metabolism in this model organism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Regulation of DNA replication in irradiated cells by trans-acting factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Huq, M.S.; Cheng, X.; Iliakis, G.

    1995-01-01

    We compared DNA replication activity in cytoplasmic extracts prepared from irradiated and nonirradiated HeLa cells using a simian virus 40 (SV40)-based in vitro replication assay. The assay measures semi-conservative DNA replication in a plasmid carrying the SV40 origin of replication and requires SV40 T antigen as the sole noncellular protein. The plasmid DNA used in the replication reaction is never exposed to radiation. We find that replication of plasmid DNA is significantly reduced when cytoplasmic extracts from irradiated cells are used. Since plasmid replication proceeds to completion in extracts from irradiated cells, the observed reduction in the overall replication activity is probably due to a reduction in the efficiency of initiation events. The degree of inhibition of DNA replication after exposure to 10, 30 and 50 Gy X rays as measured in vitro using this assay is similar to that measured in intact cells immediately before processing for extract preparation. These observations are compatible with the induction or activation by ionizing radiation of a factor(s) that inhibits in trans DNA replication. The results contribute to our understanding of the mechanism(s) developed by the cells to regulate DNA replication when exposed to clastogenic agents. Such processes may be of significance in the restoration of DNA integrity, and may define yet another checkpoint operating during S at the level of clusters of replicons. 26 refs., 4 figs

  12. Curcumin inhibits hepatitis B virus infection by down-regulating cccDNA-bound histone acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Ke, Chang-Zheng; Chen, Hong-Xia; Ren, Pan; He, Yu-Lin; Hu, Pei; Ma, De-Qiang; Luo, Jie; Meng, Zhong-Ji

    2017-09-14

    To investigate the potential effect of curcumin on hepatitis B virus (HBV) covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) and the underlying mechanism. A HepG2.2.15 cell line stably transfected with HBV was treated with curcumin, and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and e antigen (HBeAg) expression levels were assessed by ELISA. Intracellular HBV DNA replication intermediates and cccDNA were detected by Southern blot and real-time PCR, respectively. The acetylation levels of histones H3 and H4 were measured by Western blot. H3/H4-bound cccDNA was detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. The deacetylase inhibitors trichostatin A and sodium butyrate were used to study the mechanism of action for curcumin. Additionally, short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting HBV were tested along with curcumin. Curcumin treatment led to time- and dose-dependent reductions in HBsAg and HBeAg expression and significant reductions in intracellular HBV DNA replication intermediates and HBV cccDNA. After treatment with 20 μmol/L curcumin for 2 d, HBsAg and cccDNA levels in HepG2.2.15 cells were reduced by up to 57.7% ( P curcumin, accompanied by reductions in H3- and H4-bound cccDNA. Furthermore, the deacetylase inhibitors trichostatin A and sodium butyrate could block the effects of curcumin. Additionally, transfection of siRNAs targeting HBV enhanced the inhibitory effects of curcumin. Curcumin inhibits HBV gene replication via down-regulation of cccDNA-bound histone acetylation and has the potential to be developed as a cccDNA-targeting antiviral agent for hepatitis B.

  13. Regulation of Xenopus laevis DNA topoisomerase I activity by phosphorylation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiserman, H.B.; Ingebritsen, T.S.; Benbow, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase I has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from ovaries of the frog Xenopus laevis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the most purified fraction revealed a single major band at 110 kDa and less abundant minor bands centered at 62 kDa. Incubation of the most purified fraction with immobilized calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase abolished all DNA topoisomerase enzymatic activity in a time-dependent reaction. Treatment of the dephosphorylated X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I with a X. laevis casein kinase type II activity and ATP restored DNA topoisomerase activity to a level higher than that observed in the most purified fraction. In vitro labeling experiments which employed the most purified DNA topoisomerase I fraction, [γ- 32 P]ATP, and the casein kinase type II enzyme showed that both the 110- and 62-kDa bands became phosphorylated in approximately molar proportions. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that only serine residues became phosphorylated. Phosphorylation was accompanied by an increase in DNA topoisomerase activity in vitro. Dephosphorylation of DNA topoisomerase I appears to block formation of the initial enzyme-substrate complex on the basis of the failure of the dephosphorylated enzyme to nick DNA in the presence of camptothecin. The authors conclude that X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I is partially phosphorylated as isolated and that this phosphorylation is essential for expression of enzymatic activity in vitro. On the basis of the ability of the casein kinase type II activity to reactivate dephosphorylated DNA topoisomerase I, they speculate that this kinase may contribute to the physiological regulation of DNA topoisomerase I activity

  14. Mechanisms Governing DDK Regulation of the Initiation of DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larasati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK complex—comprised of cell division cycle (Cdc7 kinase and its regulatory subunit dumbbell former 4 (Dbf4—is required to trigger the initiation of DNA replication through the phosphorylation of multiple minichromosome maintenance complex subunits 2-7 (Mcm2-7. DDK is also a target of the radiation sensitive 53 (Rad53 checkpoint kinase in response to replication stress. Numerous investigations have determined mechanistic details, including the regions of Mcm2, Mcm4, and Mcm6 phosphorylated by DDK, and a number of DDK docking sites. Similarly, the way in which the Rad53 forkhead-associated 1 (FHA1 domain binds to DDK—involving both canonical and non-canonical interactions—has been elucidated. Recent work has revealed mutual promotion of DDK and synthetic lethal with dpb11-1 3 (Sld3 roles. While DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2-7 subunits facilitates their interaction with Sld3 at origins, Sld3 in turn stimulates DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2. Details of a mutually antagonistic relationship between DDK and Rap1-interacting factor 1 (Rif1 have also recently come to light. While Rif1 is able to reverse DDK-mediated Mcm2-7 complex phosphorylation by targeting the protein phosphatase glycogen 7 (Glc7 to origins, there is evidence to suggest that DDK can counteract this activity by binding to and phosphorylating Rif1.

  15. Tcf4 Regulates Synaptic Plasticity, DNA Methylation, and Memory Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Kennedy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human haploinsufficiency of the transcription factor Tcf4 leads to a rare autism spectrum disorder called Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS, which is associated with severe language impairment and development delay. Here, we demonstrate that Tcf4 haploinsufficient mice have deficits in social interaction, ultrasonic vocalization, prepulse inhibition, and spatial and associative learning and memory. Despite learning deficits, Tcf4(+/− mice have enhanced long-term potentiation in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. In translationally oriented studies, we found that small-molecule HDAC inhibitors normalized hippocampal LTP and memory recall. A comprehensive set of next-generation sequencing experiments of hippocampal mRNA and methylated DNA isolated from Tcf4-deficient and WT mice before or shortly after experiential learning, with or without administration of vorinostat, identified “memory-associated” genes modulated by HDAC inhibition and dysregulated by Tcf4 haploinsufficiency. Finally, we observed that Hdac2 isoform-selective knockdown was sufficient to rescue memory deficits in Tcf4(+/− mice.

  16. Tcf4 Regulates Synaptic Plasticity, DNA Methylation, and Memory Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Andrew J; Rahn, Elizabeth J; Paulukaitis, Brynna S; Savell, Katherine E; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; Wang, Jing; Lewis, John W; Posey, Jessica; Strange, Sarah K; Guzman-Karlsson, Mikael C; Phillips, Scott E; Decker, Kyle; Motley, S Timothy; Swayze, Eric E; Ecker, David J; Michael, Todd P; Day, Jeremy J; Sweatt, J David

    2016-09-06

    Human haploinsufficiency of the transcription factor Tcf4 leads to a rare autism spectrum disorder called Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS), which is associated with severe language impairment and development delay. Here, we demonstrate that Tcf4 haploinsufficient mice have deficits in social interaction, ultrasonic vocalization, prepulse inhibition, and spatial and associative learning and memory. Despite learning deficits, Tcf4(+/-) mice have enhanced long-term potentiation in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. In translationally oriented studies, we found that small-molecule HDAC inhibitors normalized hippocampal LTP and memory recall. A comprehensive set of next-generation sequencing experiments of hippocampal mRNA and methylated DNA isolated from Tcf4-deficient and WT mice before or shortly after experiential learning, with or without administration of vorinostat, identified "memory-associated" genes modulated by HDAC inhibition and dysregulated by Tcf4 haploinsufficiency. Finally, we observed that Hdac2 isoform-selective knockdown was sufficient to rescue memory deficits in Tcf4(+/-) mice. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cell cycle regulation of DNA polymerase beta in rotenone-based Parkinson's disease models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongcai Wang

    Full Text Available In Parkinson's disease (PD, neuronal cells undergo mitotic catastrophe and endoreduplication prior to cell death; however, the regulatory mechanisms remain to be defined. In this study, we investigated cell cycle regulation of DNA polymerase β (poly β in rotenone-based dopaminergic cellular and animal models. Incubation with a low concentration (0.25 µM of rotenone for 1.5 to 7 days resulted in a flattened cell body and decreased DNA replication during S phase, whereas a high concentration (2 µM of rotenone exposure resulted in enlarged, multi-nucleated cells and converted the mitotic cycle into endoreduplication. Consistently, DNA poly β, which is mainly involved in DNA repair synthesis, was upregulated to a high level following exposure to 2 µM rotenone. The abrogation of DNA poly β by siRNA transfection or dideoxycytidine (DDC treatment attenuated the rotenone-induced endoreduplication. The cell cycle was reactivated in cyclin D-expressing dopaminergic neurons from the substantia nigra (SN of rats following stereotactic (ST infusion of rotenone. Increased DNA poly β expression was observed in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc and the substantia nigra pars reticulate (SNr of rotenone-treated rats. Collectively, in the in vitro model of rotenone-induced mitotic catastrophe, the overexpression of DNA poly β promotes endoreduplication; in the in vivo model, the upregulation of DNA poly β and cell cycle reentry were also observed in the adult rat substantia nigra. Therefore, the cell cycle regulation of DNA poly β may be involved in the pathological processes of PD, which results in the induction of endoreduplication.

  18. The DNA Replication Checkpoint Directly Regulates MBF-Dependent G1/S Transcription▿

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Chaitali; Patel, Prasanta K.; Rosebrock, Adam; Oliva, Anna; Leatherwood, Janet; Rhind, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    The DNA replication checkpoint transcriptionally upregulates genes that allow cells to adapt to and survive replication stress. Our results show that, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the replication checkpoint regulates the entire G1/S transcriptional program by directly regulating MBF, the G1/S transcription factor. Instead of initiating a checkpoint-specific transcriptional program, the replication checkpoint targets MBF to maintain the normal G1/S transcriptional program du...

  19. Mms1 is an assistant for regulating G-quadruplex DNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Eike; Paeschke, Katrin

    2017-11-02

    The preservation of genome stability is fundamental for every cell. Genomic integrity is constantly challenged. Among those challenges are also non-canonical nucleic acid structures. In recent years, scientists became aware of the impact of G-quadruplex (G4) structures on genome stability. It has been shown that folded G4-DNA structures cause changes in the cell, such as transcriptional up/down-regulation, replication stalling, or enhanced genome instability. Multiple helicases have been identified to regulate G4 structures and by this preserve genome stability. Interestingly, although these helicases are mostly ubiquitous expressed, they show specificity for G4 regulation in certain cellular processes (e.g., DNA replication). To this date, it is not clear how this process and target specificity of helicases are achieved. Recently, Mms1, an ubiquitin ligase complex protein, was identified as a novel G4-DNA-binding protein that supports genome stability by aiding Pif1 helicase binding to these regions. In this perspective review, we discuss the question if G4-DNA interacting proteins are fundamental for helicase function and specificity at G4-DNA structures.

  20. Mycobacterium smegmatis PafBC is involved in regulation of DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudrini Olivencia, Begonia; Müller, Andreas U; Roschitzki, Bernd; Burger, Sibylle; Weber-Ban, Eilika; Imkamp, Frank

    2017-10-25

    Two genes, pafB and pafC, are organized in an operon with the Pup-ligase gene pafA, which is part of the Pup-proteasome system (PPS) present in mycobacteria and other actinobacteria. The PPS is crucial for Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance towards reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI). However, pafB and pafC apparently play only a minor role in RNI resistance. To characterize their function, we generated a pafBC deletion in Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm). Proteome analysis of the mutant strain revealed decreased cellular levels of various proteins involved in DNA damage repair, including recombinase A (RecA). In agreement with this finding, Msm ΔpafBC displayed increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. In mycobacteria two pathways regulate DNA repair genes: the LexA/RecA-dependent SOS response and a predominant pathway that controls gene expression via a LexA/RecA-independent promoter, termed P1. PafB and PafC feature winged helix-turn-helix DNA binding motifs and we demonstrate that together they form a stable heterodimer in vitro, implying a function as a heterodimeric transcriptional regulator. Indeed, P1-driven transcription of recA was decreased in Msm ΔpafBC under standard conditions and induction of recA expression upon DNA damage was strongly impaired. Taken together, our data indicate an important regulatory function of PafBC in the mycobacterial DNA damage response.

  1. Regulation of DNA Methylation Patterns by CK2-Mediated Phosphorylation of Dnmt3a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Deplus

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is a central epigenetic modification that is established by de novo DNA methyltransferases. The mechanisms underlying the generation of genomic methylation patterns are still poorly understood. Using mass spectrometry and a phosphospecific Dnmt3a antibody, we demonstrate that CK2 phosphorylates endogenous Dnmt3a at two key residues located near its PWWP domain, thereby downregulating the ability of Dnmt3a to methylate DNA. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis shows that CK2 primarily modulates CpG methylation of several repeats, most notably of Alu SINEs. This modulation can be directly attributed to CK2-mediated phosphorylation of Dnmt3a. We also find that CK2-mediated phosphorylation is required for localization of Dnmt3a to heterochromatin. By revealing phosphorylation as a mode of regulation of de novo DNA methyltransferase function and by uncovering a mechanism for the regulation of methylation at repetitive elements, our results shed light on the origin of DNA methylation patterns.

  2. A Quick-responsive DNA Nanotechnology Device for Bio-molecular Homeostasis Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songlin; Wang, Pei; Xiao, Chen; Li, Zheng; Yang, Bing; Fu, Jieyang; Chen, Jing; Wan, Neng; Ma, Cong; Li, Maoteng; Yang, Xiangliang; Zhan, Yi

    2016-08-10

    Physiological processes such as metabolism, cell apoptosis and immune responses, must be strictly regulated to maintain their homeostasis and achieve their normal physiological functions. The speed with which bio-molecular homeostatic regulation occurs directly determines the ability of an organism to adapt to conditional changes. To produce a quick-responsive regulatory system that can be easily utilized for various types of homeostasis, a device called nano-fingers that facilitates the regulation of physiological processes was constructed using DNA origami nanotechnology. This nano-fingers device functioned in linked open and closed phases using two types of DNA tweezers, which were covalently coupled with aptamers that captured specific molecules when the tweezer arms were sufficiently close. Via this specific interaction mechanism, certain physiological processes could be simultaneously regulated from two directions by capturing one biofactor and releasing the other to enhance the regulatory capacity of the device. To validate the universal application of this device, regulation of the homeostasis of the blood coagulant thrombin was attempted using the nano-fingers device. It was successfully demonstrated that this nano-fingers device achieved coagulation buffering upon the input of fuel DNA. This nano-device could also be utilized to regulate the homeostasis of other types of bio-molecules.

  3. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Debra L; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4(Cdt2)) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression.

  4. DNA methylation regulates transcriptional homeostasis of algal endosymbiosis in the coral model Aiptasia

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yong; Liew, Yi Jin; Cui, Guoxin; Cziesielski, Maha J; Zahran, Noura Ibrahim Omar; Michell, Craig T; Voolstra, Christian R.; Aranda, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The symbiotic relationship between cnidarians and dinoflagellates is the cornerstone of coral reef ecosystems. Although research is focusing on the molecular mechanisms underlying this symbiosis, the role of epigenetic mechanisms, which have been implicated in transcriptional regulation and acclimation to environmental change, is unknown. To assess the role of DNA methylation in the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, we analyzed genome-wide CpG methylation, histone associations, and transcriptomic states of symbiotic and aposymbiotic anemones in the model system Aiptasia. We find methylated genes are marked by histone H3K36me3 and show significant reduction of spurious transcription and transcriptional noise, revealing a role of DNA methylation in the maintenance of transcriptional homeostasis. Changes in DNA methylation and expression show enrichment for symbiosis-related processes such as immunity, apoptosis, phagocytosis recognition and phagosome formation, and unveil intricate interactions between the underlying pathways. Our results demonstrate that DNA methylation provides an epigenetic mechanism of transcriptional homeostasis during symbiosis.

  5. DNA methylation regulates transcriptional homeostasis of algal endosymbiosis in the coral model Aiptasia

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yong

    2017-11-03

    The symbiotic relationship between cnidarians and dinoflagellates is the cornerstone of coral reef ecosystems. Although research is focusing on the molecular mechanisms underlying this symbiosis, the role of epigenetic mechanisms, which have been implicated in transcriptional regulation and acclimation to environmental change, is unknown. To assess the role of DNA methylation in the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, we analyzed genome-wide CpG methylation, histone associations, and transcriptomic states of symbiotic and aposymbiotic anemones in the model system Aiptasia. We find methylated genes are marked by histone H3K36me3 and show significant reduction of spurious transcription and transcriptional noise, revealing a role of DNA methylation in the maintenance of transcriptional homeostasis. Changes in DNA methylation and expression show enrichment for symbiosis-related processes such as immunity, apoptosis, phagocytosis recognition and phagosome formation, and unveil intricate interactions between the underlying pathways. Our results demonstrate that DNA methylation provides an epigenetic mechanism of transcriptional homeostasis during symbiosis.

  6. Regulation and function of the cGAS-STING pathway of cytosolic DNA sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Zhijian J

    2016-09-20

    The recognition of microbial nucleic acids is a major mechanism by which the immune system detects pathogens. Cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor that activates innate immune responses through production of the second messenger cGAMP, which activates the adaptor STING. The cGAS-STING pathway not only mediates protective immune defense against infection by a large variety of DNA-containing pathogens but also detects tumor-derived DNA and generates intrinsic antitumor immunity. However, aberrant activation of the cGAS pathway by self DNA can also lead to autoimmune and inflammatory disease. Thus, the cGAS pathway must be properly regulated. Here we review the recent advances in understanding of the cGAS-STING pathway, focusing on the regulatory mechanisms and roles of this pathway in heath and disease.

  7. Differential regulation of the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks in G1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlow, Jacqueline H; Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2008-01-01

    -induced breaks are recognized by Rfa1 only after the cell enters S phase. This difference is dependent on the DNA end-binding Yku70/Yku80 complex. Cell-cycle regulation is also observed in the DNA damage checkpoint response. Specifically, the 9-1-1 complex is required in G1 cells to recruit the Ddc2 checkpoint...... protein to damaged DNA, while, upon entry into S phase, the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28 and the 9-1-1 complex both serve to recruit Ddc2 to foci. Together, these results demonstrate that the DNA repair machinery distinguishes between different types of damage in G1, which translates into different modes...

  8. Specific DNA-binding proteins and DNA sequences involved in steroid hormone regulation of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelsberg, T.; Hora, J.; Horton, M.; Goldberger, A.; Littlefield, B.; Seelke, R.; Toyoda, H.

    1987-01-01

    Steroid hormones circulate in the blood and are taken by target cells via complexes with intracellular binding proteins termed receptors, that are hormone and tissue specific. Each receptor binds it specific steroid with very high affinity, having an equilibrium dissociation constant (K/sub d/) in the range of 10 -9 to 10 -10 M. Once bound by their specific steroid hormones, the steroid receptors undergo a conformational change which allows them to bind with high affinity to sites on chromatin, termed nuclear acceptor sites. There are estimated 5,000 to 10,000 of these sites expressed with an equal number not expressed (''masked'') in intact chromatin. The result of the binding to nuclear acceptor sites is an alteration of gene transcription or, in some cases, gene expression as measured by the changing levels of specific RNAs and proteins in that target tissue. Each steroid regulates specific effects on the RNA and protein profiles. The chronology of the above mechanism of action after injection of radiolabelled steroid as is follows: Steroid-receptor complex formation (1 minute), nuclear acceptor sites (2 minutes), effects on RNA synthesis (10 to 30 minutes), and finally the changing protein profiles via changes in protein synthesis and protein turnover (1 to 6 hours). Thus steroid receptors represent one of the first identified intracellular gene regulation proteins. The receptor molecules themselves are regulated by the presence or absence of the steroid molecule

  9. Role of transcription factor Sp1 and RNA binding protein HuR in the downregulation of Dr+ Escherichia coli receptor protein decay accelerating factor (DAF or CD55) by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banadakoppa, Manu; Liebenthal, Daniel; Nowak, David E; Urvil, Petri; Yallampalli, Uma; Wilson, Gerald M; Kishor, Aparna; Yallampalli, Chandra

    2013-02-01

    We previously reported that nitric oxide (NO) reduces the rate of bacteremia and maternal mortality in pregnant rats with uterine infection by Escherichia coli expressing the Dr Fimbria (Dr(+) ). The epithelial invasion of Dr(+) E. coli is dependent on the expression level of its cellular receptor decay accelerating factor (DAF). NO reduces the rate of bacteremia by downregulating the expression of DAF. In this study, we elucidated the role of transcription factor Sp1 and RNA binding protein HuR in the downregulation of human DAF by NO. We generated a series of deletion mutant constructs of DAF gene 5'-untranslated region and mapped the NO-response region upstream to the core promoter region of the DAF gene. One of the several Sp1 binding sites in the DAF 5'-untranslated region was located within the NO-response region. The binding of Sp1 to this site was inhibited by NO. Furthermore, NO also promoted the degradation of DAF mRNA. The 3'-untranslated region of DAF harbors an AU-rich element and this element destabilized the mRNA transcript. NO promoted the rapid degradation of DAF mRNA by inhibiting the binding of mRNA stabilizing protein HuR to this AU-rich region. The inhibition of binding of HuR to the AU-rich region was due to the S-nitrosylation of one or more cysteine residues by NO. Thus, these data reveal the molecular mediators of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of DAF by NO with implications in pathophysiology related to DAF. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  10. Serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation regulates DNA binding of bacterial transcriptional regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalantari, Aida; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of bacterial transcriptional regulators (TRs) belonging to the family of two-component systems (TCSs) is a well-established mechanism for regulating gene expression. Recent evidence points to the fact that reversible phosphorylation of bacterial TRs on other types...

  11. Different domains of P21Cip1/waf1 regulate DNA replication and DNA repair-associated processes after UV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, Gaston; Speroni, Juliana; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L.; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Prives, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Many genotoxic insults result in p21 up-regulation and p21-dependent cell cycle arrest but UV irradiation triggers p21 proteolysis. The significance of the increased p21 turnover is unclear and might be associated to DNA repair. While the role of p21 in Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) remains controversial, two recent reports explore its effect on Translesion DNA Synthesis (TLS), a process that avoids replication blockage during S phase. The first report shows that p21 degradation is required for efficient PCNA ubiquitination, a post transcriptional modification that is relevant for TLS. The second report demonstrates that p21 (-/-) cells have increased TLS-associated mutagenic rates. Herein we analyze the effect of p21 on different PCNA-driven processes including DNA replication, NER and TLS. Whereas only the CDK binding domain of p21 is required for cell cycle arrest in unstressed cells; neither the CDK- nor the PCNA-binding domains of p21 are able to block early and late steps of NER. Intriguingly, through its PCNA binding domain, p21 inhibited recruitment of the TLS-polymerase, polη to PCNA foci after UV. Moreover, this obstruction correlates with accumulation of γH2AX and increased apoptosis. Taking together, our data emphasizes the link between p21 turnover and efficient TLS. This might also suggest a potential effect of p21 on other activities of polζ, a DNA polymerase with central roles in other biological scenarios such as genetic conversion, homologous recombination and modulation of the cellular response to genotoxic agents [es

  12. Overexpressed DNA polymerase iota regulated by JNK/c-Jun contributes to hypermutagenesis in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fang; Xu, Zhigang; Yang, Mingzhen; Wei, Quanfang; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Jin; Zhi, Yi; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zhiwen; Yang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase iota (pol ι) possesses high error-prone DNA replication features and performs translesion DNA synthesis. It may be specialized and strictly regulated in normal mammalian cells. Dysregulation of pol ι may contribute to the acquisition of a mutator phenotype. However, there are few reports describing the transcription regulatory mechanism of pol ι, and there is controversy regarding its role in carcinogenesis. In this study, we performed the deletion and point-mutation experiment, EMSA, ChIP, RNA interference and western blot assay to prove that c-Jun activated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) regulates the transcription of pol ι in normal and cancer cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein (XPC) and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated related protein (ATR) promote early JNK activation in response to DNA damage and consequently enhance the expression of pol ι, indicating that the novel role of JNK signal pathway is involved in DNA damage response. Furthermore, associated with elevated c-Jun activity, the overexpression of pol ι is positively correlated with the clinical tumor grade in 97 bladder cancer samples and may contribute to the hypermutagenesis. The overexpressed pol ι-involved mutagenesis is dependent on JNK/c-Jun pathway in bladder cancer cells identifying by the special mutation spectra. Our results support the conclusion that dysregulation of pol ι by JNK/c-Jun is involved in carcinogenesis and offer a novel understanding of the role of pol ι or c-Jun in mutagenesis.

  13. Rho GTPases: Novel Players in the Regulation of the DNA Damage Response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Fritz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1 belongs to the family of Ras-homologous small GTPases. It is well characterized as a membrane-bound signal transducing molecule that is involved in the regulation of cell motility and adhesion as well as cell cycle progression, mitosis, cell death and gene expression. Rac1 also adjusts cellular responses to genotoxic stress by regulating the activity of stress kinases, including c-Jun-N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK and p38 kinases as well as related transcription factors. Apart from being found on the inner side of the outer cell membrane and in the cytosol, Rac1 has also been detected inside the nucleus. Different lines of evidence indicate that genotoxin-induced DNA damage is able to activate nuclear Rac1. The exact mechanisms involved and the biological consequences, however, are unclear. The data available so far indicate that Rac1 might integrate DNA damage independent and DNA damage dependent cellular stress responses following genotoxin treatment, thereby coordinating mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR that are related to DNA repair, survival and cell death.

  14. RUNX Family Participates in the Regulation of p53-Dependent DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinori Ozaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A proper DNA damage response (DDR, which monitors and maintains the genomic integrity, has been considered to be a critical barrier against genetic alterations to prevent tumor initiation and progression. The representative tumor suppressor p53 plays an important role in the regulation of DNA damage response. When cells receive DNA damage, p53 is quickly activated and induces cell cycle arrest and/or apoptotic cell death through transactivating its target genes implicated in the promotion of cell cycle arrest and/or apoptotic cell death such as p21WAF1, BAX, and PUMA. Accumulating evidence strongly suggests that DNA damage-mediated activation as well as induction of p53 is regulated by posttranslational modifications and also by protein-protein interaction. Loss of p53 activity confers growth advantage and ensures survival in cancer cells by inhibiting apoptotic response required for tumor suppression. RUNX family, which is composed of RUNX1, RUNX2, and RUNX3, is a sequence-specific transcription factor and is closely involved in a variety of cellular processes including development, differentiation, and/or tumorigenesis. In this review, we describe a background of p53 and a functional collaboration between p53 and RUNX family in response to DNA damage.

  15. [RTEL1 (regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1), a DNA helicase essential for genome stability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guen, Tangui; Jullien, Laurent; Schertzer, Mike; Lefebvre, Axelle; Kermasson, Laetitia; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Revy, Patrick

    2013-12-01

    RTEL1 (regulator of telomere length helicase 1) is a DNA helicase that has been identified more than 10 years ago. Many works since, mainly in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the mouse, have highlighted its role in chromosomal stability, maintenance of telomere length, and DNA repair. Recently, four laboratories have characterized RTEL1 mutations in patients with dyskeratosis congenita (DC) and Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson (HH) syndrome, a rare and severe variant of DC. We here summarize the current knowledge on RTEL1 and discuss the possible other functions that RTEL1 could play. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  16. Regulation of Small Mitochondrial DNA Replicative Advantage by Ribonucleotide Reductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliot Bradshaw

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Small mitochondrial genomes can behave as selfish elements by displacing wild-type genomes regardless of their detriment to the host organism. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, small hypersuppressive mtDNA transiently coexist with wild-type in a state of heteroplasmy, wherein the replicative advantage of the small mtDNA outcompetes wild-type and produces offspring without respiratory capacity in >95% of colonies. The cytosolic enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR catalyzes the rate-limiting step in dNTP synthesis and its inhibition has been correlated with increased petite colony formation, reflecting loss of respiratory function. Here, we used heteroplasmic diploids containing wild-type (rho+ and suppressive (rho− or hypersuppressive (HS rho− mitochondrial genomes to explore the effects of RNR activity on mtDNA heteroplasmy in offspring. We found that the proportion of rho+ offspring was significantly increased by RNR overexpression or deletion of its inhibitor, SML1, while reducing RNR activity via SML1 overexpression produced the opposite effects. In addition, using Ex Taq and KOD Dash polymerases, we observed a replicative advantage for small over large template DNA in vitro, but only at low dNTP concentrations. These results suggest that dNTP insufficiency contributes to the replicative advantage of small mtDNA over wild-type and cytosolic dNTP synthesis by RNR is an important regulator of heteroplasmy involving small mtDNA molecules in yeast.

  17. Dynamic conformational change regulates the protein-DNA recognition: an investigation on binding of a Y-family polymerase to its target DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiakun Chu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein-DNA recognition is a central biological process that governs the life of cells. A protein will often undergo a conformational transition to form the functional complex with its target DNA. The protein conformational dynamics are expected to contribute to the stability and specificity of DNA recognition and therefore may control the functional activity of the protein-DNA complex. Understanding how the conformational dynamics influences the protein-DNA recognition is still challenging. Here, we developed a two-basin structure-based model to explore functional dynamics in Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA Y-family polymerase IV (DPO4 during its binding to DNA. With explicit consideration of non-specific and specific interactions between DPO4 and DNA, we found that DPO4-DNA recognition is comprised of first 3D diffusion, then a short-range adjustment sliding on DNA and finally specific binding. Interestingly, we found that DPO4 is under a conformational equilibrium between multiple states during the binding process and the distributions of the conformations vary at different binding stages. By modulating the strength of the electrostatic interactions, the flexibility of the linker, and the conformational dynamics in DPO4, we drew a clear picture on how DPO4 dynamically regulates the DNA recognition. We argue that the unique features of flexibility and conformational dynamics in DPO4-DNA recognition have direct implications for low-fidelity translesion DNA synthesis, most of which is found to be accomplished by the Y-family DNA polymerases. Our results help complete the description of the DNA synthesis process for the Y-family polymerases. Furthermore, the methods developed here can be widely applied for future investigations on how various proteins recognize and bind specific DNA substrates.

  18. Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce CCL20 up-regulation promoting tumorigenic phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sligh, James [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Janda, Jaroslav [University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Jandova, Jana, E-mail: jjandova@email.arizona.edu [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Alterations in mitochondrial DNA are commonly found in various human cancers. • Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce up-regulation of chemokine CCL20. • Increased growth and motility of mtBALB cells is associated with CCL20 levels. • mtDNA changes in BALB induce in vivo tumor growth through CCL20 up-regulation. • Mutations in mitochondrial DNA play important roles in keratinocyte neoplasia. - Abstract: mtDNA mutations are common in human cancers and are thought to contribute to the process of neoplasia. We examined the role of mtDNA mutations in skin cancer by generating fibroblast cybrids harboring a mutation in the gene encoding the mitochondrial tRNA for arginine. This somatic mutation (9821insA) was previously reported in UV-induced hyperkeratotic skin tumors in hairless mice and confers specific tumorigenic phenotypes to mutant cybrids. Microarray analysis revealed and RT-PCR along with Western blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 in mtBALB haplotype containing the mt-Tr 9821insA allele compared to wild type mtB6 haplotype. Based on reported role of CCL20 in cancer progression we examined whether the hyper-proliferation and enhanced motility of mtBALB haplotype would be associated with CCL20 levels. Treatment of both genotypes with recombinant CCL20 (rmCCL20) resulted in enhanced growth and motility of mtB6 cybrids. Furthermore, the acquired somatic alteration increased the in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids through the up-regulation of CCL20 since neutralizing antibody significantly decreased in vivo tumor growth of these cells; and tumors from anti-CCL20 treated mice injected with mtBALB cybrids showed significantly decreased CCL20 levels. When rmCCL20 or mtBALB cybrids were used as chemotactic stimuli, mtB6 cybrids showed increased motility while anti-CCL20 antibody decreased the migration and in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids. Moreover, the inhibitors of MAPK signaling and NF

  19. Characterization of DNA binding, transcriptional activation, and regulated nuclear association of recombinant human NFATp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seto Anita G

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NFATp is one member of a family of transcriptional activators whose nuclear accumulation and hence transcriptional activity is regulated in mammalian cells. Human NFATp exists as a phosphoprotein in the cytoplasm of naive T cells. Upon antigen stimulation, NFATp is dephosphorylated, accumulates in nuclei, and functions to regulate transcription of genes including those encoding cytokines. While the properties of the DNA binding domain of NFATp have been investigated in detail, biochemical studies of the transcriptional activation and regulated association with nuclei have remained unexplored because of a lack of full length, purified recombinant NFATp. Results We developed methods for expressing and purifying full length recombinant human NFATp that has all of the properties known to be associated with native NFATp. The recombinant NFATp binds DNA on its own and cooperatively with AP-1 proteins, activates transcription in vitro, is phosphorylated, can be dephosphorylated by calcineurin, and exhibits regulated association with nuclei in vitro. Importantly, activation by recombinant NFATp in a reconstituted transcription system required regions of the protein outside of the central DNA binding domain. Conclusions We conclude that NFATp is a bona fide transcriptional activator. Moreover, the reagents and methods that we developed will facilitate future studies on the mechanisms of transcriptional activation and nuclear accumulation by NFATp, a member of an important family of transcriptional regulatory proteins.

  20. Fission yeast shelterin regulates DNA polymerases and Rad3(ATR kinase to limit telomere extension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ting Chang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies in fission yeast have previously identified evolutionarily conserved shelterin and Stn1-Ten1 complexes, and established Rad3(ATR/Tel1(ATM-dependent phosphorylation of the shelterin subunit Ccq1 at Thr93 as the critical post-translational modification for telomerase recruitment to telomeres. Furthermore, shelterin subunits Poz1, Rap1 and Taz1 have been identified as negative regulators of Thr93 phosphorylation and telomerase recruitment. However, it remained unclear how telomere maintenance is dynamically regulated during the cell cycle. Thus, we investigated how loss of Poz1, Rap1 and Taz1 affects cell cycle regulation of Ccq1 Thr93 phosphorylation and telomere association of telomerase (Trt1(TERT, DNA polymerases, Replication Protein A (RPA complex, Rad3(ATR-Rad26(ATRIP checkpoint kinase complex, Tel1(ATM kinase, shelterin subunits (Tpz1, Ccq1 and Poz1 and Stn1. We further investigated how telomere shortening, caused by trt1Δ or catalytically dead Trt1-D743A, affects cell cycle-regulated telomere association of telomerase and DNA polymerases. These analyses established that fission yeast shelterin maintains telomere length homeostasis by coordinating the differential arrival of leading (Polε and lagging (Polα strand DNA polymerases at telomeres to modulate Rad3(ATR association, Ccq1 Thr93 phosphorylation and telomerase recruitment.

  1. Genome-Wide Expression of MicroRNAs Is Regulated by DNA Methylation in Hepatocarcinogenesis

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    Jing Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies, including ours, have examined the regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs by DNA methylation, but whether this regulation occurs at a genome-wide level in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is unclear. Subjects/Methods. Using a two-phase study design, we conducted genome-wide screening for DNA methylation and miRNA expression to explore the potential role of methylation alterations in miRNAs regulation. Results. We found that expressions of 25 miRNAs were statistically significantly different between tumor and nontumor tissues and perfectly differentiated HCC tumor from nontumor. Six miRNAs were overexpressed, and 19 were repressed in tumors. Among 133 miRNAs with inverse correlations between methylation and expression, 8 miRNAs (6% showed statistically significant differences in expression between tumor and nontumor tissues. Six miRNAs were validated in 56 additional paired HCC tissues, and significant inverse correlations were observed for miR-125b and miR-199a, which is consistent with the inactive chromatin pattern found in HepG2 cells. Conclusion. These data suggest that the expressions of miR-125b and miR-199a are dramatically regulated by DNA hypermethylation that plays a key role in hepatocarcinogenesis.

  2. The RNA binding protein HuR does not interact directly with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and does not affect reverse transcription in vitro

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    Gronenborn Angela M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lemay et al recently reported that the RNA binding protein HuR directly interacts with the ribonuclease H (RNase H domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT and influences the efficiency of viral reverse transcription (Lemay et al., 2008, Retrovirology 5:47. HuR is a member of the embryonic lethal abnormal vision protein family and contains 3 RNA recognition motifs (RRMs that bind AU-rich elements (AREs. To define the structural determinants of the HuR-RT interaction and to elucidate the mechanism(s by which HuR influences HIV-1 reverse transcription activity in vitro, we cloned and purified full-length HuR as well as three additional protein constructs that contained the N-terminal and internal RRMs, the internal and C-terminal RRMs, or the C-terminal RRM only. Results All four HuR proteins were purified and characterized by biophysical methods. They are well structured and exist as monomers in solution. No direct protein-protein interaction between HuR and HIV-1 RT was detected using NMR titrations with 15N labeled HuR variants or the 15N labeled RNase H domain of HIV-1 RT. Furthermore, HuR did not significantly affect the kinetics of HIV-1 reverse transcription in vitro, even on RNA templates that contain AREs. Conclusions Our results suggest that HuR does not impact HIV-1 replication through a direct protein-protein interaction with the viral RT.

  3. Structural Basis for DNA Recognition by the Two-Component Response Regulator RcsB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippova, Ekaterina V; Zemaitaitis, Bozena; Aung, Theint; Wolfe, Alan J; Anderson, Wayne F

    2018-02-27

    RcsB is a highly conserved transcription regulator of the Rcs phosphorelay system, a complex two-component signal transduction system (N. Majdalani and S. Gottesman, Annu Rev Microbiol 59:379-405, 2005; A. J. Wolfe, Curr Opin Microbiol 13:204-209, 2010, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mib.2010.01.002; D. J. Clarke, Future Microbiol 5:1173-1184, 2010, https://doi.org/10.2217/fmb.10.83). RcsB plays an important role in virulence and pathogenicity in human hosts by regulating biofilm formation. RcsB can regulate transcription alone or together with its auxiliary transcription regulators by forming heterodimers. This complexity allows RcsB to regulate transcription of more than 600 bacterial genes in response to different stresses (D. Wang et al., Mol Plant Microbe Interact 25:6-17, 2012, https://doi.org/10.1094/MPMI-08-11-0207). Despite increasing knowledge of RcsB importance, molecular mechanisms that drive the ability of RcsB to control transcription of a large number of genes remain unclear. Here, we present crystal structures of unphosphorylated RcsB in complex with the consensus DNA-binding sequence of 22-mer (DNA22) and 18-mer (DNA18) of the flhDC operon from Escherichia coli determined at 3.15- and 3.37-Å resolution, respectively. The results of our structural analysis combined with the results of in vitro binding assays provide valuable insights to the protein regulatory mechanism, demonstrate how RcsB recognizes target DNA sequences, and reveal a unique oligomeric state that allows RcsB to form homo- and heterodimers. This information will help us understand the complex mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by RcsB in bacteria. IMPORTANCE RcsB is a well-studied two-component response regulator of the Rcs phosphorelay system, conserved within the family Enterobacteriaceae , which includes many pathogens. It is a global regulator, controlling more than 5% of bacterial genes associated with capsule biosynthesis, flagellar biogenesis, cell wall biosynthesis

  4. USP37 deubiquitinates Cdt1 and contributes to regulate DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pérez, Santiago; Cabrera, Elisa; Amoedo, Hugo; Rodríguez-Acebes, Sara; Koundrioukoff, Stephane; Debatisse, Michelle; Méndez, Juan; Freire, Raimundo

    2016-10-01

    DNA replication control is a key process in maintaining genomic integrity. Monitoring DNA replication initiation is particularly important as it needs to be coordinated with other cellular events and should occur only once per cell cycle. Crucial players in the initiation of DNA replication are the ORC protein complex, marking the origin of replication, and the Cdt1 and Cdc6 proteins, that license these origins to replicate by recruiting the MCM2-7 helicase. To accurately achieve its functions, Cdt1 is tightly regulated. Cdt1 levels are high from metaphase and during G1 and low in S/G2 phases of the cell cycle. This control is achieved, among other processes, by ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. In an overexpression screen for Cdt1 deubiquitinating enzymes, we isolated USP37, to date the first ubiquitin hydrolase controlling Cdt1. USP37 overexpression stabilizes Cdt1, most likely a phosphorylated form of the protein. In contrast, USP37 knock down destabilizes Cdt1, predominantly during G1 and G1/S phases of the cell cycle. USP37 interacts with Cdt1 and is able to de-ubiquitinate Cdt1 in vivo and, USP37 is able to regulate the loading of MCM complexes onto the chromatin. In addition, downregulation of USP37 reduces DNA replication fork speed. Taken together, here we show that the deubiquitinase USP37 plays an important role in the regulation of DNA replication. Whether this is achieved via Cdt1, a central protein in this process, which we have shown to be stabilized by USP37, or via additional factors, remains to be tested. Copyright © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. HuR binding to AU-rich elements present in the 3' untranslated region of Classical swine fever virus

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    Huang Chin-Cheng

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical swine fever virus (CSFV is the member of the genus Pestivirus under the family Flaviviridae. The 5' untranslated region (UTR of CSFV contains the IRES, which is a highly structured element that recruits the translation machinery. The 3' UTR is usually the recognition site of the viral replicase to initiate minus-strand RNA synthesis. Adenosine-uridine rich elements (ARE are instability determinants present in the 3' UTR of short-lived mRNAs. However, the presence of AREs in the 3' UTR of CSFV conserved in all known strains has never been reported. This study inspects a possible role of the ARE in the 3' UTR of CSFV. Results Using RNA pull-down and LC/MS/MS assays, this study identified at least 32 possible host factors derived from the cytoplasmic extracts of PK-15 cells that bind to the CSFV 3' UTR, one of which is HuR. HuR is known to bind the AREs and protect the mRNA from degradation. Using recombinant GST-HuR, this study demonstrates that HuR binds to the ARE present in the 3' UTR of CSFV in vitro and that the binding ability is conserved in strains irrespective of virulence. Conclusions This study identified one of the CSFV 3' UTR binding proteins HuR is specifically binding to in the ARE region.

  6. Functions and regulation of the multitasking FANCM family of DNA motor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Sung, Patrick; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-09-01

    Members of the conserved FANCM family of DNA motor proteins play key roles in genome maintenance processes. FANCM supports genome duplication and repair under different circumstances and also functions in the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint. Some of these roles are shared among lower eukaryotic family members. Human FANCM has been linked to Fanconi anemia, a syndrome characterized by cancer predisposition, developmental disorder, and bone marrow failure. Recent studies on human FANCM and its orthologs from other organisms have provided insights into their biological functions, regulation, and collaboration with other genome maintenance factors. This review summarizes the progress made, with the goal of providing an integrated view of the functions and regulation of these enzymes in humans and model organisms and how they advance our understanding of genome maintenance processes. © 2015 Xue et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Regulation of DNA methylation on EEF1D and RPL8 expression in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Qin; Jiang, Li

    2017-10-01

    Dynamic changes to the epigenome play a critical role in a variety of biology processes and complex traits. Many important candidate genes have been identified through our previous genome wide association study (GWAS) on milk production traits in dairy cattle. However, the underlying mechanism of candidate genes have not yet been clearly understood. In this study, we analyzed the methylation variation of the candidate genes, EEF1D and RPL8, which were identified to be strongly associated with milk production traits in dairy cattle in our previous studies, and its effect on protein and mRNA expression. We compared DNA methylation profiles and gene expression levels of EEF1D and RPL8 in five different tissues (heart, liver, mammary gland, ovary and muscle) of three cows. Both genes showed the highest expression level in mammary gland. For RPL8, there was no difference in the DNA methylation pattern in the five tissues, suggesting no effect of DNA methylation on gene expression. For EEF1D, the DNA methylation levels of its first CpG island differed in the five tissues and were negatively correlated with the gene expression levels. To further investigate the function of DNA methylation on the expression of EEF1D, we collected blood samples of three cows at early stage of lactation and in dry period and analyzed its expression and the methylation status of the first CpG island in blood. As a result, the mRNA expression of EEF1D in the dry period was higher than that at the early stage of lactation, while the DNA methylation level in the dry period was lower than that at the early stage of lactation. Our result suggests that the DNA methylation of EEF1D plays an important role in the spatial and temporal regulation of its expression and possibly have an effect on the milk production traits.

  8. TRIM30α Is a Negative-Feedback Regulator of the Intracellular DNA and DNA Virus-Triggered Response by Targeting STING.

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    Yanming Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled immune responses to intracellular DNA have been shown to induce autoimmune diseases. Homeostasis regulation of immune responses to cytosolic DNA is critical for limiting the risk of autoimmunity and survival of the host. Here, we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif protein 30α (TRIM30α was induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection in dendritic cells (DCs. Knockdown or genetic ablation of TRIM30α augmented the type I IFNs and interleukin-6 response to intracellular DNA and DNA viruses. Trim30α-deficient mice were more resistant to infection by DNA viruses. Biochemical analyses showed that TRIM30α interacted with the stimulator of interferon genes (STING, which is a critical regulator of the DNA-sensing response. Overexpression of TRIM30α promoted the degradation of STING via K48-linked ubiquitination at Lys275 through a proteasome-dependent pathway. These findings indicate that E3 ligase TRIM30α is an important negative-feedback regulator of innate immune responses to DNA viruses by targeting STING.

  9. Transcription of hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular DNA is regulated by CpG methylation during chronic infection.

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    Yongmei Zhang

    Full Text Available The persistence of hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is maintained by the nuclear viral covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA, which serves as transcription template for viral mRNAs. Previous studies suggested that cccDNA contains methylation-prone CpG islands, and that the minichromosome structure of cccDNA is epigenetically regulated by DNA methylation. However, the regulatory effect of each CpG island methylation on cccDNA activity remains elusive. In the present study, we analyzed the distribution of CpG methylation within cccDNA in patient samples and investigated the impact of CpG island methylation on cccDNA-driven virus replication. Our study revealed the following observations: 1 Bisulfite sequencing of cccDNA from chronic hepatitis B patients indicated that CpG island I was seldom methylated, 2 CpG island II methylation was correlated to the low level of serum HBV DNA in patients, and in vitro methylation studies confirmed that CpG island II methylation markedly reduced cccDNA transcription and subsequent viral core DNA replication, 3 CpG island III methylation was associated with low serum HBsAg titers, and 4 Furthermore, we found that HBV genotype, HBeAg positivity, and patient age and liver fibrosis stage were also relevant to cccDNA CpG methylation status. Therefore, we clearly demonstrated that the status of cccDNA methylation is connected to the biological behavior of HBV. Taken together, our study provides a complete profile of CpG island methylation within HBV cccDNA and new insights for the function of CpG methylation in regulating HBV cccDNA transcription.

  10. SET oncoprotein accumulation regulates transcription through DNA demethylation and histone hypoacetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luciana O; Neto, Marinaldo P C; Sousa, Lucas O; Tannous, Maryna A; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andreia M

    2017-04-18

    Epigenetic modifications are essential in the control of normal cellular processes and cancer development. DNA methylation and histone acetylation are major epigenetic modifications involved in gene transcription and abnormal events driving the oncogenic process. SET protein accumulates in many cancer types, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); SET is a member of the INHAT complex that inhibits gene transcription associating with histones and preventing their acetylation. We explored how SET protein accumulation impacts on the regulation of gene expression, focusing on DNA methylation and histone acetylation. DNA methylation profile of 24 tumour suppressors evidenced that SET accumulation decreased DNA methylation in association with loss of 5-methylcytidine, formation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and increased TET1 levels, indicating an active DNA demethylation mechanism. However, the expression of some suppressor genes was lowered in cells with high SET levels, suggesting that loss of methylation is not the main mechanism modulating gene expression. SET accumulation also downregulated the expression of 32 genes of a panel of 84 transcription factors, and SET directly interacted with chromatin at the promoter of the downregulated genes, decreasing histone acetylation. Gene expression analysis after cell treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AZA) and Trichostatin A (TSA) revealed that histone acetylation reversed transcription repression promoted by SET. These results suggest a new function for SET in the regulation of chromatin dynamics. In addition, TSA diminished both SET protein levels and SET capability to bind to gene promoter, suggesting that administration of epigenetic modifier agents could be efficient to reverse SET phenotype in cancer.

  11. Timely binding of IHF and Fis to DARS2 regulates ATP–DnaA production and replication initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasho, Kazutoshi; Fujimitsu, Kazuyuki; Matoba, Toshihiro; Oshima, Taku; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the ATP-bound form of DnaA (ATP–DnaA) promotes replication initiation. During replication, the bound ATP is hydrolyzed to ADP to yield the ADP-bound form (ADP–DnaA), which is inactive for initiation. The chromosomal site DARS2 facilitates the regeneration of ATP–DnaA by catalyzing nucleotide exchange between free ATP and ADP bound to DnaA. However, the regulatory mechanisms governing this exchange reaction are unclear. Here, using in vitro reconstituted experiments, we show that two nucleoid-associated proteins, IHF and Fis, bind site-specifically to DARS2 to activate coordinately the exchange reaction. The regenerated ATP–DnaA was fully active in replication initiation and underwent DnaA–ATP hydrolysis. ADP–DnaA formed heteromultimeric complexes with IHF and Fis on DARS2, and underwent nucleotide dissociation more efficiently than ATP–DnaA. Consistently, mutant analyses demonstrated that specific binding of IHF and Fis to DARS2 stimulates the formation of ATP–DnaA production, thereby promoting timely initiation. Moreover, we show that IHF–DARS2 binding is temporally regulated during the cell cycle, whereas Fis only binds to DARS2 in exponentially growing cells. These results elucidate the regulation of ATP–DnaA and replication initiation in coordination with the cell cycle and growth phase. PMID:25378325

  12. Timely binding of IHF and Fis to DARS2 regulates ATP-DnaA production and replication initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasho, Kazutoshi; Fujimitsu, Kazuyuki; Matoba, Toshihiro; Oshima, Taku; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2014-12-01

    In Escherichia coli, the ATP-bound form of DnaA (ATP-DnaA) promotes replication initiation. During replication, the bound ATP is hydrolyzed to ADP to yield the ADP-bound form (ADP-DnaA), which is inactive for initiation. The chromosomal site DARS2 facilitates the regeneration of ATP-DnaA by catalyzing nucleotide exchange between free ATP and ADP bound to DnaA. However, the regulatory mechanisms governing this exchange reaction are unclear. Here, using in vitro reconstituted experiments, we show that two nucleoid-associated proteins, IHF and Fis, bind site-specifically to DARS2 to activate coordinately the exchange reaction. The regenerated ATP-DnaA was fully active in replication initiation and underwent DnaA-ATP hydrolysis. ADP-DnaA formed heteromultimeric complexes with IHF and Fis on DARS2, and underwent nucleotide dissociation more efficiently than ATP-DnaA. Consistently, mutant analyses demonstrated that specific binding of IHF and Fis to DARS2 stimulates the formation of ATP-DnaA production, thereby promoting timely initiation. Moreover, we show that IHF-DARS2 binding is temporally regulated during the cell cycle, whereas Fis only binds to DARS2 in exponentially growing cells. These results elucidate the regulation of ATP-DnaA and replication initiation in coordination with the cell cycle and growth phase. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. JMJD1C demethylates MDC1 to regulate the RNF8 and BRCA1-mediated chromatin response to DNA breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watanabe, Sugiko; Watanabe, Kenji; Akimov, Vyacheslav

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin ubiquitylation flanking DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), mediated by RNF8 and RNF168 ubiquitin ligases, orchestrates a two-branch pathway, recruiting repair factors 53BP1 or the RAP80-BRCA1 complex. We report that human demethylase JMJD1C regulates the RAP80-BRCA1 branch of this DNA...

  14. Metformin regulates global DNA methylation via mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuyàs, E; Fernández-Arroyo, S; Verdura, S; García, R Á-F; Stursa, J; Werner, L; Blanco-González, E; Montes-Bayón, M; Joven, J; Viollet, B; Neuzil, J; Menendez, J A

    2018-02-15

    The anti-diabetic biguanide metformin may exert health-promoting effects via metabolic regulation of the epigenome. Here we show that metformin promotes global DNA methylation in non-cancerous, cancer-prone and metastatic cancer cells by decreasing S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), a strong feedback inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent DNA methyltransferases, while promoting the accumulation of SAM, the universal methyl donor for cellular methylation. Using metformin and a mitochondria/complex I (mCI)-targeted analog of metformin (norMitoMet) in experimental pairs of wild-type and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-, serine hydroxymethyltransferase 2 (SHMT2)- and mCI-null cells, we provide evidence that metformin increases the SAM:SAH ratio-related methylation capacity by targeting the coupling between serine mitochondrial one-carbon flux and CI activity. By increasing the contribution of one-carbon units to the SAM from folate stores while decreasing SAH in response to AMPK-sensed energetic crisis, metformin can operate as a metabolo-epigenetic regulator capable of reprogramming one of the key conduits linking cellular metabolism to the DNA methylation machinery.

  15. Coordinate regulation of stromelysin and collagenase genes determined with cDNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, S.M.; Clark, E.J.; Werb, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Secreted proteinases are required for tumor metastasis, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling during wound healing and embryonic growth. Thus, the regulation of the genes of secreted proteinases may serve as an interesting model for growth-controlled genes in general. The authors studied the genes of the secreted proteinases stromelysin and collagenase by using molecularly cloned cDNAs from each proteinase. Stromelysin cDNA was cloned by differential screening of a total cDNA library from rabbit synovial cells treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, which yielded a clone of 1.2 kilobase pairs; collagenase cDNA was obtained by cloning reverse transcripts of anti-collagenase-immunoadsorbed polysomal mRNA, which yielded a clone of 0.8 kilobase pairs. Stromelysin and collagenase mRNA species of 2.2 and 2.4 kilobases, respectively, were detected on hybridization blots of RNA from phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-treated but not untreated rabbit synovial cells. Expression of stromelysin mRNA was also induced in rabbit alveolar macrophages and rabbit brain capillary endothelial cells treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Stromelysin and collagenase mRNA were both induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and cytochalasin B at a constant ratio of the two gene products; this suggest coordinate regulation. The fact that induction was blocked after inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide implicates an indirect signal transduction pathway that requires new protein synthesis

  16. P-body proteins regulate transcriptional rewiring to promote DNA replication stress resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loll-Krippleber, Raphael; Brown, Grant W

    2017-09-15

    mRNA-processing (P-) bodies are cytoplasmic granules that form in eukaryotic cells in response to numerous stresses to serve as sites of degradation and storage of mRNAs. Functional P-bodies are critical for the DNA replication stress response in yeast, yet the repertoire of P-body targets and the mechanisms by which P-bodies promote replication stress resistance are unknown. In this study we identify the complete complement of mRNA targets of P-bodies during replication stress induced by hydroxyurea treatment. The key P-body protein Lsm1 controls the abundance of HHT1, ACF4, ARL3, TMA16, RRS1 and YOX1 mRNAs to prevent their toxic accumulation during replication stress. Accumulation of YOX1 mRNA causes aberrant downregulation of a network of genes critical for DNA replication stress resistance and leads to toxic acetaldehyde accumulation. Our data reveal the scope and the targets of regulation by P-body proteins during the DNA replication stress response.P-bodies form in response to stress and act as sites of mRNA storage and degradation. Here the authors identify the mRNA targets of P-bodies during DNA replication stress, and show that P-body proteins act to prevent toxic accumulation of these target transcripts.

  17. Endometrial Cancer and Hypermethylation: Regulation of DNA and MicroRNA by Epigenetics

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    Kouji Banno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the seventh most common cancer in women worldwide. Therefore elucidation of the pathogenesis and development of effective treatment for endometrial cancer are important. However, several aspects of the mechanism of carcinogenesis in the endometrium remain unclear. Associations with genetic variation and mutations of cancer-related genes have been shown, but these do not provide a complete explanation. Therefore, in recent years, epigenetic mechanisms that do not involve changes in DNA sequences have been examined. Studies aimed at detection of aberrant DNA hypermethylation in cancer cells present in microscopic amounts in vivo and application of the results to cancer diagnosis have also started. Breakdown of the DNA mismatch repair mechanism is thought to play a large role in the development of endometrial cancer, with changes in the expression of the hMLH1 gene being particularly important. Silencing of genes such as APC and CHFR, Sprouty 2, RASSF1A, GPR54, CDH1, and RSK4 by DNA hypermethylation, onset of Lynch syndrome due to hereditary epimutation of hMLH1 and hMSH2 mismatch repair genes, and regulation of gene expression by microRNAs may also underlie the carcinogenic mechanisms of endometrial cancer. Further understanding of these issues may permit development of new therapies.

  18. Role of XRCC4 phosphorylation by DNA-PK in the regulation of NHEJ repair pathway of DNA double strand break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Imamichi, Shoji; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Kamdar, Radhika P.; Sicheng, Liu; Wanotayan, Rujira; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the predominant pathway of DNA double strand breaks in higher eukaryotes and is active throughout the cell cycle. NHEJ repair includes many factors as Ku70/86, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4-Ligase IV complex and XLF (also known as Cernunnos). In these factors, DNA-PKcs acts as central regulator in NHEJ repair. It recruited at the DNA damages site after DNA damage and after association with Ku its kinase activity is activated. It phosphorylates many of important NHEJ proteins in vitro including XRCC4, Ku 70/86, Artemis, and even DNA-PKcs but till now, very less studies have been done to know the role and significance of phosphorylation in the NHEJ repair. Studies by other researchers identified various phosphorylation sites in XRCC4 by DNA-PK using mass spectrometry but these phosphorylation sites were shown to be dispensable for DSB repair. In the present investigation, we identified 3 serine and one new threonine phosphorylation sites in XRCC4 protein by DNA-PK. In vivo phosphorylation at these sites was verified by generating phosphorylation specific antibodies and the requirement for DNA-PK therein was verified by using DNA-PK inhibitor and DNA-PK proficient and deficient cell lines in response to radiation and zeocin treatment. We have also found that phosphorylation at these sites showed dose dependency in response to radiation treatment. The two serine and one threonine phosphorylation site is also biological important as their mutation into alanine significantly elevated radiosensitivity as measured by colony formation assay. Neutral comet assay showed delayed kinetics in DSB repair of these mutants. Furthermore, we have found a protein, with putative DSB repair function, which interacts with domain including the phosphorylation sites.These results indicate that these phosphorylation sites would mediate functional link between XRCC4 and DNA-PK. (author)

  19. Transcription profiling suggests that mitochondrial topoisomerase IB acts as a topological barrier and regulator of mitochondrial DNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Zhang, Hongliang; Khiati, Salim; Wu, Xiaolin; Pommier, Yves

    2017-12-08

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for cell viability because it encodes subunits of the respiratory chain complexes. Mitochondrial topoisomerase IB (TOP1MT) facilitates mtDNA replication by removing DNA topological tensions produced during mtDNA transcription, but it appears to be dispensable. To test whether cells lacking TOP1MT have aberrant mtDNA transcription, we performed mitochondrial transcriptome profiling. To that end, we designed and implemented a customized tiling array, which enabled genome-wide, strand-specific, and simultaneous detection of all mitochondrial transcripts. Our technique revealed that Top1mt KO mouse cells process the mitochondrial transcripts normally but that protein-coding mitochondrial transcripts are elevated. Moreover, we found discrete long noncoding RNAs produced by H-strand transcription and encompassing the noncoding regulatory region of mtDNA in human and murine cells and tissues. Of note, these noncoding RNAs were strongly up-regulated in the absence of TOP1MT. In contrast, 7S DNA, produced by mtDNA replication, was reduced in the Top1mt KO cells. We propose that the long noncoding RNA species in the D-loop region are generated by the extension of H-strand transcripts beyond their canonical stop site and that TOP1MT acts as a topological barrier and regulator for mtDNA transcription and D-loop formation.

  20. Implications for x-chromosome regulation from studies of human x-chromosome DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, S.F.; Migeon, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    It is clear that there must be multiple events involved in the regulation of the mammalian X chromosome. The initial event, occurring about the time of implantation results in inactivation of all but a single X chromosome in diploid cells. A popular working hypothesis is that DNA modification, such as methylation or sequence rearrangement, might be responsible for maintenance of the inactive state. Methylation is particularly attractive, since the preference for methylating half-methylated sites might result in perpetuation of the differentiated state. In this paper we discuss several facets of our studies of X inactivation; specifically, our general strategy, studies of X DNA methylation, and studies of loci that escape inactivation. 47 references, 8 figures, 2 tables

  1. DNA methylation and histone deacetylation regulating insulin sensitivity due to chronic cold exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Lai; Sun, Yizheng; Li, Ruiping; Deng, Jinbo; Deng, Jiexin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the causal relationship between chronic cold exposure and insulin resistance and the mechanisms of how DNA methylation and histone deacetylation regulate cold-reduced insulin resistance. 46 adult male mice from postnatal day 90-180 were randomly assigned to control group and cold-exposure group. Mice in cold-exposure group were placed at temperature from -1 to 4 °C for 30 days to mimic chronic cold environment. Then, fasting blood glucose, blood insulin level and insulin resistance index were measured with enzymatic methods. Immunofluorescent labeling was carried out to visualize the insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2), Obese receptor (Ob-R, a leptin receptor), voltage-dependent anion channel protein 1 (VDAC1), cytochrome C (cytC), 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) positive cells in hippocampal CA1 area. Furthermore, the expressions of some proteins mentioned above were detected with Western blot. The results showed: ① Chronic cold exposure could reduce the insulin resistance index (P cold-exposure group than in control group with both immunohistochemical staining and Western blot (P cold exposure increased DNA methylation and histone deacetylation in the pyramidal cells of CA1 area and led to an increase in the expression of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and DNA methylation relative enzymes (P cold exposure can improve insulin sensitivity, with the involvement of DNA methylation, histone deacetylation and the regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. These epigenetic modifications probably form the basic mechanism of cold-reduced insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Aberrant regulation of DNA methylation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a new target of disease mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lee J; Wong, Margaret

    2013-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the third most common adult-onset neurodegenerative disease. A diagnosis is fatal owing to degeneration of motor neurons in brain and spinal cord that control swallowing, breathing, and movement. ALS can be inherited, but most cases are not associated with a family history of the disease. The mechanisms causing motor neuron death in ALS are still unknown. Given the suspected complex interplay between multiple genes, the environment, metabolism, and lifestyle in the pathogenesis of ALS, we have hypothesized that the mechanisms of disease in ALS involve epigenetic contributions that can drive motor neuron degeneration. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism for gene regulation engaged by DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt)-catalyzed methyl group transfer to carbon-5 in cytosine residues in gene regulatory promoter and nonpromoter regions. Recent genome-wide analyses have found differential gene methylation in human ALS. Neuropathologic assessments have revealed that motor neurons in human ALS show significant abnormalities in Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and 5-methylcytosine. Similar changes are seen in mice with motor neuron degeneration, and Dnmt3a was found abundantly at synapses and in mitochondria. During apoptosis of cultured motor neuron-like cells, Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a protein levels increase, and 5-methylcytosine accumulates. Enforced expression of Dnmt3a, but not Dnmt1, induces degeneration of cultured neurons. Truncation mutation of the Dnmt3a catalytic domain and Dnmt3a RNAi blocks apoptosis of cultured neurons. Inhibition of Dnmt catalytic activity with small molecules RG108 and procainamide protects motor neurons from excessive DNA methylation and apoptosis in cell culture and in a mouse model of ALS. Thus, motor neurons can engage epigenetic mechanisms to cause their degeneration, involving Dnmts and increased DNA methylation. Aberrant DNA methylation in vulnerable cells is a new direction for discovering mechanisms of ALS

  3. The influences of the hurly-burly renaissance world in the formation of camonian thematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Rogério souza

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Current article proposes a reading of poetic texts produced by Camões based on his experience as a man of the Renaissance. Luíz Vaz de Camões (1524-1580 experienced the social conflicts brought about by structural and organizational changes in 16th century Portuguese society, which developed into world confusion. Such an experience may be observed in Rhymes and in the epic poem The Lusiads with different themes. It reveals a man divided between contradictory feelings and social conflicts experienced at that historical moment. The selected poems and the historical-biographical references on the poet produce the hurly-burly world immortalized in his verses and in the great changes of the 16th century.

  4. Nyemissioner i börsnoterade bolag : - Hur bör en investerare agera?

    OpenAIRE

    Ericsson, Marcus; Dragsten, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Vi har valt att undersöka hur nyemissioner påverkar aktiekursen. Detta eftersom det den senaste tiden genomförts ett antal nyemissioner på stockholmsbörsen. Undersökningen genomfördes genom en kvantitativ eventstudie av ett antal nyemissioner genomförda på stockholmsbörsen mellan åren 2000-2007. I undersökningen delades de identifierade bolagen upp efter storlek och bransch för att därigenom försöka finna eventuella mönster. För att kunna dra konkreta slutsatser beräknades, med hjälp av ett t...

  5. The DNA replication checkpoint directly regulates MBF-dependent G1/S transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Chaitali; Patel, Prasanta K; Rosebrock, Adam; Oliva, Anna; Leatherwood, Janet; Rhind, Nicholas

    2008-10-01

    The DNA replication checkpoint transcriptionally upregulates genes that allow cells to adapt to and survive replication stress. Our results show that, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the replication checkpoint regulates the entire G(1)/S transcriptional program by directly regulating MBF, the G(1)/S transcription factor. Instead of initiating a checkpoint-specific transcriptional program, the replication checkpoint targets MBF to maintain the normal G(1)/S transcriptional program during replication stress. We propose a mechanism for this regulation, based on in vitro phosphorylation of the Cdc10 subunit of MBF by the Cds1 replication-checkpoint kinase. Replacement of two potential phosphorylation sites with phosphomimetic amino acids suffices to promote the checkpoint transcriptional program, suggesting that Cds1 phosphorylation directly regulates MBF-dependent transcription. The conservation of MBF between fission and budding yeast, and recent results implicating MBF as a target of the budding yeast replication checkpoint, suggests that checkpoint regulation of the MBF transcription factor is a conserved strategy for coping with replication stress. Furthermore, the structural and regulatory similarity between MBF and E2F, the metazoan G(1)/S transcription factor, suggests that this checkpoint mechanism may be broadly conserved among eukaryotes.

  6. The DNA Replication Checkpoint Directly Regulates MBF-Dependent G1/S Transcription▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Chaitali; Patel, Prasanta K.; Rosebrock, Adam; Oliva, Anna; Leatherwood, Janet; Rhind, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    The DNA replication checkpoint transcriptionally upregulates genes that allow cells to adapt to and survive replication stress. Our results show that, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the replication checkpoint regulates the entire G1/S transcriptional program by directly regulating MBF, the G1/S transcription factor. Instead of initiating a checkpoint-specific transcriptional program, the replication checkpoint targets MBF to maintain the normal G1/S transcriptional program during replication stress. We propose a mechanism for this regulation, based on in vitro phosphorylation of the Cdc10 subunit of MBF by the Cds1 replication-checkpoint kinase. Replacement of two potential phosphorylation sites with phosphomimetic amino acids suffices to promote the checkpoint transcriptional program, suggesting that Cds1 phosphorylation directly regulates MBF-dependent transcription. The conservation of MBF between fission and budding yeast, and recent results implicating MBF as a target of the budding yeast replication checkpoint, suggests that checkpoint regulation of the MBF transcription factor is a conserved strategy for coping with replication stress. Furthermore, the structural and regulatory similarity between MBF and E2F, the metazoan G1/S transcription factor, suggests that this checkpoint mechanism may be broadly conserved among eukaryotes. PMID:18662996

  7. Up-regulation of DNA-dependent protein kinase correlates with radiation resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintani, Satoru; Mihara, Mariko; Li, Chunnan; Nakahara Yuuji; Hino, Satoshi; Nakashiro, Koh-ichi; Hamakawa, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    DNA-PK is a nuclear protein with serine/threonine kinase activity and forms a complex consisting of the DNA-PKcs and a heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80 proteins. Recent laboratory experiments have demonstrated that the DNA-PK complex formation is one of the major pathways by which mammalian cells respond to DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between expression levels of DNA-PKcs, Ku70 and Ku80 proteins and radiation sensitivity in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines and in OSCC patients treated with preoperative radiation therapy. The OSCC cell lines greatly differed in their response to irradiation, as assessed by a standard colony formation assay. However, the expression levels of the DNA-PK complex proteins were all similar, and there was no association between the magnitude of their expression and the tumor radiation sensitivity. Expression of DNA-PK complex proteins increased after radiation treatment, and the increased values correlated with the tumor radiation resistance. Expression of DNA-PKcs and Ku70 after irradiation was increased in the surviving cells of OSCC tissues irradiated preoperatively. These results suggest that up-regulation of DNA-PK complex protein, especially DNA-PKcs, after radiation treatment correlates to radiation resistance. DNA-PKcs might be a molecular target for a novel radiation sensitization therapy of OSCC. (author)

  8. Proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Fuyi; Yao, Yao; Luo, Jianjun; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Dengyang; Gao, Fenglei; Wang, Po

    2017-01-01

    Novel hybridization proximity-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly strategy has been proposed for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles as signal label. The DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles were characterized with atomic force microscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The highly efficient electrocatalysis by DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles for NaBH 4 oxidation produced an intense detection signal. The label-free electrochemical method achieved the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) with a linear range from 10 −15 to 10 −11  g mL −1 and a detection limit of 0.43 × 10 −15  g mL −1 . Through introducing a supersandwich reaction to increase the DNA length, the electrochemical signal was further amplified, leading to a detection limit of 0.52 × 10 −16  g mL −1 . And it rendered satisfactory analytical performance for the determination of CEA in serum samples. Furthermore, it exhibited good reproducibility and stability; meanwhile, it also showed excellent specificity due to the specific recognition of antigen by antibody. Therefore, the DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles based signal amplification approach has great potential in clinical applications and is also suitable for quantification of biomarkers at ultralow level. - Graphical abstract: A novel label-free and enzyme-free electrochemical immunoassay based on proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assemblies for recycling of the CEA. - Highlights: • A novel enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor was developed for detection of CEA. • The signal amplification was based on catalytic DNA hairpin assembly and DNA-template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles. • The biosensor could detect CEA down to 0.52 × 10 −16  g mL −1 level with a dynamic range spanning 5 orders of magnitude.

  9. DNA barcodes for bio-surveillance: regulated and economically important arthropod plant pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashfaq, Muhammad; Hebert, Paul D N

    2016-11-01

    Many of the arthropod species that are important pests of agriculture and forestry are impossible to discriminate morphologically throughout all of their life stages. Some cannot be differentiated at any life stage. Over the past decade, DNA barcoding has gained increasing adoption as a tool to both identify known species and to reveal cryptic taxa. Although there has not been a focused effort to develop a barcode library for them, reference sequences are now available for 77% of the 409 species of arthropods documented on major pest databases. Aside from developing the reference library needed to guide specimen identifications, past barcode studies have revealed that a significant fraction of arthropod pests are a complex of allied taxa. Because of their importance as pests and disease vectors impacting global agriculture and forestry, DNA barcode results on these arthropods have significant implications for quarantine detection, regulation, and management. The current review discusses these implications in light of the presence of cryptic species in plant pests exposed by DNA barcoding.

  10. CDKL5 is a brain MeCP2 target gene regulated by DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carouge, Delphine; Host, Lionel; Aunis, Dominique; Zwiller, Jean; Anglard, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    Rett syndrome and its "early-onset seizure" variant are severe neurodevelopmental disorders associated with mutations within the MECP2 and the CDKL5 genes. Antidepressants and drugs of abuse induce the expression of the epigenetic factor MeCP2, thereby influencing chromatin remodeling. We show that increased MeCP2 levels resulted in the repression of Cdkl5 in rat brain structures in response to cocaine, as well as in cells exposed to serotonin, or overexpressing MeCP2. In contrast, Cdkl5 was induced by siRNA-mediated knockdown of Mecp2 and by DNA-methyltransferase inhibitors, demonstrating its regulation by MeCP2 and by DNA methylation. Cdkl5 gene methylation and its methylation-dependent binding to MeCP2 were increased in the striatum of cocaine-treated rats. Our data demonstrate that Cdkl5 is a MeCP2-repressed target gene providing a link between genes the mutation of which generates overlapping symptoms. They highlight DNA methylation changes as a potential mechanism participating in the long-term plasticity triggered by pharmacological agents.

  11. Transcriptional regulation and DNA methylation in plastids during transitional conversion of chloroplasts to chromoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, H; Ngernprasirtsiri, J; Akazawa, T

    1990-01-01

    During transitional conversion of chloroplasts to chromoplasts in ripening tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruits, transcripts for several plastid genes for photosynthesis decreased to undetectable levels. Run-on transcription of plastids indicated that transcriptional regulation operated as a predominant factor. We found that most of the genes in chloroplasts were actively transcribed in vitro by Escherichia coli and soluble plastid RNA polymerases, but some genes in chromoplasts seemed to be silent when assayed by the in vitro systems. The regulatory step, therefore, was ascribed to DNA templates. The analysis of modified base composition revealed the presence of methylated bases in chromoplast DNA, in which 5-methylcytosine was most abundant. The presence of 5-methylcytosine detected by isoschizomeric endonucleases and Southern hybridization was correlated with the undetectable transcription activity of each gene in the run-on assay and in vitro transcription experiments. It is thus concluded that the suppression of transcription mediated by DNA methylation is one of the mechanisms governing gene expression in plastids converting from chloroplasts to chromoplasts. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2303026

  12. DNA methylation differentially regulates cytokine secretion in gingival epithelia in response to bacterial challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Jeanie L; Chung, Whasun Oh

    2015-03-01

    Epigenetic modifications are changes in gene expression without altering DNA sequence. We previously reported that bacteria-specific innate immune responses are regulated by epigenetic modifications. Our hypothesis is that DNA methylation affects gingival cytokine secretion in response to bacterial stimulation. Gingival epithelial cells (GECs) were treated with DNMT-1 inhibitors prior to Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) or Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) exposure. Protein secretion was assessed using ELISA. Gene expression was quantified using qRT-PCR. The ability of bacteria to invade inhibitor pretreated GECs was assessed utilizing flow cytometry. Changes were compared to unstimulated GECs. GEC upregulation of IL-6 and CXCL1 by Pg or Fn stimulation was significantly diminished by inhibitor pretreatment. Pg stimulated IL-1α secretion and inhibitor pretreatment significantly enhanced this upregulation, while Fn alone or with inhibitor pretreatment had no effect on IL-1α expression. GEC upregulation of human beta-definsin-2 in response to Pg and Fn exposure was enhanced following the inhibitor pretreatment. GEC susceptibility to bacterial invasion was unaltered. These results suggest that DNA methylation differentially affects gingival cytokine secretion in response to Pg or Fn. Our data provide basis for better understanding of how epigenetic modifications, brought on by exposure to oral bacteria, will subsequently affect host susceptibility to oral diseases. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. miR-24-mediated down-regulation of H2AX suppresses DNA repair in terminally differentiated blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Ashish; Pan, Yunfeng; Navarro, Francisco; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.; Moreau, Lisa; Meire, Eti; Bentwich, Zvi; Lieberman, Judy; Chowdhury, Dipanjan

    2010-01-01

    Terminally differentiated cells have reduced capacity to repair double strand breaks (DSB), but the molecular mechanism behind this down-regulation is unclear. Here we find that miR-24 is consistently up-regulated during post-mitotic differentiation of hematopoietic cell lines and regulates the histone variant H2AX, a key DSB repair protein that activates cell cycle checkpoint proteins and retains DSB repair factors at DSB foci. The H2AX 3’UTR contains conserved miR-24 binding sites regulated by miR-24. Both H2AX mRNA and protein are substantially reduced during hematopoietic cell terminal differentiation by miR-24 up-regulation both in in vitro differentiated cells and primary human blood cells. miR-24 suppression of H2AX renders cells hypersensitive to γ-irradiation and genotoxic drugs. Antagonizing miR-24 in differentiating cells protects them from DNA damage-induced cell death, while transfecting miR-24 mimics in dividing cells increases chromosomal breaks and unrepaired DNA damage and reduces viability in response to DNA damage. This DNA repair phenotype can be fully rescued by over-expressing miR-24-insensitive H2AX. Therefore, miR-24 up-regulation in post-replicative cells reduces H2AX and thereby renders them highly vulnerable to DNA damage. PMID:19377482

  14. Införandet av IAS 41 : Hur har kapitalfördelningen mellan intressenter i den norska laxodlingsbranschen utvecklats?

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlén, Jonas; Josefsson, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Införandet av IAS 41 medförde att redovisningsprinciperna för värderingen av ett företags biologiska tillgångar förändrades. Det finns forskning på hur införandet av IAS 41 påverkat olika aktörer inom skogsindustrin men lite är skrivet om dess påverkan på laxodlingsindustrin. Denna uppsats ämnar undersöka hur kapitalfördelningen till intressenter utvecklats sedan införandet av IAS 41. Studien fokuserar på intressenterna ägare och anställda. Vi har tillämpat en kvantitativ metod där vår empiri...

  15. Laget före jaget? : En kvalitativ studie om hur svenska sportorganisationer kommunicerar under en spelares individuella kris

    OpenAIRE

    Bjerkland, Albin; Edman, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    Idrottsskandaler blir ofta uppmärksammade i nyhetsmedier och aktörerna i krisen behöver därför uttala sig offentligt. Denna studie undersöker hur svenska sportorganisationer, Malmö FF, IF Björklöven, Gefle IF och Pixbo Wallenstam, hanterar en kris som uppstått från ett individuellt övertramp. Mer specifikt försöker studien att ta reda på hur och till vilken grad laget skyddar sin organisation, respektive den anklagade spelaren i den externa kommunikationen. För att kunna svara på de frågestäl...

  16. Does DNA methylation regulate metamorphosis? The case of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covelo-Soto, Lara; Saura, María; Morán, Paloma

    2015-07-01

    Lampreys represent one of the most ancient vertebrate lineages enclosing a special interest for genetic and epigenetic studies. The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) is an anadromous species that experiences metamorphosis all the way up to the adult stage. Although representing a gradual process, metamorphosis in this species involves dramatic conversions with regard to physiological together with structural body changes preparing individuals for a marine and parasitic life; in consequence, multiple gene expression modifications are expected. The implications of thyroid hormones and HOX gene expression changes have previously been reported in this species and also in other vertebrate species. Nonetheless, information lacks on how these genes are regulated in lampreys. We here report about the existence of methylation pattern differences between the adult and the larvae sea lamprey life cycle stages making use of the Methylation-Sensitive Amplified Polymorphism (MSAP) technique. Differentially methylated fragment sequencing allowed to establish homologous identities with HOX genes involved in morphogenesis, along with genes related to the water balance and to the osmotic homoeostasis, all associated to a marine environment adaptation. These results provide evidences revealing that DNA methylation plays a role in the epigenetic regulation of the P. marinus post-natal development representing a starting point for future studies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study which detects DNA methylation changes associated with metamorphosis in lampreys. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Illegal trade of regulated and protected aquatic species in the Philippines detected by DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asis, Angelli Marie Jacynth M; Lacsamana, Joanne Krisha M; Santos, Mudjekeewis D

    2016-01-01

    Illegal trade has greatly affected marine fish stocks, decreasing fish populations worldwide. Despite having a number of aquatic species being regulated, illegal trade still persists through the transport of dried or processed products and juvenile species trafficking. In this regard, accurate species identification of illegally traded marine fish stocks by DNA barcoding is deemed to be a more efficient method in regulating and monitoring trade than by morphological means which is very difficult due to the absence of key morphological characters in juveniles and processed products. Here, live juvenile eels (elvers) and dried products of sharks and rays confiscated for illegal trade were identified. Twenty out of 23 (87%) randomly selected "elvers" were identified as Anguilla bicolor pacifica and 3 (13%) samples as Anguilla marmorata. On the other hand, 4 out of 11 (36%) of the randomly selected dried samples of sharks and rays were Manta birostris. The rest of the samples were identified as Alopias pelagicus, Taeniura meyeni, Carcharhinus falciformis, Himantura fai and Mobula japonica. These results confirm that wild juvenile eels and species of manta rays are still being caught in the country regardless of its protected status under Philippine and international laws. It is evident that the illegal trade of protected aquatic species is happening in the guise of dried or processed products thus the need to put emphasis on strengthening conservation measures. This study aims to underscore the importance of accurate species identification in such cases of illegal trade and the effectivity of DNA barcoding as a tool to do this.

  18. DNA breaks and chromatin structural changes enhance the transcription of autoimmune regulator target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Mithu; Saare, Mario; Maslovskaja, Julia; Kisand, Kai; Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Tasa, Tõnis; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Peterson, Pärt

    2017-04-21

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) protein is the key factor in thymic negative selection of autoreactive T cells by promoting the ectopic expression of tissue-specific genes in the thymic medullary epithelium. Mutations in AIRE cause a monogenic autoimmune disease called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE has been shown to promote DNA breaks via its interaction with topoisomerase 2 (TOP2). In this study, we investigated topoisomerase-induced DNA breaks and chromatin structural alterations in conjunction with AIRE-dependent gene expression. Using RNA sequencing, we found that inhibition of TOP2 religation activity by etoposide in AIRE-expressing cells had a synergistic effect on genes with low expression levels. AIRE-mediated transcription was not only enhanced by TOP2 inhibition but also by the TOP1 inhibitor camptothecin. The transcriptional activation was associated with structural rearrangements in chromatin, notably the accumulation of γH2AX and the exchange of histone H1 with HMGB1 at AIRE target gene promoters. In addition, we found the transcriptional up-regulation to co-occur with the chromatin structural changes within the genomic cluster of carcinoembryonic antigen-like cellular adhesion molecule genes. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of AIRE can trigger molecular events leading to an altered chromatin landscape and the enhanced transcription of low-expressed genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Emerging roles of the nucleolus in regulating the DNA damage response: the noncanonical DNA repair enzyme APE1/Ref-1 as a paradigmatical example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniali, Giulia; Lirussi, Lisa; Poletto, Mattia; Tell, Gianluca

    2014-02-01

    An emerging concept in DNA repair mechanisms is the evidence that some key enzymes, besides their role in the maintenance of genome stability, display also unexpected noncanonical functions associated with RNA metabolism in specific subcellular districts (e.g., nucleoli). During the evolution of these key enzymes, the acquisition of unfolded domains significantly amplified the possibility to interact with different partners and substrates, possibly explaining their phylogenetic gain of functions. After nucleolar stress or DNA damage, many DNA repair proteins can freely relocalize from nucleoli to the nucleoplasm. This process may represent a surveillance mechanism to monitor the synthesis and correct assembly of ribosomal units affecting cell cycle progression or inducing p53-mediated apoptosis or senescence. A paradigm for this kind of regulation is represented by some enzymes of the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway, such as apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1). In this review, the role of the nucleolus and the noncanonical functions of the APE1 protein are discussed in light of their possible implications in human pathologies. A productive cross-talk between DNA repair enzymes and proteins involved in RNA metabolism seems reasonable as the nucleolus is emerging as a dynamic functional hub that coordinates cell growth arrest and DNA repair mechanisms. These findings will drive further analyses on other BER proteins and might imply that nucleic acid processing enzymes are more versatile than originally thought having evolved DNA-targeted functions after a previous life in the early RNA world.

  20. UPPER FRASNIAN (UPPER DEVONIAN POLYGNATHUS AND ICRIODUS CONODONTS FROM THE BAHRAM FORMATION, HUR SECTION, KERMAN PROVINCE, SOUTHEASTERN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAYEBEH AHMADI

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Conodont fauna from the Upper Devonian (Frasnian Bahram Formation at the Hur section, north of Kerman, southeast Iran, is dominated by species of Icriodus and Polygnathus. This fauna allowed discrimination of two biointervals from the Lower rhenana Zone to an Upper rhenana-linguiformis interval. The age of the lower part of the studied section is tentatively considered to be older than the Lower rhenana Zone. 

  1. Histone dosage regulates DNA damage sensitivity in a checkpoint-independent manner by the homologous recombination pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dun; Burkhart, Sarah Lyn; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Kabbaj, Marie-Helene Miquel; Gunjan, Akash

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, multiple genes encode histone proteins that package genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and regulate its accessibility. Because of their positive charge, ‘free’ (non-chromatin associated) histones can bind non-specifically to the negatively charged DNA and affect its metabolism, including DNA repair. We have investigated the effect of altering histone dosage on DNA repair in budding yeast. An increase in histone gene dosage resulted in enhanced DNA damage sensitivity, whereas deletion of a H3–H4 gene pair resulted in reduced levels of free H3 and H4 concomitant with resistance to DNA damaging agents, even in mutants defective in the DNA damage checkpoint. Studies involving the repair of a HO endonuclease-mediated DNA double-strand break (DSB) at the MAT locus show enhanced repair efficiency by the homologous recombination (HR) pathway on a reduction in histone dosage. Cells with reduced histone dosage experience greater histone loss around a DSB, whereas the recruitment of HR factors is concomitantly enhanced. Further, free histones compete with the HR machinery for binding to DNA and associate with certain HR factors, potentially interfering with HR-mediated repair. Our findings may have important implications for DNA repair, genomic stability, carcinogenesis and aging in human cells that have dozens of histone genes. PMID:22850743

  2. HuR and podoplanin expression is associated with a high risk of malignant transformation in patients with oral preneoplastic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habiba, Umma; Kitamura, Tetsuya; Yanagawa-Matsuda, Aya; Higashino, Fumihiro; Hida, Kyoko; Totsuka, Yasunori; Shindoh, Masanobu

    2016-11-01

    The risk of malignant transformation in oral preneoplastic lesions (OPLs) is challenging to assess. The objective of the present study was to determine the expression of ELAV like RNA binding protein 1 (HuR) and podoplanin in OPLs, and to evaluate the use of each protein as biomarkers for the risk assessment of malignant transformations. Immunohistochemistry for HuR and podoplanin was performed on the tissues of 51 patients with OPL, including cases of low grade dysplasia (LGD) and high grade dysplasia (HGD). The association between the protein expression patterns and clinicopathological parameters, including oral cancer free survival (OCFS) time, was analyzed during the follow-up period. HuR and podoplanin expression was observed in 28 (55%) and 36 (71%) of 51 patients, respectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the expression of HuR and podoplanin was associated with the risk of progression to oral cancer (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed that HuR and podoplanin expression was associated with a 2.93-fold (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.98-10.34; P=0.055) and 2.06-fold (95% CI, 0.55-8.01; P=0.283) increase in risk of malignant transformation, respectively. The risk of OPL malignant transformation was considerably increased with the coexpression of HuR and podoplanin compared with the histological grading (95% CI, 1.64-23.59; P=0.005). The results of the present study demonstrated that the expression of HuR and podoplanin associates with malignant transformation and suggests that the proteins may be used as biomarkers to identify OPL patients with an increased risk of cancer development.

  3. pp32 (ANP32A expression inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth and induces gemcitabine resistance by disrupting HuR binding to mRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy K Williams

    Full Text Available The expression of protein phosphatase 32 (PP32, ANP32A is low in poorly differentiated pancreatic cancers and is linked to the levels of HuR (ELAV1, a predictive marker for gemcitabine response. In pancreatic cancer cells, exogenous overexpression of pp32 inhibited cell growth, supporting its long-recognized role as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer. In chemotherapeutic sensitivity screening assays, cells overexpressing pp32 were selectively resistant to the nucleoside analogs gemcitabine and cytarabine (ARA-C, but were sensitized to 5-fluorouracil; conversely, silencing pp32 in pancreatic cancer cells enhanced gemcitabine sensitivity. The cytoplasmic levels of pp32 increased after cancer cells are treated with certain stressors, including gemcitabine. pp32 overexpression reduced the association of HuR with the mRNA encoding the gemcitabine-metabolizing enzyme deoxycytidine kinase (dCK, causing a significant reduction in dCK protein levels. Similarly, ectopic pp32 expression caused a reduction in HuR binding of mRNAs encoding tumor-promoting proteins (e.g., VEGF and HuR, while silencing pp32 dramatically enhanced the binding of these mRNA targets. Low pp32 nuclear expression correlated with high-grade tumors and the presence of lymph node metastasis, as compared to patients' tumors with high nuclear pp32 expression. Although pp32 expression levels did not enhance the predictive power of cytoplasmic HuR status, nuclear pp32 levels and cytoplasmic HuR levels associated significantly in patient samples. Thus, we provide novel evidence that the tumor suppressor function of pp32 can be attributed to its ability to disrupt HuR binding to target mRNAs encoding key proteins for cancer cell survival and drug efficacy.

  4. DNA Binding and Phosphorylation Regulate the Core Structure of the NF-κB p50 Transcription Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonderach, Matthias; Byrne, Dominic P; Barran, Perdita E; Eyers, Patrick A; Eyers, Claire E

    2018-06-05

    The NF-κB transcription factors are known to be extensively phosphorylated, with dynamic site-specific modification regulating their ability to dimerize and interact with DNA. p50, the proteolytic product of p105 (NF-κB1), forms homodimers that bind DNA but lack intrinsic transactivation function, functioning as repressors of transcription from κB promoters. Here, we examine the roles of specific phosphorylation events catalysed by either protein kinase A (PKA c ) or Chk1, in regulating the functions of p50 homodimers. LC-MS/MS analysis of proteolysed p50 following in vitro phosphorylation allows us to define Ser328 and Ser337 as PKA c - and Chk1-mediated modifications, and pinpoint an additional four Chk1 phosphosites: Ser65, Thr152, Ser242 and Ser248. Native mass spectrometry (MS) reveals Chk1- and PKA c -regulated disruption of p50 homodimer formation through Ser337. Additionally, we characterise the Chk1-mediated phosphosite, Ser242, as a regulator of DNA binding, with a S242D p50 phosphomimetic exhibiting a > 10-fold reduction in DNA binding affinity. Conformational dynamics of phosphomimetic p50 variants, including S242D, are further explored using ion-mobility MS (IM-MS). Finally, comparative theoretical modelling with experimentally observed p50 conformers, in the absence and presence of DNA, reveals that the p50 homodimer undergoes conformational contraction during electrospray ionisation that is stabilised by complex formation with κB DNA. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  5. A damage-responsive DNA binding protein regulates transcription of the yeast DNA repair gene PHR1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, J.; Sancar, G.B.

    1991-01-01

    The PHR1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the DNA repair enzyme photolyase. Transcription of PHR1 increases in response to treatment of cells with 254-nm radiation and chemical agents that damage DNA. The authors here the identification of a damage-responsive DNA binding protein, termed photolyase regulatory protein (PRP), and its cognate binding site, termed the PHR1 transcription after DNA damage. PRP activity, monitored by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assay, was detected in cells during normal growth but disappeared within 30 min after irradiation. Copper-phenanthroline footprinting of PRP-DNA complexes revealed that PRP protects a 39-base-pair region of PHR1 5' flanking sequence beginning 40 base pairs upstream from the coding sequence. Thus these observations establish that PRP is a damage-responsive repressor of PHR1 transcription

  6. ATM phosphorylation of Mdm2 Ser394 regulates the amplitude and duration of the DNA damage response in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Hugh S.; Woda, Bruce A.; Jones, Stephen N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation (IR) activates the ATM kinase, which subsequently stabilizes and activates the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Although phosphorylation of p53 by ATM was found previously to modulate p53 levels and transcriptional activities in vivo, it does not appear to be a major regulator of p53 stability. We have utilized mice bearing altered Mdm2 alleles to demonstrate that ATM phosphorylation of Mdm2 serine 394 is required for robust p53 stabilization and activation after DNA damage. In addition, we demonstrate that dephosphorylation of Mdm2 Ser394 regulates attenuation of the p53-mediated response to DNA damage. Therefore, the phosphorylation status of Mdm2 Ser394 governs p53 protein levels and functions in cells undergoing DNA damage. PMID:22624716

  7. HuR cytoplasmic expression is associated with increased cyclin A expression and poor outcome with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Peir-In; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Hsu, Han-Ping; Chen, Li-Tzon; Lin, Ching-Yih; Tai, Chein; Lin, Chun-Mao; Li, Chien-Feng; Li, Wei-Ming; Wang, Yu-Hui; Wu, Ting-Feng; Wu, Wen-Ren; Liao, Alex C; Shen, Kun-Hung; Wei, Yu-Ching; Hsing, Chung-Hsi

    2012-01-01

    HuR is an RNA-binding protein that post-transcriptionally modulates the expressions of various target genes implicated in carcinogenesis, such as CCNA2 encoding cyclin A. No prior study attempted to evaluate the significance of HuR expression in a large cohort with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinomas (UTUCs). In total, 340 cases of primary localized UTUC without previous or concordant bladder carcinoma were selected. All of these patients received ureterectomy or radical nephroureterectomy with curative intents. Pathological slides were reviewed, and clinical findings were collected. Immunostaining for HuR and cyclin A was performed and evaluated by using H-score. The results of cytoplasmic HuR and nuclear cyclin A expressions were correlated with disease-specific survival (DSS), metastasis-free survival (MeFS), urinary bladder recurrence-free survival (UBRFS), and various clinicopathological factors. HuR cytoplasmic expression was significantly related to the pT status, lymph node metastasis, a higher histological grade, the pattern of invasion, vascular and perineurial invasion, and cyclin A expression (p = 0.005). Importantly, HuR cytoplasmic expression was strongly associated with a worse DSS (p < 0.0001), MeFS (p < 0.0001), and UBRFS (p = 0.0370) in the univariate analysis, and the first two results remained independently predictive of adverse outcomes (p = 0.038, relative risk [RR] = 1.996 for DSS; p = 0.027, RR = 1.880 for MeFS). Cyclin A nuclear expression was associated with a poor DSS (p = 0.0035) and MeFS (p = 0.0015) in the univariate analysis but was not prognosticatory in the multivariate analyses. High-risk patients (pT3 or pT4 with/without nodal metastasis) with high HuR cytoplasmic expression had better DSS if adjuvant chemotherapy was performed (p = 0.015). HuR cytoplasmic expression was correlated with adverse phenotypes and cyclin A overexpression and also independently predictive of worse DSS and MeFS, suggesting its roles in

  8. Phosphorylation of Minichromosome Maintenance 3 (MCM3) by Checkpoint Kinase 1 (Chk1) Negatively Regulates DNA Replication and Checkpoint Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiangzi; Mayca Pozo, Franklin; Wisotsky, Jacob N; Wang, Benlian; Jacobberger, James W; Zhang, Youwei

    2015-05-08

    Mechanisms controlling DNA replication and replication checkpoint are critical for the maintenance of genome stability and the prevention or treatment of human cancers. Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is a key effector protein kinase that regulates the DNA damage response and replication checkpoint. The heterohexameric minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex is the core component of mammalian DNA helicase and has been implicated in replication checkpoint activation. Here we report that Chk1 phosphorylates the MCM3 subunit of the MCM complex at Ser-205 under normal growth conditions. Mutating the Ser-205 of MCM3 to Ala increased the length of DNA replication track and shortened the S phase duration, indicating that Ser-205 phosphorylation negatively controls normal DNA replication. Upon replicative stress treatment, the inhibitory phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser-205 was reduced, and this reduction was accompanied with the generation of single strand DNA, the key platform for ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) activation. As a result, the replication checkpoint is activated. Together, these data provide significant insights into the regulation of both normal DNA replication and replication checkpoint activation through the novel phosphorylation of MCM3 by Chk1. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Drosophila UTX coordinates with p53 to regulate ku80 expression in response to DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengwan Zhang

    Full Text Available UTX is known as a general factor that activates gene transcription during development. Here, we demonstrate an additional essential role of UTX in the DNA damage response, in which it upregulates the expression of ku80 in Drosophila, both in cultured cells and in third instar larvae. We further showed that UTX mediates the expression of ku80 by the demethylation of H3K27me3 at the ku80 promoter upon exposure to ionizing radiation (IR in a p53-dependent manner. UTX interacts physically with p53, and both UTX and p53 are recruited to the ku80 promoter following IR exposure in an interdependent manner. In contrast, the loss of utx has little impact on the expression of ku70, mre11, hid and reaper, suggesting the specific regulation of ku80 expression by UTX. Thus, our findings further elucidate the molecular function of UTX.

  10. DNA damage regulates alternative splicing through changes in POL II elongation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, M.J.; Perez Santangelo, M.S.; De la Mata, M.; Kornblihtt, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    Many apoptotic genes are regulated via alternative splicing (AS) but little is known about the mechanisms controlling AS in stress situations derived from DNA damage. Here we show that ultraviolet (UV) radiation affects co-transcriptional, but not post transcriptional, AS through a systemic mechanism involving a CDK-9-dependent hyper phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II carboxy terminal domain (CTD) and a subsequent and unprecedented inhibition of transcriptional elongation, estimated in vivo and in real time by FRAP. To mimic this hyper phosphorylation we used CTD mutants with serines 2 or 5 substituted by glutamic acids and found that they not only display lower elongation rates but duplicate the effects of UV light on AS in the absence of irradiation. Consistently, substitution of the serines with alanines prevents the UV effect on splicing. These results represent the first in vivo proof of modulation of elongation in response to an environmental signal, affecting in turn the kinetic coupling between transcription and splicing. (authors)

  11. DNA Methylation Dynamics Regulate the Formation of a Regenerative Wound Epithelium during Axolotl Limb Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Aguilar

    Full Text Available The formation of a blastema during regeneration of an axolotl limb involves important changes in the behavior and function of cells at the site of injury. One of the earliest events is the formation of the wound epithelium and subsequently the apical epidermal cap, which involves in vivo dedifferentiation that is controlled by signaling from the nerve. We have investigated the role of epigenetic modifications to the genome as a possible mechanism for regulating changes in gene expression patterns of keratinocytes of the wound and blastema epithelium that are involved in regeneration. We report a modulation of the expression DNMT3a, a de novo DNA methyltransferase, within the first 72 hours post injury that is dependent on nerve signaling. Treatment of skin wounds on the upper forelimb with decitabine, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, induced changes in gene expression and cellular behavior associated with a regenerative response. Furthermore, decitabine-treated wounds were able to participate in regeneration while untreated wounds inhibited a regenerative response. Elucidation of the specific epigenetic modifications that mediate cellular dedifferentiation likely will lead to insights for initiating a regenerative response in organisms that lack this ability.

  12. Protein Phosphatase 1 Recruitment by Rif1 Regulates DNA Replication Origin Firing by Counteracting DDK Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoushka Davé

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The firing of eukaryotic origins of DNA replication requires CDK and DDK kinase activities. DDK, in particular, is involved in setting the temporal program of origin activation, a conserved feature of eukaryotes. Rif1, originally identified as a telomeric protein, was recently implicated in specifying replication timing in yeast and mammals. We show that this function of Rif1 depends on its interaction with PP1 phosphatases. Mutations of two PP1 docking motifs in Rif1 lead to early replication of telomeres in budding yeast and misregulation of origin firing in fission yeast. Several lines of evidence indicate that Rif1/PP1 counteract DDK activity on the replicative MCM helicase. Our data suggest that the PP1/Rif1 interaction is downregulated by the phosphorylation of Rif1, most likely by CDK/DDK. These findings elucidate the mechanism of action of Rif1 in the control of DNA replication and demonstrate a role of PP1 phosphatases in the regulation of origin firing.

  13. Control of radiation sensitivity of mammalian cells. Regulation of expression of DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kayo; Morita, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    This review describes authors' investigations concerning regulation of expression of DNA repair genes for the purpose of control of radiosensitivity of mammalian cells for cancer radiotherapy. One of their experiments concerns the enhancement of sensitivity to radiation and anti-tumor agents by suppressing the expression of mammalian Rad51 gene which playing a central role in recombination repair against DNA double-strand break, by RNA interference (RNAi). Described are the mode of action of RNAi, mechanism of suppression of Rad51 gene expression by it, enhancing effect in radiosensitivity, stable suppression and enhancement by hairpin RNA and its possible usefulness in cancer therapy. The other concerns the histone H2AX gene, which delivering the repair signal post phosphorylation in chromatin against the double-strand break. Experimental results of suppression of the histone H2AX gene by tet-off system, enhancement of radiosensitivity by the suppression and functional recovery by the gene transfer are described, and the radiosensitivity can be thus artificially controlled by tetracycline in authors' F9 2AX (tet/tet) cells. (N.I.)

  14. Methylation of DNA Ligase 1 by G9a/GLP Recruits UHRF1 to Replicating DNA and Regulates DNA Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Laure; Fournier, Alexandra; Tsusaka, Takeshi; Adelmant, Guillaume; Shimazu, Tadahiro; Matano, Shohei; Kirsh, Olivier; Amouroux, Rachel; Dohmae, Naoshi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Filion, Guillaume J; Deng, Wen; de Dieuleveult, Maud; Fritsch, Lauriane; Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Jeltsch, Albert; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Hajkova, Petra; Marto, Jarrod A; Arita, Kyohei; Shinkai, Yoichi; Defossez, Pierre-Antoine

    2017-08-17

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic mark in mammals that has to be re-established after each round of DNA replication. The protein UHRF1 is essential for this process; it has been proposed that the protein targets newly replicated DNA by cooperatively binding hemi-methylated DNA and H3K9me2/3, but this model leaves a number of questions unanswered. Here, we present evidence for a direct recruitment of UHRF1 by the replication machinery via DNA ligase 1 (LIG1). A histone H3K9-like mimic within LIG1 is methylated by G9a and GLP and, compared with H3K9me2/3, more avidly binds UHRF1. Interaction with methylated LIG1 promotes the recruitment of UHRF1 to DNA replication sites and is required for DNA methylation maintenance. These results further elucidate the function of UHRF1, identify a non-histone target of G9a and GLP, and provide an example of a histone mimic that coordinates DNA replication and DNA methylation maintenance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Theoretical models for the regulation of DNA replication in fast-growing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutziger, Martin; Schmidt, Mischa; Lenz, Peter

    2012-09-01

    Growing in always changing environments, Escherichia coli cells are challenged by the task to coordinate growth and division. In particular, adaption of their growth program to the surrounding medium has to guarantee that the daughter cells obtain fully replicated chromosomes. Replication is therefore to be initiated at the right time, which is particularly challenging in media that support fast growth. Here, the mother cell initiates replication not only for the daughter but also for the granddaughter cells. This is possible only if replication occurs from several replication forks that all need to be correctly initiated. Despite considerable efforts during the last 40 years, regulation of this process is still unknown. Part of the difficulty arises from the fact that many details of the relevant molecular processes are not known. Here, we develop a novel theoretical strategy for dealing with this general problem: instead of analyzing a single model, we introduce a wide variety of 128 different models that make different assumptions about the unknown processes. By comparing the predictions of these models we are able to identify the key quantities that allow the experimental discrimination of the different models. Analysis of these quantities yields that out of the 128 models 94 are not consistent with available experimental data. From the remaining 34 models we are able to conclude that mass growth and DNA replication need either to be truly coupled, by coupling DNA replication initiation to the event of cell division, or to the amount of accumulated mass. Finally, we make suggestions for experiments to further reduce the number of possible regulation scenarios.

  16. Friends-enemies: endogenous retroviruses are major transcriptional regulators of human DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzdin, Anton A.; Prassolov, Vladimir; Garazha, Andrew V.

    2017-06-01

    Endogenous retroviruses are mobile genetic elements hardly distinguishable from infectious, or “exogenous”, retroviruses at the time of insertion in the host DNA. Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are not rare. They gave rise to multiple families of closely related mobile elements that occupy 8% of the human genome. Together, they shape genomic regulatory landscape by providing at least 320,000 human transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) located on 110,000 individual HERV elements. The HERVs host as many as 155,000 mapped DNaseI hypersensitivity sites, which denote loci active in the regulation of gene expression or chromatin structure. The contemporary view of the HERVs evolutionary dynamics suggests that at the early stages after insertion, the HERV is treated by the host cells as a foreign genetic element, and is likely to be suppressed by the targeted methylation and mutations. However, at the later stages, when significant number of mutations has been already accumulated and when the retroviral genes are broken, the regulatory potential of a HERV may be released and recruited to modify the genomic balance of transcription factor binding sites. This process goes together with further accumulation and selection of mutations, which reshape the regulatory landscape of the human DNA. However, developmental reprogramming, stress or pathological conditions like cancer, inflammation and infectious diseases, can remove the blocks limiting expression and HERV-mediated host gene regulation. This, in turn, can dramatically alter the gene expression equilibrium and shift it to a newer state, thus further amplifying instability and exacerbating the stressful situation.

  17. Functional link between DNA damage responses and transcriptional regulation by ATM in response to a histone deacetylase inhibitor TSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Soo

    2007-09-01

    Mutations in the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) gene, which encodes a 370 kd protein with a kinase catalytic domain, predisposes people to cancers, and these mutations are also linked to ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T). The histone acetylaion/deacetylation- dependent chromatin remodeling can activate the ATM kinase-mediated DNA damage signal pathway (in an accompanying work, Lee, 2007). This has led us to study whether this modification can impinge on the ATM-mediated DNA damage response via transcriptional modulation in order to understand the function of ATM in the regulation of gene transcription. To identify the genes whose expression is regulated by ATM in response to histone deaceylase (HDAC) inhibition, we performed an analysis of oligonucleotide microarrays with using the appropriate cell lines, isogenic A-T (ATM(-)) and control (ATM(+)) cells, following treatment with a HDAC inhibitor TSA. Treatment with TSA reprograms the differential gene expression profile in response to HDAC inhibition in ATM(-) cells and ATM(+) cells. We analyzed the genes that are regulated by TSA in the ATM-dependent manner, and we classified these genes into different functional categories, including those involved in cell cycle/DNA replication, DNA repair, apoptosis, growth/differentiation, cell- cell adhesion, signal transduction, metabolism and transcription. We found that while some genes are regulated by TSA without regard to ATM, the patterns of gene regulation are differentially regulated in an ATM-dependent manner. Taken together, these finding indicate that ATM can regulate the transcription of genes that play critical roles in the molecular response to DNA damage, and this response is modulated through an altered HDAC inhibition-mediated gene expression.

  18. Torsional regulation of hRPA-induced unwinding of double-stranded DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vlaminck, I.; Vidic, I.; Van Loenhout, M.T.J.; Kanaar, R.; Lebbink, J.H.G.; Dekker, C.

    2010-01-01

    All cellular single-stranded (ss) DNA is rapidly bound and stabilized by single stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs). Replication protein A, the main eukaryotic SSB, is able to unwind double-stranded (ds) DNA by binding and stabilizing transiently forming bubbles of ssDNA. Here, we study the

  19. Proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Fuyi [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Yao, Yao; Luo, Jianjun; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Dengyang [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Gao, Fenglei, E-mail: jsxzgfl@sina.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Wang, Po, E-mail: wangpo@jsnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China)

    2017-05-29

    Novel hybridization proximity-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly strategy has been proposed for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles as signal label. The DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles were characterized with atomic force microscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The highly efficient electrocatalysis by DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles for NaBH{sub 4} oxidation produced an intense detection signal. The label-free electrochemical method achieved the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) with a linear range from 10{sup −15} to 10{sup −11} g mL{sup −1} and a detection limit of 0.43 × 10{sup −15} g mL{sup −1}. Through introducing a supersandwich reaction to increase the DNA length, the electrochemical signal was further amplified, leading to a detection limit of 0.52 × 10{sup −16} g mL{sup −1}. And it rendered satisfactory analytical performance for the determination of CEA in serum samples. Furthermore, it exhibited good reproducibility and stability; meanwhile, it also showed excellent specificity due to the specific recognition of antigen by antibody. Therefore, the DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles based signal amplification approach has great potential in clinical applications and is also suitable for quantification of biomarkers at ultralow level. - Graphical abstract: A novel label-free and enzyme-free electrochemical immunoassay based on proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assemblies for recycling of the CEA. - Highlights: • A novel enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor was developed for detection of CEA. • The signal amplification was based on catalytic DNA hairpin assembly and DNA-template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles. • The biosensor could detect CEA down to 0.52 × 10{sup −16} g mL{sup −1} level with a dynamic range spanning 5 orders of magnitude.

  20. Regulation of DNA Damage Response by Estrogen Receptor β-Mediated Inhibition of Breast Cancer Associated Gene 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Hao Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that ubiquitin E3 ligases are involved in cancer development as their mutations correlate with genomic instability and genetic susceptibility to cancer. Despite significant findings of cancer-driving mutations in the BRCA1 gene, estrogen receptor (ER-positive breast cancers progress upon treatment with DNA damaging-cytotoxic therapies. In order to understand the underlying mechanism by which ER-positive breast cancer cells develop resistance to DNA damaging agents, we employed an estrogen receptor agonist, Erb-041, to increase the activity of ERβ and negatively regulate the expression and function of the estrogen receptor α (ERα in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Upon Erb-041-mediated ERα down-regulation, the transcription of an ERα downstream effector, BCA2 (Breast Cancer Associated gene 2, correspondingly decreased. The ubiquitination of chromatin-bound BCA2 was induced by ultraviolet C (UVC irradiation but suppressed by Erb-041 pretreatment, resulting in a blunted DNA damage response. Upon BCA2 silencing, DNA double-stranded breaks increased with Rad51 up-regulation and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM activation. Mechanistically, UV-induced BCA2 ubiquitination and chromatin binding were found to promote DNA damage response and repair via the interaction of BCA2 with ATM, γH2AX and Rad51. Taken together, this study suggests that Erb-041 potentiates BCA2 dissociation from chromatin and co-localization with Rad51, resulting in inhibition of homologous recombination repair.

  1. RNA Binding Proteins Posttranscriptionally Regulate Genes Involved In Oncogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    HuR using RNA immunoprecipitations applied to m icroarray chip s ( RIP-Chip) in estrogen positiv e (ER+) and estrogen negative (ER-) breast ca ncer...CALM2 mRNAs, were identified and validated by quantitative RT-PCR and biotin pull- down analysis. Conclusion: This is the first report of a side-by...labeled amplified cDNA) were quantitated using a Nanodrop™ (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA) spectrophotometer. RNA quality and integrity were

  2. Nickel induces transcriptional down-regulation of DNA repair pathways in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Susan E; Scanlon, Christine D; Hegan, Denise C; Sulkowski, Parker L; Glazer, Peter M

    2017-06-01

    The heavy metal nickel is a known carcinogen, and occupational exposure to nickel compounds has been implicated in human lung and nasal cancers. Unlike many other environmental carcinogens, however, nickel does not directly induce DNA mutagenesis, and the mechanism of nickel-related carcinogenesis remains incompletely understood. Cellular nickel exposure leads to signaling pathway activation, transcriptional changes and epigenetic remodeling, processes also impacted by hypoxia, which itself promotes tumor growth without causing direct DNA damage. One of the mechanisms by which hypoxia contributes to tumor growth is the generation of genomic instability via down-regulation of high-fidelity DNA repair pathways. Here, we find that nickel exposure similarly leads to down-regulation of DNA repair proteins involved in homology-dependent DNA double-strand break repair (HDR) and mismatch repair (MMR) in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic human lung cells. Functionally, nickel induces a defect in HDR capacity, as determined by plasmid-based host cell reactivation assays, persistence of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks and cellular hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. Mechanistically, we find that nickel, in contrast to the metalloid arsenic, acutely induces transcriptional repression of HDR and MMR genes as part of a global transcriptional pattern similar to that seen with hypoxia. Finally, we find that exposure to low-dose nickel reduces the activity of the MLH1 promoter, but only arsenic leads to long-term MLH1 promoter silencing. Together, our data elucidate novel mechanisms of heavy metal carcinogenesis and contribute to our understanding of the influence of the microenvironment on the regulation of DNA repair pathways. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. IL-2 and GM-CSF are regulated by DNA demethylation during activation of T cells, B cells and macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Department of Genome Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia); Ohms, Stephen J. [ACRF Biomolecular Resource Facility, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia); Shannon, Frances M. [Department of Genome Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia); The University of Canberra, ACT 2602 (Australia); Sun, Chao, E-mail: sunchao2775@163.com [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Fan, Jun Y., E-mail: jun.fan@anu.edu.au [Department of Genome Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA methylation is dynamic and flexible and changes rapidly upon cell activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA methylation controls the inducible gene expression in a given cell type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some enzymes are involved in maintaining the methylation profile of immune cells. -- Abstract: DNA demethylation has been found to occur at the promoters of a number of actively expressed cytokines and is believed to play a critical role in transcriptional regulation. While many DNA demethylation studies have focused on T cell activation, proliferation and differentiation, changes in DNA methylation in other types of immune cells are less well studied. We found that the expression of two cytokines (IL-2 and GM-CSF) responded differently to activation in three types of immune cells: EL4, A20 and RAW264.7 cells. Using the McrBC and MeDIP approaches, we observed decreases in DNA methylation at a genome-wide level and at the promoters of the genes of these cytokines. The expression of several potential enzymes/co-enzymes involved in the DNA demethylation pathways seemed to be associated with immune cell activation.

  4. IL-2 and GM-CSF are regulated by DNA demethylation during activation of T cells, B cells and macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yan; Ohms, Stephen J.; Shannon, Frances M.; Sun, Chao; Fan, Jun Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► DNA methylation is dynamic and flexible and changes rapidly upon cell activation. ► DNA methylation controls the inducible gene expression in a given cell type. ► Some enzymes are involved in maintaining the methylation profile of immune cells. -- Abstract: DNA demethylation has been found to occur at the promoters of a number of actively expressed cytokines and is believed to play a critical role in transcriptional regulation. While many DNA demethylation studies have focused on T cell activation, proliferation and differentiation, changes in DNA methylation in other types of immune cells are less well studied. We found that the expression of two cytokines (IL-2 and GM-CSF) responded differently to activation in three types of immune cells: EL4, A20 and RAW264.7 cells. Using the McrBC and MeDIP approaches, we observed decreases in DNA methylation at a genome-wide level and at the promoters of the genes of these cytokines. The expression of several potential enzymes/co-enzymes involved in the DNA demethylation pathways seemed to be associated with immune cell activation.

  5. FANCD2 Binds CtIP and Regulates DNA-End Resection during DNA Interstrand Crosslink Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junya Unno

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA pathway is critically involved in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells and the suppression of carcinogenesis. A key FA protein, FANCD2, is monoubiquitinated and accumulates in chromatin in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs, where it coordinates DNA repair through mechanisms that are still poorly understood. Here, we report that CtIP protein directly interacts with FANCD2. A region spanning amino acids 166 to 273 of CtIP and monoubiquitination of FANCD2 are both essential for the FANCD2-CtIP interaction and mitomycin C (MMC-induced CtIP foci. Remarkably, both FANCD2 and CtIP are critical for MMC-induced RPA2 hyperphosphorylation, an event that accompanies end resection of double-strand breaks. Collectively, our results reveal a role of monoubiquitinated FANCD2 in end resection that depends on its binding to CtIP during ICL repair.

  6. Tet1 Oxidase Regulates Neuronal Gene Transcription, Active DNA Hydroxy-methylation, Object Location Memory, and Threat Recognition Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Aggarwal, Milan; Kaas, Garrett A; Lewis, John; Wang, Jing; Ross, Daniel L; Zhong, Chun; Kennedy, Andrew; Song, Hongjun; Sweatt, J David

    2015-10-01

    A dynamic equilibrium between DNA methylation and demethylation of neuronal activity-regulated genes is crucial for memory processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this equilibrium remain elusive. Tet1 oxidase has been shown to play a key role in the active DNA demethylation in the CNS. In this study, we used Tet1 gene knockout (Tet1KO) mice to examine the involvement of Tet1 in memory consolidation and storage in the adult brain. We found that Tet1 ablation leads to: altered expression of numerous neuronal activity-regulated genes, compensatory upregulation of active demethylation pathway genes, and upregulation of various epigenetic modifiers. Moreover, Tet1KO mice showed an enhancement in the consolidation and storage of threat recognition (cued and contextual fear conditioning) and object location memories. We conclude that Tet1 plays a critical role in regulating neuronal transcription and in maintaining the epigenetic state of the brain associated with memory consolidation and storage.

  7. Tet1 oxidase regulates neuronal gene transcription, active DNA hydroxymethylation, object location memory, and threat recognition memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic equilibrium between DNA methylation and demethylation of neuronal activity-regulated genes is crucial for memory processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this equilibrium remain elusive. Tet1 oxidase has been shown to play a key role in the active DNA demethylation in the central nervous system. In this study, we used Tet1 gene knockout (Tet1KO mice to examine the involvement of Tet1 in memory consolidation and storage in the adult brain. We found that Tet1 ablation leads to altered expression of numerous neuronal activity-regulated genes, compensatory upregulation of active demethylation pathway genes, and upregulation of various epigenetic modifiers. Moreover, Tet1KO mice showed an enhancement in the consolidation and storage of threat recognition (cued and contextual fear conditioning and object location memories. We conclude that Tet1 plays a critical role in regulating neuronal transcription and in maintaining the epigenetic state of the brain associated with memory consolidation and storage.

  8. Hur äldres sexualitet och sexuella hälsa är kopplade till deras livskvalitet : En litteraturstudie

    OpenAIRE

    Heinrich, Elsa; Johansson, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Sexualiteten och den sexuella hälsan är en grundpelare i att varje människas individualitet. Det finns ett fördomsfullt synsätt angående äldre och deras sexualitet där gruppen blir betraktade som asexuell. Ämnet är tabubelagt och det föreligger relativt lite kunskap kring det. Livskvalitet är en subjektiv upplevelse som förändras över tid. Åldrandet bidrar till flera riskfaktorer som kan leda till nedsatt livskvalitet. Denna litteraturstudies syfte var att undersöka hur sexualitet och sexuell...

  9. Histone Variant Regulates DNA Repair via Chromatin Condensation | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activating the appropriate DNA repair pathway is essential for maintaining the stability of the genome after a break in both strands of DNA. How a pathway is selected, however, is not well understood. Since these double strand breaks (DSBs) occur while DNA is packaged as chromatin, changes in its organization are necessary for repair to take place. Numerous alterations have

  10. Regulation of the DNA Methylation Landscape in Human Somatic Cell Reprogramming by the miR-29 Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriona Hysolli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming to pluripotency after overexpression of OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and MYC is accompanied by global genomic and epigenomic changes. Histone modification and DNA methylation states in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have been shown to be highly similar to embryonic stem cells (ESCs. However, epigenetic differences still exist between iPSCs and ESCs. In particular, aberrant DNA methylation states found in iPSCs are a major concern when using iPSCs in a clinical setting. Thus, it is critical to find factors that regulate DNA methylation states in reprogramming. Here, we found that the miR-29 family is an important epigenetic regulator during human somatic cell reprogramming. Our global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation analysis shows that DNA demethylation is a major event mediated by miR-29a depletion during early reprogramming, and that iPSCs derived from miR-29a depletion are epigenetically closer to ESCs. Our findings uncover an important miRNA-based approach to generate clinically robust iPSCs.

  11. Conformational dynamism for DNA interaction in the Salmonella RcsB response regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casino, Patricia; Miguel-Romero, Laura; Huesa, Juanjo; García, Pablo; García-Del Portillo, Francisco; Marina, Alberto

    2018-01-09

    The RcsCDB phosphorelay system controls an extremely large regulon in Enterobacteriaceae that involves processes such as biofilm formation, flagella production, synthesis of extracellular capsules and cell division. Therefore, fine-tuning of this system is essential for virulence in pathogenic microorganisms of this group. The final master effector of the RcsCDB system is the response regulator (RR) RcsB, which activates or represses multiple genes by binding to different promoter regions. This regulatory activity of RcsB can be done alone or in combination with additional transcriptional factors in phosphorylated or dephosphorylated states. The capacity of RcsB to interact with multiple promoters and partners, either dephosphorylated or phosphorylated, suggests an extremely conformational dynamism for this RR. To shed light on the activation mechanism of RcsB and its implication on promoter recognition, we solved the crystal structure of full-length RcsB from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the presence and absence of a phosphomimetic molecule BeF3-. These two novel structures have guided an extensive site-directed mutagenesis study at the structural and functional level that confirms RcsB conformational plasticity and dynamism. Our data allowed us to propose a β5-T switch mechanism where phosphorylation is coupled to alternative DNA binding ways and which highlights the conformational dynamism of RcsB to be so pleiotropic. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. A decade of understanding spatio-temporal regulation of DNA repair by the nuclear architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Hicham; Cobb, Jennifer A

    2016-10-01

    The nucleus is a hub for gene expression and is a highly organized entity. The nucleoplasm is heterogeneous, owing to the preferential localization of specific metabolic factors, which lead to the definition of nuclear compartments or bodies. The genome is organized into chromosome territories, as well as heterochromatin and euchromatin domains. Recent observations have indicated that nuclear organization is important for maintaining genomic stability. For example, nuclear organization has been implicated in stabilizing damaged DNA, repair-pathway choice, and in preventing chromosomal rearrangements. Over the past decade, several studies have revealed that dynamic changes in the nuclear architecture are important during double-strand break repair. Stemming from work in yeast, relocation of a damaged site prior to repair appears to be at least partially conserved in multicellular eukaryotes. In this review, we will discuss genome and nucleoplasm architecture, particularly the importance of the nuclear periphery in genome stability. We will also discuss how the site of relocation regulates repair-pathway choice.

  13. Global functional analysis of nucleophosmin in Taxol response, cancer, chromatin regulation, and ribosomal DNA transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstralh, Daniel T.; Conti, Brian J.; Moore, Chris B.; Brickey, W. June; Taxman, Debra J.; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of lung cancer response to chemotherapeutic agents showed the accumulation of a Taxol-induced protein that reacted with an anti-phospho-MEK1/2 antibody. Mass spectroscopy identified the protein as nucleophosmin/B23 (NPM), a multifunctional protein with diverse roles: ribosome biosynthesis, p53 regulation, nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling, and centrosome duplication. Our work demonstrates that following cellular exposure to mitosis-arresting agents, NPM is phosphorylated and its chromatographic property is altered, suggesting changes in function during mitosis. To determine the functional relevance of NPM, its expression in tumor cells was reduced by siRNA. Cells with reduced NPM were treated with Taxol followed by microarray profiling accompanied by gene/protein pathway analyses. These studies demonstrate several expected and unexpected consequences of NPM depletion. The predominant downstream effectors of NPM are genes involved in cell proliferation, cancer, and the cell cycle. In congruence with its role in cancer, NPM is over-expressed in primary malignant lung cancer tissues. We also demonstrate a role for NPM in the expression of genes encoding SET (TAF1β) and the histone methylase SET8. Additionally, we show that NPM is required for a previously unobserved G2/M upregulation of TAF1A, which encodes the rDNA transcription factor TAF I 48. These results demonstrate multi-faceted functions of NPM that can affect cancer cells

  14. Nucleosome–nucleosome interactions via histone tails and linker DNA regulate nuclear rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Yuta; Tamura, Sachiko; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Cells, as well as the nuclei inside them, experience significant mechanical stress in diverse biological processes, including contraction, migration, and adhesion. The structural stability of nuclei must therefore be maintained in order to protect genome integrity. Despite extensive knowledge on nuclear architecture and components, however, the underlying physical and molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. We address this by subjecting isolated human cell nuclei to microneedle-based quantitative micromanipulation with a series of biochemical perturbations of the chromatin. We find that the mechanical rigidity of nuclei depends on the continuity of the nucleosomal fiber and interactions between nucleosomes. Disrupting these chromatin features by varying cation concentration, acetylating histone tails, or digesting linker DNA results in loss of nuclear rigidity. In contrast, the levels of key chromatin assembly factors, including cohesin, condensin II, and CTCF, and a major nuclear envelope protein, lamin, are unaffected. Together with in situ evidence using living cells and a simple mechanical model, our findings reveal a chromatin-based regulation of the nuclear mechanical response and provide insight into the significance of local and global chromatin structures, such as those associated with interdigitated or melted nucleosomal fibers. PMID:28428255

  15. DNA Supercoiling Regulates the Motility of Campylobacter jejuni and Is Altered by Growth in the Presence of Chicken Mucus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Shortt

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans, but relatively little is known about the global regulation of virulence factors during infection of chickens or humans. This study identified DNA supercoiling as playing a key role in regulating motility and flagellar protein production and found that this supercoiling-controlled regulon is induced by growth in chicken mucus. A direct correlation was observed between motility and resting DNA supercoiling levels in different strains of C. jejuni, and relaxation of DNA supercoiling resulted in decreased motility. Transcriptional analysis and Western immunoblotting revealed that a reduction in motility and DNA supercoiling affected the two-component regulatory system FlgRS and was associated with reduced FlgR expression, increased FlgS expression, and aberrant expression of flagellin subunits. Electron microscopy revealed that the flagellar structure remained intact. Growth in the presence of porcine mucin resulted in increased negative supercoiling, increased motility, increased FlgR expression, and reduced FlgS expression. Finally, this supercoiling-dependent regulon was shown to be induced by growth in chicken mucus, and the level of activation was dependent on the source of the mucus from within the chicken intestinal tract. In conclusion, this study reports for the first time the key role played by DNA supercoiling in regulating motility in C. jejuni and indicates that the induction of this supercoiling-induced regulon in response to mucus from different sources could play a critical role in regulating motility in vivo.

  16. NAD-Dependent DNA-Binding Activity of the Bifunctional NadR Regulator of Salmonella typhimurium

    OpenAIRE

    Penfound, Thomas; Foster, John W.

    1999-01-01

    NadR is a 45-kDa bifunctional regulator protein. In vivo genetic studies indicate that NadR represses three genes involved in the biosynthesis of NAD. It also participates with an integral membrane protein (PnuC) in the import of nicotinamide mononucleotide, an NAD precursor. NadR was overexpressed and purified as a His-tagged fusion in order to study its DNA-binding properties. The protein bound to DNA fragments containing NAD box consensus sequences. NAD proved to be the relevant in vivo co...

  17. RNA-processing proteins regulate Mec1/ATR activation by promoting generation of RPA-coated ssDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfrini, Nicola; Trovesi, Camilla; Wery, Maxime; Martina, Marina; Cesena, Daniele; Descrimes, Marc; Morillon, Antonin; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2015-02-01

    Eukaryotic cells respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by activating a checkpoint that depends on the protein kinases Tel1/ATM and Mec1/ATR. Mec1/ATR is activated by RPA-coated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which arises upon nucleolytic degradation (resection) of the DSB. Emerging evidences indicate that RNA-processing factors play critical, yet poorly understood, roles in genomic stability. Here, we provide evidence that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA decay factors Xrn1, Rrp6 and Trf4 regulate Mec1/ATR activation by promoting generation of RPA-coated ssDNA. The lack of Xrn1 inhibits ssDNA generation at the DSB by preventing the loading of the MRX complex. By contrast, DSB resection is not affected in the absence of Rrp6 or Trf4, but their lack impairs the recruitment of RPA, and therefore of Mec1, to the DSB. Rrp6 and Trf4 inactivation affects neither Rad51/Rad52 association nor DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR), suggesting that full Mec1 activation requires higher amount of RPA-coated ssDNA than HR-mediated repair. Noteworthy, deep transcriptome analyses do not identify common misregulated gene expression that could explain the observed phenotypes. Our results provide a novel link between RNA processing and genome stability. © 2014 The Authors.

  18. ATM Protein Physically and Functionally Interacts with Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen to Regulate DNA Synthesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamper, Armin M.; Choi, Serah; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Banerjee, Dibyendu; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Bakkenist, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a pleiotropic disease, with a characteristic hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation that is caused by biallelic mutations in A-T mutated (ATM), a gene encoding a protein kinase critical for the induction of cellular responses to DNA damage, particularly to DNA double strand breaks. A long known characteristic of A-T cells is their ability to synthesize DNA even in the presence of ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage, a phenomenon termed radioresistant DNA synthesis. We previously reported that ATM kinase inhibition, but not ATM protein disruption, blocks sister chromatid exchange following DNA damage. We now show that ATM kinase inhibition, but not ATM protein disruption, also inhibits DNA synthesis. Investigating a potential physical interaction of ATM with the DNA replication machinery, we found that ATM co-precipitates with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) from cellular extracts. Using bacterially purified ATM truncation mutants and in vitro translated PCNA, we showed that the interaction is direct and mediated by the C terminus of ATM. Indeed, a 20-amino acid region close to the kinase domain is sufficient for strong binding to PCNA. This binding is specific to ATM, because the homologous regions of other PIKK members, including the closely related kinase A-T and Rad3-related (ATR), did not bind PCNA. ATM was found to bind two regions in PCNA. To examine the functional significance of the interaction between ATM and PCNA, we tested the ability of ATM to stimulate DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase δ, which is implicated in both DNA replication and DNA repair processes. ATM was observed to stimulate DNA polymerase activity in a PCNA-dependent manner. PMID:22362778

  19. Molecular cloning of cDNA for rat brain metallothionein-2 and regulation of its gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saijoh, Kiyofumi; Sumino, Kimiaki [Department of Public Health, Kobe University School of Medicine (Japan); Kuno, Takayoshi; Shuntoh, Hisato; Tanaka, Chikako [Department of Pharmacology, Kobe University of Medicine (Japan)

    1989-01-01

    A rat brain metallothionein-II (MT-II) complementary DNA (cDNA) clone was isolated from a cDNA plasmid library, which was prepared from non-treated rat brain mRNA, by a colony screening procedure using /sup 32/P-labeled synthetic oligonucleotide probes. It is deduced that the clone encodes for a protein of 61 amino acids comprising 20 cysteines, which is highly homologous to MT-IIs in other species. Northern blot analysis demonstrated major mRNA species in the brain, liver and kidneys (approximately 350 b in size), which is induced in response to dexamethasone, zinc, cadmium and mercury but not to methyl mercury. These findings confirm that MT-II genes are expressed and regulated both by steroid and heavy metals in the brain as well as in peripheral organs. (author).

  20. Molecular cloning of cDNA for rat brain metallothionein-2 and regulation of its gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saijoh, Kiyofumi; Sumino, Kimiaki; Kuno, Takayoshi; Shuntoh, Hisato; Tanaka, Chikako

    1989-01-01

    A rat brain metallothionein-II (MT-II) complementary DNA (cDNA) clone was isolated from a cDNA plasmid library, which was prepared from non-treated rat brain mRNA, by a colony screening procedure using 32 P-labeled synthetic oligonucleotide probes. It is deduced that the clone encodes for a protein of 61 amino acids comprising 20 cysteines, which is highly homologous to MT-IIs in other species. Northern blot analysis demonstrated major mRNA species in the brain, liver and kidneys (approximately 350 b in size), which is induced in response to dexamethasone, zinc, cadmium and mercury but not to methyl mercury. These findings confirm that MT-II genes are expressed and regulated both by steroid and heavy metals in the brain as well as in peripheral organs. (author)

  1. High-resolution detection of DNA binding sites of the global transcriptional regulator GlxR in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungwirth, Britta; Sala, Claudia; Kohl, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    of the 6C non-coding RNA gene and to non-canonical DNA binding sites within protein-coding regions. The present study underlines the dynamics within the GlxR regulon by identifying in vivo targets during growth on glucose and contributes to the expansion of knowledge of this important transcriptional......The transcriptional regulator GlxR has been characterized as a global hub within the gene-regulatory network of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with a specific anti-GlxR antibody and subsequent high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) was applied to C. glutamicum to get new...... mapping of these data on the genome sequence of C. glutamicum, 107 enriched DNA fragments were detected from cells grown with glucose as carbon source. GlxR binding sites were identified in the sequence of 79 enriched DNA fragments, of which 21 sites were not previously reported. Electrophoretic mobility...

  2. Smurf2 Regulates DNA Repair and Packaging to Prevent Tumors | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The blueprint for all of a cell’s functions is written in the genetic code of DNA sequences as well as in the landscape of DNA and histone modifications. DNA is wrapped around histones to package it into chromatin, which is stored in the nucleus. It is important to maintain the integrity of the chromatin structure to ensure that the cell continues to behave appropriately.

  3. Sequence-dependent response of DNA to torsional stress: a potential biological regulation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymer, Anna; Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Lavery, Richard

    2018-02-28

    Torsional restraints on DNA change in time and space during the life of the cell and are an integral part of processes such as gene expression, DNA repair and packaging. The mechanical behavior of DNA under torsional stress has been studied on a mesoscopic scale, but little is known concerning its response at the level of individual base pairs and the effects of base pair composition. To answer this question, we have developed a geometrical restraint that can accurately control the total twist of a DNA segment during all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. By applying this restraint to four different DNA oligomers, we are able to show that DNA responds to both under- and overtwisting in a very heterogeneous manner. Certain base pair steps, in specific sequence environments, are able to absorb most of the torsional stress, leaving other steps close to their relaxed conformation. This heterogeneity also affects the local torsional modulus of DNA. These findings suggest that modifying torsional stress on DNA could act as a modulator for protein binding via the heterogeneous changes in local DNA structure.

  4. A Graphene-Based Biosensing Platform Based on Regulated Release of an Aptameric DNA Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yu; Chen, Yongli; Li, Song; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2015-11-09

    A novel biosensing platform was developed by integrating an aptamer-based DNA biosensor with graphene oxide (GO) for rapid and facile detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, as a model target). The DNA biosensor, which is locked by GO, is designed to contain two sensing modules that include recognition site for ATP and self-replication track that yields the nicking domain for Nt.BbvCI. By taking advantage of the different binding affinity of single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA and aptamer-target complex toward GO, the DNA biosensor could be efficiently released from GO in the presence of target with the help of a complementary DNA strand (CPDNA) that partially hybridizes to the DNA biosensor. Then, the polymerization/nicking enzyme synergetic isothermal amplification could be triggered, leading to the synthesis of massive DNA amplicons, thus achieving an enhanced sensitivity with a wide linear dynamic response range of four orders of magnitude and good selectivity. This biosensing strategy expands the applications of GO-DNA nanobiointerfaces in biological sensing, showing great potential in fundamental research and biomedical diagnosis.

  5. Ubiquitination of HTLV-I Tax in response to DNA damage regulates nuclear complex formation and nuclear export

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marriott Susan J

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HTLV-I oncoprotein, Tax, is a pleiotropic protein whose activity is partially regulated by its ability to interact with, and perturb the functions of, numerous cellular proteins. Tax is predominantly a nuclear protein that localizes to nuclear foci known as Tax Speckled Structures (TSS. We recently reported that the localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins are altered in response to various forms of genotoxic and cellular stress. The level of cytoplasmic Tax increases in response to stress and this relocalization depends upon the interaction of Tax with CRM1. Cellular pathways and signals that regulate the subcellular localization of Tax remain to be determined. However, post-translational modifications including sumoylation and ubiquitination are known to influence the subcellular localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins. The sumoylated form of Tax exists predominantly in the nucleus while ubiquitinated Tax exists predominantly in the cytoplasm. Therefore, we hypothesized that post-translational modifications of Tax that occur in response to DNA damage regulate the localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins. Results We found a significant increase in mono-ubiquitination of Tax in response to UV irradiation. Mutation of specific lysine residues (K280 and K284 within Tax inhibited DNA damage-induced ubiquitination. In contrast to wild-type Tax, which undergoes transient nucleocytoplasmic shuttling in response to DNA damage, the K280 and K284 mutants were retained in nuclear foci following UV irradiation and remained co-localized with the cellular TSS protein, sc35. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the localization of Tax, and its interactions with cellular proteins, are dynamic following DNA damage and depend on the post-translational modification status of Tax. Specifically, DNA damage induces the ubiquitination of Tax at K280 and K284

  6. DNA methylation in the human cerebral cortex is dynamically regulated throughout the life span and involves differentiated neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly D Siegmund

    Full Text Available The role of DNA cytosine methylation, an epigenetic regulator of chromatin structure and function, during normal and pathological brain development and aging remains unclear. Here, we examined by MethyLight PCR the DNA methylation status at 50 loci, encompassing primarily 5' CpG islands of genes related to CNS growth and development, in temporal neocortex of 125 subjects ranging in age from 17 weeks of gestation to 104 years old. Two psychiatric disease cohorts--defined by chronic neurodegeneration (Alzheimer's or lack thereof (schizophrenia--were included. A robust and progressive rise in DNA methylation levels across the lifespan was observed for 8/50 loci (GABRA2, GAD1, HOXA1, NEUROD1, NEUROD2, PGR, STK11, SYK typically in conjunction with declining levels of the corresponding mRNAs. Another 16 loci were defined by a sharp rise in DNA methylation levels within the first few months or years after birth. Disease-associated changes were limited to 2/50 loci in the Alzheimer's cohort, which appeared to reflect an acceleration of the age-related change in normal brain. Additionally, methylation studies on sorted nuclei provided evidence for bidirectional methylation events in cortical neurons during the transition from childhood to advanced age, as reflected by significant increases at 3, and a decrease at 1 of 10 loci. Furthermore, the DNMT3a de novo DNA methyl-transferase was expressed across all ages, including a subset of neurons residing in layers III and V of the mature cortex. Therefore, DNA methylation is dynamically regulated in the human cerebral cortex throughout the lifespan, involves differentiated neurons, and affects a substantial portion of genes predominantly by an age-related increase.

  7. Crystal Structures of SlyA Protein, a Master Virulence Regulator of Salmonella, in Free and DNA-bound States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Kyle T.; Duguid, Erica M.; He, Chuan (UC)

    2011-11-17

    SlyA is a master virulence regulator that controls the transcription of numerous genes in Salmonella enterica. We present here crystal structures of SlyA by itself and bound to a high-affinity DNA operator sequence in the slyA gene. SlyA interacts with DNA through direct recognition of a guanine base by Arg-65, as well as interactions between conserved Arg-86 and the minor groove and a large network of non-base-specific contacts with the sugar phosphate backbone. Our structures, together with an unpublished structure of SlyA bound to the small molecule effector salicylate (Protein Data Bank code 3DEU), reveal that, unlike many other MarR family proteins, SlyA dissociates from DNA without large conformational changes when bound to this effector. We propose that SlyA and other MarR global regulators rely more on indirect readout of DNA sequence to exert control over many genes, in contrast to proteins (such as OhrR) that recognize a single operator.

  8. Abnormal regulation of DNA replication and increased lethality in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaspers, N.G.; de Wit, J.; Regulski, M.R.; Bootsma, D.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of different carcinogenic agents on the rate of semiconservative DNA replication in normal and ataxia telangiectasis (AT) cells was investigated. The rate of DNA synthesis in all AT cell strains tested was depressed to a significantly lesser extent than in normal cells after exposure to X-rays under oxia or hypoxia or to bleomycin, agents to which AT cells are hypersensitive. In contrast, inhibition of DNA replication in normal human and AT cells was similar after treatment with some DNA-methylating agents or mitomycin C. Colony-forming ability of AT cells treated with these agents was not different from normal cells. Treatment with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide elicited a variable response in both AT and normal cell strains. In some strains, including those shown to be hypersensitive to the drug by other workers, the inhibition of DNA synthesis was more pronounced than in other cell strains, but no significant difference between AT and normal cells could be detected. The rejoining of DNA strand breaks induced by X-rays, measured by DNA elution techniques, occurred within l2 hr after treatment and could not be correlated with the difference in DNA synthesis inhibition in AT and normal cells. After low doses of X-rays, AT cells rejoined single-strand breaks slightly more slowly than did normal cells. The rate of DNA replication in X-irradiation AT and normal cells was not affected by nicotinamide, an inhibitor of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis. These data indicate that the diminished inhibition of DNA replication in carcinogen-treated AT cells (a) is a general characteristic of all AT cell strains, (b) correlates with AT cellular hypersensitivity, (c) is not directly caused by the bulk of the DNA strand breaks produced by carcinogenic agents, and (d) is not based on differences in the induction of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis between X-irradiated AT and normal cells

  9. Identification and characterization of preferred DNA-binding sites for the Thermus thermophilus transcriptional regulator FadR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minwoo Lee

    Full Text Available One of the primary transcriptional regulators of fatty acid homeostasis in many prokaryotes is the protein FadR. To better understand its biological function in the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus HB8, we sought to first determine its preferred DNA-binding sequences in vitro using the combinatorial selection method Restriction Endonuclease Protection, Selection, and Amplification (REPSA and then use this information to bioinformatically identify potential regulated genes. REPSA determined a consensus FadR-binding sequence 5´-TTRNACYNRGTNYAA-3´, which was further characterized using quantitative electrophoretic mobility shift assays. With this information, a search of the T. thermophilus HB8 genome found multiple operons potentially regulated by FadR. Several of these were identified as encoding proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and degradation; however, others were novel and not previously identified as targets of FadR. The role of FadR in regulating these genes was validated by physical and functional methods, as well as comparative genomic approaches to further characterize regulons in related organisms. Taken together, our study demonstrates that a systematic approach involving REPSA, biophysical characterization of protein-DNA binding, and bioinformatics can be used to postulate biological roles for potential transcriptional regulators.

  10. The β-1,3-glucanosyltransferase Gas1 regulates Sir2-mediated rDNA stability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Cheol Woong; Kim, Kwantae; Chang, Yeon Ji; Kim, Bongkeun; Huh, Won-Ki

    2014-07-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the stability of highly repetitive rDNA array is maintained through transcriptional silencing. Recently, a β-1,3-glucanosyltransferase Gas1 has been shown to play a significant role in the regulation of transcriptional silencing in S. cerevisiae. Here, we show that the gas1Δ mutation increases rDNA silencing in a Sir2-dependent manner. Remarkably, the gas1Δ mutation induces nuclear localization of Msn2/4 and stimulates the expression of PNC1, a gene encoding a nicotinamidase that functions as a Sir2 activator. The lack of enzymatic activity of Gas1 or treatment with a cell wall-damaging agent, Congo red, exhibits effects similar to those of the gas1Δ mutation. Furthermore, the loss of Gas1 or Congo red treatment lowers the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity in a cell wall integrity MAP kinase Slt2-dependent manner. Collectively, our results suggest that the dysfunction of Gas1 plays a positive role in the maintenance of rDNA integrity by decreasing PKA activity and inducing the accumulation of Msn2/4 in the nucleus. It seems that nuclear-localized Msn2/4 stimulate the expression of Pnc1, thereby enhancing the association of Sir2 with rDNA and promoting rDNA stability. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Regulation of DNA double-strand break repair by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwertman, Petra; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions. The swift recognition and faithful repair of such damage is crucial for the maintenance of genomic stability, as well as for cell and organismal fitness. Signalling by ubiquitin, SUMO and other ubiquitin-like modifiers (UBLs...

  12. DNA methylation patterns provide insight into epigenetic regulation in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavery Mackenzie R

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism with important regulatory functions in animals. While the mechanism itself is evolutionarily ancient, the distribution and function of DNA methylation is diverse both within and among phylogenetic groups. Although DNA methylation has been well studied in mammals, there are limited data on invertebrates, particularly molluscs. Here we characterize the distribution and investigate potential functions of DNA methylation in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas. Results Methylation sensitive PCR and bisulfite sequencing PCR approaches were used to identify CpG methylation in C. gigas genes and demonstrated that this species possesses intragenic methylation. In silico analysis of CpGo/e ratios in publicly available sequence data suggests that DNA methylation is a common feature of the C. gigas genome, and that specific functional categories of genes have significantly different levels of methylation. Conclusions The Pacific oyster genome displays intragenic DNA methylation and contains genes necessary for DNA methylation in animals. Results of this investigation suggest that DNA methylation has regulatory functions in Crassostrea gigas, particularly in gene families that have inducible expression, including those involved in stress and environmental responses.

  13. Viral DNA Replication Orientation and hnRNPs Regulate Transcription of the Human Papillomavirus 18 Late Promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Liu, Haibin; Ge, Hui; Ajiro, Masahiko; Sharma, Nishi R; Meyers, Craig; Morozov, Pavel; Tuschl, Thomas; Klar, Amar; Court, Donald; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2017-05-30

    The life cycle of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is tightly linked to keratinocyte differentiation. Although expression of viral early genes is initiated immediately upon virus infection of undifferentiated basal cells, viral DNA amplification and late gene expression occur only in the mid to upper strata of the keratinocytes undergoing terminal differentiation. In this report, we show that the relative activity of HPV18 TATA-less late promoter P 811 depends on its orientation relative to that of the origin (Ori) of viral DNA replication and is sensitive to the eukaryotic DNA polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin. Additionally, transfected 70-nucleotide (nt)-long single-strand DNA oligonucleotides that are homologous to the region near Ori induce late promoter activity. We also found that promoter activation in raft cultures leads to production of the late promoter-associated, sense-strand transcription initiation RNAs (tiRNAs) and splice-site small RNAs (spliRNAs). Finally, a cis -acting AAGTATGCA core element that functions as a repressor to the promoter was identified. This element interacts with hnRNP D0B and hnRNP A/B factors. Point mutations in the core prevented binding of hnRNPs and increased the promoter activity. Confirming this result, knocking down the expression of both hnRNPs in keratinocytes led to increased promoter activity. Taking the data together, our study revealed the mechanism of how the HPV18 late promoter is regulated by DNA replication and host factors. IMPORTANCE It has been known for decades that the activity of viral late promoters is associated with viral DNA replication among almost all DNA viruses. However, the mechanism of how DNA replication activates the viral late promoter and what components of the replication machinery are involved remain largely unknown. In this study, we characterized the P 811 promoter region of HPV18 and demonstrated that its activation depends on the orientation of DNA replication. Using single

  14. THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Goto, Yamafumi [Department of Dermatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan); Takata, Minoru [Department of Dermatology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medical Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan); Turkson, James; Li, Xiaoman Shawn [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Zervos, Antonis S., E-mail: azervos@mail.ucf.edu [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. {yields} THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. {yields} THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. {yields} THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.

  15. THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla; Goto, Yamafumi; Takata, Minoru; Turkson, James; Li, Xiaoman Shawn; Zervos, Antonis S.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. → THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. → THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. → THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.

  16. Mcm10 regulates DNA replication elongation by stimulating the CMG replicative helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lõoke, Marko; Maloney, Michael F; Bell, Stephen P

    2017-02-01

    Activation of the Mcm2-7 replicative DNA helicase is the committed step in eukaryotic DNA replication initiation. Although Mcm2-7 activation requires binding of the helicase-activating proteins Cdc45 and GINS (forming the CMG complex), an additional protein, Mcm10, drives initial origin DNA unwinding by an unknown mechanism. We show that Mcm10 binds a conserved motif located between the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide fold (OB-fold) and A subdomain of Mcm2. Although buried in the interface between these domains in Mcm2-7 structures, mutations predicted to separate the domains and expose this motif restore growth to conditional-lethal MCM10 mutant cells. We found that, in addition to stimulating initial DNA unwinding, Mcm10 stabilizes Cdc45 and GINS association with Mcm2-7 and stimulates replication elongation in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, we identified a lethal allele of MCM10 that stimulates initial DNA unwinding but is defective in replication elongation and CMG binding. Our findings expand the roles of Mcm10 during DNA replication and suggest a new model for Mcm10 function as an activator of the CMG complex throughout DNA replication. © 2017 Lõoke et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. p38-MK2 signaling axis regulates RNA metabolism after UV-light-induced DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borisova, Marina E; Voigt, Andrea; Tollenaere, Maxim A X

    2018-01-01

    quantitative phosphoproteomics and protein kinase inhibition to provide a systems view on protein phosphorylation patterns induced by UV light and uncover the dependencies of phosphorylation events on the canonical DNA damage signaling by ATM/ATR and the p38 MAP kinase pathway. We identify RNA-binding proteins......Ultraviolet (UV) light radiation induces the formation of bulky photoproducts in the DNA that globally affect transcription and splicing. However, the signaling pathways and mechanisms that link UV-light-induced DNA damage to changes in RNA metabolism remain poorly understood. Here we employ...

  18. DNA methylation as a dynamic regulator of development and disease processes: spotlight on the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Kimberly P; Vezina, Chad M

    2015-01-01

    Prostate development, benign hyperplasia and cancer involve androgen and growth factor signaling as well as stromal-epithelial interactions. We review how DNA methylation influences these and related processes in other organ systems such as how proliferation is restricted to specific cell populations during defined temporal windows, how androgens elicit their actions and how cells establish, maintain and remodel DNA methylation in a time and cell specific fashion. We also discuss mechanisms by which hormones and endocrine disrupting chemicals reprogram DNA methylation in the prostate and elsewhere and examine evidence for a reawakening of developmental epigenetic pathways as drivers of prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia.

  19. Influence of DNA-methylation on zinc homeostasis in myeloid cells: Regulation of zinc transporters and zinc binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessels, Jana Elena; Wessels, Inga; Haase, Hajo; Rink, Lothar; Uciechowski, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of intracellular zinc, predominantly regulated through zinc transporters and zinc binding proteins, is required to support an efficient immune response. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are involved in the expression of these genes. In demethylation experiments using 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AZA) increased intracellular (after 24 and 48h) and total cellular zinc levels (after 48h) were observed in the myeloid cell line HL-60. To uncover the mechanisms that cause the disturbed zinc homeostasis after DNA demethylation, the expression of human zinc transporters and zinc binding proteins were investigated. Real time PCR analyses of 14 ZIP (solute-linked carrier (SLC) SLC39A; Zrt/IRT-like protein), and 9 ZnT (SLC30A) zinc transporters revealed significantly enhanced mRNA expression of the zinc importer ZIP1 after AZA treatment. Because ZIP1 protein was also enhanced after AZA treatment, ZIP1 up-regulation might be the mediator of enhanced intracellular zinc levels. The mRNA expression of ZIP14 was decreased, whereas zinc exporter ZnT3 mRNA was also significantly increased; which might be a cellular reaction to compensate elevated zinc levels. An enhanced but not significant chromatin accessibility of ZIP1 promoter region I was detected by chromatin accessibility by real-time PCR (CHART) assays after demethylation. Additionally, DNA demethylation resulted in increased mRNA accumulation of zinc binding proteins metallothionein (MT) and S100A8/S100A9 after 48h. MT mRNA was significantly enhanced after 24h of AZA treatment also suggesting a reaction of the cell to restore zinc homeostasis. These data indicate that DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism affecting zinc binding proteins and transporters, and, therefore, regulating zinc homeostasis in myeloid cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  1. Developmentally Regulated Ribosomal rDNA Genes in Plasmodium vivax: Biological Implications and Practical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-10

    technological advances, especially DNA polymerase chain reaction (peR), molecular cloning and rapid nuc1eotide sequencing. These advances have allowed...containing 0.15% saponin and set on ice for 2· minutes. After washing and centrifugation twice, as described above, the pellets were dissolved in...incubated at 370C for 60 minutes. DNA was further processed by standard procedures [Maniatis et al., 1982]. Briefly, the lysed sample was extracted

  2. DNA Replication Is Required for Circadian Clock Function by Regulating Rhythmic Nucleosome Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Dang, Yunkun; Matsu-Ura, Toru; He, Yubo; He, Qun; Hong, Christian I; Liu, Yi

    2017-07-20

    Although the coupling between circadian and cell cycles allows circadian clocks to gate cell division and DNA replication in many organisms, circadian clocks were thought to function independently of cell cycle. Here, we show that DNA replication is required for circadian clock function in Neurospora. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of DNA replication abolished both overt and molecular rhythmicities by repressing frequency (frq) gene transcription. DNA replication is essential for the rhythmic changes of nucleosome composition at the frq promoter. The FACT complex, known to be involved in histone disassembly/reassembly, is required for clock function and is recruited to the frq promoter in a replication-dependent manner to promote replacement of histone H2A.Z by H2A. Finally, deletion of H2A.Z uncoupled the dependence of the circadian clock on DNA replication. Together, these results establish circadian clock and cell cycle as interdependent coupled oscillators and identify DNA replication as a critical process in the circadian mechanism. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. DNA methylation of specific CpG sites in the promoter region regulates the transcription of the mouse oxytocin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimrat Mamrut

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a peptide hormone, well known for its role in labor and suckling, and most recently for its involvement in mammalian social behavior. All central and peripheral actions of oxytocin are mediated through the oxytocin receptor, which is the product of a single gene. Transcription of the oxytocin receptor is subject to regulation by gonadal steroid hormones, and is profoundly elevated in the uterus and mammary glands during parturition. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism that regulates gene transcription, and has been linked to reduced expression of the oxytocin receptor in individuals with autism. Here, we hypothesized that transcription of the mouse oxytocin receptor is regulated by DNA methylation of specific sites in its promoter, in a tissue-specific manner. Hypothalamus-derived GT1-7, and mammary-derived 4T1 murine cell lines displayed negative correlations between oxytocin receptor transcription and methylation of the gene promoter, and demethylation caused a significant enhancement of oxytocin receptor transcription in 4T1 cells. Using a reporter gene assay, we showed that methylation of specific sites in the gene promoter, including an estrogen response element, significantly inhibits transcription. Furthermore, methylation of the oxytocin receptor promoter was found to be differentially correlated with oxytocin receptor expression in mammary glands and the uterus of virgin and post-partum mice, suggesting that it plays a distinct role in oxytocin receptor transcription among tissues and under different physiological conditions. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the expression of the mouse oxytocin receptor gene is epigenetically regulated by DNA methylation of its promoter.

  4. Regulation of UGT1A1 and HNF1 transcription factor gene expression by DNA methylation in colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey Mario

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1 is a pivotal enzyme involved in metabolism of SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan commonly used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer. We previously demonstrated aberrant methylation of specific CpG dinucleotides in UGT1A1-negative cells, and revealed that methylation state of the UGT1A1 5'-flanking sequence is negatively correlated with gene transcription. Interestingly, one of these CpG dinucleotides (CpG -4 is found close to a HNF1 response element (HRE, known to be involved in activation of UGT1A1 gene expression, and within an upstream stimulating factor (USF binding site. Results Gel retardation assays revealed that methylation of CpG-4 directly affect the interaction of USF1/2 with its cognate sequence without altering the binding for HNF1-alpha. Luciferase assays sustained a role for USF1/2 and HNF1-alpha in UGT1A1 regulation in colon cancer cells. Based on the differential expression profiles of HNF1A gene in colon cell lines, we also assessed whether methylation affects its expression. In agreement with the presence of CpG islands in the HNF1A promoter, treatments of UGT1A1-negative HCT116 colon cancer cells with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor restore HNF1A gene expression, as observed for UGT1A1. Conclusions This study reveals that basal UGT1A1 expression in colon cells is positively regulated by HNF1-alpha and USF, and negatively regulated by DNA methylation. Besides, DNA methylation of HNF1A could also play an important role in regulating additional cellular drug metabolism and transporter pathways. This process may contribute to determine local inactivation of drugs such as the anticancer agent SN-38 by glucuronidation and define tumoral response.

  5. sarA negatively regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation by modulating expression of 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein and autolysis‐dependent release of eDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christner, Martin; Heinze, Constanze; Busch, Michael

    2012-01-01

    to biofilm formation in mutant 1585ΔsarA. Increased eDNA amounts indirectly resulted from upregulation of metalloprotease SepA, leading to boosted processing of autolysin AtlE, in turn inducing augmented autolysis and release of eDNA. Hence, this study identifies sarA as a negative regulator of Embp‐ and e...

  6. An Arginine Finger Regulates the Sequential Action of Asymmetrical Hexameric ATPase in the Double-Stranded DNA Translocation Motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhengyi; De-Donatis, Gian Marco; Schwartz, Chad; Fang, Huaming; Li, Jingyuan; Guo, Peixuan

    2016-10-01

    Biological motors are ubiquitous in living systems. Currently, how the motor components coordinate the unidirectional motion is elusive in most cases. Here, we report that the sequential action of the ATPase ring in the DNA packaging motor of bacteriophage ϕ29 is regulated by an arginine finger that extends from one ATPase subunit to the adjacent unit to promote noncovalent dimer formation. Mutation of the arginine finger resulted in the interruption of ATPase oligomerization, ATP binding/hydrolysis, and DNA translocation. Dimer formation reappeared when arginine mutants were mixed with other ATPase subunits that can offer the arginine to promote their interaction. Ultracentrifugation and virion assembly assays indicated that the ATPase was presenting as monomers and dimer mixtures. The isolated dimer alone was inactive in DNA translocation, but the addition of monomer could restore the activity, suggesting that the hexameric ATPase ring contained both dimer and monomers. Moreover, ATP binding or hydrolysis resulted in conformation and entropy changes of the ATPase with high or low DNA affinity. Taking these observations together, we concluded that the arginine finger regulates sequential action of the motor ATPase subunit by promoting the formation of the dimer inside the hexamer. The finding of asymmetrical hexameric organization is supported by structural evidence of many other ATPase systems showing the presence of one noncovalent dimer and four monomer subunits. All of these provide clues for why the asymmetrical hexameric ATPase gp16 of ϕ29 was previously reported as a pentameric configuration by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) since the contact by the arginine finger renders two adjacent ATPase subunits closer than other subunits. Thus, the asymmetrical hexamer would appear as a pentamer by cryo-EM, a technology that acquires the average of many images. Copyright © 2016 Zhao et al.

  7. IFN-γ Induces Mimic Extracellular Trap Cell Death in Lung Epithelial Cells Through Autophagy-Regulated DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Chien, Shun-Yi; Chen, Chia-Ling; Hsieh, Chia-Yuan; Tseng, Po-Chun; Wang, Yu-Chih

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) causes cell growth inhibition and cytotoxicity in lung epithelial malignancies. Regarding the induction of autophagy related to IFN-γ signaling, this study investigated the link between autophagy and IFN-γ cytotoxicity. In A549 human lung cancer cells, IFN-γ treatment induced concurrent apoptotic and nonapoptotic events. Unexpectedly, the nonapoptotic cells present mimic extracellular trap cell death (ETosis), which was regulated by caspase-3 and by autophagy induction through immunity-related GTPase family M protein 1 and activating transcription factor 6. Furthermore, IFN-γ signaling controlled mimic ETosis through a mechanism involving an autophagy- and Fas-associated protein with death domain-controlled caspase-8/-3 activation. Following caspase-mediated lamin degradation, IFN-γ caused DNA damage-associated ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR)/ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-regulated mimic ETosis. Upon ATR/ATM signaling, peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4)-mediated histone 3 citrullination promoted mimic ETosis. Such IFN-γ-induced effects were defective in PC14PE6/AS2 human lung cancer cells, which were unsusceptible to IFN-γ-induced autophagy. Due to autophagy-based caspase cascade activation, IFN-γ triggers unconventional caspase-mediated DNA damage, followed by ATR/ATM-regulated PAD4-mediated histone citrullination during mimic ETosis in lung epithelial malignancy.

  8. Amyloid protein-mediated differential DNA methylation status regulates gene expression in Alzheimer’s disease model cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Hye Youn; Choi, Eun Nam; Ahn Jo, Sangmee; Oh, Seikwan; Ahn, Jung-Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in Alzheimer’s disease model cell line. ► Integrated analysis of CpG methylation and mRNA expression profiles. ► Identify three Swedish mutant target genes; CTIF, NXT2 and DDR2 gene. ► The effect of Swedish mutation on alteration of DNA methylation and gene expression. -- Abstract: The Swedish mutation of amyloid precursor protein (APP-sw) has been reported to dramatically increase beta amyloid production through aberrant cleavage at the beta secretase site, causing early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). DNA methylation has been reported to be associated with AD pathogenesis, but the underlying molecular mechanism of APP-sw-mediated epigenetic alterations in AD pathogenesis remains largely unknown. We analyzed genome-wide interplay between promoter CpG DNA methylation and gene expression in an APP-sw-expressing AD model cell line. To identify genes whose expression was regulated by DNA methylation status, we performed integrated analysis of CpG methylation and mRNA expression profiles, and identified three target genes of the APP-sw mutant; hypomethylated CTIF (CBP80/CBP20-dependent translation initiation factor) and NXT2 (nuclear exporting factor 2), and hypermethylated DDR2 (discoidin domain receptor 2). Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine restored mRNA expression of these three genes, implying methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation. The profound alteration in the methylation status was detected at the −435, −295, and −271 CpG sites of CTIF, and at the −505 to −341 region in the promoter of DDR2. In the promoter region of NXT2, only one CpG site located at −432 was differentially unmethylated in APP-sw cells. Thus, we demonstrated the effect of the APP-sw mutation on alteration of DNA methylation and subsequent gene expression. This epigenetic regulatory mechanism may contribute to the pathogenesis of AD.

  9. Ursolic Acid-Regulated Energy Metabolism—Reliever or Propeller of Ultraviolet-Induced Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Hao Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV light is a leading cause of diseases, such as skin cancers and cataracts. A main process mediating UV-induced pathogenesis is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Excessive ROS levels induce the formation of DNA adducts (e.g., pyrimidine dimers and result in stalled DNA replication forks. In addition, ROS promotes phosphorylation of tyrosine kinase-coupled hormone receptors and alters downstream energy metabolism. With respect to the risk of UV-induced photocarcinogenesis and photodamage, the antitumoral and antioxidant functions of natural compounds become important for reducing UV-induced adverse effects. One important question in the field is what determines the differential sensitivity of various types of cells to UV light and how exogenous molecules, such as phytochemicals, protect normal cells from UV-inflicted damage while potentiating tumor cell death, presumably via interaction with intracellular target molecules and signaling pathways. Several endogenous molecules have emerged as possible players mediating UV-triggered DNA damage responses. Specifically, UV activates the PIKK (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase family members, which include DNA-PKcs, ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin, whose signaling can be affected by energy metabolism; however, it remains unclear to what extent the activation of hormone receptors regulates PIKKs and whether this crosstalk occurs in all types of cells in response to UV. This review focuses on proteomic descriptions of the relationships between cellular photosensitivity and the phenotypic expression of the insulin/insulin-like growth receptor. It covers the cAMP-dependent pathways, which have recently been shown to regulate the DNA repair machinery through interactions with the PIKK family members. Finally, this review provides a strategic illustration of how UV-induced mitogenic activity is modulated by the insulin

  10. Triphlorethol-A from Ecklonia cava Up-Regulates the Oxidant Sensitive 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Cheon Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the protective mechanisms of triphlorethol-A, isolated from Ecklonia cava, against oxidative stress-induced DNA base damage, especially 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG, in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast V79-4 cells. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1 plays an important role in the removal of 8-oxoG during the cellular response to DNA base damage. Triphlorethol-A significantly decreased the levels of 8-oxoG induced by H2O2, and this correlated with increases in OGG1 mRNA and OGG1 protein levels. Furthermore, siOGG1-transfected cell attenuated the protective effect of triphlorethol-A against H2O2 treatment. Nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 (Nrf2 is a transcription factor for OGG1, and Nrf2 combines with small Maf proteins in the nucleus to bind to antioxidant response elements (ARE in the upstream promoter region of the OGG1 gene. Triphlorethol-A restored the expression of nuclear Nrf2, small Maf protein, and the Nrf2-Maf complex, all of which were reduced by oxidative stress. Furthermore, triphlorethol-A increased Nrf2 binding to ARE sequences and the resulting OGG1 promoter activity, both of which were also reduced by oxidative stress. The levels of the phosphorylated forms of Akt kinase, downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, and Erk, which are regulators of OGG1, were sharply decreased by oxidative stress, but these decreases were prevented by triphlorethol-A. Specific PI3K, Akt, and Erk inhibitors abolished the cytoprotective effects of triphlorethol-A, suggesting that OGG1 induction by triphlorethol-A involves the PI3K/Akt and Erk pathways. Taken together, these data indicate that by activating the DNA repair system, triphlorethol-A exerts protective effects against DNA base damage induced by oxidative stress.

  11. The Smc5/6 complex regulates the yeast Mph1 helicase at RNA-DNA hybrid-mediated DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafuente-Barquero, Juan; Luke-Glaser, Sarah; Graf, Marco

    2017-01-01

    of Fanconi anemia protein M (FANCM), is required for cell viability in the absence of RNase H enzymes. The integrity of the Mph1 helicase domain is crucial to prevent the accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids and RNA-DNA hybrid-dependent DNA damage, as determined by Rad52 foci. Mph1 forms foci when RNA-DNA hybrids...

  12. The PCNA-associated protein PARI negatively regulates homologous recombination via the inhibition of DNA repair synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkovics, Peter; Dome, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia

    2016-01-01

    to inhibit homologous recombination (HR) events. Here, we describe a biochemical mechanism in which PARI functions as an HR regulator after replication fork stalling and during double-strand break repair. In our reconstituted biochemical system, we show that PARI inhibits DNA repair synthesis during...... recombination events in a PCNA interaction-dependent way but independently of its UvrD-like helicase domain. In accordance, we demonstrate that PARI inhibits HR in vivo, and its knockdown suppresses the UV sensitivity of RAD18-depleted cells. Our data reveal a novel human regulatory mechanism that limits...

  13. ZBED6, a novel transcription factor derived from a domesticated DNA transposon regulates IGF2 expression and muscle growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markljung, Ellen; Jiang, Lin; Jaffe, Jacob D

    2009-01-01

    and find that the protein, named ZBED6, is previously unknown, specific for placental mammals, and derived from an exapted DNA transposon. Silencing of Zbed6 in mouse C2C12 myoblasts affected Igf2 expression, cell proliferation, wound healing, and myotube formation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (Ch......, including development and transcriptional regulation. The phenotypic effects in mutant pigs and ZBED6-silenced C2C12 myoblasts, the extreme sequence conservation, its nucleolar localization, the broad tissue distribution, and the many target genes with essential biological functions suggest that ZBED6...... is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation, and growth....

  14. Amino acid-dependent signaling via S6K1 and MYC is essential for regulation of rDNA transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jian; Kusnadi, Eric P.; Ogden, Allison J.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Bammert, Lukas; Kutay, Ulrike; Hung, Sandy; Sanij, Elaine; Hannan, Ross D.; Hannan, Katherine M.; Pearson, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of RNA polymerase I (Pol I)-dependent ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription is a consistent feature of malignant transformation that can be targeted to treat cancer. Understanding how rDNA transcription is coupled to the availability of growth factors and nutrients will provide insight into how ribosome biogenesis is maintained in a tumour environment characterised by limiting nutrients. We demonstrate that modulation of rDNA transcription initiation, elongation and rRNA processing is an immediate, co-regulated response to altered amino acid abundance, dependent on both mTORC1 activation of S6K1 and MYC activity. Growth factors regulate rDNA transcription initiation while amino acids modulate growth factor-dependent rDNA transcription by primarily regulating S6K1-dependent rDNA transcription elongation and processing. Thus, we show for the first time amino acids regulate rRNA synthesis by a distinct, post-initiation mechanism, providing a novel model for integrated control of ribosome biogenesis that has implications for understanding how this process is dysregulated in cancer. PMID:27385002

  15. H3K9me3 demethylase Kdm4d facilitates the formation of pre-initiative complex and regulates DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rentian; Wang, Zhiquan; Zhang, Honglian; Gan, Haiyun; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2017-01-09

    DNA replication is tightly regulated to occur once and only once per cell cycle. How chromatin, the physiological substrate of DNA replication machinery, regulates DNA replication remains largely unknown. Here we show that histone H3 lysine 9 demethylase Kdm4d regulates DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. Depletion of Kdm4d results in defects in DNA replication, which can be rescued by the expression of H3K9M, a histone H3 mutant transgene that reverses the effect of Kdm4d on H3K9 methylation. Kdm4d interacts with replication proteins, and its recruitment to DNA replication origins depends on the two pre-replicative complex components (origin recognition complex [ORC] and minichromosome maintenance [MCM] complex). Depletion of Kdm4d impairs the recruitment of Cdc45, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and polymerase δ, but not ORC and MCM proteins. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism by which Kdm4d regulates DNA replication by reducing the H3K9me3 level to facilitate formation of pre-initiative complex. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. DNA Repair Network Analysis Reveals Shieldin as a Key Regulator of NHEJ and PARP Inhibitor Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Rajat; Somyajit, Kumar; Narita, Takeo

    2018-01-01

    Repair of damaged DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and for preventing genome-instability-associated diseases, such as cancer. By combining proximity labeling with quantitative mass spectrometry, we generated high-resolution interaction neighborhood maps of the endogenously expres...... and the evolution of antibody CSR in higher vertebrates....

  17. Nuclear DNA polymerase beta from Leishmania infantum. Cloning, molecular analysis and developmental regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taladriz, Soraya; Hanke, Tobias; Ramiro, María J.; García-Díaz, Miguel; Lacoba, Mario García de; Blanco, Luis; Larraga, Vicente

    2001-01-01

    We have identified a novel polymerase beta (Pol β)-like enzyme from Leishmania infantum, a parasite protozoon causing disease in humans. This protein, named Li Pol β, shows a nuclear localization that contrasts with the mitochondrial localization of Pol β from Crithidia fasciculata, a closely related parasite, the only polymerase β described so far in Trypanosomatidae. Li Pol β, that belongs to the DNA polymerase X family, displays an evolutionarily conserved Pol β-type DNA polymerase core, in which most of the key residues involved in DNA binding, nucleotide binding, dRPase and polymerization catalysis are conserved. In agreement with this, Li Pol β, overproduced in Escherichia coli, displayed intrinsic DNA polymerase activity. Cell synchronization experiments showed a correlation between both Li Pol β mRNA and protein levels along the parasite cell cycle. Analysis of these parameters at the different growth phases of the parasite, from the proliferative (non-infective) logarithmic phase to the non-dividing (highly infectious) stationary phase, showed high levels of Li Pol β at the infective phase of the parasite. The data suggest a role of Li Pol β in base excision repair in L.infantum, a parasite usually affected by oxygen stress environments into the macrophage host cells. PMID:11557814

  18. Arabidopsis RETINOBLASTOMA RELATED directly regulates DNA damage responses through functions beyond cell cycle control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horvath, B.M.; Kourová, Hana; Nagy, S.; Nemeth, E.; Magyar, Z.; Papdi, C.; Ahmad, Z.; Sanchez-Perez, G.F.; Perilli, S.; Blilou, I.; Pettko-Szandtner, A.; Darula, Z.; Meszaros, T.; Binarová, Pavla; Bogre, L.; Scheres, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 9 (2017), s. 1261-1278 ISSN 0261-4189 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11657S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Arabidopsis * BRCA1 * DNA damage response Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 9.792, year: 2016

  19. Relationship status: It's complicated : En undersökning i hur äldreboenden kan stärka relationen till sin målgrupp

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna, Norberg; Victoria, Angberg; Nina, Moradi

    2017-01-01

    Frågeställning: Vilka behov behöver tillfredsställas hos de boende och anhöriga för att stärka en relation till äldreboendet? Kan digital marknadsföring användas som metod för att stärka relationer och i så fall hur? Syfte: Syftet är att undersöka hur relationen mellan äldreboende och deras målgrupp kan stärkas. Metod: Ansatsen har varit en deduktiv ansats och en kvalitativ metod har använts där sju semistrukturerade intervjuer har genomförts. Slutsats: Resultatet visar på fem faktorer som sa...

  20. "Positive people always win" : en studie av hur kvinnor som livestreamar på Twitch.tv upplever interaktionen med sina tittare i kanalchatten

    OpenAIRE

    Thoresen, Josef; Elfwendahl, Sofia

    2017-01-01

    I denna studie har vi undersökt kvinnor som livestreamar sitt datorspelande på hemsidan Twitch.tv och deras erfarenheter gällande chattkommentarer på deras livesändningar. Vi har främst fokuserat på negativa chattkommentarer och hur dessa påverkar kvinnorna, då tidigare forskning redan har visat på att kvinnor utsätts för fler trakasserier än män, både generellt på internet och på Twitch.tv (Nakandala, Ciampaglia, Su & Ahn. 2016). Vidare ville vi också se hur kvinnorna hanterar dessa nega...

  1. FANCI Regulates Recruitment of the FA Core Complex at Sites of DNA Damage Independently of FANCD2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Castella

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA-BRCA pathway mediates repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks. The FA core complex, a multi-subunit ubiquitin ligase, participates in the detection of DNA lesions and monoubiquitinates two downstream FA proteins, FANCD2 and FANCI (or the ID complex. However, the regulation of the FA core complex itself is poorly understood. Here we show that the FA core complex proteins are recruited to sites of DNA damage and form nuclear foci in S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. ATR kinase activity, an intact FA core complex and FANCM-FAAP24 were crucial for this recruitment. Surprisingly, FANCI, but not its partner FANCD2, was needed for efficient FA core complex foci formation. Monoubiquitination or ATR-dependent phosphorylation of FANCI were not required for the FA core complex recruitment, but FANCI deubiquitination by USP1 was. Additionally, BRCA1 was required for efficient FA core complex foci formation. These findings indicate that FANCI functions upstream of FA core complex recruitment independently of FANCD2, and alter the current view of the FA-BRCA pathway.

  2. Three-Dimensional Graphene Supported Bimetallic Nanocomposites with DNA Regulated-Flexibly Switchable Peroxidase-Like Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fang; Zhao, Huimin; Zang, Hongmei; Ye, Fei; Quan, Xie

    2016-04-20

    A synergistic bimetallic enzyme mimetic catalyst, three-dimensional (3D) graphene/Fe3O4-AuNPs, was successfully fabricated which exhibited flexibly switchable peroxidase-like activity. Compared to the traditional 2D graphene-based monometallic composite, the introduced 3D structure, which was induced by the addition of glutamic acid, and bimetallic anchoring approach dramatically improved the catalytic activity, as well as the catalysis velocity and its affinity for substrate. Herein, Fe3O4NPs acted as supporters for AuNPs, which contributed to enhance the efficiency of electron transfer. On the basis of the measurement of Mott-Schottky plots of graphene and metal anchored hybrids, the catalysis mechanism was elucidated by the decrease of Fermi level resulted from the chemical doping behavior. Notably, the catalytic activity was able to be regulated by the adsorption and desorption of single-stranded DNA molecules, which laid a basis for its utilization in the construction of single-stranded DNA-based colorimetric biosensors. This strategy not only simplified the operation process including labeling, modification, and imprinting, but also protected the intrinsic affinity between the target and biological probe. Accordingly, based on the peroxidase-like activity and its controllability, our prepared nanohybrids was successfully adopted in the visualized and label-free sensing detections of glucose, sequence-specific DNA, mismatched nucleotides, and oxytetracycline.

  3. Acid or erythromycin stress significantly improves transformation efficiency through regulating expression of DNA binding proteins in Lactococcus lactis F44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Binbin; Zhang, Huawei; Liang, Dongmei; Hao, Panlong; Li, Yanni; Qiao, Jianjun

    2017-12-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a gram-positive bacterium used extensively in the dairy industry and food fermentation, and its biological characteristics are usually improved through genetic manipulation. However, poor transformation efficiency was the main restriction factor for the construction of engineered strains. In this study, the transformation efficiency of L. lactis F44 showed a 56.1-fold increase in acid condition (pH 5.0); meanwhile, erythromycin stress (0.04 μg/mL) promoted the transformation efficiency more significantly (76.9-fold). Notably, the transformation efficiency of F44e (L. lactis F44 harboring empty pLEB124) increased up to 149.1-fold under the synergistic stresses of acid and erythromycin. In addition, the gene expression of some DNA binding proteins (DprA, RadA, RadC, RecA, RecQ, and SsbA) changed correspondingly. Especially for radA, 25.1-fold improvement was detected when F44e was exposed to pH 5.0. Overexpression of some DNA binding proteins could improve the transformation efficiency. The results suggested that acid or erythromycin stress could improve the transformation efficiency of L. lactis through regulating gene expression of DNA binding proteins. We have proposed a simple but promising strategy for improving the transformation efficiency of L. lactis and other hard-transformed microorganisms. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. RNase-L regulates the stability of mitochondrial DNA-encoded mRNAs in mouse embryo fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekaran, Krish; Mehrabian, Zara; Li Xiaoling; Hassel, Bret

    2004-01-01

    Accelerated decrease in the levels of mitochondrial DNA-encoded mRNA (mt-mRNA) occurs in neuronal cells exposed either to the excitatory amino acid, glutamate or to the sodium ionophore, monensin, suggesting a role of mitochondrial RNase(s) on the stability of mt-mRNAs. Here we report that in mouse embryo fibroblasts that are devoid of the interferon-regulated RNase, RNase-L, the monensin-induced decrease in the half-life of mt-mRNA was reduced. In monensin (250 nM)-treated RNase-L +/+ cells the average half-life of mt-mRNA, determined after termination of transcription with actinomycin D, was found to be 3 h, whereas in monensin-treated RNase-L -/- cells the half-life of mt-mRNA was >6 h. In contrast, the stability of nuclear DNA-encoded β-actin mRNA was unaffected. Induction of RNase-L expression in mouse 3T3 fibroblasts further decreased the monensin-induced reduction in mt-mRNA half-life to 1.5 h. The results indicate that the RNase-L-dependent decrease in mtDNA-encoded mRNA transcript levels occurs through a decrease in the half-life of mt-mRNA, and that RNase-L may play a role in the stability of mt-mRNA

  5. Recombination at DNA replication fork barriers is not universal and is differentially regulated by Swi1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryce, David W; Ramayah, Soshila; Jaendling, Alessa; McFarlane, Ramsay J

    2009-03-24

    DNA replication stress has been implicated in the etiology of genetic diseases, including cancers. It has been proposed that genomic sites that inhibit or slow DNA replication fork progression possess recombination hotspot activity and can form potential fragile sites. Here we used the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, to demonstrate that hotspot activity is not a universal feature of replication fork barriers (RFBs), and we propose that most sites within the genome that form RFBs do not have recombination hotspot activity under nonstressed conditions. We further demonstrate that Swi1, the TIMELESS homologue, differentially controls the recombination potential of RFBs, switching between being a suppressor and an activator of recombination in a site-specific fashion.

  6. HuR and Ago2 Bind the Internal Ribosome Entry Site of Enterovirus 71 and Promote Virus Translation and Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Yi Lin

    Full Text Available EV71 (enterovirus 71 RNA contains an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES that directs cap-independent initiation of translation. IRES-dependent translation requires the host's translation initiation factors and IRES-associated trans-acting factors (ITAFs. We reported recently that mRNA decay factor AUF1 is a negative-acting ITAF that binds IRES stem-loop II. We also reported that the small RNA-processing enzyme Dicer produces at least four small RNAs (vsRNAs from the EV71 IRES. One of these, vsRNA1, derived from IRES stem-loop II, reduces IRES activity and virus replication. Since its mechanism of action is unknown, we hypothesized that it might control association of ITAFs with the IRES. Here, we identified the mRNA stability factor HuR and the RISC subunit Argonaute 2 (Ago2 as two ITAFs that bind stem-loop II. In contrast to AUF1, HuR and Ago2 promote EV71 IRES activity and virus replication. In vitro RNA-binding assays revealed that vsRNA1 can alter association of Ago2, HuR, and AUF1 with stem-loop II. This presents a possible mechanism by which vsRNA1 could control viral translation and replication.

  7. DBC1 promotes castration-resistant prostate cancer by positively regulating DNA binding and stability of AR-V7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sue Jin; Jeong, Byong Chang; Kim, Hwa Jin; Lim, Joung Eun; Kwon, Ghee Young; Kim, Jeong Hoon

    2018-03-01

    Constitutively active AR-V7, one of the major androgen receptor (AR) splice variants lacking the ligand-binding domain, plays a key role in the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and anti-androgen resistance. However, our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of AR-V7-driven transcription is limited. Here we report DBC1 as a key regulator of AR-V7 transcriptional activity and stability in CRPC cells. DBC1 functions as a coactivator for AR-V7 and is required for the expression of AR-V7 target genes including CDH2, a mesenchymal marker linked to CRPC progression. DBC1 is required for recruitment of AR-V7 to its target enhancers and for long-range chromatin looping between the CDH2 enhancer and promoter. Mechanistically, DBC1 enhances DNA-binding activity of AR-V7 by direct interaction and inhibits CHIP E3 ligase-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of AR-V7 by competing with CHIP for AR-V7 binding, thereby stabilizing and activating AR-V7. Importantly, DBC1 depletion suppresses the tumorigenic and metastatic properties of CRPC cells. Our results firmly establish DBC1 as a critical AR-V7 coactivator that plays a key role in the regulation of DNA binding and stability of AR-V7 and has an important physiological role in CRPC progression.

  8. AIM2-Like Receptors Positively and Negatively Regulate the Interferon Response Induced by Cytosolic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Yuki; Lilue, Jingtao; Stavrou, Spyridon; Moran, Eileen A; Ross, Susan R

    2017-07-05

    Cytosolic DNAs derived from retrotransposons serve as pathogen-associated molecular patterns for pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that stimulate the induction of interferons (IFNs) and other cytokines, leading to autoimmune disease. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase is one PRR that senses retrotransposon DNA, activating type I IFN responses through the stimulator of IFN genes (STING). Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2)-like receptors (ALRs) have also been implicated in these pathways. Here we show that the mouse ALR IFI205 senses cytosolic retrotransposon DNA independently of cyclic GMP-AMP production. AIM2 antagonizes IFI205-mediated IFN induction activity by sequestering it from STING. We also found that the complement of genes located in the ALR locus in C57BL/6 and AIM2 knockout mice are different and unique, which has implications for interpretation of the sensing of pathogens in different mouse strains. Our data suggest that members of the ALR family are critical to the host IFN response to endogenous DNA. IMPORTANCE Autoimmune diseases like Aicardi-Goutières syndrome and lupus erythematosus arise when cells of the immune system become activated and attack host cells and tissues. We found that DNA generated by endogenous retroviruses and retroelements in inbred mice and mouse cells is recognized by several host proteins found in macrophages that are members of the ALR family and that these proteins both suppress and activate the pathways leading to the generation of cytokines and IFNs. We also show that there is great genetic diversity between different inbred mouse strains in the ALR genes, which might contribute to differential susceptibility to autoimmunity. Understanding how immune cells become activated is important to the control of disease. Copyright © 2017 Nakaya et al.

  9. Cruciform structures are a common DNA feature important for regulating biological processes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázda, Václav; Laister, R.C.; Jagelská, Eva; Arrowsmith, Ch.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 33 (2011), s. 1-16 ISSN 1471-2199 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/1211; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : cruciform structure * inverted repeat * protein- DNA binding Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.857, year: 2011

  10. AIM2-Like Receptors Positively and Negatively Regulate the Interferon Response Induced by Cytosolic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Nakaya

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cytosolic DNAs derived from retrotransposons serve as pathogen-associated molecular patterns for pattern recognition receptors (PRRs that stimulate the induction of interferons (IFNs and other cytokines, leading to autoimmune disease. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase is one PRR that senses retrotransposon DNA, activating type I IFN responses through the stimulator of IFN genes (STING. Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2-like receptors (ALRs have also been implicated in these pathways. Here we show that the mouse ALR IFI205 senses cytosolic retrotransposon DNA independently of cyclic GMP-AMP production. AIM2 antagonizes IFI205-mediated IFN induction activity by sequestering it from STING. We also found that the complement of genes located in the ALR locus in C57BL/6 and AIM2 knockout mice are different and unique, which has implications for interpretation of the sensing of pathogens in different mouse strains. Our data suggest that members of the ALR family are critical to the host IFN response to endogenous DNA.

  11. Down-regulation of DNA mismatch repair enhances initiation and growth of neuroblastoma and brain tumour multicellular spheroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel L Collins

    Full Text Available Multicellular tumour spheroid (MCTS cultures are excellent model systems for simulating the development and microenvironmental conditions of in vivo tumour growth. Many documented cell lines can generate differentiated MCTS when cultured in suspension or in a non-adhesive environment. While physiological and biochemical properties of MCTS have been extensively characterized, insight into the events and conditions responsible for initiation of these structures is lacking. MCTS are formed by only a small subpopulation of cells during surface-associated growth but the processes responsible for this differentiation are poorly understood and have not been previously studied experimentally. Analysis of gene expression within spheroids has provided clues but to date it is not known if the observed differences are a cause or consequence of MCTS growth. One mechanism linked to tumourigenesis in a number of cancers is genetic instability arising from impaired DNA mismatch repair (MMR. This study aimed to determine the role of MMR in MCTS initiation and development. Using surface-associated N2a and CHLA-02-ATRT culture systems we have investigated the impact of impaired MMR on MCTS growth. Analysis of the DNA MMR genes MLH1 and PMS2 revealed both to be significantly down-regulated at the mRNA level compared with non-spheroid-forming cells. By using small interfering RNA (siRNA against these genes we show that silencing of MLH1 and PMS2 enhances both MCTS initiation and subsequent expansion. This effect was prolonged over several passages following siRNA transfection. Down-regulation of DNA MMR can contribute to tumour initiation and progression in N2a and CHLA-02-ATRT MCTS models. Studies of surface-associated MCTS differentiation may have broader applications in studying events in the initiation of cancer foci.

  12. Identification of BC005512 as a DNA damage responsive murine endogenous retrovirus of GLN family involved in cell growth regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfeng Wu

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity assessment is of great significance in drug safety evaluation, and microarray is a useful tool widely used to identify genotoxic stress responsive genes. In the present work, by using oligonucleotide microarray in an in vivo model, we identified an unknown gene BC005512 (abbreviated as BC, official full name: cDNA sequence BC005512, whose expression in mouse liver was specifically induced by seven well-known genotoxins (GTXs, but not by non-genotoxins (NGTXs. Bioinformatics revealed that BC was a member of the GLN family of murine endogenous retrovirus (ERV. However, the relationship to genotoxicity and the cellular function of GLN are largely unknown. Using NIH/3T3 cells as an in vitro model system and quantitative real-time PCR, BC expression was specifically induced by another seven GTXs, covering diverse genotoxicity mechanisms. Additionally, dose-response and linear regression analysis showed that expression level of BC in NIH/3T3 cells strongly correlated with DNA damage, measured using the alkaline comet assay,. While in p53 deficient L5178Y cells, GTXs could not induce BC expression. Further functional studies using RNA interference revealed that down-regulation of BC expression induced G1/S phase arrest, inhibited cell proliferation and thus suppressed cell growth in NIH/3T3 cells. Together, our results provide the first evidence that BC005512, a member from GLN family of murine ERV, was responsive to DNA damage and involved in cell growth regulation. These findings could be of great value in genotoxicity predictions and contribute to a deeper understanding of GLN biological functions.

  13. Condensin suppresses recombination and regulates double-strand break processing at the repetitive ribosomal DNA array to ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Jin, Hui; Yu, Hong-Guo

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis, homologues are linked by crossover, which is required for bipolar chromosome orientation before chromosome segregation at anaphase I. The repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) array, however, undergoes little or no meiotic recombination. Hyperrecombination can cause chromosome missegregation and rDNA copy number instability. We report here that condensin, a conserved protein complex required for chromosome organization, regulates double-strand break (DSB) formation and repair at the rDNA gene cluster during meiosis in budding yeast. Condensin is highly enriched at the rDNA region during prophase I, released at the prophase I/metaphase I transition, and reassociates with rDNA before anaphase I onset. We show that condensin plays a dual role in maintaining rDNA stability: it suppresses the formation of Spo11-mediated rDNA breaks, and it promotes DSB processing to ensure proper chromosome segregation. Condensin is unnecessary for the export of rDNA breaks outside the nucleolus but required for timely repair of meiotic DSBs. Our work reveals that condensin coordinates meiotic recombination with chromosome segregation at the repetitive rDNA sequence, thereby maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25103240

  14. Epidermal Rac1 regulates the DNA damage response and protects from UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and skin carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Haase, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common type of cancer. Increased expression and activity of Rac1, a small Rho GTPase, has been shown previously in NMSC and other human cancers; suggesting that Rac1 may function as an oncogene in skin. DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis studies in mice have shown that Rac1 is required for chemically induced skin papilloma formation. However, UVB radiation by the sun, which causes DNA damage, is the most relevant cause for NMSC. A potential role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far. To investigate this, we irradiated mice with epidermal Rac1 deficiency (Rac1-EKO) and their controls using a well-established protocol for long-term UV-irradiation. Most of the Rac1-EKO mice developed severe skin erosions upon long-term UV-irradiation, unlike their controls. These skin erosions in Rac1-EKO mice healed subsequently. Surprisingly, we observed development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) within the UV-irradiation fields. This shows that the presence of Rac1 in the epidermis protects from UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis. Short-term UV-irradiation experiments revealed increased UV-light-induced apoptosis of Rac1-deficient epidermal keratinocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. Further investigations using cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase transgenic mice revealed that the observed increase in UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis in Rac1-EKO mice is DNA damage dependent and correlates with caspase-8 activation. Furthermore, Rac1-deficient keratinocytes showed reduced levels of p53, γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 suggesting an attenuated DNA damage response upon UV-irradiation. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for a protective role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis and keratinocyte apoptosis probably through regulating mechanisms of the DNA damage response and repair pathways. PMID:28277539

  15. APE1, the DNA base excision repair protein, regulates the removal of platinum adducts in sensory neuronal cultures by NER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun-Suk; Guo, Chunlu; Thompson, Eric L.; Jiang, Yanlin; Kelley, Mark R.; Vasko, Michael R.; Lee, Suk-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the major side effects of treatment with the anticancer drug, cisplatin. One proposed mechanism for this neurotoxicity is the formation of platinum adducts in sensory neurons that could contribute to DNA damage. Although this damage is largely repaired by nuclear excision repair (NER), our previous findings suggest that augmenting the base excision repair pathway (BER) by overexpressing the repair protein APE1 protects sensory neurons from cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity. The question remains whether APE1 contributes to the ability of the NER pathway to repair platinum-damage in neuronal cells. To examine this, we manipulated APE1 expression in sensory neuronal cultures and measured Pt-removal after exposure to cisplatin. When neuronal cultures were treated with increasing concentrations of cisplatin for two or three hours, there was a concentration-dependent increase in Pt-damage that peaked at four hours and returned to near baseline levels after 24 h. In cultures where APE1 expression was reduced by ∼80% using siRNA directed at APE1, there was a significant inhibition of Pt-removal over eight hours which was reversed by overexpressing APE1 using a lentiviral construct for human wtAPE1. Overexpressing a mutant APE1 (C65 APE1), which only has DNA repair activity, but not its other significant redox-signaling function, mimicked the effects of wtAPE1. Overexpressing DNA repair activity mutant APE1 (226 + 177APE1), with only redox activity was ineffective suggesting it is the DNA repair function of APE1 and not its redox-signaling, that restores the Pt-damage removal. Together, these data provide the first evidence that a critical BER enzyme, APE1, helps regulate the NER pathway in the repair of cisplatin damage in sensory neurons

  16. APE1, the DNA base excision repair protein, regulates the removal of platinum adducts in sensory neuronal cultures by NER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Suk [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Guo, Chunlu; Thompson, Eric L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Jiang, Yanlin [Department of Pediatrics and Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Kelley, Mark R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Pediatrics and Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Vasko, Michael R. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Lee, Suk-Hee, E-mail: slee@iu.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the major side effects of treatment with the anticancer drug, cisplatin. One proposed mechanism for this neurotoxicity is the formation of platinum adducts in sensory neurons that could contribute to DNA damage. Although this damage is largely repaired by nuclear excision repair (NER), our previous findings suggest that augmenting the base excision repair pathway (BER) by overexpressing the repair protein APE1 protects sensory neurons from cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity. The question remains whether APE1 contributes to the ability of the NER pathway to repair platinum-damage in neuronal cells. To examine this, we manipulated APE1 expression in sensory neuronal cultures and measured Pt-removal after exposure to cisplatin. When neuronal cultures were treated with increasing concentrations of cisplatin for two or three hours, there was a concentration-dependent increase in Pt-damage that peaked at four hours and returned to near baseline levels after 24 h. In cultures where APE1 expression was reduced by ∼80% using siRNA directed at APE1, there was a significant inhibition of Pt-removal over eight hours which was reversed by overexpressing APE1 using a lentiviral construct for human wtAPE1. Overexpressing a mutant APE1 (C65 APE1), which only has DNA repair activity, but not its other significant redox-signaling function, mimicked the effects of wtAPE1. Overexpressing DNA repair activity mutant APE1 (226 + 177APE1), with only redox activity was ineffective suggesting it is the DNA repair function of APE1 and not its redox-signaling, that restores the Pt-damage removal. Together, these data provide the first evidence that a critical BER enzyme, APE1, helps regulate the NER pathway in the repair of cisplatin damage in sensory neurons.

  17. Epidermal Rac1 regulates the DNA damage response and protects from UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Haase, Ingo

    2017-03-09

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common type of cancer. Increased expression and activity of Rac1, a small Rho GTPase, has been shown previously in NMSC and other human cancers; suggesting that Rac1 may function as an oncogene in skin. DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis studies in mice have shown that Rac1 is required for chemically induced skin papilloma formation. However, UVB radiation by the sun, which causes DNA damage, is the most relevant cause for NMSC. A potential role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far. To investigate this, we irradiated mice with epidermal Rac1 deficiency (Rac1-EKO) and their controls using a well-established protocol for long-term UV-irradiation. Most of the Rac1-EKO mice developed severe skin erosions upon long-term UV-irradiation, unlike their controls. These skin erosions in Rac1-EKO mice healed subsequently. Surprisingly, we observed development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) within the UV-irradiation fields. This shows that the presence of Rac1 in the epidermis protects from UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis. Short-term UV-irradiation experiments revealed increased UV-light-induced apoptosis of Rac1-deficient epidermal keratinocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. Further investigations using cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase transgenic mice revealed that the observed increase in UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis in Rac1-EKO mice is DNA damage dependent and correlates with caspase-8 activation. Furthermore, Rac1-deficient keratinocytes showed reduced levels of p53, γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 suggesting an attenuated DNA damage response upon UV-irradiation. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for a protective role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis and keratinocyte apoptosis probably through regulating mechanisms of the DNA damage response and repair pathways.

  18. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) regulate DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Neal, Jessica A; De Wever, Veerle; Morrice, Nick A; Meek, Katheryn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2014-06-25

    The protein kinase activity of the DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit) and its autophosphorylation are critical for DBS (DNA double-strand break) repair via NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining). Recent studies have shown that depletion or inactivation of DNA-PKcs kinase activity also results in mitotic defects. DNA-PKcs is autophosphorylated on Ser2056, Thr2647 and Thr2609 in mitosis and phosphorylated DNA-PKcs localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and the midbody. DNA-PKcs also interacts with PP6 (protein phosphatase 6), and PP6 has been shown to dephosphorylate Aurora A kinase in mitosis. Here we report that DNA-PKcs is phosphorylated on Ser3205 and Thr3950 in mitosis. Phosphorylation of Thr3950 is DNA-PK-dependent, whereas phosphorylation of Ser3205 requires PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1). Moreover, PLK1 phosphorylates DNA-PKcs on Ser3205 in vitro and interacts with DNA-PKcs in mitosis. In addition, PP6 dephosphorylates DNA-PKcs at Ser3205 in mitosis and after IR (ionizing radiation). DNA-PKcs also phosphorylates Chk2 on Thr68 in mitosis and both phosphorylation of Chk2 and autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs in mitosis occur in the apparent absence of Ku and DNA damage. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into the roles of DNA-PKcs and PP6 in mitosis and suggest that DNA-PKcs' role in mitosis may be mechanistically distinct from its well-established role in NHEJ.

  19. Suppression of the Escherichia coli dnaA46 mutation by changes in the activities of the pyruvate-acetate node links DNA replication regulation to central carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymecka-Mulik, Joanna; Boss, Lidia; Maciąg-Dorszyńska, Monika; Matias Rodrigues, João F; Gaffke, Lidia; Wosinski, Anna; Cech, Grzegorz M; Szalewska-Pałasz, Agnieszka; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Glinkowska, Monika

    2017-01-01

    To ensure faithful transmission of genetic material to progeny cells, DNA replication is tightly regulated, mainly at the initiation step. Escherichia coli cells regulate the frequency of initiation according to growth conditions. Results of the classical, as well as the latest studies, suggest that the DNA replication in E. coli starts at a predefined, constant cell volume per chromosome but the mechanisms coordinating DNA replication with cell growth are still not fully understood. Results of recent investigations have revealed a role of metabolic pathway proteins in the control of cell division and a direct link between metabolism and DNA replication has also been suggested both in Bacillus subtilis and E. coli cells. In this work we show that defects in the acetate overflow pathway suppress the temperature-sensitivity of a defective replication initiator-DnaA under acetogenic growth conditions. Transcriptomic and metabolic analyses imply that this suppression is correlated with pyruvate accumulation, resulting from alterations in the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity. Consequently, deletion of genes encoding the pyruvate dehydrogenase subunits likewise resulted in suppression of the thermal-sensitive growth of the dnaA46 strain. We propose that the suppressor effect may be directly related to the PDH complex activity, providing a link between an enzyme of the central carbon metabolism and DNA replication.

  20. Novel mechanism of gene regulation: the protein Rv1222 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits transcription by anchoring the RNA polymerase onto DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra, Paulami; Prajapati, Ranjit Kumar; Banerjee, Rajdeep; Sengupta, Shreya; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2015-07-13

    We propose a novel mechanism of gene regulation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis where the protein Rv1222 inhibits transcription by anchoring RNA polymerase (RNAP) onto DNA. In contrast to our existing knowledge that transcriptional repressors function either by binding to DNA at specific sequences or by binding to RNAP, we show that Rv1222-mediated transcription inhibition requires simultaneous binding of the protein to both RNAP and DNA. We demonstrate that the positively charged C-terminus tail of Rv1222 is responsible for anchoring RNAP on DNA, hence the protein slows down the movement of RNAP along the DNA during transcription elongation. The interaction between Rv1222 and DNA is electrostatic, thus the protein could inhibit transcription from any gene. As Rv1222 slows down the RNA synthesis, upon expression of the protein in Mycobacterium smegmatis or Escherichia coli, the growth rate of the bacteria is severely impaired. The protein does not possess any significant affinity for DNA polymerase, thus, is unable to inhibit DNA synthesis. The proposed mechanism by which Rv1222 inhibits transcription reveals a new repertoire of prokaryotic gene regulation. © Crown copyright 2015.

  1. DNA supercoiling in Escherichia coli is under tight and subtle homeostatic control, involving gene-expression and metabolic regulation of both topoisomerase I and DNA gyrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoep, J.L.; van der Weijden, C.C.; Andersen, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    DNA of prokaryotes is in a nonequilibrium. structural state, characterized as 'active' DNA supercoiling. Alterations in this state affect many life processes and a homeostatic control of DNA supercoiling has been suggested [Menzel, R. & Gellert. M. (1983) Cell 34, 105-113]. We here report on a ne...... of the nonequilibrium DNA structure in wild-type Escherichia coli is almost complete and subtle (i.e. involving at least three regulatory mechanisms)....

  2. DNA damage checkpoint kinase ATM regulates germination and maintains genome stability in seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterworth, Wanda M; Footitt, Steven; Bray, Clifford M; Finch-Savage, William E; West, Christopher E

    2016-08-23

    Genome integrity is crucial for cellular survival and the faithful transmission of genetic information. The eukaryotic cellular response to DNA damage is orchestrated by the DNA damage checkpoint kinases ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED (ATM) and ATM AND RAD3-RELATED (ATR). Here we identify important physiological roles for these sensor kinases in control of seed germination. We demonstrate that double-strand breaks (DSBs) are rate-limiting for germination. We identify that desiccation tolerant seeds exhibit a striking transcriptional DSB damage response during germination, indicative of high levels of genotoxic stress, which is induced following maturation drying and quiescence. Mutant atr and atm seeds are highly resistant to aging, establishing ATM and ATR as determinants of seed viability. In response to aging, ATM delays germination, whereas atm mutant seeds germinate with extensive chromosomal abnormalities. This identifies ATM as a major factor that controls germination in aged seeds, integrating progression through germination with surveillance of genome integrity. Mechanistically, ATM functions through control of DNA replication in imbibing seeds. ATM signaling is mediated by transcriptional control of the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED 5, an essential factor required for the aging-induced delay to germination. In the soil seed bank, seeds exhibit increased transcript levels of ATM and ATR, with changes in dormancy and germination potential modulated by environmental signals, including temperature and soil moisture. Collectively, our findings reveal physiological functions for these sensor kinases in linking genome integrity to germination, thereby influencing seed quality, crucial for plant survival in the natural environment and sustainable crop production.

  3. Characterization of three different clusters of 18S-26S ribosomal DNA genes in the sea urchin P. lividus: Genetic and epigenetic regulation synchronous to 5S rDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Caradonna, Fabio

    2016-04-15

    We previously reported the characterization 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clusters in the common sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and demonstrated the presence of DNA methylation-dependent silencing of embryo specific 5S rDNA cluster in adult tissue. In this work, we show genetic and epigenetic characterization of 18S-26S rDNA clusters in this specie. The results indicate the presence of three different 18S-26S rDNA clusters with different Non-Transcribed Spacer (NTS) regions that have different chromosomal localizations. Moreover, we show that the two largest clusters are hyper-methylated in the promoter-containing NTS regions in adult tissues, as in the 5S rDNA. These findings demonstrate an analogous epigenetic regulation in small and large rDNA clusters and support the logical synchronism in building ribosomes. In fact, all the ribosomal RNA genes must be synchronously and equally transcribed to perform their unique final product. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. ATM regulates 3-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase and promotes therapeutic resistance to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Burrell, Kelly; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Remke, Marc; Golbourn, Brian; Chornenkyy, Yevgen; Gajadhar, Aaron; Fernandez, Nestor A; Clarke, Ian D; Barszczyk, Mark S; Pajovic, Sanja; Ternamian, Christian; Head, Renee; Sabha, Nesrin; Sobol, Robert W; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T; Jones, Chris; Dirks, Peter B; Zadeh, Gelareh; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-10-01

    Alkylating agents are a first-line therapy for the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including pediatric glioblastoma, a lethal tumor in children. Unfortunately, many tumors are resistant to this therapy. We sought to identify ways of sensitizing tumor cells to alkylating agents while leaving normal cells unharmed, increasing therapeutic response while minimizing toxicity. Using an siRNA screen targeting over 240 DNA damage response genes, we identified novel sensitizers to alkylating agents. In particular, the base excision repair (BER) pathway, including 3-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG), as well as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), were identified in our screen. Interestingly, we identified MPG as a direct novel substrate of ATM. ATM-mediated phosphorylation of MPG was required for enhanced MPG function. Importantly, combined inhibition or loss of MPG and ATM resulted in increased alkylating agent-induced cytotoxicity in vitro and prolonged survival in vivo. The discovery of the ATM-MPG axis will lead to improved treatment of alkylating agent-resistant tumors. Inhibition of ATM and MPG-mediated BER cooperate to sensitize tumor cells to alkylating agents, impairing tumor growth in vitro and in vivo with no toxicity to normal cells, providing an ideal therapeutic window. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. The DNA Sensor AIM2 Maintains Intestinal Homeostasis via Regulation of Epithelial Antimicrobial Host Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiqing Hu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial pattern molecules in the intestine play immunoregulatory roles via diverse pattern recognition receptors. However, the role of the cytosolic DNA sensor AIM2 in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis is unknown. Here, we show that Aim2−/− mice are highly susceptible to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis that is associated with microbial dysbiosis as represented by higher colonic burden of commensal Escherichia coli. Colonization of germ-free mice with Aim2−/− mouse microbiota leads to higher colitis susceptibility. In-depth investigation of AIM2-mediated host defense responses reveals that caspase-1 activation and IL-1β and IL-18 production are compromised in Aim2−/− mouse colons, consistent with defective inflammasome function. Moreover, IL-18 infusion reduces E. coli burden as well as colitis susceptibility in Aim2−/− mice. Altered microbiota in inflammasome-defective mice correlate with reduced expression of several antimicrobial peptides in intestinal epithelial cells. Together, these findings implicate DNA sensing by AIM2 as a regulatory mechanism for maintaining intestinal homeostasis.

  6. DNA Repair, Redox Regulation and Modulation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Mediated Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis-Ducey, Carol Dianne

    2009-01-01

    Interaction of estrogen receptor [alpha] (ER[alpha]) with 17[beta]-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) facilitates binding of the receptor to estrogen response elements (EREs) in target genes, which in turn leads to recruitment of coregulatory proteins. To better understand how estrogen-responsive genes are regulated, our laboratory identified a number of…

  7. Polycomb proteins control proliferation and transformation independently of cell cycle checkpoints by regulating DNA replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piunti, Andrea; Rossi, Alessandra; Cerutti, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    The ability of PRC1 and PRC2 to promote proliferation is a main feature that links polycomb (PcG) activity to cancer. PcGs silence the expression of the tumour suppressor locus Ink4a/Arf, whose products positively regulate pRb and p53 functions. Enhanced PcG activity is a frequent feature of human...

  8. Cyclic AMP Regulates Bacterial Persistence through Repression of the Oxidative Stress Response and SOS-Dependent DNA Repair in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C; Silva-Valenzuela, Cecilia; Brewster, Jennifer; Castro-Nallar, Eduardo; Levy, Stuart B; Camilli, Andrew

    2018-01-09

    Bacterial persistence is a transient, nonheritable physiological state that provides tolerance to bactericidal antibiotics. The stringent response, toxin-antitoxin modules, and stochastic processes, among other mechanisms, play roles in this phenomenon. How persistence is regulated is relatively ill defined. Here we show that cyclic AMP, a global regulator of carbon catabolism and other core processes, is a negative regulator of bacterial persistence in uropathogenic Escherichia coli , as measured by survival after exposure to a β-lactam antibiotic. This phenotype is regulated by a set of genes leading to an oxidative stress response and SOS-dependent DNA repair. Thus, persister cells tolerant to cell wall-acting antibiotics must cope with oxidative stress and DNA damage and these processes are regulated by cyclic AMP in uropathogenic E. coli IMPORTANCE Bacterial persister cells are important in relapsing infections in patients treated with antibiotics and also in the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Our results show that in uropathogenic E. coli , the second messenger cyclic AMP negatively regulates persister cell formation, since in its absence much more persister cells form that are tolerant to β-lactams antibiotics. We reveal the mechanism to be decreased levels of reactive oxygen species, specifically hydroxyl radicals, and SOS-dependent DNA repair. Our findings suggest that the oxidative stress response and DNA repair are relevant pathways to target in the design of persister-specific antibiotic compounds. Copyright © 2018 Molina-Quiroz et al.

  9. Cell- and virus-mediated regulation of the barrier-to-autointegration factor's phosphorylation state controls its DNA binding, dimerization, subcellular localization, and antipoxviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamin, Augusta; Wicklund, April; Wiebe, Matthew S

    2014-05-01

    Barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) is a DNA binding protein with multiple cellular functions, including the ability to act as a potent defense against vaccinia virus infection. This antiviral function involves BAF's ability to condense double-stranded DNA and subsequently prevent viral DNA replication. In recent years, it has become increasingly evident that dynamic phosphorylation involving the vaccinia virus B1 kinase and cellular enzymes is likely a key regulator of multiple BAF functions; however, the precise mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we analyzed how phosphorylation impacts BAF's DNA binding, subcellular localization, dimerization, and antipoxviral activity through the characterization of BAF phosphomimetic and unphosphorylatable mutants. Our studies demonstrate that increased phosphorylation enhances BAF's mobilization from the nucleus to the cytosol, while dephosphorylation restricts BAF to the nucleus. Phosphorylation also impairs both BAF's dimerization and its DNA binding activity. Furthermore, our studies of BAF's antiviral activity revealed that hyperphosphorylated BAF is unable to suppress viral DNA replication or virus production. Interestingly, the unphosphorylatable BAF mutant, which is capable of binding DNA but localizes predominantly to the nucleus, was also incapable of suppressing viral replication. Thus, both DNA binding and localization are important determinants of BAF's antiviral function. Finally, our examination of how phosphatases are involved in regulating BAF revealed that PP2A dephosphorylates BAF during vaccinia infection, thus counterbalancing the activity of the B1 kinase. Altogether, these data demonstrate that phosphoregulation of BAF by viral and cellular enzymes modulates this protein at multiple molecular levels, thus determining its effectiveness as an antiviral factor and likely other functions as well. The barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) contributes to cellular genomic integrity in multiple ways

  10. C/EBPα Expression is Partially Regulated by C/EBPβ in Response to DNA Damage and C/EBPα Deficient Fibroblasts Display an Impaired G1 Checkpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Rakesh; Thompson, Elizabeth A.; Yoon, Kyungsil; Smart, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    We observed that C/EBPα is highly inducible in primary fibroblasts by DNA damaging agents that induce strand breaks, alkylate and crosslink DNA as well as those that produce bulky DNA lesions. Fibroblasts deficient in C/EBPα (C/EBPα-/-) display an impaired G1 checkpoint as evidenced by inappropriate entry into S-phase in response to DNA damage and these cells also display an enhanced G1 to S transition in response to mitogens. The induction of C/EBPα by DNA damage in fibroblasts does not require p53. EMSA analysis of nuclear extracts prepared from UVB- and MNNG-treated fibroblasts revealed increased binding of C/EBPβ to a C/EBP consensus sequence and ChIP analysis revealed increased C/EBPβ binding to the C/EBPα promoter. To determine whether C/EBPβ has a role in the regulation of C/EBPα we treated C/EBPβ-/- fibroblasts with UVB or MNNG. We observed C/EBPα induction was impaired in both UVB- and MNNG- treated C/EBPβ-/- fibroblasts. Our study reveals a novel role for C/EBPβ in the regulation of C/EBPα in response to DNA damage and provides definitive genetic evidence that C/EBPα has a critical role in the DNA damage G1 checkpoint. PMID:19581927

  11. NF-κB regulates DNA double-strand break repair in conjunction with BRCA1-CtIP complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volcic, Meta; Karl, Sabine; Baumann, Bernd; Salles, Daniela; Daniel, Peter; Fulda, Simone; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    NF-κB is involved in immune responses, inflammation, oncogenesis, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Even though NF-κB can be activated by DNA damage via Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) signalling, little was known about an involvement in DNA repair. In this work, we dissected distinct DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair mechanisms revealing a stimulatory role of NF-κB in homologous recombination (HR). This effect was independent of chromatin context, cell cycle distribution or cross-talk with p53. It was not mediated by the transcriptional NF-κB targets Bcl2, BAX or Ku70, known for their dual roles in apoptosis and DSB repair. A contribution by Bcl-xL was abrogated when caspases were inhibited. Notably, HR induction by NF-κB required the targets ATM and BRCA2. Additionally, we provide evidence that NF-κB interacts with CtIP-BRCA1 complexes and promotes BRCA1 stabilization, and thereby contributes to HR induction. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed accelerated formation of replication protein A (RPA) and Rad51 foci upon NF-κB activation indicating HR stimulation through DSB resection by the interacting CtIP-BRCA1 complex and Rad51 filament formation. Taken together, these results define multiple NF-κB-dependent mechanisms regulating HR induction, and thereby providing a novel intriguing explanation for both NF-κB-mediated resistance to chemo- and radiotherapies as well as for the sensitization by pharmaceutical intervention of NF-κB activation.

  12. Genome-wide DNA binding pattern of two-component system response regulator RhpR in Pseudomonas syringae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhong Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although Pseudomonas syringae uses the two-component system RhpRS to modulate the expression of type III secretion system (T3SS genes and pathogenicity, the molecular mechanisms and the regulon of RhpRS have yet to be fully demonstrated. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of RhpR binding to DNA prepared from P. syringae pv. phaseolicola in order to identify candidate direct targets of RhpR-mediated transcriptional regulation, as described in our recent article [1]. The data are available from NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO with the accession number GSE58533. Here we describe the detailed methods and data analyses of our RhpR ChIP-seq dataset.

  13. RNA epitranscriptomics: Regulation of infection of RNA and DNA viruses by N6 -methyladenosine (m6 A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Brandon; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2018-04-26

    N 6 -methyladenosine (m 6 A) was discovered 4 decades ago. However, the functions of m 6 A and the cellular machinery that regulates its changes have just been revealed in the last few years. m 6 A is an abundant internal mRNA modification on cellular RNA and is implicated in diverse cellular functions. Recent works have demonstrated the presence of m 6 A in the genomes of RNA viruses and transcripts of a DNA virus with either a proviral or antiviral role. Here, we first summarize what is known about the m 6 A "writers," "erasers," "readers," and "antireaders" as well as the role of m 6 A in mRNA metabolism. We then review how the replications of numerous viruses are enhanced and restricted by m 6 A with emphasis on the oncogenic DNA virus, Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), whose m 6 A epitranscriptome was recently mapped. In the context of KSHV, m 6 A and the reader protein YTHDF2 acts as an antiviral mechanism during viral lytic replication. During viral latency, KSHV alters m 6 A on genes that are implicated in cellular transformation and viral latency. Lastly, we discuss future studies that are important to further delineate the functions of m 6 A in KSHV latent and lytic replication and KSHV-induced oncogenesis. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. DNA-mediated dimerization on a compact sequence signature controls enhancer engagement and regulation by FOXA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuecong; Srivastava, Yogesh; Jankowski, Aleksander; Malik, Vikas; Wei, Yuanjie; Del Rosario, Ricardo C H; Cojocaru, Vlad; Prabhakar, Shyam; Jauch, Ralf

    2018-04-14

    FOXA1 is a transcription factor capable to bind silenced chromatin to direct context-dependent cell fate conversion. Here, we demonstrate that a compact palindromic DNA element (termed 'DIV' for its diverging half-sites) induces the homodimerization of FOXA1 with strongly positive cooperativity. Alternative structural models are consistent with either an indirect DNA-mediated cooperativity or a direct protein-protein interaction. The cooperative homodimer formation is strictly constrained by precise half-site spacing. Re-analysis of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data indicates that the DIV is effectively targeted by FOXA1 in the context of chromatin. Reporter assays show that FOXA1-dependent transcriptional activity declines when homodimeric binding is disrupted. In response to phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibition DIV sites pre-bound by FOXA1 such as at the PVT1/MYC locus exhibit a strong increase in accessibility suggesting a role of the DIV configuration in the chromatin closed-open dynamics. Moreover, several disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms map to DIV elements and show allelic differences in FOXA1 homodimerization, reporter gene expression and are annotated as quantitative trait loci. This includes the rs541455835 variant at the MAPT locus encoding the Tau protein associated with Parkinson's disease. Collectively, the DIV guides chromatin engagement and regulation by FOXA1 and its perturbation could be linked to disease etiologies.

  15. Transcriptional regulation and DNA methylation in plastids during transitional conversion of chloroplasts to chromoplasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, H; Ngernprasirtsiri, J; Akazawa, T

    1990-01-01

    During transitional conversion of chloroplasts to chromoplasts in ripening tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruits, transcripts for several plastid genes for photosynthesis decreased to undetectable levels. Run-on transcription of plastids indicated that transcriptional regulation operated as a predominant factor. We found that most of the genes in chloroplasts were actively transcribed in vitro by Escherichia coli and soluble plastid RNA polymerases, but some genes in chromoplasts seemed to ...

  16. Melatonin-Mediated Development of Ovine Cumulus Cells, Perhaps by Regulation of DNA Methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Fang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cumulus cells of pre-pubertal domestic animals are dysfunctional, perhaps due to age-specific epigenetic events. This study was designed to determine effects of melatonin treatment of donors on methylation modification of pre-pubertal cumulus cells. Cumulus cells from germinal vesicle stage cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs were collected from eighteen lambs which were randomly divided into control group (C and melatonin group given an 18 mg melatonin implant subcutaneous (M. Compared to the C group, the M group had higher concentrations of melatonin in plasma and follicular fluid (p < 0.05, greater superovulation, a higher proportion of fully expanded COCs, and a lower proportion of apoptotic cumulus cells (p < 0.05. Real-time PCR results showed that melatonin up-regulated expression of genes MT1, Bcl2, DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b, but down-regulated expression of genes p53, Caspase 3 and Bax (p < 0.05. Furthermore, melatonin increased FI of FITC (global methylation level on cumulus cells (p < 0.05. To understand the regulation mechanism, the DNMTs promoter methylation sequence were analyzed. Compared to the C group, although there was less methylation at two CpG sites of DNMT1 (p < 0.05 and higher methylation at two CpG sites of DNMT3a (p < 0.05, there were no significant differences in methylation of the detected DNMT1 and DNMT3a promoter regions. However, there were lower methylation levels at five CpG sites of DNMT3b, which decreased methylation of detected DNMT3b promoter region on M group (p < 0.05. In conclusion, alterations of methylation regulated by melatonin may mediate development of cumulus cells in lambs.

  17. Chk2 regulates transcription-independent p53-mediated apoptosis in response to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chen; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide; Motoyama, Noboru

    2005-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a central role in the induction of apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. The protein kinase Chk2 is an important regulator of p53 function in mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Cells derived from Chk2-deficient mice are resistant to the induction of apoptosis by IR, and this resistance has been thought to be a result of the defective transcriptional activation of p53 target genes. It was recently shown, however, that p53 itself and histone H1.2 translocate to mitochondria and thereby induces apoptosis in a transcription-independent manner in response to IR. We have now examined whether Chk2 also regulates the transcription-independent induction of apoptosis by p53 and histone H1.2. The reduced ability of IR to induce p53 stabilization in Chk2-deficient thymocytes was associated with a marked impairment of p53 and histone H1 translocation to mitochondria. These results suggest that Chk2 regulates the transcription-independent mechanism of p53-mediated apoptosis by inducing stabilization of p53 in response to IR

  18. Regulating repression: roles for the sir4 N-terminus in linker DNA protection and stabilization of epigenetic states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Kueng

    Full Text Available Silent information regulator proteins Sir2, Sir3, and Sir4 form a heterotrimeric complex that represses transcription at subtelomeric regions and homothallic mating type (HM loci in budding yeast. We have performed a detailed biochemical and genetic analysis of the largest Sir protein, Sir4. The N-terminal half of Sir4 is dispensable for SIR-mediated repression of HM loci in vivo, except in strains that lack Yku70 or have weak silencer elements. For HM silencing in these cells, the C-terminal domain (Sir4C, residues 747-1,358 must be complemented with an N-terminal domain (Sir4N; residues 1-270, expressed either independently or as a fusion with Sir4C. Nonetheless, recombinant Sir4C can form a complex with Sir2 and Sir3 in vitro, is catalytically active, and has sedimentation properties similar to a full-length Sir4-containing SIR complex. Sir4C-containing SIR complexes bind nucleosomal arrays and protect linker DNA from nucleolytic digestion, but less effectively than wild-type SIR complexes. Consistently, full-length Sir4 is required for the complete repression of subtelomeric genes. Supporting the notion that the Sir4 N-terminus is a regulatory domain, we find it extensively phosphorylated on cyclin-dependent kinase consensus sites, some being hyperphosphorylated during mitosis. Mutation of two major phosphoacceptor sites (S63 and S84 derepresses natural subtelomeric genes when combined with a serendipitous mutation (P2A, which alone can enhance the stability of either the repressed or active state. The triple mutation confers resistance to rapamycin-induced stress and a loss of subtelomeric repression. We conclude that the Sir4 N-terminus plays two roles in SIR-mediated silencing: it contributes to epigenetic repression by stabilizing the SIR-mediated protection of linker DNA; and, as a target of phosphorylation, it can destabilize silencing in a regulated manner.

  19. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Regulates Expression of the DNA Damage Repair Gene, Fanconi anemia A, in Pituitary Gonadotroph Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larder, Rachel; Chang, Lynda; Clinton, Michael; Brown, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Gonadal function is critically dependant on regulated secretion of the gonadotropin hormones from anterior pituitary gonadotroph cells. Gonadotropin biosynthesis and release is triggered by the binding of hypothalamic GnRH to GnRH receptor expressed on the gonadotroph cell surface. The repertoire of regulatory molecules involved in this process are still being defined. We used the mouse LβT2 gonadotroph cell line, which expresses both gonadotropin hormones, as a model to investigate GnRH regulation of gene expression and differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to identify and isolate hormonally induced changes. This approach identified Fanconi anemia a (Fanca), a gene implicated in DNA damage repair, as a differentially expressed transcript. Mutations in Fanca account for the majority of cases of Fanconi anemia (FA), a recessively inherited disease identified by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, infertility, and cancer susceptibility. We confirmed expression and hormonal regulation of Fanca mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR, which showed that GnRH induced a rapid, transient increase in Fanca mRNA. Fanca protein was also acutely upregulated after GnRH treatment of LβT2 cells. In addition, Fanca gene expression was confined to mature pituitary gonadotrophs and adult mouse pituitary and was not expressed in the immature αT3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Thus, this study extends the expression profile of Fanca into a highly specialized endocrine cell and demonstrates hormonal regulation of expression of the Fanca locus. We suggest that this regulatory mechanism may have a crucial role in the GnRH-response mechanism of mature gonadotrophs and perhaps the etiology of FA. PMID:15128600

  20. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone regulates expression of the DNA damage repair gene, Fanconi anemia A, in pituitary gonadotroph cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larder, Rachel; Chang, Lynda; Clinton, Michael; Brown, Pamela

    2004-09-01

    Gonadal function is critically dependant on regulated secretion of the gonadotropin hormones from anterior pituitary gonadotroph cells. Gonadotropin biosynthesis and release is triggered by the binding of hypothalamic GnRH to GnRH receptor expressed on the gonadotroph cell surface. The repertoire of regulatory molecules involved in this process are still being defined. We used the mouse L beta T2 gonadotroph cell line, which expresses both gonadotropin hormones, as a model to investigate GnRH regulation of gene expression and differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to identify and isolate hormonally induced changes. This approach identified Fanconi anemia a (Fanca), a gene implicated in DNA damage repair, as a differentially expressed transcript. Mutations in Fanca account for the majority of cases of Fanconi anemia (FA), a recessively inherited disease identified by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, infertility, and cancer susceptibility. We confirmed expression and hormonal regulation of Fanca mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR, which showed that GnRH induced a rapid, transient increase in Fanca mRNA. Fanca protein was also acutely upregulated after GnRH treatment of L beta T2 cells. In addition, Fanca gene expression was confined to mature pituitary gonadotrophs and adult mouse pituitary and was not expressed in the immature alpha T3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Thus, this study extends the expression profile of Fanca into a highly specialized endocrine cell and demonstrates hormonal regulation of expression of the Fanca locus. We suggest that this regulatory mechanism may have a crucial role in the GnRH-response mechanism of mature gonadotrophs and perhaps the etiology of FA.

  1. DNA-binding proteins regulating pIP501 transfer and replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Grohmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available pIP501 is a Gram-positive broad-host-range model plasmid intensively used for studying plasmid replication and conjugative transfer. It is a multiple antibiotic resistance plasmid frequently found in clinical Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates. Replication of pIP501 proceeds unidirectionally by a theta mechanism. The minimal replicon of pIP501 is composed of the repR gene encoding the essential rate-limiting replication initiator protein RepR and the origin of replication, oriR, located downstream of repR. RepR is similar to RepE of related streptococcal plasmid pAMβ1, which has been shown to possess RNase activity cleaving free RNA molecules in close proximity of the initiation site of DNA synthesis. Replication of pIP501 is controlled by the concerted action of a small protein, CopR, and an antisense RNA, RNAIII. CopR has a dual role: It acts as transcriptional repressor at the repR promoter and prevents convergent transcription of RNAIII and repR mRNA (RNAII, thereby indirectly increasing RNAIII synthesis. CopR binds asymmetrically as a dimer at two consecutive binding sites upstream of and overlapping with the repR promoter. RNAIII induces transcriptional attenuation within the leader region of the repR mRNA (RNAII. Deletion of either control component causes a 10- to 20-fold increase of plasmid copy number, while simultaneous deletions have no additional effect. Conjugative transfer of pIP501 depends on a type IV secretion system (T4SS encoded in a single operon. Its transfer host-range is considerably broad, as it has been transferred to virtually all Gram-positive bacteria including filamentous streptomycetes and even the Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Expression of the 15 genes encoding the T4SS is tightly controlled by binding of the relaxase TraA, the transfer initiator protein, to the operon promoter, which overlaps with the origin of transfer (oriT. The T4SS operon encodes the DNA-binding proteins TraJ (VirD4

  2. Hur reagerar läsarna på sponsrade inlägg publicerade på Isabella Löwengrips blogg? : En teoriprövande studie av Stuart Halls teori om inkodning och avkodning.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorentzon, Karin; Gustafsson, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Denna studie handlar om hur ett sponsrat blogginlägg av en influencer inkodas och hur läsarna i kommentarerna avkodar meddelandet och reagerar på inlägget. Studiens syfte är att öka förståelsen för hur läsare avkodar sponsrade blogginlägg. Vi antog innan genomförandet att fler skulle avkoda meddelandena på ett sätt som skulle vara mer kritiskt gentemot samarbetet, därför har det gjorts en teoriprövande studie av Stuart Halls teori om inkodning och avkodning. För uppnå vårt syfte har vi använt...

  3. Hsp90α regulates ATM and NBN functions in sensing and repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, Rosa; Antoccia, Antonio; Leone, Stefano; Ascenzi, Paolo; di Masi, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90α) regulates cell proteostasis and mitigates the harmful effects of endogenous and exogenous stressors on the proteome. Indeed, the inhibition of Hsp90α ATPase activity affects the cellular response to ionizing radiation (IR). Although the interplay between Hsp90α and several DNA damage response (DDR) proteins has been reported, its role in the DDR is still unclear. Here, we show that ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated kinase (ATM) and nibrin (NBN), but not 53BP1, RAD50, and MRE11, are Hsp90α clients as the Hsp90α inhibitor 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) induces ATM and NBN polyubiquitination and proteosomal degradation in normal fibroblasts and lymphoblastoid cell lines. Hsp90α-ATM and Hsp90α-NBN complexes are present in unstressed and irradiated cells, allowing the maintenance of ATM and NBN stability that is required for the MRE11/RAD50/NBN complex-dependent ATM activation and the ATM-dependent phosphorylation of both NBN and Hsp90α in response to IR-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Hsp90α forms a complex also with ph-Ser1981-ATM following IR. Upon phosphorylation, NBN dissociates from Hsp90α and translocates at the DSBs, while phThr5/7-Hsp90α is not recruited at the damaged sites. The inhibition of Hsp90α affects nuclear localization of MRE11 and RAD50, impairs DDR signaling (e.g., BRCA1 and CHK2 phosphorylation), and slows down DSBs repair. Hsp90α inhibition does not affect DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity, which possibly phosphorylates Hsp90α and H2AX after IR. Notably, Hsp90α inhibition causes H2AX phosphorylation in proliferating cells, this possibly indicating replication stress events. Overall, present data shed light on the regulatory role of Hsp90α on the DDR, controlling ATM and NBN stability and influencing the DSBs signaling and repair. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. Regulation of adeno-associated virus DNA replication by the cellular TAF-I/set complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Gianluca; Marcello, Alessandro; Myers, Michael P; Giacca, Mauro

    2006-07-01

    The Rep proteins of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) are required for viral replication in the presence of adenovirus helper functions and as yet poorly characterized cellular factors. In an attempt to identify such factors, we purified Flag-Rep68-interacting proteins from human cell lysates. Several polypeptides were identified by mass spectrometry, among which was ANP32B, a member of the acidic nuclear protein 32 family which takes part in the formation of the template-activating factor I/Set oncoprotein (TAF-I/Set) complex. The N terminus of Rep was found to specifically bind the acidic domain of ANP32B; through this interaction, Rep was also able to recruit other members of the TAF-I/Set complex, including the ANP32A protein and the histone chaperone TAF-I/Set. Further experiments revealed that silencing of ANP32A and ANP32B inhibited AAV replication, while overexpression of all of the components of the TAF-I/Set complex increased de novo AAV DNA synthesis in permissive cells. Besides being the first indication that the TAF-I/Set complex participates in wild-type AAV replication, these findings have important implications for the generation of recombinant AAV vectors since overexpression of the TAF-I/Set components was found to markedly increase viral vector production.

  5. Hepatitis B virus X protein suppresses caveolin-1 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma by regulating DNA methylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Jun; Lu, Qian; Dong, Jiahong; Li, Xiaowu; Ma, Kuansheng; Cai, Lei

    2012-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms of caveolin-1 downregulation by hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx). The DNA methylation status of the caveolin-1 promoter was examined by nested methylation-specific PCR of 33 hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) samples. The SMMC-7721 hepatoma cell line was transfected with a recombinant HBx adenoviral vector, and the effects of HBx protein on caveolin-1 expression and promoter methylation were examined and confirmed by sequencing. A reporter gene containing the caveolin-1 promoter region was constructed, and the effects of HBx on the transcriptional activity of the promoter were also studied. Methylation of the caveolin-1 promoter was detected in 84.8% (28/33) of HBV-infected HCC samples. Expression of caveolin-1 was significantly downregulated (P = 0.022), and multiple CpG sites in the promoter region of caveolin-1 were methylated in SMMC-7721 cells after HBx transfection. Transfected HBx significantly suppressed caveolin-1 promoter activity (P = 0.001). HBx protein induces methylation of the caveolin-1 promoter region and suppresses its expression

  6. Epigenetic regulation of somatic angiotensin-converting enzyme by DNA methylation and histone acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, Guillaume; Lienhard, Daniel; Andrieu, Thomas; Vieau, Didier; Frey, Brigitte M; Frey, Felix J

    2011-04-01

    Somatic angiotensin-converting enzyme (sACE) is crucial in cardiovascular homeostasis and displays a tissue-specific profile. Epigenetic patterns modulate genes expression and their alterations were implied in pathologies including hypertension. However, the influence of DNA methylation and chromatin condensation state on the expression of sACE is unknown. We examined whether such epigenetic mechanisms could participate in the control of sACE expression in vitro and in vivo. We identified two CpG islands in the human ace-1 gene 3 kb proximal promoter region. Their methylation abolished the luciferase activity of ace-1 promoter/reporter constructs transfected into human liver (HepG2), colon (HT29), microvascular endothelial (HMEC-1) and lung (SUT) cell lines (p sACE mRNA expression cell-type specifically (p sACE mRNA expression in the lungs and liver (p = 0.05), but not in the kidney. In conclusion, the expression level of somatic ACE is modulated by CpG-methylation and histone deacetylases inhibition. The basal methylation pattern of the promoter of the ace-1 gene is cell-type specific and correlates to sACE transcription. DNMT inhibition is associated with altered methylation of the ace-1 promoter and a cell-type and tissue-specific increase of sACE mRNA levels. This study indicates a strong influence of epigenetic mechanisms on sACE expression.

  7. Lärplatta som verktyg för elever i behov av särskilt stöd! : En specialpedagogisk studie om hur elever i åk 4-7 använder lärplatta i klassrummet och hur uppföljning av användningen sker

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, Ditte; Nordström, Ulrika

    2017-01-01

    Studiens syfte var att få kunskap om hur lärplatta används som verktyg för elever i behov av särskilt stöd i åk 4-7, samt om lärplattan används utifrån specialpedagogens syfte för den enskilda eleven med den. Använda datainsamlingsmetoder är kvalitativa intervjuer med specialpedagoger, lärare och elever, samt elevobservationer. De frågeställningar som studien sökt svar på är: i vilket syfte valdes lärplatta som verktyg av specialpedagog för elever i behov av särskilt stöd, hur använder elever...

  8. DNA dynamics play a role as a basal transcription factor in the positioning and regulation of gene transcription initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Gelev, Vladimir; Yoo, Sang Wook; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Bishop, Alan R.; Rasmussen, Kim ?.; Usheva, Anny

    2009-01-01

    We assess the role of DNA breathing dynamics as a determinant of promoter strength and transcription start site (TSS) location. We compare DNA Langevin dynamic profiles of representative gene promoters, calculated with the extended non-linear PBD model of DNA with experimental data on transcription factor binding and transcriptional activity. Our results demonstrate that DNA dynamic activity at the TSS can be suppressed by mutations that do not affect basal transcription factor binding–DNA co...

  9. SRSF1 Prevents DNA Damage and Promotes Tumorigenesis through Regulation of DBF4B Pre-mRNA Splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulated alternative splicing events have been implicated in many types of cancer, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we observe that the splicing factor SRSF1 regulates DBF4B exon6 splicing by specifically binding and promoting its inclusion. Knockdown of the exon6-containing isoform (DBF4B-FL significantly inhibits the tumorigenic potential of colon cancer cells in vitro and in mice, and SRSF1 inactivation phenocopies DBF4B-FL depletion. DBF4B-FL and SRSF1 are required for cancer cell proliferation and for the maintenance of genomic stability. Overexpression of DBF4B-FL can protect against DNA damage induced by SRSF1 knockdown and rescues growth defects in SRSF1-depleted cells. Increased DBF4B exon6 inclusion parallels SRSF1 upregulation in clinical colorectal cancer samples. Taken together, our findings identify SRSF1 as a key regulator of DBF4B pre-mRNA splicing dysregulation in colon cancer, with possible clinical implications as candidate prognostic factors in cancer patients.

  10. DNA repair genes RAD52 and SRS2, a cell wall synthesis regulator gene SMI1, and the membrane sterol synthesis scaffold gene ERG28 are important in efficient Agrobacterium-mediated yeast transformation with chromosomal T-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmine, Yuta; Satoh, Yukari; Kiyokawa, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shinji; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Katsunori

    2016-04-02

    Plant pathogenic Agrobacterium strains can transfer T-DNA regions of their Ti plasmids to a broad range of eukaryotic hosts, including fungi, in vitro. In the recent decade, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a model host to reveal important host proteins for the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT). Further investigation is required to understand the fundamental mechanism of AMT, including interaction at the cell surface, to expand the host range, and to develop new tools. In this study, we screened a yeast mutant library for low AMT mutant strains by advantage of a chromosome type T-DNA, which transfer is efficient and independent on integration into host chromosome. By the mutant screening, we identified four mutant strains (srs2Δ, rad52Δ, smi1Δ and erg28Δ), which showed considerably low AMT efficiency. Structural analysis of T-DNA product replicons in AMT colonies of mutants lacking each of the two DNA repair genes, SRS2 and RAD52, suggested that the genes act soon after T-DNA entry for modification of the chromosomal T-DNA to stably maintain them as linear replicons and to circularize certain T-DNA simultaneously. The cell wall synthesis regulator SMI1 might have a role in the cell surface interaction between the donor and recipient cells, but the smi1Δ mutant exhibited pleiotropic effect, i.e. low effector protein transport as well as low AMT for the chromosomal T-DNA, but relatively high AMT for integrative T-DNAs. The ergosterol synthesis regulator/enzyme-scaffold gene ERG28 probably contributes by sensing a congested environment, because growth of erg28Δ strain was unaffected by the presence of donor bacterial cells, while the growth of the wild-type and other mutant yeast strains was suppressed by their presence. RAD52 and the DNA helicase/anti-recombinase gene SRS2 are necessary to form and maintain artificial chromosomes through the AMT of chromosomal T-DNA. A sterol synthesis scaffold gene ERG28 is important in the high

  11. Mitochondrial DNA maintenance is regulated in human hepatoma cells by glycogen synthase kinase 3β and p53 in response to tumor necrosis factor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadrot, Nathalie; Ghanem, Sarita; Braut, Françoise; Gavrilescu, Laura; Pilard, Nathalie; Mansouri, Abdellah; Moreau, Richard; Reyl-Desmars, Florence

    2012-01-01

    During chronic liver inflammation, up-regulated Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α) targets hepatocytes and induces abnormal reactive oxygen species (ROS) production responsible for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations. The serine/threonine Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) plays a pivotal role during inflammation but its involvement in the maintenance of mtDNA remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate its involvement in TNF-α induced mtDNA depletion and its interrelationship with p53 a protein known to maintain mtDNA copy numbers. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) we found that at 30 min in human hepatoma HepG2 cells TNF-α induced 0.55±0.10 mtDNA lesions per 10 Kb and a 52.4±2.8% decrease in mtDNA content dependent on TNF-R1 receptor and ROS production. Both lesions and depletion returned to baseline from 1 to 6 h after TNF-α exposure. Luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (LAC) was used to measure the rapid (10 min) and transient TNF-α induced increase in ROS production (168±15%). A transient 8-oxo-dG level of 1.4±0.3 ng/mg DNA and repair of abasic sites were also measured by ELISA assays. Translocation of p53 to mitochondria was observed by Western Blot and co-immunoprecipitations showed that TNF-α induced p53 binding to GSK3β and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM). In addition, mitochondrial D-loop immunoprecipitation (mtDIP) revealed that TNF-α induced p53 binding to the regulatory D-loop region of mtDNA. The knockdown of p53 by siRNAs, inhibition by the phosphoSer(15)p53 antibody or transfection of human mutant active GSK3βS9A pcDNA3 plasmid inhibited recovery of mtDNA content while blockade of GSK3β activity by SB216763 inhibitor or knockdown by siRNAs suppressed mtDNA depletion. This study is the first to report the involvement of GSK3β in TNF-α induced mtDNA depletion. We suggest that p53 binding to GSK3β, TFAM and D-loop could induce recovery of mtDNA content through mtDNA repair.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA maintenance is regulated in human hepatoma cells by glycogen synthase kinase 3β and p53 in response to tumor necrosis factor α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Vadrot

    Full Text Available During chronic liver inflammation, up-regulated Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α targets hepatocytes and induces abnormal reactive oxygen species (ROS production responsible for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA alterations. The serine/threonine Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 beta (GSK3β plays a pivotal role during inflammation but its involvement in the maintenance of mtDNA remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate its involvement in TNF-α induced mtDNA depletion and its interrelationship with p53 a protein known to maintain mtDNA copy numbers. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR we found that at 30 min in human hepatoma HepG2 cells TNF-α induced 0.55±0.10 mtDNA lesions per 10 Kb and a 52.4±2.8% decrease in mtDNA content dependent on TNF-R1 receptor and ROS production. Both lesions and depletion returned to baseline from 1 to 6 h after TNF-α exposure. Luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (LAC was used to measure the rapid (10 min and transient TNF-α induced increase in ROS production (168±15%. A transient 8-oxo-dG level of 1.4±0.3 ng/mg DNA and repair of abasic sites were also measured by ELISA assays. Translocation of p53 to mitochondria was observed by Western Blot and co-immunoprecipitations showed that TNF-α induced p53 binding to GSK3β and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM. In addition, mitochondrial D-loop immunoprecipitation (mtDIP revealed that TNF-α induced p53 binding to the regulatory D-loop region of mtDNA. The knockdown of p53 by siRNAs, inhibition by the phosphoSer(15p53 antibody or transfection of human mutant active GSK3βS9A pcDNA3 plasmid inhibited recovery of mtDNA content while blockade of GSK3β activity by SB216763 inhibitor or knockdown by siRNAs suppressed mtDNA depletion. This study is the first to report the involvement of GSK3β in TNF-α induced mtDNA depletion. We suggest that p53 binding to GSK3β, TFAM and D-loop could induce recovery of mtDNA content through mtDNA repair.

  13. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Seho [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chunghun [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Yoon-Jae [Department of Life Science, Kyungwon University, Seongnam-Si, Kyeonggi-Do 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Junsoo [Division of Biological Science and Technology, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-100 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Joonho [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Taegun, E-mail: tseo@dongguk.edu [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-16

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  14. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Seho; Lim, Chunghun; Lee, Jae Young; Song, Yoon-Jae; Park, Junsoo; Choe, Joonho; Seo, Taegun

    2010-01-01

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  15. Regulation of human histone gene expression: transcriptional and posttranscriptional control in the coupling of histone messenger RNA stability with DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumbach, L.L.; Stein, G.S.; Stein, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The extent to which transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation contributes to the coupling of histone gene expression and DNA replication was examined during the cell cycle in synchronized HeLa S3 cells. Rates of transcription were determined in vitro in isolated nuclei. A 3-5-fold increase in cell cycle dependent histone gene transcription was observed in early S phase, prior to the peak of DNA synthesis. This result is consistent with a previous determination of histone mRNA synthesis in intact cells. The transcription of these genes did not change appreciably after inhibition of DNA replication by hydroxyurea treatment, although Northern blot analysis indicated that cellular levels of histone mRNA decreased rapidly in the presence of the drug. Total cellular levels of histone mRNA closely parallel the rate of DNA synthesis as a function of cell cycle progression, reaching a maximal 20-fold increase as compared with non S phase levels. This DNA synthesis dependent accumulation of histone mRNA occurs predominantly in the cytoplasm and appears to be mediated primarily by control of histone mRNA stability. Changes in nuclear histone mRNA levels were less pronounced. These combined observations suggest that both transcriptional regulation and posttranscriptional regulation contribute toward control of the cell cycle dependent accumulation of histone mRNA during S phase, while the stability of histone mRNA throughout S phase and the selective turnover of histone mRNAs, either at the natural termination of S phase or following inhibition of DNA synthesis, are posttranscriptionally regulated

  16. Mutual enhancement of IL-2 and IL-7 on DNA vaccine immunogenicity mainly involves regulations on their receptor expression and receptor-expressing lymphocyte generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonghong; Liang, Shuang; Li, Xiujin; Wang, Liyue; Zhang, Jianlou; Xu, Jian; Huo, Shanshan; Cao, Xuebin; Zhong, Zhenyu; Zhong, Fei

    2015-07-09

    Our previous study showed that IL-2 and IL-7 could mutually enhance the immunogenicity of canine parvovirus VP2 DNA vaccine, although the underlying mechanism remained unknown. Here, we used the OVA gene as a DNA vaccine in a mouse model to test their enhancement on DNA vaccine immunogenicity and to explore the molecular mechanism. Results showed that both IL-2 and IL-7 genes significantly increased the immunogenicity of OVA DNA vaccine in mice. Co-administration of IL-2 and IL-7 genes with OVA DNA significantly increased OVA-specific antibody titers, T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production compared with IL-2 or IL-7 alone, confirming that IL-2 and IL-7 mutually enhanced DNA vaccine immunogenicity. Mechanistically, we have shown that IL-2 significantly stimulated generation of IL-7 receptor-expressing lymphocytes, and that IL-7 significantly induced IL-2 receptor expression. These results contribute to an explanation of the mechanism of the mutual effects of IL-2 and IL-7 on enhancing DNA vaccine immunogenicity and provided a basis for further investigation on their mutual effects on adjuvant activity and immune regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pretreatment antigen-specific immunity and regulation - association with subsequent immune response to anti-tumor DNA vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Laura E; Olson, Brian M; McNeel, Douglas G

    2017-07-18

    Immunotherapies have demonstrated clinical benefit for many types of cancers, however many patients do not respond, and treatment-related adverse effects can be severe. Hence many efforts are underway to identify treatment predictive biomarkers. We have reported the results of two phase I trials using a DNA vaccine encoding prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) in patients with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer. In both trials, persistent PAP-specific Th1 immunity developed in some patients, and this was associated with favorable changes in serum PSA kinetics. In the current study, we sought to determine if measures of antigen-specific or antigen non-specific immunity were present prior to treatment, and associated with subsequent immune response, to identify possible predictive immune biomarkers. Patients who developed persistent PAP-specific, IFNγ-secreting immune responses were defined as immune "responders." The frequency of peripheral T cell and B cell lymphocytes, natural killer cells, monocytes, dendritic cells, myeloid derived suppressor cells, and regulatory T cells were assessed by flow cytometry and clinical laboratory values. PAP-specific immune responses were evaluated by cytokine secretion in vitro, and by antigen-specific suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity to a recall antigen in an in vivo SCID mouse model. The frequency of peripheral blood cell types did not differ between the immune responder and non-responder groups. Non-responder patients tended to have higher PAP-specific IL-10 production pre-vaccination (p = 0.09). Responder patients had greater preexisting PAP-specific bystander regulatory responses that suppressed DTH to a recall antigen (p = 0.016). While our study population was small (n = 38), these results suggest that different measures of antigen-specific tolerance or regulation might help predict immunological outcome from DNA vaccination. These will be prospectively evaluated in an ongoing randomized, phase II trial.

  18. DNA methylation regulated microRNAs in HPV-16-induced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannigrahi, M K; Sharma, Rajni; Singh, Varinder; Panda, Naresh K; Rattan, Vidya; Khullar, Madhu

    2018-02-17

    Epigenetic modifications have been reported to play an important role in regulating gene expression and these modifications become critical when they have a role in controlling another important layer of epigenetic regulation namely microRNAs. In the present study, we have identified the microRNAs that may be regulated by promoter DNA methylation and histone acetylation in Human papilloma virus-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. HPV-negative cell line (UPCI:SCC-116) and HPV-16 +ve cell line (UPCI:SCC-090) were treated with methylation inhibitor (5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, AZA) and acetylation inhibitor (Trichostatin-A, TSA), followed by micro-array analysis. The differentially expressed miRNAs were validated in control (n = 10), HPV-16 +ve (n = 30), and HPV -ve (n = 30) HNC, TCGA (n = 529) tissue samples, and two HPV -ve (SCC116 and Hacat) and two HPV +ve (SCC090 and SiHa) cell lines. Methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (CHIP) were performed to validate their regulation. In silico and in vitro analyses of identified miRNAs were done to study putative pathways they target and their possible role in carcinogenesis. Among 10 miRNAs specifically up-regulated in microarray analysis of AZA-treated SCC090 cells, we observed significantly decreased expression of hsa-miR-181c-5p, hsa-miR-132-5p, hsa-miR-658 in HPV +ve HNC cohort, TCGA tissue samples, and cell lines as compared to their HPV -ve counterpart, and their promoter region also possesses CpG islands. MSP and analysis of TCGA data (MethHC) revealed increased frequency of methylation at the promoter of hsa-miR-132-5p that is negatively correlated with its expression. In TSA-treated SCC090 cells, out of 7 miRNAs, two namely Hsa-miR-129-2-3p and Hsa-miR-449a were found to be up-regulated as compared to HPV -ve cells. However, the levels of enrichment by anti-acetyl-H3 and anti-acetyl-H4 were significantly low in cell lines compared to respective controls

  19. Resveratrol Induced Premature Senescence Is Associated with DNA Damage Mediated SIRT1 and SIRT2 Down-Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehtap Kilic Eren

    agent doxorubicin also induced senescence in BJ fibroblasts associated with decreased SIRT1/2 levels. In conclusion our data reveal that resveratrol induced premature senescence is associated with SIRT1 and SIRT2 down regulation in human dermal fibroblasts. Here we suggest that the concomitant decline in SIRT1/2 expression in response to resveratrol treatment may be a cause for induction of senescence, which is most likely mediated by a regulatory mechanism activated by DNA damage response.

  20. Att vara "container" för patienten : En studie om hur sjukhuskuratorer upplever att de påverkas av det patientnära arbetet

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Oskar; Holmstedt, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Sjukhuskuratorer har samtal med patienter som lider till exempel av depression, ångest eller andra besvär orsakade av psykosociala faktorer så som stress, livskriser eller alkohol. I denna studie ställdes frågan vilka effekter det patientnära arbetet kan ha för sjukhuskuratorn. Syftet var att utifrån ett emotionsteoretiskt perspektiv undersöka hur sjukhuskuratorer upplever att de påverkas av det patientnära arbetet. I studien ställdes frågan vad sjukhuskuratorer upplever att det patientnära a...

  1. Employer branding. : - En fallstudie vid Sandvik AB om uppfattningar av begreppet employer branding och hur detta tillämpas idag och i framtiden.

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Employer branding är ett begrepp som är aktuellt bland företagen just nu och allt fler väljer att satsa på employer branding som marknadsföringsstrategi. Den här studien handlar om employer branding på Sandvik och begreppet employer branding.Syftet med denna fallstudie av en global koncern är att förklara och beskriva begreppet employerbranding, samt hur man arbetar med detta och vilka framtidsvisioner man har på Sandvik.Studien genomfördes med hjälp av kvalitativa intervjuer med ett antal ny...

  2. Decreased cell survival and DNA repair capacity after UVC irradiation in association with down-regulation of GRP78/BiP in human RSa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Ling; Kita, Kazuko; Wano, Chieko; Wu Yuping; Sugaya, Shigeru; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to extensive studies on the roles of molecular chaperones, such as heat shock proteins, there are only a few reports about the roles of GRP78/BiP, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced molecular chaperone, in mammalian cell responses to DNA-damaging stresses. To investigate whether GRP78/BiP is involved in resistance to a DNA-damaging agent, UVC (principally 254 nm in wavelength), we established human cells with down-regulation of GRP78/BiP by transfection of human RSa cells with antisense cDNA for GRP78/BiP. We found that the transfected cells showed higher sensitivity to UVC-induced cell death than control cells transfected with the vector alone. In the antisense-cDNA transfected cells, the removal capacities of the two major types of UVC-damaged DNA (thymine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts) in vivo and DNA synthesis activity of whole cell extracts to repair UVC-irradiated plasmids in vitro were remarkably decreased compared with those in the control cells. Furthermore, the antisense-cDNA transfected cells also showed slightly higher sensitivity to cisplatin-induced cell death than the control cells. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage is primarily repaired by nucleotide excision repair, like UVC-induced DNA damage. The present results suggest that GRP78/BiP plays a protective role against UVC-induced cell death possibly via nucleotide excision repair, at least in the human RSa cells tested

  3. SIRT3 restricts HBV transcription and replication via epigenetic regulation of cccDNA involving SUV39H1 and SETD1A histone methyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ji-Hua; Hu, Jie-Li; Cheng, Sheng-Tao; Yu, Hai-Bo; Wong, Vincent Kam Wai; Law, Betty Yuen Kwan; Yang, Yong-Feng; Huang, Ying; Liu, Yi; Chen, Wei-Xian; Cai, Xue-Fei; Tang, Hua; Hu, Yuan; Zhang, Wen-Lu; Liu, Xiang; Long, Quan-Xin; Zhou, Li; Tao, Na-Na; Zhou, Hong-Zhong; Yang, Qiu-Xia; Ren, Fang; He, Lin; Gong, Rui; Huang, Ai-Long; Chen, Juan

    2018-04-06

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. Maintenance of the covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) which serves as a template for HBV RNA transcription is responsible for the failure of eradicating chronic HBV during current antiviral therapy. cccDNA is assembled with cellular histone proteins into chromatin, but little is known about the regulation of HBV chromatin by histone posttranslational modifications. In this study, we identified SIRT3 as a host factor restricting HBV transcription and replication by screening seven members of Sirtuin family which is the class III histone deacetylase. Ectopic SIRT3 expression significantly reduced total HBV RNAs, 3.5-kb RNA as well as replicative intermediate DNA in HBV-infected HepG2-NTCP cells and PHH. In contrast, gene silencing of SIRT3 promoted HBV transcription and replication. Mechanistic study found nuclear SIRT3 was recruited to the HBV cccDNA, where it deacetylated histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9). Importantly, occupancy of SIRT3 onto cccDNA could increase the recruitment of histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 to cccDNA and decrease recruitment of SETD1A, leading to a marked increase of H3K9me3 and a decrease of H3K4me3 on cccDNA. Moreover, SIRT3-mediated HBV cccDNA transcriptional repression involved decreased binding of host RNA polymerase II and transcription factor YY1 to cccDNA. Finally, viral protein HBx could relieve SIRT3-mediated cccDNA transcriptional repression by inhibiting both SIRT3 expression and its recruitment to cccDNA. SIRT3 is a novel host factor epigenetically restricting HBV cccDNA transcription by acting cooperatively with histone methyltransferase. These data provided a rational for the use of SIRT3 activators in the prevention or treatment of HBV infection. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  4. Systematic analysis of DEMETER-like DNA glycosylase genes shows lineage-specific Smi-miR7972 involved in SmDML1 regulation in Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Li, Caili; Lu, Shanfa

    2018-05-08

    DEMETER-like DNA glycosylases (DMLs) initiate the base excision repair-dependent DNA demethylation to regulate a wide range of biological processes in plants. Six putative SmDML genes, termed SmDML1-SmDML6, were identified from the genome of S. miltiorrhiza, an emerging model plant for Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) studies. Integrated analysis of gene structures, sequence features, conserved domains and motifs, phylogenetic analysis and differential expression showed the conservation and divergence of SmDMLs. SmDML1, SmDML2 and SmDML4 were significantly down-regulated by the treatment of 5Aza-dC, a general DNA methylation inhibitor, suggesting involvement of SmDMLs in genome DNA methylation change. SmDML1 was predicted and experimentally validated to be target of Smi-miR7972. Computational analysis of forty whole genome sequences and almost all of RNA-seq data from Lamiids revealed that MIR7972s were only distributed in some plants of the three orders, including Lamiales, Solanales and Boraginales, and the number of MIR7972 genes varied among species. It suggests that MIR7972 genes underwent expansion and loss during the evolution of some Lamiids species. Phylogenetic analysis of MIR7972s showed closer evolutionary relationships between MIR7972s in Boraginales and Solanales in comparison with Lamiales. These results provide a valuable resource for elucidating DNA demethylation mechanism in S. miltiorrhiza.

  5. General transfer matrix formalism to calculate DNA-protein-drug binding in gene regulation: application to OR operator of phage lambda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teif, Vladimir B

    2007-01-01

    The transfer matrix methodology is proposed as a systematic tool for the statistical-mechanical description of DNA-protein-drug binding involved in gene regulation. We show that a genetic system of several cis-regulatory modules is calculable using this method, considering explicitly the site-overlapping, competitive, cooperative binding of regulatory proteins, their multilayer assembly and DNA looping. In the methodological section, the matrix models are solved for the basic types of short- and long-range interactions between DNA-bound proteins, drugs and nucleosomes. We apply the matrix method to gene regulation at the O(R) operator of phage lambda. The transfer matrix formalism allowed the description of the lambda-switch at a single-nucleotide resolution, taking into account the effects of a range of inter-protein distances. Our calculations confirm previously established roles of the contact CI-Cro-RNAP interactions. Concerning long-range interactions, we show that while the DNA loop between the O(R) and O(L) operators is important at the lysogenic CI concentrations, the interference between the adjacent promoters P(R) and P(RM) becomes more important at small CI concentrations. A large change in the expression pattern may arise in this regime due to anticooperative interactions between DNA-bound RNA polymerases. The applicability of the matrix method to more complex systems is discussed.

  6. RPA physically interacts with the human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 to regulate excision of oxidative DNA base damage in primer-template structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Corey A; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Hazra, Tapas K; Mitra, Sankar

    2010-06-04

    The human DNA glycosylase NEIL1, activated during the S-phase, has been shown to excise oxidized base lesions in single-strand DNA substrates. Furthermore, our previous work demonstrating functional interaction of NEIL1 with PCNA and flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) suggested its involvement in replication-associated repair. Here we show interaction of NEIL1 with replication protein A (RPA), the heterotrimeric single-strand DNA binding protein that is essential for replication and other DNA transactions. The NEIL1 immunocomplex isolated from human cells contains RPA, and its abundance in the complex increases after exposure to oxidative stress. NEIL1 directly interacts with the large subunit of RPA (K(d) approximately 20 nM) via the common interacting interface (residues 312-349) in NEIL1's disordered C-terminal region. RPA inhibits the base excision activity of both wild-type NEIL1 (389 residues) and its C-terminal deletion CDelta78 mutant (lacking the interaction domain) for repairing 5-hydroxyuracil (5-OHU) in a primer-template structure mimicking the DNA replication fork. This inhibition is reduced when the damage is located near the primer-template junction. Contrarily, RPA moderately stimulates wild-type NEIL1 but not the CDelta78 mutant when 5-OHU is located within the duplex region. While NEIL1 is inhibited by both RPA and Escherichia coli single-strand DNA binding protein, only inhibition by RPA is relieved by PCNA. These results showing modulation of NEIL1's activity on single-stranded DNA substrate by RPA and PCNA support NEIL1's involvement in repairing the replicating genome. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The histone H3K9 methylation and RNAi pathways regulate normalnucleolar and repeated DNA organization by inhibiting formation ofextrachromosomal DNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2006-06-15

    In order to identify regulators of nuclear organization, Drosophila mutants in the Su(var)3-9 histone H3K9 methyltransferase, RNAi pathway components, and other regulators of heterochromatin-mediated gene silencing were examined for altered nucleoli and positioning of repeated DNAs. Animals lacking components of the H3K9 methylation and RNAi pathways contained disorganized nucleoli, ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and satellite DNAs. The levels of H3K9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) in chromatin associated with repeated DNAs decreased dramatically in Su(var)3-9 and dcr-2 (dicer-2) mutant tissues compared to wild type. We also observed a substantial increase in extrachromosomal repeated DNAs in mutant tissues. The disorganized nucleolus phenotype depends on the presence of Ligase 4 (Lig4), and ecc DNA formation is not induced by removal of cohesin. We conclude that H3K9 methylation of rDNA and satellites, maintained by Su(var)3-9, HP1, and the RNAi pathway, is necessary for the structural stability of repeated DNAs, which is mediated through suppression of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). These results suggest a mechanism for how local chromatin structure can regulate genome stability, and the organization of chromosomal elements and nuclear organelles.

  8. Differences in the regulation by poly(ADP-ribose) of repair of DNA damage from alkylating agents and ultraviolet light according to cell type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleaver, J.E.; Bodell, W.J.; Morgan, W.F.; Zelle, B.

    1983-08-10

    Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis by 3-aminobenzamide in various human and hamster cells influenced the responses to DNA damage from methyl methanesulfonate, but not from ultraviolet light. After exposure to methyl methanesulfonate, 3-aminobenzamide increased the strand break frequency in all cell types studied, but only stimulated repair replication in lymphoid and HeLa cells, suggesting these are independent effects. 3-Aminobenzamide also inhibited the pathway for de novo synthesis of DNA purines, suggesting that some of its effects may be due to disturbance of precursor pathways and irrelevant to the role of poly(ADP-ribose) in repair. Previous claims that 3-aminobenzamide stimulates repair synthesis after exposure to UV light are probably artifacts, because the stimulations are only observed in lymphocytes in the presence of a high concentration of hydroxyurea that itself inhibits repair. The initial inhibition of semiconservative DNA synthesis and the excision of the major alkylation products and pyrimidine dimers were unaffected by 3-aminobenzamide. In general poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis appears to be uniquely involved in regulating the ligation stage of repair of alkylation damage but not ultraviolet damage. By regulating the ligation efficiency, poly(ADP-ribosylation) modulates the dynamic balance between incision and ligation, so as to minimize the frequency of DNA breaks. The ligation stage of repair of UV damage appears different and is not regulated by poly(ADP-ribosylation).

  9. Nano-hydroxyapatite modulates osteoblast lineage commitment by stimulation of DNA methylation and regulation of gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Shin-Woo; Jang, Hae Lin; Nam, Ki Tae; Beck, George R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is the primary structural component of the skeleton and dentition. Under biological conditions, HA does not occur spontaneously and therefore must be actively synthesized by mineralizing cells such as osteoblasts. The mechanism(s) by which HA is actively synthesized by cells and deposited to create a mineralized matrix are not fully understood and the consequences of mineralization on cell function are even less well understood. HA can be chemically synthesized (HAp) and is therefore currently being investigated as a promising therapeutic biomaterial for use as a functional scaffold and implant coating for skeletal repair and dental applications. Here we investigated the biological effects of nano-HAp (10×100 nm) on the lineage commitment and differentiation of bone forming osteoblasts. Exposure of early stage differentiating osteoblasts resulted in dramatic and sustained changes in gene expression, both increased and decreased, whereas later stage osteoblasts were much less responsive. Analysis of the promoter region one of the most responsive genes, alkaline phosphatase, identified the stimulation of DNA methylation following cell exposure to nano-HAp. Collectively, the results reveal the novel epigenetic regulation of cell function by nano-HAp which has significant implication on lineage determination as well as identifying a novel potential therapeutic use of nanomaterials. PMID:26141836

  10. Small RNA-based feedforward loop with AND-gate logic regulates extrachromosomal DNA transfer in Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenfort, Kai; Espinosa, Elena; Casadesús, Josep; Vogel, Jörg

    2015-08-25

    Horizontal gene transfer via plasmid conjugation is a major driving force in microbial evolution but constitutes a complex process that requires synchronization with the physiological state of the host bacteria. Although several host transcription factors are known to regulate plasmid-borne transfer genes, RNA-based regulatory circuits for host-plasmid communication remain unknown. We describe a posttranscriptional mechanism whereby the Hfq-dependent small RNA, RprA, inhibits transfer of pSLT, the virulence plasmid of Salmonella enterica. RprA employs two separate seed-pairing domains to activate the mRNAs of both the sigma-factor σ(S) and the RicI protein, a previously uncharacterized membrane protein here shown to inhibit conjugation. Transcription of ricI requires σ(S) and, together, RprA and σ(S) orchestrate a coherent feedforward loop with AND-gate logic to tightly control the activation of RicI synthesis. RicI interacts with the conjugation apparatus protein TraV and limits plasmid transfer under membrane-damaging conditions. To our knowledge, this study reports the first small RNA-controlled feedforward loop relying on posttranscriptional activation of two independent targets and an unexpected role of the conserved RprA small RNA in controlling extrachromosomal DNA transfer.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis class II apurinic/apyrimidinic-endonuclease/3'-5' exonuclease III exhibits DNA regulated modes of interaction with the sliding DNA β-clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanam, Taran; Rai, Niyati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2015-10-01

    The class-II AP-endonuclease (XthA) acts on abasic sites of damaged DNA in bacterial base excision repair. We identified that the sliding DNA β-clamp forms in vivo and in vitro complexes with XthA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel 239 QLRFPKK245 motif in the DNA-binding domain of XthA was found to be important for the interactions. Likewise, the peptide binding-groove (PBG) and the C-terminal of β-clamp located on different domains interact with XthA. The β-clamp-XthA complex can be disrupted by clamp binding peptides and also by a specific bacterial clamp inhibitor that binds at the PBG. We also identified that β-clamp stimulates the activities of XthA primarily by increasing its affinity for the substrate and its processivity. Additionally, loading of the β-clamp onto DNA is required for activity stimulation. A reduction in XthA activity stimulation was observed in the presence of β-clamp binding peptides supporting that direct interactions between the proteins are necessary to cause stimulation. Finally, we found that in the absence of DNA, the PBG located on the second domain of the β-clamp is important for interactions with XthA, while the C-terminal domain predominantly mediates functional interactions in the substrate's presence. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. GANP regulates the choice of DNA repair pathway by DNA-PKcs interaction in AID-dependent IgV region diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Mohammed Mansour Abbas; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Almofty, Sarah Ameen; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Shimoda, Mayuko; Sakaguchi, Nobuo

    2014-06-15

    RNA export factor germinal center-associated nuclear protein (GANP) interacts with activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and shepherds it from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and toward the IgV region loci in B cells. In this study, we demonstrate a role for GANP in the repair of AID-initiated DNA damage in chicken DT40 B cells to generate IgV region diversity by gene conversion and somatic hypermutation. GANP plays a positive role in IgV region diversification of DT40 B cells in a nonhomologous end joining-proficient state. DNA-PKcs physically interacts with GANP, and this interaction is dissociated by dsDNA breaks induced by a topoisomerase II inhibitor, etoposide, or AID overexpression. GANP affects the choice of DNA repair mechanism in B cells toward homologous recombination rather than nonhomologous end joining repair. Thus, GANP presumably plays a critical role in protection of the rearranged IgV loci by favoring homologous recombination of the DNA breaks under accelerated AID recruitment. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. The characterization of DNA methylation-mediated regulation of bovine placental lactogen and bovine prolactin-related protein-1 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Osman V

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine trophoblast binucleate cells (BNC express a plethora of molecules including bovine placental lactogen (bPL, gene name is bCSH1 and bovine prolactin-related protein-1 (bPRP1. BCSH1 and bPRP1 are members of the growth hormone (GH/prolactin (PRL gene family, which are expressed simultaneously in BNC and are central to placentation and the progression of pregnancy in cattle. However, there is a paucity of information on the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of both the bCSH1 and bPRP1 genes. Recent studies, however, have demonstrated that the expression of a number of genes is controlled by the methylation status of their promoter region. In the present study, we examined the cell-type-specific epigenetic alterations of the 5'-flanking region of the bCSH1 and bPRP1 genes to gain an insight into their regulatory mechanisms. Results Analysis of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment demonstrated that bCSH1 expression is moderately induced in fibroblast cultures but enhanced in BT-1 cells. Sodium bisulfite based sequencing revealed that bCSH1 is hypomethylated in the cotyledonary tissue but not in the fetal skin, and this pattern was not altered with the progression of pregnancy. On the other hand, the methylation status of bPRP1 was similar between the cotyledon and fetal skin. The bPRP1 gene was exclusively hypermethylated in a bovine trophoblast cell-derived BT-1 cell-line. While the activity of bCSH1 was similar in both BT-1 and bovine fibroblast cells, that of bPRP1 was specific to BT-1. Treatment with a demethylating agent and luciferase assays provided in vitro evidence of the positive regulation of bCSH1 but not bPRP1. Conclusion This is the first report to identify the differential regulatory mechanisms of the bCSH1 and bPRP1 genes and indicates that bCSH1 might potentially be the only transcript that is subject to DNA methyltransferase regulation. The data indicates the possibility of novel kinetics of induction of

  14. C/EBPα regulates CRL4Cdt2-mediated degradation of p21 in response to UVB-induced DNA damage to control the G1/S checkpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jonathan R; Bereman, Michael S; Nepomuceno, Angelito I; Thompson, Elizabeth A; Muddiman, David C; Smart, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    The bZIP transcription factor, C/EBPα is highly inducible by UVB and other DNA damaging agents in keratinocytes. C/EBPα-deficient keratinocytes fail to undergo cell cycle arrest in G1 in response to UVB-induced DNA damage and mice lacking epidermal C/EBPα are highly susceptible to UVB-induced skin cancer. The mechanism through which C/EBPα regulates the cell cycle checkpoint in response to DNA damage is unknown. Here we report untreated C/EBPα-deficient keratinocytes have normal levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21, however, UVB-treated C/EBPα-deficient keratinocytes fail to up-regulate nuclear p21 protein levels despite normal up-regulation of Cdkn1a mRNA levels. UVB-treated C/EBPα-deficient keratinocytes displayed a 4-fold decrease in nuclear p21 protein half-life due to the increased proteasomal degradation of p21 via the E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4Cdt2. Cdt2 is the substrate recognition subunit of CRL4Cdt2 and Cdt2 mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in UVB-treated C/EBPα-deficient keratinocytes. Knockdown of Cdt2 restored p21 protein levels in UVB-treated C/EBPα-deficient keratinocytes. Lastly, the failure to accumulate p21 in response to UVB in C/EBPα-deficient keratinocytes resulted in decreased p21 interactions with critical cell cycle regulatory proteins, increased CDK2 activity, and inappropriate entry into S-phase. These findings reveal C/EBPα regulates G1/S cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage via the control of CRL4Cdt2 mediated degradation of p21. PMID:25483090

  15. CK2 phosphorylation of Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 protein regulates its cellular traffic and secretion but not its DNA transactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu da Silva, Isabel Caetano; Carneiro, Vitor Coutinho; Maciel, Renata de Moraes; da Costa, Rodrigo Furtado Madeiro; Furtado, Daniel Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Francisco Meirelles Bastos; da Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso; Rumjanek, Franklin David; Fantappié, Marcelo Rosado

    2011-01-01

    The helminth Schistosoma mansoni parasite resides in mesenteric veins where fecundated female worms lay hundred of eggs daily. Some of the egg antigens are trapped in the liver and induce a vigorous granulomatous response. High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear factor, can also be secreted and act as a cytokine. Schistosome HMGB1 (SmHMGB1) is secreted by the eggs and stimulate the production of key cytokines involved in the pathology of schistosomiasis. Thus, understanding the mechanism of SmHMGB1 release becomes mandatory. Here, we addressed the question of how the nuclear SmHMGB1 can reach the extracellular space. We showed in vitro and in vivo that CK2 phosphorylation was involved in the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SmHMGB1. By site-directed mutagenesis we mapped the two serine residues of SmHMGB1 that were phosphorylated by CK2. By DNA bending and supercoiling assays we showed that CK2 phosphorylation of SmHMGB1 had no effect in the DNA binding activities of the protein. We showed by electron microscopy, as well as by cell transfection and fluorescence microscopy that SmHMGB1 was present in the nucleus and cytoplasm of adult schistosomes and mammalian cells. In addition, we showed that treatments of the cells with either a phosphatase or a CK2 inhibitor were able to enhance or block, respectively, the cellular traffic of SmHMGB1. Importantly, we showed by confocal microscopy and biochemically that SmHMGB1 is significantly secreted by S. mansoni eggs of infected animals and that SmHMGB1 that were localized in the periovular schistosomotic granuloma were phosphorylated. We showed that secretion of SmHMGB1 is regulated by phosphorylation. Moreover, our results suggest that egg-secreted SmHMGB1 may represent a new egg antigen. Therefore, the identification of drugs that specifically target phosphorylation of SmHMGB1 might block its secretion and interfere with the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis.

  16. CK2 phosphorylation of Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 protein regulates its cellular traffic and secretion but not its DNA transactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Caetano de Abreu da Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The helminth Schistosoma mansoni parasite resides in mesenteric veins where fecundated female worms lay hundred of eggs daily. Some of the egg antigens are trapped in the liver and induce a vigorous granulomatous response. High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1, a nuclear factor, can also be secreted and act as a cytokine. Schistosome HMGB1 (SmHMGB1 is secreted by the eggs and stimulate the production of key cytokines involved in the pathology of schistosomiasis. Thus, understanding the mechanism of SmHMGB1 release becomes mandatory. Here, we addressed the question of how the nuclear SmHMGB1 can reach the extracellular space. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We showed in vitro and in vivo that CK2 phosphorylation was involved in the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SmHMGB1. By site-directed mutagenesis we mapped the two serine residues of SmHMGB1 that were phosphorylated by CK2. By DNA bending and supercoiling assays we showed that CK2 phosphorylation of SmHMGB1 had no effect in the DNA binding activities of the protein. We showed by electron microscopy, as well as by cell transfection and fluorescence microscopy that SmHMGB1 was present in the nucleus and cytoplasm of adult schistosomes and mammalian cells. In addition, we showed that treatments of the cells with either a phosphatase or a CK2 inhibitor were able to enhance or block, respectively, the cellular traffic of SmHMGB1. Importantly, we showed by confocal microscopy and biochemically that SmHMGB1 is significantly secreted by S. mansoni eggs of infected animals and that SmHMGB1 that were localized in the periovular schistosomotic granuloma were phosphorylated. CONCLUSIONS: We showed that secretion of SmHMGB1 is regulated by phosphorylation. Moreover, our results suggest that egg-secreted SmHMGB1 may represent a new egg antigen. Therefore, the identification of drugs that specifically target phosphorylation of SmHMGB1 might block its secretion and interfere with the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis.

  17. SUMO regulates p21Cip1 intracellular distribution and with p21Cip1 facilitates multiprotein complex formation in the nucleolus upon DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Sonia; Abella, Neus; Berciano, Maria T; Tapia, Olga; Jaumot, Montserrat; Freire, Raimundo; Lafarga, Miguel; Agell, Neus

    2017-01-01

    We previously showed that p21Cip1 transits through the nucleolus on its way from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and that DNA damage inhibits this transit and induces the formation of p21Cip1-containing intranucleolar bodies (INoBs). Here, we demonstrate that these INoBs also contain SUMO-1 and UBC9, the E2 SUMO-conjugating enzyme. Furthermore, whereas wild type SUMO-1 localized in INoBs, a SUMO-1 mutant, which is unable to conjugate with proteins, does not, suggesting the presence of SUMOylated proteins at INoBs. Moreover, depletion of the SUMO-conjugating enzyme UBC9 or the sumo hydrolase SENP2 changed p21Cip1 intracellular distribution. In addition to SUMO-1 and p21Cip1, cell cycle regulators and DNA damage checkpoint proteins, including Cdk2, Cyclin E, PCNA, p53 and Mdm2, and PML were also detected in INoBs. Importantly, depletion of UBC9 or p21Cip1 impacted INoB biogenesis and the nucleolar accumulation of the cell cycle regulators and DNA damage checkpoint proteins following DNA damage. The impact of p21Cip1 and SUMO-1 on the accumulation of proteins in INoBs extends also to CRM1, a nuclear exportin that is also important for protein translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleolus. Thus, SUMO and p21Cip1 regulate the transit of proteins through the nucleolus, and that disruption of nucleolar export by DNA damage induces SUMO and p21Cip1 to act as hub proteins to form a multiprotein complex in the nucleolus.

  18. GADD45a Regulates Olaquindox-Induced DNA Damage and S-Phase Arrest in Human Hepatoma G2 Cells via JNK/p38 Pathways

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    Daowen Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Olaquindox, a quinoxaline 1,4-dioxide derivative, is widely used as a feed additive in many countries. The potential genotoxicity of olaquindox, hence, is of concern. However, the proper mechanism of toxicity was unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of growth arrest and DNA damage 45 alpha (GADD45a on olaquindox-induced DNA damage and cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells. The results showed that olaquindox could induce reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated DNA damage and S-phase arrest, where increases of GADD45a, cyclin A, Cdk 2, p21 and p53 protein expression, decrease of cyclin D1 and the activation of phosphorylation-c-Jun N-terminal kinases (p-JNK, phosphorylation-p38 (p-p38 and phosphorylation-extracellular signal-regulated kinases (p-ERK were involved. However, GADD45a knockdown cells treated with olaquindox could significantly decrease cell viability, exacerbate DNA damage and increase S-phase arrest, associated with the marked activation of p-JNK, p-p38, but not p-ERK. Furthermore, SP600125 and SB203580 aggravated olaquindox-induced DNA damage and S-phase arrest, suppressed the expression of GADD45a. Taken together, these findings revealed that GADD45a played a protective role in olaquindox treatment and JNK/p38 pathways may partly contribute to GADD45a regulated olaquindox-induced DNA damage and S-phase arrest. Our findings increase the understanding on the molecular mechanisms of olaquindox.

  19. A repetitive DNA element regulates expression of the Helicobacter pylori sialic acid binding adhesin by a rheostat-like mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Åberg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available During persistent infection, optimal expression of bacterial factors is required to match the ever-changing host environment. The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has a large set of simple sequence repeats (SSR, which constitute contingency loci. Through a slipped strand mispairing mechanism, the SSRs generate heterogeneous populations that facilitate adaptation. Here, we present a model that explains, in molecular terms, how an intergenically located T-tract, via slipped strand mispairing, operates with a rheostat-like function, to fine-tune activity of the promoter that drives expression of the sialic acid binding adhesin, SabA. Using T-tract variants, in an isogenic strain background, we show that the length of the T-tract generates multiphasic output from the sabA promoter. Consequently, this alters the H. pylori binding to sialyl-Lewis x receptors on gastric mucosa. Fragment length analysis of post-infection isolated clones shows that the T-tract length is a highly variable feature in H. pylori. This mirrors the host-pathogen interplay, where the bacterium generates a set of clones from which the best-fit phenotypes are selected in the host. In silico and functional in vitro analyzes revealed that the length of the T-tract affects the local DNA structure and thereby binding of the RNA polymerase, through shifting of the axial alignment between the core promoter and UP-like elements. We identified additional genes in H. pylori, with T- or A-tracts positioned similar to that of sabA, and show that variations in the tract length likewise acted as rheostats to modulate cognate promoter output. Thus, we propose that this generally applicable mechanism, mediated by promoter-proximal SSRs, provides an alternative mechanism for transcriptional regulation in bacteria, such as H. pylori, which possesses a limited repertoire of classical trans-acting regulatory factors.

  20. Regulation of DNA synthesis and the cell cycle in human prostate cancer cells and lymphocytes by ovine uterine serpin

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    Hansen Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uterine serpins are members of the serine proteinase inhibitor superfamily. Like some other serpins, these proteins do not appear to be functional proteinase inhibitors. The most studied member of the group, ovine uterine serpin (OvUS, inhibits proliferation of several cell types including activated lymphocytes, bovine preimplantation embryos, and cell lines for lymphoma, canine primary osteosarcoma and human prostate cancer (PC-3 cells. The goal for the present study was to evaluate the mechanism by which OvUS inhibits cell proliferation. In particular, it was tested whether inhibition of DNA synthesis in PC-3 cells involves cytotoxic actions of OvUS or the induction of apoptosis. The effect of OvUS in the production of the autocrine and angiogenic cytokine interleukin (IL-8 by PC-3 cells was also determined. Finally, it was tested whether OvUS blocks specific steps in the cell cycle using both PC-3 cells and lymphocytes. Results Recombinant OvUS blocked proliferation of PC-3 cells at concentrations as low as 8 μg/ml as determined by measurements of [3H]thymidine incorporation or ATP content per well. Treatment of PC-3 cells with OvUS did not cause cytotoxicity or apoptosis or alter interleukin-8 secretion into medium. Results from flow cytometry experiments showed that OvUS blocked the entry of PC-3 cells into S phase and the exit from G2/M phase. In addition, OvUS blocked entry of lymphocytes into S phase following activation of proliferation with phytohemagglutinin. Conclusion Results indicate that OvUS acts to block cell proliferation through disruption of the cell cycle dynamics rather than induction of cytotoxicity or apoptosis. The finding that OvUS can regulate cell proliferation makes this one of only a few serpins that function to inhibit cell growth.

  1. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein through TLR4 signaling induces mitochondrial DNA fragmentation and regulates macrophage cell death after trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Fan, Erica K; Liu, Jinghua; Scott, Melanie J; Li, Yuehua; Li, Song; Xie, Wen; Billiar, Timothy R; Wilson, Mark A; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Ping; Fan, Jie

    2017-05-11

    Trauma is a major cause of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Macrophages (Mφ) direct trauma-induced inflammation, and Mφ death critically influences the progression of the inflammatory response. In the current study, we explored an important role of trauma in inducing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in Mφ and the subsequent regulation of Mφ death. Using an animal pseudo-fracture trauma model, we demonstrated that tissue damage induced NADPH oxidase activation and increased the release of reactive oxygen species via cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP)-TLR4-MyD88 signaling. This in turn, activates endonuclease G, which serves as an executor for the fragmentation of mtDNA in Mφ. We further showed that fragmented mtDNA triggered both p62-related autophagy and necroptosis in Mφ. However, autophagy activation also suppressed Mφ necroptosis and pro-inflammatory responses. This study demonstrates a previously unidentified intracellular regulation of Mφ homeostasis in response to trauma.

  2. A preliminary study of endocannabinoid system regulation in psychosis: Distinct alterations of CNR1 promoter DNA methylation in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addario, Claudio; Micale, Vincenzo; Di Bartolomeo, Martina; Stark, Tibor; Pucci, Mariangela; Sulcova, Alexandra; Palazzo, Mariacarlotta; Babinska, Zuzana; Cremaschi, Laura; Drago, Filippo; Carlo Altamura, A; Maccarrone, Mauro; Dell'Osso, Bernardo

    2017-10-01

    Compelling evidence supports the involvement of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in psychosis vulnerability. We here evaluated the transcriptional regulation of ECS components in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from subjects suffering from bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and schizophrenia, focusing in particular on the effects of DNA methylation. We observed selective alterations of DNA methylation at the promoter of CNR1, the gene coding for the type-1 cannabinoid receptor, in schizophrenic patients (N=25) with no changes in any other disorder. We confirmed the regulation of CNR1 in a well-validated animal model of schizophrenia, induced by prenatal methylazoxymethanol (MAM) acetate exposure (N=7 per group) where we found, in the prefrontal cortex, a significant increase in CNR1 expression and a consistent reduction in DNA methylation at specific CpG sites of gene promoter. Overall, our findings suggest a selective dysregulation of ECS in psychosis, and highlight the evaluation of CNR1 DNA methylation levels in PBMCs as a potential biomarker for schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Down-regulation of SMT3A gene expression in association with DNA synthesis induction after X-ray irradiation in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugaya, Shigeru; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Sugita, Katsuo; Kita, Kazuko; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2005-01-01

    Fibroblast cells derived from nevoid basal carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) patients show increased levels of DNA synthesis after X-ray irradiation. Genes, whose expression is modulated in association with the DNA synthesis induction, were searched by using PCR-based mRNA differential display analysis in one of the NBCCS cell lines, NBCCS1 cells. Decreased levels of SMT3A gene expression were found in X-ray-irradiated NBCCS1 cells. This decrease was also shown by RT-PCR analysis in another cell line, NBCCS3 cells. In addition to NBCCS cells, normal fibroblast cells showed the DNA synthesis induction after X-ray irradiation when they were treated with antisense oligonucleotides (AO) for SMT3A. However, treatment of normal fibroblasts with the random oligonucleotides (RO) resulted in decreased levels of DNA synthesis after X-ray irradiation. Thus, down-regulation of SMT3A gene expression may be involved in the DNA synthesis induction after X-ray irradiation in the NBCCS cells at least tested

  4. Down-regulation of SMT3A gene expression in association with DNA synthesis induction after X-ray irradiation in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugaya, Shigeru [Department of Environmental Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Nakanishi, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Tanzawa, Hideki [Department of Clinical Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Sugita, Katsuo [Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Education, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Kita, Kazuko [Department of Environmental Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Suzuki, Nobuo [Department of Environmental Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)]. E-mail: nobuo@faculty.chiba-u.jp

    2005-10-15

    Fibroblast cells derived from nevoid basal carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) patients show increased levels of DNA synthesis after X-ray irradiation. Genes, whose expression is modulated in association with the DNA synthesis induction, were searched by using PCR-based mRNA differential display analysis in one of the NBCCS cell lines, NBCCS1 cells. Decreased levels of SMT3A gene expression were found in X-ray-irradiated NBCCS1 cells. This decrease was also shown by RT-PCR analysis in another cell line, NBCCS3 cells. In addition to NBCCS cells, normal fibroblast cells showed the DNA synthesis induction after X-ray irradiation when they were treated with antisense oligonucleotides (AO) for SMT3A. However, treatment of normal fibroblasts with the random oligonucleotides (RO) resulted in decreased levels of DNA synthesis after X-ray irradiation. Thus, down-regulation of SMT3A gene expression may be involved in the DNA synthesis induction after X-ray irradiation in the NBCCS cells at least tested.

  5. Feedback-regulated poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by PARP-1 is required for rapid response to DNA damage in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortusewicz, Oliver; Amé, Jean-Christophe; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2007-01-01

    Genome integrity is constantly threatened by DNA lesions arising from numerous exogenous and endogenous sources. Survival depends on immediate recognition of these lesions and rapid recruitment of repair factors. Using laser microirradiation and live cell microscopy we found that the DNA-damage dependent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP) PARP-1 and PARP-2 are recruited to DNA damage sites, however, with different kinetics and roles. With specific PARP inhibitors and mutations, we could show that the initial recruitment of PARP-1 is mediated by the DNA-binding domain. PARP-1 activation and localized poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis then generates binding sites for a second wave of PARP-1 recruitment and for the rapid accumulation of the loading platform XRCC1 at repair sites. Further PARP-1 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation eventually initiates the release of PARP-1. We conclude that feedback regulated recruitment of PARP-1 and concomitant local poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation at DNA lesions amplifies a signal for rapid recruitment of repair factors enabling efficient restoration of genome integrity. PMID:17982172

  6. DNA methylation regulates expression of VEGF-C, and S-adenosylmethionine is effective for VEGF-C methylation and for inhibiting cancer growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da, M.X. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Gansu Provincial Hospital, Lanzhou (China); Zhang, Y.B. [Department of Surgery, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan (China); Yao, J.B. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Gansu Provincial Hospital, Lanzhou (China); Duan, Y.X. [Department of Surgery, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan (China)

    2014-09-30

    DNA hypomethylation may activate oncogene transcription, thus promoting carcinogenesis and tumor development. S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is a methyl donor in numerous methylation reactions and acts as an inhibitor of intracellular demethylase activity, which results in hypermethylation of DNA. The main objectives of this study were to determine whether DNA hypomethylation correlated with vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) expression, and the effect of SAM on VEGF-C methylation and gastric cancer growth inhibition. VEGF-C expression was assayed by Western blotting and RT-qPCR in gastric cancer cells, and by immunohistochemistry in tumor xenografts. VEGF-C methylation was assayed by bisulfite DNA sequencing. The effect of SAM on cell apoptosis was assayed by flow cytometry analyses and its effect on cancer growth was assessed in nude mice. The VEGF-C promoters of MGC-803, BGC-823, and SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells, which normally express VEGF-C, were nearly unmethylated. After SAM treatment, the VEGF-C promoters in these cells were highly methylated and VEGF-C expression was downregulated. SAM also significantly inhibited tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. DNA methylation regulates expression of VEGF-C. SAM can effectively induce VEGF-C methylation, reduce the expression of VEGF-C, and inhibit tumor growth. SAM has potential as a drug therapy to silence oncogenes and block the progression of gastric cancer.

  7. Differential DNA methylation may contribute to temporal and spatial regulation of gene expression and the development of mycelia and conidia in entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanzhen; Wang, Yulong; Zhu, Jianyu; Wang, Zhangxun; Tang, Guiliang; Huang, Bo

    2017-03-01

    Conidia and mycelia are two important developmental stages in the asexual life cycle of entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium. Despite the crucial role that DNA methylation plays in many biological processes, its role in regulation of gene expression and development in fungi is not yet fully understood. We performed genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation patterns of an M. robertsii strain with single base pair resolution. Specifically, we examined for changes in methylation patterns between the conidia and mycelia stages. The results showed that approximately 0.38 % of cytosines are methylated in conidia, which is lower than the DNA methylation level (0.42 %) in mycelia. We found that DNA methylation undergoes genome-wide reprogramming during fungal development in M. robertsii. 132 differentially methylated regions (DMRs), which were mostly distributed in gene regions, were identified. KEGG analysis revealed that the DMR-associated genes belong to metabolic pathways. Intriguingly, in contrast to most other eukaryotes, promoter activities in M. robertsii seemed differentially modulated by DNA methylation levels. We found that transcription tended to be enhanced in genes with moderate promoter methylation, while gene expression was decreased in genes with high or low promoter methylation. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhibition of Ku70 acetylation by INHAT subunit SET/TAF-Iβ regulates Ku70-mediated DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kee-Beom; Kim, Dong-Wook; Park, Jin Woo; Jeon, Young-Joo; Kim, Daehwan; Rhee, Sangmyung; Chae, Jung-Il; Seo, Sang-Beom

    2014-07-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can cause either cell death or genomic instability. The Ku heterodimer Ku70/80 is required for the NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) DNA DSB repair pathway. The INHAT (inhibitor of histone acetyltransferases) complex subunit, SET/TAF-Iβ, can inhibit p300- and PCAF-mediated acetylation of both histone and p53, thereby repressing general transcription and that of p53 target genes. Here, we show that SET/TAF-Iβ interacts with Ku70/80, and that this interaction inhibits CBP- and PCAF-mediated Ku70 acetylation in an INHAT domain-dependent manner. Notably, DNA damage by UV disrupted the interaction between SET/TAF-Iβ and Ku70. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpressed SET/TAF-Iβ inhibits recruitment of Ku70/80 to DNA damage sites. We propose that dysregulation of SET/TAF-Iβ expression prevents repair of damaged DNA and also contributes to cellular proliferation. All together, our findings indicate that SET/TAF-Iβ interacts with Ku70/80 in the nucleus and inhibits Ku70 acetylation. Upon DNA damage, SET/TAF-Iβ dissociates from the Ku complex and releases Ku70/Ku80, which are then recruited to DNA DSB sites via the NHEJ DNA repair pathway.

  9. DNA methyltransferase expressions in Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes) embryogenesis is developmentally regulated and modulated by ethanol and 5-azacytidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    We aimed to investigate the impact of the epigenome in inducting fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) phenotypes in Japanese rice fish embryogenesis. One of the significant events in epigenome is DNA methylation which is catalyzed by DNA methyl transferase (DNMT) enzymes. We analyzed DNMT enzyme m...

  10. Geminin deploys multiple mechanisms to regulate Cdt1 before cell division thus ensuring the proper execution of DNA replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballabeni, Andrea; Zamponi, Raffaella; Moore, Jodene K

    2013-01-01

    the accumulation of Cdt1 in mitosis, because decreasing the Geminin levels prevents Cdt1 accumulation and impairs DNA replication. Geminin is known to inhibit Cdt1 function; its depletion during G2 leads to DNA rereplication and checkpoint activation. Here we show that, despite rapid Cdt1 protein turnover in G2...

  11. Human Xip1 (C2orf13) is a novel regulator of cellular responses to DNA strand breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Fugger, Kasper; Danielsen, Jannie Rendtlew

    2007-01-01

    DNA strand breaks arise continuously as the result of intracellular metabolism and in response to a multitude of genotoxic agents. To overcome such challenges to genomic stability, cells have evolved genome surveillance pathways that detect and repair damaged DNA in a coordinated fashion. Here we...

  12. Cloning of cDNA sequences of a progestin-regulated mRNA from MCF7 human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalbos, D; Westley, B; Alibert, C; Rochefort, H

    1986-01-24

    A cDNA clone corresponding to an mRNA regulated by the progestin R5020, has been isolated by differential screening of a cDNA library from the MCF7 breast cancer cell line, which contains estrogen and progesterone receptors. This probe hybridized with a single species of poly A + RNA of 8-kb molecular weight as shown by Northern blot analysis and could also be used to total RNA preparation. This recombinant cone hybridized specifically to an mRNA coding for a 250,000 daltons protein when translated in vitro. This protein was identical to the 250 kDa progestin-regulated protein that the authors previously described as shown by immunoprecipitation with specific rabbit polyclonal antibodies. Dose-response curve and specificity studies show that the accumulation of the Pg8 mRNA and that of the 250-kDa protein was increased by 5 to 30-fold following progestin treatment and that this effect was mediated by the progesterone receptor. Time course of induction indicated that the accumulation of mRNA was rapid and preceded that of the protein. This is the first report on a cloned cDNA probe of progestin-regulated mRNA in human cell lines.

  13. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS genes are silenced by DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation and regulate response to radiotherapy in cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon-Hong Kim

    Full Text Available Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS family is an important negative regulator of cytokine signaling and deregulation of SOCS has been involved in many types of cancer. All cervical cancer cell lines tested showed lower expression of SOCS1, SOCS3, and SOCS5 than normal tissue or cell lines. The immunohistochemistry result for SOCS proteins in human cervical tissue also confirmed that normal tissue expressed higher level of SOCS proteins than neighboring tumor. Similar to the regulation of SOCS in other types of cancer, DNA methylation contributed to SOCS1 downregulation in CaSki, ME-180, and HeLa cells. However, the expression of SOCS3 or SOCS5 was not recovered by the inhibition of DNA methylation. Histone deacetylation may be another regulatory mechanism involved in SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression, however, SOCS5 expression was neither affected by DNA methylation nor histone deacetylation. Ectopic expression of SOCS1 or SOCS3 conferred radioresistance to HeLa cells, which implied SOCS signaling regulates the response to radiation in cervical cancer. In this study, we have shown that SOCS expression repressed by, in part, epigenetically and altered SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression could contribute to the radiosensitive phenotype in cervical cancer.

  14. Generation of covalently closed circular DNA of hepatitis B viruses via intracellular recycling is regulated in a virus specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Köck

    Full Text Available Persistence of hepatitis B virus (HBV infection requires covalently closed circular (cccDNA formation and amplification, which can occur via intracellular recycling of the viral polymerase-linked relaxed circular (rc DNA genomes present in virions. Here we reveal a fundamental difference between HBV and the related duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV in the recycling mechanism. Direct comparison of HBV and DHBV cccDNA amplification in cross-species transfection experiments showed that, in the same human cell background, DHBV but not HBV rcDNA converts efficiently into cccDNA. By characterizing the distinct forms of HBV and DHBV rcDNA accumulating in the cells we find that nuclear import, complete versus partial release from the capsid and complete versus partial removal of the covalently bound polymerase contribute to limiting HBV cccDNA formation; particularly, we identify genome region-selectively opened nuclear capsids as a putative novel HBV uncoating intermediate. However, the presence in the nucleus of around 40% of completely uncoated rcDNA that lacks most if not all of the covalently bound protein strongly suggests a major block further downstream that operates in the HBV but not DHBV recycling pathway. In summary, our results uncover an unexpected contribution of the virus to cccDNA formation that might help to better understand the persistence of HBV infection. Moreover, efficient DHBV cccDNA formation in human hepatoma cells should greatly facilitate experimental identification, and possibly inhibition, of the human cell factors involved in the process.

  15. DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is involved in key cellular processes, including X-chromosome inactivation, imprinting and transcriptional silencing of specific genes and repetitive elements. DNA methylation patterns are frequently perturbed in human diseases such as imprinting disorders and cancer. The recent...... discovery that the three members of the TET protein family can convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has provided a potential mechanism leading to DNA demethylation. Moreover, the demonstration that TET2 is frequently mutated in haematopoietic tumours suggests that the TET...... proteins are important regulators of cellular identity. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the function of the TET proteins, and discuss various mechanisms by which they contribute to transcriptional control. We propose that the TET proteins have an important role in regulating DNA methylation...

  16. Prophage induction and differential RecA and UmuDAb transcriptome regulation in the DNA damage responses of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter baylyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle M Hare

    Full Text Available The SOS response to DNA damage that induces up to 10% of the prokaryotic genome requires RecA action to relieve LexA transcriptional repression. In Acinetobacter species, which lack LexA, the error-prone polymerase accessory UmuDAb is instead required for ddrR induction after DNA damage, suggesting it might be a LexA analog. RNA-Seq experiments defined the DNA damage transcriptome (mitomycin C-induced of wild type, recA and umuDAb mutant strains of both A. baylyi ADP1 and A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Of the typical SOS response genes, few were differentially regulated in these species; many were repressed or absent. A striking 38.4% of all ADP1 genes, and 11.4% of all 17978 genes, were repressed under these conditions. In A. baylyi ADP1, 66 genes (2.0% of the genome, including a CRISPR/Cas system, were DNA damage-induced, and belonged to four regulons defined by differential use of recA and umuDAb. In A. baumannii ATCC 17978, however, induction of 99% of the 152 mitomycin C-induced genes depended on recA, and only 28 of these genes required umuDAb for their induction. 90% of the induced A. baumannii genes were clustered in three prophage regions, and bacteriophage particles were observed after mitomycin C treatment. These prophages encoded esvI, esvK1, and esvK2, ethanol-stimulated virulence genes previously identified in a Caenorhabditis elegans model, as well as error-prone polymerase alleles. The induction of all 17978 error-prone polymerase alleles, whether prophage-encoded or not, was recA dependent, but only these DNA polymerase V-related genes were de-repressed in the umuDAb mutant in the absence of DNA damage. These results suggest that both species possess a robust and complex DNA damage response involving both recA-dependent and recA-independent regulons, and further demonstrates that although umuDAb has a specialized role in repressing error-prone polymerases, additional regulators likely participate in these species' transcriptional

  17. Activation of the DnaK-ClpB Complex is Regulated by the Properties of the Bound Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Higuero, Jose Angel; Aguado, Alejandra; Perales-Calvo, Judit; Moro, Fernando; Muga, Arturo

    2018-04-11

    The chaperone ClpB in bacteria is responsible for the reactivation of aggregated proteins in collaboration with the DnaK system. Association of these chaperones at the aggregate surface stimulates ATP hydrolysis, which mediates substrate remodeling. However, a question that remains unanswered is whether the bichaperone complex can be selectively activated by substrates that require remodeling. We find that large aggregates or bulky, native-like substrates activates the complex, whereas a smaller, permanently unfolded protein or extended, short peptides fail to stimulate it. Our data also indicate that ClpB interacts differently with DnaK in the presence of aggregates or small peptides, displaying a higher affinity for aggregate-bound DnaK, and that DnaK-ClpB collaboration requires the coupled ATPase-dependent remodeling activities of both chaperones. Complex stimulation is mediated by residues at the β subdomain of DnaK substrate binding domain, which become accessible to the disaggregase when the lid is allosterically detached from the β subdomain. Complex activation also requires an active NBD2 and the integrity of the M domain-ring of ClpB. Disruption of the M-domain ring allows the unproductive stimulation of the DnaK-ClpB complex in solution. The ability of the DnaK-ClpB complex to discrimínate different substrate proteins might allow its activation when client proteins require remodeling.

  18. Vad och hur gör de? − att synliggöra lärande i grundskolans slöjdpraktik via videoetnografi och mikroanalys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marléne Johansson

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Artikeln bygger på resultat och erfarenheter av etnografiskt insamlade videoinspelningar från grundskolans slöjdundervisning utgående från tre studier; dels vid ett projekt med förstudier under slutet av 1990-talet (Johansson, 1996, dels vid avhandlingsprojektet Slöjdpraktik i skolan (Johansson, 2002 och dels inom forskningsprojektet Kommunikation och lärande i slöjdpraktiker, (”Komolär-projektet”, under 2005−2010 (Lindström, Borg, Johansson & Lindberg, 2003.Att insamla empiri i autentiska slöjdmiljöer är av intresse då lärandesituationer kan synliggöras när elever med hjälp av material och redskap arbetar med att tillverka artefakter. Utifrån detaljerade analyser av slöjdaktiviteter går det att upptäcka det som utspelar sig och möjligheter ges att uppfatta något annat jämfört med vad man kan tro känna väl eller ha förenklade och till och med felaktiga uppfattningar om. Videoobservationer möjliggör att antaganden istället görs på empiriskt grundat datamaterial. Med risk att videofilma och analysera det man tror sig veta och söka har forskningsprojektens insamlingar mer förutsättningslöst arbetat efter vad och hur elever och lärare gör i slöjdpraktik och vad man får veta när slöjdaktiviteter analyseras mer ingående. Videomaterialen har analyserats både på en mer övergripande nivå och detaljerat med hjälp av mikroanalyser. Därefter har lärandet synliggjorts och beskrivits bland annat i teman för att visa hur personerna är resurser för varandra och hur lärandet utvecklas genom olika språkanvändning och med slöjdpraktikens fysiska redskap och material.Sökord: metod, slöjd, klassrumsforskning, videoetnografi, mikroanalysURN:NBN:no-29955

  19. ALDH1A1 maintains ovarian cancer stem cell-like properties by altered regulation of cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair network signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhong Meng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH expressing cells have been characterized as possessing stem cell-like properties. We evaluated ALDH+ ovarian cancer stem cell-like properties and their role in platinum resistance. METHODS: Isogenic ovarian cancer cell lines for platinum sensitivity (A2780 and platinum resistant (A2780/CP70 as well as ascites from ovarian cancer patients were analyzed for ALDH+ by flow cytometry to determine its association to platinum resistance, recurrence and survival. A stable shRNA knockdown model for ALDH1A1 was utilized to determine its effect on cancer stem cell-like properties, cell cycle checkpoints, and DNA repair mediators. RESULTS: ALDH status directly correlated to platinum resistance in primary ovarian cancer samples obtained from ascites. Patients with ALDHHIGH displayed significantly lower progression free survival than the patients with ALDHLOW cells (9 vs. 3 months, respectively p<0.01. ALDH1A1-knockdown significantly attenuated clonogenic potential, PARP-1 protein levels, and reversed inherent platinum resistance. ALDH1A1-knockdown resulted in dramatic decrease of KLF4 and p21 protein levels thereby leading to S and G2 phase accumulation of cells. Increases in S and G2 cells demonstrated increased expression of replication stress associated Fanconi Anemia DNA repair proteins (FANCD2, FANCJ and replication checkpoint (pS317 Chk1 were affected. ALDH1A1-knockdown induced DNA damage, evidenced by robust induction of γ-H2AX and BAX mediated apoptosis, with significant increases in BRCA1 expression, suggesting ALDH1A1-dependent regulation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair networks in ovarian cancer stem-like cells. CONCLUSION: This data suggests that ovarian cancer cells expressing ALDH1A1 may maintain platinum resistance by altered regulation of cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair network signaling.

  20. Down-regulation of DNA mismatch repair proteins in human and murine tumor spheroids: implications for multicellular resistance to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Giulio; Green, Shane K; Bocci, Guido; Man, Shan; Emmenegger, Urban; Ebos, John M L; Weinerman, Adina; Shaked, Yuval; Kerbel, Robert S

    2005-10-01

    Similar to other anticancer agents, intrinsic or acquired resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics is a major obstacle for cancer therapy. Current strategies aimed at overcoming this problem are mostly based on the premise that tumor cells acquire heritable genetic mutations that contribute to drug resistance. Here, we present evidence for an epigenetic, tumor cell adhesion-mediated, and reversible form of drug resistance that is associated with a reduction of DNA mismatch repair proteins PMS2 and/or MLH1 as well as other members of this DNA repair process. Growth of human breast cancer, human melanoma, and murine EMT-6 breast cancer cell lines as multicellular spheroids in vitro, which is associated with increased resistance to many chemotherapeutic drugs, including alkylating agents, is shown to lead to a reproducible down-regulation of PMS2, MLH1, or, in some cases, both as well as MHS6, MSH3, and MSH2. The observed down-regulation is in part reversible by treatment of tumor spheroids with the DNA-demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine. Thus, treatment of EMT-6 mouse mammary carcinoma spheroids with 5-azacytidine resulted in reduced and/or disrupted cell-cell adhesion, which in turn sensitized tumor spheroids to cisplatin-mediated killing in vitro. Our results suggest that antiadhesive agents might sensitize tumor spheroids to alkylating agents in part by reversing or preventing reduced DNA mismatch repair activity and that the chemosensitization properties of 5-azacytidine may conceivably reflect its role as a potential antiadhesive agent as well as reversal agent for MLH1 gene silencing in human tumors.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the transcriptional regulator RfaH from Escherichia coli and its complex with ops DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassylyeva, Marina N.; Svetlov, Vladimir; Klyuyev, Sergiy; Devedjiev, Yancho D.; Artsimovitch, Irina; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.

    2006-01-01

    The E. coli transcriptional regulator RfaH was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized and the complex of RfaH with its target DNA oligonucleotide was cocrystallized. Complete diffraction data sets were collected for the apo protein and its nucleic acid complex at 2.4 and at 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. The bacterial transcriptional factor and virulence regulator RfaH binds to rapidly moving transcription elongation complexes through specific interactions with the exposed segment of the non-template DNA strand. To elucidate this unusual mechanism of recruitment, determination of the three-dimensional structure of RfaH and its complex with DNA was initiated. To this end, the Escherichia coli rfaH gene was cloned and expressed. The purified protein was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion technique. The space group was P6 1 22 or P6 5 22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 45.46, c = 599.93 Å. A complex of RfaH and a nine-nucleotide oligodeoxyribonucleotide was crystallized by the same technique, but under different crystallization conditions, yielding crystals that belonged to space group P1 (unit-cell parameters a = 36.79, b = 44.01, c = 62.37 Å, α = 80.62, β = 75.37, γ = 75.41°). Complete diffraction data sets were collected for RfaH and its complex with DNA at 2.4 and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. Crystals of selenomethionine-labeled proteins in both crystal forms were obtained by cross-microseeding using the native microcrystals. The structure determination of RfaH and its complex with DNA is in progress

  2. Interferon-inducible p200-family protein IFI16, an innate immune sensor for cytosolic and nuclear double-stranded DNA: regulation of subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeranki, Sudhakar; Choubey, Divaker

    2012-01-01

    The interferon (IFN)-inducible p200-protein family includes structurally related murine (for example, p202a, p202b, p204, and Aim2) and human (for example, AIM2 and IFI16) proteins. All proteins in the family share a partially conserved repeat of 200-amino acid residues (also called HIN-200 domain) in the C-terminus. Additionally, most proteins (except the p202a and p202b proteins) also share a protein-protein interaction pyrin domain (PYD) in the N-terminus. The HIN-200 domain contains two consecutive oligosaccharide/oligonucleotide binding folds (OB-folds) to bind double stranded DNA (dsDNA). The PYD domain in proteins allows interactions with the family members and an adaptor protein ASC. Upon sensing cytosolic dsDNA, Aim2, p204, and AIM2 proteins recruit ASC protein to form an inflammasome, resulting in increased production of proinflammatory cytokines. However, IFI16 protein can sense cytosolic as well as nuclear dsDNA. Interestingly, the IFI16 protein contains a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Accordingly, the initial studies had indicated that the endogenous IFI16 protein is detected in the nucleus and within the nucleus in the nucleolus. However, several recent reports suggest that subcellular localization of IFI16 protein in nuclear versus cytoplasmic (or both) compartment depends on cell type. Given that the IFI16 protein can sense cytosolic as well as nuclear dsDNA and can initiate different innate immune responses (production of IFN-β versus proinflammatory cytokines), here we evaluate the experimental evidence for the regulation of subcellular localization of IFI16 protein in various cell types. We conclude that further studies are needed to understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate the subcellular localization of IFI16 protein. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Interplay of ribosomal DNA loci in nucleolar dominance: dominant NORs are up-regulated by chromatin dynamics in the wheat-rye system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromatin organizational and topological plasticity, and its functions in gene expression regulation, have been strongly revealed by the analysis of nucleolar dominance in hybrids and polyploids where one parental set of ribosomal RNA (rDNA genes that are clustered in nucleolar organizing regions (NORs, is rendered silent by epigenetic pathways and heterochromatization. However, information on the behaviour of dominant NORs is very sparse and needed for an integrative knowledge of differential gene transcription levels and chromatin specific domain interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using molecular and cytological approaches in a wheat-rye addition line (wheat genome plus the rye nucleolar chromosome pair 1R, we investigated transcriptional activity and chromatin topology of the wheat dominant NORs in a nucleolar dominance situation. Herein we report dominant NORs up-regulation in the addition line through quantitative real-time PCR and silver-staining technique. Accompanying this modification in wheat rDNA trascription level, we also disclose that perinucleolar knobs of ribosomal chromatin are almost transcriptionally silent due to the residual detection of BrUTP incorporation in these domains, contrary to the marked labelling of intranucleolar condensed rDNA. Further, by comparative confocal analysis of nuclei probed to wheat and rye NORs, we found that in the wheat-rye addition line there is a significant decrease in the number of wheat-origin perinucleolar rDNA knobs, corresponding to a diminution of the rDNA heterochromatic fraction of the dominant (wheat NORs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that inter-specific interactions leading to wheat-origin NOR dominance results not only on the silencing of rye origin NOR loci, but dominant NORs are also modified in their transcriptional activity and interphase organization. The results show a cross-talk between wheat and rye NORs, mediated by ribosomal chromatin

  4. A genome-wide scan reveals important roles of DNA methylation in human longevity by regulating age-related disease genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Hui Xiao

    Full Text Available It is recognized that genetic factors contribute to human longevity. Besides the hypothesis of existence of longevity genes, another suggests that a lower frequency of risk alleles decreases the incidence of age-related diseases in the long-lived people. However, the latter finds no support from recent genetic studies. Considering the crucial role of epigenetic modification in gene regulation, we then hypothesize that suppressing disease-related genes in longevity individuals is likely achieved by epigenetic modification, e.g. DNA methylation. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the genome-wide methylation profile in 4 Chinese female centenarians and 4 middle-aged controls using methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing. 626 differentially methylated regions (DMRs were observed between both groups. Interestingly, genes with these DMRs were enriched in age-related diseases, including type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke and Alzheimer's disease. This pattern remains rather stable after including methylomes of two white individuals. Further analyses suggest that the observed DMRs likely have functional roles in regulating disease-associated gene expressions, with some genes [e.g. caspase 3 (CASP3] being down-regulated whereas the others [i.e. interleukin 1 receptor, type 2 (IL1R2] up-regulated. Therefore, our study suggests that suppressing the disease-related genes via epigenetic modification is an important contributor to human longevity.

  5. Glutamylation of the DNA sensor cGAS regulates its binding and synthase activity in antiviral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Pengyan; Ye, Buqing; Wang, Shuo; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Du, Ying; Xiong, Zhen; Tian, Yong; Fan, Zusen

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA during viral infection and catalyzes synthesis of the dinucleotide cGAMP, which activates the adaptor STING to initiate antiviral responses. Here we found that deficiency in the carboxypeptidase CCP5 or CCP6 led to susceptibility to DNA viruses. CCP5 and CCP6 were required for activation of the transcription factor IRF3 and interferons. Polyglutamylation of cGAS by the enzyme TTLL6 impeded its DNA-binding ability, whereas TTLL4-mediated monoglutamylation of cGAS blocked its synthase activity. Conversely, CCP6 removed the polyglutamylation of cGAS, whereas CCP5 hydrolyzed the monoglutamylation of cGAS, which together led to the activation of cGAS. Therefore, glutamylation and deglutamylation of cGAS tightly modulate immune responses to infection with DNA viruses.

  6. Role of Cell Cycle Regulation and MLH1, A Key DNA Mismatch Repair Protein, In Adaptive Survival Responses. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Boothman

    1999-08-11

    Due to several interesting findings on both adaptive survival responses (ASRs) and DNA mismatch repair (MMR), this grant was separated into two discrete Specific Aim sets (each with their own discrete hypotheses). The described experiments were simultaneously performed.

  7. Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv AldR (Rv2779c), a Regulator of the ald Gene: DNA BINDING AND IDENTIFICATION OF SMALL MOLECULE INHIBITORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Abhishek; Shree, Sonal; Pandey, Sarvesh Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2016-06-03

    Here we report the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis AldR (Rv2779c) showing that the N-terminal DNA-binding domains are swapped, forming a dimer, and four dimers are assembled into an octamer through crystal symmetry. The C-terminal domain is involved in oligomeric interactions that stabilize the oligomer, and it contains the effector-binding sites. The latter sites are 30-60% larger compared with homologs like MtbFFRP (Rv3291c) and can consequently accommodate larger molecules. MtbAldR binds to the region upstream to the ald gene that is highly up-regulated in nutrient-starved tuberculosis models and codes for l-alanine dehydrogenase (MtbAld; Rv2780). Further, the MtbAldR-DNA complex is inhibited upon binding of Ala, Tyr, Trp and Asp to the protein. Studies involving a ligand-binding site G131T mutant show that the mutant forms a DNA complex that cannot be inhibited by adding the amino acids. Comparative studies suggest that binding of the amino acids changes the relative spatial disposition of the DNA-binding domains and thereby disrupt the protein-DNA complex. Finally, we identified small molecules, including a tetrahydroquinoline carbonitrile derivative (S010-0261), that inhibit the MtbAldR-DNA complex. The latter molecules represent the very first inhibitors of a feast/famine regulatory protein from any source and set the stage for exploring MtbAldR as a potential anti-tuberculosis target. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Untersuchung der Regulation und Aktivität der DNA-Doppelstrangbruchreparatur in humanen B-Lymphozyten

    OpenAIRE

    Mierau, Maren

    2005-01-01

    Während der T-Zell-abhängigen Immunantwort bilden die aktivierten B-Lymphozyten das Keimzentrum, in dem Klassenwechselrekombination und somatische Hypermutation stattfinden. Der Mechanismus dieser Prozesse ist besonders im Falle der somatischen Hypermutation noch weitgehend unbekannt. Als essentieller Faktor konnte bisher die Aktivierungsinduzierte Cytidindeaminase AID identifiziert werden, die über Läsionen Mutationen und eventuell auch DNA-Doppelstrangbrüche in die DNA einführen kann. Da DN...

  9. Sumoylation Promotes the Stability of the DNA Sensor cGAS and the Adaptor STING to Regulate the Kinetics of Response to DNA Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming-Ming; Yang, Qing; Xie, Xue-Qin; Liao, Chen-Yang; Lin, Heng; Liu, Tian-Tian; Yin, Lei; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2016-09-20

    During viral infection, sensing of cytosolic DNA by the cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) activates the adaptor protein STING and triggers an antiviral response. Little is known about the mechanisms that determine the kinetics of activation and deactivation of the cGAS-STING pathway, ensuring effective but controlled innate antiviral responses. Here we found that the ubiquitin ligase Trim38 targets cGas for sumoylation in uninfected cells and during the early phase of viral infection. Sumoylation of cGas prevented its polyubiquitination and degradation. Trim38 also sumoylated Sting during the early phase of viral infection, promoting both Sting activation and protein stability. In the late phase of infection, cGas and Sting were desumoylated by Senp2 and subsequently degraded via proteasomal and chaperone-mediated autophagy pathways, respectively. Our findings reveal an essential role for Trim38 in the innate immune response to DNA virus and provide insight into the mechanisms that ensure optimal activation and deactivation of the cGAS-STING pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. DNA-methylation dependent regulation of embryo-specific 5S ribosomal DNA cluster transcription in adult tissues of sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Naselli, Flores; Caradonna, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    We have previously reported a molecular and cytogenetic characterization of three different 5S rDNA clusters in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and recently, demonstrated the presence of high heterogeneity in functional 5S rRNA. In this paper, we show some important distinctive data on 5S rRNA transcription for this organism. Using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, we demonstrate the existence of two classes of 5S rRNA, one which is embryo-specific and encoded by the smallest (700 bp) cluster and the other which is expressed at every stage and encoded by longer clusters (900 and 950 bp). We also demonstrate that the embryo-specific class of 5S rRNA is expressed in oocytes and embryonic stages and is silenced in adult tissue and that this phenomenon appears to be due exclusively to DNA methylation, as indicated by sensitivity to 5-azacytidine, unlike Xenopus where this mechanism is necessary but not sufficient to maintain the silenced status. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The intracellular immune receptor Rx1 regulates the DNA-binding activity of a Golden2-like transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Philip D; Dixon, Christopher H; Slootweg, Erik J; Sukarta, Octavina C A; Yang, Ally W H; Hughes, Timothy R; Sharples, Gary J; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Goverse, Aska; Cann, Martin J

    2018-03-02

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable the immune system to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. An early consequence of immune activation is transcriptional reprogramming, and some NLRs have been shown to act in the nucleus and interact with transcription factors. The Rx1 NLR protein of potato is further able to bind and distort double-stranded DNA. However, Rx1 host targets that support a role for Rx1 in transcriptional reprogramming at DNA are unknown. Here, we report a functional interaction between Rx1 and Nb Glk1, a Golden2-like transcription factor. Rx1 binds to Nb Glk1 in vitro and in planta. Nb Glk1 binds to known Golden2-like consensus DNA sequences. Rx1 reduces the binding affinity of Nb Glk1 for DNA in vitro. Nb Glk1 activates cellular responses to potato virus X, whereas Rx1 associates with Nb Glk1 and prevents its assembly on DNA in planta unless activated by PVX. This study provides new mechanistic insight into how an NLR can coordinate an immune signaling response at DNA following pathogen perceptions. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. DNA methylation-dependent regulation of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC genes in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Wook [Laboratory of Molecular Disease and Cell Regulation, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-Joo [Department of Environmental Medical Biology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Soo [Laboratory of Molecular Disease and Cell Regulation, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Son, Byung Ho [Department of Surgery, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, 108 Pyung-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul 110-746 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yong Kyun, E-mail: choyk2004@hanmail.net [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, 108 Pyung-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul 110-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung-Pyo, E-mail: kimhp@yuhs.ac [Department of Environmental Medical Biology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Expression of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC is significantly elevated in human hepatocellular carcinoma. {yields} Downregulation of Trks is correlated with their promoter hypermethylation. {yields} Inhibiting DNA methylation restored expression of Trks in normal liver cell lines. {yields} Trks promote the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma. {yields} Trks induce expression of the metastatic regulator, Twist. -- Abstract: The tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) family of neurotrophin receptors, TrkA, TrkB and TrkC, has been implicated in the growth and survival of human cancers. Here we report that Trks are frequently overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from patients and human liver cancer cell lines. To unravel the underlying molecular mechanism(s) for this phenomenon, DNA methylation patterns of CpG islands in TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC genes were examined in normal and cancer cell lines derived from liver. A good correlation was observed between promoter hypermethylation and lower expression of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC genes, which was supported by the data that inhibiting DNA methylation with 5-azacytidine restored expression of those genes in normal liver cell lines. Furthermore, Trks promoted the proliferation of HepG2 and induced expression of the metastatic regulator, Twist. These results suggest that Trks may contribute to growth and metastasis of liver cancer.

  13. DNA methylation-dependent regulation of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC genes in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Wook; Lee, Jong-Joo; Kim, Min Soo; Son, Byung Ho; Cho, Yong Kyun; Kim, Hyoung-Pyo

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Expression of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC is significantly elevated in human hepatocellular carcinoma. → Downregulation of Trks is correlated with their promoter hypermethylation. → Inhibiting DNA methylation restored expression of Trks in normal liver cell lines. → Trks promote the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma. → Trks induce expression of the metastatic regulator, Twist. -- Abstract: The tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) family of neurotrophin receptors, TrkA, TrkB and TrkC, has been implicated in the growth and survival of human cancers. Here we report that Trks are frequently overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from patients and human liver cancer cell lines. To unravel the underlying molecular mechanism(s) for this phenomenon, DNA methylation patterns of CpG islands in TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC genes were examined in normal and cancer cell lines derived from liver. A good correlation was observed between promoter hypermethylation and lower expression of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC genes, which was supported by the data that inhibiting DNA methylation with 5-azacytidine restored expression of those genes in normal liver cell lines. Furthermore, Trks promoted the proliferation of HepG2 and induced expression of the metastatic regulator, Twist. These results suggest that Trks may contribute to growth and metastasis of liver cancer.

  14. Crucial role of dynamic linker histone binding and divalent ions for DNA accessibility and gene regulation revealed by mesoscale modeling of oligonucleosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Schlick, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of a mesoscale model of oligonucleosomes are analyzed to examine the role of dynamic-linker histone (LH) binding/unbinding in high monovalent salt with divalent ions, and to further interpret noted chromatin fiber softening by dynamic LH in monovalent salt conditions. We find that divalent ions produce a fiber stiffening effect that competes with, but does not overshadow, the dramatic softening triggered by dynamic-LH behavior. Indeed, we find that in typical in vivo conditions, dynamic-LH binding/unbinding reduces fiber stiffening dramatically (by a factor of almost 5, as measured by the elasticity modulus) compared with rigidly fixed LH, and also the force needed to initiate chromatin unfolding, making it consistent with those of molecular motors. Our data also show that, during unfolding, divalent ions together with LHs induce linker-DNA bending and DNA–DNA repulsion screening, which guarantee formation of heteromorphic superbeads-on-a-string structures that combine regions of loose and compact fiber independently of the characteristics of the LH–core bond. These structures might be important for gene regulation as they expose regions of the DNA selectively. Dynamic control of LH binding/unbinding, either globally or locally, in the presence of divalent ions, might constitute a mechanism for regulation of gene expression. PMID:22790986

  15. Distribution of the type III DNA methyltransferases modA, modB and modD among Neisseria meningitidis genotypes: implications for gene regulation and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Aimee; Hill, Dorothea M C; Harrison, Odile B; Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Jennings, Michael P; Maiden, Martin C J; Seib, Kate L

    2016-02-12

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human-specific bacterium that varies in invasive potential. All meningococci are carried in the nasopharynx, and most genotypes are very infrequently associated with invasive meningococcal disease; however, those belonging to the 'hyperinvasive lineages' are more frequently associated with sepsis or meningitis. Genome content is highly conserved between carriage and disease isolates, and differential gene expression has been proposed as a major determinant of the hyperinvasive phenotype. Three phase variable DNA methyltransferases (ModA, ModB and ModD), which mediate epigenetic regulation of distinct phase variable regulons (phasevarions), have been identified in N. meningitidis. Each mod gene has distinct alleles, defined by their Mod DNA recognition domain, and these target and methylate different DNA sequences, thereby regulating distinct gene sets. Here 211 meningococcal carriage and >1,400 disease isolates were surveyed for the distribution of meningococcal mod alleles. While modA11-12 and modB1-2 were found in most isolates, rarer alleles (e.g., modA15, modB4, modD1-6) were specific to particular genotypes as defined by clonal complex. This suggests that phase variable Mod proteins may be associated with distinct phenotypes and hence invasive potential of N. meningitidis strains.

  16. Millennials : Hur företag ska arbeta med styrning för att behålla den nya generationen

    OpenAIRE

    Lemchen, Gabriella; Gjärdman, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Generationen millennials ses av många ledare som lata, krävande men även illojala. Vilket har gjort det svårt för många företag att leda, styra samt förankra dem. Anledningen grundar sig mångt och mycket i en generationskrock där ledare ur de äldre generationerna inte vet hur de ska styra den yngre generationen. Millennials är framstående inom kunskapsintensiva tjänsteföretag idag och är även den generation som byter arbetsgivare mer frekvent än tidigare generationer. Det är därför vitalt för...

  17. Webb Couture : En studie om hur modedesign kan inspirera och förändra webbdesignprocessen för att utmana User Experience standarder

    OpenAIRE

    Carlfjord, Adam; Gustavsson, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Webbdesign är ett hantverk med potential till oändlig variation och oräkneliga möjligheter, men det är även en process styrd av standarder och förhållningssätt för att optimera resultatet för slutanvändaren. Begrepp så som user experience och framför allt user experience design har i och med utvecklingen blivit allt viktigare aktörer inom webbdesign. Samtidigt som de underlättar i utvecklingsprocessen genom att diktera hur design bör utformas, skapar de inte också då begränsningar av potentia...

  18. Familjearbetaren hos en ensamförsörjare : en kvalitativ studie om ensamförsörjarens livssituation och hur familjearbetet påverkas

    OpenAIRE

    Sjöblom, Mikaela; Azimi, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Syftet med vårt lärdomsprov är att redogöra för familjearbetarnas åsikter om familjearbetet har specifika drag i utförandet av det hos familjer med en försörjare. I teoridelen tas det upp om familjepolitiken i Finland, familjearbete samt om hur en ensamförsörjares livssituation kan se ut. I undersökningen använde vi oss av kvalitativa forskningsintervjuer. Undersökningspersonerna bestod av åtta familjearbetare från fyra olika kommuner. Intervjuerna gjordes både i grupper och som individue...

  19. Starbucksfenomenet i Finland : Hur uppfattar och upplever finska konsumenter tillhörande generation Y och Z varumärket Starbucks?

    OpenAIRE

    Emtö, Anna

    2014-01-01

    I den här undersökningen har jag undersökt hur finska konsumenter uppfattar och upplever varumärket Starbucks. Jag har utfört undersökningen genom att använda mig av fokusgruppintervjuer. Intervjuerna utfördes på basen av min frågeguide som utvecklats kring de relevanta teoriområden som är presenterade i arbetet. Mitt urval för intervjuerna var finska konsumenter tillhörande generationerna Y och Z i och med att dessa vuxit upp med varumärket samt upplevt inflytandet av sociala medier i vardag...

  20. Poliovirus 2A protease triggers a selective nucleo-cytoplasmic redistribution of splicing factors to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Álvarez

    Full Text Available Poliovirus protease 2A (2A(pro obstructs host gene expression by reprogramming transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory events during infection. Here we demonstrate that expression of 2A(pro induces a selective nucleo-cytoplasm translocation of several important RNA binding proteins and splicing factors. Subcellular fractionation studies, together with immunofluorescence microscopy revealed an asymmetric distribution of HuR and TIA1/TIAR in 2A(pro expressing cells, which modulates splicing of the human Fas exon 6. Consistent with this result, knockdown of HuR or overexpression of TIA1/TIAR, leads to Fas exon 6 inclusion in 2A(pro-expressing cells. Therefore, poliovirus 2A(pro can target alternative pre-mRNA splicing by regulating protein shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm.

  1. Porcine bocavirus NP1 negatively regulates interferon signaling pathway by targeting the DNA-binding domain of IRF9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ruoxi; Fang, Liurong; Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Zhang, Huan; Xie, Lilan; Li, Yi; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2015-01-01

    To subvert host antiviral immune responses, many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit IFN signaling pathway. Porcine bocavirus (PBoV), a newly identified porcine parvovirus, has received attention because it shows clinically high co-infection prevalence with other pathogens in post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PWMS) and diarrheic piglets. In this study, we screened the structural and non-structural proteins encoded by PBoV and found that the non-structural protein NP1 significantly suppressed IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) activity and subsequent IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. However, NP1 affected neither the activation and translocation of STAT1/STAT2, nor the formation of the heterotrimeric transcription factor complex ISGF3 (STAT1/STAT2/IRF9). Detailed analysis demonstrated that PBoV NP1 blocked the ISGF3 DNA-binding activity by combining with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of IRF9. In summary, these results indicate that PBoV NP1 interferes with type I IFN signaling pathway by blocking DNA binding of ISGF3 to attenuate innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Porcine bocavirus (PBoV) NP1 interferes with the IFN α/β signaling pathway. • PBoV NP1 does not prevent STAT1/STAT2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. • PBoV NP1 inhibits the DNA-binding activity of ISGF3. • PBoV NP1 interacts with the DNA-binding domain of IRF9.

  2. Porcine bocavirus NP1 negatively regulates interferon signaling pathway by targeting the DNA-binding domain of IRF9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ruoxi [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China); Fang, Liurong, E-mail: fanglr@mail.hzau.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Zhang, Huan [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xie, Lilan; Li, Yi [College of Life Science and Technology, Wuhan Institute of Bioengineering, Wuhan 430415 (China); Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2015-11-15

    To subvert host antiviral immune responses, many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit IFN signaling pathway. Porcine bocavirus (PBoV), a newly identified porcine parvovirus, has received attention because it shows clinically high co-infection prevalence with other pathogens in post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PWMS) and diarrheic piglets. In this study, we screened the structural and non-structural proteins encoded by PBoV and found that the non-structural protein NP1 significantly suppressed IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) activity and subsequent IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. However, NP1 affected neither the activation and translocation of STAT1/STAT2, nor the formation of the heterotrimeric transcription factor complex ISGF3 (STAT1/STAT2/IRF9). Detailed analysis demonstrated that PBoV NP1 blocked the ISGF3 DNA-binding activity by combining with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of IRF9. In summary, these results indicate that PBoV NP1 interferes with type I IFN signaling pathway by blocking DNA binding of ISGF3 to attenuate innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Porcine bocavirus (PBoV) NP1 interferes with the IFN α/β signaling pathway. • PBoV NP1 does not prevent STAT1/STAT2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. • PBoV NP1 inhibits the DNA-binding activity of ISGF3. • PBoV NP1 interacts with the DNA-binding domain of IRF9.

  3. Beyond DNA repair: DNA-PK function in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Jonathan F.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a pivotal component of the DNA repair machinery that governs the response to DNA damage, serving to maintain genome integrity. However, the DNA-PK kinase component was initially isolated with transcriptional complexes, and recent findings have illuminated the impact of DNA-PK-mediated transcriptional regulation on tumor progression and therapeutic response. DNA-PK expression has also been correlated with poor outcome in selected tumor types, furthe...

  4. Chilling-Mediated DNA Methylation Changes during Dormancy and Its Release Reveal the Importance of Epigenetic Regulation during Winter Dormancy in Apple (Malus x domestica Borkh..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulshan Kumar

    Full Text Available Winter dormancy is a well known mechanism adopted by temperate plants, to mitigate the chilling temperature of winters. However, acquisition of sufficient chilling during winter dormancy ensures the normal phenological traits in subsequent growing period. Thus, low temperature appears to play crucial roles in growth and development of temperate plants. Apple, being an important temperate fruit crop, also requires sufficient chilling to release winter dormancy and normal phenological traits, which are often associated with yield and quality of fruits. DNA cytosine methylation is one of the important epigenetic modifications which remarkably affect the gene expression during various developmental and adaptive processes. In present study, methylation sensitive amplified polymorphism was employed to assess the changes in cytosine methylation during dormancy, active growth and fruit set in apple, under differential chilling conditions. Under high chill conditions, total methylation was decreased from 27.2% in dormant bud to 21.0% in fruit set stage, while no significant reduction was found under low chill conditions. Moreover, the demethylation was found to be decreased, while methylation increased from dormant bud to fruit set stage under low chill as compared to high chill conditions. In addition, RNA-Seq analysis showed high expression of DNA methyltransferases and histone methyltransferases during dormancy and fruit set, and low expression of DNA glcosylases during active growth under low chill conditions, which was in accordance with changes in methylation patterns. The RNA-Seq data of 47 genes associated with MSAP fragments involved in cellular metabolism, stress response, antioxidant system and transcriptional regulation showed correlation between methylation and their expression. Similarly, bisulfite sequencing and qRT-PCR analysis of selected genes also showed correlation between gene body methylation and gene expression. Moreover

  5. Chilling-Mediated DNA Methylation Changes during Dormancy and Its Release Reveal the Importance of Epigenetic Regulation during Winter Dormancy in Apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gulshan; Rattan, Usha Kumari; Singh, Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Winter dormancy is a well known mechanism adopted by temperate plants, to mitigate the chilling temperature of winters. However, acquisition of sufficient chilling during winter dormancy ensures the normal phenological traits in subsequent growing period. Thus, low temperature appears to play crucial roles in growth and development of temperate plants. Apple, being an important temperate fruit crop, also requires sufficient chilling to release winter dormancy and normal phenological traits, which are often associated with yield and quality of fruits. DNA cytosine methylation is one of the important epigenetic modifications which remarkably affect the gene expression during various developmental and adaptive processes. In present study, methylation sensitive amplified polymorphism was employed to assess the changes in cytosine methylation during dormancy, active growth and fruit set in apple, under differential chilling conditions. Under high chill conditions, total methylation was decreased from 27.2% in dormant bud to 21.0% in fruit set stage, while no significant reduction was found under low chill conditions. Moreover, the demethylation was found to be decreased, while methylation increased from dormant bud to fruit set stage under low chill as compared to high chill conditions. In addition, RNA-Seq analysis showed high expression of DNA methyltransferases and histone methyltransferases during dormancy and fruit set, and low expression of DNA glcosylases during active growth under low chill conditions, which was in accordance with changes in methylation patterns. The RNA-Seq data of 47 genes associated with MSAP fragments involved in cellular metabolism, stress response, antioxidant system and transcriptional regulation showed correlation between methylation and their expression. Similarly, bisulfite sequencing and qRT-PCR analysis of selected genes also showed correlation between gene body methylation and gene expression. Moreover, significant association

  6. Salicylic acid and nitric oxide alleviate high temperature induced oxidative damage in Lablab purpureus L plants by regulating bio-physical processes and DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Krishna Kumar; Rai, Nagendra; Rai, Shashi Pandey

    2018-07-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor) modulates plant growth and development processes and recent findings have also revealed their involvement in the regulation of epigenetic factors under stress condition. In the present study, some of these factors were comparatively studied in hyacinth bean plants subjected to high temperature (HT) environment (40-42 °C) with and without exogenous application of SA and SNP under field condition. Exogenous application of SA and SNP substantially modulated the growth and biophysical process of hyacinth bean plants under HT environment. Exogenous application of SA and SNP also remarkably regulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes, modulated mRNA level of certain enzymes, improves plant water relation, enhance photosynthesis and thereby increasing plant defence under HT. Coupled restriction enzyme digestion-random amplification (CRED-RA) technique revealed that many methylation changes were "dose dependent" and HT significantly increased DNA damages as evidenced by both increase and decrease in bands profiles, methylation and de-methylation pattern. Thus, the result of the present study clearly shows that exogenous SA and SNP regulates DNA methylation pattern, modulates stress-responsive genes and can impart transient HT tolerance by synchronizing growth and physiological acclimatization of plants, thus narrowing the gaps between physio-biochemical and molecular events in addressing HT tolerance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. MiR-34a is up-regulated in response to low dose, low energy X-ray induced DNA damage in breast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankevicins, Luiza; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Moura Gallo, Claudia Vitoria de; Almeida da Silva, Ana Paula; Ventura dos Passos, Flavia; Santos Ferreira, Evelin dos; Menks Ribeiro, Maria Cecilia; G David, Mariano; J Pires, Evandro; Ferreira-Machado, Samara Cristina; Vassetzky, Yegor

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are non-coding RNAs involved in the regulation of gene expression including DNA damage responses. Low doses of low energy X-ray radiation, similar to those used in mammographic exams, has been described to be genotoxic. In the present work we investigated the expression of miR-34a; a well described p53-regulated miRNA implicated in cell responses to X-ray irradiation at low doses. Non-cancerous breast cell line MCF-10A and cancerous T-47D and MCF-7 cell lines were submitted to a low-energy X-ray irradiation (ranging from 28–30 Kv) using a dose of 5 Gy. The expression level of miR-34a, let-7a and miR-21 was assessed by qRT-PCR at 4 and 24 hours post-irradiation. DNA damage was then measured by comet assay and micronuclei estimation in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines, where an increase of miR-34a levels could be observed after irradiation. The rate of apoptotic cells was estimated by nuclear staining and fluorescence microscopy. These experiments were also performed at low doses (3; 12 and 48 mGy) in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines. We have observed an increase in miR-34a expression 4 hours post-irradiation at 5 Gy in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines while its level did not change in T-47D, a breast cancer cell line bearing non-functional p53. At low doses, miR-34a was up-regulated in non-tumoral MCF-10A to a higher extent as compared to MCF-7. MiR-34a levels decreased 24 hours post-irradiation. We have also observed DNA damage and apoptosis at low-energy X-ray irradiation at low doses and the high dose in MCF-10A and MCF-7 4 and 24 hours post-irradiation relative to the mock control. Low energy X-ray is able to promote DNA strand breaks and miR-34a might be involved in cell responses to low energy X-ray DNA damage. MiR-34a expression correlates with X-ray dose, time after irradiation and cell type. The present study reinforces the need of investigating consequences of low dose X-ray irradiation of breast cells

  8. Cul8/Rtt101 Forms a Variety of Protein Complexes That Regulate DNA Damage Response and Transcriptional Silencing*

    OpenAIRE

    Mimura, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Ishii, Satoru; Noro, Emiko; Katsura, Tomoya; Obuse, Chikashi; Kamura, Takumi

    2010-01-01

    The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has three cullin proteins, which act as platforms for Cullin-based E3 ubiquitin ligases. Genetic evidence indicates that Cul8, together with Mms1, Mms22, and Esc4, is involved in the repair of DNA damage that can occur during DNA replication. Cul8 is thought to form a complex with these proteins, but the composition and the function of Cul8-based E3 ubiquitin ligases remain largely uncharacterized. Herein, we report a comprehensive biochemical anal...

  9. mTOR regulates the expression of DNA damage response enzymes in long-lived Snell dwarf, GHRKO, and PAPPA-KO mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Graham; Bowman, Jacqueline; Li, Xinna; Miller, Richard A; Garcia, Gonzalo G

    2017-02-01

    Studies of the mTOR pathway have prompted speculation that diminished mTOR complex-1 (mTORC1) function may be involved in controlling the aging process. Our previous studies have shown diminished mTORC1 activity in tissues of three long-lived mutant mice: Snell dwarf mice, growth hormone receptor gene disrupted mice (GHRKO), and in this article, mice deficient in the pregnancy-associated protein-A (PAPPA-KO). The ways in which lower mTOR signals slow aging and age-related diseases are, however, not well characterized. Here, we show that Snell, GHKRO, and PAPPA-KO mice express high levels of two proteins involved in DNA repair, O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1). Furthermore, we report that lowering mTOR enhances MGMT and NDRG1 protein expression via post-transcriptional mechanisms. We show that the CCR4-NOT complex, a post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression, is downstream of the mTORC1 pathway and may be responsible for the upregulation of MGMT and NDRG1 in all three varieties of long-lived mice. Our data thus suggest a novel link between DNA repair and mTOR signaling via post-transcriptional regulation involving specific alteration in the CCR4-NOT complex, whose modulation could control multiple aspects of the aging process. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Employer branding på Q-Med : En fallstudie i hur företagsspecifika värden förmedlas till potentiella och befintliga medarbetare

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Stina; Ljungmark, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Sammanfattning "Employer branding på Q-Med – En fallstudie i hur företagsspecifika värden förmedlas till potentiella och befintliga medarbetare" Datum: 19 januari, 2011 Nivå: Kandidatuppsats i företagsekonomi, 15 ECTS Institution: Akademin för hållbar samhälls‐ och teknikutveckling, HST, Mälardalens Högskola Författare: Erik Ljungmark 29 januari 1980, Stina Nilsson 25 april 1983 Titel: Employer branding på Q-Med – En fallstudie i hur företagsspecifika värden förmedlas till potentiella och...

  11. Comprehensive analyses of DNA methylation profile, regulation on flowering, and seed mineral accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana in response to zinc deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Xiaochao

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential micronutrient for plant growth and development, which plays important roles in DNA binding, metabolic, catalytic and transcriptional regulator activities. However, Zn deficiency is a worldwide problem due to its limited bioavailability in soils in many agricultural areas, often as a result of high CaCO3 content and high pH. In addition, phytic acid is able to strongly chelate cations, such as Zn2+, Fe2+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ to form the phytate salts. Phytate cannot be dige...

  12. Role of Protein Phosphorylation in the Regulation of Cell Cycle and DNA-Related Processes in Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Garcia, Transito; Poncet, Sandrine; Derouiche, Abderahmane

    2016-01-01

    In all living organisms, the phosphorylation of proteins modulates various aspects of their functionalities. In eukaryotes, protein phosphorylation plays a key role in cell signaling, gene expression, and differentiation. Protein phosphorylation is also involved in the global control of DNA repli...

  13. CD133+ cells contribute to radioresistance via altered regulation of DNA repair genes in human lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Amar; Webb, Bryan; Gerson, Stanton L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Radioresistance in human tumors has been linked in part to a subset of cells termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). The prominin 1 (CD133) cell surface protein is proposed to be a marker enriching for CSCs. We explore the importance of DNA repair in contributing to radioresistance in CD133+ lung cancer cells. Materials and methods: A549 and H1299 lung cancer cell lines were used. Sorted CD133+ cells were exposed to either single 4 Gy or 8 Gy doses and clonogenic survival measured. ϒ-H2AX immunofluorescence and quantitative real time PCR was performed on sorted CD133+ cells both in the absence of IR and after two single 4 Gy doses. Lentiviral shRNA was used to silence repair genes. Results: A549 but not H1299 cells expand their CD133+ population after single 4 Gy exposure, and isolated A549 CD133+ cells demonstrate IR resistance. This resistance corresponded with enhanced repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and upregulated expression of DSB repair genes in A549 cells. Prior IR exposure of two single 4 Gy doses resulted in acquired DNA repair upregulation and improved repair proficiency in both A549 and H1299. Finally Exo1 and Rad51 silencing in A549 cells abrogated the CD133+ IR expansion phenotype and induced IR sensitivity in sorted CD133+ cells. Conclusions: CD133 identifies a population of cells within specific tumor types containing altered expression of DNA repair genes that are inducible upon exposure to chemotherapy. This altered gene expression contributes to enhanced DSB resolution and the radioresistance phenotype of these cells. We also identify DNA repair genes which may serve as promising therapeutic targets to confer radiosensitivity to CSCs

  14. miRNA-148a regulates the expression of the estrogen receptor through DNMT1-mediated DNA methylation in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yurui; Chao, Lin; Wang, Jianyu; Sun, Yonghong

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer remains the most prevalent cancer among women worldwide. The expression of estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) is an important marker for prognosis. ER-α status may be positive or negative in breast cancer cells, although the cause of negative or positive status is not yet fully characterized. In the present study, the expression of ER-α and miRNA-148a was assessed in two breast cancer cell lines, HCC1937 and MCF7. An association between ER-α and miRNA-148a expression was identified. It was then demonstrated that DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is a target of miRNA-148a, which may suppress the expression of ER-α via DNA methylation. Finally, an miRNA-148a mimic or inhibitor was transfected into MCF7 cells; the miRNA-148a mimic increased ER-α expression whereas the miRNA-148a inhibitor decreased ER-α expression. In conclusion, it was identified that miRNA-148a regulates ER-α expression through DNMT1-mediated DNA methylation in breast cancer cells. This may represent a potential miRNA-based strategy to modulate the expression of ER-α and provide a novel perspective for investigating the role of miRNAs in treating breast cancer. PMID:29085474

  15. Genome-wide specificity of DNA binding, gene regulation, and chromatin remodeling by TALE- and CRISPR/Cas9-based transcriptional activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polstein, Lauren R; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Kocak, D Dewran; Vockley, Christopher M; Bledsoe, Peggy; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E; Gersbach, Charles A

    2015-08-01

    Genome engineering technologies based on the CRISPR/Cas9 and TALE systems are enabling new approaches in science and biotechnology. However, the specificity of these tools in complex genomes and the role of chromatin structure in determining DNA binding are not well understood. We analyzed the genome-wide effects of TALE- and CRISPR-based transcriptional activators in human cells using ChIP-seq to assess DNA-binding specificity and RNA-seq to measure the specificity of perturbing the transcriptome. Additionally, DNase-seq was used to assess genome-wide chromatin remodeling that occurs as a result of their action. Our results show that these transcription factors are highly specific in both DNA binding and gene regulation and are able to open targeted regions of closed chromatin independent of gene activation. Collectively, these results underscore the potential for these technologies to make precise changes to gene expression for gene and cell therapies or fundamental studies of gene function. © 2015 Polstein et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. A miR-590/Acvr2a/Rad51b Axis Regulates DNA Damage Repair during mESC Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qidong Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESCs enable rapid proliferation that also causes DNA damage. To maintain genomic stabilization during rapid proliferation, ESCs must have an efficient system to repress genotoxic stress. Here, we show that withdrawal of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF, which maintains the self-renewal capability of mouse ESCs (mESCs, significantly inhibits the cell proliferation and DNA damage of mESCs and upregulates the expression of miR-590. miR-590 promotes single-strand break (SSB and double-strand break (DSB damage repair, thus slowing proliferation of mESCs without influencing stemness. miR-590 directly targets Activin receptor type 2a (Acvr2a to mediate Activin signaling. We identified the homologous recombination-mediated repair (HRR gene, Rad51b, as a downstream molecule of the miR-590/Acvr2a pathway regulating the SSB and DSB damage repair and cell cycle. Our study shows that a miR-590/Acvr2a/Rad51b signaling axis ensures the stabilization of mESCs by balancing DNA damage repair and rapid proliferation during self-renewal.

  17. Inositol hexakisphosphate kinase-1 mediates assembly/disassembly of the CRL4–signalosome complex to regulate DNA repair and cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Feng; Xu, Jing; Khan, A. Basit; Gadalla, Moataz M.; Cha, Jiyoung Y.; Xu, Risheng; Tyagi, Richa; Dang, Yongjun; Chakraborty, Anutosh; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2014-01-01

    Inositol polyphosphates containing an energetic pyrophosphate bond are formed primarily by a family of three inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) kinases (IP6K1–3). The Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) regulate diverse biological processes through substrate ubiquitylation. CRL4, comprising the scaffold Cullin 4A/B, the E2-interacting Roc1/2, and the adaptor protein damage-specific DNA-binding protein 1, is activated by DNA damage. Basal CRL4 activity is inhibited by binding to the COP9 signalosome (CSN). UV radiation and other stressors dissociate the complex, leading to E3 ligase activation, but signaling events that trigger signalosome dissociation from CRL4 have been unclear. In the present study, we show that, under basal conditions, IP6K1 forms a ternary complex with CSN and CRL4 in which IP6K1 and CRL4 are inactive. UV dissociates IP6K1 to generate IP7, which then dissociates CSN–CRL4 to activate CRL4. Thus, IP6K1 is a novel CRL4 subunit that transduces UV signals to mediate disassembly of the CRL4–CSN complex, thereby regulating nucleotide excision repair and cell death. PMID:25349427

  18. The SFP1 gene product of Saccharomyces cerevisiae regulates G2/M transitions during the mitotic cell cycle and DNA-damage response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Z.; Norris, D.

    1998-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, checkpoint pathways arrest cell-cycle progression if a particular event has failed to complete appropriately or if an important intracellular structure is defective or damaged. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that lack the SFP1 gene fail to arrest at the G2 DNA-damage checkpoint in response to genomic injury, but maintain their ability to arrest at the replication and spindle-assembly checkpoints. sfp1D mutants are characterized by a premature entrance into mitosis during a normal (undamaged) cell cycle, while strains that overexpress Sfp1p exhibit delays in G2. Sfp1p therefore acts as a repressor of the G2/M transition, both in the normal cell cycle and in the G2 checkpoint pathway. Sfp1 is a nuclear protein with two Cys2His2 zinc-finger domains commonly found in transcription factors. We propose that Sfp1p regulates the expression of gene products involved in the G2/M transition during the mitotic cell cycle and the DNA-damage response. In support of this model, overexpression of Sfp1p induces the expression of the PDS1 gene, which is known to encode a protein that regulates the G2 checkpoint. (author)

  19. The JAK-STAT transcriptional regulator, STAT-5, activates the ATM DNA damage pathway to induce HPV 31 genome amplification upon epithelial differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyuan Hong

    Full Text Available High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV must evade innate immune surveillance to establish persistent infections and to amplify viral genomes upon differentiation. Members of the JAK-STAT family are important regulators of the innate immune response and HPV proteins downregulate expression of STAT-1 to allow for stable maintenance of viral episomes. STAT-5 is another member of this pathway that modulates the inflammatory response and plays an important role in controlling cell cycle progression in response to cytokines and growth factors. Our studies show that HPV E7 activates STAT-5 phosphorylation without altering total protein levels. Inhibition of STAT-5 phosphorylation by the drug pimozide abolishes viral genome amplification and late gene expression in differentiating keratinocytes. In contrast, treatment of undifferentiated cells that stably maintain episomes has no effect on viral replication. Knockdown studies show that the STAT-5β isoform is mainly responsible for this activity and that this is mediated through the ATM DNA damage response. A downstream target of STAT-5, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ contributes to the effects on members of the ATM pathway. Overall, these findings identify an important new regulatory mechanism by which the innate immune regulator, STAT-5, promotes HPV viral replication through activation of the ATM DNA damage response.

  20. DNA-Mediated Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase-Dependent and -Independent Regulation of Innate Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motani, Kou; Ito, Shinji; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2015-05-15

    Cytoplasmic DNA activates cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) to produce cyclic 2'-5'3'-5'GMP-AMP dinucleotide (2'5 'cGAMP). The binding of 2'5'cGAMP to an adaptor protein, stimulator of IFN genes (STING), activates a transcription factor, IFN regulatory factor 3, leading to the induction of IFN and chemokine gene expression. In this study, we found that the 2'5'cGAMP-dependent STING activation induced highly upregulated CXCL10 gene expression. Formation of a distinct STING dimer, which was detected by native PAGE, was induced by 2'5'cGAMP, but not 3'-5'3'-5'cGAMP. Analysis of DNase II(-/-) mice, which constitutively produce IFN-β and CXCL10, showed the accumulation of 2'5'cGAMP in their fetal livers and spleens, suggesting that the undigested DNA accumulating in DNase II(-/-) cells may have leaked from the lysosomes into the cytoplasm. The DNase II(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts produced 2'5'cGAMP in a cGAS-dependent manner during apoptotic cell engulfment. However, cGAS deficiency did not impair the STING-dependent upregulation of CXCL10 in DNase II(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that was induced by apoptotic cell engulfment or DNA lipofection. These results suggest the involvement of a cGAS-independent additional DNA sensor(s) that induces the STING-dependent activation of innate immunity. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. Pim-3 contributes to radioresistance through regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage repair in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang-Yuan; Wang, Zhen [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Bei [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Ying-Jian, E-mail: yjzhang111@aliyun.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Ying-Yi, E-mail: liyingyi@fudan.edu.cn [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-04-22

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy is a major clinical problem in pancreatic cancer treatment. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of cellular resistance and identifying novel targets are essential for improving treatment efficacy for pancreatic cancer patients. Previous studies have demonstrated a significant role for Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer survival against gemcitabine-induced genotoxic stress. Here, we observed that radiation treatment enhanced Pim-3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Stable overexpression of Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer cells significantly protected cells against radiation treatment by attenuating G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and DNA damage response. Silencing of Pim-3 expression significantly elevated the phosphorylation of histone variant H2AX, a marker of DNA double strand breaks, and decreased the activation of ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, along with its downstream targets, eventually enhancing the radiosensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Hence, we demonstrated a novel function for Pim-3 in human pancreatic cancer cell survival against radiation. Targeting Pim-3 may be a promising way to improve treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • This is first study to demonstrate that Pim-3 is endogenously induced by ionizing radiation in pancreatic cancer cells, and Pim-3 overexpression enhanced radioresistance of pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. • This is first study to provide evidence that radioresistance induced by Pim-3 is mainly attributed to Pim-3 induces activation of ATM, which subsequently activates checkpoint 1, leading to amplification of DNA repair through cell cycle arrest and DNA repair pathways. • This is first study to indicate that targeting Pim-3 may be a promising strategy to provide better treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic

  2. ICBP90 Regulation of DNA Methylation, Histone Ubiquitination, and Tumor Suppressor Gene Expression in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    accomplishments include creation of relevant plant lines, development of in vitro assays, and profiling of mRNA expression in null mutants. 15. SUBJECT TERMS...DNA methylation, UHRF1, VIM1, ubiquitination, epigenetics, chromatin 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF...Molecular Basis of Human Disease ,” which covered several weeks’ worth of material specifically related to the molecular and epigenetic basis of cancer

  3. Pim-3 contributes to radioresistance through regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage repair in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiang-Yuan; Wang, Zhen; Li, Bei; Zhang, Ying-Jian; Li, Ying-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy is a major clinical problem in pancreatic cancer treatment. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of cellular resistance and identifying novel targets are essential for improving treatment efficacy for pancreatic cancer patients. Previous studies have demonstrated a significant role for Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer survival against gemcitabine-induced genotoxic stress. Here, we observed that radiation treatment enhanced Pim-3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Stable overexpression of Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer cells significantly protected cells against radiation treatment by attenuating G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and DNA damage response. Silencing of Pim-3 expression significantly elevated the phosphorylation of histone variant H2AX, a marker of DNA double strand breaks, and decreased the activation of ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, along with its downstream targets, eventually enhancing the radiosensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Hence, we demonstrated a novel function for Pim-3 in human pancreatic cancer cell survival against radiation. Targeting Pim-3 may be a promising way to improve treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • This is first study to demonstrate that Pim-3 is endogenously induced by ionizing radiation in pancreatic cancer cells, and Pim-3 overexpression enhanced radioresistance of pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. • This is first study to provide evidence that radioresistance induced by Pim-3 is mainly attributed to Pim-3 induces activation of ATM, which subsequently activates checkpoint 1, leading to amplification of DNA repair through cell cycle arrest and DNA repair pathways. • This is first study to indicate that targeting Pim-3 may be a promising strategy to provide better treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic

  4. Viral DNA Sensors IFI16 and Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Possess Distinct Functions in Regulating Viral Gene Expression, Immune Defenses, and Apoptotic Responses during Herpesvirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, Benjamin A; Lum, Krystal K; Toettcher, Jared E; Cristea, Ileana M

    2016-11-15

    The human interferon-inducible protein IFI16 is an important antiviral factor that binds nuclear viral DNA and promotes antiviral responses. Here, we define IFI16 dynamics in space and time and its distinct functions from the DNA sensor cyclic dinucleotide GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). Live-cell imaging reveals a multiphasic IFI16 redistribution, first to viral entry sites at the nuclear periphery and then to nucleoplasmic puncta upon herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. Optogenetics and live-cell microscopy establish the IFI16 pyrin domain as required for nuclear periphery localization and oligomerization. Furthermore, using proteomics, we define the signature protein interactions of the IFI16 pyrin and HIN200 domains and demonstrate the necessity of pyrin for IFI16 interactions with antiviral proteins PML and cGAS. We probe signaling pathways engaged by IFI16, cGAS, and PML using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated knockouts in primary fibroblasts. While IFI16 induces cytokines, only cGAS activates STING/TBK-1/IRF3 and apoptotic responses upon HSV-1 and HCMV infections. cGAS-dependent apoptosis upon DNA stimulation requires both the enzymatic production of cyclic dinucleotides and STING. We show that IFI16, not cGAS or PML, represses HSV-1 gene expression, reducing virus titers. This indicates that regulation of viral gene expression may function as a greater barrier to viral replication than the induction of antiviral cytokines. Altogether, our findings establish coordinated and distinct antiviral functions for IFI16 and cGAS against herpesviruses. How mammalian cells detect and respond to DNA viruses that replicate in the nucleus is poorly understood. Here, we decipher the distinct functions of two viral DNA sensors, IFI16 and cGAS, during active immune signaling upon infection with two herpesviruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). We show that IFI16

  5. A TetR family transcriptional factor directly regulates the expression of a 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase and physically interacts with the enzyme to stimulate its base excision activity in Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Huang, Cheng; He, Zheng-Guo

    2014-03-28

    3-Methyladenine DNA glycosylase recognizes and excises a wide range of damaged bases and thus plays a critical role in base excision repair. However, knowledge on the regulation of DNA glycosylase in prokaryotes and eukaryotes is limited. In this study, we successfully characterized a TetR family transcriptional factor from Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), namely BCG0878c, which directly regulates the expression of 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (designated as MbAAG) and influences the base excision activity of this glycosylase at the post-translational level. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay and DNase I footprinting experiments, we identified two conserved motifs within the upstream region of mbaag specifically recognized by BCG0878c. Significant down-regulation of mbaag was observed in BCG0878c-overexpressed M. bovis BCG strains. By contrast, about 12-fold up-regulation of mbaag expression was found in bcg0878c-deleted mutant M. bovis BCG strains. β-Galactosidase activity assays also confirmed these results. Thus, BCG0878c can function as a negative regulator of mbaag expression. In addition, the regulator was shown to physically interact with MbAAG to enhance the ability of the glycosylase to bind damaged DNA. Interaction between the two proteins was further found to facilitate AAG-catalyzed removal of hypoxanthine from DNA. These results indicate that a TetR family protein can dually regulate the function of 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase in M. bovis BCG both at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. These findings enhance our understanding of the expression and regulation of AAG in mycobacteria.

  6. Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballereau, P.

    1999-01-01

    The different regulations relative to nuclear energy since the first of January 1999 are given here. Two points deserve to be noticed: the decree of the third august 1999 authorizing the national Agency for the radioactive waste management to install and exploit on the commune of Bures (Meuse) an underground laboratory destined to study the deep geological formations where could be stored the radioactive waste. The second point is about the uranium residues and the waste notion. The judgment of the administrative tribunal of Limoges ( 9. july 1998) forbidding the exploitation of a storage installation of depleted uranium considered as final waste and qualifying it as an industrial waste storage facility has been annulled bu the Court of Appeal. It stipulated that, according to the law number 75663 of the 15. july 1965, no criteria below can be applied to depleted uranium: production residue (possibility of an ulterior enrichment), abandonment of a personal property or simple intention to do it ( future use aimed in the authorization request made in the Prefecture). This judgment has devoted the primacy of the waste notion on this one of final waste. (N.C.)

  7. Progesterone and DNA Damage Encourage Uterine Cell Proliferation and Decidualization through Up-regulating Ribonucleotide Reductase 2 Expression during Early Pregnancy in Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wei; Feng, Xu-Hui; Deng, Wen-Bo; Ni, Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Rong; Jia, Bo; Yang, Xin-Ling; Wang, Tong-Song; Liu, Ji-Long; Su, Ren-Wei; Liang, Xiao-Huan; Qi, Qian-Rong; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Embryo implantation into the maternal uterus is a crucial step for the successful establishment of mammalian pregnancy. Following the attachment of embryo to the uterine luminal epithelium, uterine stromal cells undergo steroid hormone-dependent decidualization, which is characterized by stromal cell proliferation and differentiation. The mechanisms underlying steroid hormone-induced stromal cell proliferation and differentiation during decidualization are still poorly understood. Ribonucleotide reductase, consisting of two subunits (RRM1 and RRM2), is a rate-limiting enzyme in deoxynucleotide production for DNA synthesis and plays an important role in cell proliferation and tumorgenicity. Based on our microarray analysis, Rrm2 expression was significantly higher at implantation sites compared with interimplantation sites in mouse uterus. However, the expression, regulation, and function of RRM2 in mouse uterus during embryo implantation and decidualization are still unknown. Here we show that although both RRM1 and RRM2 expression are markedly induced in mouse uterine stromal cells undergoing decidualization, only RRM2 is regulated by progesterone, a key regulator of decidualization. Further studies showed that the induction of progesterone on RRM2 expression in stromal cells is mediated by the AKT/c-MYC pathway. RRM2 can also be induced by replication stress and DNA damage during decidualization through the ATR/ATM-CHK1-E2F1 pathway. The weight of implantation sites and deciduoma was effectively reduced by specific inhibitors for RRM2. The expression of decidual/trophoblast prolactin-related protein (Dtprp), a reliable marker for decidualization in mice, was significantly reduced in deciduoma and steroid-induced decidual cells after HU treatment. Therefore, RRM2 may be an important effector of progesterone signaling to induce cell proliferation and decidualization in mouse uterus. PMID:22403396

  8. Regulation of DNA repair mechanism in human glioma xenograft cells both in vitro and in vivo in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnala, Shivani; Veeravalli, Krishna Kumar; Chetty, Chandramu; Dinh, Dzung H; Rao, Jasti S

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal form of brain tumor. Efficient DNA repair and anti-apoptotic mechanisms are making glioma treatment difficult. Proteases such as MMP9, cathepsin B and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) are over expressed in gliomas and contribute to enhanced cancer cell proliferation. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair mechanism plays a major role in double strand break (DSB) repair in mammalian cells. Here we show that silencing MMP9 in combination with uPAR/cathepsin B effects NHEJ repair machinery. Expression of DNA PKcs and Ku70/80 at both mRNA and protein levels in MMP9-uPAR (pMU) and MMP9-cathepsin B (pMC) shRNA-treated glioma xenograft cells were reduced. FACS analysis showed an increase in apoptotic peak and proliferation assays revealed a significant reduction in the cell population in pMU- and pMC-treated cells compared to untreated cells. We hypothesized that reduced NHEJ repair led to DSBs accumulation in pMU- and pMC-treated cells, thereby initiating cell death. This hypothesis was confirmed by reduced Ku70/Ku80 protein binding to DSB, increased comet tail length and elevated γH2AX expression in treated cells compared to control. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed that EGFR-mediated lowered DNA PK activity in treated cells compared to controls. Treatment with pMU and pMC shRNA reduced the expression of DNA PKcs and ATM, and elevated γH2AX levels in xenograft implanted nude mice. Glioma cells exposed to hypoxia and irradiation showed DSB accumulation and apoptosis after pMU and pMC treatments compared to respective controls. Our results suggest that pMU and pMC shRNA reduce glioma proliferation by DSB accumulation and increase apoptosis under normoxia, hypoxia and in combination with irradiation. Considering the radio- and chemo-resistant cancers favored by hypoxia, our study provides important therapeutic potential of MMP9, uPAR and cathepsin B shRNA in the treatment of glioma from clinical stand

  9. Regulation of DNA repair mechanism in human glioma xenograft cells both in vitro and in vivo in nude mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Ponnala

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM is the most lethal form of brain tumor. Efficient DNA repair and anti-apoptotic mechanisms are making glioma treatment difficult. Proteases such as MMP9, cathepsin B and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR are over expressed in gliomas and contribute to enhanced cancer cell proliferation. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ repair mechanism plays a major role in double strand break (DSB repair in mammalian cells.Here we show that silencing MMP9 in combination with uPAR/cathepsin B effects NHEJ repair machinery. Expression of DNA PKcs and Ku70/80 at both mRNA and protein levels in MMP9-uPAR (pMU and MMP9-cathepsin B (pMC shRNA-treated glioma xenograft cells were reduced. FACS analysis showed an increase in apoptotic peak and proliferation assays revealed a significant reduction in the cell population in pMU- and pMC-treated cells compared to untreated cells. We hypothesized that reduced NHEJ repair led to DSBs accumulation in pMU- and pMC-treated cells, thereby initiating cell death. This hypothesis was confirmed by reduced Ku70/Ku80 protein binding to DSB, increased comet tail length and elevated γH2AX expression in treated cells compared to control. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed that EGFR-mediated lowered DNA PK activity in treated cells compared to controls. Treatment with pMU and pMC shRNA reduced the expression of DNA PKcs and ATM, and elevated γH2AX levels in xenograft implanted nude mice. Glioma cells exposed to hypoxia and irradiation showed DSB accumulation and apoptosis after pMU and pMC treatments compared to respective controls.Our results suggest that pMU and pMC shRNA reduce glioma proliferation by DSB accumulation and increase apoptosis under normoxia, hypoxia and in combination with irradiation. Considering the radio- and chemo-resistant cancers favored by hypoxia, our study provides important therapeutic potential of MMP9, uPAR and cathepsin B shRNA in the treatment of glioma from

  10. Experimental mitochondria-targeted DNA methylation identifies GpC methylation, not CpG methylation, as potential regulator of mitochondrial gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijst, Monique G. P.; van Tilburg, Amanda Y.; Ruiters, Marcel H. J.; Rots, Marianne G.

    2017-01-01

    Like the nucleus, mitochondria contain their own DNA and recent reports provide accumulating evidence that also the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is subjective to DNA methylation. This evidence includes the demonstration of mitochondria-localised DNA methyltransferases and demethylases, and the

  11. Changes in pH and NADPH regulate the DNA binding activity of neuronal PAS domain protein 2, a mammalian circadian transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Katsuhiro; Tajima, Fumihisa; Ishijima, Sumio; Sagami, Ikuko

    2015-01-20

    Neuronal PAS domain protein 2 (NPAS2) is a core clock transcription factor that forms a heterodimer with BMAL1 to bind the E-box in the promoter of clock genes and is regulated by various environmental stimuli such as heme, carbon monoxide, and NAD(P)H. In this study, we investigated the effects of pH and NADPH on the DNA binding activity of NPAS2. In an electrophoretic mobility shift (EMS) assay, the pH of the reaction mixture affected the DNA binding activity of the NPAS2/BMAL1 heterodimer but not that of the BMAL1/BMAL1 homodimer. A change in pH from 7.0 to 7.5 resulted in a 1.7-fold increase in activity in the absence of NADPH, and NADPH additively enhanced the activity up to 2.7-fold at pH 7.5. The experiments using truncated mutants revealed that N-terminal amino acids 1-61 of NPAS2 were sufficient to sense the change in both pH and NADPH. We further analyzed the kinetics of formation and DNA binding of the NPAS2/BMAL1 heterodimer at various pH values. In the absence of NADPH, a change in pH from 6.5 to 8.0 decreased the KD(app) value of the E-box from 125 to 22 nM, with an 8-fold increase in the maximal level of DNA binding for the NPAS2/BMAL1 heterodimer. The addition of NADPH resulted in a further decrease in KD(app) to 9 nM at pH 8.0. Furthermore, NPAS2-dependent transcriptional activity in a luciferase assay using NIH3T3 cells also increased with the pH of the culture medium. These results suggest that NPAS2 has a role as a pH and metabolite sensor in regulating circadian rhythms.

  12. Tet2 and Tet3 cooperate with B-lineage transcription factors to regulate DNA modification and chromatin accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Chan-Wang; Zhang, Jiayuan; González-Avalos, Edahí; Hogan, Patrick G; Chang, Xing; Rao, Anjana

    2016-11-21

    Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes oxidize 5-methylcytosine, facilitating DNA demethylation and generating new epigenetic marks. Here we show that concomitant loss of Tet2 and Tet3 in mice at early B cell stage blocked the pro- to pre-B cell transition in the bone marrow, decreased Irf4 expression and impaired the germline transcription and rearrangement of the Igκ locus. Tet2/3-deficient pro-B cells showed increased CpG methylation at the Igκ 3' and distal enhancers that was mimicked by depletion of E2A or PU.1, as well as a global decrease in chromatin accessibility at enhancers. Importantly, re-expression of the Tet2 catalytic domain in Tet2/3-deficient B cells resulted in demethylation of the Igκ enhancers and restored their chromatin accessibility. Our data suggest that TET proteins and lineage-specific transcription factors cooperate to influence chromatin accessibility and Igκ enhancer function by modulating the modification status of DNA.

  13. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie; Soliymani, Rabah; Tenhunen, Mikko; Ahtiainen, Laura; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  14. Subtractive cloning of cDNA from Aspergillus oryzae differentially regulated between solid-state culture and liquid (submerged) culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akao, Takeshi; Gomi, Katsuya; Goto, Kuniyasu; Okazaki, Naoto; Akita, Osamu

    2002-07-01

    In solid-state cultures (SC), Aspergillus oryzae shows characteristics such as high-level production and secretion of enzymes and hyphal differentiation with asexual development which are absent in liquid (submerged) culture (LC). It was predicted that many of the genes involved in the characteristics of A. oryzae in SC are differentially expressed between SC and LC. We generated two subtracted cDNA libraries with bi-directional cDNA subtractive hybridizations to isolate and identify such genes. Among them, we identified genes upregulated in or specific to SC, such as the AOS ( A. oryzae SC-specific gene) series, and those downregulated or not expressed in SC, such as the AOL ( A. oryzae LC-specific) series. Sequencing analyses revealed that the AOS series and the AOL series contain genes encoding extra- and intracellular enzymes and transport proteins. However, half were functionally unclassified by nucleotide sequences. Also, by expression profile, the AOS series comprised two groups. These gene products' molecular functions and physiological roles in SC await further investigation.

  15. Promoter Engineering Reveals the Importance of Heptameric Direct Repeats for DNA Binding by Streptomyces Antibiotic Regulatory Protein-Large ATP-Binding Regulator of the LuxR Family (SARP-LAL) Regulators in Streptomyces natalensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreales, Eva G; Vicente, Cláudia M; de Pedro, Antonio; Santos-Aberturas, Javier; Aparicio, Jesús F

    2018-05-15

    The biosynthesis of small-size polyene macrolides is ultimately controlled by a couple of transcriptional regulators that act in a hierarchical way. A Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein-large ATP-binding regulator of the LuxR family (SARP-LAL) regulator binds the promoter of a PAS-LuxR regulator-encoding gene and activates its transcription, and in turn, the gene product of the latter activates transcription from various promoters of the polyene gene cluster directly. The primary operator of PimR, the archetype of SARP-LAL regulators, contains three heptameric direct repeats separated by four-nucleotide spacers, but the regulator can also bind a secondary operator with only two direct repeats separated by a 3-nucleotide spacer, both located in the promoter region of its unique target gene, pimM A similar arrangement of operators has been identified for PimR counterparts encoded by gene clusters for different antifungal secondary metabolites, including not only polyene macrolides but peptidyl nucleosides, phoslactomycins, or cycloheximide. Here, we used promoter engineering and quantitative transcriptional analyses to determine the contributions of the different heptameric repeats to transcriptional activation and final polyene production. Optimized promoters have thus been developed. Deletion studies and electrophoretic mobility assays were used for the definition of DNA-binding boxes formed by 22-nucleotide sequences comprising two conserved heptameric direct repeats separated by four-nucleotide less conserved spacers. The cooperative binding of PimR SARP appears to be the mechanism involved in the binding of regulator monomers to operators, and at least two protein monomers are required for efficient binding. IMPORTANCE Here, we have shown that a modulation of the production of the antifungal pimaricin in Streptomyces natalensis can be accomplished via promoter engineering of the PAS-LuxR transcriptional activator pimM The expression of this gene is

  16. Vad är den främst avgörande faktorn vid privatkundens val av marginalbank? : en studie om hur demografiska skillnader påverkar privatkunders val av marginalbank samt se hur deras val kan användas vid segmentering

    OpenAIRE

    Lindh, Jenni; Persson, Frida

    2012-01-01

    Syfte: Syftet med detta examensarbete är att förklara vad som är den främst avgörande faktorn vid privatkundens val av marginalbank, genom att jämföra med demografiska variabler samt hur deras val kan användas vid segmentering. Dessutom vill vi titta på vilka typer av banker privatkunder har. Metod: För att nå fram till resultat för analysen har ett positivistiskt angreppssätt och en deduktiv ansats använts. Det empiriska materialet är baserat på en enkätundersökning gjord på personer i Hässl...

  17. Role for DNA methylation in the regulation of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in normal and cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrba, Lukas; Jensen, Taylor J.; Garbe, James C.; Heimark, Ronald L.; Cress, Anne E.; Dickinson, Sally; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-12-23

    BACKGROUND: The microRNA-200 family participates in the maintenance of an epithelial phenotype and loss of its expression can result in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Furthermore, the loss of expression of miR-200 family members is linked to an aggressive cancer phenotype. Regulation of the miR-200 family expression in normal and cancer cells is not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Epigenetic mechanisms participate in the control of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in both normal and cancer cells. A CpG island near the predicted mir-200c/mir-141 transcription start site shows a striking correlation between miR-200c and miR-141 expression and DNA methylation in both normal and cancer cells, as determined by MassARRAY technology. The CpG island is unmethylated in human miR-200/miR-141 expressing epithelial cells and in miR-200c/miR-141 positive tumor cells. The CpG island is heavily methylated in human miR-200c/miR-141 negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative tumor cells. Mouse cells show a similar inverse correlation between DNA methylation and miR-200c expression. Enrichment of permissive histone modifications, H3 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation, is seen in normal miR-200c/miR-141-positive epithelial cells, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to real-time PCR. In contrast, repressive H3K9 dimethylation marks are present in normal miR-200c/miR-141-negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative cancer cells and the permissive histone modifications are absent. The epigenetic modifier drug, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, reactivates miR-200c/miR-141 expression showing that epigenetic mechanisms play a functional role in their transcriptional control. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: We report that DNA methylation plays a role in the normal cell type-specific expression of miR-200c and miR-141 and this role appears evolutionarily conserved, since similar results were obtained in mouse. Aberrant DNA methylation

  18. SIRT6 Acts as a Negative Regulator in Dengue Virus-Induced Inflammatory Response by Targeting the DNA Binding Domain of NF-κB p65

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a mosquito-borne single-stranded RNA virus causing human disease with variable severity. The production of massive inflammatory cytokines in dengue patients has been associated with dengue disease severity. However, the regulation of these inflammatory responses remains unclear. In this study, we report that SIRT6 is a negative regulator of innate immune responses during DENV infection. Silencing of Sirt6 enhances DENV-induced proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production. Overexpression of SIRT6 inhibits RIG-I-like receptor (RLR and Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 mediated NF-κB activation. The sirtuin core domain of SIRT6 is required for the inhibition of NF-κB p65 function. SIRT6 interacts with the DNA binding domain of p65 and competes with p65 to occupy the Il6 promoter during DENV infection. Collectively, our study demonstrates that SIRT6 negatively regulates DENV-induced inflammatory response via RLR and TLR3 signaling pathways.

  19. Regulation of the G1/S Transition in Hepatocytes: Involvement of the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Cdk1 in the DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Corlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A singular feature of adult differentiated hepatocytes is their capacity to proliferate allowing liver regeneration. This review emphasizes the literature published over the last 20 years that established the most important pathways regulating the hepatocyte cell cycle. Our article also aimed at illustrating that many discoveries in this field benefited from the combined use of in vivo models of liver regeneration and in vitro models of primary cultures of human and rodent hepatocytes. Using these models, our laboratory has contributed to decipher the different steps of the progression into the G1 phase and the commitment to S phase of proliferating hepatocytes. We identified the mitogen dependent restriction point located at the two-thirds of the G1 phase and the concomitant expression and activation of both Cdk1 and Cdk2 at the G1/S transition. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these two Cdks contribute to the DNA replication. Finally, we provided strong evidences that Cdk1 expression and activation is correlated to extracellular matrix degradation upon stimulation by the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα leading to the identification of a new signaling pathway regulating Cdk1 expression at the G1/S transition. It also further confirms the well-orchestrated regulation of liver regeneration via multiple extracellular signals and pathways.

  20. Effect of the amino acid substitution in the DNA-binding domain of the Fur regulator on production of pyoverdine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valešová, Renata; Palyzová, Andrea; Marešová, Helena; Štěpánek, Václav; Babiak, Petr; Kyslík, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 4 (2013), s. 311-317 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500200703 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : FERRIC UPTAKE REGULATOR * STARVATION SIGMA-FACTOR * MEDIATED IRON TRANSPORT Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 1.145, year: 2013

  1. Transcription factor ZBED6 mediates IGF2 gene expression by regulating promoter activity and DNA methylation in myoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we found that the expression of the ZBED6 and IGF2 were up regulated during C2C12 differentiation. The IGF2 expression levels wer...

  2. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  3. DNA methylcytosine dioxygenase ten-eleven translocation 2 enhances lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine expression in human dental pulp cells by regulating MyD88 hydroxymethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinxuan; Feng, Zhihui; Li, Qimeng; Yi, Baicheng; Xu, Qiong

    2018-04-13

    Dental pulp inflammation is a bacterially driven inflammation process characterized by the local accumulation of cytokines/chemokines that participate in destructive processes in the pulp. Multiple mechanisms are involved in dental pulp inflammation, including epigenetic events, such as DNA methylation/demethylation. Ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2) is a recently discovered DNA methylcytosine dioxygenase that plays important roles in inflammatory disease. However, its role in the inflammatory response of dental pulp is unknown. We observed elevated mRNA and protein levels of TET2 after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). To identify the effects of TET2 on cytokine expression, TET2 was knocked down and cytokines were detected using a cytokine antibody array after LPS stimulation. The protein expression of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-8 and RANTES decreased in the LPS-induced hDPCs following TET2 knockdown. The downregulated expression levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were further confirmed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Additionally, the phosphorylation levels of IKK-α/β, p65 and IκBα of the NF-κB signaling pathway were decreased in the TET2-silenced group. Furthermore, the global 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) level was significantly decreased and the genomic 5-methylcytosine (5mC) level was increased in the TET2-deficient hDPCs; TET2 depletion resulted in a decrease in the 5hmC level of the MyD88 promoter following LPS stimulation. These findings indicate that TET2 knockdown inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory response in hDPCs by downregulating MyD88 hydroxymethylation. Thus, TET2-dependent DNA demethylation might play an important role in dental pulp inflammation as an epigenetic regulator.

  4. Viral DNA Sensors IFI16 and Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Possess Distinct Functions in Regulating Viral Gene Expression, Immune Defenses, and Apoptotic Responses during Herpesvirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A. Diner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The human interferon-inducible protein IFI16 is an important antiviral factor that binds nuclear viral DNA and promotes antiviral responses. Here, we define IFI16 dynamics in space and time and its distinct functions from the DNA sensor cyclic dinucleotide GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS. Live-cell imaging reveals a multiphasic IFI16 redistribution, first to viral entry sites at the nuclear periphery and then to nucleoplasmic puncta upon herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infections. Optogenetics and live-cell microscopy establish the IFI16 pyrin domain as required for nuclear periphery localization and oligomerization. Furthermore, using proteomics, we define the signature protein interactions of the IFI16 pyrin and HIN200 domains and demonstrate the necessity of pyrin for IFI16 interactions with antiviral proteins PML and cGAS. We probe signaling pathways engaged by IFI16, cGAS, and PML using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockouts in primary fibroblasts. While IFI16 induces cytokines, only cGAS activates STING/TBK-1/IRF3 and apoptotic responses upon HSV-1 and HCMV infections. cGAS-dependent apoptosis upon DNA stimulation requires both the enzymatic production of cyclic dinucleotides and STING. We show that IFI16, not cGAS or PML, represses HSV-1 gene expression, reducing virus titers. This indicates that regulation of viral gene expression may function as a greater barrier to viral replication than the induction of antiviral cytokines. Altogether, our findings establish coordinated and distinct antiviral functions for IFI16 and cGAS against herpesviruses.

  5. The fission yeast minichromosome maintenance (MCM)-binding protein (MCM-BP), Mcb1, regulates MCM function during prereplicative complex formation in DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, Venny; Martha, Sabrina; Hirose, Noriaki; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2013-03-08

    The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex is a replicative helicase, which is essential for chromosome DNA replication. In recent years, the identification of a novel MCM-binding protein (MCM-BP) in most eukaryotes has led to numerous studies investigating its function and its relationship to the MCM complex. However, the mechanisms by which MCM-BP functions and associates with MCM complexes are not well understood; in addition, the functional role of MCM-BP remains controversial and may vary between model organisms. The present study aims to elucidate the nature and biological function of the MCM-BP ortholog, Mcb1, in fission yeast. The Mcb1 protein continuously interacts with MCM proteins during the cell cycle in vivo and can interact with any individual MCM subunit in vitro. To understand the detailed characteristics of mcb1(+), two temperature-sensitive mcb1 gene mutants (mcb1(ts)) were isolated. Extensive genetic analysis showed that the mcb1(ts) mutants were suppressed by a mcm5(+) multicopy plasmid and displayed synthetic defects with many S-phase-related gene mutants. Moreover, cyclin-dependent kinase modulation by Cig2 repression or Rum1 overproduction suppressed the mcb1(ts) mutants, suggesting the involvement of Mcb1 in pre-RC formation during DNA replication. These data are consistent with the observation that Mcm7 loading onto replication origins is reduced and S-phase progression is delayed in mcb1(ts) mutants. Furthermore, the mcb1(ts) mutation led to the redistribution of MCM subunits to the cytoplasm, and this redistribution was dependent on an active nuclear export system. These results strongly suggest that Mcb1 promotes efficient pre-RC formation during DNA replication by regulating the MCM complex.

  6. The Fission Yeast Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM)-binding Protein (MCM-BP), Mcb1, Regulates MCM Function during Prereplicative Complex Formation in DNA Replication*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, Venny; Martha, Sabrina; Hirose, Noriaki; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2013-01-01

    The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex is a replicative helicase, which is essential for chromosome DNA replication. In recent years, the identification of a novel MCM-binding protein (MCM-BP) in most eukaryotes has led to numerous studies investigating its function and its relationship to the MCM complex. However, the mechanisms by which MCM-BP functions and associates with MCM complexes are not well understood; in addition, the functional role of MCM-BP remains controversial and may vary between model organisms. The present study aims to elucidate the nature and biological function of the MCM-BP ortholog, Mcb1, in fission yeast. The Mcb1 protein continuously interacts with MCM proteins during the cell cycle in vivo and can interact with any individual MCM subunit in vitro. To understand the detailed characteristics of mcb1+, two temperature-sensitive mcb1 gene mutants (mcb1ts) were isolated. Extensive genetic analysis showed that the mcb1ts mutants were suppressed by a mcm5+ multicopy plasmid and displayed synthetic defects with many S-phase-related gene mutants. Moreover, cyclin-dependent kinase modulation by Cig2 repression or Rum1 overproduction suppressed the mcb1ts mutants, suggesting the involvement of Mcb1 in pre-RC formation during DNA replication. These data are consistent with the observation that Mcm7 loading onto replication origins is reduced and S-phase progression is delayed in mcb1ts mutants. Furthermore, the mcb1ts mutation led to the redistribution of MCM subunits to the cytoplasm, and this redistribution was dependent on an active nuclear export system. These results strongly suggest that Mcb1 promotes efficient pre-RC formation during DNA replication by regulating the MCM complex. PMID:23322785

  7. C. difficile 630Δerm Spo0A regulates sporulation, but does not contribute to toxin production, by direct high-affinity binding to target DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina E Rosenbusch

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a Gram positive, anaerobic bacterium that can form highly resistant endospores. The bacterium is the causative agent of C. difficile infection (CDI, for which the symptoms can range from a mild diarrhea to potentially fatal pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. Endospore formation in Firmicutes, including C. difficile, is governed by the key regulator for sporulation, Spo0A. In Bacillus subtilis, this transcription factor is also directly or indirectly involved in various other cellular processes. Here, we report that C. difficile Spo0A shows a high degree of similarity to the well characterized B. subtilis protein and recognizes a similar binding sequence. We find that the laboratory strain C. difficile 630Δerm contains an 18bp-duplication near the DNA-binding domain compared to its ancestral strain 630. In vitro binding assays using purified C-terminal DNA binding domain of the C. difficile Spo0A protein demonstrate direct binding to DNA upstream of spo0A and sigH, early sporulation genes and several other putative targets. In vitro binding assays suggest that the gene encoding the major clostridial toxin TcdB may be a direct target of Spo0A, but supernatant derived from a spo0A negative strain was no less toxic towards Vero cells than that obtained from a wild type strain, in contrast to previous reports. These results identify for the first time direct (putative targets of the Spo0A protein in C. difficile and make a positive effect of Spo0A on production of the large clostridial toxins unlikely.

  8. Evidence on How a Conserved Glycine in the Hinge Region of HapR Regulates Its DNA Binding Ability: LESSONS FROM A NATURAL VARIANT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Dongre; N Singh; C Dureja; N Peddada; A Solanki; F Ashish; S Raychaudhuri

    2011-12-31

    HapR has been recognized as a quorum-sensing master regulator in Vibrio cholerae. Because it controls a plethora of disparate cellular events, the absence of a functional HapR affects the physiology of V. cholerae to a great extent. In the current study, we pursued an understanding of an observation of a natural protease-deficient non-O1, non-O139 variant V. cholerae strain V2. Intriguingly, a nonfunctional HapR (henceforth designated as HapRV2) harboring a substitution of glycine to aspartate at position 39 of the N-terminal hinge region has been identified. An in vitro gel shift assay clearly suggested the inability of HapRV2 to interact with various cognate promoters. Reinstatement of glycine at position 39 restores DNA binding ability of HapRV2 (HapRV2G), thereby rescuing the protease-negative phenotype of this strain. The elution profile of HapRV2 and HapRV2G proteins in size-exclusion chromatography and their circular dichroism spectra did not reflect any significant differences to explain the functional discrepancies between the two proteins. To gain insight into the structure-function relationship of these two proteins, we acquired small/wide angle x-ray scattering data from samples of the native and G39D mutant. Although Guinier analysis and indirect Fourier transformation of scattering indicated only a slight difference in the shape parameters, structure reconstruction using dummy amino acids concluded that although HapR adopts a 'Y' shape similar to its crystal structure, the G39D mutation in hinge drastically altered the DNA binding domains by bringing them in close proximity. This altered spatial orientation of the helix-turn-helix domains in this natural variant provides the first structural evidence on the functional role of the hinge region in quorum sensing-related DNA-binding regulatory proteins of Vibrio spp.

  9. Identification of aluminum-regulated genes by cDNA-AFLP analysis of roots in two contrasting genotypes of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inostroza-Blancheteau, Claudio; Aquea, Felipe; Reyes-Díaz, Marjorie; Alberdi, Miren; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of Al(3+)-stress in blueberry, a cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) analysis was employed to identify Al-regulated genes in roots of contrasting genotypes of highbush blueberry (Brigitta, Al(3+)-resistant and Bluegold, Al(3+)-sensitive). Plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with 0 and 100 μM Al(3+) and collected at different times over 48 h. Seventy transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were identified as being Al(3+) responsive, 31 of which showed significant homology to genes with known or putative functions. Twelve TDFs were homologous to uncharacterized genes and 27 did not have significant matches. The expression pattern of several of the genes with known functions in other species was confirmed by quantitative relative real-time RT-PCR. Twelve genes of known or putative function were related to cellular metabolism, nine associated to stress responses and other transcription and transport facilitation processes. Genes involved in signal transduction, photosynthetic and energy processes were also identified, suggesting that a multitude of processes are implicated in the Al(3+)-stress response as reported previously for other species. The Al(3+)-stress response genes identified in this study could be involved in Al(3+)-resistance in woody plants.

  10. USP22 Induces Cisplatin Resistance in Lung Adenocarcinoma by Regulating γH2AX-Mediated DNA Damage Repair and Ku70/Bax-Mediated Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy is one of the most important reasons for treatment failure in advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but the underlying mechanism is extremely complex and unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the correlation of ubiquitin-specific peptidase 22 (USP22 with acquired resistance to cisplatin in lung adenocarcinoma. In this study, we found that overexpression of USP22 could lead to cisplatin resistance in A549 cells. USP22 and its downstream proteins γH2AX and Sirt1 levels are upregulated in the cisplatin- resistant A549/CDDP cell line. USP22 enhances DNA damage repair and induce cisplatin resistance by promoting the phosphorylation of histone H2AX via deubiquitinating histone H2A. In addition, USP22 decreases the acetylation of Ku70 by stabilizing Sirt1, thus inhibiting Bax-mediated apoptosis and inducing cisplatin resistance. The cisplatin sensitivity in cisplatin-resistant A549/CDDP cells was restored by USP22 inhibition in vivo and vitro. In summary, our findings reveal the dual mechanism of USP22 involvement in cisplatin resistance that USP22 can regulate γH2AX-mediated DNA damage repair and Ku70/Bax-mediated apoptosis. USP22 is a potential target in cisplatin-resistant lung adenocarcinoma and should be considered in future therapeutic practice.

  11. Självkänsla hos daghemsbarn : En kvalitativ undersökning om hur barnträdgårdslärare bekräftar och stärker barnets självkänsla på daghem

    OpenAIRE

    Fant, Sofia

    2017-01-01

    Syftet med detta examensarbete är att ta reda på hur en barnträdgårdslärare kan stärka och bekräfta barnets självkänsla på daghem. Vilken syn och uppfattning finns det om självkänslan på daghem och hur kan man stödja barnen på bästa sätt när det gäller självkänslan? I detta examensarbete har jag genom litteratur tagit fram vad självkänsla är, men även olika definitioner kring självkänslan och hur miljön runt om kan påverka självkänslan hos barnet. I intervjuerna som blev gjorda framkom ...

  12. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Regulates Expression of the DNA Damage Repair Gene, Fanconi anemia A, in Pituitary Gonadotroph Cells1

    OpenAIRE

    Larder, Rachel; Chang, Lynda; Clinton, Michael; Brown, Pamela

    2004-01-01

    Gonadal function is critically dependant on regulated secretion of the gonadotropin hormones from anterior pituitary gonadotroph cells. Gonadotropin biosynthesis and release is triggered by the binding of hypothalamic GnRH to GnRH receptor expressed on the gonadotroph cell surface. The repertoire of regulatory molecules involved in this process are still being defined. We used the mouse LβT2 gonadotroph cell line, which expresses both gonadotropin hormones, as a model to investigate GnRH regu...

  13. To understand the whole, you must know the parts: Unraveling the roles of protein-DNA interactions in genome regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Lloyd M.; Shortreed, Michael R.; Olivier, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of gene transcription is fundamental to the existence of complex multicellular organisms such as humans. This process dictates which genes are expressed in which tissues, and controls how various cell types grow, differentiate, and respond to their environments. Although the deciphering of the human genome sequence has given us the “source code” for life, we still know far too little about the mechanisms that control which sets of genes are active in which tissues, and how thei...

  14. Sequences within the 5' untranslated region regulate the levels of a kinetoplast DNA topoisomerase mRNA during the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasion, S G; Hines, J C; Ou, X; Mahmood, R; Ray, D S

    1996-12-01

    Gene expression in trypanosomatids appears to be regulated largely at the posttranscriptional level and involves maturation of mRNA precursors by trans splicing of a 39-nucleotide miniexon sequence to the 5' end of the mRNA and cleavage and polyadenylation at the 3' end of the mRNA. To initiate the identification of sequences involved in the periodic expression of DNA replication genes in trypanosomatids, we have mapped splice acceptor sites in the 5' flanking region of the TOP2 gene, which encodes the kinetoplast DNA topoisomerase, and have carried out deletion analysis of this region on a plasmid-encoded TOP2 gene. Block deletions within the 5' untranslated region (UTR) identified two regions (-608 to -388 and -387 to -186) responsible for periodic accumulation of the mRNA. Deletion of one or the other of these sequences had no effect on periodic expression of the mRNA, while deletion of both regions resulted in constitutive expression of the mRNA throughout the cell cycle. Subcloning of these sequences into the 5' UTR of a construct lacking both regions of the TOP2 5' UTR has shown that an octamer consensus sequence present in the 5' UTR of the TOP2, RPA1, and DHFR-TS mRNAs is required for normal cycling of the TOP2 mRNA. Mutation of the consensus octamer sequence in the TOP2 5' UTR in a plasmid construct containing only a single consensus octamer and that shows normal cycling of the plasmid-encoded TOP2 mRNA resulted in substantial reduction of the cycling of the mRNA level. These results imply a negative regulation of TOP2 mRNA during the cell cycle by a mechanism involving redundant elements containing one or more copies of a conserved octamer sequence within the 5' UTR of TOP2 mRNA.

  15. Smad mediated regulation of inhibitor of DNA binding 2 and its role in phenotypic maintenance of human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangalakumar Veerasamy

    Full Text Available The basic-Helix-Loop-Helix family (bHLH of transcriptional factors plays a major role in regulating cellular proliferation, differentiation and phenotype maintenance. The downregulation of one of the members of bHLH family protein, inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2 has been shown to induce de-differentiation of epithelial cells. Opposing regulators of epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype in renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (PTEC, TGFβ1 and BMP7 also have counter-regulatory effects in models of renal fibrosis. We investigated the regulation of Id2 by these growth factors in human PTECs and its implication in the expression of markers of epithelial versus myofibroblastic phenotype. Cellular Id2 levels were reduced by TGFβ1 treatment; this was prevented by co-incubation with BMP7. BMP7 alone increased cellular levels of Id2. TGFβ1 and BMP7 regulated Id2 through Smad2/3 and Smad1/5 dependent mechanisms respectively. TGFβ1 mediated Id2 suppression was essential for α-SMA induction in PTECs. Although Id2 over-expression prevented α-SMA induction, it did not prevent E-cadherin loss under the influence of TGFβ1. This suggests that the loss of gate keeper function of E-cadherin alone may not necessarily result in complete EMT and further transcriptional re-programming is essential to attain mesenchymal phenotype. Although BMP7 abolished TGFβ1 mediated α-SMA expression by restoring Id2 levels, the loss of Id2 was not sufficient to induce α-SMA expression even in the context of reduced E-cadherin expression. Hence, a reduction in Id2 is critical for TGFβ1-induced α-SMA expression in this model of human PTECs but is not sufficient in it self to induce α-SMA even in the context of reduced E-cadherin.

  16. Whole-genome transcription and DNA methylation analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells identified aberrant gene regulation pathways in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Honglin; Mi, Wentao; Luo, Hui; Chen, Tao; Liu, Shengxi; Raman, Indu; Zuo, Xiaoxia; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2016-07-13

    Recent achievement in genetics and epigenetics has led to the exploration of the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Identification of differentially expressed genes and their regulatory mechanism(s) at whole-genome level will provide a comprehensive understanding of the development of SLE and its devastating complications, lupus nephritis (LN). We performed whole-genome transcription and DNA methylation analysis in PBMC of 30 SLE patients, including 15 with LN (SLE LN(+)) and 15 without LN (SLE LN(-)), and 25 normal controls (NC) using HumanHT-12 Beadchips and Illumina Human Methy450 chips. The serum proinflammatory cytokines were quantified using Bio-plex Human Cytokine 27-plex assay. Differentially expressed genes and differentially methylated CpG were analyzed with GenomeStudio, R, and SAM software. The association between DNA methylation and gene expression were tested. Gene interaction pathways of the differentially expressed genes were analyzed by IPA software. We identified 552 upregulated genes and 550 downregulated genes in PBMC of SLE. Integration of DNA methylation and gene expression profiling showed that 334 upregulated genes were hypomethylated, and 479 downregulated genes were hypermethylated. Pathway analysis on the differential genes in SLE revealed significant enrichment in interferon (IFN) signaling and toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways. Nine IFN- and seven TLR-related genes were identified and displayed step-wise increase in SLE LN(-) and SLE LN(+). Hypomethylated CpG sites were detected on these genes. The gene expressions for MX1, GPR84, and E2F2 were increased in SLE LN(+) as compared to SLE LN(-) patients. The serum levels of inflammatory cytokines, including IL17A, IP-10, bFGF, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-15, GM-CSF, IL-1RA, IL-5, and IL-12p70, were significantly elevated in SLE compared with NC. The levels of IL-15 and IL1RA correlated with their mRNA expression. The upregulation of IL-15 may be regulated by hypomethylated

  17. Phytometabolite Dehydroleucodine Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and DNA Damage in Human Astrocytoma Cells through p73/p53 Regulation.

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    Natalia Bailon-Moscoso

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence supports the idea that secondary metabolites obtained from medicinal plants (phytometabolites may be important contributors in the development of new chemotherapeutic agents to reduce the occurrence or recurrence of cancer. Our study focused on Dehydroleucodine (DhL, a sesquiterpene found in the provinces of Loja and Zamora-Chinchipe. In this study, we showed that DhL displayed cytostatic and cytotoxic activities on the human cerebral astrocytoma D384 cell line. With lactone isolated from Gynoxys verrucosa Wedd, a medicinal plant from Ecuador, we found that DhL induced cell death in D384 cells by triggering cell cycle arrest and inducing apoptosis and DNA damage. We further found that the cell death resulted in the increased expression of CDKN1A and BAX proteins. A marked induction of the levels of total TP73 and phosphorylated TP53, TP73, and γ-H2AX proteins was observed in D384 cells exposed to DhL, but no increase in total TP53 levels was detected. Overall these studies demonstrated the marked effect of DhL on the diminished survival of human astrocytoma cells through the induced expression of TP73 and phosphorylation of TP73 and TP53, suggesting their key roles in the tumor cell response to DhL treatment.

  18. Phytometabolite Dehydroleucodine Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and DNA Damage in Human Astrocytoma Cells through p73/p53 Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailon-Moscoso, Natalia; González-Arévalo, Gabriela; Velásquez-Rojas, Gabriela; Malagon, Omar; Vidari, Giovanni; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Ratovitski, Edward A; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the idea that secondary metabolites obtained from medicinal plants (phytometabolites) may be important contributors in the development of new chemotherapeutic agents to reduce the occurrence or recurrence of cancer. Our study focused on Dehydroleucodine (DhL), a sesquiterpene found in the provinces of Loja and Zamora-Chinchipe. In this study, we showed that DhL displayed cytostatic and cytotoxic activities on the human cerebral astrocytoma D384 cell line. With lactone isolated from Gynoxys verrucosa Wedd, a medicinal plant from Ecuador, we found that DhL induced cell death in D384 cells by triggering cell cycle arrest and inducing apoptosis and DNA damage. We further found that the cell death resulted in the increased expression of CDKN1A and BAX proteins. A marked induction of the levels of total TP73 and phosphorylated TP53, TP73, and γ-H2AX proteins was observed in D384 cells exposed to DhL, but no increase in total TP53 levels was detected. Overall these studies demonstrated the marked effect of DhL on the diminished survival of human astrocytoma cells through the induced expression of TP73 and phosphorylation of TP73 and TP53, suggesting their key roles in the tumor cell response to DhL treatment.

  19. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Ora [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunghan [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Plant Science, Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yun-jeong [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo-Young [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Hee-Jong, E-mail: heejkoh@snu.ac.kr [Department of Plant Science, Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Choong-Ill, E-mail: ccheon@sookmyung.ac.kr [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. - Highlights: • Nucleosome assembly protein 1 (AtNAP1) interacts with RPS6 as well as with AtHD2B. • rDNA transcription is regulated S6K1. • Overexpression or down regulation of AtNAP1 results in concomitant increase or decrease in rDNA transcription.

  20. DNA Damage-Inducible Transcript 4 Is an Innate Surveillant of Hair Follicular Stress in Vitamin D Receptor Knockout Mice and a Regulator of Wound Re-Epithelialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengguang Zhao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mice and human patients with impaired vitamin D receptor (VDR signaling have normal developmental hair growth but display aberrant post-morphogenic hair cycle progression associated with alopecia. In addition, VDR–/– mice exhibit impaired cutaneous wound healing. We undertook experiments to determine whether the stress-inducible regulator of energy homeostasis, DNA damage-inducible transcript 4 (Ddit4, is involved in these processes. By analyzing hair cycle activation in vivo, we show that VDR−/− mice at day 14 exhibit increased Ddit4 expression within follicular stress compartments. At day 29, degenerating VDR−/− follicular keratinocytes, but not bulge stem cells, continue to exhibit an increase in Ddit4 expression. At day 47, when normal follicles and epidermis are quiescent and enriched for Ddit4, VDR−/− skin lacks Ddit4 expression. In a skin wound healing assay, the re-epithelialized epidermis in wildtype (WT but not VDR−/− animals harbor a population of Ddit4- and Krt10-positive cells. Our study suggests that VDR regulates Ddit4 expression during epidermal homeostasis and the wound healing process, while elevated Ddit4 represents an early growth-arresting stress response within VDR−/− follicles.

  1. DNA Damage-Inducible Transcript 4 Is an Innate Surveillant of Hair Follicular Stress in Vitamin D Receptor Knockout Mice and a Regulator of Wound Re-Epithelialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hengguang; Rieger, Sandra; Abe, Koichiro; Hewison, Martin; Lisse, Thomas S

    2016-11-26

    Mice and human patients with impaired vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling have normal developmental hair growth but display aberrant post-morphogenic hair cycle progression associated with alopecia. In addition, VDR -/- mice exhibit impaired cutaneous wound healing. We undertook experiments to determine whether the stress-inducible regulator of energy homeostasis, DNA damage-inducible transcript 4 (Ddit4), is involved in these processes. By analyzing hair cycle activation in vivo, we show that VDR -/- mice at day 14 exhibit increased Ddit4 expression within follicular stress compartments. At day 29, degenerating VDR -/- follicular keratinocytes, but not bulge stem cells, continue to exhibit an increase in Ddit4 expression. At day 47, when normal follicles and epidermis are quiescent and enriched for Ddit4, VDR -/- skin lacks Ddit4 expression. In a skin wound healing assay, the re-epithelialized epidermis in wildtype (WT) but not VDR -/- animals harbor a population of Ddit4- and Krt10-positive cells. Our study suggests that VDR regulates Ddit4 expression during epidermal homeostasis and the wound healing process, while elevated Ddit4 represents an early growth-arresting stress response within VDR -/- follicles.

  2. Fanconi anemia proteins localize to chromatin and the nuclear matrix in a DNA damage- and cell cycle-regulated manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, F; Moss, A; Kupfer, G M

    2001-06-29

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. Cells from patients with FA exhibit genomic instability and hypersensitivity to DNA cross linking agents such as mitomycin C. Despite the identification of seven complementation groups and the cloning of six genes, the function of the encoded gene products remains elusive. The FancA (Fanconi anemia complementation group A), FancC, and FancG proteins have been detected within a nuclear complex, but no change in level, binding, or localization has been reported as a result of drug treatment or cell cycle. We show that in immunofluorescence studies, FancA appears as a non-nucleolar nuclear protein that is excluded from condensed, mitotic chromosomes. Biochemical fractionation reveals that the FA proteins are found in nuclear matrix and chromatin and that treatment with mitomycin C results in increase of the FA proteins in nuclear matrix and chromatin fractions. This induction occurs in wild-type cells and mutant FA-D (Fanconi complementation group D) cells but not in mutant FA-A cells. Immunoprecipitation of FancA protein in chromatin demonstrates the coprecipitation of FancA, FancC, and FancG, showing that the FA proteins move together as a complex. Also, fractionation of mitotic cells confirms the lack of FA proteins in chromatin or the nuclear matrix. Furthermore, phosphorylation of FancG was found to be temporally correlated with exit of the FA complex from chromosomes at mitosis. Taken together, these findings suggest a role for FA proteins in chromatin and nuclear matrix.

  3. Interaction of the phosphorylated DNA-binding domain in nuclear receptor CAR with its ligand-binding domain regulates CAR activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizu, Ryota; Min, Jungki; Sobhany, Mack; Pedersen, Lars C; Mutoh, Shingo; Negishi, Masahiko

    2018-01-05

    The nuclear protein constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR or NR1I3) regulates several liver functions such as drug and energy metabolism and cell growth or death, which are often involved in the development of diseases such as diabetes and hepatocellular carcinoma. CAR undergoes a conversion from inactive homodimers to active heterodimers with retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), and phosphorylation of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) at Thr-38 in CAR regulates this conversion. Here, we uncovered the molecular mechanism by which this phosphorylation regulates the intramolecular interaction between CAR's DBD and ligand-binding domain (LBD), enabling the homodimer-heterodimer conversion. Phosphomimetic substitution of Thr-38 with Asp increased co-immunoprecipitation of the CAR DBD with CAR LBD in Huh-7 cells. Isothermal titration calorimetry assays also revealed that recombinant CAR DBD-T38D, but not nonphosphorylated CAR DBD, bound the CAR LBD peptide. This DBD-LBD interaction masked CAR's dimer interface, preventing CAR homodimer formation. Of note, EGF signaling weakened the interaction of CAR DBD T38D with CAR LBD, converting CAR to the homodimer form. The DBD-T38D-LBD interaction also prevented CAR from forming a heterodimer with RXRα. However, this interaction opened up a CAR surface, allowing interaction with protein phosphatase 2A. Thr-38 dephosphorylation then dissociated the DBD-LBD interaction, allowing CAR heterodimer formation with RXRα. We conclude that the intramolecular interaction of phosphorylated DBD with the LBD enables CAR to adapt a transient monomer configuration that can be converted to either the inactive homodimer or the active heterodimer.

  4. TFII-I regulates target genes in the PI-3K and TGF-β signaling pathways through a novel DNA binding motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Puimedon, Maria; Borralleras, Cristina; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Campuzano, Victoria

    2013-09-25

    General transcription factor (TFII-I) is a multi-functional protein involved in the transcriptional regulation of critical developmental genes, encoded by the GTF2I gene located on chromosome 7q11.23. Haploinsufficiency at GTF2I has been shown to play a major role in the neurodevelopmental features of Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS). Identification of genes regulated by TFII-I is thus critical to detect molecular determinants of WBS as well as to identify potential new targets for specific pharmacological interventions, which are currently absent. We performed a microarray screening for transcriptional targets of TFII-I in cortex and embryonic cells from Gtf2i mutant and wild-type mice. Candidate genes with altered expression were verified using real-time PCR. A novel motif shared by deregulated genes was found and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in embryonic fibroblasts were used to document in vitro TFII-I binding to this motif in the promoter regions of deregulated genes. Interestingly, the PI3K and TGFβ signaling pathways were over-represented among TFII-I-modulated genes. In this study we have found a highly conserved DNA element, common to a set of genes regulated by TFII-I, and identified and validated novel in vivo neuronal targets of this protein affecting the PI3K and TGFβ signaling pathways. Overall, our data further contribute to unravel the complexity and variability of the different genetic programs orchestrated by TFII-I. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. MicroRNA-219-2-3p functions as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer and is regulated by DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huizi Lei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AIMS: Gastric cancer is the most frequent gastrointestinal tumor in adults and is the most lethal form of human cancer. Despite of the improvements in treatments, the underlying mechanism of gastric carcinogenesis is not well known. To define novel modulators that regulate susceptibility to tumorgenesis, we focused on miR-219-2-3p. METHODS: Quantitative RT-PCR was employed to investigate the level of miR-219-2-3p in gastric cancer (GC tissues (n = 113 and their matched adjacent normal tissues (n = 113. In vitro cell proliferation, apoptosis assays, cell migration, and invasion assays were performed to elucidate biological effects of miR-219-2-3p. Since silencing of miRNA by promoter CpG island methylation may be an important mechanism in tumorgenesis, GC cells were treated with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A, and expression changes of miR-219-2-3p were subsequently examined by quantitative RT-PCR. Finally, the methylation status of CpG island upstream of miR-219-2-3p was analyzed by methylation-specific PCR in GC tissues (n = 22. RESULTS: miR-219-2-3p was down-regulated in GC and cell lines. In addition, the experiments documented the lower expression of miR-219-2-3p in GC specimens with higher grade and later stage tumors. Meanwhile, miR-219-2-3p exerted antiproliferative, proapoptotic, and antimetastatic roles and reduced levels of p-ERK1/2 in GC cells. Furthermore, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A increased the expression (~2 fold of miR-219-2-3p in GC cells. By methylation-specific PCR, DNA methylation in the upstream region of miR-219-2-3p was detected in both adjacent normal tissues and cancer tissues. As expected, the methylation level was considerably higher in the miR-219-2-3p down-regulated group than up-regulated group. CONCLUSIONS: miR-219-2-3p is potentially involved in gastric cancer progression and metastasis by regulating ERK1/2-related signal pathways, which may provide a novel therapeutic strategy

  6. BYOD och Cloud Computing : En vägledande studie för hur BYOD bör bedrivas säkert tillsammans med cloud computing

    OpenAIRE

    Abramian, Fredrik; Wedholm, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Syftet med denna uppsats är att få en insikt i hur informationssäkerhetsarbetet påverkas av Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) i kombination med cloud computing. Författarna har kommit fram till sin slutsats genom att utföra intervjuer på två olika verksamheter samt en enkätundersökning som sedan har analyserats med aktuell teori. Utifrån detta har en kravspecifikation tagits fram som ett vägledande bidrag för organisationer. The aim of this thesis is to gain a richer insight into how informati...

  7. Bankvärldens framtid : En studie kring hur banker utnyttjar den teknologiska utvecklingen och digitaliseringen av tjänster, samt dess påverkan på kundrelationer, förtroende och lojalitet

    OpenAIRE

    Grip, Sebastian; Hellström, Gustav; Skyttevall, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Titel: Bankvärldens framtid: En studie kring hur banker utnyttjar den teknologiska utvecklingen och digitaliseringen av tjänster samt dess påverkan på kundrelationer, förtroende och lojalitet   Nivå: Kandidatuppsats i företagsekonomi   Akademi: Akademin för Ekonomi, Samhälle och Teknik, Mälardalens Högskola   Författare: Sebastian Grip, Gustav Hellström och Tobias Skyttevall (92/04/22), (94/02/28), (95/05/21) Handledare: Hadjikhani, Annoch   Datum: 05–06–17   Bakgrund: Att skapa en lojal kun...

  8. TGF-β regulates DNA methyltransferase expression in prostate cancer, correlates with aggressive capabilities, and predicts disease recurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    Full Text Available DNA methyltransferase (DNMT is one of the major factors mediating the methylation of cancer related genes such as TGF-β receptors (TβRs. This in turn may result in a loss of sensitivity to physiologic levels of TGF-β in aggressive prostate cancer (CaP. The specific mechanisms of DNMT's role in CaP remain undetermined. In this study, we describe the mechanism of TGF-β-mediated DNMT in CaP and its association with clinical outcomes following radical prostatectomy.We used human CaP cell lines with varying degrees of invasive capability to describe how TGF-β mediates the expression of DNMT in CaP, and its effects on methylation status of TGF-β receptors and the invasive capability of CaP in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we determined the association between DNMT expression and clinical outcome after radical prostatectomy. We found that more aggressive CaP cells had significantly higher TGF-β levels, increased expression of DNMT, but reduced TβRs when compared to benign prostate cells and less aggressive prostate cancer cells. Blockade of TGF-β signaling or ERK activation (p-ERK was associated with a dramatic decrease in the expression of DNMT, which results in a coincident increase in the expression of TβRs. Blockade of either TGF-β signaling or DNMT dramatically decreased the invasive capabilities of CaP. Inhibition of TGF-β in an TRAMP-C2 CaP model in C57BL/6 mice using 1D11 was associated with downregulation of DNMTs and p-ERK and impairment in tumor growth. Finally, independent of Gleason grade, increased DNMT1 expression was associated with biochemical recurrence following surgical treatment for prostate cancer.Our findings demonstrate that CaP derived TGF-β may induce the expression of DNMTs in CaP which is associated with methylation of its receptors and the aggressive potential of CaP. In addition, DNMTs is an independent predictor for disease recurrence after prostatectomy, and may have clinical implications for Ca

  9. p53 regulates the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by both homologous and non-homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willers, H.; Powell, S.N.; Dahm-Daphi, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: p53 is known to suppress spontaneous homologous recombination (HR), while its role in non-homologous recombination (NHR) remains to be clarified. Here, we sought to determine the influence of p53 on the repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) by HR or NHR using specially designed recombination substrates that integrate into the genome. Isogenic mouse fibroblast pairs with or without expression of exogenous p53 protein were utilized. A reporter plasmid carrying a mutated XGPRT gene was chromosomally integrated and DSBs were generated within the plasmid by the I-SceI endonuclease. Subsequent homology-mediated repair from an episomal donor resulted in XGPRT reconstitution and cellular resistance to a selection antibiotic. Analogously, the repair of chromosomal I-SceI breaks by NHR using another novel reporter plasmid restored XGPRT translation. For p53-null cells, the mean frequency of I-SceI break repair via HR was 5.5 x 10 -4 . The p53-Val135 mutant, which previously has been shown to suppress spontaneous HR by 14-fold employing the same cell system and reporter gene, only caused a 2- to 3-fold suppression of break-induced HR. In contrast, a dramatic effect of p53 on repair via NHR was found. Preliminary sequence analysis indicated that there was at least a 1000-fold reduction of illegitimate repair events resulting in loss of sequence at the break sites. The observed effects were mediated by p53 mutants defective in regulation of the cell-cycle and apoptosis. The main findings were: (1) p53 virtually blocked illegitimate rejoining of chromosomal ends. (2) The suppression of homologous DSB repair was less pronounced than the inhibition of spontaneous HR. We hypothesize that p53 allows to a certain extent error-free homology-dependent repair to proceed, while blocking error-prone NHR. The data support and extent a previous model, in which p53 maintains genomic stability by regulating recombination independently of its transactivation function

  10. Hepatic deficiency of the pioneer transcription factor FoxA restricts hepatitis B virus biosynthesis by the developmental regulation of viral DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa C McFadden

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The FoxA family of pioneer transcription factors regulates hepatitis B virus (HBV transcription, and hence viral replication. Hepatocyte-specific FoxA-deficiency in the HBV transgenic mouse model of chronic infection prevents the transcription of the viral DNA genome as a result of the failure of the developmentally controlled conversion of 5-methylcytosine residues to cytosine during postnatal hepatic maturation. These observations suggest that pioneer transcription factors such as FoxA, which mark genes for expression at subsequent developmental steps in the cellular differentiation program, mediate their effects by reversing the DNA methylation status of their target genes to permit their ensuing expression when the appropriate tissue-specific transcription factor combinations arise during development. Furthermore, as the FoxA-deficient HBV transgenic mice are viable, the specific developmental timing, abundance and isoform type of pioneer factor expression must permit all essential liver gene expression to occur at a level sufficient to support adequate liver function. This implies that pioneer transcription factors can recognize and mark their target genes in distinct developmental manners dependent upon, at least in part, the concentration and affinity of FoxA for its binding sites within enhancer and promoter regulatory sequence elements. This selective marking of cellular genes for expression by the FoxA pioneer factor compared to HBV may offer the opportunity for the specific silencing of HBV gene expression and hence the resolution of chronic HBV infections which are responsible for approximately one million deaths worldwide annually due to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  11. DNA Methylation Influences Chlorogenic Acid Biosynthesis in Lonicera japonica by Mediating LjbZIP8 to Regulate Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase 2 Expression

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    Liangping Zha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The content of active compounds differ in buds and flowers of Lonicera japonica (FLJ and L. japonica var. chinensis (rFLJ. Chlorogenic acid (CGAs were major active compounds of L. japonica and regarded as measurements for quality evaluation. However, little is known concerning the formation of active compounds at the molecular level. We quantified the major CGAs in FLJ and rFLJ, and found the concentrations of CGAs were higher in the buds of rFLJ than those of FLJ. Further analysis of CpG methylation of CGAs biosynthesis genes showed differences between FLJ and rFLJ in the 5′-UTR of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase 2 (PAL2. We identified 11 LjbZIP proteins and 24 rLjbZIP proteins with conserved basic leucine zipper domains, subcellular localization, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that the transcription factor LjbZIP8 is a nuclear-localized protein that specifically binds to the G-box element of the LjPAL2 5′-UTR. Additionally, a transactivation assay and LjbZIP8 overexpression in transgenic tobacco indicated that LjbZIP8 could function as a repressor of transcription. Finally, treatment with 5-azacytidine decreased the transcription level of LjPAL2 and CGAs content in FLJ leaves. These results raise the possibility that DNA methylation might influence the recruitment of LjbZIP8, regulating PAL2 expression level and CGAs content in L. japonica.

  12. Dynamic phosphorylation of RelA on Ser42 and Ser45 in response to TNFα stimulation regulates DNA binding and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanucara, Francesco; Lam, Connie; Mann, Jelena; Monie, Tom P; Colombo, Stefano A P; Holman, Stephen W; Boyd, James; Dange, Manohar C; Mann, Derek A; White, Michael R H; Eyers, Claire E

    2016-07-01

    The NF-κB signalling module controls transcription through a network of protein kinases such as the IKKs, as well as inhibitory proteins (IκBs) and transcription factors including RelA/p65. Phosphorylation of the NF-κB subunits is critical for dictating system dynamics. Using both non-targeted discovery and quantitative selected reaction monitoring-targeted proteomics, we show that the cytokine TNFα induces dynamic multisite phosphorylation of RelA at a number of previously unidentified residues. Putative roles for many of these phosphorylation sites on RelA were predicted by modelling of various crystal structures. Stoichiometry of phosphorylation determination of Ser45 and Ser42 revealed preferential early phosphorylation of Ser45 in response to TNFα. Quantitative analyses subsequently confirmed differential roles for pSer42 and pSer45 in promoter-specific DNA binding and a role for both of these phosphosites in regulating transcription from the IL-6 promoter. These temporal dynamics suggest that RelA-mediated transcription is likely to be controlled by functionally distinct NF-κB proteoforms carrying different combinations of modifications, rather than a simple 'one modification, one effect' system. © 2016 The Authors.

  13. A methionine-free diet associated with nitrosourea treatment down-regulates methylguanine-DNA methyl transferase activity in patients with metastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thivat, Emilie; Durando, Xavier; Demidem, Aïcha; Farges, Marie-Chantal; Rapp, Maryse; Cellarier, Eric; Guenin, Samuel; D'Incan, Michel; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Chollet, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Methionine (MET) depletion used in association with chemotherapy improves the therapeutic index in animal models. This potentiating effect may be due to tumor cell sensitization to chloroethylnitrosoureas through their MET dependency and the down-regulation of O6- methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). Our purpose was to evaluate the impact of the association of a dietary MET restriction with nitrosourea treatment on MGMT activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Six patients with metastatic cancer (melanoma and glioma) received 4 cycles of a MET-free diet with cystemustine (60 mg/m2). MGMT activity in PBMCs decreased by an average of 13% from 553+/-90 fnol/mg before the diet to 413+/-59 fmol/mg after the diet + chemotherapy period (p=0.029). The decrease of MGMT activity was not affected by the duration of the MET-free diet period but seems to be correlated to the plasma MET depletion induced by the MET-free diet.

  14. Germline Mutations in PALB2, BRCA1, and RAD51C, Which Regulate DNA Recombination Repair, in Patients with Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahasrabudhe, Ruta; Lott, Paul; Bohorquez, Mabel; Toal, Ted; Estrada, Ana P.; Suarez, John J.; Brea-Fernández, Alejandro; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Pinto, Carla; Ramos, Irma; Mantilla, Alejandra; Prieto, Rodrigo; Corvalan, Alejandro; Norero, Enrique; Alvarez, Carolina; Tapia, Teresa; Carvallo, Pilar; Gonzalez, Luz M.; Cock-Rada, Alicia; Solano, Angela; Neffa, Florencia; Valle, Adriana Della; Yau, Chris; Soares, Gabriela; Borowsky, Alexander; Hu, Nan; He, Li-Ji; Han, Xiao-You; Taylor, Philip R.; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Torres, Javier; Echeverry, Magdalena; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Carvajal Carmona, Luis G.

    2016-01-01

    Up to 10% of cases of gastric cancer are familial, but so far, only mutations in CDH1 have been associated with gastric cancer risk. To identify genetic variants that affect risk for gastric cancer, we collected blood samples from 28 patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) not associated with mutations in CDH1 and performed whole-exome sequence analysis. We then analyzed sequences of candidate genes in 333 independent HDGC and non-HDGC cases. We identified 11 cases with mutations in PALB2, BRCA1, or RAD51C genes, which regulate homologous DNA recombination. We found these mutations in 2 of 31 patients with HDGC (6.5%) and 9 of 331 patients with sporadic gastric cancer (2.8%). Most of these mutations had been previously associated with other types of tumors and partially co-segregated with gastric cancer in our study. Tumors that developed in patients with these mutations had a mutation signature associated with somatic homologous recombination deficiency. Our findings indicate that defects in homologous recombination increase risk for gastric cancer. PMID:28024868

  15. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology. Volume XLVII, Part 1. Structures of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The proceedings for the 47th Annual Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology are presented. This symposium focused on the Structure of DNA. Topics presented covered research in the handedness of DNA, conformational analysis, chemically modified DNA, chemical synthesis of DNA, DNA-protein interactions, DNA within nucleosomes, DNA methylation, DNA replication, gyrases and topoisomerases, recombining and mutating DNA, transcription of DNA and its regulation, the organization of genes along DNA, repetitive DNA and pseudogenes, and origins of replication, centromeres, and teleomeres

  16. DNA Knots: Theory and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumners, D. W.

    Cellular DNA is a long, thread-like molecule with remarkably complex topology. Enzymes that manipulate the geometry and topology of cellular DNA perform many vital cellular processes (including segregation of daughter chromosomes, gene regulation, DNA repair, and generation of antibody diversity). Some enzymes pass DNA through itself via enzyme-bridged transient breaks in the DNA; other enzymes break the DNA apart and reconnect it to different ends. In the topological approach to enzymology, circular DNA is incubated with an enzyme, producing an enzyme signature in the form of DNA knots and links. By observing the changes in DNA geometry (supercoiling) and topology (knotting and linking) due to enzyme action, the enzyme binding and mechanism can often be characterized. This paper will discuss some personal research history, and the tangle model for the analysis of site-specific recombination experiments on circular DNA.

  17. RNA Binding Protein RBM38 Regulates Expression of the 11-Kilodalton Protein of Parvovirus B19, Which Facilitates Viral DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganaie, Safder S; Chen, Aaron Yun; Huang, Chun; Xu, Peng; Kleiboeker, Steve; Du, Aifang; Qiu, Jianming

    2018-04-15

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) expresses a single precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), which undergoes alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation to generate 12 viral mRNA transcripts that encode two structural proteins (VP1 and VP2) and three nonstructural proteins (NS1, 7.5-kDa protein, and 11-kDa protein). Splicing at the second 5' donor site (D2 site) of the B19V pre-mRNA is essential for the expression of VP2 and the 11-kDa protein. We previously identified that cis -acting intronic splicing enhancer 2 (ISE2) that lies immediately after the D2 site facilitates the recognition of the D2 donor for its efficient splicing. In this study, we report that ISE2 is critical for the expression of the 11-kDa viral nonstructural protein. We found that ISE2 harbors a consensus RNA binding motif protein 38 (RBM38) binding sequence, 5'-UGUGUG-3'. RBM38 is expressed during the middle stage of erythropoiesis. We first confirmed that RBM38 binds specifically with the ISE2 element in vitro The knockdown of RBM38 significantly decreases the level of spliced mRNA at D2 that encodes the 11-kDa protein but not that of the D2-spliced mRNA that encodes VP2. Importantly, we found that the 11-kDa protein enhances viral DNA replication and virion release. Accordingly, the knockdown of RBM38 decreases virus replication via downregulating 11-kDa protein expression. Taken together, these results suggest that the 11-kDa protein facilitates B19V DNA replication and that RBM38 is an essential host factor for B19V pre-mRNA splicing and for the expression of the 11-kDa protein. IMPORTANCE B19V is a human pathogen that can cause fifth disease, arthropathy, anemia in immunocompromised patients and sickle cell disease patients, myocarditis, and hydrops fetalis in pregnant women. Human erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) are most susceptible to B19V infection and fully support viral DNA replication. The exclusive tropism of B19V for erythroid-lineage cells is dependent not only on the expression of viral

  18. Interferon γ-inducible protein (IFI) 16 transcriptionally regulates type i interferons and other interferon-stimulated genes and controls the interferon response to both DNA and RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mikayla R; Sharma, Shruti; Atianand, Maninjay; Jensen, Søren B; Carpenter, Susan; Knipe, David M; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A

    2014-08-22

    The interferon γ-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) has recently been linked to the detection of nuclear and cytosolic DNA during infection with herpes simplex virus-1 and HIV. IFI16 binds dsDNA via HIN200 domains and activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING), leading to TANK (TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator)-binding kinase-1 (TBK1)-dependent phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and transcription of type I interferons (IFNs) and related genes. To better understand the role of IFI16 in coordinating type I IFN gene regulation, we generated cell lines with stable knockdown of IFI16 and examined responses to DNA and RNA viruses as well as cyclic dinucleotides. As expected, stable knockdown of IFI16 led to a severely attenuated type I IFN response to DNA ligands and viruses. In contrast, expression of the NF-κB-regulated cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β was unaffected in IFI16 knockdown cells, suggesting that the role of IFI16 in sensing these triggers was unique to the type I IFN pathway. Surprisingly, we also found that knockdown of IFI16 led to a severe attenuation of IFN-α and the IFN-stimulated gene retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) in response to cyclic GMP-AMP, a second messenger produced by cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) as well as RNA ligands and viruses. Analysis of IFI16 knockdown cells revealed compromised occupancy of RNA polymerase II on the IFN-α promoter in these cells, suggesting that transcription of IFN-stimulated genes is dependent on IFI16. These results indicate a broader role for IFI16 in the regulation of the type I IFN response to RNA and DNA viruses in antiviral immunity. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Down-regulation of NF-κB DNA binding activity by Angelica Sinensis to ameliorate radiation-induced pulmonary injury in mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Zhen; Xie Conghua; Zhou Fuxiang; Luo Zhiguo; Zhou Yunfeng; Hang Guang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the trend of NF-kB binding activity during the course of radiation-induced pulmonary injury (RPI), and to evaluate the intervention effect of Angelica Sinensis on it. Methods: Adult female C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into 4 groups: blank control group (N group), Angelica Sinensis control group (A group), irradiation group (NX group) and irradiation group with Angelica Sinensis intervention (AX group). All mice from the NX and AX groups underwent single fraction of 12 Gy γ-ray delivered to the whole thorax. All mice were intraperitoneally injected 25% Angelica Sinensis injection (20 ml/kg) or identical volume Normal Sodiumdaily injection initiated 1 week before irradiation, lasted till 2 weeks after irradiation. Mice were sacrificed at designated time points (1, 24, 72 h, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 24 weeks), and the whole lungs were removed freshly. HE and Masson staining were performed to provide histopathologic evidence and to evaluate the collagen deposit situation respectively. The immunohistochemical staining of NF-κB P65 protein was performed to identify the location as well as the relative content of P65 protein. The DNA binding activity of NF-κB was detected by TransAM TM ELISA assay. Results: HE and Masson staining manifested that visible pathological alterations began at 2 weeks, typical interstitial pneumonitis were showed at 4 and 8 weeks, collagen deposition was visible from 16 weeks. The NF-κB binding activity detection and the immunohistochemical half-quantity analysis showed two-phase elevation, at 24 h and 8 weeks. Preventive application of Angelica Sinensis revealed prominently ameliorative effect for RPI, with pathological improvement, decreased immunohistochemical staining and lower NF-κB binding activity in both peaks. Conclusions: During the development process of RPI, NF-κB binding activity shows two-phase elevation. Chinese medicine Angelica Sinensis can down-regulate the elevation, showing noted ameliorative effect

  20. New insights into transcription fidelity: thermal stability of non-canonical structures in template DNA regulates transcriptional arrest, pause, and slippage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Isono, Noburu; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The thermal stability and topology of non-canonical structures of G-quadruplexes and hairpins in template DNA were investigated, and the effect of non-canonical structures on transcription fidelity was evaluated quantitatively. We designed ten template DNAs: A linear sequence that does not have significant higher-order structure, three sequences that form hairpin structures, and six sequences that form G-quadruplex structures with different stabilities. Templates with non-canonical structures induced the production of an arrested, a slipped, and a full-length transcript, whereas the linear sequence produced only a full-length transcript. The efficiency of production for run-off transcripts (full-length and slipped transcripts) from templates that formed the non-canonical structures was lower than that from the linear. G-quadruplex structures were more effective inhibitors of full-length product formation than were hairpin structure even when the stability of the G-quadruplex in an aqueous solution was the same as that of the hairpin. We considered that intra-polymerase conditions may differentially affect the stability of non-canonical structures. The values of transcription efficiencies of run-off or arrest transcripts were correlated with stabilities of non-canonical structures in the intra-polymerase condition mimicked by 20 wt% polyethylene glycol (PEG). Transcriptional arrest was induced when the stability of the G-quadruplex structure (-ΔG°37) in the presence of 20 wt% PEG was more than 8.2 kcal mol(-1). Thus, values of stability in the presence of 20 wt% PEG are an important indicator of transcription perturbation. Our results further our understanding of the impact of template structure on the transcription process and may guide logical design of transcription-regulating drugs.

  1. Systems biology approach identifies the kinase Csnk1a1 as a regulator of the DNA damage response in embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carreras Puigvert, Jordi; von Stechow, Louise; Siddappa, Ramakrishnaiah

    2013-01-01

    screen targeting all kinases, phosphatases, and transcription factors with global transcriptomics and phosphoproteomics to map the DDR in mouse embryonic stem cells treated with the DNA cross-linker cisplatin. Networks derived from canonical pathways shared in all three data sets were implicated in DNA...

  2. Post-transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor: Implications for tumor angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter S Yoo; Abby L Mulkeen; Charles H Cha

    2006-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent secreted mitogen critical for physiologic and tumor angiogenesis. Regulation of VEGF occurs at several levels, including transcription, mRNA stabilization,translation, and differential cellular localization of various isoforms. Recent advances in our understanding of posttranscriptional regulation of VEGF include identification of the stabilizing mRNA binding protein, HuR, and the discovery of internal ribosomal entry sites in the 5'UTR of the VEGF mRNA. Monoclonal anti-VEGF antibody was recently approved for use in humans, but suffers from the need for high systemic doses. RNA interference (RNAi)technology is being used in vitro and in animal models with promising results. Here, we review the literature on post-transcriptional regulation of VEGF and describe recent progress in targeting these mechanisms for therapeutic benefit.

  3. The Staphylococcus aureus group II biotin protein ligase BirA is an effective regulator of biotin operon transcription and requires the DNA binding domain for full enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Sarah K; Cronan, John E

    2016-11-01

    Group II biotin protein ligases (BPLs) are characterized by the presence of an N-terminal DNA binding domain that functions in transcriptional regulation of the genes of biotin biosynthesis and transport. The Staphylococcus aureus Group II BPL which is called BirA has been reported to bind an imperfect inverted repeat located upstream of the biotin synthesis operon. DNA binding by other Group II BPLs requires dimerization of the protein which is triggered by synthesis of biotinoyl-AMP (biotinoyl-adenylate), the intermediate in the ligation of biotin to its cognate target proteins. However, the S. aureus BirA was reported to dimerize and bind DNA in the absence of biotin or biotinoyl-AMP (Soares da Costa et al. (2014) Mol Microbiol 91: 110-120). These in vitro results argued that the protein would be unable to respond to the levels of biotin or acceptor proteins and thus would lack the regulatory properties of the other characterized BirA proteins. We tested the regulatory function of the protein using an in vivo model system and examined its DNA binding properties in vitro using electrophoretic mobility shift and fluorescence anisotropy analyses. We report that the S. aureus BirA is an effective regulator of biotin operon transcription and that the prior data can be attributed to artifacts of mobility shift analyses. We also report that deletion of the DNA binding domain of the S. aureus BirA results in loss of virtually all of its ligation activity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zeeland, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    In this chapter a series of DNA repair pathways are discussed which are available to the cell to cope with the problem of DNA damaged by chemical or physical agents. In the case of microorganisms our knowledge about the precise mechanism of each DNA repair pathway and the regulation of it has been improved considerably when mutants deficient in these repair mechanisms became available. In the case of mammalian cells in culture, until recently there were very little repair deficient mutants available, because in almost all mammalian cells in culture at least the diploid number of chromosomes is present. Therefore the frequency of repair deficient mutants in such populations is very low. Nevertheless because replica plating techniques are improving some mutants from Chinese hamsters ovary cells and L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells are now available. In the case of human cells, cultures obtained from patients with certain genetic diseases are available. A number of cells appear to be sensitive to some chemical or physical mutagens. These include cells from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum, Ataxia telangiectasia, Fanconi's anemia, Cockayne's syndrome. However, only in the case of xeroderma pigmentosum cells, has the sensitivity to ultraviolet light been clearly correlated with a deficiency in excision repair of pyrimidine dimers. Furthermore the work with strains obtained from biopsies from man is difficult because these cells generally have low cloning efficiencies and also have a limited lifespan in vitro. It is therefore very important that more repair deficient mutants will become available from established cell lines from human or animal origin

  5. När David förlorade mot Goliat : En studie om hur ett varumärke påverkas vid förlusten av en tvist

    OpenAIRE

    Ekberg, Emma; Blomqvist, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    I november 2015 avgjordes en tvist mellan havredrycksproducenten Oatly och branschorganisationen Svensk Mjölk i Marknadsdomstolen. Svensk Mjölk stämde Oatly eftersom de ansåg att deras marknadsföring var vilseledande. Stämningen ledde till att Oatly dömdes till förbud för marknadsföring som antyder att havremjölk är ett bättre val än komjölk. Denna studies syfte är att undersöka hur tvisten påverkat Oatlys lojala kunders varumärkesuppfattning utifrån begreppet brand image. För att undersöka d...

  6. ”… alla vill vi väl ha ett förhållande” : En studie om hur kvinnor i övre medelåldern upplever livet som singel

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Sverige är ett av världens mest individualistiska länder. Befolkningen utgörs till 46 procent av singlar och den största gruppen singlar är kvinnor i åldersgrupperna övre medelålder och äldre (Statistiska centralbyrån, 2012). Syftet med den här uppsatsen är att öka kunskapen kring hur svenska heterosexuella kvinnor i gruppen övre medelålder upplever singellivet. Jag använde mig utav välkända teorier och begrepp inom sociologin. De tillämpade teorierna och teoretiska begreppen var individualis...

  7. Det gränslösa arbetslivets genomtränglighet i Spotify-rekryterarnas sfärer : hur flexibilitet och tillgänglighet påverkar work-life balance

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Emelie; Hallgren, Malin

    2016-01-01

    Syftet med denna studie är att bidra med en förståelse för hur rekryterare upplever och hanterar flexibilitet, tillgänglighet och work-life balance i en multinationell och expanderande organisation präglad av det gränslösa arbetslivet. Denna förståelse är betydelsefull då det gränslösa arbetslivet innebär ett stort eget ansvar för individen, vilket skapar en utmaning för individen själv att måna om sin work-life balance och upprätthållandet av ett långsiktigt välmående. För att uppfylla studi...

  8. Finansiell Bootstrapping i SME : en kvantitativ studie om hur ett starkt socialt och affärsmässigt nätverk påverkar valet av bootstrappingmetoder

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Ida; Sacic, Zehra

    2016-01-01

    Syftet med denna kandidatuppsats är se hur ett starkt socialt och affärsmässigt nätverk påverkar valet av bootstrappingmetoder i små och medelstora företag (SME). Detta eftersom SME står för 99,9 procent av samtliga företag på den svenska marknaden och därmed är betydelsefulla för landets ekonomiska tillväxt och sysselsättning. Däremot möter SME svårigheter vid extern finansiering av sin verksamhet. SME kompenserar detta genom att engagera sig i olika ”bootstrappingaktiviteter”. Bootstrapping...

  9. Ledarskapet och de två faktorerna : En induktiv studie för att förstå hur organisationsfaktorer och könsstereotyper påverkar ledarskap

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Hampus; Tang, Vinh; Vannfält, Jessica

    2018-01-01

    Sammanfattning   Titel: Ledarskapet och de två faktorerna: En induktiv studie för att förstå hur organisationsfaktorer och könsstereotyper påverkar ledarskap.   Seminariedatum: 2018-01-09   Akademi: Akademin för Ekonomi, Samhälle och Teknik, Mälardalen Högskola   Ämne/kurs: FOA300, examensarbete i företagsekonomi på kandidatnivå.   Författare: Larsson, Hampus 930903, Tang, Vinh 940523, Vannfält, Jessica 911031   Handledare: Magnus Linderström   Syfte: Syftet med denna studie är att genom en i...

  10. Arbetet med arbetsgivarvarumärkets attraktivitet : En kvalitativ intervjustudie i tre företag om hur arbetet med "Employer branding" ser ut och implementeras i företag.

    OpenAIRE

    Drugge, Marie; Bernelind, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Arbetet med att stärka ett arbetsgivarvarumärkes attraktivitet, både internt och externt, det alltmer välbekanta begreppet “Employer branding”, är ett vanligt förekommande koncept i dagens organisationer. Syftet med studien är att försöka ta reda på vad fenomenet “Employer branding” är och hur organisationer kan bedriva arbetet med att göra sitt arbetsgivarvarumärket attraktiv på den svenska arbetsmarknaden. Tieto, COWI och Klarna AB är de företag som deltar i studien. Begreppen legitimitet o...

  11. Role of Cell Cycle Regulation and MLH1, A Key DNA Mismatch Repair Protein, In Adaptive Survival Responses. Final Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David A. Boothman

    1999-01-01

    Due to several interesting findings on both adaptive survival responses (ASRs) and DNA mismatch repair (MMR), this grant was separated into two discrete Specific Aim sets (each with their own discrete hypotheses). The described experiments were simultaneously performed

  12. Yeast Srs2 Helicase Promotes Redistribution of Single-Stranded DNA-Bound RPA and Rad52 in Homologous Recombination Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisina De Tullio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Srs2 is a super-family 1 helicase that promotes genome stability by dismantling toxic DNA recombination intermediates. However, the mechanisms by which Srs2 remodels or resolves recombination intermediates remain poorly understood. Here, single-molecule imaging is used to visualize Srs2 in real time as it acts on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA bound by protein factors that function in recombination. We demonstrate that Srs2 is highly processive and translocates rapidly (∼170 nt per second in the 3′→5′ direction along ssDNA saturated with replication protein A (RPA. We show that RPA is evicted from DNA during the passage of Srs2. Remarkably, Srs2 also readily removes the recombination mediator Rad52 from RPA-ssDNA and, in doing so, promotes rapid redistribution of both Rad52 and RPA. These findings have important mechanistic implications for understanding how Srs2 and related nucleic acid motor proteins resolve potentially pathogenic nucleoprotein intermediates.

  13. Yeast Srs2 Helicase Promotes Redistribution of Single-Stranded DNA-Bound RPA and Rad52 in Homologous Recombination Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tullio, Luisina; Kaniecki, Kyle; Kwon, Youngho; Crickard, J Brooks; Sung, Patrick; Greene, Eric C

    2017-10-17

    Srs2 is a super-family 1 helicase that promotes genome stability by dismantling toxic DNA recombination intermediates. However, the mechanisms by which Srs2 remodels or resolves recombination intermediates remain poorly understood. Here, single-molecule imaging is used to visualize Srs2 in real time as it acts on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) bound by protein factors that function in recombination. We demonstrate that Srs2 is highly processive and translocates rapidly (∼170 nt per second) in the 3'→5' direction along ssDNA saturated with replication protein A (RPA). We show that RPA is evicted from DNA during the passage of Srs2. Remarkably, Srs2 also readily removes the recombination mediator Rad52 from RPA-ssDNA and, in doing so, promotes rapid redistribution of both Rad52 and RPA. These findings have important mechanistic implications for understanding how Srs2 and related nucleic acid motor proteins resolve potentially pathogenic nucleoprotein intermediates. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The SOS and RpoS Regulons Contribute to Bacterial Cell Robustness to Genotoxic Stress by Synergistically Regulating DNA Polymerase Pol II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapa, Tanja; Fleurier, Sébastien; Bredeche, Marie-Florence; Matic, Ivan

    2017-07-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC) is a genotoxic agent that induces DNA cross-links, DNA alkylation, and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). MMC induces the SOS response and RpoS regulons in Escherichia coli SOS-encoded functions are required for DNA repair, whereas the RpoS regulon is typically induced by metabolic stresses that slow growth. Thus, induction of the RpoS regulon by MMC may be coincidental, because DNA damage slows growth; alternatively, the RpoS regulon may be an adaptive response contributing to cell survival. In this study, we show that the RpoS regulon is primarily induced by MMC-induced ROS production. We also show that RpoS regulon induction is required for the survival of MMC-treated growing cells. The major contributor to RpoS-dependent resistance to MMC treatment is DNA polymerase Pol II, which is encoded by the polB gene belonging to the SOS regulon. The observation that polB gene expression is controlled by the two major stress response regulons that are required to maximize survival and fitness further emphasizes the key role of this DNA polymerase as an important factor in genome stability. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  15. Systems biology approach identifies the kinase Csnk1a1 as a regulator of the DNA damage response in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras Puigvert, Jordi; von Stechow, Louise; Siddappa, Ramakrishnaiah; Pines, Alex; Bahjat, Mahnoush; Haazen, Lizette C J M; Olsen, Jesper V; Vrieling, Harry; Meerman, John H N; Mullenders, Leon H F; van de Water, Bob; Danen, Erik H J

    2013-01-22

    In pluripotent stem cells, DNA damage triggers loss of pluripotency and apoptosis as a safeguard to exclude damaged DNA from the lineage. An intricate DNA damage response (DDR) signaling network ensures that the response is proportional to the severity of the damage. We combined an RNA interference screen targeting all kinases, phosphatases, and transcription factors with global transcriptomics and phosphoproteomics to map the DDR in mouse embryonic stem cells treated with the DNA cross-linker cisplatin. Networks derived from canonical pathways shared in all three data sets were implicated in DNA damage repair, cell cycle and survival, and differentiation. Experimental probing of these networks identified a mode of DNA damage-induced Wnt signaling that limited apoptosis. Silencing or deleting the p53 gene demonstrated that genotoxic stress elicited Wnt signaling in a p53-independent manner. Instead, this response occurred through reduced abundance of Csnk1a1 (CK1α), a kinase that inhibits β-catenin. Together, our findings reveal a balance between p53-mediated elimination of stem cells (through loss of pluripotency and apoptosis) and Wnt signaling that attenuates this response to tune the outcome of the DDR.

  16. Redox/methylation mediated abnormal DNA methylation as regulators of ambient fine particulate matter-induced neurodevelopment related impairment in human neuronal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongying; Liang, Fan; Meng, Ge; Nie, Zhiqing; Zhou, Ren; Cheng, Wei; Wu, Xiaomeng; Feng, Yan; Wang, Yan

    2016-09-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has been implicated as a risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders including autism in children. However, the underlying biological mechanism remains unclear. DNA methylation is suggested to be a fundamental mechanism for the neuronal responses to environmental cues. We prepared whole particle of PM2.5 (PM2.5), water-soluble extracts (Pw), organic extracts (Po) and carbon core component (Pc) and characterized their chemical constitutes. We found that PM2.5 induced significant redox imbalance, decreased the levels of intercellular methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine and caused global DNA hypomethylation. Furthermore, PM2.5 exposure triggered gene-specific promoter DNA hypo- or hypermethylation and abnormal mRNA expression of autism candidate genes. PM2.5-induced DNA hypermethylation in promoter regions of synapse related genes were associated with the decreases in their mRNA and protein expression. The inhibiting effects of antioxidative reagents, a methylation-supporting agent and a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor demonstrated the involvement of redox/methylation mechanism in PM2.5-induced abnormal DNA methylation patterns and synaptic protein expression. The biological effects above generally followed a sequence of PM2.5 ≥ Pwo > Po > Pw > Pc. Our results implicated a novel epigenetic mechanism for the neurodevelopmental toxicity of particulate air pollution, and that eliminating the chemical components could mitigate the neurotoxicity of PM2.5.

  17. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  18. F-box protein FBXO31 is a dedicated checkpoint protein to facilitate cell cycle arrest through activation of regulators in radiation induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santra, Manas Kumar

    2017-01-01

    In response to radiation-induced DNA damage, eukaryotic cells initiate a complex signalling pathway, termed the DNA damage response (DDR), which coordinates cell cycle arrest with DNA repair. Previous study showed that induction of G1 arrest in response to radiation induced DNA damage is minimally a two-step process: a fast p53-independent initiation of G1 arrest mediated by cyclin D1 proteolysis and a slower maintenance of arrest resulting from increased p53 stability. We elucidated the molecular mechanism of slow and fast response of radiation induced DDR. We showed that FBXO31, a member of F-box family proteins, plays important role in DDR induced by ionizing radiation. We show that FBXO31 is responsible for promoting MDM2 degradation following radiation. FBXO31 interacts with and directs the degradation of MDM2 in ATM dependent phosphorylation of MDM2. FBXO31-mediated loss of MDM2 leads to elevated levels of p53, resulting in growth arrest. In cells depleted of FBXO31, MDM2 is not degraded and p53 levels do not increase following genotoxic stress. Thus, FBXO31 is essential for the classic robust increase in p53 levels following DNA damage

  19. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the HMG domain of the chondrogenesis master regulator Sox9 in complex with a ChIP-Seq-identified DNA element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivekanandan, Saravanan; Moovarkumudalvan, Balasubramanian; Lescar, Julien; Kolatkar, Prasanna R.

    2015-10-30

    Sox9 is a fundamental sex-determining gene and the master regulator of chondrogenesis, and is involved in the development of various vital organs such as testes, kidney, heart and brain, and in skeletal development. Similar to other known Sox transcription factors, Sox9 recognizes and binds DNA with the consensus sequence C(T/A)TTG(T/A)(T/A) through the highly conserved HMG domain. Nonetheless, the molecular basis of the functional specificity of Sox9 in key developmental processes is still unclear. As an initial step towards a mechanistic understanding of Sox9 transcriptional regulation, the current work describes the details of the purification of the mouse Sox9 HMG domain (mSox9HMG), its crystallization in complex with a ChIP-Seq-identified FOXP2 promoter DNA element and the X-ray diffraction data analysis of this complex. The mSox9HMG–FOXP2 promoter DNA complex was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using 20% PEG 3350 in 200 mMsodium/potassium phosphate with 100 mMbis-tris propane at pH 8.5. The crystals diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution and the complex crystallized in the tetragonal space groupP41212, with unit-cell parametersa=b= 99.49,c= 45.89 Å. Crystal-packing parameters revealed that asymmetric unit contained one mSox9HMG–FOXP2 promoter DNA complex with an estimated solvent content of 64%.

  20. Antioxidant-mediated up-regulation of OGG1 via NRF2 induction is associated with inhibition of oxidative DNA damage in estrogen-induced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Bhupendra; Chatterjee, Anwesha; Ronghe, Amruta M; Bhat, Nimee K; Bhat, Hari K

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen metabolism-mediated oxidative stress is suggested to play an important role in estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis. We have earlier demonstrated that antioxidants, vitamin C (Vit C) and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) inhibit 17β-estradiol (E2)-mediated oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage, and breast carcinogenesis in female August Copenhagen Irish (ACI) rats. The objective of the present study was to characterize the mechanism by which above antioxidants prevent DNA damage during breast carcinogenesis. Female ACI rats were treated with E2; Vit C; Vit C + E2; BHA; and BHA + E2 for up to 240 days. mRNA and protein levels of a DNA repair enzyme 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and a transcription factor NRF2 were quantified in the mammary and mammary tumor tissues of rats after treatment with E2 and compared with that of rats treated with antioxidants either alone or in combination with E2. The expression of OGG1 was suppressed in mammary tissues and in mammary tumors of rats treated with E2. Expression of NRF2 was also significantly suppressed in E2-treated mammary tissues and in mammary tumors. Vitamin C or BHA treatment prevented E2-mediated decrease in OGG1 and NRF2 levels in the mammary tissues. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that antioxidant-mediated induction of OGG1 was through increased direct binding of NRF2 to the promoter region of OGG1. Studies using silencer RNA confirmed the role of OGG1 in inhibition of oxidative DNA damage. Our studies suggest that antioxidants Vit C and BHA provide protection against oxidative DNA damage and E2-induced mammary carcinogenesis, at least in part, through NRF2-mediated induction of OGG1

  1. Structural aspects of DNA in its replication and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, S.; Pal, B.C.; Foote, R.S.; Bates, R.C.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Snow, E.T.; Wobbe, C.R.; Morse, C.C.; Snyder, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    The research objective of this laboratory is to investigate the structure of DNA, the mechanism of DNA replication and its regulation, and the mechanism and role of repair of the altered DNA in the expression of heritable changes. This research has two broad aims, namely investigation of (a) the regulation of DNA replication in mammals, using parvovirus DNA as a model system and (b) the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis induced by simple alkylating mutagens

  2. MiR-29c regulates the expression of miR-34c and miR-449a by targeting DNA methyltransferase 3a and 3b in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Man; Gao, Dan; Wen, Qiuyuan; Wei, Pingpin; Pan, Suming; Shuai, Cijun; Ma, Huiling; Xiang, Juanjuan; Li, Zheng; Fan, Songqing; Li, Guiyuan; Peng, Shuping

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is prevalent in South East Asia and Southern China particularly, despite the reported 5-year survival ratio is relative higher than other deadly cancers such as liver, renal, pancreas cancer, the lethality is characterized by high metastatic potential in the early stage and high recurrence rate after radiation treatment. MicroRNA-29c was found to be down-regulated in the serum as well as in the tissue of nasopharyngeal carcinoma tissue. In this study, we found accidentally that the transfection of pre-miR-29c or miR-29c mimics significantly increases the expression level of miR-34c and miR-449a but doesn’t affect that of miR-222 using real-time quantitative PCR in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines. To explore the molecular mechanism of the regulatory role, the cells are treated with 5-Aza-2-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) treatment and the level of miR-34c and miR-449a but not miR-222 accumulated by the treatment. DNA methyltransferase 3a, 3b were down-regulated by the 5-Aza-CdR treatment with western blot and real-time quantitative PCR. We found that pre-miR-29c or miR-29c mimics significantly increases the expression level of miR-34c and miR-449a. We further found DNA methyltransferase 3a and 3b are the target gene of miR-29c. Restoration of miR-29c in NPC cells down-regulated DNA methyltransferase 3a, 3b, but not DNA methyltransferase T1. The regulation of miR-29c/DNMTs/miR-34c/449a is an important molecular axis of NPC development and targeting DNMTs or restoring of miR-29c might be a promising therapy strategy for the prevention of NPC

  3. Cadmium(Cd)-induced oxidative stress down-regulates the gene expression of DNA mismatch recognition proteins MutS homolog 2 (MSH2) and MSH6 in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Todd, E-mail: toddhsu@mail.ntou.edu.tw [Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology and Center of Excellence for Marine Bioenvironment and Biotechnology, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China); Huang, Kuan-Ming; Tsai, Huei-Ting; Sung, Shih-Tsung; Ho, Tsung-Nan [Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology and Center of Excellence for Marine Bioenvironment and Biotechnology, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-15

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) of simple base mismatches and small insertion-deletion loops in eukaryotes is initiated by the binding of the MutS homolog 2 (MSH2)-MSH6 heterodimer to mismatched DNA. Cadmium (Cd) is a genotoxic heavy metal that has been recognized as a human carcinogen. Oxidant stress and inhibition of DNA repair have been proposed as major factors underlying Cd genotoxicity. Our previous studies indicated the ability of Cd to disturb the gene expression of MSH6 in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. This study was undertaken to explore if Cd-induced oxidative stress down-regulated MSH gene activities. Following the exposure of zebrafish embryos at 1 h post fertilization (hpf) to sublethal concentrations of Cd at 3-5 {mu}M for 4 or 9 h, a parallel down-regulation of MSH2, MSH6 and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) gene expression was detected by real-time RT-PCR and the expression levels were 40-50% of control after a 9-h exposure. Cd exposure also induced oxidative stress, yet no inhibition of catalase gene activity was observed. Whole mount in situ hybridization revealed a wide distribution of msh6 mRNA in the head regions of 10 hpf embryos and pretreatment of embryos with antioxidants butylhydroxytoluene (BHT), D-mannitol or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at 1-10 {mu}M restored Cd-suppressed msh6 expression. QPCR confirmed the protective effects of antioxidants on Cd-suppressed msh2/msh6 mRNA production. Down-regulated MSH gene activities reaching about 50% of control were also induced in embryos exposed to paraquat, a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating herbicide, or hydrogen peroxide at 200 {mu}M. Hence, Cd at sublethal levels down-regulates msh2/msh6 expression primarily via ROS as signaling molecules. The transcriptional activation of human msh6 is known to be fully dependent on the specificity factor 1 (Sp1). Cd failed to inhibit the DNA binding activity of zebrafish Sp1 unless at lethal concentrations based on band shift assay, therefore

  4. Tight regulation of the Epstein-Barr virus setpoint: interindividual differences in Epstein-Barr virus DNA load are conserved after HIV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piriou, Erwan; van Dort, Karel; Otto, Sigrid; van Oers, Marinus H. J.; van Baarle, Debbie

    2008-01-01

    Healthy individuals carry a constant number of Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells in the peripheral blood over time. Here, we show that interindividual differences in Epstein-Barr virus DNA levels are maintained after HIV infection, providing evidence for the existence of an individual Epstein-Barr

  5. Damaged DNA-binding protein down-regulates epigenetic mark H3K56Ac through histone deacetylase 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qianzheng; Battu, Aruna; Ray, Alo; Wani, Gulzar; Qian, Jiang; He, Jinshan; Wang, Qi-en [Department of Radiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Wani, Altaf A., E-mail: wani.2@osu.edu [Department of Radiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, The O